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Sample records for age-matched control population

  1. Assessment of the cardiac autonomic neuropathy among the known diabetics and age-matched controls using noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests in a South-Indian population: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sukla, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Rao, Nambaru Lakshmana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a rural area of South India, among the known diabetics after comparing them with the age-matched healthy controls, utilizing noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was conducted for 4 months (October 2014 to January 2015) at an Urban Health and Training Center (UHTC) of a Medical College located in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu. The study was conducted among 126 diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients and in 152 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to ensure comparability between the cases and controls and, thus, reduce variability due to demographic variables. All the study subjects (cases and controls) were selected from the patients attending UHTC during the study duration, provided they satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study participants were subjected to undergo noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. The associations were tested using paired t-test for the continuous (mean ± standard deviation) variables. Results: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2% (67/126). On further classification, positive (abnormal) results were obtained in 56 (sympathetic – 44.4%) and 51 (parasympathetic – 40.5%) diabetic cases. Overall, heart rate variation during deep breathing was found to be the most sensitive test to detect parasympathetic autonomic neuropathy while the diastolic blood pressure response to sustained handgrip exercise was the most sensitive method to detect sympathetic neuropathy dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2%. Even though cardiac autonomic neuropathy can be detected by various invasive tests, noninvasive tests remain a key tool to detect

  2. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17 015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample. PMID:26538188

  3. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  4. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  5. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  6. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  7. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  8. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O’Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite® system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns. PMID:26957776

  9. Sensorimotor Control of Tracking Movements at Various Speeds for Stroke Patients as Well as Age-Matched and Young Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Di; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2015-01-01

    There are aging- and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control in daily activities, but their mechanisms have not been well investigated. This study explored speed-, aging-, and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control. Eleven stroke patients (affected sides and unaffected sides) and 20 control subjects (10 young and 10 age-matched individuals) were enrolled to perform elbow tracking tasks using sinusoidal trajectories, which included 6 target speeds (15.7, 31.4, 47.1, 62.8, 78.5, and 94.2 deg/s). The actual elbow angle was recorded and displayed on a screen as visual feedback, and three indicators, the root mean square error (RMSE), normalized integrated jerk (NIJ) and integral of the power spectrum density of normalized speed (IPNS), were used to investigate the strategy of sensorimotor control. Both NIJ and IPNS had significant differences among the four groups (P<0.01), and the values were ranked in the following order: young controls < age-matched controls control. The RMSE increased with the increase in the target speed and the NIJ and IPNS initially declined and then remained steady for all four groups, which indicated a shift from feedback to feedforward control as the target speed increased. The feedback-feedforward trade-off induced by stroke, aging and speed might be explained by a change in the transmission delay and neuromotor noise. The findings in this study improve our understanding of the mechanism underlying the sensorimotor control and neurological changes caused by stroke and aging. PMID:26030289

  10. Stable Schizophrenia Patients Learn Equally Well as Age-Matched Controls and Better than Elderly Controls in Two Sensorimotor Rotary Pursuit Tasks

    PubMed Central

    De Picker, Livia J.; Cornelis, Claudia; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Fransen, Erik; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sensorimotor performance and learning in stable schizophrenia patients, healthy age- and sex-matched controls and elderly controls on two variations of the rotary pursuit: circle pursuit (true motor learning) and figure pursuit (motor and sequence learning). Method: In the circle pursuit, a target circle, rotating with increasing speed along a predictable circular path on the computer screen, must be followed by a cursor controlled by a pen on a writing tablet. In the eight-trial figure pursuit, subjects learn to draw a complex figure by pursuing the target circle that moves along an invisible trajectory between and around several goals. Tasks were administered thrice (day 1, day 2, day 7) to 30 patients with stable schizophrenia (S), 30 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (C), and 30 elderly participants (>65 years; E) and recorded with a digitizing tablet and pressure-sensitive pen. The outcome measure accuracy (% of time that cursor is within the target) was used to assess performance. Results: We observed significant group differences in accuracy, both in circle and figure pursuit tasks (E < S < C, p < 0.01). Strong learning effects were found in each group. Learning curves were similar in circle pursuit but differed between groups in figure pursuit. When corrected for group differences in starting level, the learning gains over the three sessions of schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls were equal and both were larger than those of the elderly controls. Conclusion: Despite the reduced sensorimotor performance that was found in the schizophrenia patients, their sensorimotor learning seems to be preserved. The relevance of this finding for the evaluation of procedural learning in schizophrenia is discussed. The better performance and learning rate of the patients compared to the elderly controls was unexpected and deserves further study. PMID:25505425

  11. Intensively managed young children with type 1 diabetes consume high-fat, low-fiber diets similar to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sanjeev N; Volkening, Lisa K; Quinn, Nicolle; Laffel, Lori M B

    2014-05-01

    Despite significant emphasis on nutrition, older children with diabetes demonstrate poor dietary quality. We tested the hypothesis that dietary quality in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) would be better than age-matched children in the US population. Dietary data from children with T1D (n = 67) aged 2 to 12 years attending a pediatric diabetes clinic were compared with a nationally representative, age-matched sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 1691). Multiple 24-hour dietary recalls were used. Recommended intakes were based on national guidelines, and dietary quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. More children with T1D were overweight or obese compared with children participating in NHANES (42% vs 30%, P = .04). Greater proportions of children with T1D met daily recommendations for vegetables (22% vs 13%, P = .03), whole grains (12% vs 5%, P = .005), and dairy (55% vs 36%, P = .001) compared with NHANES children, whereas similar proportions met daily fruit recommendations (40% vs 33%, P = .2). Less than one-third of all children limited total fat to recommended levels; children with T1D consumed more saturated fat than did NHANES children (14% vs 12% total energy intake, P = .0009). Fiber intakes were very low in both groups. Compared with NHANES children, children with T1D had higher Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores (59.6 vs 49.7, P = .0006) primarily because of lower intakes of added sugars. The nutritional intake of young children with T1D remains suboptimal in the contemporary era of diabetes management. Despite focused nutrition management, young children with T1D consume high-fat, low-fiber diets comparable with youth in the general population. PMID:24916556

  12. Immunity in young adult survivors of childhood leukemia is similar to the elderly rather than age-matched controls: Role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Azanan, Mohamad Shafiq; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; Chua, Ling Ling; Lum, Su Han; Abdul Ghafar, Sayyidatul Syahirah; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul; Lewin, Sharon R; Woo, Yin Ling; Ariffin, Hany; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Many treatment complications that occur late in childhood cancer survivors resemble age-related comorbidities observed in the elderly. An immune phenotype characterized by increased immune activation, systemic inflammation, and accumulation of late-differentiated memory CD57(+) CD28(-) T cells has been associated with comorbidities in the elderly. Here, we explored if this phenotype was present in young adult leukemia survivors following an average of 19 years from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy completion, and compared this with that in age-matched controls. We found that markers of systemic inflammation-IL-6 and human C-reactive protein and immune activation-CD38 and HLA-DR on T cells, soluble CD (sCD)163 from monocytes and macrophages-were increased in survivors compared to controls. T-cell responses specific to cytomegalovirus (CMV) were also increased in survivors compared to controls while CMV IgG levels in survivors were comparable to levels measured in the elderly (>50years) and correlated with IL-6, human C-reactive protein, sCD163, and CD57(+) CD28(-) memory T cells. Immune activation and inflammation markers correlated poorly with prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy exposure. These data suggest that CMV infection/reactivation is strongly correlated with the immunological phenotype seen in young childhood leukemia survivors and these changes may be associated with the early onset of age-related comorbidities in this group. PMID:27129782

  13. No consistent difference in gray matter volume between individuals with fibromyalgia and age-matched healthy subjects when controlling for affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Michael C; Harris, Richard E; Sundgren, Pia C; Welsh, Robert C; Fernandes, Carlo R; Clauw, Daniel J; Williams, David A

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for the presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p< or =.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={-28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=-.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  14. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  15. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as “the ball is above the cup”, where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6–11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as “the cup is above the drum” or “the bird is below the hat”. Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children’s scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of

  16. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  17. Analysis of abstract and concrete word processing in persons with aphasia and age-matched neurologically healthy adults using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-08-01

    The concreteness effect occurs in both normal and language-disordered populations. Research suggests that abstract and concrete concepts elicit differing neural activation patterns in healthy young adults, but this is undocumented in persons with aphasia (PWA). Three PWA and three age-matched controls were scanned using fMRI while processing abstract and concrete words. Consistent with current theories of abstract and concrete word processing, abstract words elicited activation in verbal areas, whereas concrete words additionally activated multimodal association areas. PWA show greater differences in neural activation than age-matched controls between abstract and concrete words, possibly due to an exaggerated concreteness effect. PMID:23548150

  18. Cairo: repackaging population control.

    PubMed

    Simons, H

    1995-01-01

    Aid agencies, charities, and other nongovernmental organizations once denounced population control programs as racist interference in the third world. Yet, at the United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo last September, these same organizations endorsed very similar ideas. The U.N. can now claim that even its fiercest critics not only have muted their criticism of population control programs but now positively endorse them. Over the last 30 years, population control has been consciously repackaged by the U.S. establishment. The image of population control has changed from being overtly anti-third world to being about giving the people of the third world--especially women--basic rights in family planning. Wrapped up in the language of women's empowerment and environmentalism, the establishment's old arguments about there being too many nonwhite babies in the world, have, unfortunately, won the day. PMID:7591381

  19. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  20. Population control II: The population establishment today.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Although population assistance represents a relatively small share of official development assistance, it influences many other aspects of development planning. The organizations that comprise the population establishment have a common purpose--the reduction of population growth in the Third World--but they are not homogeneous and sometimes have conflicting goals and strategies. National governments, multilateral agencies, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, academic centers, and pressure groups all contribute to creating and sustaining what has become a virtual population control industry. Through scholarships, travel grants, awards, and favorable publicity, Third World elites have been encouraged to join the population establishment. The World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.N. Fund for Population Activities have pursued explicit strategies for pressuring Third World governments to design and implement population policies, most recently in Africa. PMID:9285281

  1. Controlling Population with Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Population models are often discussed in algebra, calculus, and differential equations courses. In this article we will use the human population of the world as our application. After quick looks at two common models we'll investigate more deeply a model which incorporates the negative effect that accumulated pollution may have on population.

  2. Population Control and Scientific Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Zev

    1978-01-01

    Garrett Hardin, a trained biologist, made a plea for coercive population control in a prestigious scientific journal (Science, 1968). His theory on how to control population is examined, the net effects of a situational vs an absolute ethics is weighed, and the limits to science and its methodology are evaluated. (Author/RK)

  3. Population control in symbiotic corals

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G. ); Dubinsky, Z. ); Muscatine, L. ); McCloskey, L. )

    1993-10-01

    Stability in symbiotic association requires control of population growth between symbionts. The population density of zooxanthellae per unit surface area of most symbiotic corals is remarkably consistant. How is the population density of zooxanthellae maintained and what happens to the symbiotic association if the balance between algae and host is perturbed. The answers to these question, examined in this paper, provide a framework for understanding how the size of the component populations is controlled in symbiotic associations. The topic areas covered include the following: carbon economy in a symbiotic coral; effects of nutrient enrichment; the chemostat model of population control; the effects of exposure to ammonium levels. Ammonium ions and organic materials are the factors which maintain the density of zooxanthellae. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  4. [Population control and environment protection].

    PubMed

    Qu, G

    1982-01-29

    Although many factors cause environmental pollution and damage, the most important and basic factor is a rapidly increasing population. Therefore, a balanced development of population and environment is essential. The pressure a rapidly increasing populaton exerts on the environment has many aspects. The pressure of population on land resources results in increased land use and increased insecticide use due to increased insect tolerance leading to decreased productivity of cultivated land, increased desert formation, and decreased food supply. Population pressure on forest resources leads to land erosion; one of the major causes of the 1981 flood in Sichuan was attributed to excessive logging activities. Demand for fuels (firewood, straws, animal manures) by an increasing population leads to decrease in natural fertilizers, decreased food production, and energy shortage in rural areas. Population pressure on cities leads to air, water, noise and other environmental pollution as well as decrease in housing facilities and in green vegetation. Problems resulting from population pressures on industrial development include industrial and environmental pollution and unemployment. Population increases and accompanying industrial activities affect the weather which in turn affects the quality of agriculture, forests, and lakes. Thus, if unchecked, atmospheric carbon dioxide level would double by the middle of the next century, which would lead to increase in atmospheric temperature with disastrous consequences. Therefore, a well planned program for population control is essential for achieving decent quality of life. PMID:12338285

  5. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 22 Age Matched Male and Female Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek; Masiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this electrophysiological neuroimaging study was to provide a deeper mechanistic understanding of both olanzapine and risperidone pharmacodynamics relative to gender. In doing so, we age-matched 22 men and women and evaluated their resting-state EEG recordings and later used standard low resolution brain Electrotomography to visualize the differences in brain activity amongst the two patient groups. Methods In this investigation, electroencephalogram (EEG) data were analyzed from male and female schizophrenia patients treated with either olanzapine or risperidone, both atypical antipsychotics, during their in-patient stay at the Department of Psychiatry. Twenty-two males and females were age-matched and EEG recordings were analyzed from 19 Ag/AgCl electrodes. Thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). 3D statistical non-paramentric maps for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were finally computed. Results The results indicated that, relative to males patients, females schizophrenia patients had increased neuronal synchronization in delta frequency, slow-wave, EEG band located in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, within the middle frontal gyrus (t= -2.881, p < 0.03580). These findings suggest that females experience greater dopamine (D2) receptor and serotonin (5-HT2) receptor neuronal blockade relative to age-matched males. Further, our finding provided insight to the pharmacodynamics of second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone. Conclusion When compared to male patients, female patients, suffering from schizophrenia, have D2 and 5-HT2 receptors that are blocked more readily than age-matched male schizophrenia patients. Clinically, this may translate into a quicker time to treatment-response in females as compared to male patients. PMID:26617679

  6. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  7. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  8. Population control I: Birth of an ideology.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Population control, as a major international development strategy, is a relatively recent phenomenon. However, its origins reach back to social currents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, culminating in an organized birth control movement in Europe and the United States. The conflicts and contradictions in that movement's history presage many of today's debates over population policy and women's rights. Eugenics had a deep influence on the U.S. birth control movement in the first half of the 20th century. After World War II private agencies and foundations played an important role in legitimizing population control as a way to secure Western control over Third World resources and stem political instability. In the late 1960s the U.S. government became a major funder of population control programs overseas and built multilateral support through establishment of the U.N. Fund for Population Activities. At the 1974 World Population Conference, Third World governments challenged the primacy of population control. While their critique led population agencies to change their strategies, population control remained a central component of international development and national security policies in the United States. PMID:9285280

  9. Heroin snorters versus injectors: comparison on drug use and treatment outcome in age-matched samples.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M J; Chutuape, M A; Stitzer, M L

    1998-12-01

    Drug use histories and treatment outcomes were compared for age, race and gender-matched samples of intravenous (IV; n = 28) versus intranasal (IN; n = 28) opiate abusers entering a 3-day inpatient detoxification unit. Data were derived from the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) interview. Both groups reported daily heroin use prior to detoxification, but IV users reported more days of alcohol and multiple drug use during the past 30 days. Despite age matching, IV users also started using alcohol at an earlier age and accumulated more lifetime months of regular alcohol, cocaine and multidrug use. IV users were more likely to enter treatment following the detox, but no significant outcome differences were noted at 1 and 3 months post-detoxification. The results show that intravenous, as compared to intranasal, opiate users have both a more severe pattern and a more extensive history of the use of non-opiate drugs. PMID:10933336

  10. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  11. Refugees, immigrants aggravate population controls.

    PubMed

    Struck, D

    1994-09-01

    The UN Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994 will discuss the pressure of population growth, the increase in the numbers of refugees, and labor migration between developing and developed countries. Population movement has been estimated as 1/50 in the world, regardless of reason. The impact of movement can be to augment a declining work force or to strain resources in poor countries, such as Zaire or Thailand. Rich countries may also respond with resentment and political turmoil, as is currently occurring in Germany. The tendency is to respond after the fact. Rwanda could be used as an example of a country with population pressure on land resources, which has exacerbated ethnic conflict. If the world in 1994 shows this pattern, the concern is that the future prospects are likely to reflect even greater turmoil and migration. The number of refugees has already increased from 2.5 million in 1970 to 20 million today. The head of the UN Commission on Refugees views the end of the Cold War as responsible for exposed and heightened ethnic and tribal rivalry. Migration movement is viewed as the desire for an improvement in quality of life. Significant shifts are to developed countries such as the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The 1994 UN Plan of Action offers concrete recommendations about mass movements. Recommendations are made to assure host country's assurances of protection in work and safety for migrants, removal of restrictive banking practices that impede monetary transfers between countries, and arrangements for temporary migration. Host countries are urged to provide assistance for return migration. Rights and equal treatment with nationals should be extended to longterm migrants. Each country has a right to enact migration restrictions. Smuggling of immigrants should be stopped through international cooperation. Countries of origin have a responsibility to readmit nationals rejected by other countries. There are few recommendations

  12. Benign ovarian teratomas: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, C.; Pike, M.; Vessey, M.

    1988-01-01

    We attempted to identify all cases of benign ovarian teratoma which occurred in two health districts in the UK during a 56 month period. The crude incidence was 8.9 cases/100,000 women. One hundred and twenty cases and 119 age-matched controls were interviewed to identify risk factors for this disease. In addition, 137 mothers completed postal questionnaires. Cases were older at leaving school, had higher social class occupations, were more often unmarried or married late, and had fewer children than controls. Oral contraceptive use was similar for both. Cases reported more exercise at all ages, and more alcohol consumption 1 year before diagnosis. Cases' mothers reported slightly less nausea during pregnancy than controls' mothers, and none of the mothers reported exogenous hormone exposure during the index pregnancy. In this study benign ovarian teratomas strongly resemble testicular cancer in their age distribution in the population. They also resemble testicular cancer in their association with educational status and marital status. There was, however, no similarity regarding prenatal hormone exposure. The increased risks associated with exercise and alcohol use were unexpected; we need further information about how these exposures affect the ovary, and whether they affect the testis. PMID:3166898

  13. Five proposals re China's population growth control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Wu, C; Lin, F

    1983-01-01

    China's population was 540 million in 1949. By the end of 1978 the population will reach 960 million, representing a 2% average annual growth rate. High population growth 1) is costly, 2) makes finding employment difficult, since there is little still land still to be reclaimed and agricultural productivity cannot be upgraded if backward farming techniques are used simply to employ more people, and 3) reduces the quality of material and cutural life. Nearly half of consumer funds accumulated in 1949-1977 was spent to provide basic needs for China's 600 million people. Housing has especially suffered: average per capita living space is only 2 square meters in some cities. With over 100 million primary school children and tens of millions in secondary schools, education funds must be allocated to the lower grades, to higher education's detriment. Each generation's age structure determines the next generation's reproduction scale and speed. This historical principle leads to the following: 1) population growth will continue to be vigorous given growth at a 2% rate, or if a percentage of rural (30%) and urban (10%) couples continue to have more than 2 children, or if every couple only has 2 children; 2) population stagnation requires continuous, persistent efforts, abolishing 2 or more children and encouraging one child per couple. Stagnation can be reached by 2008, with 1,200 million people. Political and ideological education combined with effective economic measures must solve the population problem. 5 strong measures must be taken: 1) economic policies and incentives should assist couples with one or no child, 2) every means should be used to communicate the population problem to the people, 3) population control should be part of the national economy program, 4) 3 births should be prohibited and one child per couple advocated, and 5) a permanent "population committee" should be established to insure ongoing population programs, policies, study, and evaluation

  14. Lysenkoism and the population control movement.

    PubMed

    Simon, J L

    1997-09-01

    The case of Lysenkoism in the Soviet Union helps us understand how people's wrong beliefs can be influenced by what the information they receive from outside, especially when there is a large volume of media coverage and there is no contrary information to be heard. The population control movement in contemporary United States has many parallels to the Lysenko episode. PMID:9611299

  15. Bertrand Russell Tribunal considers population control.

    PubMed

    Mass, B

    1974-01-01

    A summary of a "scientific report" on the development and implementation of population control in Latin America is presented. The report is to be presented at the Bertrand Russell Tribunal 2, concerned with repression in Latin America, in Brussels, Belgium, in January 1975. Hearings from the 1966-1968 U.S. Senate subcommittee on Foreign Aid Expenditures are cited to show evidence of American economic and military interests using theories of population control as a solution to deteriorating material conditions in Latin America. Explosive populations are also regarded as causes of political instability. The report further cites the "widespread use of coercive and misleading birth control propaganda" which distorts cultural and economic factors determining personal choices available to Latin American families. High birthrates are pictured as a major cause of poverty, slow economic growth, and scarcity of raw materials. Evidence of dangerous clinical testing of birth control products in Latin America, beginning in the 1930s in Puerto Rico, is presented. The questionable population policies of such institutions as the World Bank and the Rockefeller Foundation are also discussed. PMID:12307034

  16. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  17. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  18. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  19. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  20. Secreted proteome profiling in human RPE cell cultures derived from donors with age related macular degeneration and age matched healthy donors.

    PubMed

    An, Eunkyung; Lu, Xiaoning; Flippin, Jessica; Devaney, Joseph M; Halligan, Brian; Hoffman, Eric P; Hoffman, Eric; Strunnikova, Nataly; Csaky, Karl; Hathout, Yetrib

    2006-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by progressive loss of central vision, which is attributed to abnormal accumulation of macular deposits called "drusen" at the interface between the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane. In the most severe cases, drusen deposits are accompanied by the growth of new blood vessels that breach the RPE layer and invade photoreceptors. In this study, we hypothesized that RPE secreted proteins are responsible for drusen formation and choroidal neovascularization. We used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with LC-MS/MS analysis and ZoomQuant quantification to assess differential protein secretion by RPE cell cultures prepared from human autopsy eyes of AMD donors (diagnosed by histological examinations of the macula and genotyped for the Y402H-complement factor H variant) and age-matched healthy control donors. In general, RPE cells were found to secrete a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, complement factors, and protease inhibitors that have been reported to be major constituents of drusen (hallmark deposits in AMD). Interestingly, RPE cells from AMD donors secreted 2 to 3-fold more galectin 3 binding protein, fibronectin, clusterin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and pigment epithelium derived factor than RPE cells from age-matched healthy donors. Conversely, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) was found to be down regulated by 2-fold in AMD RPE cells versus healthy RPE cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis grouped these differentially secreted proteins into two groups; those involved in tissue development and angiogenesis and those involved in complement regulation and protein aggregation such as clusterin. Overall, these data strongly suggest that RPE cells are involved in the biogenesis of drusen and the pathology of AMD. PMID:17022631

  1. Entry control system for large populations

    SciTech Connect

    Merillat, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    An Entry Control System has been developed which is appropriate for use at an installation with a large population requiring access over a large area. This is accomplished by centralizing the data base management and enrollment functions and decentralizing the guard-assisted, positive personnel identification and access functions. Current information pertaining to all enrollees is maintained through user-friendly enrollment stations. These stations may be used to enroll individuals, alter their area access authorizations, change expiration dates, and other similar functions. An audit trail of data base alterations is provided to the System Manager. Decentrailized systems exist at each area to which access is controlled. The central system provides these systems with the necessary entry control information to allow them to operate microprocessor-driven entry control devices. The system is comprised of commercially available entry control components and is structured such that it will be able to incorporate improved devices as technology porogresses. Currently, access is granted to individuals who possess a valid credential, have current access authorization, can supply a memorized personal identification number, and whose physical hand dimensions match their profile obtained during enrollment. The entry control devices report misuses as security violations to a Guard Alarm Display and Assessment System.

  2. Characteristics of the infant thermal environment in the control population of a case-control study of SIDS.

    PubMed

    Ponsonby, A L; Dwyer, T; Cochrane, J A; Gibbons, L E; Jones, M E

    1992-01-01

    This report examines the thermal environment during last sleep of a control population to investigate how the thermal environment of the infant's bedroom varies by season, external temperature and by certain maternal and infant characteristics. Two age-matched control infants were chosen for each case, one of which was also matched on birthweight. The home visits were not pre-arranged and were matched on climatic conditions, time of year and time period of day for the index case. The initial response rate for controls (n = 108) was 86%. Although there was a large amount of variation in the infant thermal environment, thermal insulation correlated with room temperature (r = -0.44, P = 0.0001) and external temperature (r = -0.30, P = 0.002). The thermal environment of the infant, as defined by excess thermal insulation for room temperature, did not vary by indoor or outdoor temperature, but higher average values were observed in teenage mothers (mean difference = 2.7 tog [95% Cl = 0.3, 5.2]), infants who slept in an adult bed (mean difference = 2.6 tog [-0.1, 5.4]) and infants with an illness (mean difference = 0.8 tog [-0.3, 1.9]). There was a tendency for the thermal environment of infants to be higher and more variable during winter, supporting previous hypotheses that paradoxical overheating may occur in some infants during winter. Further work is required to provide a set of recommendations on the optimal thermal conditions for post-neonatal infants. PMID:1524881

  3. Genetic control of mosquitoes: population suppression strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL) offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods. PMID:22983293

  4. Risk factors in facial hyperpigmentation in Maghrebian population - a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Benchikhi, H; Atide, N; Jroundi, I; Humbert, P; Lakhdar, H

    2012-10-01

    Triggering factors seem to be multiple in the pathogenesis of facial hyperpigmentation (FH), as dark skin types, pregnancy, sun exposure… The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for FH in Maghrebian population. Patients with FH were included in a case-controlled study. Following data were recorded: age, sex, parity, phototype, FH and hormonal-related history, endocrinological features, sunlight exposure, specific cultural behaviours, use of topic corticosteroids and sunscreens. One hundred women (mean age 29.5 ± 13.7 years) were included with 200 age-matched controls. Duration of FH was 32.9 ± 42.2 months. There was a statistically significant relation between FH and hirsutism (P = 0.009), troubles of menstruations (P = 0.008), but not with acne (P = 0.23) and contraceptive oral (P = 0.06) drugs or with history of thyroid disorders (P = 0.13). For cultural factors, there were a statistical significant relation with rubbing by flannel glove (P < 0.05), use of dark soap (P = 0.009) and traditional masks (P < 0.05) but both groups were used to go to hammam. A strong relation was observed between FH and use of topical corticosteroids: 40% in the FH group vs. 5% in the control group (P < 0.05). Both groups used to apply sunscreens: 70% in the FH group and 67% in the control group where as there were no differences in the two groups for sun exposure. No statistical differences were observed regarding to age, phototypes and grade of parity. Our study demonstrated a relation between FH and hyperestrogenemia, rubbing with a friction glove, use of moroccan traditional masks and application of topical steroids. The eviction of all these triggering factors could be an adjuvant recommendation in the assessment of FH. PMID:22784199

  5. A population-based case-control study of canine mammary tumours and clinical use of medroxyprogesterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Støvring, M; Moe, L; Glattre, E

    1997-08-01

    We investigated whether or not an association could be found between mammary tumours and prior clinical use of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in bitches. A population-based retrospective age-matched case-control study was designed based on interviews with the owners of the bitches. The proportion of bitches with diagnosed mammary tumours (group MT+, n = 98) that had received progestin injections was compared with the proportion in a control group without mammary tumours (group MT-, n = 98). In the case group 39%, and in the control group 21% of the bitches had been treated with MPA. A significantly higher number of bitches with mammary tumours had been exposed to progestins, compared with the control group without mammary tumours (odds ratio = 2.32, Chi-square = 7.01, p = 0.008). Bitches treated clinically with low doses of MPA to avoid oestrus were at a greater risk of developing mammary tumours, the majority of which were histologically malignant (91%). PMID:9298095

  6. Diet and risk of endometriosis in a population-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Trabert, Britton; Peters, Ulrike; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Scholes, Delia; Holt, Victoria L.

    2012-01-01

    Diet plausibly has a role in the aetiology of endometriosis through effects on steroid hormone levels; however, few published studies have examined the diet and endometriosis risk. We evaluated dietary risk factors for endometriosis in a population-based case–control study. Cases were 284 Group Health (GH) enrollees aged 18–49 years with newly diagnosed, surgically confirmed endometriosis between 1996 and 2001. Controls were 660 randomly selected age-matched female GH enrollees without a history of endometriosis. Nutrients and selected food groups were assessed using the Women’s Health Initiative FFQ. OR of endometriosis risk associated with dietary exposures were estimated using unconditional logistic regression and adjusted for identified covariates. Increased total fat consumption was associated with decreased endometriosis risk (fourth quartile v. lowest: OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2, 1·0, P-trend=0·12). Increased β-carotene consumption and servings/d of fruit were associated with increased risk (β-carotene third quartile v. lowest: OR 1·7, 95% CI 1·1, 2·6; fourth quartile v. lowest: OR 1·6, 95% CI 1·0, 2·5, P-trend 0·16; fruit >2 servings/d v. <1: OR 1·5, 95% CI 1·0, 2·3, P -trend=0·04). We also found a suggestion of decreased endometriosis risk associated with the consumption of dairy products (2 servings/d v. ≤1: OR 0·6, >2 servings/d v. ≤1: OR 0·7), but this association was not statistically significant for the highest tertile. The present study suggests that specific dietary components may be associated with endometriosis risk. PMID:20875189

  7. Optimal control of Atlantic population Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauser, C.E.; Runge, M.C.; Cooch, E.G.; Johnson, F.A.; Harvey, W.F., IV

    2007-01-01

    Management of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) can be a balance between providing sustained harvest opportunity while not allowing populations to become overabundant and cause damage. In this paper, we focus on the Atlantic population of Canada geese and use stochastic dynamic programming to determine the optimal harvest strategy over a range of plausible models for population dynamics. There is evidence to suggest that the population exhibits significant age structure, and it is possible to reconstruct age structure from surveys. Consequently the harvest strategy is a function of the age composition, as well as the abundance, of the population. The objective is to maximize harvest while maintaining the number of breeding adults in the population between specified upper and lower limits. In addition, the total harvest capacity is limited and there is uncertainty about the strength of density-dependence. We find that under a density-independent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at the highest acceptable abundance. However if harvest capacity is limited, then the optimal long-term breeding population size is lower than the highest acceptable level, to reduce the risk of the population growing to an unacceptably large size. Under the proposed density-dependent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at an intermediate level between the bounds on acceptable population size; limits to harvest capacity have little effect on the optimal long-term population size. It is clear that the strength of density-dependence and constraints on harvest significantly affect the optimal harvest strategy for this population. Model discrimination might be achieved in the long term, while continuing to meet management goals, by adopting an adaptive management strategy.

  8. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  9. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  10. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  11. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  12. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  13. Attitudes toward population control in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Hall, M F

    1975-01-01

    This article explores Chilean attitudes toward the national population's size and rate of growth, as indicated by a special survey conducted for this purpose. The survey sample consisted of 1,410 men 20 to 54 years of age in urban Santiago, who were separated into six categories on the basis of their education and socioeconomic status. The subjects were interviewed by 36 students from the University of Chile who utilized a prepared questionnaire including both open-ended and multiple-choice questions. The results clearly indicate that men in the lower socioeconomic categories tended to know less about the population's size and growth than their better-off counterparts. Nevertheless, they more often felt that Chile had "too many" inhabitants, that recent population growth had been rapid, and that this rate of growth should be reduced. PMID:1212535

  14. Population control programme in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V

    1996-01-01

    Population size doubled over the period 1947-81 and continues to grow. Such a rapid increase in population size has serious repercussions upon socioeconomic development. Population growth threatens to nullify efforts to improve the condition of the poor. Indeed, all gains in the field of agriculture, industry, and national income look marginal when measured in per capita terms. The family welfare program seeks to promote, on a voluntary basis, responsible and planned parenthood of a two-child norm devoid of any bias for or against the sex of a given child. Use of the mass media and interpersonal communication to explain various methods of contraception and remove sociocultural barriers has led to an increase in the number of family planning acceptors in recent years. However, despite the family welfare program being in operation for four decades, population continues to grow at an alarming rate. It is clear that program strategy and mode of implementation must be reviewed. The state government of West Bengal is determined to implement the family welfare program effectively through the motivation and education of married couples, while making various types of contraceptive services available to the people. PMID:12347749

  15. A Particle Population Control Method for Dynamic Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Nolen, Steve; Adams, Terry; Zukaitis, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    A general particle population control method has been derived from splitting and Russian Roulette for dynamic Monte Carlo particle transport. A well-known particle population control method, known as the particle population comb, has been shown to be a special case of this general method. This general method has been incorporated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK) and examples of it's use are shown for both super-critical and sub-critical systems.

  16. [On some theoretic issues about planned control of population].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q

    1981-01-01

    There are basic differences between Marxian and Malthusian population thought: 1) For Marx, population is a social phenomenon--human reproduction belongs to social production and population laws are social laws influenced by the means of production. Marx recognized that human reproduction had both a natural and a social relationship, but Malthus population theory only acknowledges the natural relationship of human reproduction. Malthus believed that if population grows without interference, it will double every 25 years, or geometrically. It is evident Malthus substituted biological possibilities for the objective inevitability of population evolution, and natural population laws for social population laws. 2) Marx believed that social production is the unification of material production and human reproduction. Material production is controlled and necessitates control of human reproduction. For Malthus, the growth of the means of subsistence never catches up with the growth of the population, but Marx said that even though land is limited, the development of production forces is limitless. Marxist theory postulates that man is basically a producer, but that population must be planned because not everyone is a producer (e.g., children and the unskilled). 3) Malthus believed that in capitalistic countries unemployment, famine, and poverty stem from too many births by the laboring class, i.e., population determines the economy. The only solution to population problems is to have fewer children. For Marx, economics determines population problems. PMID:12159326

  17. Spatial variation in mortality risk for haematological malignancies near a petrochemical refinery: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Di Salvo, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Vieira, Veronica; Baili, Paolo; Mariottini, Mauro; Baldini, Marco; Micheli, Andrea; Sant, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The study investigated the geographic variation of mortality risk for hematological malignancies (HMs) in order to identify potential high-risk areas near an Italian petrochemical refinery. Material and methods A population-based case-control study was conducted and residential histories for 171 cases and 338 sex- and age-matched controls were collected. Confounding factors were obtained from interviews with consenting relatives for 109 HM deaths and 267 controls. To produce risk mortality maps, two different approaches were applied. We mapped (1) adptive kernel density relative risk estimation (KDE) for case-control studies which estimates a spatial relative risk function using the ratio between cases and controls’ densities, and (2) estimated odds ratios for case-control study data using generalized additive models (GAMs) to smooth the effect of location, a proxy for exposure, while adjusting for confounding variables. Results No high-risk areas for HM mortality were identified among all subjects (men and women combined), by applying both approaches. Using the adaptive KDE approach, we found a significant increase in death risk only among women in a large area 2–6 km southeast of the refinery and the application of GAMs also identified a similarly-located significant high-risk area among women only (global p-value<0.025). Potential confounding risk factors we considered in the GAM did not alter the results. Conclusion Both approaches identified a high-risk area close to the refinery among women only. Those spatial methods are useful tools for public policy management to determine priority areas for intervention. Our findings suggest several directions for further research in order to identify other potential environmental exposures that may be assessed in forthcoming studies based on detailed exposure modeling. PMID:26073202

  18. Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy vs standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A non-randomized, age-matched single center trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Yoen TK; Bosscha, Koop; Prins, Hubert A; Lips, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the safety of single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomies with standard four-port cholecystectomies. METHODS: Between January 2011 and December 2012 datas were gathered from 100 consecutive patients who received a single-port cholecystectomy. Patient baseline characteristics of all 100 single-port cholecystectomies were collected (body mass index, age, etc.) in a database. This group was compared with 100 age-matched patients who underwent a conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the same period. Retrospectively, per- and postoperative data were added. The two groups were compared to each other using independent t-tests and χ2-tests, P values below 0.05 were considered significantly different. RESULTS: No differences were found between both groups regarding baseline characteristics. Operating time was significantly shorter in the total single-port group (42 min vs 62 min, P < 0.05); in procedures performed by surgeons the same trend was seen (45 min vs 59 min, P < 0.05). Peroperative complications between both groups were equal (3 in the single-port group vs 5 in the multiport group; P = 0.42). Although not significant less postoperative complications were seen in the single-port group compared with the multiport group (3 vs 9; P = 0.07). No statistically significant differences were found between both groups with regard to length of hospital stay, readmissions and mortality. CONCLUSION: Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the potential to be a safe technique with a low complication rate, short in-hospital stay and comparable operating time. Single-port cholecystectomy provides the patient an almost non-visible scar while preserving optimal quality of surgery. Further prospective studies are needed to prove the safety of the single-port technique. PMID:26328034

  19. Coherent Population Trapping with Controlled Interparticle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, H.; Günter, G.; Hofmann, C. S.; Giese, C.; Saliba, S. D.; Depaola, B. D.; Amthor, T.; Weidemüller, M.; Sevinçli, S.; Pohl, T.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate coherent population trapping in a strongly interacting ultracold Rydberg gas. Despite the strong van der Waals interactions and interparticle correlations, we observe the persistence of a resonance with subnatural linewidth at the single-particle resonance frequency as we tune the interaction strength. This narrow resonance cannot be understood within a mean-field description of the strong Rydberg-Rydberg interactions. Instead, a many-body density matrix approach, accounting for the dynamics of interparticle correlations, is shown to reproduce the observed spectral features.

  20. India gets serious about population control.

    PubMed

    Singh, S V

    1987-01-01

    India, under prime minister Rajiv Ghandi, has revamped its population policy, installing new goals, incentives, and emphasis on child health and later marriage. At the current growth rate of 2.2 % per year, India will reach 1.5 billion by 2025, becoming the world's most populous nation. New targets of the "national family welfare program" include reducing growth to 1.9% raising use of contraception from 35 to 42%, and cutting the birth rate from 33 to 29.1/1000, all by 1990. There will be an attempt to raise the average age of marriage for women by fostering education and employment. Immunization of all children, and supplementing their diets with iron, iodine and vitamin A will be among the efforts to use village health services more effectively. Non-government agencies and schools will participate in educating and motivating people. Attractive incentives such as pensions, insurance and bonds will be offered to those with 1 child or no sons. PMID:12268498

  1. High Intake of Energy and Fat in Southwest Chinese Women with PCOS: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Liangzhi; Zhou, Lingling; Tang, Liulin; Zhuang, Jing; Guo, Wenqi; Hu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive endocrinological disease with heterogeneous phenotype. Obesity contributes to the increased prevalence and severity of PCOS. Whether the intakes of major nutrients are higher in Chinese PCOS patients is still unknown. Objectives To study the intakes of total energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate in Southwest Chinese PCOS patients. Methods 1854 women were included in the cross-sectional study. A population-based case-control study was conducted. The dietary habits and nutrients intake status of 169 PCOS patients and 338 age-matched controls were investigated by the method of semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Results The actual intake of total energy (P = 0.01) and fat (P = 0.01) were higher, but carbohydrate was lower (P = 0.01) in PCOS patients as compared with the controls. The energy percentage supplied by protein (12.33%±2.27% vs. 19.26%±5.91%, P<0.001) and carbohydrate (48.72%±6.41% vs. 68.31%±8.37%, P<0.001) were lower in Southwest Chinese PCOS patients than those of control, however, the energy percentage supplied by fat was higher (38.95%±5.71% vs. 12.42%±5.13%, P<0.001) in PCOS. Conclusions Limit the intake of total energy and fat shall be recommended to the Southwest Chinese PCOS patients. Women with PCOS in Southwest China shall consult with the nutritionist for improving the dietary structure. PMID:25993656

  2. [Five recommendations for controlling population growth in China].

    PubMed

    Lui, Z; Wu, C P; Lin, F D

    1980-10-01

    The rapid population growth rate (2% annually from 1949 to 1978) caused great difficulties for China's national economy because it increased the burden of families, communities, and government. It caused employment problems and slowed increases in living standards and educational levels. The best way to control population growth is based on a combination of political education and effective economic measures. The recommendations are: 1) coordinate employment, food rationing, salaries, bonuses, health treatment, age and condition of retirement, preschool care and education with family planning programs, maintain the elderly's living standard, and give preference to childless and single child families; 2) educate people about family planning and incorporate population growth and family planning into political and economics courses in high school and college; 3) incorporate population control into national economic plans; 4) prohibit families with 3 children and advocate 1 child per couple; and 5) establish a permanent population committee to plan, develop, and implement population policies and related research. PMID:12264235

  3. The politics of population: birth control and the eugenics movement.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L

    1974-01-01

    The birth control movement and the population control movement became inseparable in people's minds during the early years of the birth control movement, led by Margaret Sanger in 1915. Emma Goldman and Margaret Sanger defied obscenity laws by disseminating information on contraception. The birth control movement was concerned with individual choice and reproductive self determination. Population control referred to a large-scale social policy of limiting births throughout a whole society or in certain groups for the purpose of changing economic, ecological and/or political conditions. Population control ideas were dominated by eugenics and marred by racism and nativism in the United States. Unfortunately, eugenic ideas and population control were often confused with birth control, especially by poor, lower class women. Real democracy in population control requires that women, not men, have the reproductive choice. It is the material basis for liberation. If a woman's desire for children interferes with a reasonable and democratic social plan to lower birth rates, the woman should be offered educational and economic opportunities as an alternative to childbearing. Eugenics and imperialism were closely related in American and English history, focussing first on one group of immigrants then another. PMID:11615086

  4. Optimal control methods for controlling bacterial populations with persister dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial tolerance to antibiotics is a well-known phenomena; however, only recent studies of bacterial biofilms have shown how multifaceted tolerance really is. By joining into a structured community and offering shared protection and gene transfer, bacterial populations can protect themselves genotypically, phenotypically and physically. In this study, we collect a line of research that focuses on phenotypic (or plastic) tolerance. The dynamics of persister formation are becoming better understood, even though there are major questions that remain. The thrust of our results indicate that even without detailed description of the biological mechanisms, theoretical studies can offer strategies that can eradicate bacterial populations with existing drugs.

  5. Control of Population Flow in Coherently Driven Quantum Ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, Ruth; Bergmann, Klaas; Ekers, Aigars; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2005-07-22

    A technique for adiabatic control of the population flow through a preselected decaying excited level in a three-level quantum ladder is presented. The population flow through the intermediate or upper level is controlled efficiently and robustly by varying the pulse delay between a pair of partly overlapping coherent laser pulses. The technique is analyzed theoretically and demonstrated in an experiment with Na{sub 2} molecules.

  6. The value of monitoring to control evolving populations

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andrej; Mustonen, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Populations can evolve to adapt to external changes. The capacity to evolve and adapt makes successful treatment of infectious diseases and cancer difficult. Indeed, therapy resistance has become a key challenge for global health. Therefore, ideas of how to control evolving populations to overcome this threat are valuable. Here we use the mathematical concepts of stochastic optimal control to study what is needed to control evolving populations. Following established routes to calculate control strategies, we first study how a polymorphism can be maintained in a finite population by adaptively tuning selection. We then introduce a minimal model of drug resistance in a stochastically evolving cancer cell population and compute adaptive therapies. When decisions are in this manner based on monitoring the response of the tumor, this can outperform established therapy paradigms. For both case studies, we demonstrate the importance of high-resolution monitoring of the target population to achieve a given control objective, thus quantifying the intuition that to control, one must monitor. PMID:25587136

  7. The value of monitoring to control evolving populations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andrej; Vázquez-García, Ignacio; Mustonen, Ville

    2015-01-27

    Populations can evolve to adapt to external changes. The capacity to evolve and adapt makes successful treatment of infectious diseases and cancer difficult. Indeed, therapy resistance has become a key challenge for global health. Therefore, ideas of how to control evolving populations to overcome this threat are valuable. Here we use the mathematical concepts of stochastic optimal control to study what is needed to control evolving populations. Following established routes to calculate control strategies, we first study how a polymorphism can be maintained in a finite population by adaptively tuning selection. We then introduce a minimal model of drug resistance in a stochastically evolving cancer cell population and compute adaptive therapies. When decisions are in this manner based on monitoring the response of the tumor, this can outperform established therapy paradigms. For both case studies, we demonstrate the importance of high-resolution monitoring of the target population to achieve a given control objective, thus quantifying the intuition that to control, one must monitor. PMID:25587136

  8. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  9. Stray dog population demographics in Jodhpur, India following a population control/rabies vaccination program.

    PubMed

    Totton, Sarah C; Wandeler, Alex I; Zinsstag, Jakob; Bauch, Chris T; Ribble, Carl S; Rosatte, Rick C; McEwen, Scott A

    2010-10-01

    Animal Birth Control (ABC) is a program by which stray dogs are sterilized and vaccinated against rabies with the aim of controlling both dog population size and rabies. Population size and demographics of stray dogs were measured before and after implementation of an ABC program in Jodhpur, India. Dog population size declined (p<0.05) in three of five areas surveyed, showed a decreasing trend (p>0.05) in 1 area, and remained stable in 1 area between 2005 and 2007. By 2007, 61.8-86.5% of the free-roaming dog population was surgically sterilized and vaccinated for rabies in the areas surveyed. In March-May, 2007, adults comprised 80-96% of the free-roaming dog population, while subadults and puppies comprised 0-18 and 0-4%, respectively. The male:female ratio among dogs>3 months old was 1.4:1. A population demographic model predicted that at the current level of sterilization/rabies vaccination, vaccination coverage would remain above 70%, and the dog population would decrease by 69% reaching stability after 13-18 years. A surgical sterilization coverage under 40% would maintain the dog population at current levels. PMID:20696487

  10. Biological control agents elevate hantavirus by subsidizing deer mouse populations.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E; Callaway, Ragan M

    2006-04-01

    Biological control of exotic invasive plants using exotic insects is practiced under the assumption that biological control agents are safe if they do not directly attack non-target species. We tested this assumption by evaluating the potential for two host-specific biological control agents (Urophora spp.), widely established in North America for spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) control, to indirectly elevate Sin Nombre hantavirus by providing food subsidies to populations of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), the primary reservoir for the virus. We show that seropositive deer mice (mice testing positive for hantavirus) were over three times more abundant in the presence of the biocontrol food subsidy. Elevating densities of seropositive mice may increase risk of hantavirus infection in humans and significantly alter hantavirus ecology. Host specificity alone does not ensure safe biological control. To minimize indirect risks to non-target species, biological control agents must suppress pest populations enough to reduce their own numbers. PMID:16623730

  11. Dog population management for the control of human echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kachani, Malika; Heath, David

    2014-11-01

    Cystic and alveolar hydatid disease of humans caused by infection with Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis are significant zoonoses in developing countries. For human infections, the main definitive host is the dog, and reduction in the population of unwanted dogs, together with anthelmintic treatment of wanted dogs, are recommended control procedures for these zoonoses. Both owned and unowned dogs have been shown to be a major source of Echinococcus spp. infection in developing countries. Unowned dogs are the most challenging category in dog population management for the control of major zoonotic diseases. Unowned dogs are those dogs that do not have an owner, and those dogs whose owner cannot readily be identified. Control of numbers of unowned dogs can be done in various ways if funds are available. Fertility control and humane euthanasia are likely to be the most effective procedures in developing countries. Fertility control requires significant funding, and where resources are scarce humane euthanasia may be the most effective option. Both procedures are ongoing events, with no predictable end point. This paper examines the sociology and technology for the population management of owned and unowned dogs, specifically for the reduction of human hydatid disease. Examples are given for developing and developed countries. Although a "One Health" approach is desirable, the technology for hydatid control is different from that for rabies, and FAO Animal Welfare recommendations for dog population management should be adjusted accordingly. PMID:25046696

  12. Potential explanations for the educational gradient in coronary heart disease: a population-based case-control study of Swedish women.

    PubMed Central

    Wamala, S P; Mittleman, M A; Schenck-Gustafsson, K; Orth-Gomér, K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between educational attainment and coronary heart disease (CHD) and the factors that may explain this association. METHODS: This population-based case-control study included 292 women with CHD who were 65 years or younger and 292 age-matched controls. RESULTS: Compared with the adjusted odds ratio for CHD associated with college education, the age-adjusted odds ratio associated with mandatory education (< or = 9 years) was 1.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23, 2.84) and the odds ratio for high school education was 1.35 (95% CI = 0.81, 2.25) (P for trend < .01). The odds ratio for mandatory education was reduced by 82%, to 1.16 (95% CI = 0.69, 2.09), after adjustment for psychosocial stress, unhealthy lifestyle patterns, hemostatic factors, hypertension, and lipids. CONCLUSIONS: Much of the increased risk of CHD in women with low education appears to be linked to psychosocial stress and lifestyle factors. Hemostatic factors, lipids, and hypertension also contribute to a lesser extent. These factors may be considered in strategies geared to reducing socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular health. PMID:10076479

  13. Awareness regarding contraception and population control among school going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, G; Patra, S R

    2009-12-01

    Growing sexuality among adolescents increases their risk of getting reproductive tract infections and pregnancy. This Cross sectional survey was done to assess the knowledge and attitude of higher secondary school children regarding contraception and population control. Majority of students (94.4%) were aware of contraceptives and their easy availability on chemist shop. However very few were aware of name and how to use them and 60% of them considered that condom is an emergency contraceptive. Lack of employment facilities as a consequence of uncontrolled population growth was the main concern of both boys and girls. The two children norm was acceptable to most, with one son and one daughter. All perceived that there is need to be informed about contraceptives. Most of the adolescents are misinformed about contraceptives and their attitude is not favorable as far as responsibility is concerned. There is an unmet need of contraceptive & population control knowledge and attitude among school adolescents and require urgent intervention. PMID:20803909

  14. Control of nuisance populations of crayfish with traps and toxicants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Crayfish have long been a nuisance in fish-rearing ponds at fish hatcheries. The rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus ) has displaced endemic species and caused serious declines of aquatic plants in some ponds and lakes in the midwestern USA. The authors attempted to evaluate the effect of intensive trapping on a crayfish population and to identify a selective chemical control agent and evaluate its effectiveness under field conditions. A crayfish population in a small pond was suppressed but not eliminated by trapping: adults were effectively harvested but efficiency diminished sharply as the population declined. Of 19 chemicals tested as possible control agents for crayfish, a synthetic pyrethroid (Baythroid) was by far the most toxic; 25 mu g/L produced a complete kill of crayfish in the pond and was also the most selective for crayfish in laboratory tests.

  15. Population Control, Myth or Fact as a National Goal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarembinski, Clem

    Evidence presented in this paper substantiates the position that: (1) the United States is pursuing a national goal and foreign policy of population control; and (2) a conflict about this goal could arise within the minds of many people. To support these two facts, the author has outlined statements giving an overview about the profusion of…

  16. Serum uric acid is associated with increased risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in high HDL-C population: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    YU, MIAO; LING, KEN; TENG, YUNFEI; LI, QIN; MEI, FEI; LI, YIQING; OUYANG, CHENXI

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that metabolic disorders are positively correlated with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE), whereas the risk factor serum uric acid (SUA) for idiopathic VTE has yet to be investigated. In this retrospective case-control study, 276 idiopathic VTE patients and 536 gender- and age-matched control subjects were included. The subjects in the case and control groups exhibiting common known VTE risk factors and the patients with a first VTE onset in one month were excluded. For the control group, primary and secondary VTE patients were excluded. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and current smoking were significantly associated with idiopathic VTE in the univariate analysis. Hyperuricemia was detected in 56/276 (20.29%) idiopathic patients compared with 71/536 (13.25%) in the control group. HDL-C was considered the most prominent interactive factor for SUA in idiopathic VTE by the interaction analysis. After testing for the interaction terms, SUA was closely associated with idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population (P=0.0026 for interaction), while there was no such correlation in the low HDL-C group. The results indicated no obvious correlation between triglyceride and hypertension to idiopathic VTE. In conclusion, SUA is closely associated with an increased risk of idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population. The abnormality of SUA may act as an important linkage between atherosclerosis and idiopathic VTE through HDL-C. PMID:27284315

  17. Universality in exact quantum state population dynamics and control

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Segal, Dvira; Brumer, Paul; Egusquiza, Inigo L.

    2010-09-15

    We consider an exact population transition, defined as the probability of finding a state at a final time that is exactly equal to the probability of another state at the initial time. We prove that, given a Hamiltonian, there always exists a complete set of orthogonal states that can be employed as time-zero states for which this exact population transition occurs. The result is general: It holds for arbitrary systems, arbitrary pairs of initial and final states, and for any time interval. The proposition is illustrated with several analytic models. In particular, we demonstrate that in some cases, by tuning the control parameters, a complete transition might occur, where a target state, vacant at t=0, is fully populated at time {tau}.

  18. Occupational exposure to textile dust increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from a Malaysian population-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Too, Chun Lai; Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Ilar, Anna; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Murad, Shahnaz; Bengtsson, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lung exposures including cigarette smoking and silica exposure are associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the association between textile dust exposure and the risk of RA in the Malaysian population, with a focus on women who rarely smoke. Methods Data from the Malaysian Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis population-based case–control study involving 910 female early RA cases and 910 female age-matched controls were analysed. Self-reported information on ever/never occupationally exposed to textile dust was used to estimate the risk of developing anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA-negative RA. Interaction between textile dust and the human leucocyte antigen DR β-1 (HLA-DRB1) shared epitope (SE) was evaluated by calculating the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), with 95% CI. Results Occupational exposure to textile dust was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing RA in the Malaysian female population (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.6 to 5.2). The association between occupational exposure to textile dust and risk of RA was uniformly observed for the ACPA-positive RA (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 4.8) and ACPA-negative RA (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.0) subsets, respectively. We observed a significant interaction between exposure to occupational textile dust and HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of ACPA-positive RA (OR for double exposed: 39.1, 95% CI 5.1 to 297.5; AP: 0.8, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.2). Conclusions This is the first study demonstrating that textile dust exposure is associated with an increased risk for RA. In addition, a gene–environment interaction between HLA-DRB1 SE and textile dust exposure provides a high risk for ACPA-positive RA. PMID:26681695

  19. A theoretical analysis of optimum consumer population and its control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Mao, Z; Wang, H

    1994-01-01

    Material production is related to population consumption in every society. Consumption also constantly transforms materials, energy, and information. In this sense, consumption provides both impetus for material production and a self-adapting mechanism for population development and control. Population structure variables affecting economic production can be divided according to non-adults, working-age work force and the elderly, social status, and urban-rural structure. The consumptive structures among people of different social status reflect different needs for social and economic development. The theoretical calculation of the consumer population in the national economy demonstrates that the national income in a certain year of a given national economy equals consumption fund plus accumulation fund where consumption fund includes social consumption fund and residential consumption fund. Social consumption fund is spent mostly on public utilities, administrative management, national defense, education, public health and urban construction, as well as on environment management and disaster relief. The residential consumption fund can be divided into basic expenditure such as clothing, food, shelter and transportation, and self-improvement expenditure such as recreation, education, and travel. As a result of economic development, not only the percentage of the expenditure on food will decrease and the percentage of the expenditure on clothing, shelter, transportation, and other daily necessities will increase, but expenses on recreation and education also will grow. Residential consumption is divided into subsistence consumption (Type I consumption) and self-improvement (recreation and education) consumption (Type II consumption) in order to determine consumer population and the degree of urbanization and its impact upon social and economic development. A moderate consumer population model of urban and rural areas was established by using the urban and rural

  20. Controlled Population Transfer in a Double Quantum Dot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoulakis, Antonios; Terzis, Andreas F.; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2007-12-26

    We study the potential for controlled population transfer between the ground states of two anharmonic coupled quantum dots. We propose a method based on the interaction of the quantum dot structure with external electromagnetic fields. The interaction of the quantum dot system with the electromagnetic fields is studied with the use of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present numerical results for an asymmetric quantum dot structure.

  1. Health education campaign on population control: lessons from Iran.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, A

    1995-11-01

    A descriptive study was carried out in Tehran, the capital of Iran, to investigate a health education campaign on population control. A sample of 68 adults aged 20 to 40 years participated in the study. Each respondent was shown a picture of the campaign. They then filled in a short questionnaire. The main objectives of the study were to measure recall rates and to assess attitude of the subjects. The study results show that recall rates were high (78%), 68% of respondents claimed that the campaign is likely to change their attitudes towards population control, and 87% of participants perceived the main idea of the campaign correctly. The study findings show that there are some significant associations between demographic variables (marital status, having child or not) and perception of the campaign. These may lead health educators and health promoters to communicate more effectively and efficiently in the context of family planning. In countries with a large number of young people, health education campaigns on population control with respect to social values of each society and moral considerations are recommended. PMID:8570803

  2. Risk factors associated with a breast cancer in a population of Moroccan women whose age is less than 40 years: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Laamiri, Fatima Zahra; Hasswane, Nadia; Kerbach, Aicha; Aguenaou, Hassan; Taboz, Youness; Benkirane, Hassna; Mrabet, Mustapha; Amina, Barkat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most common cancer in morocco women were it occupies the first place in term of incidence and mortality. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the risk factors associated with a breast cancer in a population of Moroccan women. Methods A case-control study was conducted with population women whose age is less than 40 years during 2008-2010 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. These women were interviewed for Epidemiological information and risk factor for breast cancer. Results Included in this study were 124 cases and 148 age matched controls. No statistically significant case-control difference was found for the early age of menarche (OR = 2.474; CI 95%: 1.354- 4.521), and family antecedents of first degree of breast cancer (OR = 11.556; 95% CI: 2.548-52.411). However physical activity (OR = 0.507; 95% CI: 0.339 -0.757) early maternity age (OR = 0.212; 95% CI: 0.087 - 0.514), multiparity (OR = 0.742; 95% CI: 0.359 -1.539) and breastfeeding than 6 months (OR = 0.739; 95% CI: 0.357 -1.523) appear as significant protective factors. Conclusion This study show the criminalization of only part of the known risk factors of breast cancer in this age group and confirms the probable protective role of physical activity and factors related to life reproductive women in our study (early childbearing, multiparity and lactation). PMID:27583083

  3. QT Is Longer in Drug-Free Patients with Schizophrenia Compared with Age-Matched Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kumiko; Ozeki, Yuji; Okayasu, Hiroaki; Takano, Yumiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Hori, Hiroaki; Orui, Masami; Horie, Minoru; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    The potassium voltage-gated channel KCNH2 is a well-known gene in which mutations induce familial QT interval prolongation. KCNH2 is suggested to be a risk gene for schizophrenia. Additionally, the disturbance of autonomic control, which affects the QT interval, is known in schizophrenia. Therefore, we speculate that schizophrenic patients have characteristic features in terms of the QT interval in addition to the effect of antipsychotic medication. The QT interval of patients with schizophrenia not receiving antipsychotics (n = 85) was compared with that of patients with schizophrenia receiving relatively large doses of antipsychotics (n = 85) and healthy volunteers (n = 85). The QT interval was corrected using four methods (Bazett, Fridericia, Framingham or Hodges method). In ANCOVA with age and heart rate as covariates, patients not receiving antipsychotic treatment had longer QT intervals than did the healthy volunteers, but antipsychotics prolonged the QT interval regardless of the correction method used (P<0.01). Schizophrenic patients with and without medication had a significantly higher mean heart rate than did the healthy volunteers, with no obvious sex-related differences in the QT interval. The QT interval prolongation may be manifestation of a certain biological feature of schizophrenia. PMID:24887423

  4. Internal models for interpreting neural population activity during sensorimotor control

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Matthew D; Yu, Byron M; Chase, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    To successfully guide limb movements, the brain takes in sensory information about the limb, internally tracks the state of the limb, and produces appropriate motor commands. It is widely believed that this process uses an internal model, which describes our prior beliefs about how the limb responds to motor commands. Here, we leveraged a brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigm in rhesus monkeys and novel statistical analyses of neural population activity to gain insight into moment-by-moment internal model computations. We discovered that a mismatch between subjects’ internal models and the actual BMI explains roughly 65% of movement errors, as well as long-standing deficiencies in BMI speed control. We then used the internal models to characterize how the neural population activity changes during BMI learning. More broadly, this work provides an approach for interpreting neural population activity in the context of how prior beliefs guide the transformation of sensory input to motor output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10015.001 PMID:26646183

  5. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  6. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning.

    PubMed

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  7. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11165008 and 11365009), the Foundation of Young Scientist of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20142BCB23011), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Jiangxi Provincial Department of Education (Grant No. GJJ13348).

  8. Evaluation of Canada goose sterilization for population control.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Converse, Kathryn A.; Kennelly, James J.

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the vasectomy of 72 male Canada geese as a method to control growing populations of nuisance geese in Westchester County, New York. Thirty-three of the vasectomized males paired with a female and were located during ≥1 breeding seasons; 7 treated males were not seen following surgery. The remaining 32 males were never observed paired with a female during the breeding season. Of 56 nesting attempts by the 33 pairs in ≥1 breeding seasons, 84% of the nests were unsuccessful. Fidelity to nest sites during the second and third breeding seasons occurred for 17 of the 18 vasectomized males and their females that were observed for ≥2 seasons. The results suggest that male sterilization may reduce productivity of nuisance Canada geese providing one carefully selects areas and flocks suitable for this type of control.

  9. Control of BRD in large dairy calf populations.

    PubMed

    Lehenbauer, Terry W

    2014-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in dairy calves. As the number of calves being raised on the dairy farm or at a calf-raising operation has become larger, both opportunity and risk have increased. Opportunities for applying economies of size and scale exist in these large dairy calf populations while meeting specific needs of the dairy calf. BRD control requires effective biosecurity and biocontainment efforts, adequate passive transfer of immunoglobulins, a strategic immunization program, and appropriate diagnostic strategies for ongoing disease surveillance. These components are necessary to achieve an evidence-based approach for preventing and reducing severity of BRD cases. Proper nutrition, housing, and environmental management are important for achieving optimal dairy calf health and performance. Good record keeping and analysis of outcomes are needed to document dairy calf health and performance and to efficiently identify new problems that require attention in these large dairy calf populations. Proper management of calves to prevent and control BRD requires careful planning and follow through to achieve those results but will likely pay big dividends in improved calf health and future productivity. PMID:25497502

  10. Z-type control of populations for Lotka-Volterra model with exponential convergence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunong; Yan, Xiaogang; Liao, Bolin; Zhang, Yinyan; Ding, Yaqiong

    2016-02-01

    The population control of the Lotka-Volterra model is one of the most important and widely investigated issues in mathematical ecology. In this study, assuming that birth rate is controllable and using the Z-type dynamic method, we develop Z-type control laws to drive the prey population and/or predator population to a desired state to keep species away from extinction and to improve ecosystem stability. A direct controller group is initially designed to control the prey and predator populations simultaneously. Two indirect controllers are then proposed for prey population control and predator population control by exerting exogenous measure on another species. All three control laws possess exponential convergence performances. Finally, the corresponding numerical simulations are performed. Results substantiate the theoretical analysis and effectiveness of such Z-type control laws for the population control of the Lotka-Volterra model. PMID:26644036

  11. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  12. 50 CFR 21.61 - Population control of resident Canada geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., resumption of injuries caused by growth of the population and not otherwise addressable by the methods... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Population control of resident Canada... Populations § 21.61 Population control of resident Canada geese. (a) Which Canada geese are covered by...

  13. 50 CFR 21.61 - Population control of resident Canada geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., resumption of injuries caused by growth of the population and not otherwise addressable by the methods... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Population control of resident Canada... Populations § 21.61 Population control of resident Canada geese. (a) Which Canada geese are covered by...

  14. 50 CFR 21.61 - Population control of resident Canada geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., resumption of injuries caused by growth of the population and not otherwise addressable by the methods... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Population control of resident Canada... Populations § 21.61 Population control of resident Canada geese. (a) Which Canada geese are covered by...

  15. 50 CFR 21.61 - Population control of resident Canada geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., resumption of injuries caused by growth of the population and not otherwise addressable by the methods... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Population control of resident Canada... Populations § 21.61 Population control of resident Canada geese. (a) Which Canada geese are covered by...

  16. Efficient control of population structure in model organism association mapping.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Min; Zaitlen, Noah A; Wade, Claire M; Kirby, Andrew; Heckerman, David; Daly, Mark J; Eskin, Eleazar

    2008-03-01

    Genomewide association mapping in model organisms such as inbred mouse strains is a promising approach for the identification of risk factors related to human diseases. However, genetic association studies in inbred model organisms are confronted by the problem of complex population structure among strains. This induces inflated false positive rates, which cannot be corrected using standard approaches applied in human association studies such as genomic control or structured association. Recent studies demonstrated that mixed models successfully correct for the genetic relatedness in association mapping in maize and Arabidopsis panel data sets. However, the currently available mixed-model methods suffer from computational inefficiency. In this article, we propose a new method, efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), which corrects for population structure and genetic relatedness in model organism association mapping. Our method takes advantage of the specific nature of the optimization problem in applying mixed models for association mapping, which allows us to substantially increase the computational speed and reliability of the results. We applied EMMA to in silico whole-genome association mapping of inbred mouse strains involving hundreds of thousands of SNPs, in addition to Arabidopsis and maize data sets. We also performed extensive simulation studies to estimate the statistical power of EMMA under various SNP effects, varying degrees of population structure, and differing numbers of multiple measurements per strain. Despite the limited power of inbred mouse association mapping due to the limited number of available inbred strains, we are able to identify significantly associated SNPs, which fall into known QTL or genes identified through previous studies while avoiding an inflation of false positives. An R package implementation and webserver of our EMMA method are publicly available. PMID:18385116

  17. Quantifying prion disease penetrance using large population control cohorts.

    PubMed

    Minikel, Eric Vallabh; Vallabh, Sonia M; Lek, Monkol; Estrada, Karol; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; McLean, Cory Y; Tung, Joyce Y; Yu, Linda P C; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Blevins, Janis; Zhang, Shulin; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Yamada, Masahito; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Collins, Steven J; Boyd, Alison; Will, Robert G; Knight, Richard; Ponto, Claudia; Zerr, Inga; Kraus, Theo F J; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Giese, Armin; Calero, Miguel; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Haïk, Stéphane; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Bouaziz-Amar, Elodie; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Capellari, Sabina; Parchi, Piero; Poleggi, Anna; Ladogana, Anna; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H; Karczewski, Konrad J; Marshall, Jamie L; Boehnke, Michael; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L; Kähler, Anna; Chambert, Kimberly; McCarroll, Steven; Sullivan, Patrick F; Hultman, Christina M; Purcell, Shaun M; Sklar, Pamela; van der Lee, Sven J; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Jansen, Casper; Hofman, Albert; Kraaij, Robert; van Rooij, Jeroen G J; Ikram, M Arfan; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Daly, Mark J; MacArthur, Daniel G

    2016-01-20

    More than 100,000 genetic variants are reported to cause Mendelian disease in humans, but the penetrance-the probability that a carrier of the purported disease-causing genotype will indeed develop the disease-is generally unknown. We assess the impact of variants in the prion protein gene (PRNP) on the risk of prion disease by analyzing 16,025 prion disease cases, 60,706 population control exomes, and 531,575 individuals genotyped by 23andMe Inc. We show that missense variants in PRNP previously reported to be pathogenic are at least 30 times more common in the population than expected on the basis of genetic prion disease prevalence. Although some of this excess can be attributed to benign variants falsely assigned as pathogenic, other variants have genuine effects on disease susceptibility but confer lifetime risks ranging from <0.1 to ~100%. We also show that truncating variants in PRNP have position-dependent effects, with true loss-of-function alleles found in healthy older individuals, a finding that supports the safety of therapeutic suppression of prion protein expression. PMID:26791950

  18. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L.; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems.

  19. Population-dynamics method with a multicanonical feedback control.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Bouchet, Freddy; Jack, Robert L; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the Giardinà-Kurchan-Peliti population dynamics method for evaluating large deviations of time-averaged quantities in Markov processes [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 120603 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.120603]. This method exhibits systematic errors which can be large in some circumstances, particularly for systems with weak noise, with many degrees of freedom, or close to dynamical phase transitions. We show how these errors can be mitigated by introducing control forces within the algorithm. These forces are determined by an iteration-and-feedback scheme, inspired by multicanonical methods in equilibrium sampling. We demonstrate substantially improved results in a simple model, and we discuss potential applications to more complex systems. PMID:27415224

  20. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  1. Costs of children--benefit theory and population control.

    PubMed

    Tian, X

    1989-01-01

    fertile women are also important. The State's population policy of rewards and penalties also affects the costs and benefits. Administrative intervention to implement the FP program have been effectively and adequately used in the past to control population growth, even though it is recognized that social and economic development is another way of affecting population growth. Parents still need to be guaranteed that 1 child will indeed be a benefit. Children's economic value has been accepted, and policy is moving in the direction of correcting the imbalances between children's costs and benefits, such as increasing fines along with improving education and income distribution. PMID:12316996

  2. Prevalence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies and chronic liver disease in the general population: a nested case-control study of the Dionysos cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, M; Bellentani, S; Saccoccio, G; Muratori, P; Masutti, F; Muratori, L; Cassani, F; Bianchi, F; Tiribelli, C

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Several retrospective and prospective studies report an increased prevalence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies (NOSAs) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) related chronic liver disease (CLD). Some of the data so far available are controversial and the true prevalence of NOSAs in the general population is still not known.
AIM—To explore the prevalence of NOSAs, their relation to different HCV genotypes, and the presence and severity of CLD in the general population of Northern Italy.
PATIENTS—All 226 anti-HCV positive and 87 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive patients of the Dionysos cohort study were analysed and compared with sex and age matched cases (226) negative for both anti-HCV antibody and HBsAg selected from the same cohort.
METHODS—Sera tested for the presence of NOSAs (anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibody (SMA), and anti-liver/kidney microsomes type 1 antibody (LKM1)) were screened by indirect immunofluorescence at a 1:40 serum dilution. HCV RNA and HCV genotypes were also determined by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 5' non-coding region and by PCR amplification of the core region with type specific primers.
RESULTS—The overall prevalence of NOSA reactivity was significantly higher in anti-HCV positive subjects than in both normal and pathological controls (25% v 6% and 7% respectively, p<0.05). ANA, SMA, and LKM1 occurred in 16, 10, and 1.3% of cases respectively. No specific association between NOSAs and a specific HCV genotype was found. NOSAs were found more often associated with more than one genotype (35.7%) and with untypable genotypes (34.6%), although the association was not statistically significant. NOSAs were associated with HCV RNA and CLD but not with the presence of cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. On univariate analysis, NOSA reactivity was independently associated with abnormal alanine aminotransferase (p<0.01) and

  3. Control of mucosal polymicrobial populations by innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Mason, Katie L; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2009-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract carries out the complex process of localizing the polymicrobial populations of the indigenous microbiota to the lumenal side of the GI mucosa while absorbing nutrients from the lumen and preventing damage to the mucosa. This process is accomplished through a combination of physical, innate and adaptive host defences and a 'strategic alliance' with members of the microbiota. To cope with the constant exposure to a diverse microbial community, the GI tract, through the actions of a number of specialized cells in the epithelium and lamina propria, has layers of humoral, physical and cellular defences that limit attachment, invasion and dissemination of the indigenous microbiota. However, the role of the microbiota in this dynamic balance is vital and serves as another level of 'innate' defence. We are just beginning to understand how bacterial metabolites aid in the control of potential pathogens within the microbiota and limit inflammatory responses to the microbiota, concepts that will impact our understanding of the biological effects of antibiotics, diet and probiotics on mucosal inflammatory responses. PMID:19558617

  4. Analyzing Population Genetics Using the Mitochondrial Control Region and Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Takumi; Phillips, Bonnie; Latourelle, Sandra M.; Elwess, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    The 14-base pair hypervariable region in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Asian populations, specifically Japanese and Chinese students at Plattsburgh State University, was examined. Previous research on this 14-base pair region showed it to be susceptible to mutations and as a result indicated direct correlation with specific ethnic populations.…

  5. Processing Words Varying in Personal Familiarity (Based on Reading and Spelling) by Poor Readers and Age-Matched and Reading-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Evelyne; Willows, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate whether performance differences between good and poor readers relate to reading-specific cognitive factors that result from engaging in reading activities and other experiential factors, the authors gave students in Grades 4 and 6 a perceptual identification test of words not only drawn from their personal lexicon but also varying in…

  6. Ecological feedbacks can reduce population-level efficacy of wildlife fertility control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Hobbs, N. Thompson; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    1. Anthropogenic stress on natural systems, particularly the fragmentation of landscapes and the extirpation of predators from food webs, has intensified the need to regulate abundance of wildlife populations with management. Controlling population growth using fertility control has been considered for almost four decades, but nearly all research has focused on understanding effects of fertility control agents on individual animals. Questions about the efficacy of fertility control as a way to control populations remain largely unanswered. 2. Collateral consequences of contraception can produce unexpected changes in birth rates, survival, immigration and emigration that may reduce the effectiveness of regulating animal abundance. The magnitude and frequency of such effects vary with species-specific social and reproductive systems, as well as connectivity of populations. Developing models that incorporate static demographic parameters from populations not controlled by contraception may bias predictions of fertility control efficacy. 3. Many population-level studies demonstrate that changes in survival and immigration induced by fertility control can compensate for the reduction in births caused by contraception. The most successful cases of regulating populations using fertility control come from applications of contraceptives to small, closed populations of gregarious and easily accessed species. 4. Fertility control can result in artificial selection pressures on the population and may lead to long-term unintentional genetic consequences. The magnitude of such selection is dependent on individual heritability and behavioural traits, as well as environmental variation. 5. Synthesis and applications. Understanding species' life-history strategies, biology, behavioural ecology and ecological context is critical to developing realistic expectations of regulating populations using fertility control. Before time, effort and funding are invested in wildlife

  7. Ecological feedbacks can reduce population-level efficacy of wildlife fertility control

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Jason I; Powers, Jenny G; Thompson Hobbs, N; Baker, Dan L

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic stress on natural systems, particularly the fragmentation of landscapes and the extirpation of predators from food webs, has intensified the need to regulate abundance of wildlife populations with management. Controlling population growth using fertility control has been considered for almost four decades, but nearly all research has focused on understanding effects of fertility control agents on individual animals. Questions about the efficacy of fertility control as a way to control populations remain largely unanswered. Collateral consequences of contraception can produce unexpected changes in birth rates, survival, immigration and emigration that may reduce the effectiveness of regulating animal abundance. The magnitude and frequency of such effects vary with species-specific social and reproductive systems, as well as connectivity of populations. Developing models that incorporate static demographic parameters from populations not controlled by contraception may bias predictions of fertility control efficacy. Many population-level studies demonstrate that changes in survival and immigration induced by fertility control can compensate for the reduction in births caused by contraception. The most successful cases of regulating populations using fertility control come from applications of contraceptives to small, closed populations of gregarious and easily accessed species. Fertility control can result in artificial selection pressures on the population and may lead to long-term unintentional genetic consequences. The magnitude of such selection is dependent on individual heritability and behavioural traits, as well as environmental variation. Synthesis and applications. Understanding species' life-history strategies, biology, behavioural ecology and ecological context is critical to developing realistic expectations of regulating populations using fertility control. Before time, effort and funding are invested in wildlife contraception, managers

  8. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  9. Investigating Biological Control Agents for Controlling Invasive Populations of the Mealybug Pseudococcus comstocki in France

    PubMed Central

    Malausa, Thibaut; Delaunay, Mathilde; Fleisch, Alexandre; Groussier-Bout, Géraldine; Warot, Sylvie; Crochard, Didier; Guerrieri, Emilio; Delvare, Gérard; Pellizzari, Giuseppina; Kaydan, M. Bora; Al-Khateeb, Nadia; Germain, Jean-François; Brancaccio, Lisa; Le Goff, Isabelle; Bessac, Melissa; Ris, Nicolas; Kreiter, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Pseudococcus comstocki (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) is a mealybug species native to Eastern Asia and present as an invasive pest in northern Italy and southern France since the start of the century. It infests apple and pear trees, grapevines and some ornamental trees. Biocontrol programmes against this pest proved successful in central Asia and North America in the second half of the 20th century. In this study, we investigated possible biocontrol agents against P. comstocki, with the aim of developing a biocontrol programme in France. We carried out systematic DNA-barcoding at each step in the search for a specialist parasitoid. First we characterised the French target populations of P. comstocki. We then identified the parasitoids attacking P. comstocki in France. Finally, we searched for foreign mealybug populations identified a priori as P. comstocki and surveyed their hymenopteran parasitoids. Three mealybug species (P. comstocki, P. viburni and P. cryptus) were identified during the survey, together with at least 16 different parasitoid taxa. We selected candidate biological control agent populations for use against P. comstocki in France, from the species Allotropa burrelli (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and Acerophagus malinus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). The coupling of molecular and morphological characterisation for both pests and natural enemies facilitated the programme development and the rejection of unsuitable or generalist parasitoids. PMID:27362639

  10. Investigating Biological Control Agents for Controlling Invasive Populations of the Mealybug Pseudococcus comstocki in France.

    PubMed

    Malausa, Thibaut; Delaunay, Mathilde; Fleisch, Alexandre; Groussier-Bout, Géraldine; Warot, Sylvie; Crochard, Didier; Guerrieri, Emilio; Delvare, Gérard; Pellizzari, Giuseppina; Kaydan, M Bora; Al-Khateeb, Nadia; Germain, Jean-François; Brancaccio, Lisa; Le Goff, Isabelle; Bessac, Melissa; Ris, Nicolas; Kreiter, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Pseudococcus comstocki (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) is a mealybug species native to Eastern Asia and present as an invasive pest in northern Italy and southern France since the start of the century. It infests apple and pear trees, grapevines and some ornamental trees. Biocontrol programmes against this pest proved successful in central Asia and North America in the second half of the 20th century. In this study, we investigated possible biocontrol agents against P. comstocki, with the aim of developing a biocontrol programme in France. We carried out systematic DNA-barcoding at each step in the search for a specialist parasitoid. First we characterised the French target populations of P. comstocki. We then identified the parasitoids attacking P. comstocki in France. Finally, we searched for foreign mealybug populations identified a priori as P. comstocki and surveyed their hymenopteran parasitoids. Three mealybug species (P. comstocki, P. viburni and P. cryptus) were identified during the survey, together with at least 16 different parasitoid taxa. We selected candidate biological control agent populations for use against P. comstocki in France, from the species Allotropa burrelli (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and Acerophagus malinus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). The coupling of molecular and morphological characterisation for both pests and natural enemies facilitated the programme development and the rejection of unsuitable or generalist parasitoids. PMID:27362639

  11. The organization and control of an evolving interdependent population.

    PubMed

    Vural, Dervis C; Isakov, Alexander; Mahadevan, L

    2015-07-01

    Starting with Darwin, biologists have asked how populations evolve from a low fitness state that is evolutionarily stable to a high fitness state that is not. Specifically of interest is the emergence of cooperation and multicellularity where the fitness of individuals often appears in conflict with that of the population. Theories of social evolution and evolutionary game theory have produced a number of fruitful results employing two-state two-body frameworks. In this study, we depart from this tradition and instead consider a multi-player, multi-state evolutionary game, in which the fitness of an agent is determined by its relationship to an arbitrary number of other agents. We show that populations organize themselves in one of four distinct phases of interdependence depending on one parameter, selection strength. Some of these phases involve the formation of specialized large-scale structures. We then describe how the evolution of independence can be manipulated through various external perturbations. PMID:26040593

  12. The organization and control of an evolving interdependent population

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Dervis C.; Isakov, Alexander; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Starting with Darwin, biologists have asked how populations evolve from a low fitness state that is evolutionarily stable to a high fitness state that is not. Specifically of interest is the emergence of cooperation and multicellularity where the fitness of individuals often appears in conflict with that of the population. Theories of social evolution and evolutionary game theory have produced a number of fruitful results employing two-state two-body frameworks. In this study, we depart from this tradition and instead consider a multi-player, multi-state evolutionary game, in which the fitness of an agent is determined by its relationship to an arbitrary number of other agents. We show that populations organize themselves in one of four distinct phases of interdependence depending on one parameter, selection strength. Some of these phases involve the formation of specialized large-scale structures. We then describe how the evolution of independence can be manipulated through various external perturbations. PMID:26040593

  13. Conference on Geospatial Approaches to Cancer Control and Population Sciences

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of this conference is to bring together a community of researchers across the cancer control continuum using geospatial tools, models and approaches to address cancer prevention and control.

  14. Environmental Pollution Control: Two Views from the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althoff, Phillip; Greig, William H.

    1977-01-01

    Citizens exhibitied concern about pollution, a low level of trust in governmental and industrial efforts, and a low level of dedication to environmental protection. Demands to clean up the environment came from one segment of the population while demands to solve the energy crisis came from other segments. (AJ)

  15. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a...

  16. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a...

  17. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a...

  18. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a...

  19. 50 CFR 31.2 - Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. 31.2 Section 31.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Surplus Wildlife § 31.2 Methods of surplus wildlife population control and disposal. Upon a...

  20. Large-scale control site selection for population monitoring: an example assessing Sage-grouse trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; O'Donnell, Michael; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2015-01-01

    Human impacts on wildlife populations are widespread and prolific and understanding wildlife responses to human impacts is a fundamental component of wildlife management. The first step to understanding wildlife responses is the documentation of changes in wildlife population parameters, such as population size. Meaningful assessment of population changes in potentially impacted sites requires the establishment of monitoring at similar, nonimpacted, control sites. However, it is often difficult to identify appropriate control sites in wildlife populations. We demonstrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) data across large spatial scales to select biologically relevant control sites for population monitoring. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hearafter, sage-grouse) are negatively affected by energy development, and monitoring of sage-grouse population within energy development areas is necessary to detect population-level responses. Weused population data (1995–2012) from an energy development area in Wyoming, USA, the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), and GIS data to identify control sites that were not impacted by energy development for population monitoring. Control sites were surrounded by similar habitat and were within similar climate areas to the ARPA. We developed nonlinear trend models for both the ARPA and control sites and compared long-term trends from the 2 areas. We found little difference between the ARPA and control sites trends over time. This research demonstrated an approach for control site selection across large landscapes and can be used as a template for similar impact-monitoring studies. It is important to note that identification of changes in population parameters between control and treatment sites is only the first step in understanding the mechanisms that underlie those changes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Mitochondrial control region sequences from an Egyptian population sample.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Jessica L; Irwin, Jodi A; Strouss, Katharine M; Ragab, Hisham; Sturk, Kimberly A; Parsons, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Entire mitochondrial control region data was generated for 277 unrelated Egyptian individuals. High-throughput robotics, a redundant sequencing approach, and several quality control checks were implemented to generate a high-quality database. The data presented here will augment the limited Egyptian mtDNA reference data currently available for forensic comparisons. PMID:19414160

  2. Evaluation of Chinese population control in the past decade and the countermeasures in the future.

    PubMed

    Wei, J

    1989-01-01

    This commentary is a preliminary review of Chinese population control between 1978-88 and future choices. There is discussion of new problems in population control, new experiments in population control, and the beneficial impact of population control. Control of the population was more effective from 1979 to the present than from 1973-1978. Figures reflect the patterns of age of 1st marriage, marriage rate, fertility rate, single child rate, birth rate, and natural growth rate. Problems are identified as the increase in rural household size and the failures of rural economic reform which stressed responsibility. Age structure also has had an effect. Rural households have changed so that increases have occurred and weakened the population control system. Discussion proceeds with some detail on the changes in household needs, changes that correspond to household size, and the weakening of the population control system. New experiments in population control have occurred in the responsibility systems, through the combination of a strict strategy and flexible tactics, and with the establishment of an extensive network of family planning (FP) departments, which have received increased funding over the years. There has been a strategy of combining and coordinating birth control practice, publicity, and education. Publicity has consisted of both information stressing the necessity of FP and government policies, and knowledge about population theories and birth control. FP techniques are used as appropriate to specific populations; i.e., married, unmarried, newly married, pregnant, or those having recently conceived. Publicity and education are combined with birth control services. Publicity and education also are integrated with the establishment of socialist values. 4 variables that determine the fertility rate have been identified: bachelorhood or spinsterhood, contraception, abortion, and breastfeeding and sterility. These have contributed to the drop in fertility to

  3. Lifelong vegetarianism and risk of breast cancer: a population-based case-control study among South Asian migrant women living in England.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Mangtani, Punam; McCormack, Valerie; Bhakta, Dee; Sevak, Leena; McMichael, Anthony J

    2002-05-10

    To investigate the role of lifelong vegetarianism on the aetiology of female breast cancer, we conducted a population-based case-control study among South Asian migrant women from the Indian subcontinent resident in England. A total of 240 South Asian breast cancer cases were identified from 2 cancer registries during 1995-1999. For each case, 2 age-matched South Asian controls were randomly selected from the age-sex register of the case practice. Lifelong vegetarians had a slight reduction, although not statistically significant, in the odds of breast cancer relative to lifelong meat-eaters, which persisted after adjustment for socio-demographic and reproductive variables [odds ratio (OR)=0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.50-1.18]. Analysis by food group revealed no linear trend in the odds of breast cancer with increasing consumption of meat (p=0.10) but the odds were higher for women in the top 75%. In contrast, there were strong inverse trends in the odds of breast cancer with increasing intake of vegetables (p=0.005), pulses (p=0.007) and fibre [non-starch polysaccharides, NSP (p=0.02)], with women in the highest 25% of intake of these foods having about 50% of the odds of those in the lowest ones. Adjustment for intake of vegetables and pulses reverted the odds of breast cancer in lifelong vegetarians relative to lifelong meat-eaters (OR=1.04; 95% CI=0.65-1.68) and attenuated the quartile-specific estimates for meat intake, whereas the inverse trends in the odds of breast cancer with intake of vegetables and pulses remained after adjustment for type of diet or meat intake. These findings suggest that lifelong vegetarianism may be associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer through its association with a higher intake of vegetables and pulses. Although it is not possible to exclude the possibility that lifelong meat abstention may also play a role, the findings provide evidence that a diet rich in vegetables and pulses, such as those typically

  4. A review of perioperative glucose control in the neurosurgical population.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Joshua H; Smith, David S

    2009-11-01

    Significant fluctuations in serum glucose levels accompany the stress response of surgery or acute injury and may be associated with vascular or neurologic morbidity. Maintenance of euglycemia with intensive insulin therapy (IIT) continues to be investigated as a therapeutic intervention to decrease morbidity associated with derangements in glucose metabolism. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of IIT with potential for significant morbidity, especially in the neurologically injured patient. Differences in cerebral versus systemic glucose metabolism, the time course of cerebral response to injury, and heterogeneity of pathophysiology in neurosurgical patient populations are important to consider in evaluating the risks and benefits of IIT. While extremes of glucose levels are to be avoided, there are little data to support specific use of IIT for maintenance of euglycemia in the perioperative management of neurosurgical patients. Existing data are summarized and reviewed in this context. PMID:20144389

  5. Hydrological Controls on Water Chemistry that Supports Freshwater Mussel Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestegaard, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Native freshwater mussel species ranges and population sizes have been declining throughout N. America. Due to their sedentary nature, adult mussels are vulnerable to both local habitat changes (often associated with land-use changes, contaminants, and biological invaders) and to climate changes that can alter river flow regimes, bed stability, and water chemistry. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between water chemistry and hydrological events in rivers that support native mussel populations. USGS ion concentration and water quality (pH, temperature, conductivity) data were used to calculate saturation indices for aragonite. For some sites, electrical conductivity was highly correlated with calcium and bicarbonate concentrations and could be used to estimate concentrations when ion chemistry was not measured. Continuous water quality data from datasondes could thus be used to evaluate saturation indices for aragonite on a daily basis for 10-15 year periods. For the Delaware River, which has relatively few carbonate rocks in its watershed, tributary aragonite saturation tended to reflect local geological conditions. The lower main stem of the river integrates the water chemistry of the basin and also responds to climatic conditions. The lower Delaware supports aragonite precipitation approximately 50 days per year, with considerable inter-annual variability. During most years, aragonite precipitation could occur during both the spring and late summer periods, but years with heavy spring rains rather than snowmelt shifts aragonite precipitation to late summer periods. In 2011 when several major tropical storms hit the Delaware basin, streamflow was too dilute for aragonite precipitation for most of the summer period. These data suggest that hydrological changes associated with climatic changes may influence the water chemistry and affect the suitability of some rivers as mussel habitat.

  6. Economic benefit of fertility control in wild horse populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.

    2007-01-01

    I projected costs for several contraceptive treatments that could be used by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to manage 4 wild horse (Equus caballus) populations. Potential management alternatives included existing roundup and selective removal methods combined with contraceptives of different duration and effectiveness. I projected costs for a 20-year economic life using the WinEquus?? wild horse population model and state-by-state cost estimates reflecting BLM's operational expenses. Findings revealed that 1) currently available 2-year contraceptives in most situations are capable of reducing variable operating costs by 15%, 2) experimental 3-year contraceptives may be capable of reducing costs by 18%, and 3) combining contraceptives with modest changes to herd sex ratio (e.g., 55-60% M) could trim costs by 30%. Predicted savings can increase when contraception is applied in conjunction with a removal policy that targets horses aged 0-4 years instead of 0-5 years. However, reductions in herd size result in greater variation in annual operating expenses. Because the horse program's variable operating costs make up about half of the total program costs (which include other fixed costs), contraceptive application and management can only reduce total costs by 14%, saving about $6.1 million per year. None of the contraceptive options I examined eliminated the need for long-term holding facilities over the 20-year period simulated, but the number of horses held may be reduced by about 17% with contraceptive treatment. Cost estimates were most sensitive to the oldest age adoptable and per-day holding costs. The BLM will experience significant cost savings as carefully designed contraceptive programs become widespread in the wild horse herds it manages.

  7. Control of pestivirus infections in the management of wildlife populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lack of host-specificity allow pestiviruses to infect domestic livestock as well as captive and free-ranging wildlife, posing unique challenges to different stakeholders. While current control measures for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are focused only on cattle, increased attention on the ...

  8. Size and demography pattern of the domestic dog population in Bhutan: Implications for dog population management and disease control.

    PubMed

    Rinzin, Karma; Tenzin, Tenzin; Robertson, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the demography of domestic dogs is essential to plan the dog population management and rabies control program. In this study, we estimated the owned and stray dog population and the proportion of owned dogs that are free-roaming in Bhutan. For this, a cross-sectional household surveys were conducted in six districts (both urban and rural areas) and two border towns in southern Bhutan. The population estimation was done by extrapolation of the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person, whilst mark-resight survey was conducted to estimate the proportion of owned dogs that were free-roaming. A total of 1,301 (rural:585; urban:716) respondents (one per household) were interviewed of which 173 households (24.4%) in urban areas owned 237 dogs whilst 238 households (40.8%) in rural areas owned 353 dogs. The mean number of dogs per dog owning household was estimated to be 1.44 (urban:1.37 dogs; rural:1.48 dogs) and dogs per household was estimated to be 0.45 (urban:0.33; rural:0.60). The dog: human ratio was 1:16.30 (0.06 dogs per person) in urban areas and 1:8.43 (0.12 dogs per person) in rural areas. The total owned dog population based on the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person were estimated to be 65,312 and 71,245 in the country, respectively. The male: female ratio of the owned dog was 1.31:1 in urban areas and 2.05:1 in rural areas. Majority of the dogs were local non-descript breeds in both urban (60.8%) and rural (78%) areas, and the most common source was acquisition from friends or family (44.7%). The stray dog population in Bhutan was estimated to be 48,379 (urban:22,772; rural:25,607). Of the total estimated owned dog population in the two border towns, the proportion that were found free-roaming was estimated to be 31%. The different dog population estimation methods were compared and discussed in this paper. This study generated baseline data on the demographic patterns of the owned and stray dogs in Bhutan which

  9. Biomineralization control related to population density under ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Goffredo, Stefano; Prada, Fiorella; Caroselli, Erik; Capaccioni, Bruno; Zaccanti, Francesco; Pasquini, Luca; Fantazzini, Paola; Fermani, Simona; Reggi, Michela; Levy, Oren; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is a major driver of current environmental change in most ecosystems1, and the related ocean acidification (OA) is threatening marine biota2. With increasing pCO2, calcification rates of several species decrease3, although cases of up-regulation are observed4. Here, we show that biological control over mineralization relates to species abundance along a natural pH gradient. As pCO2 increased, the mineralogy of a scleractinian coral (Balanophyllia europaea) and a mollusc (Vermetus triqueter) did not change. In contrast, two calcifying algae (Padina pavonica and Acetabularia acetabulum) reduced and changed mineralization with increasing pCO2, from aragonite to the less soluble calcium sulphates and whewellite, respectively. As pCO2 increased, the coral and mollusc abundance was severely reduced, with both species disappearing at pH < 7.8. Conversely, the two calcifying and a non-calcifying algae (Lobophora variegata) showed less severe or no reductions with increasing pCO2, and were all found at the lowest pH site. The mineralization response to decreasing pH suggests a link with the degree of control over the biomineralization process by the organism, as only species with lower control managed to thrive in the lowest pH. PMID:25071869

  10. Biomineralization control related to population density under ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Stefano; Prada, Fiorella; Caroselli, Erik; Capaccioni, Bruno; Zaccanti, Francesco; Pasquini, Luca; Fantazzini, Paola; Fermani, Simona; Reggi, Michela; Levy, Oren; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is a major driver of present environmental change in most ecosystems, and the related ocean acidification is threatening marine biota. With increasing pCO2, calcification rates of several species decrease, although cases of upregulation are observed. Here, we show that biological control over mineralization relates to species abundance along a natural pH gradient. As pCO2 increased, the mineralogy of a scleractinian coral (Balanophyllia europaea) and a mollusc (Vermetus triqueter) did not change. In contrast, two calcifying algae (Padina pavonica and Acetabularia acetabulum) reduced and changed mineralization with increasing pCO2, from aragonite to the less soluble calcium sulphates and whewellite, respectively. As pCO2 increased, the coral and mollusc abundance was severely reduced, with both species disappearing at pH < 7.8. Conversely, the two calcifying and a non-calcifying algae (Lobophora variegata) showed less severe or no reductions with increasing pCO2, and were all found at the lowest pH site. The mineralization response to decreasing pH suggests a link with the degree of control over the biomineralization process by the organism, as only species with lower control managed to thrive in the lowest pH.

  11. Biomineralization control related to population density under ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Stefano; Prada, Fiorella; Caroselli, Erik; Capaccioni, Bruno; Zaccanti, Francesco; Pasquini, Luca; Fantazzini, Paola; Fermani, Simona; Reggi, Michela; Levy, Oren; Fabricius, Katharina E; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is a major driver of current environmental change in most ecosystems(1), and the related ocean acidification (OA) is threatening marine biota(2). With increasing pCO2, calcification rates of several species decrease(3), although cases of up-regulation are observed(4). Here, we show that biological control over mineralization relates to species abundance along a natural pH gradient. As pCO2 increased, the mineralogy of a scleractinian coral (Balanophyllia europaea) and a mollusc (Vermetus triqueter) did not change. In contrast, two calcifying algae (Padina pavonica and Acetabularia acetabulum) reduced and changed mineralization with increasing pCO2, from aragonite to the less soluble calcium sulphates and whewellite, respectively. As pCO2 increased, the coral and mollusc abundance was severely reduced, with both species disappearing at pH < 7.8. Conversely, the two calcifying and a non-calcifying algae (Lobophora variegata) showed less severe or no reductions with increasing pCO2, and were all found at the lowest pH site. The mineralization response to decreasing pH suggests a link with the degree of control over the biomineralization process by the organism, as only species with lower control managed to thrive in the lowest pH. PMID:25071869

  12. Randomized-Control Screening Trials to Lower Gall Bladder Cancer Mortality in High Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer is generally fatal. The high morbidity and mortality due to gall bladder cancer exerts a significant impact on efforts towards cancer control in high risk populations of the World and a rationale program for control of gall bladder cancer mortality has remained as an unmet need in these populations. Currently there are no effective strategies for controlling gall bladder cancer mortality. This mini review is to highlight the need and feasibility for secondary prevention of gall bladder cancer by screening in high risk populations. A way forward is to assess the role of secondary prevention of gall bladder cancers by conducting randomized- controlled screening trials in high risk populations. PMID:27221939

  13. Control and management of insect populations by chemosterilants.

    PubMed Central

    Borkovec, A B

    1976-01-01

    Chemosterilants, i.e., chemical compounds that interfere with the reproduction potential of sexually reproducing organisms, can be used in three new approaches to insect control. In the sterile-insect release technique, the principal problem is to develop compounds and methods for their application that would not result in introducing harmful residues into the environment. Because of the unusual and often unique circumstances connected with releasing large numbers of sterilized insects, the residue problem and its cost-benefit aspects must be examined individually for each intended control or eradication program. In the direct application technique, chemosterilants must meet the same efficiency and safety standards required from approved insecticides. Combined insecticidal and sterilizing activity is characteristic for some compounds now being investigated. In the genetic technique, chemosterilants may be used for inducing heritable changes in the insect's genome under laboratory conditions, and such procedures would not present any residue problems. Only the first two chemosterilant techniques are approaching practical application, and their safety aspects require detailed evaluation and assessment. PMID:789057

  14. Assessing pest control using changes in instantaneous rate of population increase: treated targets and stable fly populations case study.

    PubMed

    Beresford, D V; Sutcliffe, J F

    2010-06-01

    The instantaneous rate of population increase was used to assess the ability of attractive targets coated with permethrin to control stable fly populations on 3 dairy farms in south central Ontario, Canada. Two attractive targets were deployed over 10 wk in 2001 at each of 6 dairy farms. Three farms were outfitted with 2 untreated targets and 3 were outfitted with 2 targets treated with permethrin [Ectiban-impregnated Coroplast (Ectiban: Schering-Plough Canada Inc., Pointe-Claire, Québec, Canada; Coroplast: Great Pacific Enterprises Inc., Granby, Québec, Canada)]. Population growth rate was measured in terms of degree-days above a 10 degrees C developmental threshold (r(DD10)). The r(DD10) at the 3 treated dairy farms were significantly lower than r(DD10) at the 3 neighboring untreated dairy farms (mean r(DD10): treated=0.0088, untreated=0.013), but not in the previous year when targets were not installed (mean r(DD10): treated=0.012, untreated=0.015). This supports a long-term approach to management that lowers population growth rates in those regions where stable fly numbers increase exponentially from spring until winter, by shortening the period of economic impact of this pest. PMID:20494159

  15. Migratory bird hunter opinions regarding potential management strategies for controlling light goose populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinges, Andrew J.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Nilon, Charles H.; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A.

    2014-01-01

    We expanded the Nebraska Light Goose Conservation Order (LGCO) harvest survey (NE, USA) in spring 2012 to assess migratory bird hunter opinions regarding future management strategies for controlling light goose populations. Although hunters strongly agreed that population control of light geese was an important wildlife management issue, they were generally unsupportive of wildlife officials using forms of direct control methods to control light goose populations. Respondents who indicated participation in the 2012 LGCO were also less supportive of any form of direct control compared with migratory bird hunters who did not participate in the LGCO. When presented with alternative methods by wildlife officials for future light goose population control, respondents were most supportive of wildlife agencies selectively shooting light geese on migration and wintering areas and least supportive of wildlife officials using bait with approved chemicals to euthanize light geese. A clear understanding of public perception of various potential direct-control options will likely assist wildlife biologists in making informed decisions on how to proceed with population control of light geese.

  16. CORE-OM Mental Health Norms of Students Attending University Counselling Services Benchmarked against an Age-Matched Primary Care Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Janice; Barkham, Michael; Mellor-Clark, John

    2007-01-01

    Whilst concern has been expressed at the increasing severity of the mental health of students, there has been very little research on this growing population outside of small, single institution studies. The aims of this paper are to provide CORE Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) norms for the psychological health of students across multiple sites…

  17. Toxoplasmosis gondii and schizophrenia: a case control study in a low Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence Mexican population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are conflicting reports concerning the association of T. gondii infection and schizophrenia. Therefore, we determined such association in a Mexican population of Mestizo ethnicity. Through a case-control study design, 50 schizophrenic patients and 150 control subjects matched by gender, age, r...

  18. The use and manipulation of insect reproductive molecules for controlling insect populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use and manipulation of insect reproductive molecules, and the genes that encode them, provides a variety of methods to control insect fertility and thus a means of population control for insect pests. Towards this end, we first studied the yolk polypeptide gene from the caribfly, Anastrepha su...

  19. Unraveling the Limits of Mitochondrial Control Region to Estimate the Fine Scale Population Genetic Differentiation in Anadromous Fish Tenualosa ilisha

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rashmi; Singh, Mahender; Kumar, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial control region has been the first choice for examining the population structure but hypervariability and homoplasy have reduced its suitability. We analysed eight populations using control region for examining the population structure of Hilsa. Although the control region analysis revealed broad structuring between the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (FST  0.0441, p < 0.001) it was unable to detect structure among riverine populations. These results suggest that the markers used must be able to distinguish populations and control region has led to an underestimation of genetic differentiation among populations of Hilsa. PMID:27313951

  20. Unraveling the Limits of Mitochondrial Control Region to Estimate the Fine Scale Population Genetic Differentiation in Anadromous Fish Tenualosa ilisha.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rashmi; Singh, Mahender; Kumar, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial control region has been the first choice for examining the population structure but hypervariability and homoplasy have reduced its suitability. We analysed eight populations using control region for examining the population structure of Hilsa. Although the control region analysis revealed broad structuring between the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (F ST  0.0441, p < 0.001) it was unable to detect structure among riverine populations. These results suggest that the markers used must be able to distinguish populations and control region has led to an underestimation of genetic differentiation among populations of Hilsa. PMID:27313951

  1. Control of rare events in reaction and population systems by deterministically imposed transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasin, M.; Dykman, M. I.

    2011-03-01

    We consider control of reaction and population systems by imposing transitions between states with different numbers of particles or individuals. The transitions take place at predetermined instants of time. Even where they are significantly less frequent than spontaneous transitions, they can exponentially strongly modify the rates of rare events, including switching between metastable states or population extinction. We also study optimal control of rare events. Specifically, we are interested in the optimal control of disease extinction for a limited vaccine supply. A comparison is made with control of rare events by modulating the rates of elementary transitions rather than imposing transitions deterministically. It is found that, unexpectedly, for the same mean control parameters, controlling the transitions rates can be more efficient.

  2. The biology of small, introduced populations, with special reference to biological control

    PubMed Central

    Fauvergue, Xavier; Vercken, Elodie; Malausa, Thibaut; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2012-01-01

    Populations are introduced into novel environments in different contexts, one being the biological control of pests. Despite intense efforts, less than half introduced biological control agents establish. Among the possible approaches to improve biological control, one is to better understand the processes that underpin introductions and contribute to ecological and evolutionary success. In this perspective, we first review the demographic and genetic processes at play in small populations, be they stochastic or deterministic. We discuss the theoretical outcomes of these different processes with respect to individual fitness, population growth rate, and establishment probability. Predicted outcomes differ subtly in some cases, but enough so that the evaluating results of introductions have the potential to reveal which processes play important roles in introduced populations. Second, we attempt to link the theory we have discussed with empirical data from biological control introductions. A main result is that there are few available data, but we nonetheless report on an increasing number of well-designed, theory-driven, experimental approaches. Combining demography and genetics from both theoretical and empirical perspectives highlights novel and exciting avenues for research on the biology of small, introduced populations, and great potential for improving both our understanding and practice of biological control. PMID:22949919

  3. Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility as a means for insect pest population control

    PubMed Central

    Zabalou, Sofia; Riegler, Markus; Theodorakopoulou, Marianna; Stauffer, Christian; Savakis, Charalambos; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2004-01-01

    Biological control is the purposeful introduction of parasites, predators, and pathogens to reduce or suppress pest populations. Wolbachia are inherited bacteria of arthropods that have recently attracted attention for their potential as new biocontrol agents. Wolbachia manipulate host reproduction by using several strategies, one of which is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) [Stouthamer, R., Breeuwer, J. A. J. & Hurst, G. D. D. (1999) Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 53, 71–102]. We established Wolbachia-infected lines of the medfly Ceratitis capitata using the infected cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi as donor. Wolbachia induced complete CI in the novel host. Laboratory cage populations were completely suppressed by single releases of infected males, suggesting that Wolbachia-induced CI could be used as a novel environmentally friendly tool for the control of medfly populations. The results also encourage the introduction of Wolbachia into pest and vector species of economic and hygenic relevance to suppress or modify natural populations. PMID:15469918

  4. Avoiding Extinction in a Managed Single Species Population Model by Means of Anticipative Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Mark E.

    2006-06-01

    Population models with a high intrinsic growth rate that are subject to an Allee effect are known to exhibit chaotic transients which end in a population collapse and consequent extinction. In a managed environment, it might be possible to anticipate this event and affect the outcome by a carefully designed strategy. In this paper, the dynamics of a managed single species are modelled using an Anticipatory System and possible control strategies resulting from this are analysed and evaluated.

  5. Population ecology of feral horses in an era of fertility control management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    Management of wildlife often requires intervention to regulate growth of populations that would otherwise become overabundant. Controlling fecundity using contraceptives has become an increasingly popular tool for attempting to manage locally overabundant wildlife species, but the population-level effects of such applications are largely unknown. Contraceptive treatments can produce unexpected feedbacks that act on births, survival, immigration, and emigration. Such feedbacks may considerably influence our ability to regulate populations using fertility control. I followed feral horses (Equus caballus) in three intensively managed populations to assess longitudinal treatment effects on demography. The transient contraceptive porcine zona pellucida (PZP) produced longer duration of infertility than intended. Repeated PZP vaccinations of females extended the duration of infertility far beyond the targeted management period, with time to first post-treatment parturition increasing 411days for every annual inoculation received. When these animals did conceive and give birth, parturition was later in the year and temporally asynchronous with forage abundance. An average of 30% (range=11–77%) of females were contracepted annually during the treatment period in all three populations and apparent annual population growth rate was 4–9% lower in the post-treatment years as compared to pretreatment years. Population growth was positive, however, and increased steadily every year that a management removal did not occur. The observed number of births was 33% fewer than the expected number of births, based on number of treated females, individual efficacy of treatment, and number of untreated females and their age-specific fecundity rates. Only half of this difference was explained by the apparent residual effect of treatment. Birth rate in the youngest untreated females (age 2–5 years old) was reduced in years when their conspecifics were treated, enhancing the effects of

  6. Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction.

    PubMed

    Morters, Michelle K; Restif, Olivier; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Wood, James L N; Conlan, Andrew J K

    2013-01-01

    Control measures for canine rabies include vaccination and reducing population density through culling or sterilization. Despite the evidence that culling fails to control canine rabies, efforts to reduce canine population density continue in many parts of the world. The rationale for reducing population density is that rabies transmission is density-dependent, with disease incidence increasing directly with host density. This may be based, in part, on an incomplete interpretation of historical field data for wildlife, with important implications for disease control in dog populations. Here, we examine historical and more recent field data, in the context of host ecology and epidemic theory, to understand better the role of density in rabies transmission and the reasons why culling fails to control rabies. We conclude that the relationship between host density, disease incidence and other factors is complex and may differ between species. This highlights the difficulties of interpreting field data and the constraints of extrapolations between species, particularly in terms of control policies. We also propose that the complex interactions between dogs and people may render culling of free-roaming dogs ineffective irrespective of the relationship between host density and disease incidence. We conclude that vaccination is the most effective means to control rabies in all species. PMID:23004351

  7. Controlling populations of invasive pygmy mussel (Xenostrobus securis) through citizen science and environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Laura; Dopico, Eduardo; Devlo-Delva, Floriaan; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-09-15

    Early detection of dangerous exotic species is crucial for stopping marine invasions. The New Zealand pygmy mussel Xenostrobus securis is a problematic species in coasts of temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. In this study we have controlled a population of this invader that recently expanded in a north Iberian estuary with both a participatory approach involving researchers and citizens, and employing a sensitive eDNA-based tool to monitor the population expansion in the estuary. Results demonstrate successful eradication of pygmy mussels in the outer part of the estuary with citizen science and the practical utility of eDNA for controlling biological invasions. PMID:27381987

  8. Population and forensic genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA control region variation from six major provinces in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Beom; Kim, Ki Cheol; Kim, Wook

    2015-07-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 704 unrelated individuals residing in six major provinces in Korea. In addition to our earlier survey of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup variation, a total of 560 different haplotypes characterized by 271 polymorphic sites were identified, of which 473 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity and random match probability were 0.9989 and 0.0025, respectively. According to the pairwise comparison of the 704 control region sequences, the mean number of pairwise differences between individuals was 13.47±6.06. Based on the result of mtDNA control region sequences, pairwise FST genetic distances revealed genetic homogeneity of the Korean provinces on a peninsular level, except in samples from Jeju Island. This result indicates there may be a need to formulate a local mtDNA database for Jeju Island, to avoid bias in forensic parameter estimates caused by genetic heterogeneity of the population. Thus, the present data may help not only in personal identification but also in determining maternal lineages to provide an expanded and reliable Korean mtDNA database. These data will be available on the EMPOP database via accession number EMP00661. PMID:25900647

  9. Duodeno-Gastric-Esophageal Reflux—What is Pathologic? Comparison of Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus and Age-Matched Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgarten, Eva; Pütz, Benito; Hölscher, Arnulf H.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to analyse pH- and bile-monitoring data in patients with Barrett’s esophagus and in age- and gender-matched controls. Subjects and Methods Twenty-four consecutive Barrett’s patients (8 females, 16 males, mean age 57 years), 21 patients with esophagitis (10 females, 11 males, mean age 58 years), and 19 healthy controls (8 females, 11 males, mean age 51 years), were included. Only patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy. All groups were investigated with manometry, gastric and esophageal 24-h pH, and simultaneous bile monitoring according to a standardized protocol. A bilirubin absorption >0.25 was determined as noxious bile reflux. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) method was applied to determine the optimal cutoff value of pathologic bilirubin levels. Results Of Barrett’s patients, 79% had pathologic acidic gastric reflux (pH<4 >5% of total measuring time). However, 32% of healthy controls also had acid reflux (p < 0.05) without any symptoms. The median of esophageal bile reflux was 7.8% (lower quartile (LQ)–upper quartile (UQ) = 1.6–17.8%) in Barrett’s patients, in patients with esophagitis, 3.5% (LQ–UQ = 0.1–13.5), and in contrast to 0% (LQ–UQ = 0–1.0%) in controls, p = 0.001. ROC analysis showed the optimal dividing value for patients at more than 1% bile reflux over 24 h (75% sensitivity, 84% specificity). Conclusion An optimal threshold to differentiate between normal and pathological bile reflux into the esophagus is 1% (24-h bile monitoring with an absorbance >0.25). PMID:17436133

  10. Elevated, specific temporal lobe signs in a population engaged in psychic studies.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; Fisher, S D

    1990-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a special population of people who maintain exotic beliefs and report frequent subjective psi experiences should display more frequent temporal lobe signs and symptoms. Clusters of items, that reflect various temporal lobe factors for 20 women who were actively (greater than 1 year) involved with a local psychic and spiritual development group, were compared to items for an age-matched reference group (n = 61). T-scores for the reference group did not differ from those of the normal population. Whereas the psychic group did not differ from the reference group on various control and psychiatric measures, mean T-scores on clusters that infer complex partial epileptic signs (specifically a sense of presence, olfactory experiences, and intense meaning) ranged between 65 and 70. Group affiliation explained 22 to 50% of the variance for each of these variables; with discriminant analysis, they correctly classified 95% of both groups of participants. PMID:2293183

  11. History of the Athens Canadian Random Bred and the Athens Random Bred control populations.

    PubMed

    Collins, K E; Marks, H L; Aggrey, S E; Lacy, M P; Wilson, J L

    2016-05-01

    The University of Georgia maintains two meat-type chicken control strains: the Athens Random Bred (ARB) and the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB). The Athens Random Bred was developed from colored plumage commercial meat chicken strains in 1956. The ACRB is a replicate population of the Ottawa Meat Control strain which was developed in 1955 from white plumage commercial meat-type chickens. These genetic lines have been extremely valuable research resources and have been used extensively to provide comparative context to modern meat-type strains. The ACRB may be the oldest pedigreed control commercial meat-type chicken still in existence today. This paper reviews the history of the breed backgrounds for both control populations and reviews research utilizing the ACRB. PMID:26976904

  12. A functional HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism is associated with breast cancer susceptibility and poor clinicopathological characteristics in a Turkish population: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Süleyman; Sümbül, Ahmet Taner; Dadaş, Erdoğan

    2016-04-01

    Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), is pervasively overexpressed and correlated with tumor invasion, progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis in various human cancers including breast cancer (BC) that plays a role as an oncogenic molecule. A common functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs12826786 C>T) at the HOTAIR promoter has been reported to influence HOTAIR expression and gastric adenocarcinoma susceptibility, but relation of HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism with BC susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics has yet to be reported. To explore the association of the HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism with the risk of BC in a Turkish population, a hospital-based case-control study was carried out consisting of 123 BC patients and 122 age-matched healthy controls. HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using TaqMan assay. We found that women carrying TT genotype of HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism had an increased risk of developing BC in both codominant (odds ratio (OR) = 2.24, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.05-4.81, P = 0.02) and recessive (OR = 2.49, 95 % CI 1.25-4.97, P = 0.008) inheritance models. Moreover, TT genotype of HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism was significantly related with multiple clinicopathological characteristics concerned with worse BC progression such as advanced TNM stage (III and IV), larger tumor size (T3 and T4), and distant metastasis (M1), as well as poor histological grade (III) (P < 0.05). Because of our results put forward for the first time that TT genotype of HOTAIR rs12826786 C>T polymorphism might play crucial roles in genetic susceptibility and poor prognosis for BC in Turkish population, further independent studies are needed to confirm our results in a larger series, as well as in patients of distinct populations. PMID:26577852

  13. International Funding for Malaria Control in Relation to Populations at Risk of Stable Plasmodium falciparum Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Robert W; Guerra, Carlos A; Mutheu, Juliette J; Hay, Simon I

    2008-01-01

    Background The international financing of malaria control has increased significantly in the last ten years in parallel with calls to halve the malaria burden by the year 2015. The allocation of funds to countries should reflect the size of the populations at risk of infection, disease, and death. To examine this relationship, we compare an audit of international commitments with an objective assessment of national need: the population at risk of stable Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in 2007. Methods and Findings The national distributions of populations at risk of stable P. falciparum transmission were projected to the year 2007 for each of 87 P. falciparum–endemic countries. Systematic online- and literature-based searches were conducted to audit the international funding commitments made for malaria control by major donors between 2002 and 2007. These figures were used to generate annual malaria funding allocation (in US dollars) per capita population at risk of stable P. falciparum in 2007. Almost US$1 billion are distributed each year to the 1.4 billion people exposed to stable P. falciparum malaria risk. This is less than US$1 per person at risk per year. Forty percent of this total comes from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Substantial regional and national variations in disbursements exist. While the distribution of funds is found to be broadly appropriate, specific high population density countries receive disproportionately less support to scale up malaria control. Additionally, an inadequacy of current financial commitments by the international community was found: under-funding could be from 50% to 450%, depending on which global assessment of the cost required to scale up malaria control is adopted. Conclusions Without further increases in funding and appropriate targeting of global malaria control investment it is unlikely that international goals to halve disease burdens by 2015 will be achieved. Moreover, the

  14. Modelling targets for anticancer drug control optimization in physiologically structured cell population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Perthame, Benoît

    2012-09-01

    The main two pitfalls of therapeutics in clinical oncology, that limit increasing drug doses, are unwanted toxic side effects on healthy cell populations and occurrence of resistance to drugs in cancer cell populations. Depending on the constraint considered in the control problem at stake, toxicity or drug resistance, we present two different ways to model the evolution of proliferating cell populations, healthy and cancer, under the control of anti-cancer drugs. In the first case, we use a McKendrick age-structured model of the cell cycle, whereas in the second case, we use a model of evolutionary dynamics, physiologically structured according to a continuous phenotype standing for drug resistance. In both cases, we mention how drug targets may be chosen so as to accurately represent the effects of cytotoxic and of cytostatic drugs, separately, and how one may consider the problem of optimisation of combined therapies.

  15. Constrained control landscape for population transfer in a two-level system.

    PubMed

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-02-01

    The growing success of controlling the dynamics of quantum systems has been ascribed to the favorable topology of the quantum control landscape, which represents the physical observable as a function of the control field. The landscape contains no suboptimal trapping extrema when reasonable physical assumptions are satisfied, including that no significant constraints are placed on the control resources. A topic of prime interest is understanding the effects of control field constraints on the apparent landscape topology, as constraints on control resources are inevitable in the laboratory. This work particularly explores the effects of constraining the control field fluence on the topology and features of the control landscape for pure-state population transfer in a two-level system through numerical simulations, where unit probability population transfer in the system is only accessible in the strong coupling regime within the model explored here. With the fluence and three phase variables used for optimization, no local optima are found on the landscape, although saddle features are widespread at low fluence values. Global landscape optima are found to exist at two disconnected regions of the fluence that possess distinct topologies and structures. Broad scale connected optimal level sets are found when the fluence is sufficiently large, while the connectivity is reduced as the fluence becomes more constrained. These results suggest that seeking optimal fields with constrained fluence or other resources may encounter complex landscape features, calling for sophisticated algorithms that can efficiently find optimal controls. PMID:25515970

  16. Y-Linked markers for improved population control of the tephritid fruit fly pest, Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect pest control programs incorporating the sterile insect technique (SIT) rely on the mass production and release of sterilized insects to reduce the wild-type population through infertile matings. Most effective programs release only males to avoid any crop damage caused by female fruit flies o...

  17. Compensatory mechanisms in Great Lakes sea lamprey populations: implications for alternative control strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Michael L.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Twohey, Michael B.; Fodale, Michael F.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Slade, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    Compensatory mechanisms are demographic processes that tend to increase population growth rates at lower population density. These processes will tend to reduce the effectiveness of actions that use controls on reproductive success to suppress sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an economically important pest in the Great Lakes. Historical evidence for compensatory mechanisms in sea lamprey populations was reviewed, and revealed: (1) strong evidence for shifts in sex ratios as sea lamprey abundance was reduced in the early years of the control program; (2) weak and equivocal evidence for increased growth rates of sea lamprey cohorts re-colonizing streams following a lampricide treatment; and (3) suggestions of other compensatory processes, such as earlier ages at metamorphosis, but with little empirical evidence. Larval size distribution data for cohorts in the first and second years following a lampricide treatment (26 pairs of cohorts in 20 streams) was analyzed and did not indicate a consistent pattern of more rapid growth of the first colonizing cohort (only 11 of 33 cases). To test for compensation between spawning and age-1 in sea lamprey populations, data were analyzed for 49 stream-years for which spawning female abundance was known and age-1 abundance was estimated in the following year. A fit of these data to a Ricker stock-recruitment function showed evidence for compensation, measured as reduced survival to age 1 at higher abundance of spawning females. More obvious, however, was a large amount of density-independent variation in survival, which tends to mask evidence for compensatory survival. The results were applied to a simple model that simulates sea lamprey populations and their control in a hypothetical lake. Control strategies that targeted reproductive success performed far less well than comparable strategies that targeted larval populations, because density-independent recruitment variation leads to occasional strong year classes even when

  18. Control of mushroom sciarid fly Lycoriella ingenua populations with insect growth regulators applied by soil drench.

    PubMed

    Erler, F; Polat, E; Demir, H; Catal, M; Tuna, G

    2011-06-01

    Mushroom sciarid fly Lycoriella ingenua (Dufour, 1839) comb. nov., is one of the most common fly pests affecting the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach in Turkey. In this study, eight insect growth regulators (IGRs)--diflubenzuron, flufenoxuron, lufenuron, methoprene, novaluron, pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, and triflumuron-were tested for their potential to control L. ingenua populations in two successive growing periods. Treatments were targeted at larvae as soil drenches; treatment efficacy was evaluated by assessing adult emergence and larval damage. These products were compared with a control treated with water (negative control) and a conventional chemical insecticide (chlorpyrifos ethyl) (positive control). Treatments with the IGRs caused significant reductions in emerging adult numbers and sporophore damage rates compared with the water-treated control over the two growing periods. Of the IGRs tested, novaluron, diflubenzuron, and teflubenzuron had significantly lower numbers of emerging adults than the rest of the IGRs and chlorpyrifos ethyl-treated control in both periods. Treatments with teflubenzuron, pyriproxyfen, novaluron, and diflubenzuron resulted in significantly lower sporophore damage rates than all other treatments. Compared with negative control, there were no significant yield reductions due to applications of selected IGRs. The results suggest that all the IGRs tested can be used as alternatives to conventional pesticides in controlling L. ingenua populations on mushroom. PMID:21735902

  19. Modeling control of rabies outbreaks in red fox populations to evaluate culling, vaccination, and vaccination combined with fertility control.

    PubMed

    Smith, G C; Wilkinson, D

    2003-04-01

    A predictive model of spread and control of rabies in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations was used to evaluate efficacy of culling, oral vaccination, and oral vaccination and fertility control (V + FC) as rabies control strategies. In addition, effects of season, fox population density, and a delay in starting control were modeled. At fox densities of 0.5 fox families/km2 or greater, a single oral vaccination campaign with bait uptake rates of less than 50% resulted in ineffective rabies control. An uptake rate of at least 80% was required to give a better than 80% chance of eliminating rabies. Vaccination was least effective at controlling rabies if applied 1 or 2 mo before the foxes gave birth. Seasonal timing of poison or V + FC had little effect on efficacy, which was always more successful than the oral vaccination alone. The longer the delay between the simulated start of the rabies infection and the application of a single vaccination campaign, the less successful was the control, particularly at the higher fox densities tested. At a fox density of 0.25 families/km2, all the strategies were equally successful at eliminating rabies. At higher fox densities V + FC was slightly less successful than culling, whereas vaccination-only was considerably less successful. The sole use of vaccination is not considered a viable control method for areas with high fox densities. The model suggests that an area of culling centered on the disease focus, plus an outer ring of vaccine or V + FC, could be the best strategy to control a point-source wildlife rabies outbreak. PMID:12910754

  20. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region and genetic diversity of Moschus berezovskii populations in Shaanxi Province.

    PubMed

    Feng, H; Feng, C L; Huang, Y; Tang, J

    2016-01-01

    In China, Moschus berezovskii (forest musk deer), a first-class national protected animal, was earlier widely distributed. However, wild populations of the forest musk deer have declined because of human activity and habitat loss. In order to gather useful information for its conservation and management, we investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this species by analyzing a 632-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region in three wild populations in Shaanxi Province, China. The average A+T content (64.1%) of mtDNA was higher than that of G+C (35.9%). A total of 178 variable sites (about 28.03% of the total nucleotides in the sequence) were detected in 71 individuals. The nucleotide diversity (PI) in the 71 individuals was 0.04688, and the average nucleotide differences (K) were 21.238. The 71 individuals belonged to 33 haplotypes according to the determined sequences. The average genetic distance (P) among the haplotypes of the species was 0.169. The phylogenetic tree constructed using the neighbor-joining method revealed that these individuals were clustered into three groups, but the individual distribution in those groups was disordered. These data indicated the variation and rich genetic diversity in the three populations of M. berezovskii. Compared to the wild population in Longxian, those in Liuba and Fengxian had a close kinship. The present results indicated no signs of inbreeding or a decline in genetic diversity in the wild M. berezovskii population. PMID:27173215

  1. [A tentative discussion on population control in Hangzhou and direction of its development].

    PubMed

    Gu, Y

    1982-07-29

    Hangzhou is a city noted for its scenic beauty. In recent years, developments in industrial and agricultural production, cultural and educational improvements, and various constructions have made Hangzhou a more modernized city, and its population growth has become more rapid. According to one estimate, the number of childbearing women in 1987 will increase by 61% over the 1978 figure. With the mechanic (mobility) growth rate being higher than the natural growth rate, a large population is moving into Hangzhou each year, and the problem of overpopulation is becoming increasingly serious. The supply of newly built residences cannot match the demand, and the living standard is declining. Cultural and educational establishments, health care, and public facilities are unable to catch up with the speed of the population growth. Problems such as unemployment, traffic congestion, and environmental pollution are becoming more serious. In order to cope with the overall situation, the natural growth rate of the urban population should be controlled, and every married couple should be urged to have only 1 child. Satellite cities should be established and developed to match the city's economic development. Another necessary step is the redistribution of existing factories and industries inside the city and of the city's population so as to reduce pollution and noise. The increased labor population should receive better care in order to increase their productivity. Work in gardening and services should be encouraged in order to ease the pressure of unemployment and increase the tourist income. PMID:12265441

  2. Mitochondrial control region variability in Mytilus galloprovincialis populations from the central-Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Giantsis, Ioannis A; Abatzopoulos, Theodore J; Angelidis, Panagiotis; Apostolidis, Apostolos P

    2014-01-01

    The variable domain 1 (VD1) domain of the control region and a small segment of the rrnaL gene of the F mtDNA type were sequenced and analyzed in 174 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis. Samples were collected from eight locations in four Central-Eastern (CE) Mediterranean countries (Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey). A new primer, specific for the F mtDNA type, was designed for the sequencing procedure. In total 40 different haplotypes were recorded, 24 of which were unique. Aside from the two populations situated in Thermaikos gulf (Northern Aegean, Greece), relatively high levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity were estimated for both Central and Eastern Mediterranean populations. Eight out of the 40 haplotypes were shared by at least three populations while two of them were found in all populations. ΦST and cluster analysis revealed lack of structuring among CE Mediterranean populations with the exception of those located at the Sea of Marmara and Croatian coast which were highly differentiated. Apart from the species' inherit dispersal ability, anthropogenic activities, such as the repeated translocations of mussel spat, seem to have played an important role in shaping the current genetic population structure of CE M. galloprovincialis mussels. PMID:24983478

  3. Mitochondrial Control Region Variability in Mytilus galloprovincialis Populations from the Central-Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Giantsis, Ioannis A.; Abatzopoulos, Theodore J.; Angelidis, Panagiotis; Apostolidis, Apostolos P.

    2014-01-01

    The variable domain 1 (VD1) domain of the control region and a small segment of the rrnaL gene of the F mtDNA type were sequenced and analyzed in 174 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis. Samples were collected from eight locations in four Central-Eastern (CE) Mediterranean countries (Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey). A new primer, specific for the F mtDNA type, was designed for the sequencing procedure. In total 40 different haplotypes were recorded, 24 of which were unique. Aside from the two populations situated in Thermaikos gulf (Northern Aegean, Greece), relatively high levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity were estimated for both Central and Eastern Mediterranean populations. Eight out of the 40 haplotypes were shared by at least three populations while two of them were found in all populations. ΦST and cluster analysis revealed lack of structuring among CE Mediterranean populations with the exception of those located at the Sea of Marmara and Croatian coast which were highly differentiated. Apart from the species’ inherit dispersal ability, anthropogenic activities, such as the repeated translocations of mussel spat, seem to have played an important role in shaping the current genetic population structure of CE M. galloprovincialis mussels. PMID:24983478

  4. Optimal control of the population dynamics of the ground vibrational state of a polyatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E.; Botha, Lourens R.; Rohwer, Erich G.; Uys, Hermann; Du Plessis, Anton

    2011-03-01

    Simulating coherent control with femtosecond pulses on a polyatomic molecule with anharmonic splitting was demonstrated. The simulation mimicked pulse shaping of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and the interaction was described with the Von Neumann equation. A transform limited pulse with a fluence of 600 J/m2 produced 18% of the population in an arbitrarily chosen upper vibrational state, n =2. Phase only and amplitude only shaped pulse produced optimum values of 60% and 40% respectively, of the population in the vibrational state, n=2, after interaction with the ultra short pulse. The combination of phase and amplitude shaping produced the best results, 80% of the population was in the targeted vibrational state, n=2, after interaction. These simulations were carried out with all the population initially in the ground vibrational level. It was found that even at room temperatures (300 Kelvin) that the population in the selected level is comparable with the case where all population is initially in the ground vibrational state. With a 10% noise added to the amplitude and phase masks, selective excitation of the targeted vibrational state is still possible.

  5. Interplay of population genetics and dynamics in the genetic control of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Alphey, Nina; Bonsall, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Some proposed genetics-based vector control methods aim to suppress or eliminate a mosquito population in a similar manner to the sterile insect technique. One approach under development in Anopheles mosquitoes uses homing endonuclease genes (HEGs)—selfish genetic elements (inherited at greater than Mendelian rate) that can spread rapidly through a population even if they reduce fitness. HEGs have potential to drive introduced traits through a population without large-scale sustained releases. The population genetics of HEG-based systems has been established using discrete-time mathematical models. However, several ecologically important aspects remain unexplored. We formulate a new continuous-time (overlapping generations) combined population dynamic and genetic model and apply it to a HEG that targets and knocks out a gene that is important for survival. We explore the effects of density dependence ranging from undercompensating to overcompensating larval competition, occurring before or after HEG fitness effects, and consider differences in competitive effect between genotypes (wild-type, heterozygotes and HEG homozygotes). We show that population outcomes—elimination, suppression or loss of the HEG—depend crucially on the interaction between these ecological aspects and genetics, and explain how the HEG fitness properties, the homing rate (drive) and the insect's life-history parameters influence those outcomes. PMID:24522781

  6. Yanomamo ecology, population control, and their relationship to slash and burn agriculture.

    PubMed

    Owl, M Y

    1976-01-01

    Population control among the Yanomamo tribe of the Amazonian tropical rainforest is studied. 25% of male deaths are due to warfare. A male-female balance is achieved by the practice of infantcide, especially among female infants. The male:female ratio among the under-15 age group is 135:100, belying the tribe's contention that neither sex is more likely to be killed than the other. The major population controlffactor, however, is disease with about 54.2% of adult deaths due to malaria, and other communicable disease accounting for 11.7%. Other population controls are abortion and postnatal sex taboos, although the latter is for the most part overruled by the practice of infanticide for any child born while a previous child is still nursing. The intense intervillage warfare is increased by the shortage of women, resulting from female infanticide combined with polygamy and marriage alliances in which even unborn females are promised. Because there is war, male children are preferred and the cycle continues. Other observers, however, feel that the constant warfare is part of the need for new garden sites brought about by reliance on slash and burn agriculture. The author believes the shortage of women is just a side effect of population control occasioned by a protein shortage. PMID:12334855

  7. Quantum control of dressed state population for Li2 molecules by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Zai, Jing-Bo; Dang, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the Autler-Townes splitting in photoelectron spectra of \\text{L}{{\\text{i}}2} molecules steered by ultrashort laser pulses using the time-dependent wave-packet method. Structure of the Autler-Townes splitting was presented to analyze the information of a selective population of the dressed states. It was found that population transfer process, structure of photoelectron spectrum and pattern of Autler-Townes splitting can be controlled by adjusting the intensity, wavelength and delay time of laser pulses.

  8. Suicide by people in a community justice pathway: population-based nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    King, Carlene; Senior, Jane; Webb, Roger T; Millar, Tim; Piper, Mary; Pearsall, Alison; Humber, Naomi; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2015-08-01

    The elevated risk of suicide in prison and after release is a well-recognised and serious problem. Despite this, evidence concerning community-based offenders' suicide risk is sparse. We conducted a population-based nested case-control study of all people in a community justice pathway in England and Wales. Our data show 13% of general population suicides were in community justice pathways before death. Suicide risks were highest among individuals receiving police cautions, and those having recent, or impending prosecution for sexual offences. Findings have implications for the training and practice of clinicians identifying and assessing suicidality, and offering support to those at elevated risk. PMID:26159602

  9. Utilizing population controls in rare-variant case-parent association tests.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Satten, Glen A; Han, Yujun; Epstein, Michael P; Heinzen, Erin L; Goldstein, David B; Allen, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    There is great interest in detecting associations between human traits and rare genetic variation. To address the low power implicit in single-locus tests of rare genetic variants, many rare-variant association approaches attempt to accumulate information across a gene, often by taking linear combinations of single-locus contributions to a statistic. Using the right linear combination is key-an optimal test will up-weight true causal variants, down-weight neutral variants, and correctly assign the direction of effect for causal variants. Here, we propose a procedure that exploits data from population controls to estimate the linear combination to be used in an case-parent trio rare-variant association test. Specifically, we estimate the linear combination by comparing population control allele frequencies with allele frequencies in the parents of affected offspring. These estimates are then used to construct a rare-variant transmission disequilibrium test (rvTDT) in the case-parent data. Because the rvTDT is conditional on the parents' data, using parental data in estimating the linear combination does not affect the validity or asymptotic distribution of the rvTDT. By using simulation, we show that our new population-control-based rvTDT can dramatically improve power over rvTDTs that do not use population control information across a wide variety of genetic architectures. It also remains valid under population stratification. We apply the approach to a cohort of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) trios and find that dominant (or additive) inherited rare variants are unlikely to play a substantial role within EE genes previously identified through de novo mutation studies. PMID:24836453

  10. Controlling range expansion in habitat networks by adaptively targeting source populations.

    PubMed

    Hock, Karlo; Wolff, Nicholas H; Beeden, Roger; Hoey, Jessica; Condie, Scott A; Anthony, Kenneth R N; Possingham, Hugh P; Mumby, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the spread of invasive species, pests, and pathogens is often logistically limited to interventions that target specific locations at specific periods. However, in complex, highly connected systems, such as marine environments connected by ocean currents, populations spread dynamically in both space and time via transient connectivity links. This results in nondeterministic future distributions of species in which local populations emerge dynamically and concurrently over a large area. The challenge, therefore, is to choose intervention locations that will maximize the effectiveness of the control efforts. We propose a novel method to manage dynamic species invasions and outbreaks that identifies the intervention locations most likely to curtail population expansion by selectively targeting local populations most likely to expand their future range. Critically, at any point during the development of the invasion or outbreak, the method identifies the local intervention that maximizes the long-term benefit across the ecosystem by restricting species' potential to spread. In so doing, the method adaptively selects the intervention targets under dynamically changing circumstances. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method we applied it to controlling the spread of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster sp.) outbreaks across Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Application of our method resulted in an 18-fold relative improvement in management outcomes compared with a random targeting of reefs in putative starfish control scenarios. Although we focused on applying the method to reducing the spread of an unwanted species, it can also be used to facilitate the spread of desirable species through connectivity networks. For example, the method could be used to select those fragments of habitat most likely to rebuild a population if they were sufficiently well protected. PMID:26633077

  11. Reconstructing the history of Mesoamerican populations through the study of the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Gorostiza, Amaya; Acunha-Alonzo, Víctor; Regalado-Liu, Lucía; Tirado, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Sámano, David; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; González-Martín, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The study of genetic information can reveal a reconstruction of human population's history. We sequenced the entire mtDNA control region (positions 16.024 to 576 following Cambridge Reference Sequence, CRS) of 605 individuals from seven Mesoamerican indigenous groups and one Aridoamerican from the Greater Southwest previously defined, all of them in present Mexico. Samples were collected directly from the indigenous populations, the application of an individual survey made it possible to remove related or with other origins samples. Diversity indices and demographic estimates were calculated. Also AMOVAs were calculated according to different criteria. An MDS plot, based on FST distances, was also built. We carried out the construction of individual networks for the four Amerindian haplogroups detected. Finally, barrier software was applied to detect genetic boundaries among populations. The results suggest: a common origin of the indigenous groups; a small degree of European admixture; and inter-ethnic gene flow. The process of Mesoamerica's human settlement took place quickly influenced by the region's orography, which development of genetic and cultural differences facilitated. We find the existence of genetic structure is related to the region's geography, rather than to cultural parameters, such as language. The human population gradually became fragmented, though they remained relatively isolated, and differentiated due to small population sizes and different survival strategies. Genetic differences were detected between Aridoamerica and Mesoamerica, which can be subdivided into "East", "Center", "West" and "Southeast". The fragmentation process occurred mainly during the Mesoamerican Pre-Classic period, with the Otomí being one of the oldest groups. With an increased number of populations studied adding previously published data, there is no change in the conclusions, although significant genetic heterogeneity can be detected in Pima and Huichol groups

  12. Population control of the malaria vector Anopheles pseudopunctipennis by habitat manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. Guillermo; Rojas, Julio C.; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Quiroz-Martínez, Humberto; Valle, Javier; Williams, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases continue to present a major challenge to human health. Understanding the factors that regulate the size of mosquito populations is considered fundamental to the ability to predict disease transmission rates and for vector population control. The mosquito, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, a vector of Plasmodium spp., breeds in riverside pools containing filamentous algae in Mesoamerica. Breeding pools along 3 km sections of the River Coatan, Chiapas, Mexico were subjected to algal extraction or left as controls in a cross-over trial extending over 2 years. Initial densities of An. pseudopunctipennis larvae were directly proportional to the prevalence of filamentous algae in each breeding site. The extraction of algae brought about a striking decline in the density of An. pseudopunctipennis larvae sustained for about six weeks, and a concurrent reduction in the adult population in both years of the study. Mark-release experiments indicated that dispersal from adjacent untreated areas was unlikely to exert an important influence on the magnitude of mosquito control that we observed. Habitat manipulation by extraction of filamentous algae offers a unique opportunity for sustainable control of this malaria vector. This technique may represent a valuable intervention, complimenting insecticide spraying of households, to minimize Plasmodium transmission rates in Mesoamerica. PMID:15475337

  13. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension among Saudi Adult Population: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdalla A.; Al-Hamdan, Nasser A.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.; Abdalla, Abdelshakour M.; Abbas, Mostafa A. F.; Abuzaid, Lamiaa Z.

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating prevalence, awareness, treatment, control, and predictors of hypertension among Saudi adult population. Multistage stratified sampling was used to select 4758 adult participants. Three blood pressure measurements using an automatic sphygmomanometer, sociodemographics, and antihypertensive modalities were obtained. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 25.5%. Only 44.7% of hypertensives were aware, 71.8% of them received pharmacotherapy, and only 37.0% were controlled. Awareness was significantly associated with gender, age, geographical location, occupation, and comorbidity. Applying drug treatment was significantly more among older patients, but control was significantly higher among younger patients and patients with higher level of physical activity. Significant predictors of hypertension included male gender, urbanization, low education, low physical activity, obesity, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion prevalence is high, but awareness, treatment, and control levels are low indicating a need to develop a national program for prevention, early detection, and control of hypertension. PMID:21912737

  14. Complementary and alternative asthma treatments and their association with asthma control: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjia; FitzGerald, J Mark; Rousseau, Roxanne; Lynd, Larry D; Tan, Wan C; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many patients with asthma spend time and resources consuming complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). This study explores whether CAM utilisation is associated with asthma control and the intake of asthma controller medications. Design Population-based, prospective cross-sectional study. Setting General population residing in two census areas in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Recruitment was based on random-digit dialling of both landlines and cell phones. Participants 486 patients with self-reported physician diagnosis of asthma (mean age 52 years; 67.3% woman). Primary and secondary outcome measures We assessed CAM use over the previous 12 months, level of asthma control as defined by the Global Initiative for Asthma and the self-reported intake of controller medications. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to study the relationship between any usage of CAMs (outcome), asthma control and controller medication usage, adjusted for potential confounders. Results A total of 179 (36.8%) of the sample reported CAM usage in the past 12 months. Breathing exercises (17.7%), herbal medicines (10.1%) and vitamins (9.7%) were the most popular CAMs reported. After adjustment, female sex (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.52) and uncontrolled asthma (vs controlled asthma, OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.30 to 3.89) were associated with a higher likelihood of using any CAMs in the past 12 months. Controller medication use was not associated with CAM usage in general and in the subgroups defined by asthma control. Conclusions Clinicians and policy makers need to be aware of the high prevalence of CAM use in patients with asthma and its association with lack of asthma control. PMID:24005131

  15. Control mechanisms on the ctenophore Mnemiopsis population dynamics: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, B.; Fach, B. A.; Oguz, T.

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that control the ctenophore Mnemiopsis blooms in the Black Sea is gained with a zero-dimensional population based model. The stage resolving model considers detailed mass and population growth dynamics of four stages of model-ctenophore. These stages include the different growth characteristics of egg, juvenile, transitional and adult stages. The dietary patterns of the different stages follow the observations given in the literature. The model is able to represent consistent development patterns, while reflecting the physiological complexity of a population of Mnemiopsis species. The model is used to analyze the influence of temperature and food variability on Mnemiopsis reproduction and outburst. Model results imply a strong temperature control on all stages of Mnemiopsis and that high growth rates at high temperatures can only be reached if food sources are not limited (i.e. 25 mg C m - 3 and 90 mg C m - 3 mesozooplankton and microplankton, respectively). A decrease of 5 °C can result in considerable decrease in biomass of all stages, whereas at a temperature of 25 °C a 40% decrease in food concentrations could result in termination of transfer between stages. Model results demonstrate the strong role of mesozooplankton in controlling the adult ctenophore biomass capable of reproduction and that different nutritional requirements of each stage can be critical for population growth. The high overall population growth rates may occur only when growth conditions are favorable for both larval and lobate stages. Current model allows the flexibility to assess the effect of changing temperature and food conditions on different ctenophore stages. Without including this structure in end-to-end models it is not possible to analyze the influence of ctenophores on different trophic levels of the ecosystem.

  16. The control of population growth is the function of the central government.

    PubMed

    1994-04-01

    This speech of Mr. Jiang Zemin, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party and Chairman of the People's Republic of China, before the National Forum on Family Planning Work refers to the need to strictly and effectively implement the family planning program in 1994. Socioeconomic reforms will be occurring simultaneously. Success of the family planning program is attributed to Party Committees, governments, cadres, and the masses. Even though there have been advances made in slowing population growth, the vast size of the Chinese population still poses problems. China's state policy is to modernize and to maintain strict control of overrapid population growth. The strategy is to move toward a market economy, while continuing to slow population growth but without market regulation of population growth. Family planning serves the state and the people through voluntary action. The public must receive "meticulous" education and help with day to day problems in production, daily life, and human reproduction. Government departments and nongovernmental organizations need to work together. Family planning use is the obligation of every citizen, who should be made aware of relevant national policy and of the need for devotion to country. Benefits will be received by the state and families, when family planning is used. Family planning will be cultivated as an honorable act, and boys and girls will be valued equally. The educational program will train leaders and cadres to take a leadership role in practicing family planning. Party organizations and governments at all levels should take personal responsibility for program implementation. Erratic efforts are not good enough; the task is long and arduous. Serious difficulties still exist in rural areas, and program focus should be directed to rural areas and the floating population. Reports were also made at the Forum on the population status and preparatory meetings of the forthcoming women

  17. Coherent control of population transfer in Rydberg atoms via chirped microwave pulses.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Juan J; Chu, Shih-I

    2007-09-27

    We present a comprehensive and ab initio nonperturbative investigation of the coherent population transfer among the 3D high-lying Rydberg hydrogen and alkali atomic states via linearly polarized chirped microwave pulses. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the dynamical evolution of Rydberg atoms is accurately and efficiently solved by means of the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method. For atomic H, the population transfer from n = 35 to 30 with nearly 100% efficiency is achieved by means of the sequential two-photon Deltan = -1 transitions. The calculation fully utilizes all of the available orbital angular momentum l states for a given n, and the interference pattern and population evolution dynamics of individual l states are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the coherent control of the population transfer from the high n to the low n states can be accomplished by the optimization of the chirping parameters and microwave field strength. Similar analysis is performed for the Na atom, where the alkali atomic structure is described by an accurate model potential. We found that while the global population transfer pattern is qualitatively similar, there are significant differences in the dynamical response of atomic H and Na to the chirped microwave fields. Due to the degeneracy of the l states (for a given n) in unperturbed atomic H, the population transfer involves significant coupling and interference among a number of low-lying l states. For the case of Na atoms, however, the population transfer from the n to (n - 1) state is dominated by a single channel, namely, from the |n,l = 0> to the |n - 1,l = 0> state. PMID:17722891

  18. Phylogeography and population structure of the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei inferred by mitochondrial control region.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Chen, Xiao; Sun, Dianrong; Song, Na; Lin, Qin; Gao, Tianxiang

    2015-08-01

    The red stingray Dasyatis akajei is distributed in both marine and freshwater, but little is known about its phylogeography and population structure. We sampled 107 individuals from one freshwater region and 6 coastal localities within the distribution range of D. akajei. Analyses of the first hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA control region of 474 bp revealed only 17 polymorphism sites that defined 28 haplotypes, with no unique haplotype for the freshwater population. A high level of haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity were observed in both marine (h = 0.9393 ± 0.0104, π = 0.0069 ± 0.0040) and freshwater populations (h = 0.8333 ± 0.2224, π = 0.0084 ± 0.0063). Significant level of genetic structure was detected between four marine populations (TZ, WZ, ND and ZZ) via both hierarchical molecular variance analysis (AMOVA) and pairwise FST (with two exceptions), which is unusual for elasmobranchs detected previously over such short geographical distance. However, limited sampling suggested that the freshwater population was not particularly distinct (p > 0.05), but additional samples would be needed to confirm it. Demersal and slow-moving characters likely have contributed to the genetically heterogeneous population structure. The demographic history of D. akajei examined by mismatch distribution analyses, neutrality tests and Bayesian skyline analyses suggested a sudden population expansion dating to upper Pleistocene. The information on genetic diversity and genetic structure will have implications for the management of fisheries and conservation efforts. PMID:24409898

  19. Reconstructing the History of Mesoamerican Populations through the Study of the Mitochondrial DNA Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Gorostiza, Amaya; Acunha-Alonzo, Víctor; Regalado-Liu, Lucía; Tirado, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Sámano, David; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; González-Martín, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The study of genetic information can reveal a reconstruction of human population’s history. We sequenced the entire mtDNA control region (positions 16.024 to 576 following Cambridge Reference Sequence, CRS) of 605 individuals from seven Mesoamerican indigenous groups and one Aridoamerican from the Greater Southwest previously defined, all of them in present Mexico. Samples were collected directly from the indigenous populations, the application of an individual survey made it possible to remove related or with other origins samples. Diversity indices and demographic estimates were calculated. Also AMOVAs were calculated according to different criteria. An MDS plot, based on FST distances, was also built. We carried out the construction of individual networks for the four Amerindian haplogroups detected. Finally, barrier software was applied to detect genetic boundaries among populations. The results suggest: a common origin of the indigenous groups; a small degree of European admixture; and inter-ethnic gene flow. The process of Mesoamerica’s human settlement took place quickly influenced by the region’s orography, which development of genetic and cultural differences facilitated. We find the existence of genetic structure is related to the region’s geography, rather than to cultural parameters, such as language. The human population gradually became fragmented, though they remained relatively isolated, and differentiated due to small population sizes and different survival strategies. Genetic differences were detected between Aridoamerica and Mesoamerica, which can be subdivided into “East”, “Center”, “West” and “Southeast”. The fragmentation process occurred mainly during the Mesoamerican Pre-Classic period, with the Otomí being one of the oldest groups. With an increased number of populations studied adding previously published data, there is no change in the conclusions, although significant genetic heterogeneity can be detected in Pima

  20. Mitochondrial DNA control region diversity in a population from Espirito Santo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Naiara M; Paneto, Greiciane G; Figueiredo, Raquel F; de Mello, Aline O; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has proved to be useful for forensic identification, especially in cases which nuclear DNA markers fail, as in degraded samples or in cases where the biological material has few traces or no nuclear DNA. Moreover, it can be applied in population genetics, inferring the origin of a population. In this work, the entire mtDNA control region of 97 individuals from the state of Espirito Santo, Brazil, was analyzed. We have found 94 different haplotypes yielding a high haplotype diversity of 0.9994 ± 0.0016. The probability of a random match calculated was 1.09. Haplogroup distribution analysis confirmed a highly admixed Latin American population: African lineages (43.3 %), European lineages (32.0 %), Native American lineages (23.7 %) and Asian lineages (1.0 %). We have concluded that this type of tool can be used both in forensic genetics to the study of different human populations, such as highly admixed populations, and in the study of migration's history and colonization of different states and countries of the world. PMID:24996288

  1. Does polyandry control population sex ratio via regulation of a selfish gene?

    PubMed Central

    Price, Tom A. R.; Bretman, Amanda; Gradilla, Ana C.; Reger, Julia; Taylor, Michelle L.; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Campbell, Amy; Hurst, Gregory D. D.; Wedell, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The extent of female multiple mating (polyandry) can strongly impact on the intensity of sexual selection, sexual conflict, and the evolution of cooperation and sociality. More subtly, polyandry may protect populations against intragenomic conflicts that result from the invasion of deleterious selfish genetic elements (SGEs). SGEs commonly impair sperm production, and so are likely to be unsuccessful in sperm competition, potentially reducing their transmission in polyandrous populations. Here, we test this prediction in nature. We demonstrate a heritable latitudinal cline in the degree of polyandry in the fruitfly Drosophila pseudoobscura across the USA, with northern population females remating more frequently in both the field and the laboratory. High remating was associated with low frequency of a sex-ratio-distorting meiotic driver in natural populations. In the laboratory, polyandry directly controls the frequency of the driver by undermining its transmission. Hence we suggest that the cline in polyandry represents an important contributor to the cline in sex ratio in nature. Furthermore, as the meiotic driver causes sex ratio bias, variation in polyandry may ultimately determine population sex ratio across the USA, a dramatic impact of female mating decisions. As SGEs are ubiquitous it is likely that the reduction of intragenomic conflict by polyandry is widespread. PMID:24695427

  2. From population structure to genetically-engineered vectors: new ways to control vector-borne diseases?

    PubMed

    Sparagano, O A E; De Luna, C J

    2008-07-01

    Epidemiological studies on vectors and the pathogens they can carry (such as Borrelia burgdorferi) are showing some correlations between infection rates and biodiversity highlighting the "dilution" effects on potential vectors. Meanwhile other studies comparing sympatric small rodent species demonstrated that rodent species transmitting more pathogens are parasitized by more ectoparasite species. Studies on population structure and size have also proven a difference on the intensity of the parasitic infection. Furthermore, preliminary results in genetic improvement in mosquitoes (genetic markers, sexing, and genetic sterilization) will also increase performance as it has already been shown in field applications in developing countries. Recent results have greatly improved the fitness of genetically-modified insects compared to wild type populations with new approaches such as the post-integration elimination of transposon sequences, stabilising any insertion in genetically-modified insects. Encouraging results using the Sterile Insect Technique highlighted some metabolism manipulation to avoid the viability of offspring from released parent insect in the wild. Recent studies on vector symbionts would also bring a new angle in vector control capabilities, while complete DNA sequencing of some arthropods could point out ways to block the deadly impact on animal and human populations. These new potential approaches will improve the levels of control or even in some cases would eradicate vector species and consequently the vector-borne diseases they can transmit. In this paper we review some of the population biology theories, biological control methods, and the genetic techniques that have been published in the last years that are recommended to control for vector-borne diseases. PMID:17560836

  3. Systematic approach to Escherichia coli cell population control using a genetic lysis circuit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell population control allows for the maintenance of a specific cell population density. In this study, we use lysis gene BBa_K117000 from the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, formed by MIT, to lyse Escherichia coli (E. coli). The lysis gene is regulated by a synthetic genetic lysis circuit, using an inducer-regulated promoter-RBS component. To make the design more easily, it is necessary to provide a systematic approach for a genetic lysis circuit to achieve control of cell population density. Results Firstly, the lytic ability of the constructed genetic lysis circuit is described by the relationship between the promoter-RBS components and inducer concentration in a steady state model. Then, three types of promoter-RBS libraries are established. Finally, according to design specifications, a systematic design approach is proposed to provide synthetic biologists with a prescribed I/O response by selecting proper promoter-RBS component set in combination with suitable inducer concentrations, within a feasible range. Conclusion This study provides an important systematic design method for the development of next-generation synthetic gene circuits, from component library construction to genetic circuit assembly. In future, when libraries are more complete, more precise cell density control can be achieved. PMID:25559865

  4. Strategies to control a common carp population by pulsed commercial harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colvin, Michael E.; Pierce, Clay; Stewart, Timothy W.; Grummer, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial fisheries are commonly used to manage nuisance fishes in freshwater systems, but such efforts are often unsuccessful. Strategies for successfully controlling a nuisance population of common carp Cyprinus carpio by pulsed commercial harvest were evaluated with a combination of (1) field sampling, (2) population estimation and CPUE indexing, and (3) simulation using an exponential semidiscrete biomass dynamics model (SDBDM). The range of annual fishing mortalities (F) that resulted in successful control (F = 0.244–0.265) was narrow. Common carp biomass dynamics were sensitive to unintentional underharvest due to high rates of surplus production and a biomass doubling time of 2.7 years. Simulations indicated that biomanipulation never achieved successful control unless supplemental fishing mortality was imposed. Harvest of a majority of annual production was required to achieve successful control, as indicated by the ecotrophic coefficient (EC). Readily available biomass data and tools such as SDBDMs and ECs can be used in an adaptive management framework to successfully control common carp and other nuisance fishes by pulsed commercial fishing.

  5. Population Dynamics of Owned, Free-Roaming Dogs: Implications for Rabies Control

    PubMed Central

    Conan, Anne; Akerele, Oluyemisi; Simpson, Greg; Reininghaus, Bjorn; van Rooyen, Jacques; Knobel, Darryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a serious yet neglected public health threat in resource-limited communities in Africa, where the virus is maintained in populations of owned, free-roaming domestic dogs. Rabies elimination can be achieved through the mass vaccination of dogs, but maintaining the critical threshold of vaccination coverage for herd immunity in these populations is hampered by their rapid turnover. Knowledge of the population dynamics of free-roaming dog populations can inform effective planning and implementation of mass dog vaccination campaigns to control rabies. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented a health and demographic surveillance system in dogs that monitored the entire owned dog population within a defined geographic area in a community in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. We quantified demographic rates over a 24-month period, from 1st January 2012 through 1st January 2014, and assessed their implications for rabies control by simulating the decline in vaccination coverage over time. During this period, the population declined by 10%. Annual population growth rates were +18.6% in 2012 and -24.5% in 2013. Crude annual birth rates (per 1,000 dog-years of observation) were 451 in 2012 and 313 in 2013. Crude annual death rates were 406 in 2012 and 568 in 2013. Females suffered a significantly higher mortality rate in 2013 than males (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.28–1.85). In the age class 0–3 months, the mortality rate of dogs vaccinated against rabies was significantly lower than that of unvaccinated dogs (2012: MRR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.05–0.21; 2013: MRR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.11–0.69). The results of the simulation showed that achieving a 70% vaccination coverage during annual campaigns would maintain coverage above the critical threshold for at least 12 months. Conclusions and Significance Our findings provide an evidence base for the World Health Organization’s empirically-derived target of 70% vaccination coverage

  6. Using population genetic tools to develop a control strategy for feral cats (Felis catus) in Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, H.; Hess, S.C.; Cole, D.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Population genetics can provide information about the demographics and dynamics of invasive species that is beneficial for developing effective control strategies. We studied the population genetics of feral cats on Hawai'i Island by microsatellite analysis to evaluate genetic diversity and population structure, assess gene flow and connectivity among three populations, identify potential source populations, characterise population dynamics, and evaluate sex-biased dispersal. High genetic diversity, low structure, and high number of migrants per generation supported high gene flow that was not limited spatially. Migration rates revealed that most migration occurred out of West Mauna Kea. Effective population size estimates indicated increasing cat populations despite control efforts. Despite high gene flow, relatedness estimates declined significantly with increased geographic distance and Bayesian assignment tests revealed the presence of three population clusters. Genetic structure and relatedness estimates indicated male-biased dispersal, primarily from Mauna Kea, suggesting that this population should be targeted for control. However, recolonisation seems likely, given the great dispersal ability that may not be inhibited by barriers such as lava flows. Genetic monitoring will be necessary to assess the effectiveness of future control efforts. Management of other invasive species may benefit by employing these population genetic tools. ?? CSIRO 2007.

  7. Closed-loop control of epileptiform activities in a neural population model using a proportional-derivative controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Song; Wang, Mei-Li; Li, Xiao-Li; Ernst, Niebur

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is believed to be caused by a lack of balance between excitation and inhibitation in the brain. A promising strategy for the control of the disease is closed-loop brain stimulation. How to determine the stimulation control parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols remains, however, an unsolved question. To constrain the complex dynamics of the biological brain, we use a neural population model (NPM). We propose that a proportional-derivative (PD) type closed-loop control can successfully suppress epileptiform activities. First, we determine the stability of root loci, which reveals that the dynamical mechanism underlying epilepsy in the NPM is the loss of homeostatic control caused by the lack of balance between excitation and inhibition. Then, we design a PD type closed-loop controller to stabilize the unstable NPM such that the homeostatic equilibriums are maintained; we show that epileptiform activities are successfully suppressed. A graphical approach is employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PD controller in the parameter space, providing a theoretical guideline for the selection of the PD control parameters. Furthermore, we establish the relationship between the control parameters and the model parameters in the form of stabilizing regions to help understand the mechanism of suppressing epileptiform activities in the NPM. Simulations show that the PD-type closed-loop control strategy can effectively suppress epileptiform activities in the NPM. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61473208, 61025019, and 91132722), ONR MURI N000141010278, and NIH grant R01EY016281.

  8. Using noise to control heterogeneity of isogenic populations in homogenous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Gritti, Nicola; Keegstra, Johannes M.; Soltani, Mohammad; Munsky, Brian

    2015-07-01

    We explore the extent to which the phenotypes of individual, genetically identical cells can be controlled independently from each other using only a single homogeneous environmental input. We show that such control is theoretically impossible if restricted to a deterministic setting, but it can be achieved readily if one exploits heterogeneities introduced at the single-cell level due to stochastic fluctuations in gene regulation. Using stochastic analyses of a bistable genetic toggle switch, we develop a control strategy that maximizes the chances that a chosen cell will express one phenotype, while the rest express another. The control mechanism uses UV radiation to enhance identically protein degradation in all cells. Control of individual cells is made possible only by monitoring stochastic protein fluctuations and applying UV control at favorable times and levels. For two identical cells, our stochastic control law can drive protein expression of a chosen cell above its neighbor with a better than 99% success rate. In a population of 30 identical cells, we can drive a given cell to remain consistently within the top 20%. Although cellular noise typically impairs predictability for biological responses, our results show that it can also simultaneously improve controllability for those same responses.

  9. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  10. Differential Impact of Tobacco Control Policies on Youth Sub-Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tauras, John A.; Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of tobacco control interventions in reducing tobacco use among youth overall, there have been very few studies that examine the potential differential impact of tobacco control policies on various youth subgroups, defined by socio-economic status (SES), race/ethnicity, and gender. Objective: We examined the relationship between state-level cigarette prices and smoke-free air laws and youth smoking prevalence and intensity for various youth sub-populations in the United States. Methods: We estimated a 2-part model of cigarette demand using data from the 1991 through 2010 nationally representative surveys of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students as part of the Monitoring the Future project. Findings: We found that real cigarette prices are strong determinants of youth smoking. Blacks, females, Hispanics, and low-SES subpopulations are found to have a larger price response with respect to smoking prevalence than the full sample. Smoke-free air laws are found to have a negative effect on smoking prevalence for the full sample and for the male, white, and high-SES sub-populations. Conclusions: This research concludes that higher cigarette prices will reduce smoking prevalence rates of Blacks, Hispanics, females, and low-SES subpopulations faster than the overall youth population and other youth sub-populations. Moreover, this research concludes that smoke-free air laws will reduce smoking prevalence for the overall youth population with the largest reductions in high SES and male subpopulations. PMID:24036487

  11. Mitigating amphibian disease: strategies to maintain wild populations and control chytridiomycosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rescuing amphibian diversity is an achievable conservation challenge. Disease mitigation is one essential component of population management. Here we assess existing disease mitigation strategies, some in early experimental stages, which focus on the globally emerging chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. We discuss the precedent for each strategy in systems ranging from agriculture to human medicine, and the outlook for each strategy in terms of research needs and long-term potential. Results We find that the effects of exposure to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis occur on a spectrum from transient commensal to lethal pathogen. Management priorities are divided between (1) halting pathogen spread and developing survival assurance colonies, and (2) prophylactic or remedial disease treatment. Epidemiological models of chytridiomycosis suggest that mitigation strategies can control disease without eliminating the pathogen. Ecological ethics guide wildlife disease research, but several ethical questions remain for managing disease in the field. Conclusions Because sustainable conservation of amphibians in nature is dependent on long-term population persistence and co-evolution with potentially lethal pathogens, we suggest that disease mitigation not focus exclusively on the elimination or containment of the pathogen, or on the captive breeding of amphibian hosts. Rather, successful disease mitigation must be context specific with epidemiologically informed strategies to manage already infected populations by decreasing pathogenicity and host susceptibility. We propose population level treatments based on three steps: first, identify mechanisms of disease suppression; second, parameterize epizootiological models of disease and population dynamics for testing under semi-natural conditions; and third, begin a process of adaptive management in field trials with natural populations. PMID:21496358

  12. Reduced Population Control of an Insect Pest in Managed Willow Monocultures

    PubMed Central

    Dalin, Peter; Kindvall, Oskar; Björkman, Christer

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a general belief that insect outbreak risk is higher in plant monocultures than in natural and more diverse habitats, although empirical studies investigating this relationship are lacking. In this study, using density data collected over seven years at 40 study sites, we compare the temporal population variability of the leaf beetle Phratora vulgatissima between willow plantations and natural willow habitats. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was conducted in 1999–2005. The density of adult P. vulgatissima was estimated in the spring every year by a knock-down sampling technique. We used two measures of population variability, CV and PV, to compare temporal variations in leaf beetle density between plantation and natural habitat. Relationships between density and variability were also analyzed to discern potential underlying processes behind stability in the two systems. The results showed that the leaf beetle P. vulgatissima had a greater temporal population variability and outbreak risk in willow plantations than in natural willow habitats. We hypothesize that the greater population stability observed in the natural habitat was due to two separate processes operating at different levels of beetle density. First, stable low population equilibrium can be achieved by the relatively high density of generalist predators observed in natural stands. Second, stable equilibrium can also be imposed at higher beetle density due to competition, which occurs through depletion of resources (plant foliage) in the natural habitat. In willow plantations, competition is reduced mainly because plants grow close enough for beetle larvae to move to another plant when foliage is consumed. Conclusion/Significance To our knowledge, this is the first empirical study confirming that insect pest outbreak risk is higher in monocultures. The study suggests that comparative studies of insect population dynamics in different habitats may improve our ability to

  13. Population control of an overabundant species achieved through consecutive anthropogenic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Payo-Payo, Ana; Oro, Daniel; Igual, José Manuel; Jover, Lluis; Sanpera, Carolina; Tavecchia, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    The control of overabundant vertebrates is often problematic. Much work has focused on population-level responses and overabundance due to anthropogenic subsidies. However, far less work has been directed at investigating responses following the removal of subsidies. We investigate the consequences of two consecutive perturbations, the closure of a landfill and an inadvertent poisoning event, on the trophic ecology (δ13C, δ15N, and δ34S), survival, and population size of an overabundant generalist seabird species, the Yellow-legged Gull (Larus michahellis). We expected that the landfill closure would cause a strong dietary shift and the inadvertent poisoning a decrease in gull population size. As a long-lived species, we also anticipated adult survival to be buffered against the decrease in food availability but not against the inadvertent poisoning event. Stable isotope analysis confirmed the dietary shift towards marine resources after the disappearance of the landfill. Although the survival model was inconclusive, it did suggest that the perturbations had a negative effect on survival, which was followed by a recovery back to average values. Food limitation likely triggered dispersal to other populations, while poisoning may have increased mortality; these two processes were likely responsible for the large fall in population size that occurred after the two consecutive perturbations. Life-history theory suggests that perturbations may encourage species to halt existing breeding investment in order to ensure future survival. However, under strong perturbation pulses the resilience threshold might be surpassed and changes in population density can arise. Consecutive perturbations may effectively manage overabundant species. PMID:26910951

  14. Case-control study of risk factors of myelodysplastic syndromes according to World Health Organization classification in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ling; Lin, Guowei; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Cuie; Dai, Junmin; Yang, Yongchen; Zou, Hejian; Sun, Hengjuan; Gu, Minghua; Chen, Xi; Fu, Hua; Bao, Liming

    2011-02-01

    Risk factors of mydelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain largely unknown. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study consisting of 403 newly diagnosed MDS patients according to World Health Organization classification and 806 individually gender and age-matched patient controls from 27 major hospitals in Shanghai, China, to examine relation of lifestyle, environmental, and occupational factors to risk of MDS. The study showed that all MDS (all subtypes combined) risk factors included anti tuberculosis drugs [odds ratio (OR)(adj) = 3.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-8.12] as an independent risk factor, benzene (OR(adj) = 3.73; 95% CI = 1.32-10.51), hair dye use (OR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.03-2.07), new building and renovations (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.11-2.00), pesticides (OR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.22-3.82), and herbicides (OR = 5.33; 95% CI = 1.41-20.10) as relative risk factors. Risk factors of MDS subtype refractory cytopenia with multiple dysplasia (RCMD) were benzene (OR(adj) = 5.99; 95% CI = 1.19-30.16) and gasoline (OR(adj) = 11.44; 95% CI = 1.31-100.03) as independent risk factors, and traditional Chinese medicines (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.15-4.07), pesticides (OR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.37-6.25), and herbicides (OR = 12.00; 95% CI = 1.44-99.67) as relative risk factors. Smoking tobacco was significantly associated with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) (OR(adj) = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.02-5.77). Education is shown as an independent protective factor against all MDS (OR(adj) = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.83-0.99) and RCMD (OR(adj) = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79-0.99). These findings suggest that multiple modifiable behavioral, environmental, and occupational factors play a role in MDS etiology, and various MDS subtypes may have different susceptibility. PMID:21264898

  15. Population substructure and control selection in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Zhaoming; Li, Qizhai; Wacholder, Sholom; Hunter, David J; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Thomas, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the relevance of both demanding classical epidemiologic criteria for control selection and robust handling of population stratification (PS) represents a major challenge in the design and analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Empirical data from two GWAS in European Americans of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project were used to evaluate the impact of PS in studies with different control selection strategies. In each of the two original case-control studies nested in corresponding prospective cohorts, a minor confounding effect due to PS (inflation factor lambda of 1.025 and 1.005) was observed. In contrast, when the control groups were exchanged to mimic a cost-effective but theoretically less desirable control selection strategy, the confounding effects were larger (lambda of 1.090 and 1.062). A panel of 12,898 autosomal SNPs common to both the Illumina and Affymetrix commercial platforms and with low local background linkage disequilibrium (pair-wise r(2)<0.004) was selected to infer population substructure with principal component analysis. A novel permutation procedure was developed for the correction of PS that identified a smaller set of principal components and achieved a better control of type I error (to lambda of 1.032 and 1.006, respectively) than currently used methods. The overlap between sets of SNPs in the bottom 5% of p-values based on the new test and the test without PS correction was about 80%, with the majority of discordant SNPs having both ranks close to the threshold. Thus, for the CGEMS GWAS of prostate and breast cancer conducted in European Americans, PS does not appear to be a major problem in well-designed studies. A study using suboptimal controls can have acceptable type I error when an effective strategy for the correction of PS is employed. PMID:18596976

  16. Endoscopic Vasectomy of Male Feral Pigeons (Columba livia) as a Possible Method of Population Control.

    PubMed

    Heiderich, Elisabeth; Schildger, Bernd; Lierz, Michael

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate whether single-entry endoscopic vasectomy of male feral pigeons (Columba livia) significantly reduced fertility and would potentially be valuable for control of feral pigeon populations, 252 male feral pigeons were caught in the city of Berne and endoscopically vasectomized. In this procedure, approximately 1 cm of the deferent duct was removed bilaterally. Rapid, uneventful recoveries occurred in 94% (237/252) of the pigeons, whereas 6% (15/252) died because of complications associated with the procedure, consisting of perforation of the ureter (9/15), major hemorrhage (5/15), and respiratory arrest (1/15). Mean anesthesia time was 23±6 minutes. The vasectomized males were habituated to 2 pigeon houses together with fertile females. Another pigeon house with fertile pairs acted as control. All eggs laid were candled weekly to assess fertility. In the 2 pigeon houses with vasectomized males, the mean fertilization rate was 0.9% (5/563), while in the control pigeon house, the rate was 100% (39/39). The results indicate that endoscopic vasectomy of male feral pigeons may be a promising tool for field control of feral pigeon populations, especially in combination with other methods such as pigeon houses. PMID:25867661

  17. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, William F. M.; Langlands, Jean H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Wallace, W. F. M., and Langlands, J. H. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 211-216. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population. A sample of 50 men was chosen at random from the population of asbestos insulators in Belfast and matched with a control series of men of similar occupational group with respect to age, height, and smoking habit. Significantly more of the insulators complained of cough and sputum and had basal rales on examination. Clubbing was assessed by means of measurements of the hyponychial angle of both index fingers. These angles were significantly greater in the group of insulators. Twenty-one insulators had ϰ-rays which showed pleural calcification with or without pulmonary fibrosis; one control ϰ-ray showed pulmonary fibrosis. The insulators had no evidence of airways obstruction but static lung volume was reduced and their arterial oxygen tension was lower than that of the controls and their alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was greater. PMID:5557841

  18. The (non)effects of lethal population control on the diet of Australian dingoes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin L; Leung, Luke K-P

    2014-01-01

    Top-predators contribute to ecosystem resilience, yet individuals or populations are often subject to lethal control to protect livestock, managed game or humans from predation. Such management actions sometimes attract concern that lethal control might affect top-predator function in ways ultimately detrimental to biodiversity conservation. The primary function of a predator is predation, which is often investigated by assessing their diet. We therefore use data on prey remains found in 4,298 Australian dingo scats systematically collected from three arid sites over a four year period to experimentally assess the effects of repeated broad-scale poison-baiting programs on dingo diet. Indices of dingo dietary diversity and similarity were either identical or near-identical in baited and adjacent unbaited treatment areas in each case, demonstrating no control-induced change to dingo diets. Associated studies on dingoes' movement behaviour and interactions with sympatric mesopredators were similarly unaffected by poison-baiting. These results indicate that mid-sized top-predators with flexible and generalist diets (such as dingoes) may be resilient to ongoing and moderate levels of population control without substantial alteration of their diets and other related aspects of their ecological function. PMID:25243466

  19. The (Non)Effects of Lethal Population Control on the Diet of Australian Dingoes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Benjamin L.; Leung, Luke K.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Top-predators contribute to ecosystem resilience, yet individuals or populations are often subject to lethal control to protect livestock, managed game or humans from predation. Such management actions sometimes attract concern that lethal control might affect top-predator function in ways ultimately detrimental to biodiversity conservation. The primary function of a predator is predation, which is often investigated by assessing their diet. We therefore use data on prey remains found in 4,298 Australian dingo scats systematically collected from three arid sites over a four year period to experimentally assess the effects of repeated broad-scale poison-baiting programs on dingo diet. Indices of dingo dietary diversity and similarity were either identical or near-identical in baited and adjacent unbaited treatment areas in each case, demonstrating no control-induced change to dingo diets. Associated studies on dingoes' movement behaviour and interactions with sympatric mesopredators were similarly unaffected by poison-baiting. These results indicate that mid-sized top-predators with flexible and generalist diets (such as dingoes) may be resilient to ongoing and moderate levels of population control without substantial alteration of their diets and other related aspects of their ecological function. PMID:25243466

  20. Chromosomal control of pig populations in France: 2002–2006 survey

    PubMed Central

    Ducos, Alain; Berland, Hélène-Marie; Bonnet, Nathalie; Calgaro, Anne; Billoux, Sébastien; Mary, Nicolas; Garnier-Bonnet, Amélie; Darré, Roland; Pinton, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal control of pig populations has been widely developed in France over the last ten years. By December 31st, 2006, 13 765 individuals had been karyotyped in our laboratory, 62% of these since 2002. Ninety percent were young purebred boars controlled before service in artificial insemination centres, and 3% were hypoprolific boars. So far, 102 constitutional structural chromosomal rearrangements (67 since 2002) have been described. Fifty-six were reciprocal translocations and 8 peri- or paracentric inversions. For the first time since the beginning of the programme and after more than 11 000 pigs had been karyotyped, one Robertsonian translocation was identified in 2005 and two others in 2006. The estimated prevalence of balanced structural chromosomal rearrangements in a sample of more than 7700 young boars controlled before service was 0.47%. Twenty-one of the 67 rearrangements described since 2002 were identified in hypoprolific boars. All were reciprocal translocations. Twelve mosaics (XX/XY in 11 individuals, XY/XXY in one individual) were also diagnosed. Two corresponded to hypoprolific boars, and three to intersexed animals. The results presented in this communication would justify an intensification of the chromosomal control of French and, on a broader scale, European and North-American pig populations. PMID:17897598

  1. Three-dimensional patterning of multiple cell populations through orthogonal genetic control of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.; Sood, Anshum

    2013-01-01

    The ability to independently assemble multiple cell types within a three-dimensional matrix would be a powerful enabling tool for modeling and engineering complex tissues. Here we introduce a strategy to dynamically pattern distinct subpopulations of cells through genetic regulation of cell motility. We first describe glioma cell lines that were genetically engineered to stably express constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline-inducible or cumate-inducible promoter. We culture each population as multicellular spheroids and show that by adding or withdrawing the appropriate inducer at specific times, we can control the timing and extent of Rac1-dependent cell migration into three-dimensional collagen matrices. We then report results with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the other expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a cumate-inducible promoter. Using this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility in a subpopulation-specific and temporally-controlled manner. This allows us to orthogonally control the motility of each subpopulation and spatially assemble the cells into radially symmetric three-dimensional patterns through the synchronized addition and removal of doxycycline and cumate. This synthetic biology-inspired strategy offers a novel means of spatially organizing multiple cell populations in conventional matrix scaffolds and complements the emerging suite of technologies that seek to pattern cells by engineering extracellular matrix properties. PMID:24622945

  2. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case–control study in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case–control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. Methods/Design EPICAP is a population-based case–control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population. The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014). The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. Discussion The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic

  3. Management and control of microbial populations' development in LSS of missions of different durations.

    PubMed

    Somova, L A; Pechurkin, N S

    2005-01-01

    The problem of interaction between man and microorganisms in closed habitats is an inextricable part of the whole problem of co-existence between macro- and microorganisms. Concerning the support of human life in closed habitat, we can, conventionally, divide microorganisms, acting in life support system (LSS) into three groups: useful, neutral and harmful. The tasks, for human beings for optimal coexistence with microhabitants seem to be trivial: (1) to increase the activity of useful forms, (2) decrease the activity harmful forms, (3) not allow the neutral forms to become the harmful ones and even to help them to gain useful activity. The task of efficient management and control of microbial population's development in LSS highly depends on mission duration. As for short-term missions without recycling, the proper hygienic procedures are developed. For longer missions, the probability of transformation of the neutral forms into the harmful ones is becoming more dangerous. The LSS for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including system with biological recycling. In these systems, microbial populations as regenerative link should be useful and active agents. Some problems of microbial populations control and management are discussed in the paper. PMID:16175696

  4. Birth outcomes of patients with isolated anorectal malformations: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vermes, Gabor; László, Daniel; Czeizel, Andrew E; Ács, Nándor

    2016-01-01

    In most patients affected by isolated anorectal malformation (IARM) the etiology is largely unknown. Thus, the aim of our project was to analyze possible risk factors for IARM. In the first step, birth outcomes of cases with IARM were analyzed on the basis of maternal socio-demographic variables, and these data are presented in this paper. Gestational age at delivery, birthweight, preterm birth, low birthweight and small for gestational age of cases with IARM were evaluated in the function of maternal age, birth/pregnancy order, marital and employment status of mothers in the population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. The study samples included 231 live-born cases with IARM, 361 matched and 38 151 population controls without any defect. IARMs are more frequent in males, twins and newborn infants with low birthweight and small-for-gestational-age, the latter being the consequence of intrauterine growth restriction. In addition, mothers of cases were younger but with higher birth order, and had lower socio-economic status. These maternal variables are characteristic for the gypsy population in Hungary. The higher proportion of gypsy women among the mothers of cases with IARM was confirmed during the home visits of the study. Male sex and intrauterine growth restriction of cases, in addition to low socioeconomic status and gypsy origin of mothers may have a role in the risk of IARMs. PMID:26259501

  5. Costs analysis of a population level rabies control programme in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Shahid; Kakkar, Manish; Rogawski, Elizabeth Tacket

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to determine costs to the state government of implementing different interventions for controlling rabies among the entire human and animal populations of Tamil Nadu. This built upon an earlier assessment of Tamil Nadu's efforts to control rabies. Anti-rabies vaccines were made available at all health facilities. Costs were estimated for five different combinations of animal and human interventions using an activity-based costing approach from the provider perspective. Disease and population data were sourced from the state surveillance data, human census and livestock census. Program costs were extrapolated from official documents. All capital costs were depreciated to estimate annualized costs. All costs were inflated to 2012 Rupees. Sensitivity analysis was conducted across all major cost centres to assess their relative impact on program costs. It was found that the annual costs of providing Anti-rabies vaccine alone and in combination with Immunoglobulins was $0.7 million (Rs 36 million) and $2.2 million (Rs 119 million), respectively. For animal sector interventions, the annualised costs of rolling out surgical sterilisation-immunization, injectable immunization and oral immunizations were estimated to be $ 44 million (Rs 2,350 million), $23 million (Rs 1,230 million) and $ 11 million (Rs 590 million), respectively. Dog bite incidence, health systems coverage and cost of rabies biologicals were found to be important drivers of costs for human interventions. For the animal sector interventions, the size of dog catching team, dog population and vaccine costs were found to be driving the costs. Rabies control in Tamil Nadu seems a costly proposition the way it is currently structured. Policy makers in Tamil Nadu and other similar settings should consider the long-term financial sustainability before embarking upon a state or nation-wide rabies control programme. PMID:24587471

  6. Costs Analysis of a Population Level Rabies Control Programme in Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Shahid; Kakkar, Manish; Rogawski, Elizabeth Tacket

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to determine costs to the state government of implementing different interventions for controlling rabies among the entire human and animal populations of Tamil Nadu. This built upon an earlier assessment of Tamil Nadu's efforts to control rabies. Anti-rabies vaccines were made available at all health facilities. Costs were estimated for five different combinations of animal and human interventions using an activity-based costing approach from the provider perspective. Disease and population data were sourced from the state surveillance data, human census and livestock census. Program costs were extrapolated from official documents. All capital costs were depreciated to estimate annualized costs. All costs were inflated to 2012 Rupees. Sensitivity analysis was conducted across all major cost centres to assess their relative impact on program costs. It was found that the annual costs of providing Anti-rabies vaccine alone and in combination with Immunoglobulins was $0.7 million (Rs 36 million) and $2.2 million (Rs 119 million), respectively. For animal sector interventions, the annualised costs of rolling out surgical sterilisation-immunization, injectable immunization and oral immunizations were estimated to be $ 44 million (Rs 2,350 million), $23 million (Rs 1,230 million) and $ 11 million (Rs 590 million), respectively. Dog bite incidence, health systems coverage and cost of rabies biologicals were found to be important drivers of costs for human interventions. For the animal sector interventions, the size of dog catching team, dog population and vaccine costs were found to be driving the costs. Rabies control in Tamil Nadu seems a costly proposition the way it is currently structured. Policy makers in Tamil Nadu and other similar settings should consider the long-term financial sustainability before embarking upon a state or nation-wide rabies control programme. PMID:24587471

  7. Sociodemographic characteristics of domestic violence in China: a population case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cao, YuPing; Yang, ShiChang; Wang, GuoQiang; Zhang, YaLin

    2014-03-01

    A population case-control study of domestic violence in China was conducted to examine the relationship between individual- and household-level characteristics and violence perpetration and victimization. Demographic comparisons were conducted between perpetrators and victims (n = 624), perpetrators and matched controls (n = 628), and perpetrator households and control households (n = 620). A multivariate model of demographic risk was tested, integrating individual- and household-level correlates of violence perpetration. Compared with victims, perpetrators were more likely to be older, male, and have lower levels of education. In the final model, violence perpetration was more likely among individuals who earned more income, contributed a lower proportion of the household income, had a family member who was unemployed or lived in households with an authoritarian or independent power structure. PMID:24176988

  8. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences study in Saraiki population from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikandar; Akhtar, Tanveer; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hassan; Rakha, Allah; Haider, Naeem; Tayyab, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Ali, Azam; Bokhari, Syed Yassir Abbas; Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Khan, Fazle Majid

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was carried in 85 unrelated Sariki individuals living in the different provinces of Pakistan. DNA was extracted from blood preserved in EDTA vacutainers. Hypervariable regions (HV1, HV2 & HV3) were PCR amplified and sequenced. Sequencing results were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge reference sequence (rCRS). The sequencing results showed presence of total 63 different haplotypes, 58 of them are unique and 05 are common haplotypes shared by more than one individual. The most common haplotype observed was (W6) with a frequency 12.9% of population sample. The Saraiki population was detected with genetic diversity (0.9570) and power of discrimination (0.9458). This study will be beneficial for forensic casework. PMID:25465675

  9. Autonomous development of vergence control driven by disparity energy neuron populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Shi, Bertram E

    2010-03-01

    We present a simple optimization criterion that leads to autonomous development of a sensorimotor feedback loop driven by the neural representation of the depth in the mammalian visual cortex. Our test bed is an active stereo vision system where the vergence angle between the two eyes is controlled by the output of a population of disparity-selective neurons. By finding a policy that maximizes the total response across the neuron population, the system eventually tracks a target as it moves in depth. We characterized the tracking performance of the resulting policy using objects moving both sinusoidally and randomly in depth. Surprisingly, the system can even learn how to track based on stimuli it cannot track: even though the closed loop 3 dB tracking bandwidth of the system is 0.3 Hz, correct tracking policies are learned for input stimuli moving as fast as 0.75 Hz. PMID:19925282

  10. Population control of exotic rainbow trout in streams of a natural area park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stephen E.; Larson, Gary L.; Ridley, Bromfield

    1986-03-01

    Expansion of the distribution of exotic rainbow trout is thought to be a leading cause for the decline of native brook trout since the 1930s in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. An experimental rehabilitation project was conducted from 1976 to 1981 using backpack electrofish shockers on four remnant brook trout populations sympatric with rainbow trout. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique to remove the exotic rainbow trout, to determine the population responses by native brook trout, and to evaluate the usefulness of the technique for trout management in the park. Rainbow trout populations were greatly reduced in density after up to six years of electrofishing, but were not eradicated. Rainbow trout recruitment, however, was essentially eliminated. Brook trout populations responded by increasing in density (including young-of-the-year), but rates of recovery differed among streams. The maximum observed densities ir each stream occurred at the end of the project. The findings suggest that electrofishing had a major negative impact on the exotic species, which was followed by positive responses from the native species in the second and third order study streams. The technique would probably be less effective in larger (fourth-order) park streams, but as an eradication tool the technique may have its highest potential in small first order streams. Nonetheless, the technique appears useful for population control without causing undue impacts on native aquatic species, although it is labor intensive, and capture efficiency is greatly influenced by fish size and stream morphology. To completely remove the exotic fish from selected streams, different technologies will have to be explored and developed.

  11. Can tobacco control be transformative? Reducing gender inequity and tobacco use among vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco use and exposure is unequally distributed across populations and countries and among women and men. These trends and patterns reflect and cause gender and economic inequities along with negative health impacts. Despite a commitment to gender analysis in the preamble to Framework Convention on Tobacco Control there is much yet to be done to fully understand how gender operates in tobacco control. Policies, program and research in tobacco control need to not only integrate gender, but rather operationalize gender with the goal of transforming gender and social inequities in the course of tobacco control initiatives. Gender transformative tobacco control goes beyond gender sensitive efforts and challenges policy and program developers to apply gender theory in designing their initiatives, with the goal of changing negative gender and social norms and improving social, economic, health and social indicators along with tobacco reduction. This paper outlines what is needed to progress tobacco control in enhancing the status of gendered and vulnerable groups, with a view to reducing gender and social inequities due to tobacco use and exposure. PMID:24402065

  12. Can Tobacco Control Be Transformative? Reducing Gender Inequity and Tobacco Use among Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco use and exposure is unequally distributed across populations and countries and among women and men. These trends and patterns reflect and cause gender and economic inequities along with negative health impacts. Despite a commitment to gender analysis in the preamble to Framework Convention on Tobacco Control there is much yet to be done to fully understand how gender operates in tobacco control. Policies, program and research in tobacco control need to not only integrate gender, but rather operationalize gender with the goal of transforming gender and social inequities in the course of tobacco control initiatives. Gender transformative tobacco control goes beyond gender sensitive efforts and challenges policy and program developers to apply gender theory in designing their initiatives, with the goal of changing negative gender and social norms and improving social, economic, health and social indicators along with tobacco reduction. This paper outlines what is needed to progress tobacco control in enhancing the status of gendered and vulnerable groups, with a view to reducing gender and social inequities due to tobacco use and exposure. PMID:24402065

  13. The importance of functional form in optimal control solutions of problems in population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Johnson, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Optimal control theory is finding increased application in both theoretical and applied ecology, and it is a central element of adaptive resource management. One of the steps in an adaptive management process is to develop alternative models of system dynamics, models that are all reasonable in light of available data, but that differ substantially in their implications for optimal control of the resource. We explored how the form of the recruitment and survival functions in a general population model for ducks affected the patterns in the optimal harvest strategy, using a combination of analytical, numerical, and simulation techniques. We compared three relationships between recruitment and population density (linear, exponential, and hyperbolic) and three relationships between survival during the nonharvest season and population density (constant, logistic, and one related to the compensatory harvest mortality hypothesis). We found that the form of the component functions had a dramatic influence on the optimal harvest strategy and the ultimate equilibrium state of the system. For instance, while it is commonly assumed that a compensatory hypothesis leads to higher optimal harvest rates than an additive hypothesis, we found this to depend on the form of the recruitment function, in part because of differences in the optimal steady-state population density. This work has strong direct consequences for those developing alternative models to describe harvested systems, but it is relevant to a larger class of problems applying optimal control at the population level. Often, different functional forms will not be statistically distinguishable in the range of the data. Nevertheless, differences between the functions outside the range of the data can have an important impact on the optimal harvest strategy. Thus, development of alternative models by identifying a single functional form, then choosing different parameter combinations from extremes on the likelihood

  14. Lung Cancer and Occupation in a Population-based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Lubin, Jay H.; Wacholder, Sholom; Tucker, Margaret; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Caporaso, Neil E.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relation between occupation and lung cancer in the large, population-based Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE) case-control study. In 2002–2005 in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, 2,100 incident lung cancer cases and 2,120 randomly selected population controls were enrolled. Lifetime occupational histories (industry and job title) were coded by using standard international classifications and were translated into occupations known (list A) or suspected (list B) to be associated with lung cancer. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression. For men, an increased risk was found for list A (177 exposed cases and 100 controls; odds ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 2.38) and most occupations therein. No overall excess was found for list B with the exception of filling station attendants and bus and truck drivers (men) and launderers and dry cleaners (women). The authors estimated that 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.0, 7.8) of lung cancers in men were attributable to occupation. Among those in other occupations, risk excesses were found for metal workers, barbers and hairdressers, and other motor vehicle drivers. These results indicate that past exposure to occupational carcinogens remains an important determinant of lung cancer occurrence. PMID:20047975

  15. Accessibility of dog populations for rabies control in Kathmandu valley, Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Bögel, K.; Joshi, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The accessibility of dogs in urban areas of Kathmandu valley was measured using the following approaches: determination of the proportion of dogs that bore signs of having been the objects of religious worship and other signs of household association, supplemented by information obtained by interviewing people in the neighbourhood; and the vaccination coverage attained in a rabies control campaign that was preceded by intensive activities to encourage the community to participate. An accessibility rate of 90-95% was determined using the first of these approaches, whereas 75-80% of the total dog population was reached in the vaccination campaign. PMID:2289296

  16. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly. PMID:24690508

  17. [Coordination of governmental and public control in providing sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population and consumers' rights protection].

    PubMed

    Rakitin, I A; Zel'din, A L

    2015-01-01

    The article covers features of govenmental and public control in providing sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population and consumers' rights protection. Based on analysis of contemporary legislation, the authors evaluated terms "control" and "supervision", having different legal nature. The authors determined specific traits and define subjects and objects for public control in relationships aimed to provide sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population, evaluated legislative basis of citizens' claims to Rospotrebnadzor, pointed at difficulties in implementation of public control in connection with necessity to create new organizational and legal mechanisms widening control possibilities. PMID:26859972

  18. Control of Boophilus microplus populations in grazing cattle vaccinated with a recombinant Bm86 antigen preparation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M; Penichet, M L; Mouris, A E; Labarta, V; Luaces, L L; Rubiera, R; Cordovés, C; Sánchez, P A; Ramos, E; Soto, A

    1995-04-01

    Current methods for the control of cattle tick Boophilus microplus infestations are not effective and the parasite remains a serious problem for the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical areas. Recently, we developed a vaccine against B. microplus employing a recombinant Bm86 (rBm86) antigen preparation (Gavac, Heber Biotec) and it was shown to induce a protective response in vaccinated animals under controlled conditions. Here we show that, under field conditions in grazing cattle, the vaccine is able to control B. microplus populations. Two parasite-free farms were employed for the study. In the first farm, animals were vaccinated with the recombinant vaccine, while, in the second, animals received a saline injection in adjuvant. After immunization, animals were artificially infected and the infestation rate was recorded. Over the 33 weeks of the experiment, the infestation rate was lower in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. At the end of the experiment it was necessary to use chemicals in the control farm after serious losses in production and animals. PMID:7660571

  19. Leishmania infection in a population of dogs: an epidemiological investigation relating to visceral leishmaniasis control.

    PubMed

    Penaforte, Klauber Menezes; Belo, Vinícius Silva; Teixeira-Neto, Rafael Gonçalves; Ribeiro, Renata Aparecida Nascimento; de Oliveira, Robson Bruniera; Schettini, Dante Alighieri; da Silva, Eduardo Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Identification of factors associated with Leishmania infection in dogs is essential for targeting visceral leishmaniasis control actions. Thus, the present study analyzed some of these factors in a population of dogs in a Brazilian municipality, along with the limitations of control strategies implemented there. The association between the exposure variables and occurrences of infection was analyzed through logistic regression models. The disease control interventions were treated qualitatively. Out of the 755 animals examined, 13.6% (103/755) were seropositive. Of these, 23.3% (24/103) were asymptomatic and 76.7% (79/103) presented at least one clinical sign possibly associated with visceral leishmaniasis. With weak associations, purebred, shorthaired, over 5 years of age, male and large dogs were more prone to infection. The latter two variables formed the final regression model and the association with dog size was statistically significant. The control strategies developed presented limitations and a great number of seronegative dogs was culled. The data presented contribute towards better understanding of the dynamics of infection in canine visceral leishmaniasis and indicate that actions aimed towards adequate implementation of Visceral Leishmaniasis control program in Brazilian endemic areas should be prioritized. PMID:24473887

  20. Level of neurotoxic metals in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bocca, Beatrice; Forte, Giovanni; Oggiano, Riccardo; Clemente, Simonetta; Asara, Yolande; Peruzzu, Angela; Farace, Cristiano; Pala, Salvatore; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Madeddu, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    The association between exposure to toxic metals and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was explored in a population-based case-control study in the Sardinia island (Italy), a region characterized by elevated rates of ALS cases. In 34 patients with ALS (mean age, 62 ± 10 years) and 30 controls (mean age, 65 ± 11 years), Al, Cd, Hg, Mn and Pb were determined in blood, hair and urine by sector field inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Results indicated that, in blood, concentrations of Al (p=0.045) and Pb were higher (p=0.026) in ALS patients than in control subjects. In hair, a depletion of Al (p=0.006) and Mn (p=0.032) concentrations in ALS subjects respect to controls was found. In urine, no significant differences between cases and controls were observed. Thus, some metals seemed to be associated with ALS degeneration, but a definitive conclusion is still far considering the multiple risk factors (genetic mutations, environmental toxicants and stressors) involved in the disease. Finally, the interpretation that deregulated metal concentrations can be a consequence of the degenerative process, rather than a cause, is also valid. PMID:26671079

  1. Population Control of Resident and Immigrant Microglia by Mitosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wirenfeldt, Martin; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Anne Babcock, Alicia; Nielsen, Marianne; Meldgaard, Michael; Zimmer, Jens; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Finsen, Bente

    2007-01-01

    Microglial population expansion occurs in response to neural damage via processes that involve mitosis and immigration of bone marrow-derived cells. However, little is known of the mechanisms that regulate clearance of reactive microglia, when microgliosis diminishes days to weeks later. We have investigated the mechanisms of microglial population control in a well-defined model of reactive microgliosis in the mouse dentate gyrus after perforant pathway axonal lesion. Unbiased stereological methods and flow cytometry demonstrate significant lesion-induced increases in microglial numbers. Reactive microglia often occurred in clusters, some having recently incorporated bromodeoxyuridine, showing that proliferation had occurred. Annexin V labeling and staining for activated caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling showed that apoptotic mechanisms participate in dissolution of the microglial response. Using bone marrow chimeric mice, we found that the lesion-induced proliferative capacity of resident microglia superseded that of immigrant microglia, whereas lesion-induced kinetics of apoptosis were comparable. Microglial numbers and responses were severely reduced in bone marrow chimeric mice. These results broaden our understanding of the microglial response to neural damage by demonstrating that simultaneously occurring mitosis and apoptosis regulate expansion and reduction of both resident and immigrant microglial cell populations. PMID:17600121

  2. Entrainment and Control of Bacterial Populations: An in Silico Study over a Spatially Extended Agent Based Model.

    PubMed

    Mina, Petros; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Bernardo, Mario di

    2016-07-15

    We extend a spatially explicit agent based model (ABM) developed previously to investigate entrainment and control of the emergent behavior of a population of synchronized oscillating cells in a microfluidic chamber. Unlike most of the work in models of control of cellular systems which focus on temporal changes, we model individual cells with spatial dependencies which may contribute to certain behavioral responses. We use the model to investigate the response of both open loop and closed loop strategies, such as proportional control (P-control), proportional-integral control (PI-control) and proportional-integral-derivative control (PID-control), to heterogeinities and growth in the cell population, variations of the control parameters and spatial effects such as diffusion in the spatially explicit setting of a microfluidic chamber setup. We show that, as expected from the theory of phase locking in dynamical systems, open loop control can only entrain the cell population in a subset of forcing periods, with a wide variety of dynamical behaviors obtained outside these regions of entrainment. Closed-loop control is shown instead to guarantee entrainment in a much wider region of control parameter space although presenting limitations when the population size increases over a certain threshold. In silico tracking experiments are also performed to validate the ability of classical control approaches to achieve other reference behaviors such as a desired constant output or a linearly varying one. All simulations are carried out in BSim, an advanced agent-based simulator of microbial population which is here extended ad hoc to include the effects of control strategies acting onto the population. PMID:27110835

  3. A population of glomerular glutamatergic neurons controls sensory information transfer in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Roberta; Seal, Rebecca P.; Edwards, Robert H.; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In sensory systems, peripheral organs convey sensory inputs to relay networks where information is shaped by local microcircuits before being transmitted to cortical areas. In the olfactory system, odorants evoke specific patterns of sensory neuron activity which are transmitted to output neurons in olfactory bulb glomeruli. How sensory information is transferred and shaped at this level remains still unclear. Here we employ mouse genetics, 2-photon microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, to identify a novel population of glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT3+) in the glomerular layer of the adult mouse olfactory bulb as well as several of their synaptic targets. Both peripheral and serotoninergic inputs control VGLUT3+ neurons firing. Furthermore, we show that VGLUT3+ neurons photostimulation in vivo strongly suppresses both spontaneous and odor-evoked firing of bulbar output neurons. In conclusion, we identify and characterize here a microcircuit controlling the transfer of sensory information at an early stage of the olfactory pathway. PMID:24804702

  4. Analysis of Rare, Exonic Variation amongst Subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Population Controls

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Sabo, Aniko; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nagaswamy, Uma; Stevens, Christine; Lim, Elaine; Bodea, Corneliu A.; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Banks, Eric; Coon, Hillary; DePristo, Mark; Dinh, Huyen; Fennel, Tim; Flannick, Jason; Gabriel, Stacey; Garimella, Kiran; Gross, Shannon; Hawes, Alicia; Lewis, Lora; Makarov, Vladimir; Maguire, Jared; Newsham, Irene; Poplin, Ryan; Ripke, Stephan; Shakir, Khalid; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Wu, Yuanqing; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Devlin, Bernie; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Daly, Mark J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    We report on results from whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 1,039 subjects diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 870 controls selected from the NIMH repository to be of similar ancestry to cases. The WES data came from two centers using different methods to produce sequence and to call variants from it. Therefore, an initial goal was to ensure the distribution of rare variation was similar for data from different centers. This proved straightforward by filtering called variants by fraction of missing data, read depth, and balance of alternative to reference reads. Results were evaluated using seven samples sequenced at both centers and by results from the association study. Next we addressed how the data and/or results from the centers should be combined. Gene-based analyses of association was an obvious choice, but should statistics for association be combined across centers (meta-analysis) or should data be combined and then analyzed (mega-analysis)? Because of the nature of many gene-based tests, we showed by theory and simulations that mega-analysis has better power than meta-analysis. Finally, before analyzing the data for association, we explored the impact of population structure on rare variant analysis in these data. Like other recent studies, we found evidence that population structure can confound case-control studies by the clustering of rare variants in ancestry space; yet, unlike some recent studies, for these data we found that principal component-based analyses were sufficient to control for ancestry and produce test statistics with appropriate distributions. After using a variety of gene-based tests and both meta- and mega-analysis, we found no new risk genes for ASD in this sample. Our results suggest that standard gene-based tests will require much larger samples of cases and controls before being effective for gene discovery, even for a disorder like ASD. PMID:23593035

  5. Occupational risk factors for brain cancer: a population-based case-control study in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Zheng, T; Cantor, K P; Zhang, Y; Keim, S; Lynch, C F

    2001-04-01

    A number of occupations and industries have been inconsistently associated with the risk of brain cancer. To further explore possible relationships, we conducted a population-based case-control study of brain glioma in the state of Iowa, involving 375 histologically confirmed incident cases and 2434 population-based controls. Among men, the industries and/or occupations that had a significantly increased risk for employment of more than 10 years included roofing, siding, and sheet metalworking; newspaper work; rubber and plastics products, particularly tires and inner tubes; miscellaneous manufacturing industries; wholesale trade of durable goods, grain, and field beans; cleaning and building service occupations; miscellaneous mechanics and repairers; and janitors and cleaners. Subjects who worked in plumbing, heating, and air conditioning; electrical services; gasoline service stations; and military occupations also experienced a significantly increased risk. Among women, significant excess risk was observed for occupations in agricultural services and farming, apparel and textile products, electrical and electronic equipment manufacturing, various retail sales, record-keeping, and restaurant service. Workers in industries with a potential for gasoline or motor exhaust exposures experienced a non-significant excess risk of brain glioma. PMID:11322092

  6. Mitochondrial DNA control region polymorphism in the population of Alagoas state, north-eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriana B G; da Silva, Luiz Antonio F; Azevedo, Dalmo A; Balbino, Valdir Q; Mauricio-da-Silva, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    The sequences of the two hypervariable (HV) segments of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region were determined in 167 randomly selected, unrelated individuals living in the state of Alagoas, north-eastern Brazil. One hundred and forty-five different haplotypes, associated with 139 variable positions, were determined. More than 95% of the mtDNA sequences could be allocated to specific mtDNA haplogroups according to the mutational motifs. Length heteroplasmy in the C-stretch HV1 and HV2 regions was observed in 22 and 11%, respectively, of the population sample. The genetic diversity was estimated to be 0.9975 and the probability of two random individuals presenting identical mtDNA haplotypes was 0.0084. The most frequent haplotype was shared by six individuals. All sequences showed high-quality values and phantom mutations were not detected. The diversity revealed in the mitochondrial control region indicates the importance of this locus for forensic casework and population studies within Alagoas, Brazil. PMID:18279250

  7. Controlling S2 Population in Cyanine Dyes Using Shaped Femtosecond Pulses.

    PubMed

    Nairat, Muath; Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Beck, Warren F; Blanchard, G J; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-24

    Fast population transfer from higher to lower excited states occurs via internal conversion (IC) and is the basis of Kasha's rule, which states that spontaneous emission takes place from the lowest excited state of the same multiplicity. Photonic control over IC is of interest because it would allow direct influence over intramolecular nonradiative decay processes occurring in condensed phase. Here we tracked the S2 and S1 fluorescence yield for different cyanine dyes in solution as a function of linear chirp. For the cyanine dyes with polar solvation response IR144 and meso-piperidine substituted IR806, increased S2 emission was observed when using transform limited pulses, whereas chirped pulses led to increased S1 emission. The nonpolar solvated cyanine IR806, on the other hand, did not show S2 emission. A theoretical model, based on a nonperturbative solution of the equation of motion for the density matrix, is offered to explain and simulate the anomalous chirp dependence. Our findings, which depend on pulse properties beyond peak intensity, offer a photonic method to control S2 population thereby opening the door for the exploration of photochemical processes initiated from higher excited states. PMID:26935762

  8. A Survey to Identify University Student Attitudes toward the Role of Government in Controlling Human Population Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Thomas E.

    The purpose of this study was to obtain, measure, and evaluate the attitudes of postsecondary students on domestic population issues in order to determine the extent of support for a national government-controlled population stabilization program. A total of 125 students enrolled in either the American government or general sociology course at the…

  9. Disrupted Brain Networks in the Aging HIV+ Population

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Valcour, Victor G.; Nir, Talia M.; Kohannim, Omid; Busovaca, Edgar; Nicolas, Krista

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral therapies have become widely available, and as a result, individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer, and becoming integrated into the geriatric population. Around half of the HIV+ population shows some degree of cognitive impairment, but it is unknown how their neural networks and brain connectivity compare to those of noninfected people. Here we combined magnetic resonance imaging-based cortical parcellations with high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging tractography in 55 HIV-seropositive patients and 30 age-matched controls, to map white matter connections between cortical regions. We set out to determine selective virus-associated disruptions in the brain's structural network. All individuals in this study were aged 60–80, with full access to antiretroviral therapy. Frontal and motor connections were compromised in HIV+ individuals. HIV+ people who carried the apolipoprotein E4 allele (ApoE4) genotype—which puts them at even greater risk for neurodegeneration—showed additional network structure deficits in temporal and parietal connections. The ApoE4 genotype interacted with duration of illness. Carriers showed greater brain network inefficiencies the longer they were infected. Neural network deficiencies in HIV+ populations exceed those typical of normal aging, and are worse in those genetically predisposed to brain degeneration. This work isolates neuropathological alterations in HIV+ elders, even when treated with antiretroviral therapy. Network impairments may contribute to the neuropsychological abnormalities in elderly HIV patients, who will soon account for around half of all HIV+ adults. PMID:23240599

  10. Risk of miscarriage for pregnant users of pivmecillinam: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Mette; Skriver, Mette Vinther; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Pedersen, Lars

    2008-04-01

    Few data exist on the risk of miscarriage after exposure to pivmecillinam. We therefore conducted a population-based case-control study in a Danish county with 0.5 million inhabitants during the period 1997-2002. We included 1,599 women with a miscarriage recorded in the Hospital Discharge Registry and selected 10 controls per case among primiparous women who had a live birth during the study period. Controls were selected from the Danish Medical Birth Registry. We obtained data on use of pivmecillinam and sulfamethizole from a prescription database. Five cases (0.30%) and 24 controls (0.15%) were exposed to pivmecillinam in the last week before the miscarriage/index date. After adjustment for maternal age, use of antidiabetics or antiepileptics, the odds ratio for miscarriages among users of pivmecillinam compared with non-users was 2.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.77-5.33) and the corresponding odds ratio for use of sulfamethizole was 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 0.76-3.09). Exposure within 2 to 12 weeks before the miscarriage was not associated with an increased risk. We concluded that use of pivmecillinam was associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, but the risk was not significantly (p=0.64) different from the risk associated with use of sulfamethizole. PMID:18397462

  11. Serum trace element differences between Schizophrenia patients and controls in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lei; Chen, Tianlu; Yang, Jinglei; Zhou, Kejun; Yan, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenzhong; Sun, Liya; Li, Linlin; Qin, Shengying; Wang, Peng; Yang, Ping; Cui, Donghong; Burmeister, Margit; He, Lin; Jia, Wei; Wan, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the trace element profile differences between Schizophrenia patients and healthy controls; previous studies about the association of certain elements with Schizophrenia have obtained conflicting results. To identify these differences in the Han Chinese population, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantify the levels of 35 elements in the sera of 111 Schizophrenia patients and 110 healthy participants, which consisted of a training (61/61 for cases/controls included) and a test group including remaining participants. An orthogonal projection to latent structures model was constructed from the training group (R(2)Y = 0.465, Q(2)cum = 0.343) had a sensitivity of 76.0% and a specificity of 71.4% in the test group. Single element analysis indicated that the concentrations of cesium, zinc, and selenium were significantly reduced in patients with Schizophrenia in both the training and test groups. The meta-analysis including 522 cases and 360 controls supported that Zinc was significantly associated with Schizophrenia (standardized mean difference [SMD], -0.81; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -1.46 to -0.16, P = 0.01) in the random-effect model. Information theory analysis indicated that Zinc could play roles independently in Schizophrenia. These results suggest clear element profile differences between patients with Schizophrenia and healthy controls, and reduced Zn level is confirmed in the Schizophrenia patients. PMID:26456296

  12. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p < 0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of GERD for cases was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08~2.33) compared to controls. The adjusted ORs of prior GERD for patients aged 18~39, 40~59, and ≥60 years with appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group. PMID:26932391

  13. Serum trace element differences between Schizophrenia patients and controls in the Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Chen, Tianlu; Yang, Jinglei; Zhou, Kejun; Yan, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenzhong; Sun, Liya; Li, Linlin; Qin, Shengying; Wang, Peng; Yang, Ping; Cui, Donghong; Burmeister, Margit; He, Lin; Jia, Wei; Wan, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the trace element profile differences between Schizophrenia patients and healthy controls; previous studies about the association of certain elements with Schizophrenia have obtained conflicting results. To identify these differences in the Han Chinese population, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantify the levels of 35 elements in the sera of 111 Schizophrenia patients and 110 healthy participants, which consisted of a training (61/61 for cases/controls included) and a test group including remaining participants. An orthogonal projection to latent structures model was constructed from the training group (R2Y = 0.465, Q2cum = 0.343) had a sensitivity of 76.0% and a specificity of 71.4% in the test group. Single element analysis indicated that the concentrations of cesium, zinc, and selenium were significantly reduced in patients with Schizophrenia in both the training and test groups. The meta-analysis including 522 cases and 360 controls supported that Zinc was significantly associated with Schizophrenia (standardized mean difference [SMD], −0.81; 95% confidence intervals [CI], −1.46 to −0.16, P = 0.01) in the random-effect model. Information theory analysis indicated that Zinc could play roles independently in Schizophrenia. These results suggest clear element profile differences between patients with Schizophrenia and healthy controls, and reduced Zn level is confirmed in the Schizophrenia patients. PMID:26456296

  14. Rate control in yeast protein synthesis at the population and single-cell levels.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Estelle; Firczuk, Helena; McCarthy, John E G

    2015-12-01

    Yeast commits approximately 76% of its energy budget to protein synthesis and the efficiency and control of this process are accordingly critical to organism growth and fitness. We now have detailed genetic, biochemical and biophysical knowledge of the components of the eukaryotic translation machinery. However, these kinds of information do not, in themselves, give us a satisfactory picture of how the overall system is controlled. This is where quantitative system analysis can enable a step-change in our understanding of biological resource management and how this relates to cell physiology and evolution. An important aspect of this more system-oriented approach to translational control is the inherent heterogeneity of cell populations that is generated by gene expression noise. In this short review, we address the fact that, although the vast majority of our knowledge of the translation machinery is based on experimental analysis of samples that each contain hundreds of millions of cells, in reality every cell is unique in terms of its composition and control properties. We have entered a new era in which research into the heterogeneity of cell systems promises to provide answers to many (previously unanswerable) questions about cell physiology and evolution. PMID:26614671

  15. Multidimensional morphometric 3D MRI analyses for detecting brain abnormalities in children: impact of control population.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Rose, Douglas F; Holland, Scott K; Leach, James L

    2014-07-01

    Automated morphometric approaches are used to detect epileptogenic structural abnormalities in 3D MR images in adults, using the variance of a control population to obtain z-score maps in an individual patient. Due to the substantial changes the developing human brain undergoes, performing such analyses in children is challenging. This study investigated six features derived from high-resolution T1 datasets in four groups: normal children (1.5T or 3T data), normal clinical scans (3T data), and patients with structural brain lesions (3T data), with each n = 10. Normative control data were obtained from the NIH study on normal brain development (n = 401). We show that control group size substantially influences the captured variance, directly impacting the patient's z-scores. Interestingly, matching on gender does not seem to be beneficial, which was unexpected. Using data obtained at higher field scanners produces slightly different base rates of suprathreshold voxels, as does using clinically derived normal studies, suggesting a subtle but systematic effect of both factors. Two approaches for controlling suprathreshold voxels in a multidimensional approach (combining features and requiring a minimum cluster size) were shown to be substantial and effective in reducing this number. Finally, specific strengths and limitations of such an approach could be demonstrated in individual cases. PMID:25050423

  16. Caesarean Delivery and Postpartum Maternal Mortality: A Population-Based Case Control Study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Esteves-Pereira, Ana Paula; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Saucedo, Monica; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery rates continue to increase worldwide and reached 57% in Brazil in 2014. Although the safety of this surgery has improved in the last decades, this trend is a concern because it carries potential risks to women’s health and may be a modifiable risk factor of maternal mortality. This paper aims to investigate the risk of postpartum maternal death directly associated with cesarean delivery in comparison to vaginal delivery in Brazil. Methods This was a population-based case—control study performed in eight Brazilian states. To control for indication bias, deaths due to antenatal morbidity were excluded. We included 73 cases of postpartum maternal deaths from 2009–2012. Controls were selected from the Birth in Brazil Study, a 2011 nationwide survey including 9,221 postpartum women. We examined the association of cesarean section and postpartum maternal death by multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for confounders. Results After controlling for indication bias and confounders, the risk of postpartum maternal death was almost three-fold higher with cesarean than vaginal delivery (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.63–5.06), mainly due to deaths from postpartum hemorrhage and complications of anesthesia. Conclusion Cesarean delivery is an independent risk factor of postpartum maternal death. Clinicians and patients should consider this fact in balancing the benefits and risks of the procedure. PMID:27073870

  17. Organochlorine Pesticides and Risk of Endometriosis: Findings from a Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Thompson, Mary Lou; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Scholes, Delia; Barr, Dana Boyd; Holt, Victoria L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is considered an estrogen-dependent disease. Persistent environmental chemicals that exhibit hormonal properties, such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), may affect endometriosis risk. Objective: We investigated endometriosis risk in relation to environmental exposure to OCPs. Methods: We conducted the present analyses using data from the Women’s Risk of Endometriosis (WREN) study, a population-based case–control study of endometriosis conducted among 18- to 49-year-old female enrollees of a large health care system in western Washington State. OCP concentrations were measured in sera from surgically confirmed endometriosis cases (n = 248) first diagnosed between 1996 and 2001 and from population-based controls (n = 538). We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, reference date year, serum lipids, education, race/ethnicity, smoking, and alcohol intake. Results: Our data suggested increased endometriosis risk associated with serum concentrations of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (third vs. lowest quartile: OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.8; highest vs. lowest quartile OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.8, 2.4) and mirex (highest vs. lowest category: OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.2). The association between serum β-HCH concentrations and endometriosis was stronger in analyses restricting cases to those with ovarian endometriosis (third vs. lowest quartile: OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.5, 5.2; highest vs. lowest quartile: OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1, 5.3). Conclusions: In our case–control study of women enrolled in a large health care system in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, serum concentrations of β-HCH and mirex were positively associated with endometriosis. Extensive past use of environmentally persistent OCPs in the United States or present use in other countries may affect the health of reproductive-age women. Citation: Upson K, De Roos AJ, Thompson ML, Sathyanarayana S, Scholes D, Barr DB, Holt VL. 2013

  18. Control of flea populations in a simulated home environment model using lufenuron, imidacloprid or fipronil.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, D E; Hutchinson, M J; Ryan, W G

    2001-03-01

    Control strategies were evaluated over a 6-month period in a home simulation model comprising a series of similar carpeted pens, housing matched groups of six cats, in which the life-cycle of the flea Ctenocephalides felis felis Bouche (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) had been established. Additional adult fleas were placed on the cats at intervals to mimic acquisition of extraneous fleas from outside the home. Treatment strategies included a single subcutaneous deposition of injectable lufenuron supported by initial treatments with a short-acting insecticidal spray, or monthly topical applications of imidacloprid or fipronil. An untreated control group indicated that conditions were suitable for flea replication and development. Controls had to be combed on 18 occasions to remove excessive flea burdens and two developed allergic reactions. Lufenuron cats were combed once and required two insecticidal treatments in the first month to achieve control. Even so, small flea burdens were constantly present thereafter. Imidacloprid and fipronil treatments appeared to give virtually complete control throughout. Single fleas were found on imidacloprid cats on two occasions, whereas none were recovered from fipronil cats at any time after the first treatment. Tracer cats were used to monitor re-infestation rates at the end of the trial period. Small numbers of host-seeking fleas were demonstrated in all treatment pens, indicating that total eradication had not been accomplished. It is concluded that the home environment simulation model incorporating tracer animals could provide a powerful tool for studying flea population dynamics under controlled conditions but improved techniques are needed for quantifying other off-host life-cycle stages. PMID:11297105

  19. Selection of an effective microsatellite marker system for genetic control and analysis of gerbil populations in China.

    PubMed

    Du, X Y; Li, W; Sa, X Y; Li, C L; Lu, J; Wang, Y Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Although gerbils have been widely used in many areas of biological research over many years, there is currently no effective genetic quality control system available. In the present study, we sought to establish a microsatellite marker system for quality control and conducted an optimized analysis of 137 microsatellite loci in two laboratory gerbil populations and one wild population. Independent sample t-tests on the mean effective allele number, mean of Shannon's information index, and mean HE suggested that 28 of the 137 microsatellite markers were informative for gerbil genetic control. Analysis of 4 laboratory gerbil populations and 1 wild population using the 28 microsatellite loci indicated that allele numbers varied from 1.9639 (Guangzhou, GZ) to 6.6071 (North-West wild, NW). The average of HO versus HE was 0.6236/0.3802, 0.6671/0.4159, 0.4185/0.3464, 0.4592/0.3821, and 0.3972/0.4167 for the Beijing, NW, Hangzhou, Dalian, and GZ populations, respectively. The GZ population showed the greatest differentiation, having higher RST and Nei's standard genetic distances. An AMO-VA revealed high genetic differentiation among the five populations (FST = 0.296). The microsatellite system established here is effective and will be important in future studies for genetic quality control and monitoring of gerbil breeds. PMID:26400333

  20. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  1. Serum Homocysteine and Total Antioxidant Status in Vitiligo: A Case Control Study in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shikha; D'souza, Paschal; Dhali, Tapan Kumar; Arora, Sarika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress is considered as an initial pathogenic event in melanocyte destruction. These free radicals are scavenged by antioxidants, whose sum of activity in serum is measured by total antioxidant status (TAS). In addition, homocysteine (Hcy) may mediate melanocyte destruction via increased oxidative damage. However, previous studies investigating these parameters in vitiligo provide equivocal results. Aims: To study and compare serum Hcy and TAS levels in vitiligo patients with controls and also to correlate these parameters with the various disease characteristics. The present study further looked into any correlation between serum Hcy and TAS in vitiligo. Materials and Methods: A case control study was conducted on 82 vitiligo patients and 83 controls aged 18–45 years after excluding factors which could potentially alter serum Hcy or TAS levels. Disease characteristics were studied and blood samples were obtained for measuring serum Hcy and TAS levels. Results: TAS levels were lower in vitiligo patients than controls (1.79 ± 0.51 vs. 2.16 ± 0.63 mmol/L; P < 0.001) and had a negative correlation with disease activity (r = −0.410, P < 0.001). However, serum Hcy levels were comparable between vitiligo patients (18.68 ± 9.90 μmol/L) and controls (20.21 ± 13.39 μmol/L) (P = 0.406). No significant correlation was found between serum Hcy and serum TAS levels. Conclusions: Serum TAS may be further investigated to establish its role as biomarker for vitiligo since its levels also correlate with disease activity. However, serum Hcy may not be a reliable marker in Indian population probably because of differences in dietary habits. PMID:27057010

  2. TickBot: a novel robotic device for controlling tick populations in the natural environment.

    PubMed

    Gaff, Holly D; White, Alexis; Leas, Kyle; Kelman, Pamela; Squire, James C; Livingston, David L; Sullivan, Gerald A; Baker, Elizabeth W; Sonenshine, Daniel E

    2015-03-01

    A semi-autonomous 4-wheeled robot (TickBot) was fitted with a denim cloth treated with an acaricide (permethrin™) and tested for its ability to control ticks in a tick-infested natural environment in Portsmouth, Virginia. The robot's sensors detect a magnetic field signal from a guide wire encased in 80m polyethylene tubing, enabling the robot to follow the trails, open areas and other terrain where the tubing was located. To attract ticks to the treated area, CO2 was distributed through the same tubing, fitted with evenly spaced pores and flow control valves, which permitted uniform CO2 distribution. Tests were done to determine the optimum frequency for TickBot to traverse the wire-guided treatment site as well as the duration of operation that could be accomplished on a single battery charge. Prior to treatment, dragging was done to determine the natural abundance of ticks in the test site. Controls were done without CO2 and without permethrin. TickBot proved highly effective in reducing the overall tick densities to nearly zero with the treatment that included both carbon dioxide pretreatment and the permethrin treated cloth. Following a 60min traverse of the treatment areas, adult tick numbers, almost entirely Amblyomma americanum, was reduced to zero within 1h and remained at or near zero for 24h. Treatments without CO2 also showed reduction of ticks to near zero within 1h, but the populations were no different than the control sections at 4h. This study demonstrates the efficacy of TickBot as a tick control device to significantly reduce the risk of tick bites and disease transmission to humans and companion animals visiting a previously tick-infested natural environment. Continued deployment of TickBot for additional days or weeks can assure a relatively tick-safe environment for enjoyment by the public. PMID:25499615

  3. Coherent Control of Population Transfer via Linear Chirp in Liquid Solution: The Role of Motional Narrowing.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, Porscha L; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    The conditions under which linear chirp can be used to control population transfer between the electronic states of a chromophore dissolved in liquid solution are investigated. To this end, we model the chromophore as a two-state system with shifted electronic potential energy surfaces and a fluctuating electronic transition frequency. The fluctuations are described as an exponentially correlated Gaussian stochastic process, which can be characterized by the average fluctuation amplitude, σ, and correlation time, τc. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for an ensemble of stochastic histories, at different values of σ and τc, and under a wide range of pulse intensities and linear chirp coefficients. In the limit τc → ∞, we find that control diminishes rapidly as soon as σ exceeds the bandwidth of the pulse. However, we also find that control can be regained by reducing τc. We attribute this trend to motional narrowing, whereby decreasing τc narrows down the effective bandwidth of the solvent-induced fluctuations. The results suggest that the choice of methanol as a solvent in the actual experimental demonstration of chirp control by Cerullo et al. [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1996 , 262 , 362 - 368 ] may have contributed to its success, due to the particularly short τc (∼20 fs) that the rapid librations of this hydrogen bonded liquid give rise to. The results also give rise to the rather surprising prediction that coherent control in liquid solution can be strongly dependent on the choice of solvent and be improved upon by choosing solvents that correspond to lower values of στc. PMID:26595412

  4. [Economic and social impact of the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTCP) on the Cuban population].

    PubMed

    González, E; Armas, L; Baly, A; Gálvez, A; Alvarez, M; Ferrer, G; Mesa, A C

    2000-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies provide one of the greatest cost/effectiveness results. To assess the impact of the national TB control program on the Cuban population, the time series of new TB cases and death reports, potential years of life lost, and the numbers of beds for TB case hospitalization in the entire country during 1964-91 and 1992-96 were described by common simple calculation on the basis of estimated expected values. The reduction in new TB cases and deaths, potential years of life saved, and savings in expenditures for treatment, hospitalization, and unemployment compensation were estimated. From 1965 to 1991 new case reports were reduced by 94.6% (4% per year); 86,500 cases were avoided; 166,439 potential years of life were saved; 2,831,625 million pesos were saved on tuberculostatic drugs; 82.7 million pesos were saved on unemployment compensation under the social security system for workers with active TB. Estimated savings totaled 494,919,631.3 pesos. Nationwide intervention for TB control produced an important impact on the basis of the sociopolitical status making it possible to approach complete elimination of the disease in the future. PMID:11035508

  5. Statin use and the risk of colorectal cancer: A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ho, Shu-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the use of statins is associated with colorectal cancer risk. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Data were retrospectively collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Cases consisted of all patients who were aged 50 years and older and had a first-time diagnosis of colorectal cancer between the period 2005 and 2008. The controls were matched to cases by age, sex, and index date. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: We examined 1156 colorectal cancer cases and 4624 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 1.10 (95% CI = 0.94-1.30) and the adjusted OR was 1.09 (95% CI = 0.91-1.30). When statin use was categorized by cumulative dose, the adjusted ORs were 0.99 (95% CI = 0.78-1.27) for the group with cumulative statin use below 105 defined daily doses (DDDs); 1.07 (95% CI = 0.78-1.49) for the group with cumulative statin use between 106 and 298.66 DDDs; and 1.30 (95% CI = 0.96-1.75) for the group with cumulative statin use of 298.66 DDDs or more compared with nonusers. CONCLUSION: This study does not provide support for a protective effect of statins against colorectal cancer. PMID:22215945

  6. Climate control on ancestral population dynamics: insight from Patagonian fish phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Ruzzante, Daniel E; Walde, Sandra J; Gosse, John C; Cussac, Victor E; Habit, Evelyn; Zemlak, Tyler S; Adams, Emily D M

    2008-05-01

    Changes in lake and stream habitats during the growth and retreat of Pleistocene glaciers repeatedly altered the spatial distributions and population sizes of the aquatic fauna of the southern Andes. Here, we use variation in mtDNA control region sequences to infer the temporal dynamics of two species of southern Andean fish during the past few million years. At least five important climate events were associated with major demographic changes: (i) the widespread glaciations of the mid-Pliocene (c. 3.5 Ma); (ii) the largest Patagonian glaciation (1.1 Ma); (iii) the coldest Pleistocene glaciation as indicated by stacked marine delta(18)O (c. 0.7 Ma); (iv) the last southern Patagonian glaciation to reach the Atlantic coast (180 ka); and (v) the last glacial maximum (LGM, 23-25,000 years ago). The colder-water inhabitant, Galaxias platei, underwent a strong bottleneck during the LGM and its haplotype diversity coalesces c. 0.7 Ma. In contrast, the more warm-adapted and widely distributed Percichthys trucha showed continuous growth through the last two glacial cycles but went through an important bottleneck c. 180,000 years ago, at which time populations east of the Andes may have been eliminated. Haplotype diversity of the most divergent P. trucha populations, found west of the Andes, coalesces c. 3.2 Ma. The demographic timelines obtained for the two species thus illustrate the continent-wide response of aquatic life in Patagonia to climate change during the Pleistocene, but also show how differing ecological traits and distributions led to distinctive responses. PMID:18363661

  7. Genome-Wide Association Studies of HIV-1 Host Control in Ethnically Diverse Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zejun; Liu, Yang; Xu, Heng; Tang, Kun; Wu, Hao; Lu, Lin; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Zhengjie; Xu, Junjie; Zhu, Yufei; Hu, Landian; Shang, Hong; Zhao, Guoping; Kong, Xiangyin

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed several genetic loci associated with HIV-1 outcome following infection (e.g., HLA-C at 6p21.33) in multi-ethnic populations with genetic heterogeneity and racial/ethnic differences among Caucasians, African-Americans, and Hispanics. To systematically investigate the inherited predisposition to modulate HIV-1 infection in Chinese populations, we performed GWASs in three ethnically diverse HIV-infected patients groups (i.e., HAN, YUN, and XIN, N = 538). The reported loci at 6p21.33 was validated in HAN (e.g., rs9264942, P = 0.0018). An independent association signal (rs2442719, P = 7.85 × 10−7, HAN group) in the same region was observed. Imputation results suggest that haplotype HLA-B*13:02/C*06:02, which can partially account for the GWAS signal, is associated with lower viral load in Han Chinese. Moreover, several novel loci were identified using GWAS approach including the top association signals at 6q13 (KCNQ5, rs947612, P = 2.15 × 10−6), 6p24.1 (PHACTR1, rs202072, P = 3.8 × 10−6), and 11q12.3 (SCGB1D4, rs11231017, P = 7.39 × 10−7) in HAN, YUN, and XIN groups, respectively. Our findings imply shared or specific mechanisms for host control of HIV-1 in ethnically diverse Chinese populations, which may shed new light on individualized HIV/AIDS therapy in China. PMID:26039976

  8. Soil Geochemical Control Over Nematode Populations in Bull Pass, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poage, M. A.; Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Wall, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys occupy the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and are characterized by climatic conditions among the most extreme on Earth. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, some soils of the dry valleys host simple low-diversity ecosystems dominated by microbes and several taxa of metazoans, predominantly nematodes. Distributions, abundance, and diversity of these biota appear to be related to the highly variable soil geochemistry (pH, conductivity, nitrate, sulfate, chloride) of the dry valleys. Bull Pass is a glacially carved valley within the dry valleys. An ancient lake margin near the valley floor creates a continuous gradient spanning the full range of geochemical parameters found across the entire McMurdo Dry Valleys system. This unique setting provides the opportunity to systematically investigate the soil geochemical control on local biodiversity and establish, on the spatial scale of hundreds of meters, correlations between nematode populations and individual geochemical parameters that have application at the regional scale. We measured soil geochemistry and nematode population data from a 1500-meter transect across this ancient lake margin. There were significant negative correlations between live nematode abundance and concentrations of soil nitrate, sulfate and chloride as well as total soil salinity, consistent with recent laboratory experiments showing strong salinity inhibition of nematode survival. A logistical regression analysis based on a compilation of published datasets from across the dry valleys was designed to calculate the probably of live nematode populations occurring given a particular soil chemistry, using the dataset from the Bull Pass transect as a case study to field-test the model. Small-scale chemical and biological gradients can provide insights on the distribution of soil biota at much larger regional scales.

  9. Controlling malaria: competition, seasonality and 'slingshotting' transgenic mosquitoes into natural populations.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, W M; Bronnikova, T V

    2009-03-01

    Forty years after the World Health Organization abandoned its eradication campaign, malaria remains a public health problem of the first magnitude with worldwide infection rates on the order of 300 million souls. The present paper reviews potential control strategies from the viewpoint of mathematical epidemiology. Following MacDonald and others, we argue in Section 1 that the use of imagicides, i.e., killing, or at least repelling, adult mosquitoes, is inherently the most effective way of combating the pandemic. In Section 2, we model competition between wild-type (WT) and plasmodium-resistant, genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes. Under the assumptions of inherent cost and prevalence-dependant benefit to transgenics, GM introduction can never eradicate malaria save by stochastic extinction of WTs. Moreover, alternative interventions that reduce prevalence have the undesirable consequence of reducing the likelihood of successful GM introduction. Section 3 considers the possibility of using seasonal fluctuations in mosquito abundance and disease prevalence to 'slingshot' GM mosquitoes into natural populations. By introducing GM mosquitoes when natural populations are about to expand, one can 'piggyback' on the yearly cycle. Importantly, this effect is only significant when transgene cost is small, in which case the non-trivial equilibrium is a focus (damped oscillations), and piggybacking is amplified by the system's inherent tendency to oscillate. By way of contrast, when transgene cost is large, the equilibrium is a node and no such amplification is obtained. PMID:22880835

  10. Sequence polymorphism of the mitochondrial DNA control region in the population of Vojvodina Province, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Zgonjanin, Dragana; Veselinović, Igor; Kubat, Milovan; Furac, Ivana; Antov, Mirjana; Loncar, Eva; Tasić, Milos; Vuković, Radenko; Omorjan, Radovan

    2010-03-01

    In order to generate and establish the database for forensic identification purposes in Vojvodina Province (Serbia), the sequence of the hypervariable regions 1 (HV1) and 2 (HV2) of the mtDNA control region were determined in a population of 104 unrelated individuals from Vojvodina Province, using a fluorescent-based capillary electrophoresis sequencing method. A total of 93 different haplotypes were found, of these 83 mtDNA types were unique, nine haplotypes were shared by two individuals and one haplotype by three individuals. The variation of mtDNA HV1 and HV2 regions was confined to 116 nucleotide positions, of which 72 were observed in the HV1 and 44 in the HV2. A statistical estimate of the results for this population showed the genetic diversity of 0.9977 and the random match probability of 1.18%. Haplogroup H was the most common haplogroup (43.3%). Haplogroups observed at intermediate levels included clusters U (13.5%), T (10.6%), J (8.6%) and W (5.8%). PMID:19962932

  11. Evidence that sea lamprey control led to recovery of the burbot population in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, M.A.; Madenjian, C.P.; Witzel, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1987 and 2003, the abundance of burbot Lota lota in eastern Lake Erie increased significantly, especially in Ontario waters. We considered four hypotheses to explain this increase: (1) reduced competition with lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, the other major coldwater piscivore in Lake Erie; (2) increased abundance of the two main prey species, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax and round goby Neogobius melanostomus; (3) reduced interference with burbot reproduction by alewives Alosa pseudoharengus; and (4) reduced predation by sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus on burbot. Species abundance data did not support the first three hypotheses. Our results suggested that the apparent recovery of the burbot population of Lake Erie was driven by effective sea lamprey control. Sea lamprey predation appeared to be the common factor affecting burbot abundance in Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. In addition, relatively high alewife density probably depressed burbot abundance in Lakes Ontario and Michigan. We propose that a healthy adult lake trout population may augment burbot recovery in some lakes by serving as a buffer against sea lamprey predation and will not negatively impact burbot through competition.

  12. Quantifying penetrance in a dominant disease gene using large population control cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Minikel, Eric Vallabh; Vallabh, Sonia M.; Lek, Monkol; Estrada, Karol; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah; McLean, Cory Y.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Yu, Linda P.C.; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Blevins, Janis; Zhang, Shulin; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Yamada, Masahito; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Collins, Steven J.; Boyd, Alison; Will, Robert G.; Knight, Richard; Ponto, Claudia; Zerr, Inga; Kraus, Theo F.J.; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Giese, Armin; Calero, Miguel; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Haïk, Stéphane; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Bouaziz-Amar, Elodie; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Capellari, Sabina; Parchi, Piero; Poleggi, Anna; Ladogana, Anna; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Marshall, Jamie L.; Boehnke, Michael; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L.; Kähler, Anna; Chambert, Kimberly; McCarroll, Steven; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Sklar, Pamela; van der Lee, Sven J.; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Jansen, Casper; Hofman, Albert; Kraaij, Robert; van Rooij, Jeroen G.J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Daly, Mark J.; MacArthur, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100,000 genetic variants are reported to cause Mendelian disease in humans, but the penetrance - the probability that a carrier of the purported disease-causing genotype will indeed develop the disease - is generally unknown. Here we assess the impact of variants in the prion protein gene (PRNP) on the risk of prion disease by analyzing 16,025 prion disease cases, 60,706 population control exomes, and 531,575 individuals genotyped by 23andMe, Inc. We show that missense variants in PRNP previously reported to be pathogenic are at least 30× more common in the population than expected based on genetic prion disease prevalence. While some of this excess can be attributed to benign variants falsely assigned as pathogenic, other variants have genuine effects on disease susceptibility but confer lifetime risks ranging from <0.1% to ~100%. We also show that truncating variants in PRNP have position-dependent effects, with true loss-of-function alleles found in healthy older individuals, supporting the safety of therapeutic suppression of prion protein expression. PMID:26791950

  13. Electroencephalographic coherence in Alzheimer's disease: comparisons with a control group and population norms.

    PubMed

    Knott, V; Mohr, E; Mahoney, C; Ilivitsky, V

    2000-01-01

    Previous research from independent laboratories has shown reduced electroencephalographic coherence in patients diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). This study added to this work by comparing interhemispheric and intrahemispheric coherence in nonmedicated DAT patients (n = 35) with that of a normal control group (n = 30), as well as with a data bank of population norms. Raw and Z-score transformed values showed reduced coherence, interhemispherically (in delta, theta, alpha, and beta bands) and intrahemispherically (delta and theta bands) in DAT patients with both comparison procedures. Discriminant analysis correctly classified 73% to 75% of patients. The results are discussed in relation to earlier research, "trait" versus "state" factors, the cholinergic system, and cognitive processes in dementia. PMID:10753001

  14. Investigation of mtDNA control region sequences in an Egyptian population sample.

    PubMed

    Elmadawy, Mostafa Ali; Nagai, Atsushi; Gomaa, Ghada M; Hegazy, Hanaa M R; Shaaban, Fawzy Eid; Bunai, Yasuo

    2013-11-01

    The sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region were investigated in 101 unrelated individuals living in the northern region of Nile delta (Gharbia, N=55 and Kafrelsheikh, N=46). DNA was extracted from blood stained filter papers or buccal swabs. HV1, HV2 and HV3 were PCR amplified and sequenced; the resulted sequences were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). The results revealed presence of total 93 different haplotypes, 86 of them are unique and 7 are shared haplotypes, the most common haplotype, was observed with a frequency, 2.97% of population sample. High mtDNA diversity was observed with genetic diversity and power of discrimination, 0.9982 and 0.9883, respectively. In this dataset the west Eurasian haplogroups predominated over the African haplogroups. The results would be useful for forensic examinations and human genetic studies. PMID:23910099

  15. A Specific Population of Reticulospinal Neurons Controls the Termination of Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Juvin, Laurent; Grätsch, Swantje; Trillaud-Doppia, Emilie; Gariépy, Jean-François; Büschges, Ansgar; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-06-14

    Locomotion requires the proper sequencing of neural activity to start, maintain, and stop it. Recently, brainstem neurons were shown to specifically stop locomotion in mammals. However, the cellular properties of these neurons and their activity during locomotion are still unknown. Here, we took advantage of the lamprey model to characterize the activity of a cell population that we now show to be involved in stopping locomotion. We find that these neurons display a burst of spikes that coincides with the end of swimming activity. Their pharmacological activation ends ongoing swimming, whereas the inactivation of these neurons dramatically impairs the rapid termination of swimming. These neurons are henceforth referred to as stop cells, because they play a crucial role in the termination of locomotion. Our findings contribute to the fundamental understanding of motor control and provide important details about the cellular mechanisms involved in locomotor termination. PMID:27264174

  16. Predicting the Timing and Magnitude of Tropical Mosquito Population Peaks for Maximizing Control Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Brook, Barry W.; Bradshaw, Corey J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The transmission of mosquito-borne diseases is strongly linked to the abundance of the host vector. Identifying the environmental and biological precursors which herald the onset of peaks in mosquito abundance would give health and land-use managers the capacity to predict the timing and distribution of the most efficient and cost-effective mosquito control. We analysed a 15-year time series of monthly abundance of Aedes vigilax, a tropical mosquito species from northern Australia, to determine periodicity and drivers of population peaks (high-density outbreaks). Two sets of density-dependent models were used to examine the correlation between mosquito abundance peaks and the environmental drivers of peaks or troughs (low-density periods). The seasonal peaks of reproduction (r) and abundance () occur at the beginning of September and early November, respectively. The combination of low mosquito abundance and a low frequency of a high tide exceeding 7 m in the previous low-abundance (trough) period were the most parsimonious predictors of a peak's magnitude, with this model explaining over 50% of the deviance in . Model weights, estimated using AICc, were also relatively high for those including monthly maximum tide height, monthly accumulated tide height or total rainfall per month in the trough, with high values in the trough correlating negatively with the onset of a high-abundance peak. These findings illustrate that basic environmental monitoring data can be coupled with relatively simple density feedback models to predict the timing and magnitude of mosquito abundance peaks. Decision-makers can use these methods to determine optimal levels of control (i.e., least-cost measures yielding the largest decline in mosquito abundance) and so reduce the risk of disease outbreaks in human populations. PMID:19238191

  17. Population-based case-control study of childhood leukemia in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, X.O.; Gao, Y.T.; Brinton, L.A.; Linet, M.S.; Tu, J.T.; Zheng, W.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1988-08-01

    A population-based case-control interview study of 309 childhood leukemia cases and 618 healthy population control children was conducted in urban Shanghai, China. Like some studies in other countries, excess risks for both acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were associated with intrauterine and paternal preconception diagnostic x-ray exposure, and with maternal employment in the chemical and agricultural industries during pregnancy. ANLL was linked to maternal occupational exposure to benzene during pregnancy, whereas both ALL and ANLL were significantly associated with maternal exposure to gasoline and the patient's prior use of chloramphenicol. New findings, previously unsuspected, included an association of ANLL with younger maternal age at menarche (odds ratio (OR) = 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-13.9); a protective effect for long-term (greater than 1 year) use of cod liver oil containing vitamins A and D for both ALL (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.2-0.9) and ANLL (OR = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.1-1.0); and excess risks of ANLL among children whose mothers were employed in metal refining and processing (OR = 4.6; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2) and of ALL associated with maternal occupational exposure to pesticides (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.1-11.2). No relationships were found with late maternal age, certain congenital disorders, or familial occurrence, which have been related to childhood leukemia in other studies. In contrast with other reports, an excess of leukemia, primarily ANLL, occurred among second or later-born rather than firstborn children.

  18. High-throughput classification of clinical populations from natural viewing eye movements.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Po-He; Cameron, Ian G M; Pari, Giovanna; Reynolds, James N; Munoz, Douglas P; Itti, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Many high-prevalence neurological disorders involve dysfunctions of oculomotor control and attention, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have examined these deficits with clinical neurological evaluation, structured behavioral tasks, and neuroimaging. Yet, time and monetary costs prevent deploying these evaluations to large at-risk populations, which is critically important for earlier detection and better treatment. We devised a high-throughput, low-cost method where participants simply watched television while we recorded their eye movements. We combined eye-tracking data from patients and controls with a computational model of visual attention to extract 224 quantitative features. Using machine learning in a workflow inspired by microarray analysis, we identified critical features that differentiate patients from control subjects. With eye movement traces recorded from only 15 min of videos, we classified PD versus age-matched controls with 89.6 % accuracy (chance 63.2 %), and ADHD versus FASD versus control children with 77.3 % accuracy (chance 40.4 %). Our technique provides new quantitative insights into which aspects of attention and gaze control are affected by specific disorders. There is considerable promise in using this approach as a potential screening tool that is easily deployed, low-cost, and high-throughput for clinical disorders, especially in young children and elderly populations who may be less compliant to traditional evaluation tests. PMID:22926163

  19. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  20. Factors controlling the summer development of copepod populations in the southern bight of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daan, Rogier

    In two consecutive years an intensive sampling programmed was implemented at a fixed station in Dutch coastal waters to obtain a detailed record of the summer development of copepod populations in relation to phytoplankton and macroplankton abundance. The central question was whether densities of copepods are controlled by predation, in particular by invertebrate pelagic carnivores, or by food limitation. Methods applied to estimate daily predation by observed stocks of carnivores included analysis of gut contents and digestion rate, extrapolation of experimental feeding rates and of literature data on daily rations and maintenance needs. Chlorophyll- a and cell concentrations served as a rough measure for algal food supply. Since a decline in copepod densities manifested itself most clearly in decreasing naupliar numbers in both years, populations were assumed to be regulated mainly by recruitment or survival of these early life stages. Naupliar declines coincided with maximum densities of the hydromedusa Phialidium hemisphaericum, which dominated the macroplankton both in abundance and in biomass and reached a maximum density of 467 specimens·m -3 or 7 mg C·m -3. Copepod eggs appeared by far the most frequent prey item in their guts. However, these eggs are digested very slowly, if at all, and may often be ejected without any visible damage. The effect of egg predation on naupliar recruitment seems therefore relatively unimportant. Predation on swimming copepod stages was generally low. There was no evidence of selective feeding on nauplii. The maximum values of calculated predation pressure exerted by Phialidium populations matched daily copepod production only by way of exception. Impact of other invertebrate carnivores was negligible. As predation did not play a significant role, food availability seems the key factor underlying copepod population dynamics. The consequences of food limitation (reduced egg production, production of diapause eggs and enhanced

  1. Driver sleepiness and risk of serious injury to car occupants: population based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Jennie; Norton, Robyn; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Robinson, Elizabeth; Civil, Ian; Dunn, Roger; Bailey, John; Jackson, Rod

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the contribution of driver sleepiness to the causes of car crash injuries. Design Population based case control study. Setting Auckland region of New Zealand, April 1998 to July 1999. Participants 571 car drivers involved in crashes where at least one occupant was admitted to hospital or killed (“injury crash”); 588 car drivers recruited while driving on public roads (controls), representative of all time spent driving in the study region during the study period. Main outcome measures Relative risk for injury crash associated with driver characteristics related to sleep, and the population attributable risk for driver sleepiness. Results There was a strong association between measures of acute sleepiness and the risk of an injury crash. After adjustment for major confounders significantly increased risk was associated with drivers who identified themselves as sleepy (Stanford sleepiness score 4-7 v 1-3; odds ratio 8.2, 95% confidence interval 3.4 to 19.7); with drivers who reported five hours or less of sleep in the previous 24 hours compared with more than five hours (2.7, 1.4 to 5.4); and with driving between 2 am and 5 am compared with other times of day (5.6, 1.4 to 22.7). No increase in risk was associated with measures of chronic sleepiness. The population attributable risk for driving with one or more of the acute sleepiness risk factors was 19% (15% to 25%). Conclusions Acute sleepiness in car drivers significantly increases the risk of a crash in which a car occupant is injured or killed. Reductions in road traffic injuries may be achieved if fewer people drive when they are sleepy or have been deprived of sleep or drive between 2 am and 5 am. What is already known on this topicDriver sleepiness is considered a potentially important risk factor for car crashes and related injuries but the association has not been reliably quantifiedPublished estimates of the proportion of car crashes attributable to driver sleepiness vary from

  2. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Subclinical Hypothyroidism: A Case Control Study in Nepalese Population

    PubMed Central

    KC, Rajendra; Khatiwada, Saroj; Deo Mehta, Kishun; Pandey, Pratikshya; Lamsal, Madhab; Majhi, Shankhar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess cardiovascular risk factors in Nepalese population with subclinical hypothyroidism as compared to age and sex matched controls. Materials and Methods. A case control study was conducted among 200 subjects (100 subclinical hypothyroid and 100 euthyroid) at B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Demographic and anthropometric variables including systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were taken. Blood samples were assayed for serum free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP). Results. Subclinical hypothyroid patients had significantly higher diastolic BP, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and hs-CRP than controls. The odds ratio of having hypercholesterolemia (>200 mg/dL), low HDL cholesterol (<40 mg/dL), undesirable LDL-cholesterol (>100 mg/dL), high hs-CRP (>1 mg/L), and high diastolic BP (>80 mmHg) and being overweight (BMI ≥ 23 Kg/m2) in subclinical hypothyroidism was 2.29 (95% CI; 1.2–4.38, p = 0.011), 1.73 (95% CI; 0.82–3.62, p = 0.141), 3.04 (95% CI; 1.66–5.56, p < 0.001), 2.02 (95% CI; 1.12–3.64, p = 0.018), 3.35 (95% CI; 1.72–6.55, p < 0.001), and 0.9 (95% CI; 0.48–1.67, p = 0.753), respectively, as compared to controls. Conclusion. Subclinical hypothyroid patients are associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease than euthyroid subjects. PMID:26523236

  3. Population-based, Case-Control-Family Design to Investigate Genetic and Environmental Influences on Melanoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cust, Anne E.; Schmid, Helen; Maskiell, Judith A.; Jetann, Jodie; Ferguson, Megan; Holland, Elizabeth A.; Agha-Hamilton, Chantelle; Jenkins, Mark A.; Kelly, John; Kefford, Richard F.; Giles, Graham G.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Aitken, Joanne F.; Hopper, John L.; Mann, Graham J.

    2009-01-01

    Discovering and understanding genetic risk factors for melanoma and their interactions with phenotype, sun exposure, and other risk factors could lead to new strategies for melanoma control. This paper describes the Australian Melanoma Family Study, which uses a multicenter, population-based, case-control-family design. From 2001 to 2005, the authors recruited 1,164 probands including 629 cases with histopathologically confirmed, first-primary cutaneous melanoma diagnosed before age 40 years, 240 population-based controls frequency matched for age, and 295 spouse/friend controls. Information on lifetime sun exposure, phenotype, and residence history was collected for probands and nearly 4,000 living relatives. More than 3,000 subjects donated a blood sample. Proxy-reported information was collected for childhood sun exposure and deceased relatives. Important features of this study include the population-based, family-based design; a focus on early onset disease; probands from 3 major cities differing substantially in solar ultraviolet exposure and melanoma incidence; a population at high risk because of high ultraviolet exposure and susceptible pigmentation phenotypes; population-based, spouse/friend, and sibling controls; systematic recruitment of relatives of case and control probands; self and parent reports of childhood sun exposure; and objective clinical skin examinations. The authors discuss methodological and analytical issues related to the study design and conduct, as well as the potentially novel insights the study can deliver. PMID:19887461

  4. Alcohol Habits in Patients with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain: Comparison with a Matched Control Group from the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin Bronner, Kerstin Birgitta; Wennberg, Peter; Kallmen, Hakan; Schult, Marie-Louise Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to describe alcohol habits in patients with chronic pain compared with those in a matched control group from the general Swedish population. In total, 100 consecutive patients enrolled were matched against 100 individuals in a control group on the basis of age and sex. Alcohol habits were measured using the Alcohol Use…

  5. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Lü, Lingshuang; Liu, Sijun; Chen, Feng; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence, awareness, treatment and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a Chinese population. The findings from this study are expected to offer scientific evidence to better prevent and control the growing number of reported and untreated cases. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Jiangsu, China. We recruited permanent residents over 18 years of age from eight towns in Jintan (JT) and six towns in Yangzhong (YZ) using a three-stage stratified cluster sampling method. The rates of DM prevalence, awareness, treatment and control as well as their related factors were analyzed. Results A total number of 15404 people were entered into the analysis. The DM prevalence, awareness, treatment and control rates were 7.31%, 58.35%, 51.87% and 14.12%, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that being female was positively related to prevalence (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.07–1.37), awareness (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.19–1.93), treatment (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.17–1.88) and control (OR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.30–2.67) of DM. Having a family history of diabetes was significantly correlated with DM risk (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.37–2.54) and increased awareness (OR = 3.12, 95% CI: 2.19–4.47), treatment (OR = 3.47, 95% CI: 2.45–4.90) and control (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.22–2.68) of DM. Former smoking status (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.23–2.71), overweight (OR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.72–2.60) and obesity (OR = 3.46, 95% CI: 2.67–4.50) were related to the risk of DM. Additionally, we found current drinking status to be positively correlated with DM risk (OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.01–1.66) and negatively correlated with DM awareness (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29–0.59) and treatment (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29–0.59). Our study highlights the high prevalence and inadequate awareness, treatment and control of DM in the Chinese population. Conclusions Management and prevention of DM-related complications

  6. Free-roaming dog population estimation and status of the dog population management and rabies control program in Dhaka City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Tenzin, Tenzin; Ahmed, Rubaiya; Debnath, Nitish C; Ahmed, Garba; Yamage, Mat

    2015-05-01

    Beginning January 2012, a humane method of dog population management using a Catch-Neuter-Vaccinate-Release (CNVR) program was implemented in Dhaka City, Bangladesh as part of the national rabies control program. To enable this program, the size and distribution of the free-roaming dog population needed to be estimated. We present the results of a dog population survey and a pilot assessment of the CNVR program coverage in Dhaka City. Free-roaming dog population surveys were undertaken in 18 wards of Dhaka City on consecutive days using mark-resight methods. Data was analyzed using Lincoln-Petersen index-Chapman correction methods. The CNVR program was assessed over the two years (2012-2013) whilst the coverage of the CNVR program was assessed by estimating the proportion of dogs that were ear-notched (processed dogs) via dog population surveys. The free-roaming dog population was estimated to be 1,242 (95 % CI: 1205-1278) in the 18 sampled wards and 18,585 dogs in Dhaka City (52 dogs/km2) with an estimated human-to-free-roaming dog ratio of 828:1. During the two year CNVR program, a total of 6,665 dogs (3,357 male and 3,308 female) were neutered and vaccinated against rabies in 29 of the 92 city wards. A pilot population survey indicated a mean CNVR coverage of 60.6% (range 19.2-79.3%) with only eight wards achieving > 70% coverage. Given that the coverage in many neighborhoods was below the WHO-recommended threshold level of 70% for rabies eradications and since the CNVR program takes considerable time to implement throughout the entire Dhaka City area, a mass dog vaccination program in the non-CNVR coverage area is recommended to create herd immunity. The findings from this study are expected to guide dog population management and the rabies control program in Dhaka City and elsewhere in Bangladesh. PMID:25978406

  7. Free-Roaming Dog Population Estimation and Status of the Dog Population Management and Rabies Control Program in Dhaka City, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tenzin, Tenzin; Ahmed, Rubaiya; Debnath, Nitish C.; Ahmed, Garba; Yamage, Mat

    2015-01-01

    Beginning January 2012, a humane method of dog population management using a Catch-Neuter-Vaccinate-Release (CNVR) program was implemented in Dhaka City, Bangladesh as part of the national rabies control program. To enable this program, the size and distribution of the free-roaming dog population needed to be estimated. We present the results of a dog population survey and a pilot assessment of the CNVR program coverage in Dhaka City. Free-roaming dog population surveys were undertaken in 18 wards of Dhaka City on consecutive days using mark-resight methods. Data was analyzed using Lincoln-Petersen index-Chapman correction methods. The CNVR program was assessed over the two years (2012–2013) whilst the coverage of the CNVR program was assessed by estimating the proportion of dogs that were ear-notched (processed dogs) via dog population surveys. The free-roaming dog population was estimated to be 1,242 (95 % CI: 1205–1278) in the 18 sampled wards and 18,585 dogs in Dhaka City (52 dogs/km2) with an estimated human-to-free-roaming dog ratio of 828:1. During the two year CNVR program, a total of 6,665 dogs (3,357 male and 3,308 female) were neutered and vaccinated against rabies in 29 of the 92 city wards. A pilot population survey indicated a mean CNVR coverage of 60.6% (range 19.2–79.3%) with only eight wards achieving > 70% coverage. Given that the coverage in many neighborhoods was below the WHO-recommended threshold level of 70% for rabies eradications and since the CNVR program takes considerable time to implement throughout the entire Dhaka City area, a mass dog vaccination program in the non-CNVR coverage area is recommended to create herd immunity. The findings from this study are expected to guide dog population management and the rabies control program in Dhaka City and elsewhere in Bangladesh. PMID:25978406

  8. Combining aspirin with cholecalciferol (vitamin D3)--a potential new tool for controlling possum populations.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David R; Arrow, Jane; Smith, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    The introduced Australian brushtail possum is a major vertebrate pest in New Zealand, with impacts on conservation and agriculture being managed largely through poisoning operations. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is registered for use in controlling possums and despite its many advantages it is expensive and relatively inhumane. Combination of a high proportion of aspirin with a low proportion of cholecalciferol was effective in killing high proportions of groups of acclimatised, caged possums: this is attributed to both an unexpectedly high toxicity of the type of cholecalciferol used, and a proposed synergistic mechanism between the two compounds. Death was caused by localised damage to heart ventricles by aspirin, and inhibition of tissue repair by both aspirin and cholecalciferol. The observed toxicosis had lower impact on the welfare of possums than either compound administered alone, particularly aspirin alone. Residue analyses of bait remains in the GI tract suggested a low risk of secondary poisoning by either compound. The combination of cholecalciferol and aspirin has the potential to meet key requirements of cost-effectiveness and humaneness in controlling possum populations, but the effect of the combination in non-target species has yet to be tested. PMID:23950982

  9. Combining Aspirin with Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3) – A Potential New Tool for Controlling Possum Populations

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, David R.; Arrow, Jane; Smith, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    The introduced Australian brushtail possum is a major vertebrate pest in New Zealand, with impacts on conservation and agriculture being managed largely through poisoning operations. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is registered for use in controlling possums and despite its many advantages it is expensive and relatively inhumane. Combination of a high proportion of aspirin with a low proportion of cholecalciferol was effective in killing high proportions of groups of acclimatised, caged possums: this is attributed to both an unexpectedly high toxicity of the type of cholecalciferol used, and a proposed synergistic mechanism between the two compounds. Death was caused by localised damage to heart ventricles by aspirin, and inhibition of tissue repair by both aspirin and cholecalciferol. The observed toxicosis had lower impact on the welfare of possums than either compound administered alone, particularly aspirin alone. Residue analyses of bait remains in the GI tract suggested a low risk of secondary poisoning by either compound. The combination of cholecalciferol and aspirin has the potential to meet key requirements of cost-effectiveness and humaneness in controlling possum populations, but the effect of the combination in non-target species has yet to be tested. PMID:23950982

  10. Estimating population impacts via dynamic occupancy analysis of Before-After Control-Impact studies.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Viorel D; de Valpine, Perry; Tempel, Douglas; Peery, M Zachariah

    2012-06-01

    Estimating environmental impacts on populations is one of the main goals of wildlife monitoring programs, which are often conducted in conjunction with management actions or following natural disturbances. In this study we investigate the statistical power of dynamic occupancy models to detect changes in local survival and colonization from detection-nondetection data, while accounting for imperfect detection probability, in a Before-After Control-Impact (BACI) framework. We simulated impacts on local survival and/or detection probabilities, and asked questions related to: (1) costs and benefits of different analysis models, (2) confounding changes in detection with changes in local survival, (3) sampling design trade-offs, and (4) species with low vs. high rates of turnover. Estimating seasonal effects on local survival and colonization, as opposed to estimating Before-After effects, had little effect on the power to detect changes in local survival. Estimating a parameter that accounted for pretreatment differences in local survival between Control and Impact sites decreased power by 50%, but it was critical to include when such differences existed. When the experimental treatment had a negative impact on species detectability but analysis assumed constant detection, the Type I error rates were dramatically inflated (0.20 0.33). In general, there was low power (< 0.5) to detect a 50% decrease in local survival for all combinations of sites (N = 50 vs. 100), seasons sampled (8 vs. 12), and visits per site per season (4 vs. 6). Unbalanced designs performed worse than balanced designs, with the exception of the case of treatments being implemented in different seasons at different sites. Adding more control sites improved the ability to detect changes in local survival. Surveying more seasons after impact resulted in modest power gains, but at least three seasons before impact were required to successfully implement BACI occupancy studies. Turnover rates had a low

  11. Vitamin D receptor variants and breast cancer risk in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Gapska, P; Scott, R J; Serrano-Fernandez, P; Huzarski, T; Byrski, T; Kładny, J; Gronwald, J; Górski, B; Cybulski, C; Lubinski, J; Debniak, T

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether four VDR gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: rs1544410, rs731236, rs10735810 and rs4516035) are associated with breast cancer risk in Polish population. Two independent series of female patients were employed: 960 consecutive breast cancer cases, and 800 unselected early onset cases diagnosed under the age of 51. The control group for the consecutive breast cancer cases consisted of 960 healthy, age-matched women with a negative cancer family history. 550 healthy women, aged 51 or less, with negative cancer family history were selected as the independent controls for the early onset breast cancer cases. The frequencies of the VDR polymorphisms in the unselected cases when compared to the respective control population failed to reveal any association between the individual SNPs and disease. Examination of the group of early-onset patients, revealed an association between rs10735810 and increased breast cancer risk. Heterozygous carriers for the change had an OR = 1.73 (95% CI 1.33-2.26, P < 0.0001) and homozygous carriers OR = 2.34 (95% CI 1.71-3.21, P < 0.0001). The remaining three examined SNPs failed to show any association with disease risk. In summary, this study has identified an association between the VDR gene and early onset breast cancer risk in the Polish population. PMID:18587672

  12. Comparison of two populations of the pantropical predator Amblyseius largoensis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) for biological control of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Domingos, Cleiton A; Oliveira, Leandro O; de Morais, Elisângela G F; Navia, Denise; de Moraes, Gilberto J; Gondim, Manoel G C

    2013-05-01

    The red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), was recently introduced in the Americas. It spread quickly throughout coconut palm growing areas, expanding considerably its host range. The invasion of this species has caused high economic impact in several countries. In Brazil, extensive areas are expected to be affected. For logistical reasons and other concerns, chemical control does not seem desirable for the control of this pest in most Latin American countries. Biological control of R. indica by introducing exotic natural enemies seems to be an important control measure to be considered. Surveys in many countries have shown that Amblyseius largoensis (Muma) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a very common predator on coconut palms. This study compared the biology of a population of A. largoensis found for a long time in association with R. indica in La Reunion Island (Indian Ocean) with a population from Roraima State (northern Brazil), where R. indica was first found about two and a half years ago. No significant differences were observed between populations in relation to the duration of different immature stages or total survivorship. However, the oviposition period, prey consumption and net reproductive rate were significantly higher for the La Reunion population, warranting further investigation to determine whether that population should be released in Roraima to control the pest. PMID:23100107

  13. Startle Modification and P50 Gating in Schizophrenia Patients and Controls: Russian Population.

    PubMed

    Storozheva, Zinaida I; Kirenskaya, Anna V; Novototsky-Vlasov, Vladimir Y; Telesheva, Klavdia Y; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Prepulse modification of the acoustic startle response (ASR) and P50 gating are potential neurophysiological endophenotypes of schizophrenia and may be used in the construction of valid clinical biomarkers. Such approach requires a large amount of data obtained in the representative samples from different gender, socio-typological and ethnic groups, replicating studies using the similar protocols and meta-analyses. This is a replication study of ASR and the first study of P50 suppression in Russian patients with schizophrenia (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 25). ASR and P50 were estimated according to standard protocols. Patients exhibited increased baseline ASR latency (d = 0.35, p = .026) and reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) at 60 ms interval (d = 0.39, p = .003) and 120 ms interval (d = 0.37, p = .005) relative to controls. In the P50 test patients displayed greater S2 response amplitude (d = 0.24, p = .036) and deficit of P50 suppression (d = 0.43, p = .001). No correlations of PPI and P50 suppression were found in both groups. Only in controls prepulse ASR facilitation (at 2500 ms interval) positively correlated with P50 suppression (r = -.514, p = .013). In patients PPI displayed significant correlations with Difficulty in abstract thinking (N5: r = -.49, p = .005) and Hallucination (P3: r = .40, p = .036) PANSS scales. Logistic regression showed that the combination of PPI and P50 suppression could serve as a diagnostic predictor. Obtained results demonstrated that both PPI and P50 could be regarded as potential schizophrenia biomarkers in Russian population. PMID:26936103

  14. A population-based case-control study of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ron, E; Kleinerman, R A; Boice, J D; LiVolsi, V A; Flannery, J T; Fraumeni, J F

    1987-07-01

    A population-based case-control interview study of thyroid cancer (159 cases and 285 controls) was conducted in Connecticut. Prior radiotherapy to the head or neck was reported by 12% of the cases and 4% of the controls [odds ratio (OR) = 2.8; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-6.9]. Risk was inversely related to age at irradiation and was highest among children exposed under age 10. Few persons born after 1945 received prior radiotherapy, consistent with the declining use of radiation to treat benign conditions in the 1950's. Among females the radiogenic risk appeared to be potentiated by the number of subsequent live-births. Other significant risk factors included a history of benign thyroid nodules (OR = 33) or goiter (OR = 5.6). Miscarriage and multiparity increased risk but only among women who developed thyroid cancer before age 35 years. Consumption of shellfish (a rich source of iodine) seemed to increase the risk of follicular thyroid cancer, whereas consumption of goitrogen-containing vegetables appeared to reduce risk of total thyroid cancer, possibly because of their cruciferous nature. A significantly low risk was observed among persons of English descent, whereas Italian ancestry appeared to increase risk. No significant associations were found with a number of suspected risk factors: diagnostic x-rays, radioactive isotope scans, occupational radiation exposure, tonsillectomy, Jewish ethnicity, alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, oral contraceptives, lactation suppressants, menopausal estrogens, most other common medications, and water source. New associations were suggested for obesity among females (OR = 1.5), surgically treated benign breast disease (OR = 1.6), use of spironolactone (OR = 4.3) or vitamin D supplements (OR = 1.8), and a family history of thyroid cancer (OR = 5.2). About 9% of the incident thyroid cancers could be attributed to prior head and neck irradiation, 4% to goiter, and 17% to thyroid nodular disease, leaving the etiology of most

  15. An evolutionary stability perspective on oncogenesis control in mature T-cell populations.

    PubMed

    Diebner, Hans H; Kirberg, Jörg; Roeder, Ingo

    2016-01-21

    Here we present a mathematical model for the dynamics of oncogenesis control in mature T-cell populations within the blood and lymphatic system. T-cell homeostasis is maintained by clonal competition for trophic niches (survival signals stimulated through interactions with self-antigens bound to major histocompatibility molecules), where a clone is defined as the set of T cells carrying the same antigen specific T-cell receptor (TCR). We analytically derive fitness functions of healthy and leukemic clone variants, respectively, that capture the dependency of the stability of the healthy T-cell pool against leukemic invaders on clonal diversity and kinetic parameters. Similar to the stability of ecosystems with high biodiversity, leukemic mutants are suppressed within polyclonal T-cell populations, i.e., in the presence of a huge number of different TCRs. To the contrary, for a low clonal diversity the leukemic clone variants are able to invade the healthy T-cell pool. The model, therefore, describes the experimentally observed phenomenon that preleukemic clone variants prevail in quasi-monoclonal experimental settings (in mice), whereas in polyclonal settings the healthy TCR variants are able to suppress the outgrowth of tumours. Between the two extremal situations of mono- and polyclonality there exists a range of coexistence of healthy and oncogenic clone variants with moderate fitness (stability) each. A variation of cell cycle times considerably changes the dynamics within this coexistence region. Faster proliferating variants increase their chance to dominate. Finally, a simplified niche variation scheme illustrates a possible mechanism to increase clonal T-cell diversity given a small niche diversity. PMID:26549469

  16. Population based case–control study of serious non-fatal motorcycle crashes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Motorcycle sales, registration and use are increasing in many countries. The epidemiological literature on risk factors for motorcycle injury is becoming outdated, due to changes in rider demography, licensing regulations, traffic mix and density, road environments, and motorcycle designs and technologies. Further, the potential contribution of road infrastructure and travel speed has not yet been examined. Methods/design A population based case–control study together with a nested case-crossover study is planned. Cases will be motorcycle riders who are injured but not killed in a motorcycle crash on a public road within 150 km radius of Melbourne, Australia, and admitted to one of the study hospitals. Controls will be motorcycle riders who ride through the crash site on the same type of day (weekday or weekend) within an hour of the crash time. Data on rider, bike, and trip characteristics will be collected from the participants by questionnaire. Data on crash site characteristics will be collected in a structured site inspection, and travel speed for the cases will be estimated from these data. Travel speed for the controls will be measured prior to recruitment with a radar traffic detection device as they ride through the crash site. Control sites for the case-crossover study will be selected 1 km upstream from the crash site and matched on either intersection status or road curvature (either straight or cornered). If the initial site selected does not match the case site on these characteristics, then the closest matching site on the case route will be selected. Conditional multivariate logistic regression models will be used to compare risk between the matched case and control riders and to examine associations between road infrastructure and road environment characteristics and crash occurrence. Interactions between type of site and speed will be tested to determine if site type is an effect modifier of the relationship between speed and crash

  17. Event-related brain potentials, bilateral electrodermal activity and Mangina-Test performance in learning disabled/ADHD pre-adolescents with severe behavioral disorders as compared to age-matched normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mangina, C A; Beuzeron-Mangina, J H; Grizenko, N

    2000-07-01

    The most frequently encountered developmental problems of learning disabilities/ADHD often co-exist with severe behavioral disorders. As a direct consequence, this condition opens the way to delinquency, school drop-out, depression, suicide, substance abuse, work absenteeism, and other psycho-social complications. In this paper, we are presenting a selective overview of our previous research and its clinical applications in this field as it relates to our present research data pertaining to the effects of our original Memory Workload Paradigm on the event-related brain potentials in differentiating normal and pathological pre-adolescents (learning disabled/ADHD with concomitant severe behavioral disorders such as oppositional and conduct). In addition, it provides data on the bilateral electrodermal activity during cognitive workload and Mangina-Test performance of pathological and normal pre-adolescents conducted in separate sessions. The results of our present research indicate that a significant memory load effect for the P450 latency (F(3,27)=4.98, P<0.01) and the P450 amplitude (F(3,27)=3.57, P<0.05) was present for normal pre-adolescents which was absent in pathological pre-adolescents. Moreover, enhanced N450 ERP amplitudes to our Memory Workload Paradigm in pre-frontal and frontal regions clearly differentiated normal from pathological pre-adolescents (F(1, 18)=12.21, P<0.004). Furthermore, significant differences between normal and pathological groups were found in bilateral electrodermal activity (F(1,18)=23.86, P<0.001) and on the Mangina-Test performance (F(1,18)=75.35, P<0.001). Our present research findings provide an original and valuable demonstration of an integrative and effective clinical psychophysiological application of central (ERPs), autonomic (bilateral electrodermal activity) and neuro-psychometric aspects (Mangina-Test) which characterize normal and pathological pre-adolescents and underpin the neurophysiological basis of learning disabled/ADHD with severe behavioral disorders as opposed to normal subjects. PMID:10828376

  18. Naturally Occurring Incompatibilities between Different Culex pipiens pallens Populations as the Basis of Potential Mosquito Control Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zhu, Changliang; Zhang, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases remain a threat to public health, especially in tropical countries. The incompatible insect technique has been explored as a potential control strategy for several important insect vectors. However, this strategy has not been tested in Culex pipiens pallens, the most prevalent mosquito species in China. Previous works used introgression to generate new strains that matched the genetic backgrounds of target populations while harboring a new Wolbachia endosymbiont, resulting in mating competitiveness and cytoplasmic incompatibility. The generation of these incompatible insects is often time-consuming, and the long-term stability of the newly created insect-Wolbachia symbiosis is uncertain. Considering the wide distribution of Cx. pipiens pallens and hence possible isolation of different populations, we sought to test for incompatibilities between natural populations and the possibility of exploiting these incompatibilities as a control strategy. Methodology/Principal Findings Three field populations were collected from three geographic locations in eastern China. Reciprocal cross results showed that bi-directional patterns of incompatibility existed between some populations. Mating competition experiments indicated that incompatible males could compete with cognate males in mating with females, leading to reduced overall fecundity. F1 offspring from incompatible crosses maintained their maternal crossing types. All three populations tested positive for Wolbachia. Removal of Wolbachia by tetracycline rendered matings between these populations fully compatible. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that naturally occurring patterns of cytoplasmic incompatibility between Cx. pipiens pallens populations can be the basis of a control strategy for this important vector species. The observed incompatibilities are caused by Wolbachia. More tests including field trials are warranted to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy as a

  19. Efficient and robust strong-field control of population transfer in sensitizer dyes with designed femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johannes; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Winzenburg, Andreas; Bayer, Tim; Köhler, Jens; Faust, Rüdiger; Baumert, Thomas

    2011-05-21

    We demonstrate control of electronic population transfer in molecules with the help of appropriately shaped femtosecond laser pulses. To this end we investigate two photosensitizer dyes in solution being prepared in the triplet ground state. Excitation within the triplet system is followed by intersystem crossing and the corresponding singlet fluorescence is monitored as a measure of population transfer in the triplet system. We record control landscapes with respect to the fluorescence intensity on both dyes by a systematic variation of laser pulse shapes combining second order and third order dispersion. In the strong-field regime we find highly structured topologies with large areas of maximum or minimum population transfer being insensitive over a certain range of applied laser intensities thus demonstrating robustness. We then compare our experimental results with simulations on generic molecular potentials by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for excitation with shaped pulses. Control landscapes with respect to population transfer confirm the general trends from experiments. An analysis of regions with maximum or minimum population transfer indicates that coherent processes are responsible for the outcome of our excitation process. The physical mechanisms of joint motion of ground and excited state wave packets or population of a vibrational eigenstate in the excited state permit us to discuss the molecular dynamics in an atom-like picture. PMID:21437344

  20. Conditioning adaptive combination of P-values method to analyze case-parent trios with or without population controls

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Liang, Yun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Detection of rare causal variants can help uncover the etiology of complex diseases. Recruiting case-parent trios is a popular study design in family-based studies. If researchers can obtain data from population controls, utilizing them in trio analyses can improve the power of methods. The transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) is a well-known method to analyze case-parent trio data. It has been extended to rare-variant association testing (abbreviated as “rvTDT”), with the flexibility to incorporate population controls. The rvTDT method is robust to population stratification. However, power loss may occur in the conditioning process. Here we propose a “conditioning adaptive combination of P-values method” (abbreviated as “conADA”), to analyze trios with/without unrelated controls. By first truncating the variants with larger P-values, we decrease the vulnerability of conADA to the inclusion of neutral variants. Moreover, because the test statistic is developed by conditioning on parental genotypes, conADA generates valid statistical inference in the presence of population stratification. With regard to statistical methods for next-generation sequencing data analyses, validity may be hampered by population stratification, whereas power may be affected by the inclusion of neutral variants. We recommend conADA for its robustness to these two factors (population stratification and the inclusion of neutral variants). PMID:27341039

  1. Prison tobacco control policies and deaths from smoking in United States prisons: population based retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carson, E Ann; Krueger, Patrick M; Mueller, Shane R; Steiner, John F; Sabol, William J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the mortality attributable to smoking and years of potential life lost from smoking among people in prison and whether bans on smoking in prison are associated with reductions in smoking related deaths. Design Analysis of cross sectional survey data with the smoking attributable mortality, morbidity, and economic costs system; population based time series analysis. Setting All state prisons in the United States. Main outcome measures Prevalence of smoking from cross sectional survey of inmates in state correctional facilities. Data on state prison tobacco policies from web based searches of state policies and legislation. Deaths and causes of death in US state prisons from the deaths in custody reporting program of the Bureau of Justice Statistics for 2001-11. Smoking attributable mortality and years of potential life lost was assessed from the smoking attributable mortality, morbidity, and economic costs system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate Poisson models quantified the association between bans and smoking related cancer, cardiovascular and pulmonary deaths. Results The most common causes of deaths related to smoking among people in prison were lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, other heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic airways obstruction. The age adjusted smoking attributable mortality and years of potential life lost rates were 360 and 5149 per 100 000, respectively; these figures are higher than rates in the general US population (248 and 3501, respectively). The number of states with any smoking ban increased from 25 in 2001 to 48 by 2011. In prisons the mortality rate from smoking related causes was lower during years with a ban than during years without a ban (110.4/100 000 v 128.9/100 000). Prisons that implemented smoking bans had a 9% reduction (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 0.95) in smoking related deaths. Bans in place for longer than

  2. YOGA FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN IN A PREDOMINANTLY MINORITY POPULATION: A PILOT RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Robert B.; Sherman, Karen J.; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.; Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest yoga may be effective for chronic low back pain; however, trials targeting minorities have not been conducted. Primary Study Objectives Assess the feasibility of studying yoga in a predominantly minority population with chronic low back pain. Collect preliminary data to plan a larger powered study. Study Design Pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting Two community health centers in a racially diverse neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. Participants Thirty English-speaking adults (mean age 44 years, 83% female, 83% racial/ethnic minorities; 48% with incomes ≤$30000) with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. Interventions Standardized series of weekly hatha yoga classes for 12 weeks compared to a waitlist usual care control. Outcome Measures Feasibility measured by time to complete enrollment, proportion of racial/ethnic minorities enrolled, retention rates, and adverse events. Primary efficacy outcomes were changes from baseline to 12 weeks in pain score (0=no pain to 10=worst possible pain) and back-related function using the modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (0–23 point scale, higher scores reflect poorer function). Secondary efficacy outcomes were analgesic use, global improvement, and quality of life (SF-36). Results Recruitment took 2 months. Retention rates were 97% at 12 weeks and 77% at 26 weeks. Mean pain scores for yoga decreased from baseline to 12 weeks (6.7 to 4.4) compared to usual care, which decreased from 7.5 to 7.1 (P=.02). Mean Roland scores for yoga decreased from 14.5 to 8.2 compared to usual care, which decreased from 16.1 to 12.5 (P=.28). At 12 weeks, yoga compared to usual care participants reported less analgesic use (13% vs 73%, P=.003), less opiate use (0% vs 33%, P=.04), and greater overall improvement (73% vs 27%, P=.03). There were no differences in SF-36 scores and no serious adverse events. Conclusion A yoga study intervention in a predominantly minority population with

  3. How a network of conservationists and population control activists created the contemporary US anti-immigration movement.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Sebastian; Valles, Sean A

    2015-06-01

    Continuing historical narratives of the early twentieth century nexus of conservationism, eugenics, and nativism (exemplified by Madison Grant), this paper traces the history of the contemporary US anti-immigration movement's roots in environmentalism and global population control activism, through an exploration of the thoughts and activities of the activist, John Tanton, who has been called "the most influential unknown man in America." We explore the "neo-Malthusian" ideas that sparked a seminal moment for population control advocacy in the late 1960s and early 1970s, leading to the creation of Zero Population Growth (ZPG). After rising to the presidency of ZPG, Tanton, and ZPG spun off the Federation for American Immigration Reform. After leaving ZPG's leadership, Tanton created additional anti-immigration advocacy groups and built up connections with existing organizations such as the Pioneer Fund. We trace Tanton's increasingly radical conservative network of anti-immigration advocates, conservationists, and population control activists to the present day. Tanton's archived papers illustrate, among other things, his interactions with collaborators such as ecologist Garrett Hardin (author of the famous "Tragedy of the Commons") and his documented interest in reviving eugenics. We contend that this history of Tanton's network provides key insights into understanding how there came to be an overlap between the ideologies and activist communities of immigration restrictionism, population control, conservationism and eugenics. PMID:26026333

  4. Dietary patterns and risk of oesophageal cancers: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Hughes, Maria Celia; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary intake and oesophageal cancer have mostly focused on nutrients and food groups instead of dietary patterns. We conducted a population-based case-control study, which included 365 oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), 426 oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (OGJAC) and 303 oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cases, with frequency matched on age, sex and geographical location to 1580 controls. Data on demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors were collected using self-administered questionnaires. We used principal component analysis to derive three dietary patterns: 'meat and fat', 'pasta and pizza' and 'fruit and vegetable', and unconditional logistic regression models to estimate risks of OAC, OGJAC and OSCC associated with quartiles (Q) of dietary pattern scores. A high score on the meat-and-fat pattern was associated with increased risk of all three cancers: multivariable-adjusted OR 2·12 (95 % CI 1·30, 3·46) for OAC; 1·88 (95% CI 1·21, 2·94) for OGJAC; 2·84 (95% CI 1·67, 4·83) for OSCC (P-trend <0·01 for all three cancers). A high score on the pasta-and-pizza pattern was inversely associated with OSCC risk (OR 0·58, 95 % CI 0·36, 0·96, P for trend=0·009); and a high score on the fruit-and-vegetable pattern was associated with a borderline significant decreased risk of OGJAC (OR for Q4 v. Q1 0·66, 95% CI 0·42, 1·04, P=0·07) and significantly decreased risk of OSCC (OR 0·41, 95% CI 0·24, 0·70, P for trend=0·002). High-fat dairy foods appeared to play a dominant role in the association between the meat-and-fat pattern and risk of OAC and OGJAC. Further investigation in prospective studies is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:21899799

  5. Web Intervention for Adolescents Affected by Disaster: Population-Based Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Price, Matthew; Adams, Zachary; Stauffacher, Kirstin; McCauley, Jenna; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Knapp, Rebecca; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of Bounce Back Now (BBN), a modular, web-based intervention for disaster-affected adolescents and their parents. Method A population-based randomized controlled trial used address-based sampling to enroll 2,000 adolescents and parents from communities affected by tornadoes in Joplin, MO, and Alabama. Data collection via baseline and follow-up semi-structured telephone interviews was completed between September 2011 and August 2013. All families were invited to access the BBN study web portal irrespective of mental health status at baseline. Families who accessed the web portal were assigned randomly to 3 groups: (1) BBN, which featured modules for adolescents and parents targeting adolescents’ mental health symptoms; (2) BBN plus additional modules targeting parents’ mental health symptoms; or (3) assessment only. The primary outcomes were adolescent symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Results Nearly 50% of families accessed the web portal. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed time × condition interactions for PTSD symptoms (B=−0.24, SE=0.08, p<.01) and depressive symptoms (B=−0.23, SE=0.09, p<.01). Post-hoc comparisons revealed fewer PTSD and depressive symptoms for adolescents in the experimental vs. control conditions at 12-month follow-up (PTSD: B=−0.36, SE=0.19, p=.06; depressive symptoms: B=−0.42, SE=0.19, p=0.03). A time × condition interaction also was found favoring the BBN vs. BBN + parent self-help condition for PTSD symptoms (B=0.30, SE=0.12, p=.02), but not depressive symptoms (B=0.12, SE=0.12, p=.33). Conclusion Results supported the feasibility and initial efficacy of BBN as a scalable disaster mental health intervention for adolescents. Technology-based solutions have tremendous potential value if found to reduce the mental health burden of disasters. PMID:26299292

  6. Air Pollution and the Risk of Cardiac Defects: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Lee, Yungling Leo; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2015-11-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have assessed the role of the exposure to ambient air pollution in the development of cardiac birth defects, but they have provided somewhat inconsistent results. To assess the associations between exposure to ambient air pollutants and the risk of cardiac defects, a population-based case-control study was conducted using 1087 cases of cardiac defects and a random sample of 10,870 controls from 1,533,748 Taiwanese newborns in 2001 to 2007.Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for 10 ppb increases in O3 and 10 μg/m increases in PM10. In addition, we compared the risk of cardiac defects in 4 categories-high exposure (>75th percentile); medium exposure (75th to 50th percentile); low exposure (<50th-25th percentile); reference (<25th percentile) based on the distribution of each pollutant. The risks of ventricular septal defects (VSD), atrial septal defects (ASD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were associated with 10 ppb increases in O3 exposure during the first 3 gestational months among term and preterm babies. In comparison between high PM10 exposure and reference category, there were statistically significant elevations in the effect estimates of ASD for all and terms births. In addition, there was a negative or weak association between SO2, NO2, CO, and cardiac defects.The study proved that exposure to outdoor air O3 and PM10 during the first trimester of gestation may increase the risk of VSD, ASD, and PDA. PMID:26554783

  7. Digital IIR Filters Design Using Differential Evolution Algorithm with a Controllable Probabilistic Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wu; Fang, Jian-an; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Design of a digital infinite-impulse-response (IIR) filter is the process of synthesizing and implementing a recursive filter network so that a set of prescribed excitations results a set of desired responses. However, the error surface of IIR filters is usually non-linear and multi-modal. In order to find the global minimum indeed, an improved differential evolution (DE) is proposed for digital IIR filter design in this paper. The suggested algorithm is a kind of DE variants with a controllable probabilistic (CPDE) population size. It considers the convergence speed and the computational cost simultaneously by nonperiodic partial increasing or declining individuals according to fitness diversities. In addition, we discuss as well some important aspects for IIR filter design, such as the cost function value, the influence of (noise) perturbations, the convergence rate and successful percentage, the parameter measurement, etc. As to the simulation result, it shows that the presented algorithm is viable and comparable. Compared with six existing State-of-the-Art algorithms-based digital IIR filter design methods obtained by numerical experiments, CPDE is relatively more promising and competitive. PMID:22808191

  8. Variability of the human mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in the Lithuanian population.

    PubMed

    Kasperaviciūte, Dalia; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2002-01-01

    The Lithuanians and Latvians are the only two Baltic cultures that survived until today. Since the Neolithic period the native inhabitants of the present-day Lithuanian territory have not been replaced by any other ethnic group. Therefore the genetic characterization of the present-day Lithuanians may shed some light on the early history of the Balts. We have analysed 120 DNA samples from two Lithuanian ethnolinguistic groups (Aukstaiciai and Zemaiciai) by direct sequencing of the first hypervariable segment (HVI) of the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and restriction enzyme digestion for polymorphic site 00073. On the basis of specific nucleotide substitutions the obtained sequences were classified to mtDNA haplogroups. This revealed the presence of almost all European haplogroups (except X) in the Lithuanian sample, including those that expanded through Europe in the Palaeolithic and those whose expansion occurred during the Neolithic. Molecular diversity indices (gene diversity 0.97, nucleotide diversity 0.012 and mean number of pairwise differences 4.5) were within the range usually reported in European populations. No significant differences between Aukstaiciai and Zemaiciai subgroups were found, but some slight differences need further investigation. PMID:12080181

  9. The Impact of the Nurses’ Health Study on Population Health: Prevention, Translation, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Sydney E.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To summarize the overall impact of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) over the past 40 years on the health of populations through its contributions on prevention, translation, and control. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the findings of the NHS, NHS II, and NHS3 between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHS has generated significant findings about the associations between (1) smoking and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colorectal and pancreatic cancer, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and eye diseases; (2) physical activity and cardiovascular diseases, breast cancer, psoriasis, and neurodegeneration; (3) obesity and cardiovascular diseases, numerous cancer sites, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, kidney stones, and eye diseases; (4) oral contraceptives and cardiovascular disease, melanoma, and breast, colorectal, and ovarian cancer; (5) hormone therapy and cardiovascular diseases, breast and endometrial cancer, and neurodegeneration; (6) endogenous hormones and breast cancer; (7) dietary factors and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, breast and pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, neurodegeneration, multiple sclerosis, kidney stones, and eye diseases; and (8) sleep and shift work and chronic diseases. Conclusions. The NHS findings have influenced public health policy and practice both locally and globally to improve women’s health. PMID:27459441

  10. Host Control of Symbiont Natural Product Chemistry in Cryptic Populations of the Tunicate Lissoclinum patella

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Tianero, Ma. Diarey B.; Donia, Mohamed S.; Wyche, Thomas P.; Bugni, Tim S.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural products (secondary metabolites) found in marine invertebrates are often thought to be produced by resident symbiotic bacteria, and these products appear to play a major role in the symbiotic interaction of bacteria and their hosts. In these animals, there is extensive variation, both in chemistry and in the symbiotic bacteria that produce them. Here, we sought to answer the question of what factors underlie chemical variation in the ocean. As a model, we investigated the colonial tunicate Lissoclinum patella because of its rich and varied chemistry and its broad geographic range. We sequenced mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COXI) genes, and found that animals classified as L. patella fall into three phylogenetic groups that may encompass several cryptic species. The presence of individual natural products followed the phylogenetic relationship of the host animals, even though the compounds are produced by symbiotic bacteria that do not follow host phylogeny. In sum, we show that cryptic populations of animals underlie the observed chemical diversity, suggesting that the host controls selection for particular secondary metabolite pathways. These results imply novel approaches to obtain chemical diversity from the oceans, and also demonstrate that the diversity of marine natural products may be greatly impacted by cryptic local extinctions. PMID:24788869

  11. Ecological Complexity in a Coffee Agroecosystem: Spatial Heterogeneity, Population Persistence and Biological Control

    PubMed Central

    Liere, Heidi; Jackson, Doug; Vandermeer, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Spatial heterogeneity is essential for the persistence of many inherently unstable systems such as predator-prey and parasitoid-host interactions. Since biological interactions themselves can create heterogeneity in space, the heterogeneity necessary for the persistence of an unstable system could be the result of local interactions involving elements of the unstable system itself. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report on a predatory ladybird beetle whose natural history suggests that the beetle requires the patchy distribution of the mutualism between its prey, the green coffee scale, and the arboreal ant, Azteca instabilis. Based on known ecological interactions and the natural history of the system, we constructed a spatially-explicit model and showed that the clustered spatial pattern of ant nests facilitates the persistence of the beetle populations. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the beetle consuming the scale insects can cause the clustered distribution of the mutualistic ants in the first place. Conclusions/Significance From a theoretical point of view, our model represents a novel situation in which a predator indirectly causes a spatial pattern of an organism other than its prey, and in doing so facilitates its own persistence. From a practical point of view, it is noteworthy that one of the elements in the system is a persistent pest of coffee, an important world commodity. This pest, we argue, is kept within limits of control through a complex web of ecological interactions that involves the emergent spatial pattern. PMID:23029061

  12. Nonsurgical fertility control for managing free-roaming dog populations: a review of products and criteria for field applications.

    PubMed

    Massei, Giovanna; Miller, Lowell A

    2013-11-01

    About 75% of dogs worldwide are free to roam and reproduce, thus creating locally overabundant populations. Problems caused by roaming dogs include diseases transmitted to livestock and humans, predation on livestock, attacks on humans, road traffic accidents, and nuisance behavior. Nonsurgical fertility control is increasingly advocated as more cost-effective than surgical sterilization to manage dog populations and their impact. The aims of this review were to 1) analyze trends in numbers of scientific publications on nonsurgical fertility control for dogs; 2) illustrate the spectrum of fertility inhibitors available for dogs; 3) examine how differences between confined and free-roaming dogs might affect the choice of fertility inhibitors to be used in dog population management; and 4) provide a framework of criteria to guide decisions regarding the use of nonsurgical fertility control for dog population management. The results showed that the 117 articles published between 1982 and 2011 focussed on long-term hormonal contraceptives, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, immunocontraceptives, and male chemical sterilants. The number of articles published biennially increased from one to five papers produced in the early 1980s to 10 to 20 in the past decade. Differences between confined dogs and free-roaming dogs include reproduction and survival as well as social expectations regarding the duration of infertility, the costs of sterilization, and the responsibilities for meeting these costs. These differences are likely to dictate which fertility inhibitors will be used for confined or free-roaming dogs. The criteria regarding the use of fertility control for dog population management, presented as a decision tree, covered social acceptance, animal welfare, effectiveness, legal compliance, feasibility, and sustainability. The review concluded that the main challenges for the future are evaluating the feasibility, effectiveness, sustainability, and

  13. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Hospitalization with Hypomagnesemia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zipursky, Jonathan; Macdonald, Erin M.; Hollands, Simon; Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Paterson, J. Michael; Lathia, Nina; Juurlink, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some evidence suggests that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are an under-appreciated risk factor for hypomagnesemia. Whether hospitalization with hypomagnesemia is associated with use of PPIs is unknown. Methods and Findings We conducted a population-based case-control study of multiple health care databases in Ontario, Canada, from April 2002 to March 2012. Patients who were enrolled as cases were Ontarians aged 66 years or older hospitalized with hypomagnesemia. For each individual enrolled as a case, we identified up to four individuals as controls matched on age, sex, kidney disease, and use of various diuretic classes. Exposure to PPIs was categorized according to the most proximate prescription prior to the index date as current (within 90 days), recent (within 91 to 180 days), or remote (within 181 to 365 days). We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratio for the association of outpatient PPI use and hospitalization with hypomagnesemia. To test the specificity of our findings we examined use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists, drugs with no causal link to hypomagnesemia. We studied 366 patients hospitalized with hypomagnesemia and 1,464 matched controls. Current PPI use was associated with a 43% increased risk of hypomagnesemia (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43; 95% CI 1.06–1.93). In a stratified analysis, the risk was particularly increased among patients receiving diuretics, (adjusted odds ratio, 1.73; 95% CI 1.11–2.70) and not significant among patients not receiving diuretics (adjusted odds ratio, 1.25; 95% CI 0.81–1.91). We estimate that one excess hospitalization with hypomagnesemia will occur among 76,591 outpatients treated with a PPI for 90 days. Hospitalization with hypomagnesemia was not associated with the use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists (adjusted odds ratio 1.06; 95% CI 0.54–2.06). Limitations of this study include a lack of access to serum magnesium levels, uncertainty regarding diagnostic coding of

  14. Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings.

    PubMed

    Mook, P; Kanagarajah, S; Maguire, H; Adak, G K; Dabrera, G; Waldram, A; Freeman, R; Charlett, A; Oliver, I

    2016-04-01

    Timely recruitment of population controls in infectious disease outbreak investigations is challenging. We evaluated the timeliness and cost of using a market research panel as a sampling frame for recruiting controls in a case-control study during an outbreak of Salmonella Mikawasima in the UK in 2013. We deployed a web-survey by email to targeted members of a market research panel (panel controls) in parallel to the outbreak control team interviewing randomly selected public health staff by telephone and completing paper-based questionnaires (staff controls). Recruitment and completion of exposure history web-surveys for panel controls (n = 123) took 14 h compared to 15 days for staff controls (n = 82). The average staff-time cost per questionnaire for staff controls was £13·13 compared to an invoiced cost of £3·60 per panel control. Differences in the distribution of some exposures existed between these control groups but case-control studies using each group found that illness was associated with consumption of chicken outside of the home and chicken from local butchers. Recruiting market research panel controls offers time and resource savings. More rapid investigations would enable more prompt implementation of control measures. We recommend that this method of recruiting controls is considered in future investigations and assessed further to better understand strengths and limitations. PMID:26493476

  15. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: Population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety) will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. Methods/Design This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500) with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework) will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively) to compare outcomes between the trial arms

  16. Prevalence and determinants of controlled hypertension in a German population cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data of the German population-based cohort SHIP (Study of Health in Pomerania) were analysed to examine treatment rates, antihypertensive substances prescribed, and the proportion of hypertensive study participants reaching target values for blood pressure as well as determinants. Methods The study population was defined using baseline data of the cohort (collected between 1997 and 2001). Participants with blood pressure values ≥140/90 mmHg and/or antihypertensive medication with known hypertension and participants with risk-comorbidity (diabetes, stroke, angina pectoris, and/or myocardial infarction) and blood pressure values ≥130/80 mmHg were included. The analysis of treatment and target values was based on the 5-year follow-up of the cohort (collected between 2002 and 2006). Logistic regression was used to identify determinants for a normotensive blood pressure. Results 3278 SHIP-participants with hypertensive blood pressure values were included (mean age: 55.5 years; SD 13.6, range 21–80 years). The raw hypertension prevalence was 50.9% (N = 1761). 58.7% (N = 1074) of all hypertensive patients reported some form of antihypertensive treatment. Thereof 65.1% (N = 728) received combination therapy. Of the patients without risk-comorbidity, 42.1% (N = 489) reached their target blood pressure values at the time of the 5-year follow-up of the cohort. Of the patients with any risk-comorbidity this proportion was only 21.7% (N = 131). Significant determinants for reaching the target values were being female and having antihypertensive combination therapy. Increasing age, having risk-comorbidities, and obesity were negatively associated with reaching the target values. Conclusions Both the proportion of participants receiving therapy and the number of participants reaching their target blood pressure values are very low. Combination therapy is associated with better blood pressure control as compared to mono therapy. However

  17. Continuous Effector CD8(+) T Cell Production in a Controlled Persistent Infection Is Sustained by a Proliferative Intermediate Population.

    PubMed

    Chu, H Hamlet; Chan, Shiao-Wei; Gosling, John Paul; Blanchard, Nicolas; Tsitsiklis, Alexandra; Lythe, Grant; Shastri, Nilabh; Molina-París, Carmen; Robey, Ellen A

    2016-07-19

    Highly functional CD8(+) effector T (Teff) cells can persist in large numbers during controlled persistent infections, as exemplified by rare HIV-infected individuals who control the virus. Here we examined the cellular mechanisms that maintain ongoing T effector responses using a mouse model for persistent Toxoplasma gondii infection. In mice expressing the protective MHC-I molecule, H-2L(d), a dominant T effector response against a single parasite antigen was maintained without a contraction phase, correlating with ongoing presentation of the dominant antigen. Large numbers of short-lived Teff cells were continuously produced via a proliferative, antigen-dependent intermediate (Tint) population with a memory-effector hybrid phenotype. During an acute, resolved infection, decreasing antigen load correlated with a sharp drop in the Tint cell population and subsequent loss of the ongoing effector response. Vaccination approaches aimed at the development of Tint populations might prove effective against pathogens that lead to chronic infection. PMID:27421704

  18. When to be skeptical of negative studies: pitfalls in evaluating occupational risks using population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, S W; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Siemiatycki, J

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated arsenic and lung cancer incidence in a community setting in the Montreal area. Job histories and sociodemographic factors were collected by interview from 857 lung cancer cases, 533 general population controls, and 1,360 controls with other cancers. Chemist-hygienists assessed each subject's life-time occupational exposure to 294 substances. Logistic regressions yielded arsenic/lung cancer odds ratios of 1.1 (95% confidence interval = 0.60, 1.7) based on cancer controls, and 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.41, 1.6) based on population controls. Risk did not rise with increasing level or probability of exposure. Worksite studies consistently show lung carcinogenicity from arsenic. Since confounding from other chemicals was well controlled, the most likely explanation is substantially lower exposures than in previous studies. The lack of association in this study demonstrates the need for caution in interpreting negative findings from population-based case-control studies, particularly when exposures are low or rare, as well as the difficulty in generating hypotheses from such studies. PMID:10349223

  19. Impacts from control operations on a recreationally hunted feral swine population at a large military installation in Florida.

    PubMed

    Engeman, Richard; Hershberger, Troy; Orzell, Steve; Felix, Rodney; Killian, Gary; Woolard, John; Cornman, Jon; Romano, David; Huddleston, Chet; Zimmerman, Pat; Barre, Chris; Tillman, Eric; Avery, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Feral swine were targeted for control at Avon Park Air Force Range in south-central Florida to avert damage to sensitive wetland habitats on the 40,000-ha base. We conducted a 5-year study to assess impacts from control to this population that had been recreationally hunted for many years. Control was initiated in early 2009. The feral swine population was monitored from 2008 to 2012 using a passive tracking index (PTI) during the dry and wet seasons and using recreational hunter take rates from the dry season. All three indices showed substantial feral swine declines after implementing control, with indices leveling for the final two study years. Military missions and recreational hunting seasons impacted temporal and spatial consistency of control application, thereby limiting further impacts of control efforts on the feral swine population. The PTI was also able to monitor coyotes, another invasive species on the base, and detect Florida black bear and Florida panther, species of particular concern. PMID:24622991

  20. Restricted random labeling: testing for between-group interaction after controlling for joint population and within-group spatial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenfeld, Barry J.; Leslie, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical measures of spatial interaction between multiple types of entities are commonly assessed against a null model of either toroidal shift (TS), which controls for spatial structure of individual subpopulations, or random labeling (RL), which controls for spatial structure of the joint population. Neither null model controls for both types of spatial structure simultaneously, although this may sometimes be desirable when more than two subpopulations are present. To address this, we propose a flexible framework for specifying null models that we refer to as restricted random labeling (rRL). Under rRL, a specified subset of individuals is restricted and other individuals are randomly relabeled. Within this framework, two specific null models are proposed for pairwise analysis within populations consisting of three or more subpopulations, to simultaneously control for spatial structure in the joint population and one or the other of the two subpopulations being analyzed. Formulas are presented for calculating expected nearest neighbor counts and co-location quotients within the proposed framework. Differences between TS, RL and rRL are illustrated by application to six types of generating processes in a simulation study, and to empirical datasets of tree species in a forest and crime locations in an urban setting. These examples show that rRL null models are typically stricter than either TS or RL, which often detect "interactions" that are an expected consequence either of the joint population pattern or of individual subpopulation patterns.

  1. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in the older population: results from the multiple national studies on ageing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Qian, Dongfu; Hu, Dan

    2016-02-01

    The international comparisons that provided useful epidemiologic information of hypertension in the elderly people is still sparse; we aim to provide the latest international estimates on the burden of hypertension. These sampling methods of the selection of surveys mainly used multistage population registry; this cross-national study of 63,014 adults aged ≥50 years was from in four high-income countries, four upper-middle-income countries (UMICs), and three low-middle-income countries (LMICs). Overall, the age-standardized prevalence of hypertension among the adult population aged ≥50 years was 53.2% (51.9% of men and 54.3% of women). The high-income countries and UMICs had more or less twice the prevalence of hypertension compare with LMICs. The rates of awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension were 55.6%, 44.1%, and 17.1%, respectively, and awareness and control of hypertension were lowest in UMICs and treatment of hypertension was lowest in LMICs. Among this multiple national study population, hypertension was very common among elderly population. Even more worrisome is that the rates of awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension were relatively low in UMICs and IMICs. These results indicate that improving the ability to control and prevention of hypertension in resource-limited settings is needed. PMID:26778770

  2. 50 CFR 21.61 - Population control of resident Canada geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Migratory Bird Management, at the address provided at 50 CFR 2.1(b). (e) What is required for individuals to... Canada goose population in question. However, resumption of injuries caused by growth of the population... Management, at the address provided at 50 CFR 2.1(b). (h) What are the general program conditions...

  3. Population-level compensation by an invasive thistle thwarts biological control from seed predators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predispersal seed predators are often chosen as biocontrol agents because of their high impacts on plant fitness; however, they have a mixed record in realizing decreased plant population growth. Few studies have experimentally removed agents to explore their impact on weed population growth. Here...

  4. An increased risk of reversible dementia may occur after zolpidem derivative use in the elderly population: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-I; Lin, Che-Chen; Tu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Chi, Chih-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of zolpidem use to develop dementia or Alzheimer disease from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD).A retrospective population-based nested case-control study. Newly diagnosed dementia patients 65 years and older and controls were sampled. A total of 8406 dementia and 16,812 control subjects were enrolled from Taiwan NHIRD during 2006 to 2010. The relationships between zolpidem use and dementia were measured using odds and adjusted odds ratios. The relationship between the average cumulative doses for zolpidem and dementia was also analyzed.Zolpidem alone or with other underlying diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, and stroke, was significantly associated with dementia after controlling for potential confounders, such as age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, anti-hypertension drugs, stroke, anticholesterol statin drugs, depression, anxiety, benzodiazepine, anti-psychotic, and anti-depressant agents' use (Adjusted OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.24-1.41). Zolpidem use also has significant dose-response effects for most of the types of dementia. In patient with Alzheimer diseases, the effects of zolpidem among patients with Alzheimer's disease remained obscure. The adjusted OR for patients whose cumulative exposure doses were between 170 and 819 mg/year (adjusted OR: 1.65, 95% CI 1.08-2.51, P = 0.0199) was significant; however, the effects for lower and higher cumulative dose were not significant.Zolpidem used might be associated with increased risk for dementia in elderly population. Increased accumulative dose might have higher risk to develop dementia, especially in patients with underlying diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. PMID:25929937

  5. Dietary Pattern and Risk of Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Mara M.; Chang, Ellen T.; Zhang, Yawei; Fung, Teresa T.; Batista, Julie L.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Mueller, Nancy E.; Birmann, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) has few known modifiable risk factors, and the relationship between diet and cHL risk is unclear. We performed the first investigation of an association between dietary pattern and cHL risk in 435 cHL cases and 563 population-based controls from Massachusetts and Connecticut (1997–2000) who completed baseline diet questionnaires. We identified 4 major dietary patterns (“vegetable,” “high meat,” “fruit/low-fat dairy,” “desserts/sweets”) using principal components analysis. We computed multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations of dietary pattern score (quartiles) with younger-adult (age <50 years), older-adult (age ≥50 years), and overall cHL risk. Secondary analyses examined associations by histological subtype and tumor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status. A diet high in desserts/sweets was associated with younger-adult (odds ratio(quartile 4 vs. quartile 1) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 2.45; Ptrend = 0.008) and EBV-negative, younger-adult (odds ratio = 2.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.31, 3.41; Ptrend = 0.007) cHL risk. A high meat diet was associated with older-adult (odds ratio = 3.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 10.91; Ptrend = 0.04) and EBV-negative, older-adult (odds ratio = 4.64, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 20.86; Ptrend = 0.04) cHL risk. Other dietary patterns were not clearly associated with cHL. We report the first evidence for a role of dietary pattern in cHL etiology. Diets featuring high intake of meat or desserts and sweets may increase cHL risk. PMID:26182945

  6. Mitigating amphibian disease: strategies to maintain wild populations and control chytridiomycosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodhams, Douglas C.; Bosch, Jaime; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Cashins, Scott; Davis, Leyla R.; Lauer, Antje; Muths, Erin L.; Puschendorf, Robert; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Sheafor, Brandon; Voyles, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Because sustainable conservation of amphibians in nature is dependent on long-term population persistence and co-evolution with potentially lethal pathogens, we suggest that disease mitigation not focus exclusively on the elimination or containment of the pathogen, or on the captive breeding of amphibian hosts. Rather, successful disease mitigation must be context specific with epidemiologically informed strategies to manage already infected populations by decreasing pathogenicity and host susceptibility. We propose population level treatments based on three steps: first, identify mechanisms of disease suppression; second, parameterize epizootiological models of disease and population dynamics for testing under semi-natural conditions; and third, begin a process of adaptive management in field trials with natural populations.

  7. The toxin and antidote puzzle: new ways to control insect pest populations through manipulating inheritance.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John M

    2011-01-01

    Insects carry out essential ecological functions, such as pollination, but also cause extensive damage to agricultural crops, and transmit human diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Advances in insect transgenesis are making it increasingly feasible to engineer genes conferring desirable phenotypes, and gene drive systems are required to spread these genes into wild populations. Medea provides one solution, being able to spread into a population from very low initial frequencies through the action of a maternally-expressed toxin linked to a zygotically-expressed antidote. Several other toxin-antidote combinations are imaginable that distort the offspring ratio in favor of a desired transgene, or drive the population towards an all-male crash. We explore two such systems--Semele, which is capable of spreading a desired transgene into an isolated population in a confined manner; and Merea, which is capable of inducing a local population crash when located on the Z chromosome of a Lepidopteron pest. PMID:21876382

  8. Optimal Control of Population Transfer in Three-Level Λ System with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Yun; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Chen, Guo-Liang; Wang, Zu-Geng; Xü, Zhi-Zhan; Li, Ru-Xin

    2004-10-01

    Population transfer in a three-level Lambda system is simulated numerically and optimized. Almost complete population transfer from |1rangle to |3rangle is achieved by a genetic algorithm while the population in state |2rangle reached minimum over the entire evolution at the same time. The result shows that the optimal pulse sequence is the well-known stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) scheme. The detuning of pump pulse and Stokes pulse Deltap and Deltas with the opposite sign and the chirps chip and chis with the same sign are in favour of the complete and robust population transfer for few-cycle laser pulse. Rabi frequencies Omegap and Omegas have insensitive effects on the complete population transfer during a large scope of their ratio when they are large enough.

  9. Health-related quality of life in patients waiting for major joint replacement. A comparison between patients and population controls

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Johanna; Blom, Marja; Tuominen, Ulla; Seitsalo, Seppo; Lehto, Matti; Paavolainen, Pekka; Hietaniemi, Kalevi; Rissanen, Pekka; Sintonen, Harri

    2006-01-01

    Background Several quality-of-life studies in patients awaiting major joint replacement have focused on the outcomes of surgery. Interest in examining patients on the elective waiting list has increased since the beginning of 2000. We assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients waiting for total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) replacement in three Finnish hospitals, and compared patients' HRQoL with that of population controls. Methods A total of 133 patients awaiting major joint replacement due to osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee joint were prospectively followed from the time the patient was placed on the waiting list to hospital admission. A sample of controls matched by age, gender, housing and home municipality was drawn from the computerised population register. HRQoL was measured by the generic 15D instrument. Differences between patients and the population controls were tested by the independent samples t-test and between the measurement points by the paired samples t-test. A linear regression model was used to explain the variance in the 15D score at admission. Results At baseline, 15D scores were significantly different between patients and the population controls. Compared with the population controls, patients were worse off on the dimensions of moving (P < 0.001), sleeping (P < 0.001), sexual activity (P < 0.001), vitality (P < 0.001), usual activities (P < 0.001) and discomfort and symptoms (P < 0.001). Further, psychological factors – depression (P < 0.001) and distress (P = 0.004) – were worse among patients than population controls. The patients showed statistically significantly improved average scores at admission on the dimensions of moving (P = 0.026), sleeping (P = 0.004) and discomfort and symptoms (P = 0.041), but not in the overall 15D score compared with the baseline. In patients, 15D score at baseline (P < 0.001) and body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.020) had an independent effect on patients' 15D score at hospital admission

  10. Comorbidities and Burden of COPD: A Population Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baty, Florent; Putora, Paul Martin; Isenring, Bruno; Blum, Torsten; Brutsche, Martin

    2013-01-01

    COPD is associated with a relevant burden of disease and a high mortality worldwide. Only recently, the importance of comorbidities of COPD has been recognized. Studies postulated an association with inflammatory conditions potentially sharing pathogenic pathways and worsening overall prognosis. More evidence is required to estimate the role of comorbidities of COPD. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and clustering of comorbidities associated with COPD, and to estimate their impact on clinically relevant outcomes. In this population-based case-control study, a nation-wide database provided by the Swiss Federal Office for Statistics enclosing every hospital entry covering the years 2002–2010 (n = 12′888′075) was analyzed using MySQL and R statistical software. Statistical methods included non-parametric hypothesis testing by means of Fisher’s exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum test, as well as linear models with generalized estimating equation to account for intra-patient variability. Exploratory multivariate approaches were also used for the identification of clusters of comorbidities in COPD patients. In 2.6% (6.3% in patients aged >70 years) of all hospitalization cases an active diagnosis of COPD was recorded. In 21% of these cases, COPD was the main reason for hospitalization. Patients with a diagnosis of COPD had more comorbidities (7 [IQR 4–9] vs. 3 [IQR 1–6]; ), were more frequently rehospitalized (annual hospitalization rate 0.33 [IQR 0.20–0.67] vs. 0.25 [IQR 0.14–0.43]/year; ), had a longer hospital stay (9 [IQR 4–15] vs. 5 [IQR 2–11] days; ), and had higher in-hospital mortality (5.9% [95% CI 5.8%–5.9%] vs. 3.4% [95% CI 3.3%–3.5%]; ) compared to matched controls. A set of comorbidities was associated with worse outcome. We could identify COPD-related clusters of COPD-comorbidities. PMID:23691009

  11. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rambiritch, Virendra; Naidoo, Poobalan; Maharaj, Breminand; Pillai, Goonaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) of glibenclamide in poorly controlled South African type 2 diabetic subjects using noncompartmental and model-based methods. Methods A total of 24 subjects with type 2 diabetes were administered increasing doses (0 mg/d, 2.5 mg/d, 5 mg/d, 10 mg/d, and 20 mg/d) of glibenclamide daily at 2-week intervals. Plasma glibenclamide, glucose, and insulin determinations were performed. Blood sampling times were 0 minute, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes (post breakfast sampling) and 240 minutes, 270 minutes, 300 minutes, 330 minutes, 360 minutes, and 420 minutes (post lunch sampling) on days 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 for doses of 0 mg, 2.5 mg, 5.0 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg, respectively. Blood sampling was performed after the steady state was reached. A total of 24 individuals in the data set contributed to a total of 841 observation records. The PK was analyzed using noncompartmental analysis methods, which were implemented in WinNonLin®, and population PK analysis using NONMEM®. Glibenclamide concentration data were log transformed prior to fitting. Results A two-compartmental disposition model was selected after evaluating one-, two-, and three-compartmental models to describe the time course of glibenclamide plasma concentration data. The one-compartment model adequately described the data; however, the two-compartment model provided a better fit. The three-compartment model failed to achieve successful convergence. A more complex model, to account for enterohepatic recirculation that was observed in the data, was unsuccessful. Conclusion In South African diabetic subjects, glibenclamide demonstrates linear PK and was best described by a two-compartmental model. Except for the absorption rate constant, the other PK parameters reported in this study are comparable to those reported in the scientific literature. The study is limited by the small study sample size and inclusion of poorly

  12. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:26643405

  13. Dominance of Deleterious Alleles Controls the Response to a Population Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Balick, Daniel J.; Do, Ron; Cassa, Christopher A.; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Population bottlenecks followed by re-expansions have been common throughout history of many populations. The response of alleles under selection to such demographic perturbations has been a subject of great interest in population genetics. On the basis of theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we suggest that this response qualitatively depends on dominance. The number of dominant or additive deleterious alleles per haploid genome is expected to be slightly increased following the bottleneck and re-expansion. In contrast, the number of completely or partially recessive alleles should be sharply reduced. Changes of population size expose differences between recessive and additive selection, potentially providing insight into the prevalence of dominance in natural populations. Specifically, we use a simple statistic, BR≡∑xipop1/∑xjpop2, where x i represents the derived allele frequency, to compare the number of mutations in different populations, and detail its functional dependence on the strength of selection and the intensity of the population bottleneck. We also provide empirical evidence showing that gene sets associated with autosomal recessive disease in humans may have a B R indicative of recessive selection. Together, these theoretical predictions and empirical observations show that complex demographic history may facilitate rather than impede inference of parameters of natural selection. PMID:26317225

  14. Dominance of Deleterious Alleles Controls the Response to a Population Bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Balick, Daniel J; Do, Ron; Cassa, Christopher A; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2015-08-01

    Population bottlenecks followed by re-expansions have been common throughout history of many populations. The response of alleles under selection to such demographic perturbations has been a subject of great interest in population genetics. On the basis of theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we suggest that this response qualitatively depends on dominance. The number of dominant or additive deleterious alleles per haploid genome is expected to be slightly increased following the bottleneck and re-expansion. In contrast, the number of completely or partially recessive alleles should be sharply reduced. Changes of population size expose differences between recessive and additive selection, potentially providing insight into the prevalence of dominance in natural populations. Specifically, we use a simple statistic, [Formula: see text], where xi represents the derived allele frequency, to compare the number of mutations in different populations, and detail its functional dependence on the strength of selection and the intensity of the population bottleneck. We also provide empirical evidence showing that gene sets associated with autosomal recessive disease in humans may have a BR indicative of recessive selection. Together, these theoretical predictions and empirical observations show that complex demographic history may facilitate rather than impede inference of parameters of natural selection. PMID:26317225

  15. Predators with multiple ontogenetic niche shifts have limited potential for population growth and top-down control of their prey.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Anieke; Huss, Magnus; Gårdmark, Anna; Casini, Michele; Vitale, Francesca; Hjelm, Joakim; Persson, Lennart; de Roos, André M

    2013-07-01

    Catastrophic collapses of top predators have revealed trophic cascades and community structuring by top-down control. When populations fail to recover after a collapse, this may indicate alternative stable states in the system. Overfishing has caused several of the most compelling cases of these dynamics, and in particular Atlantic cod stocks exemplify such lack of recovery. Often, competition between prey species and juvenile predators is hypothesized to explain the lack of recovery of predator populations. The predator is then considered to compete with its prey for one resource when small and to subsequently shift to piscivory. Yet predator life history is often more complex than that, including multiple ontogenetic diet shifts. Here we show that no alternative stable states occur when predators in an intermediate life stage feed on an additional resource (exclusive to the predator) before switching to piscivory, because predation and competition between prey and predator do not simultaneously structure community dynamics. We find top-down control by the predator only when there is no feedback from predator foraging on the additional resource. Otherwise, the predator population dynamics are governed by a bottleneck in individual growth occurring in the intermediate life stage. Therefore, additional resources for predators may be beneficial or detrimental for predator population growth and strongly influence the potential for top-down community control. PMID:23778226

  16. Population dynamics in controlled unsteady-state systems: An application to the degradation of glyphosate in a sequencing batch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Control over population dynamics and organism selection in a biological waste treatment system provides an effective means of engineering process efficiency. Examples of applications of organism selection include control of filamentous organisms, biological nutrient removal, industrial waste treatment requiring the removal of specific substrates, and hazardous waste treatment. Inherently, full scale biological waste treatment systems are unsteady state systems due to the variations in the waste streams and mass flow rates of the substrates. Some systems, however, have the capacity to impose controlled selective pressures on the biological population by means of their operation. An example of such a system is the Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) which was the experimental system utilized in this research work. The concepts of organism selection were studied in detail for the biodegradation of a herbicide waste stream, with glyphosate as the target compound. The SBR provided a reactor configuration capable of exerting the necessary selective pressures to select and enrich for a glyphosate degrading population. Based on results for bench scale SBRs, a hypothesis was developed to explain population dynamics in glyphosate degrading systems.

  17. Changes in Chondrogenic Progenitor Populations Associated with Aging and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kyla; Dickinson, Sally C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrogenic progenitor populations, including mesenchymal stem cells, represent promising cell-based transplantation or tissue engineering therapies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage. Osteoarthritis (OA) predominantly affects the elderly and is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Advancing age is a prominent risk factor that is closely associated with the onset and progression of the disease. Understanding the influence that aging and OA have on chondrogenic progenitor cells is important to determine how these processes affect the cellular mechanisms of the cells and their capacity to differentiate into functional chondrocytes for use in therapeutic applications. Here, we review the effect of age- and OA-related changes on the growth kinetics and differentiation potential of chondrogenic progenitor cell populations. Aging differentially influences the proliferative potential of progenitor cells showing reduced growth rates with increased senescence and apoptotic activity over time, while chondrogenesis appears to be independent of donor age. Cartilage tissue affected by OA shows evidence of progenitor populations with some potential for repair, however reports on the proliferative propensity of mesenchymal stem cells and their chondrogenic potential are contradictory. This is likely attributed to the narrow age ranges of samples assessed and deficits in definitively identifying donors with OA versus healthy patients across a wide scope of advancing ages. Further studies that investigate the mechanistic effects of chondrogenic progenitor populations associated with aging and the progression of OA using clearly defined criteria and age-matched control subject groups are crucial to our understanding of the clinical relevance of these cells for use in cartilage repair therapies. PMID:27340514

  18. Lactic Acidosis in Diabetic Population: Is Metformin Implicated? Results of a Matched Case-Control Study Performed on the Type 2 Diabetes Population of Grenoble Hospital University

    PubMed Central

    Lepelley, Marion; Giai, Joris; Yahiaoui, Nassima; Chanoine, Sébastien; Villier, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the strength of association between lactic acidosis (LA) and well-recognized risk factors for LA, particularly the weight of metformin. Methods. This study is a matched case-control analysis concerning the type 2 diabetes population from Grenoble Hospital University. Cases of LA were defined biologically with pH < 7.35 and lactates > 5 mmol/L. They were matched to 2 controls defined as type 2 diabetic inpatients who did not present a LA during the study period. We performed a conditional logistic regression. Results. We included 302 cases and 604 controls; mean age was 69.5 years (SD 11.93). Intercurrent diseases were significantly associated with LA. Chronic medical conditions had a minor impact on LA incidence, except hepatocellular dysfunction. Metformin was significantly associated with a higher LA probability in case of acute kidney injury (AKI) (OR = 1.79; p value = 0.020) but not in patients without AKI. Discussion and Conclusions. According to this study, metformin, compared to acute medical conditions, seemed not to be associated with LA in patients with type 2 diabetes; however in case of AKI, metformin may be associated with LA. PMID:27034959

  19. Stray dog population health in Jodhpur, India in the wake of an animal birth control (ABC) program.

    PubMed

    Totton, Sarah C; Wandeler, Alex I; Ribble, Carl S; Rosatte, Rick C; McEwen, Scott A

    2011-02-01

    Our objectives were to (1) estimate the prevalence of various health indices in the stray dog population in Jodhpur, India and (2) determine if there was an association between an animal birth control (ABC) program and the prevalence of these health indices in this population. A prevalence survey of 323 sexually intact stray dogs >3 months caught from the streets of Jodhpur from September to November, 2005 indicated that low body condition score (70%), skin conditions (69%) and tick infestation (68%) were the most common health problems in this population. An observational study of 888 stray dogs on the streets of Jodhpur from March to April, 2006 revealed that sterilized dogs were more likely to have a higher body condition score (BCS) than sexually intact dogs when controlling for age, based on a multinomial regression model. However, sterilized dogs were more likely to have a skin condition than sexually intact dogs, based on a logistic regression model. Our observations of the surgical/kennel facility indicated that an effective tick control program was needed. Additionally, the current parasite control protocol at the kennel/shelter facility was inadequate to treat mange, a contact-transmitted skin disease. This is the first study to evaluate the associations between an ABC program and stray dog health, apart from rabies. PMID:21144606

  20. Association of genetic polymorphisms with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Chinese Han population: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Few gene studies of the Chinese population have focused on COPD. We investigated candidate genes associated with susceptibility to COPD in the Chinese Han population. Methods A total of 331 COPD patients and 213 control subjects were recruited for this study. Nighty-seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 46 genes were selected for genotyping. Genotypes were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Significant differences between patients and healthy controls were observed in the allele frequencies of seven SNPs: rs1205 C, rs2353397 C, rs20541 T, rs2070600 G, rs10947233 G, rs1800629 G, and rs2241712 A. After Bonferroni correction, rs2353397 C was most strongly associated with susceptibility to COPD. Haplotype analysis showed that the frequencies of the GC, GT haplotypes of rs2241718 (TGF-β1 gene), and rs6957 (CDC97 gene) were significantly higher in the control group than in the COPD case group (p=1.88×10-9); the frequencies of the TT haplotype of rs1205 and rs2808630 (CRP gene) were significantly higher in the control group (p=0.0377). Conclusion Our study suggests some genetic variants associated with the susceptibility of COPD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:23267696

  1. New structures for goat corrals to control peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the Gran Chaco of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gorla, David Eladio; Abrahan, Luciana; Hernández, María Laura; Porcasi, Ximena; Hrellac, Hugo Américo; Carrizo, Hugo; Catalá, Silvia Susana

    2013-05-01

    Goat production is an important economic activity for rural communities in the Gran Chaco of Argentina. Goat corrals are important for the survival of peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans. This study evaluated the impact of modifying the traditional structure of goat corrals on T. infestans populations and goat productivity in the region of Los Llanos (La Rioja). Thirty-nine experimental corrals were constructed and 57 traditional corrals were used as controls. We evaluated the infestations of the control and experimental corrals for five years following construction of the structures. The results showed that the new structures did not prevent the colonization, although it enhanced the detection of infestation at low densities of T. infestans. No significant difference was found in T. infestans population abundance between control and experimental corrals, probably because of the different detectability in the two types of structures, especially among the small nymphs. Although goat productivity average was higher in experimental than in control corrals, no significant difference was found because of high variability. The new structures can be used as a complement to promote the development of rural communities. Acceptability and adoption of the new corrals by the owners was high, as the enclosures offered better protection for the goats, increased growth of kids and facilitated herd handling. PMID:23778656

  2. New structures for goat corrals to control peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the Gran Chaco of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, David Eladio; Abrahan, Luciana; Hernández, María Laura; Porcasi, Ximena; Hrellac, Hugo Américo; Carrizo, Hugo; Catalá, Silvia Susana

    2013-01-01

    Goat production is an important economic activity for rural communities in the Gran Chaco of Argentina. Goat corrals are important for the survival of peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans. This study evaluated the impact of modifying the traditional structure of goat corrals on T. infestans populations and goat productivity in the region of Los Llanos (La Rioja). Thirty-nine experimental corrals were constructed and 57 traditional corrals were used as controls. We evaluated the infestations of the control and experimental corrals for five years following construction of the structures. The results showed that the new structures did not prevent the colonization, although it enhanced the detection of infestation at low densities of T. infestans. No significant difference was found in T. infestans population abundance between control and experimental corrals, probably because of the different detectability in the two types of structures, especially among the small nymphs. Although goat productivity average was higher in experimental than in control corrals, no significant difference was found because of high variability. The new structures can be used as a complement to promote the development of rural communities. Acceptability and adoption of the new corrals by the owners was high, as the enclosures offered better protection for the goats, increased growth of kids and facilitated herd handling. PMID:23778656

  3. Abnormal Population Responses in the Somatosensory Cortex of Alzheimer’s Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maatuf, Yossi; Stern, Edward A.; Slovin, Hamutal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. One of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-β plaques. Overexpression of human amyloid precursor protein in transgenic mice induces hippocampal and neocortical amyloid-β accumulation and plaque deposition that increases with age. The impact of these effects on neuronal population responses and network activity in sensory cortex is not well understood. We used Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging, to investigate at high spatial and temporal resolution, the sensory evoked population responses in the barrel cortex of aged transgenic (Tg) mice and of age-matched non-transgenic littermate controls (Ctrl) mice. We found that a whisker deflection evoked abnormal sensory responses in the barrel cortex of Tg mice. The response amplitude and the spatial spread of the cortical responses were significantly larger in Tg than in Ctrl mice. At the network level, spontaneous activity was less synchronized over cortical space than in Ctrl mice, however synchronization during evoked responses induced by whisker deflection did not differ between the two groups. Thus, the presence of elevated Aβ and plaques may alter population responses and disrupts neural synchronization in large-scale networks, leading to abnormalities in sensory processing. PMID:27079783

  4. Abnormal Population Responses in the Somatosensory Cortex of Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Maatuf, Yossi; Stern, Edward A; Slovin, Hamutal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. One of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-β plaques. Overexpression of human amyloid precursor protein in transgenic mice induces hippocampal and neocortical amyloid-β accumulation and plaque deposition that increases with age. The impact of these effects on neuronal population responses and network activity in sensory cortex is not well understood. We used Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging, to investigate at high spatial and temporal resolution, the sensory evoked population responses in the barrel cortex of aged transgenic (Tg) mice and of age-matched non-transgenic littermate controls (Ctrl) mice. We found that a whisker deflection evoked abnormal sensory responses in the barrel cortex of Tg mice. The response amplitude and the spatial spread of the cortical responses were significantly larger in Tg than in Ctrl mice. At the network level, spontaneous activity was less synchronized over cortical space than in Ctrl mice, however synchronization during evoked responses induced by whisker deflection did not differ between the two groups. Thus, the presence of elevated Aβ and plaques may alter population responses and disrupts neural synchronization in large-scale networks, leading to abnormalities in sensory processing. PMID:27079783

  5. Sustained reduction of the dengue vector population resulting from an integrated control strategy applied in two Brazilian cities.

    PubMed

    Regis, Lêda N; Acioli, Ridelane Veiga; Silveira, José Constantino; Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Ribeiro, Cândida M Nogueira; da Silva, Juliana C Serafim; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Oliveira, Cláudia M F; Barbosa, Rosângela M R; Braga, Cynthia; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Benedetti; Silva, Marilú Gomes N M; Ribeiro, Paulo Justiniano; Bonat, Wagner Hugo; de Castro Medeiros, Liliam César; Carvalho, Marilia Sa; Furtado, André Freire

    2013-01-01

    Aedes aegypti has developed evolution-driven adaptations for surviving in the domestic human habitat. Several trap models have been designed considering these strategies and tested for monitoring this efficient vector of Dengue. Here, we report a real-scale evaluation of a system for monitoring and controlling mosquito populations based on egg sampling coupled with geographic information systems technology. The SMCP-Aedes, a system based on open technology and open data standards, was set up from March/2008 to October/2011 as a pilot trial in two sites of Pernambuco -Brazil: Ipojuca (10,000 residents) and Santa Cruz (83,000), in a joint effort of health authorities and staff, and a network of scientists providing scientific support. A widespread infestation by Aedes was found in both sites in 2008-2009, with 96.8%-100% trap positivity. Egg densities were markedly higher in SCC than in Ipojuca. A 90% decrease in egg density was recorded in SCC after two years of sustained control pressure imposed by suppression of >7,500,000 eggs and >3,200 adults, plus larval control by adding fishes to cisterns. In Ipojuca, 1.1 million mosquito eggs were suppressed and a 77% reduction in egg density was achieved. This study aimed at assessing the applicability of a system using GIS and spatial statistic analysis tools for quantitative assessment of mosquito populations. It also provided useful information on the requirements for reducing well-established mosquito populations. Results from two cities led us to conclude that the success in markedly reducing an Aedes population required the appropriate choice of control measures for sustained mass elimination guided by a user-friendly mosquito surveillance system. The system was able to support interventional decisions and to assess the program's success. Additionally, it created a stimulating environment for health staff and residents, which had a positive impact on their commitment to the dengue control program. PMID:23844059

  6. Sustained Reduction of the Dengue Vector Population Resulting from an Integrated Control Strategy Applied in Two Brazilian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Regis, Lêda N.; Acioli, Ridelane Veiga; Silveira, José Constantino; Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Ribeiro, Cândida M. Nogueira.; da Silva, Juliana C. Serafim.; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Oliveira, Cláudia M. F.; Barbosa, Rosângela M. R.; Braga, Cynthia; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Benedetti; Silva, Marilú Gomes N. M.; Ribeiro Jr., Paulo Justiniano; Bonat, Wagner Hugo; de Castro Medeiros, Liliam César; Carvalho, Marilia Sa; Furtado, André Freire

    2013-01-01

    Aedes aegypti has developed evolution-driven adaptations for surviving in the domestic human habitat. Several trap models have been designed considering these strategies and tested for monitoring this efficient vector of Dengue. Here, we report a real-scale evaluation of a system for monitoring and controlling mosquito populations based on egg sampling coupled with geographic information systems technology. The SMCP-Aedes, a system based on open technology and open data standards, was set up from March/2008 to October/2011 as a pilot trial in two sites of Pernambuco -Brazil: Ipojuca (10,000 residents) and Santa Cruz (83,000), in a joint effort of health authorities and staff, and a network of scientists providing scientific support. A widespread infestation by Aedes was found in both sites in 2008–2009, with 96.8%–100% trap positivity. Egg densities were markedly higher in SCC than in Ipojuca. A 90% decrease in egg density was recorded in SCC after two years of sustained control pressure imposed by suppression of >7,500,000 eggs and >3,200 adults, plus larval control by adding fishes to cisterns. In Ipojuca, 1.1 million mosquito eggs were suppressed and a 77% reduction in egg density was achieved. This study aimed at assessing the applicability of a system using GIS and spatial statistic analysis tools for quantitative assessment of mosquito populations. It also provided useful information on the requirements for reducing well-established mosquito populations. Results from two cities led us to conclude that the success in markedly reducing an Aedes population required the appropriate choice of control measures for sustained mass elimination guided by a user-friendly mosquito surveillance system. The system was able to support interventional decisions and to assess the program’s success. Additionally, it created a stimulating environment for health staff and residents, which had a positive impact on their commitment to the dengue control program. PMID:23844059

  7. Quantification of rat retinal growth and vascular population changes after single and split doses of proton irradiation: translational study using stereology methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Xiao W.; Archambeau, John O.; Kubinova, Lucie; Boyle, Soames; Petersen, Georgia; Grove, Roger; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified architectural and population changes in the rat retinal vasculature after proton irradiation using stereology. A 100 MeV conformal proton beam delivered 8, 14, 20 and 28 Gy as single and split doses to the whole eye. The vascular networks were prepared from retinal digests. Stereological methods were used to obtain the area of the retina and unbiased estimates of microvessel/artery/vein endothelial, pericyte and smooth muscle population, and vessel length. The retinal area increased progressively in the unirradiated, age-matched controls and in the retinas irradiated with 8 and 14 Gy, indicating uniform progressive retinal growth. No growth occurred after 20 and 28 Gy. Regression analysis of total endothelial cell number in all vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) after irradiation documented a progressive time- and dose-dependent cell loss occurring over 15 to 24 months. The difference from controls was significant (P<0.01) after 28 Gy given in single and split doses and after 20 Gy given as a split dose (P<0.05). Total vessel length in microvessel was significantly shortened at 20 and 28 Gy compared to that of controls (P<0.05). No evident dose recovery was observed in the endothelial populations after split doses. At 10 Gy, the rate of endothelial cell loss, a dose parameter used to characterize the time- and dose-dependent loss of the endothelial population, was doubled.

  8. El Niño controls Holocene rabbit and hare populations in Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Isaac A.; Broughton, Jack M.; Gruhn, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of climatic variation worldwide, with significant impacts on modern human and animal populations. However, few detailed records exist on the long-term effects of ENSO on prehistoric vertebrate populations. Here we examine how lagomorph (rabbit and hare) deposition rate, population age structure and taxonomic composition from Abrigo de los Escorpiones, a well-dated, trans-Holocene vertebrate fauna from northern Baja California, Mexico, vary as a function of the frequency of wet El Niño events and eastern Pacific sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) derived from eastern Pacific geological records. Faunal indices vary significantly in response to El Niño-based precipitation and SST, with substantial moisture-driven variability in the middle and late Holocene. The late Holocene moisture pulse is coincident with previously documented changes in the population dynamics of other vertebrates, including humans. As the frequency and intensity of ENSO is anticipated to vary in the future, these results have important implications for change in future vertebrate populations.

  9. People of the British Isles: preliminary analysis of genotypes and surnames in a UK-control population

    PubMed Central

    Winney, Bruce; Boumertit, Abdelhamid; Day, Tammy; Davison, Dan; Echeta, Chikodi; Evseeva, Irina; Hutnik, Katarzyna; Leslie, Stephen; Nicodemus, Kristin; Royrvik, Ellen C; Tonks, Susan; Yang, Xiaofeng; Cheshire, James; Longley, Paul; Mateos, Pablo; Groom, Alexandra; Relton, Caroline; Bishop, D Tim; Black, Kathryn; Northwood, Emma; Parkinson, Louise; Frayling, Timothy M; Steele, Anna; Sampson, Julian R; King, Turi; Dixon, Ron; Middleton, Derek; Jennings, Barbara; Bowden, Rory; Donnelly, Peter; Bodmer, Walter

    2012-01-01

    There is a great deal of interest in a fine-scale population structure in the UK, both as a signature of historical immigration events and because of the effect population structure may have on disease association studies. Although population structure appears to have a minor impact on the current generation of genome-wide association studies, it is likely to have a significant part in the next generation of studies designed to search for rare variants. A powerful way of detecting such structure is to control and document carefully the provenance of the samples involved. In this study, we describe the collection of a cohort of rural UK samples (The People of the British Isles), aimed at providing a well-characterised UK-control population that can be used as a resource by the research community, as well as providing a fine-scale genetic information on the British population. So far, some 4000 samples have been collected, the majority of which fit the criteria of coming from a rural area and having all four grandparents from approximately the same area. Analysis of the first 3865 samples that have been geocoded indicates that 75% have a mean distance between grandparental places of birth of 37.3 km, and that about 70% of grandparental places of birth can be classed as rural. Preliminary genotyping of 1057 samples demonstrates the value of these samples for investigating a fine-scale population structure within the UK, and shows how this can be enhanced by the use of surnames. PMID:21829225

  10. Evaluation of New Technologies for Cancer Control Based on Population Trends in Disease Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cancer interventions often disseminate in the population before evidence of their effectiveness is available. Population disease trends provide a natural experiment for assessing the characteristics of the disease and the potential impact of the intervention. We review models for extracting information from population data for use in economic evaluations of cancer screening interventions. We focus particularly on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer and describe approaches that can be used to project the likely costs and benefits of competing screening policies. Results indicate that the lifetime probability of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer is 33%, the chance of clinical diagnosis without screening is 13%, and the average time from onset to clinical diagnosis is 14 years. Less aggressive screening policies that screen less often and use more conservative criteria (e.g., higher PSA thresholds) for biopsy referral may dramatically reduce PSA screening costs with modest impact on benefit. PMID:23962515

  11. Comprehensive approach for hypertension control in low-income populations: rationale and study design for the hypertension control program in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mills, Katherine T; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Irazola, Vilma; Chen, Jing; Beratarrechea, Andrea; Poggio, Rosana; Dolan, Jacquelyn; Augustovski, Federico; Shi, Lizheng; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Bazzano, Lydia A; He, Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Although the efficacy and effectiveness of lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive pharmaceutical treatment for the prevention and control of hypertension and concomitant cardiovascular disease have been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, this scientific knowledge has not been fully applied in the general population, especially in low-income communities. This article summarizes interventions to improve hypertension management and describes the rationale and study design for a cluster randomized trial testing whether a comprehensive intervention program within a national public primary care system will improve hypertension control among uninsured hypertensive men and women and their families. We will recruit 1,890 adults from 18 clinics within a public primary care network in Argentina. Clinic patients with uncontrolled hypertension, their spouses and hypertensive family members will be enrolled. The comprehensive intervention program targets the primary care system through health care provider education, a home-based intervention among patients and their families (home delivery of antihypertensive medication, self-monitoring of blood pressure [BP], health education for medication adherence and lifestyle modification) conducted by community health workers and a mobile health intervention. The primary outcome is net change in systolic BP from baseline to month 18 between intervention and control groups among hypertensive study participants. The secondary outcomes are net change in diastolic BP, BP control and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. This study will generate urgently needed data on effective, practical and sustainable intervention programs aimed at controlling hypertension and concomitant cardiovascular disease in underserved populations in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:24978148

  12. A multi-scale study of Orthoptera species richness and human population size controlling for sampling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarello, Elena; Steck, Claude E.; Fontana, Paolo; Fontaneto, Diego; Marini, Lorenzo; Pautasso, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Recent large-scale studies have shown that biodiversity-rich regions also tend to be densely populated areas. The most obvious explanation is that biodiversity and human beings tend to match the distribution of energy availability, environmental stability and/or habitat heterogeneity. However, the species-people correlation can also be an artefact, as more populated regions could show more species because of a more thorough sampling. Few studies have tested this sampling bias hypothesis. Using a newly collated dataset, we studied whether Orthoptera species richness is related to human population size in Italy’s regions (average area 15,000 km2) and provinces (2,900 km2). As expected, the observed number of species increases significantly with increasing human population size for both grain sizes, although the proportion of variance explained is minimal at the provincial level. However, variations in observed Orthoptera species richness are primarily associated with the available number of records, which is in turn well correlated with human population size (at least at the regional level). Estimated Orthoptera species richness (Chao2 and Jackknife) also increases with human population size both for regions and provinces. Both for regions and provinces, this increase is not significant when controlling for variation in area and number of records. Our study confirms the hypothesis that broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can in some cases be artefactual. More systematic sampling of less studied taxa such as invertebrates is necessary to ascertain whether biogeographical patterns persist when sampling effort is kept constant or included in models.

  13. Analyses of nuclear ldhA gene and mtDNA control region sequences of Atlantic northern bluefin tuna populations.

    PubMed

    Ely, B; Stoner, D S; Bremer, Alvarado J R; Dean, J M; Addis, P; Cau, A; Thelen, E J; Jones, W J; Black, D E; Smith, L; Scott, K; Naseri, I; Quattro, J M

    2002-12-01

    There has been considerable debate about whether the Atlantic northern bluefin tuna exist as a single panmictic unit. We have addressed this issue by examining both mitochondrial DNA control region nucleotide sequences and nuclear gene ldhA allele frequencies in replicate size or year class samples of northern bluefin tuna from the Mediterranean Sea and the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Pairwise comparisons of multiple year class samples from the 2 regions provided no evidence for population subdivision. Similarly, analyses of molecular variance of both mitochondrial and ldhA data revealed no significant differences among or between samples from the 2 regions. These results demonstrate the importance of analyzing multiple year classes and large sample sizes to obtain accurate estimates when using allele frequencies to characterize a population. It is important to note that the absence of genetic evidence for population substructure does not unilaterally constitute evidence of a single panmictic population, as genetic differentiation can be prevented by large population sizes and by migration. PMID:14961233

  14. Effect of non-operative management (NOM) of splenic rupture versus splenectomy on the distribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte populations and cytokine production by T cells

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, G L; Mouzaki, A; Tsiftsis, D; Apostolopoulou, A; Mougiou, A; Theodori, E; Vagianos, C; Karakantza, M

    2007-01-01

    Post-traumatic splenectomy is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and long-term impairment of humoral and cellular immunity. Alternatives to surgery have been developed to minimize or avoid the immediate and/or long-term complications of splenectomy. Herein we investigated the long-term effect of non-operative management (NOM) of the traumatic rupture of the spleen on the distribution of peripheral blood (PB) lymphocyte populations and cytokine production by T cells. PB samples were drawn from six NOM patients, 13 age-matched adults who had undergone splenectomy after trauma (SP patients) and 31 age-matched controls. Cellular phenotypes and the intracellular production of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in T cells were determined in whole blood ± mitogens by flow cytometry. NOM patients did not show any changes in the absolute numbers of lymphocytes or the distribution of their subsets, compared to the controls. In contrast, SP patients showed a sustained increase in the percentage and/or absolute numbers of lymphocytes, CD8 T cells, activated CD8 T cells, natural killer (NK) T cells, NK cells and γδ T cells, and a reduction in naive CD4 T cells. The constitutive or induced cytokine production by T cells of the NOM group was similar to the control group, whereas SP patients had increased percentages of constitutive IL-2- and IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells and IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells. Our findings indicate collectively that the healing process in NOM does not affect the architecture of the spleen to such an extent that it would lead to long-term alterations of the proportions of PB lymphocytes or the T cell cytokine profiles. PMID:17924970

  15. Locus of Control and Attitude toward Eating in a Female College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth-Marnat, Gary; Scumaker, Jack F.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and attitude to food intake in 101 female college students. Results indicated that locus of control was unable to predict attitudes toward eating and fear of becoming overweight. Thesis that locus of control would be related to attitude toward food intake was not supported. (Author/NB)

  16. Vitamin D as a marker of cognitive decline in elderly Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Vedak, Tejal Kanhaiya; Ganwir, Vaishali; Shah, Arun B.; Pinto, Charles; Lele, Vikram R.; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Hina; Deo, Sudha Shrikant

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Very few studies in India have addressed the role of vitamin D in cognitive function. The present study was conducted to assess the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and its association with markers of cognitive impairment and homocysteine levels in the elderly Indian population. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of patients with dementia (Group A, n = 32), mild cognitive impairment (MCI; Group B, n = 24), and elderly age-matched controls (Group C, n = 30). Measurement of serum levels of 25(OH)D and total homocysteine were done. Results: Significant decreased concentration of 25(OH)D and increased concentration of homocysteine was observed. Association of serum levels of vitamin D with markers of cognitive decline as well as serum homocysteine levels was observed in patients with dementia and MCI when compared to controls. Conclusion: Correlation of vitamin D with markers of cognitive decline and homocysteine opens a new door for early diagnosis of cognitive impairment. PMID:26425010

  17. Population dynamics of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in commercial honey bee colonies and implications for control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment schedules to maintain low levels of Varroa mites in honey bee colonies were tested in hives started from either package bees or splits of larger colonies. The schedules were developed based on predictions of Varroa population growth generated from a mathematical model of honey bee colony ...

  18. Fire controls population structure in four dominant tree species in a tropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Caroline E R; Prior, Lynda D; Bowman, David M J S

    2009-09-01

    The persistence of mesic savannas has been theorised as being dependent on disturbances that restrict the number of juveniles growing through the sapling size class to become fire-tolerant trees. We analysed the population structures of four dominant tropical savanna tree species from 30 locations in Kakadu National Park (KNP), northern Australia. We found that across KNP as a whole, the population size structures of these species do not exhibit recruitment bottlenecks. However, individual stands had multimodal size-class distributions and mixtures of tree species consistent with episodic and individualistic recruitment of co-occurring tree species. Using information theory and multimodel inference, we examined the relative importance of fire frequency, stand basal area and elevation difference between a site and permanent water in explaining variations in the proportion of sapling to adult stems in four dominant tree species. This showed that the proportion of the tree population made up of saplings was negatively related to both fire frequencies and stand basal area. Overall, fire frequency has density-dependent effects in the regulation of the transition of saplings to trees in this Australian savanna, due to interactions with stem size, regeneration strategies, growth rates and tree-tree competition. Although stable at the regional scale, the spatiotemporal variability of fire can result in structural and floristic diversity of savanna tree populations. PMID:19629532

  19. Using global information technology to detect, monitor, and control mosquito pest and disease vector populations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS), image analysis, and remote sensing comprise global information technologies that are used to characterize pest and vector populations of mosquitoes. At this national meeting, scientists from ARS and McNeese State University organized and convened a half-day sym...

  20. Reconsideration of r/K Selection Theory Using Stochastic Control Theory and Nonlinear Structured Population Models.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Ryo; Kuniya, Toshikazu; Enatsu, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that density effects and individual differences in life history are considered to be important for evolution, these factors lead to several difficulties in understanding the evolution of life history, especially when population sizes reach the carrying capacity. r/K selection theory explains what types of life strategies evolve in the presence of density effects and individual differences. However, the relationship between the life schedules of individuals and population size is still unclear, even if the theory can classify life strategies appropriately. To address this issue, we propose a few equations on adaptive life strategies in r/K selection where density effects are absent or present. The equations detail not only the adaptive life history but also the population dynamics. Furthermore, the equations can incorporate temporal individual differences, which are referred to as internal stochasticity. Our framework reveals that maximizing density effects is an evolutionarily stable strategy related to the carrying capacity. A significant consequence of our analysis is that adaptive strategies in both selections maximize an identical function, providing both population growth rate and carrying capacity. We apply our method to an optimal foraging problem in a semelparous species model and demonstrate that the adaptive strategy yields a lower intrinsic growth rate as well as a lower basic reproductive number than those obtained with other strategies. This study proposes that the diversity of life strategies arises due to the effects of density and internal stochasticity. PMID:27336169

  1. Reconsideration of r/K Selection Theory Using Stochastic Control Theory and Nonlinear Structured Population Models

    PubMed Central

    Oizumi, Ryo; Kuniya, Toshikazu; Enatsu, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that density effects and individual differences in life history are considered to be important for evolution, these factors lead to several difficulties in understanding the evolution of life history, especially when population sizes reach the carrying capacity. r/K selection theory explains what types of life strategies evolve in the presence of density effects and individual differences. However, the relationship between the life schedules of individuals and population size is still unclear, even if the theory can classify life strategies appropriately. To address this issue, we propose a few equations on adaptive life strategies in r/K selection where density effects are absent or present. The equations detail not only the adaptive life history but also the population dynamics. Furthermore, the equations can incorporate temporal individual differences, which are referred to as internal stochasticity. Our framework reveals that maximizing density effects is an evolutionarily stable strategy related to the carrying capacity. A significant consequence of our analysis is that adaptive strategies in both selections maximize an identical function, providing both population growth rate and carrying capacity. We apply our method to an optimal foraging problem in a semelparous species model and demonstrate that the adaptive strategy yields a lower intrinsic growth rate as well as a lower basic reproductive number than those obtained with other strategies. This study proposes that the diversity of life strategies arises due to the effects of density and internal stochasticity. PMID:27336169

  2. Recruitment issues when primary care population clusters are used in randomised controlled clinical trials: climbing mountains or pushing boulders uphill?

    PubMed

    Hoddinott, Pat; Britten, Jane; Harrild, Kirsten; Godden, David J

    2007-05-01

    Cluster randomised controlled trials for health promotion, education, public health or organisational change interventions are becoming increasingly common to inform evidence-based policy. However, there is little published methodological evidence on recruitment strategies for primary care population clusters. In this paper, we discuss how choosing which population cluster to randomise can impact on the practicalities of recruitment in primary care. We describe strategies developed through our experiences of recruiting primary care organisations to participate in a national randomised controlled trial of a policy to provide community breastfeeding groups for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, the BIG (Breastfeeding in Groups) trial. We propose an iterative qualitative approach to recruitment; collecting data generated through the recruitment process, identifying themes and using the constant comparative method of analysis. This can assist in developing successful recruitment strategies and contrasts with the standardised approach commonly used when recruiting individuals to participate in randomised controlled trials. Recruiting primary care population clusters to participate in trials is currently an uphill battle in Britain. It is a complex process, which can benefit from applying qualitative methods to inform trial design and recruitment strategy. Recruitment could be facilitated if health service managers were committed to supporting peer reviewed, funded and ethics committee approved research at national level. PMID:16996320

  3. Estimation of the probability of exposure to metalworking fluids in a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Uk; Colt, Joanne S.; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Armenti, Karla R.; Johnson, Alison; Silverman, Debra T; Stewart, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    We describe here an approach for estimating the probability that study subjects were exposed to metalworking fluids (MWFs) in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer. Study subject reports on the frequency of machining and use of specific MWFs (straight, soluble, and synthetic/semi-synthetic) were used to estimate exposure probability when available. Those reports also were used to develop estimates for job groups, which were then applied to jobs without MWF reports. Estimates using both cases and controls and controls only were developed. The prevalence of machining varied substantially across job groups (10-90%), with the greatest percentage of jobs that machined being reported by machinists and tool and die workers. Reports of straight and soluble MWF use were fairly consistent across job groups (generally, 50-70%). Synthetic MWF use was lower (13-45%). There was little difference in reports by cases and controls vs. controls only. Approximately, 1% of the entire study population was assessed as definitely exposed to straight or soluble fluids in contrast to 0.2% definitely exposed to synthetic/semi-synthetics. A comparison between the reported use of the MWFs and the US production levels by decade found high correlations (r generally >0.7). Overall, the method described here is likely to have provided a systematic and reliable ranking that better reflects the variability of exposure to three types of MWFs than approaches applied in the past. PMID:25256317

  4. IGF2BP2 rs11705701 polymorphisms are associated with prediabetes in a Chinese population: A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liyuan; Li, Yuanyuan; Tang, Linlin; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Sihan; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Mai, Yifeng; Zhuo, Renjie; Wang, Changyi; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Associations between insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) rs11705701, insulin receptor substrate 1 rs7578326, gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor rs10423928 and transcription factor 7-like 2 rs12255372 gene polymorphisms with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have not been evaluated in the Han Chinese population. These four genetic variants were investigated for their associations with prediabetes and T2D among 490 unrelated patients with T2D, 471 patients with prediabetes and 575 healthy controls. Sequenom MassARRAY software was used to genotype the patients for these variants. The Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction method was used to analyze the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A breakdown analysis by gender revealed a significant association of IGF2BP2 rs11705701 with prediabetes under the dominant genetic model in females following application of the Bonferroni correction (odds ratio = 0.26; 95% confidence interval = 0.10–0.67; P=0.005). However, no significant associations were reported between any of the other three polymorphisms and T2D under any genetic models. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant gene-gene or gene-environment interactions when evaluated with the above association tests. The present case-control study reveals a significant association between IGF2BP2 rs11705701 and prediabetes in female patients. PMID:27588103

  5. Hyperlipidemia Is Associated with Chronic Urticaria: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chen, Chao-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of chronic urticaria (CU) is diverse, with chronic infections and inflammation being reported as considerable contributing factors. Although the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was found to be significantly elevated in patients with CU, no one has specifically estimated the effects on CU following hyperlipidemia. This study aimed to examine the association between hyperlipidemia and CU using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. This study included 9798 adults with CU as cases and 9798 sex- and age-matched controls. These patients were examined for whether they had received a prior diagnosis of hyperlipidemia. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with hyperlipidemia between cases and controls. In total, 7066 (36.1%) patients had received a prior diagnosis of hyperlipidemia, including 4287 (43.8%) among CU cases and 2779 (28.4%) among controls. The conditional logistic regression revealed that the OR of prior hyperlipidemia for cases was 1.97 (95% CI: 1.85~2.09) compared to the controls. Furthermore, compared to patients without CU, patients with CU independently experienced a 1.65-fold (95% CI = 1.55~1.76; p<0.001) increased risk of having a prior hyperlipidemia diagnosis, after adjustments were made. We concluded that CU was associated with having received a prior diagnosis of hyperlipidemia. PMID:26964045

  6. Prevalence of Periodontitis in Patients with Established Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Swedish Population Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kaja; Nise, Lena; Kats, Anna; Luttropp, Elin; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Askling, Johan; Jansson, Leif; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Lundberg, Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The possible hypothesis of a link between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), specifically anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) positive RA, prompted us to investigate the prevalence of periodontitis in the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of RA (EIRA), a well-characterised population-based RA case-control cohort. Methods Periodontal status of 2,740 RA cases and 3,942 matched controls was retrieved through linking EIRA with the National Dental Health Registry (DHR), where dental diagnostic- and treatment codes on the adult Swedish population have been registered. Dental records from 100 cases and controls were reviewed to validate the periodontal diagnostic codes in DHR. Results The reviewed dental records confirmed 90% of the periodontitis diagnoses in DHR among RA cases, and 88% among controls. We found the positive predictive value of periodontitis diagnoses in the DHR to be 89% (95% CI 78 to 95%) with a sensitivity of 77% (95% CI: 65 to 86%). In total, 86% of EIRA participants were identified in DHR. The risk for periodontitis increased by age and current smoking status in both cases as well as controls. No significant differences in prevalence of periodontal disease in terms of gingivitis, periodontitis, peri-implantitis or increased risk for periodontitis or peri-implantitis were observed between RA cases and controls. In addition, there was no difference on the basis of seropositivity, ACPA or rheumatoid factor (RF), among patients with RA. Conclusions Our data verify that smoking and ageing are risk factors for periodontitis, both in RA and controls. We found no evidence of an increased prevalence of periodontitis in patients with established RA compared to healthy controls, and no differences based on ACPA or RF status among RA subjects. PMID:27203435

  7. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Optimal control of population recovery--the role of economic restoration threshold.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Adam; Hastings, Alan

    2014-01-01

    A variety of ecological systems around the world have been damaged in recent years, either by natural factors such as invasive species, storms and global change or by direct human activities such as overfishing and water pollution. Restoration of these systems to provide ecosystem services entails significant economic benefits. Thus, choosing how and when to restore in an optimal fashion is important, but has not been well studied. Here we examine a general model where population growth can be induced or accelerated by investing in active restoration. We show that the most cost-effective method to restore an ecosystem dictates investment until the population approaches an 'economic restoration threshold', a density above which the ecosystem should be left to recover naturally. Therefore, determining this threshold is a key general approach for guiding efficient restoration management, and we demonstrate how to calculate this threshold for both deterministic and stochastic ecosystems. PMID:24341983

  9. Basal p21 controls population heterogeneity in cycling and quiescent cell cycle states

    PubMed Central

    Overton, K. Wesley; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Noderer, William L.; Meyer, Tobias; Wang, Clifford L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of genetically identical cells is emerging as a common theme in multiple biological systems, including human cell biology and cancer. Using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, and kinetic modeling, we showed that two states—quiescence and cell cycling—can coexist within an isogenic population of human cells and resulted from low basal expression levels of p21, a Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI). We attribute the p21-dependent heterogeneity in cell cycle activity to double-negative feedback regulation involving CDK2, p21, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. In support of this mechanism, analysis of cells at a point before cell cycle entry (i.e., before the G1/S transition) revealed a p21–CDK2 axis that determines quiescent and cycling cell states. Our findings suggest a mechanistic role for p21 in generating heterogeneity in both normal tissues and tumors. PMID:25267623

  10. A modelling approach to vaccination and contraception programmes for rabies control in fox populations.

    PubMed

    Suppo, C; Naulin, J M; Langlais, M; Artois, M

    2000-08-01

    In a previous study, three of the authors designed a one-dimensional model to simulate the propagation of rabies within a growing fox population; the influence of various parameters on the epidemic model was studied, including oral-vaccination programmes. In this work, a two-dimensional model of a fox population having either an exponential or a logistic growth pattern was considered. Using numerical simulations, the efficiencies of two prophylactic methods (fox contraception and vaccination against rabies) were assessed, used either separately or jointly. It was concluded that far lower rates of administration are necessary to eradicate rabies, and that the undesirable side-effects of each programme disappear, when both are used together. PMID:11007334

  11. Asymmetric dispersal allows an upstream region to control population structure throughout a species' range.

    PubMed

    Pringle, James M; Blakeslee, April M H; Byers, James E; Roman, Joe

    2011-09-13

    In a single well-mixed population, equally abundant neutral alleles are equally likely to persist. However, in spatially complex populations structured by an asymmetric dispersal mechanism, such as a coastal population where larvae are predominantly moved downstream by currents, the eventual frequency of neutral haplotypes will depend on their initial spatial location. In our study of the progression of two spatially separate, genetically distinct introductions of the European green crab (Carcinus maenas) along the coast of eastern North America, we captured this process in action. We documented the shift of the genetic cline in this species over 8 y, and here we detail how the upstream haplotypes are beginning to dominate the system. This quantification of an evolving genetic boundary in a coastal system demonstrates that novel genetic alleles or haplotypes that arise or are introduced into upstream retention zones (regions whose export of larvae is not balanced by import from elsewhere) will increase in frequency in the entire system. This phenomenon should be widespread when there is asymmetrical dispersal, in the oceans or on land, suggesting that the upstream edge of a species' range can influence genetic diversity throughout its distribution. Efforts to protect the upstream edge of an asymmetrically dispersing species' range are vital to conserving genetic diversity in the species. PMID:21876126

  12. Association between STAT3 gene polymorphisms and ulcerative colitis susceptibility: a case-control study in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, Z-T; Zhang, H-X; Liu, J; Lu, S-Y; Fan, R; Zhou, J; Xia, L; Sun, Y-W; Zhong, J; Yuan, Y-Z

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammation of the large intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of two polymorphisms in STAT3 with the risk of UC development in the Chinese Han population. This is a hospital-based case-control study involving 56 UC patients and 274 controls. Genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. Statistical analyses were conducted using logistic regression and genotype risk score. Overall, there was a significant difference between patients and controls in the genotype distribution of rs2293152 (P = 0.044). The risk for UC associated with the rs2293152-G mutant allele was increased (odds ratio = 2.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.06- 7.24) under the dominant model. However, we failed to find any obvious differences in the rs4796793 genotype or allele distributions between the UC patients and controls, and did not detect any significant association of the rs4796793 polymorphism with UC across different genetic models of inheritance. Our study implies that the STAT3 rs2293152 polymorphism may be associated with the occurrence of UC and might be used as a predictive factor for UC in the Chinese Han population. PMID:24781989

  13. Strategic rat control for restoring populations of native species in forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Doug P; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Kreigenhofer, Brigitte; McArthur, Nikki; Govella, Susanne; Barrett, Paul; Richard, Yvan

    2014-06-01

    Forest fragments have biodiversity value that may be enhanced through management such as control of non-native predators. However, such efforts may be ineffective, and research is needed to ensure that predator control is done strategically. We used Bayesian hierarchical modeling to estimate fragment-specific effects of experimental rat control on a native species targeted for recovery in a New Zealand pastoral landscape. The experiment was a modified BACI (before-after-control-impact) design conducted over 6 years in 19 forest fragments with low-density subpopulations of North Island Robins (Petroica longipes). The aim was to identify individual fragments that not only showed clear benefits of rat control, but also would have a high probability of subpopulation growth even if they were the only fragment managed. We collected data on fecundity, adult and juvenile survival, and juvenile emigration, and modeled the data in an integrated framework to estimate the expected annual growth rate (λ) of each subpopulation with and without rat control. Without emigration, subpopulation growth was estimated as marginal (λ = 0.95-1.05) or negative (λ = 0.74-0.90) without rat control, but it was estimated as positive in all fragments (λ = 1.4-2.1) if rats were controlled. This reflected a 150% average increase in fecundity and 45% average increase in adult female survival. The probability of a juvenile remaining in its natal fragment was 0.37 on average, but varied with fragment connectivity. With juvenile emigration added, 6 fragments were estimated to have a high (>0.8) probability of being self-sustaining (λ > 1) with rat control. The key factors affecting subpopulation growth rates under rat control were low connectivity and stock fencing because these factors were associated with lower juvenile emigration and higher fecundity, respectively. However, there was also substantial random variation in adult survival among fragments, illustrating the importance of

  14. Evaluation of soil biodesinfestation with crop and garden residues in the control of root-knot nematodes populations.

    PubMed

    López-Cepero, J; Piedra Buena, A; Díez-Rojo, M A; Regalado, R; Brito, E; Hernández, Z; Figueredo, M; Almendros, G; Bello, A

    2007-01-01

    Fresh crop and garden residues were applied both under laboratory conditions and in commercial greenhouse in order to asses their effect on soil nematodes populations and soil fertility. In the laboratory experiments, dosages of 5 to 20 g of cabbage residues, chicken manure, cabbage residues+chicken manure, grass+chicken manure, as well as leaves and stems of orange tree, pine tree, oleander, olive tree, palm tree and boxwood were mixed with 500 g soil having root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) and soil moisture was adjusted at field capacity. A control treatment without residues was also included. The mixtures were kept into plastic bags, with four replications, and the bags were incubated for four weeks at 30 degrees C, when nematological and soil fertility analyses were carried out. In general, all these materials significantly (P < 0.05) reduced M. incognita populations and increased saprophagous nematodes, with slight effects on soil fertility except for the K increase with residues application. Tomato plants susceptible to M. incognita were planted in pots with 300 cm3 of the treated soils and kept for five weeks in a growth chamber (24 +/- 1 degrees C, 14 hours light), when root galling indices were evaluated. Most materials applied reduced root galling indices as regards to the control. In the greenhouse experiment, cabbage residues, cabbage residues+chicken manure, grass+chicken manure and grass+cabbage residues were applied to the soil and covered with a polyethylene sheet for 5 weeks. A cabbage residues:chicken manure treatment and a control (not-amended) treatment, without polyethylene, were also included. At the end of the experiment, the nematological analysis showed that all materials successfully controlled M. incognita populations, reaching 86-100% mortality with organic amendments vs. 6% for the control. After the greenhouse biodesinfestation experiment, a tomato crop was grown for one month, when root galling indices were determined. All

  15. Use of a mathematical model to study the control measures of the cattle tick Boophilus microplus population in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, F; Chalvet-Monfray, K; Sabatier, P

    1998-06-30

    Boophilus microplus is a common cattle tick of great economic importance in various tropical and subtropical countries like New Caledonia. The proposed model describes the population dynamics of female Boophilus microplus in the absence of resistant ticks. It is a system of six difference equations which can be mathematically analyzed. The analysis of the system shows the great importance of the eigenvalue denoted by lambda1. The population of ticks increases if lambda1 < 1 and decreases if lambda1 > 1. The lambda1 eigenvalue depends, in particular, on the parasitic surviving rate and encounter rate between the larvae and the cows. The treatments decrease the parasitic surviving rate as the agronomic measures decrease the encounter rate. This model permits to quantify the conditions of treatments (or of the efficacy of a vaccine) and of agronomic measures by which the populations are controlled. It shows that the different treatment rhythms and the presence or not of the wild or domestic refuges plays a major role on the dynamics of tick population. PMID:9763318

  16. Method of application of tylosin, an antibiotic for American foulbrood control, with effects on small hive beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) populations.

    PubMed

    Elzen, P J; Westervelt, D; Causey, D; Ellis, J; Hepburn, H R; Neumann, P

    2002-12-01

    The method of application of the antibiotic tylosin (Tylan) for control of oxytetracycline-resistant American foulbrood (Paenibacillus larvae White) was tested in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies. A powdered sugar mixture with tylosin, applied as a dust, was efficacious in eliminating American foulbrood symptoms at a rate of 200-mg Tylan per 20 g of powdered sugar, applied at weekly intervals for 3 weeks. A second method of treatment consisting of Tylan mixed with granulated sugar and vegetable shortening and applied once as a patty, at an equivalent total dose as the dust method, to diseased colonies also effectively eliminated symptoms of disease. In all colonies treated with patties, however, small hive beetle (Aethina tumida Murray) populations significantly increased, compared with the powder sugar method or untreated controls. Bee populations in patty-treated colonies also were significantly reduced, most likely the result of the invasion and proliferation of adult and larval small hive beetles. Such reduction in colony strength was not seen in dust-treated colonies. Because of the obvious damaging populations of small hive beetles, concerns about development of disease resistance, unknown risks of residues, and lack of support by regulatory agencies for the use of the patty method, the use of the dust method of tylosin is greatly favored over the patty method. PMID:12539820

  17. Finding the Balance: Fertility Control for the Management of Fragmented Populations of a Threatened Rock-Wallaby Species.

    PubMed

    Willers, Nicole; Martin, Graeme B; Matson, Phill; Mawson, Peter R; Morris, Keith; Bencini, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Populations of Australian marsupials can become overabundant, resulting in detrimental impacts on the environment. For example, the threatened black-flanked rock-wallaby ( Petrogale lateralis lateralis ) has previously been perceived as overabundant and thus 'unwanted' when they graze crops and cause habitat degradation. Hormonally-induced fertility control has been increasingly used to manage population size in other marsupials where alternative management options are not viable. We tested whether deslorelin, a superagonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), would suppress reproduction in free-living adult female rock-wallabies without adversely impacting body condition. We trapped, synchronised reproduction and allocated female rock-wallabies to a placebo implant (control, n = 22), one (n = 22) or two (n = 20) subcutaneous implants of deslorelin. Females were then recaptured over the following 36 months to monitor reproduction, including Luteinising Hormone levels, and body condition. Following treatment, diapaused blastocysts reactivated in five females and the resulting young were carried through to weaning. No wallabies treated with deslorelin, conceivede a new young for at least 27 months. We did not observe adverse effects on body condition on treated females. We conclude that deslorelin implants are effective for the medium-term suppression of reproduction in female black-flanked rock-wallabies and for managing overabundant populations of some marsupials. PMID:26694471

  18. Population variation of human mtDNA control region sequences detected by enzymatic amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, M; Hedgecock, D; Higuchi, R G; Vigilant, L; Erlich, H A

    1991-01-01

    A method for detecting sequence variation of hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region was developed. The technique uses hybridization of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes to DNA sequences that have been amplified by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region from 52 individuals were determined; these sequences were then used to define nine regions suitable for SSO typing. A total of 23 SSO probes were used to detect sequence variants at these nine regions in 525 individuals from five ethnic groups (African, Asian, Caucasian, Japanese, and Mexican). The SSO typing revealed an enormous amount of variability, with 274 mtDNA types observed among these 525 individuals and with diversity values, for each population, exceeding .95. For each of the nine mtDNA regions significant differences in the frequencies of sequence variants were observed between these five populations. The mtDNA SSO-typing system was successfully applied to a case involving individual identification of skeletal remains; the probability of a random match was approximately 0.7%. The potential useful applications of this mtDNA SSO-typing system thus include the analysis of individual identity as well as population genetic studies. Images Figure 3 PMID:1990843

  19. Modeling controlled nutrient release from a population of polymer coated fertilizers: statistically based model for diffusion release.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A statistically based model for describing the release from a population of polymer coated controlled release fertilizer (CRF) granules by the diffusion mechanism was constructed. The model is based on a mathematical-mechanistic description of the release from a single granule of a coated CRF accounting for its complex and nonlinear nature. The large variation within populations of coated CRFs poses the need for a statistically based approach to integrate over the release from the individual granules within a given population for which the distribution and range of granule radii and coating thickness are known. The model was constructed and verified using experimentally determined parameters and release curves of polymer-coated CRFs. A sensitivity analysis indicated the importance of water permeability in controlling the lag period and that of solute permeability in governing the rate of linear release and the total duration of the release. Increasing the mean values of normally distributed granule radii or coating thickness, increases the lag period and the period of linear release. The variation of radii and coating thickness, within realistic ranges, affects the release only when the standard deviation is very large or when water permeability is reduced without affecting solute permeability. The model provides an effective tool for designing and improving agronomic and environmental effectiveness of polymer-coated CRFs. PMID:12785533

  20. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and risk for psychiatric disorders in girls and women born between 1915 and 2010: A total population study.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Hedvig; Butwicka, Agnieszka; Nordenström, Anna; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Falhammar, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Frisén, Louise; Landén, Mikael

    2015-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a chronic condition and individuals are exposed to elevated androgen levels in utero as a result of the endogenous cortisol deficiency. Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to influence mental health, but population based studies on psychiatric morbidity among girls and women with CAH are lacking. Therefore, we performed a cohort study based on Swedish nationwide registers linked with the national CAH register. Girls and women with CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (n = 335) born between January 1915 and January 2010 were compared with aged-matched female (n = 33500) and male controls (n = 33500). Analyses were stratified by phenotype [salt wasting (SW), simple virilizing (SV), and non-classical type (NC)] and by CYP21A2 genotype subgroups (null, I2splice, I172N, and P30L). Results are presented as estimated risks (OR, 95%CI) of psychiatric disorders among girls and women with CAH compared with age-matched controls. Any psychiatric diagnoses were more common in CAH females compared with female and male population controls [1.9 (1.4-2.5), and 2.2 (1.7-2.9)]. In particular, the risk of alcohol misuse was increased compared with female and male population controls [2.8 (1.7-4.7) and 2.1 (1.2-3.5)], and appeared most common among the girls and women with the most severe null genotype [6.7 (2.6-17.8)]. The risk of stress and adjustment disorders was doubled compared with female population controls [2.1 (1.3-3.6)]. Girls and women with CAH have an increased risk of psychiatric disorders in general and substance use disorders in particular compared with unexposed females, with the highest risk among those with the most severe genotype. Prenatal androgen exposure and deficient endogenous cortisol and/or adrenaline production may provide explanations for these findings, but other factors related to CAH cannot be excluded. PMID:26184920

  1. Human Population Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmel, Thomas C.; Sligh, Michael M.

    1970-01-01

    Asserts that overpopulation is the most pressing world problem. Topics discussed include population control in primitive societies, population growth and control in modern societies, methods of motivational population control, consequences of no population control, and mass famines during the 1970's in underdeveloped countries. Cities 33…

  2. Comparative evaluation of two populations of Pseudophilothrips ichini as candidates for biological control of Brazilian peppertree

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brazilian peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) is one of the worst invasive species in Florida. The thrips Pseudophilothrips ichini Hood (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) is being considered as a potential biological control agent of Brazilian peppertree. Two populati...

  3. Modification of Traffic-related Respiratory Response by Asthma Control in a Population of Car Commuters

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Golan, Rachel; Greenwald, Roby; Raysoni, Amit U.; Holguin, Fernando; Kewada, Priya; Winquist, Andrea; Flanders, W. Dana; Sarnat, Jeremy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effects of traffic-related exposures on respiratory health are well documented, but little information is available about whether asthma control influences individual susceptibility. We analyzed data from the Atlanta Commuter Exposure study to evaluate modification of associations between rush-hour commuting, in-vehicle air pollution, and selected respiratory health outcomes by asthma control status. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, 39 adults participated in Atlanta Commuter Exposure, and each conducted two scripted rush-hour highway commutes. In-vehicle particulate components were measured during all commutes. Among adults with asthma, we evaluated asthma control by questionnaire and spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and other metrics of respiratory health were measured precommute and 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours postcommute. We used mixed effects linear regression to evaluate associations between commute-related exposures and postcommute changes in metrics of respiratory health by level of asthma control. Results We observed increased exhaled nitric oxide across all levels of asthma control compared with precommute measurements, with largest postcommute increases observed among participants with below-median asthma control (2 hours postcommute: 14.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} = 5.7, 24.2]; 3 hours postcommute: 19.5% [95% CI = 7.8, 32.5]). No associations between in-vehicle pollutants and percent of predicted FEV1 were observed, although higher PM2.5 was associated with lower FEV1 % predicted among participants with below-median asthma control (3 hours postcommute: −7.2 [95% CI = −11.8, −2.7]). Conclusions Level of asthma control may influence respiratory response to in-vehicle exposures experienced during rush-hour commuting. PMID:25901844

  4. Schistosomiasis in a migrating population in the lake region of China and its potential impact on control operation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chun-li; Bao, Zi-ping; Li, Shi-zhu; Wei, Wang-yuan; Yi, Ping; Yu, Qing; Zhu, Hong-qing; Xu, Jing; Guo, Jia-gang; Feng, Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Coverage of migrating people in schistosomiasis control program is a growing concern in China. Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum is still one of the major infectious diseases of public health importance in China though tremendous efforts have been made to control the transmission over the past decades. Along with the rapid social-economic development, migrant population has been remarkably increasing across the country. The infected migrants may introduce a new souse of infection to endemic areas or the areas where the transmission had been controlled or interrupted but the intermediate host Oncomelania snail is still present. Preliminary studies for surveillance on schistosomiasis prevalence in migrants were reported, but there is little basic information provided. We carried out an investigation on the prevalence in immigrants, emigrants and permanent residents in three villages of Hunan province located in the main endemic area of lake region, and analyzed the potential impact of migration on control practice. In the study villages, the migrant population accounts for 53.6% of the total. Schistosoma infection was detected by modified Kato-Katz method and miracidium hatching test. Questionnaire survey was conducted comprising knowledge of disease and its transmission, water contact, personal protective measures, and whether examined and treated after water contact. The survey indicated that the migrants and permanent residents had similar life style, and the majority of them experienced water contact in agricultural work or routine life activities. However, the infection rate in immigrants was significantly higher than that in permanent residents. It was also found that the migrants had significantly less knowledge about the disease than the permanent residents, and took no personal protective measures. This is due to that the control program could not cover the migrants when they were absent at the time the program being implemented. The present

  5. Birth Order and Narcolepsy Risk Among Genetically Susceptible Individuals: a Population-based Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Longstreth, W.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Birth order may play a role in autoimmune diseases and early childhood infections, both factors implicated in the etiology of narcolepsy. We investigated the association between birth order and narcolepsy risk in a population-based case-control study in which all study subjects were HLA-DQB1*0602 positive. Methods Subjects were 18-50 years old, residents of King County, Washington, and positive for HLA-DQB1*0602. Birth order was obtained from administered interviews. We used logistic regression to generate odds ratios adjusted for income and African American race. Results Analyses included 67 cases (mean age 34.3 [SD=9.1], 70.2% female) and 95 controls (mean age 35.1 [SD=8.8], 58.1% female). Associations for birth order were as follows: First born (cases 38.8% vs. controls 50.2%, OR=1.0; Reference), second born (cases 29.9% vs. controls 32.9%, OR=1.6; 95% CI 0.7, 3.7), third born or higher (cases 31.3% vs. controls 16.8%, OR=2.5; 95% CI 1.0, 6.0). A linear trend was significant (p<0.05). Sibling number, sibling gender, having children, and number of children did not differ significantly between narcolepsy cases and controls. Conclusions Narcolepsy risk was significantly associated with higher birth order in this population-based study of genetically susceptible individuals. This finding supports an environmental influence on narcolepsy risk through an autoimmune mechanism, early childhood infections, or both. PMID:22281000

  6. Stratification-score matching improves correction for confounding by population stratification in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michael P; Duncan, Richard; Broadaway, K Alaine; He, Min; Allen, Andrew S; Satten, Glen A

    2012-04-01

    Proper control of confounding due to population stratification is crucial for valid analysis of case-control association studies. Fine matching of cases and controls based on genetic ancestry is an increasingly popular strategy to correct for such confounding, both in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) as well as studies that employ next-generation sequencing, where matching can be used when selecting a subset of participants from a GWAS for rare-variant analysis. Existing matching methods match on measures of genetic ancestry that combine multiple components of ancestry into a scalar quantity. However, we show that including nonconfounding ancestry components in a matching criterion can lead to inaccurate matches, and hence to an improper control of confounding. To resolve this issue, we propose a novel method that assigns cases and controls to matched strata based on the stratification score (Epstein et al. [2007] Am J Hum Genet 80:921-930), which is the probability of disease given genomic variables. Matching on the stratification score leads to more accurate matches because case participants are matched to control participants who have a similar risk of disease given ancestry information. We illustrate our matching method using the African-American arm of the GAIN GWAS of schizophrenia. In this study, we observe that confounding due to stratification can be resolved by our matching approach but not by other existing matching procedures. We also use simulated data to show our novel matching approach can provide a more appropriate correction for population stratification than existing matching approaches. PMID:22714934

  7. Fleshflies in the flesh: epidemiology, population genetics and control of outbreaks of traumatic myiasis in the Mediterranean Basin.

    PubMed

    Sotiraki, S; Farkas, R; Hall, M J R

    2010-11-24

    Although the damaging effects on healthy tissues of its developing larvae were first described in 1770, the fleshfly Wohlfahrtia magnifica remains a serious pest for the livestock industry. Wohlfahrtiosis, the severe myiasis caused by this fly, is a grave problem in terms of both the animal welfare and economic loss. This review highlights important aspects of the biology, pest status, epidemiology, population genetic structure, economics and control of W. magnifica and wohlfahrtiosis, with an emphasis on recent outbreaks in Greece and Morocco and fly population dynamics in the Mediterranean Basin. Potential areas for future studies on genetics, host tolerance, in vitro rearing, field behaviour and range expansion of the species are also discussed. PMID:20850931

  8. Comprehensive Approach for Hypertension Control in Low-income Populations: Rationale and Study Design for the Hypertension Control Program in Argentina (HCPIA)

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Katherine T.; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Irazola, Vilma; Chen, Jing; Beratarrechea, Andrea; Poggio, Rosana; Dolan, Jacquelyn; Augustovski, Federico; Shi, Lizheng; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Bazzano, Lydia A.; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Although the efficacy and effectiveness of lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive pharmaceutical treatment for the prevention and control of hypertension and concomitant cardiovascular disease have been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, this scientific knowledge has not been fully applied in the general population, especially in low-income communities. This paper summarizes interventions to improve hypertension management and describes the rationale and study design for a cluster randomized trial testing whether a comprehensive intervention program within a national public primary care system will improve hypertension control among uninsured hypertensive men and women and their families. We will recruit 1,890 adults from 18 clinics within a public primary care network in Argentina. Clinic patients with uncontrolled hypertension, their spouses and hypertensive family members will be enrolled. The comprehensive intervention program targets the primary care system through health care provider education, a home-based intervention among patients and their families (home delivery of antihypertensive medication, self-monitoring of blood pressure, health education for medication adherence and lifestyle modification) conducted by community health workers, and a mobile health intervention. The primary outcome is net change in systolic blood pressure from baseline to month 18 between intervention and control groups among hypertensive study participants. The secondary outcomes are net change in diastolic blood pressure, blood pressure control, and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. This study will generate urgently needed data on effective, practical, and sustainable intervention programs aimed at controlling hypertension and concomitant cardiovascular disease in underserved populations in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:24978148

  9. Association of genetic polymorphisms with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Hainan population: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yipeng; Yang, Danlei; Xun, Xiaojie; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Pei; Xu, Dongchuan; He, Ping; Niu, Huan; Jin, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predicted to become the third most common cause of death and the fifth most common cause of disability in the world by 2020. Recently, variants in the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A), cholinergic receptor, neuronal nicotinic, alpha polypeptide-5, and iron-responsive element-binding protein 2 gene (IREB2) genes were found to be associated with COPD. This study aims to identify whether the variations in these genes are related to COPD in the Hainan population of the People’s Republic of China. Patients and methods We genotyped 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a case-control study with 200 COPD cases and 401 controls from Hainan, People’s Republic of China. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using the chi-squared (χ2) test, genetic model analysis, haplotype analysis, and stratification analysis. Results In the genetic model analysis, we found that the genotype T/T of rs13180 of IREB2 decreased the COPD risk by 0.52-fold (P=0.025). But in the further stratification analysis, we failed to find the association between the selected single nucleotide polymorphisms with COPD risk in Han population. In addition, the haplotype analysis of HIF1A gene also was not found to be the possible haplotype associated with COPD risk. Conclusion Our results support that IREB2 rs13180 is associated with COPD in Hainan population. And this is the first time the HIF1A polymorphisms in COPD in a Chinese population has been reported, although we failed to find any significant result. PMID:25565795

  10. Trends in Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Hypertension during 2001-2010 in an Urban Elderly Population of China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Sun, Dongling; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Miao; Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Yiyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective As the most important risk factors of cardiovascular disease, pre-hypertension and hypertension are important public health challenges. Few studies have focused on the trends of pre-hypertension and hypertension specifically for the aging population in China. Given the anticipated growth of the elderly population in China, there is an urgent need to document the conditions of pre-hypertension and hypertension in this aging population. Methods We conducted two cross-sectional surveys of Chinese adults aged ≥60 years in 2001 and 2010. A total of 2,272 (943 males, 1,329 females) and 2,074 (839 males, 1,235 females) participants were included in the two surveys, respectively. Results The age- and sex-standardized prevalence of hypertension significantly increased from 60.1% to 65.2% from the 2001 to the 2010 survey. Among the participants with hypertension, the awareness, treatment and control of hypertension all significantly increased from 69.8% to 74.5%, 50.3% to 63.7%, and 15.3% to 30.3%, respectively, from 2001 to 2010. A logistic regression showed that a higher education level, a higher BMI, a family history of hypertension and doctor-diagnosed cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with hypertension awareness and treatment. Conclusion Hypertension prevalence increased rapidly between the years surveyed. Although the awareness, treatment and control of hypertension improved significantly, the values of these variables remained low. More attention should be given to the elderly because the population is aging worldwide, and urgent action, optimal treatment approaches and proper public health strategies must be taken to prevent and manage hypertension. PMID:26241049

  11. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile toxin-positive diarrhea: a population-based prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vesteinsdottir, I; Gudlaugsdottir, S; Einarsdottir, R; Kalaitzakis, E; Sigurdardottir, O; Bjornsson, E S

    2012-10-01

    Increased incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) is of major concern. However, by minimizing known risk factors, the incidence can be decreased. The aim of this investigation was to calculate the incidence and assess risk factors for CDI in our population. A 1-year prospective population-based nationwide study in Iceland of CDIs was carried out. For risk factor evaluation, each case was matched with two age- and sex-matched controls that tested negative for C. difficile toxin. A total of 128 CDIs were identified. The crude incidence was 54 cases annually per 100,000 population >18 years of age. Incidence increased exponentially with older age (319 per 100,000 population >86 years of age). Community-acquired origin was 27 %. Independent risk factors included: dicloxacillin (odds ratio [OR]: 7.55, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-30.1), clindamycin (OR: 6.09, 95 % CI: 2.23-16.61), ceftriaxone (OR: 4.28, 95 % CI: 1.59-11.49), living in a retirement home (OR: 3.9, 95 % CI: 1.69-9.16), recent hospital stay (OR: 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.37-3.87). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were used by 60/111 (54 %) versus 91/222 (41 %) (p = 0.026) and ciprofloxacin 19/111 (17 %) versus 19/222 (9 %) (p = 0.027) for cases and controls, respectively. In all, 75 % of primary CDIs treated with metronidazole recovered from one course of treatment. CDI was mostly found among elderly patients. The most commonly identified risk factors were broad-spectrum antibiotics and recent contact with health care institutions. PPI use was significantly more prevalent among CDI patients. PMID:22441775

  12. Host–virus dynamics and subcellular controls of cell fate in a natural coccolithophore population

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Assaf; Haramaty, Liti; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Fredricks, Helen F.; Kimmance, Susan A.; Larsen, Aud; Bidle, Kay D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine viruses are major evolutionary and biogeochemical drivers in marine microbial foodwebs. However, an in-depth understanding of the cellular mechanisms and the signal transduction pathways mediating host–virus interactions during natural bloom dynamics has remained elusive. We used field-based mesocosms to examine the “arms race” between natural populations of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and its double-stranded DNA-containing coccolithoviruses (EhVs). Specifically, we examined the dynamics of EhV infection and its regulation of cell fate over the course of bloom development and demise using a diverse suite of molecular tools and in situ fluorescent staining to target different levels of subcellular resolution. We demonstrate the concomitant induction of reactive oxygen species, caspase-specific activity, metacaspase expression, and programmed cell death in response to the accumulation of virus-derived glycosphingolipids upon infection of natural E. huxleyi populations. These subcellular responses to viral infection simultaneously resulted in the enhanced production of transparent exopolymer particles, which can facilitate aggregation and stimulate carbon flux. Our results not only corroborate the critical role for glycosphingolipids and programmed cell death in regulating E. huxleyi–EhV interactions, but also elucidate promising molecular biomarkers and lipid-based proxies for phytoplankton host–virus interactions in natural systems. PMID:23134731

  13. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  14. Ecosystem scale declines in elk recruitment and population growth with wolf colonization: a before-after-control-impact approach.

    PubMed

    Christianson, David; Creel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone provided the unusual opportunity for a quasi-experimental test of the effects of wolf predation on their primary prey (elk--Cervus elaphus) in a system where top-down, bottom-up, and abiotic forces on prey population dynamics were closely and consistently monitored before and after reintroduction. Here, we examined data from 33 years for 12 elk population segments spread across southwestern Montana and northwestern Wyoming in a large scale before-after-control-impact analysis of the effects of wolves on elk recruitment and population dynamics. Recruitment, as measured by the midwinter juvenile∶female ratio, was a strong determinant of elk dynamics, and declined by 35% in elk herds colonized by wolves as annual population growth shifted from increasing to decreasing. Negative effects of population density and winter severity on recruitment, long recognized as important for elk dynamics, were detected in uncolonized elk herds and in wolf-colonized elk herds prior to wolf colonization, but not after wolf colonization. Growing season precipitation and harvest had no detectable effect on recruitment in either wolf treatment or colonization period, although harvest rates of juveniles∶females declined by 37% in wolf-colonized herds. Even if it is assumed that mortality due to predation is completely additive, liberal estimates of wolf predation rates on juvenile elk could explain no more than 52% of the total decline in juvenile∶female ratios in wolf-colonized herds, after accounting for the effects of other limiting factors. Collectively, these long-term, large-scale patterns align well with prior studies that have reported substantial decrease in elk numbers immediately after wolf recolonization, relatively weak additive effects of direct wolf predation on elk survival, and decreased reproduction and recruitment with exposure to predation risk from wolves. PMID:25028933

  15. Ecosystem Scale Declines in Elk Recruitment and Population Growth with Wolf Colonization: A Before-After-Control-Impact Approach

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, David; Creel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupus) to Yellowstone provided the unusual opportunity for a quasi-experimental test of the effects of wolf predation on their primary prey (elk – Cervus elaphus) in a system where top-down, bottom-up, and abiotic forces on prey population dynamics were closely and consistently monitored before and after reintroduction. Here, we examined data from 33 years for 12 elk population segments spread across southwestern Montana and northwestern Wyoming in a large scale before-after-control-impact analysis of the effects of wolves on elk recruitment and population dynamics. Recruitment, as measured by the midwinter juvenile∶female ratio, was a strong determinant of elk dynamics, and declined by 35% in elk herds colonized by wolves as annual population growth shifted from increasing to decreasing. Negative effects of population density and winter severity on recruitment, long recognized as important for elk dynamics, were detected in uncolonized elk herds and in wolf-colonized elk herds prior to wolf colonization, but not after wolf colonization. Growing season precipitation and harvest had no detectable effect on recruitment in either wolf treatment or colonization period, although harvest rates of juveniles∶females declined by 37% in wolf-colonized herds. Even if it is assumed that mortality due to predation is completely additive, liberal estimates of wolf predation rates on juvenile elk could explain no more than 52% of the total decline in juvenile∶female ratios in wolf-colonized herds, after accounting for the effects of other limiting factors. Collectively, these long-term, large-scale patterns align well with prior studies that have reported substantial decrease in elk numbers immediately after wolf recolonization, relatively weak additive effects of direct wolf predation on elk survival, and decreased reproduction and recruitment with exposure to predation risk from wolves. PMID:25028933

  16. ALIFE@Work: a randomised controlled trial of a distance counselling lifestyle programme for weight control among an overweight working population [ISRCTN04265725

    PubMed Central

    van Wier, Marieke F; Ariëns, Geertje AM; Dekkers, Johanna C; Hendriksen, Ingrid JM; Pronk, Nico P; Smid, Tjabe; van Mechelen, Willem

    2006-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight is increasing and its consequences will cause a major public health burden in the near future. Cost-effective interventions for weight control among the general population are therefore needed. The ALIFE@Work study is investigating a novel lifestyle intervention, aimed at the working population, with individual counselling through either phone or e-mail. This article describes the design of the study and the participant flow up to and including randomisation. Methods/Design ALIFE@Work is a controlled trial, with randomisation to three arms: a control group, a phone based intervention group and an internet based intervention group. The intervention takes six months and is based on a cognitive behavioural approach, addressing physical activity and diet. It consists of 10 lessons with feedback from a personal counsellor, either by phone or e-mail, between each lesson. Lessons contain educational content combined with behaviour change strategies. Assignments in each lesson teach the participant to apply these strategies to every day life. The study population consists of employees from seven Dutch companies. The most important inclusion criteria are having a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 and being an employed adult. Primary outcomes of the study are body weight and BMI, diet and physical activity. Other outcomes are: perceived health; empowerment; stage of change and self-efficacy concerning weight control, physical activity and eating habits; work performance/productivity; waist circumference, sum of skin folds, blood pressure, total blood cholesterol level and aerobic fitness. A cost-utility- and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed as well. Physiological outcomes are measured at baseline and after six and 24 months. Other outcomes are measured by questionnaire at baseline and after six, 12, 18 and 24 months. Statistical analyses for short term (six month) results are performed with multiple linear regression

  17. Finding the Balance: Fertility Control for the Management of Fragmented Populations of a Threatened Rock-Wallaby Species

    PubMed Central

    Willers, Nicole; Martin, Graeme B.; Matson, Phill; Mawson, Peter R.; Morris, Keith; Bencini, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Black-flanked rock-wallabies (Petrogale lateralis lateralis) can reach high numbers in fragmented populations in the West Australian wheat-belt, where they can damage crops and cause habitat degradation. As they are threatened, we wanted a non-permanent control method that did not adversely affect the body condition of treated females compared to untreated females, using body condition as an indicator of general health and fitness. We gave adult female rock-wallabies deslorelin contraceptive implants to suppress their fertility and monitored the impact for three years. Treated females did not conceive new young for over two years. We did not detect any negative effects on body condition, suggesting that deslorelin may be an effective tool for managing overabundant populations of marsupials. Abstract Populations of Australian marsupials can become overabundant, resulting in detrimental impacts on the environment. For example, the threatened black-flanked rock-wallaby (Petrogale lateralis lateralis) has previously been perceived as overabundant and thus ‘unwanted’ when they graze crops and cause habitat degradation. Hormonally-induced fertility control has been increasingly used to manage population size in other marsupials where alternative management options are not viable. We tested whether deslorelin, a superagonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), would suppress reproduction in free-living adult female rock-wallabies without adversely impacting body condition. We trapped, synchronised reproduction and allocated female rock-wallabies to a placebo implant (control, n = 22), one (n = 22) or two (n = 20) subcutaneous implants of deslorelin. Females were then recaptured over the following 36 months to monitor reproduction, including Luteinising Hormone levels, and body condition. Following treatment, diapaused blastocysts reactivated in five females and the resulting young were carried through to weaning. No wallabies treated with

  18. Long-Term Assessment of Wild Boar Harvesting and Cattle Removal for Bovine Tuberculosis Control in Free Ranging Populations

    PubMed Central

    Mentaberre, Gregorio; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Navarro-González, Nora; Velarde, Roser; Mateos, Ana; Marco, Ignasi; Olivé-Boix, Xavier; Domínguez, Lucas; Lavín, Santiago; Serrano, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Wild boar is a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in the Mediterranean ecosystems, but information is scarce outside of hotspots in southern Spain. We describe the first high-prevalence focus of TB in a non-managed wild boar population in northern Spain and the result of eight years of TB management. Measures implemented for disease control included the control of the local wild boar population through culling and stamping out of a sympatric infected cattle herd. Post-mortem inspection for detection of tuberculosis-like lesions as well as cultures from selected head and cervical lymph nodes was done in 745 wild boar, 355 Iberian ibexes and five cattle between 2004 and 2012. The seasonal prevalence of TB reached 70% amongst adult wild boar and ten different spoligotypes and 13 MIRU-VNTR profiles were detected, although more than half of the isolates were included in the same clonal complex. Only 11% of infected boars had generalized lesions. None of the ibexes were affected, supporting their irrelevance in the epidemiology of TB. An infected cattle herd grazed the zone where 168 of the 197 infected boars were harvested. Cattle removal and wild boar culling together contributed to a decrease in TB prevalence. The need for holistic, sustained over time, intensive and adapted TB control strategies taking into account the multi-host nature of the disease is highlighted. The potential risk for tuberculosis emergence in wildlife scenarios where the risk is assumed to be low should be addressed. PMID:24558435

  19. Investigating the factorial structure and availability of work time control in a representative sample of the Swedish working population

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Sophie C.; Kecklund, Göran; Tucker, Philip; Leineweber, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Past research has often neglected the sub-dimensions of work time control (WTC). Moreover, differences in levels of WTC with respect to work and demographic characteristics have not yet been examined in a representative sample. We investigated these matters in a recent sample of the Swedish working population. Methods: The study was based on the 2014 data collection of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. We assessed the structure of the WTC measure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Differences in WTC by work and demographic characteristics were examined with independent sample t-tests, one-way ANOVAs and gender-stratified logistic regressions. Results: Best model fit was found for a two-factor structure that distinguished between control over daily hours and control over time off (root mean square error of approximation = 0.06; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.09; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.99). Women, shift and public-sector workers reported lower control in relation to both factors. Age showed small associations with WTC, while a stronger link was suggested for civil status and family situation. Night, roster and rotating shift work seemed to be the most influential factors on reporting low control over daily hours and time off. Conclusions: Our data confirm the two-dimensional structure underlying WTC, namely the components ‘control over daily hours’ and ‘control over time off’. Women, public-sector and shift workers reported lower levels of control. Future research should examine the public health implications of WTC, in particular whether increased control over daily hours and time off can reduce health problems associated with difficult working-time arrangements. PMID:26620363

  20. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Social Network Targeting to Maximise Population Behaviour Change

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David A.; Hwong, Alison R.; Stafford, Derek; Hughes, D. Alex; O’Malley, A. James; Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Information and behaviour can spread through interpersonal ties. By targeting influential individuals, health interventions that harness the distributive properties of social networks may be made more effective and efficient than those that do not. Methods In this block-randomised trial of network targeting methods, we delivered two dissimilar public health interventions to 32 villages in rural Honduras (22–541 participants each; total study population of 5,773): chlorine for water purification, and multivitamins for micronutrient deficiencies. We blocked villages on the basis of network size, socioeconomic status, and baseline rates of water purification. We then randomised villages, separately for each intervention, to one of three targeting methods, introducing the interventions to 5% samples composed either of: (1) randomly selected villagers (n=9 villages for each intervention), (2) villagers with the most social ties (n=9), or (3) nominated friends of random villagers (n=9; the last strategy exploiting the “friendship paradox” of social networks). Primary endpoints were the proportion of available products redeemed by the entire population under each targeting method. Participants and data collectors were not aware of the targeting methods. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01672580). Findings For each intervention, 9 villages (each with 1–20 initial target individuals) were randomised to each of the three targeting methods. Targeting the most highly connected individuals produced no greater adoption of the interventions than random targeting. Targeting nominated friends, however, increased adoption of the nutritional intervention by 12·2% compared to random targeting (95% CI, 6·9 to 17·9). Interpretation Introducing a health intervention to the nominated friends of random individuals can enhance that intervention’s diffusion by exploiting intrinsic properties of human social networks. This method has the additional

  1. Metformin for Primary Colorectal Cancer Prevention in Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study in a US Population

    PubMed Central

    Sehdev, Amikar; Shih, Ya-Chen T.; Vekhter, Benjamin; Bissonnette, Marc; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Polite, Blase

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence from observational studies suggests that metformin may be beneficial in the primary prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, none of these were conducted in a US population. Since environmental factors, such as Western diet and obesity, are implicated in the causation of CRC, we conducted a large case control study to assess the effects of metformin on CRC incidence in a US population. Methods MarketScan® databases were used to identify diabetic patients with CRC. A case was defined as having an incident diagnosis of CRC. Up to two controls matched for age, sex and geographical region, were selected for each case. Metformin exposure was assessed by prescription tracking in the 12 months period prior to the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to adjust for multiple potential confounders and to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR). Results The mean age of participants was 55 and 57 years in the control and case group, respectively (p=1.0). Sixty percent of the study participants were males and 40% were females in each group. In the multivariable model, any metformin use was associated with 15% reduced odds of CRC (AOR, 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76–0.95, p<0.007). After adjusting for health-care utilization the beneficial effect of metformin was reduced to 12% (AOR, 0.88, 95% CI, 0.77–1.00, p=0.05). The dose-response analyses showed no significant association with metformin dose, duration or total exposure. Conclusions Metformin use is associated with reduced risk of developing CRC among diabetic patients in the US population. PMID:25424411

  2. Sotalol, but not digoxin is associated with decreased prostate cancer risk: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kaapu, Kalle J; Ahti, Janne; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2015-09-01

    Antiarrhythmic drug digoxin has been reported to have apoptosis-inducing and cytotoxic effects on prostate cancer cells. We evaluated the association between antiarrhythmic drug use and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. The study included all new prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Finland during 1995-2002 and matched controls (24,657 case-control pairs) obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Population Register Center, respectively. Information on antiarrhythmic drug purchases was obtained from national prescription database. Multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression model was used for data analysis. Compared to never-users of antiarrhythmic drugs, we found no significant association between digoxin use and prostate cancer risk overall [odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89-1.01] or for advanced prostate cancer risk (OR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.77-1.05). The result was similar also for other antiarrhythmic drugs, with the exception of sotalol, users of which had decreased risk of advanced prostate cancer (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56-0.96). Also the overall prostate cancer risk decreased by duration of sotalol use (p for trend 0.038). We show that digoxin or other common antiarrhythmic drugs generally do not associate with prostate cancer risk at population level during maximum follow-up of eight years. However, we cannot rule out longer term protective effects of digoxin. K(+) -channel blocker sotalol shows some promise as prostate cancer preventing agent. However, findings need to be confirmed in further studies. PMID:25656312

  3. Measuring coercive control: what can we learn from national population surveys?

    PubMed

    Myhill, Andy

    2015-03-01

    Numerous academic studies point to gender symmetry in the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV). Many of these studies report findings from surveys with small and/or unrepresentative samples that have insufficient questions to differentiate adequately between different types of abuse. Data from a large, nationally representative survey suggest that, while the prevalence of situational violence is fairly symmetrical, coercive controlling abuse is highly gendered, with women overwhelmingly the victims. The authors conclude that more comprehensive measures are required in national surveys that consider a wider range of controlling behaviors as well as the meaning and impact of abuse. PMID:25680801

  4. Screening for type 2 diabetes in a high-risk population: study design and feasibility of a population-based randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe the design and present the results of the first year of a population-based study of screening for type 2 diabetes in individuals at high risk of developing the disease. High risk is defined as having abdominal obesity. Methods Between 2006 and 2007, 79,142 inhabitants of two Dutch municipalities aged 40–74 years were approached to participate in screening. Eligible participants had a self-reported waist circumference of ≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men, and no known pre-existing diabetes. Of the respondents (n = 20,578; response rate 26%), 16,135 were abdominally obese. In total, 10,609 individuals gave written informed consent for participation and were randomized into either the screening (n = 5305) or the control arm (n = 5304). Participants in the screening arm were invited to have their fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measured and were referred to their general practitioner (GP) if it was ≥6.1 mmol/L. In addition, blood lipids were determined in the screening arm, because abdominal obesity is often associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Participants in both arms received written healthy lifestyle information. Between-group differences were analyzed with Chi-square tests and logistic regression (categorical variables) and unpaired t-tests (continuous variables). Results The screening attendance rate was 84.1%. Attending screening was associated with age at randomization (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04), being married (OR = 1.57, 95% CI 1.33-1.83) and not-smoking currently (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.44-0.62). Of the individuals screened, 5.6% had hyperglycemia, and a further 11.6% had an estimated absolute cardiovascular disease risk of 5% or higher, according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation risk model. These participants were referred to their GP. Conclusions Self-reported home-assessed waist circumference could feasibly detect persons at high risk of hyperglycemia or cardiovascular disease

  5. Regulating the Tumor Cell Population Dynamics by Controlling the Proliferation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschbeck, Sarah; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2007-03-01

    The two-compartment model of cancer cell population dynamics introduces two subpopulations for a tumor (proliferating and quiescent). In precious theoretical models, the interaction of tumor cells with chemotherapeutic drugs is expressed as an additional term which reduces the size of subpopulations because of the killing effect of the drug with different killing rates. We develop a simple mathematical model for a more realistic interaction of anti-cancer drugs with tumor cells. The key assumption used in developing this model is that the anti-cancer drug not only kills the subpopulations but also decreases the proliferating rate of the proliferating subpopulation during the course of therapy. Finally, we present the numerical result for the evolution of the subpopulations based on this model.

  6. Atmospheric control of Aedes aegypti populations in Buenos Aires (Argentina) and its variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Garín, A.; Bejarán, R. A.; Carbajo, A. E.; de Casas, S. C.; Schweigmann, N. J.

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the main urban vector responsible for the transmission of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, is located at the southern end of the world distribution of the species. The population abundance of Ae. aegypti is mainly regulated by environmental factors. We calculated the potential number of times that a female could lay eggs during its mean life expectancy, based on potential egg production and daily meteorological records. The model considers those variables implying physical hazard to the survival of Ae. aegypti, mosquito flying activity and oviposition. The results, obtained after calibration and validation of the model with field observations, show significant correlation (P<0.001) for different lags depending on the life stage. From these results, more favorable atmospheric conditions for Ae. aegypti reproduction (linked to the urban climatic change) can be observed. The climatic variability in the last decade resembles conditions at the end of 19th century.

  7. Aqueous precipitation: Population balance modeling and control in multi-cation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Efficient separation of metal species from aqueous streams by precipitation techniques requires a fundamental understanding of the processes that occur during precipitation. These processes include particle nucleation, particle growth by solute deposition, agglomerate formation, and agglomerate breakup. Population balance method has been used to develop a kinetic model that accounts for these competing kinetic processes. The usefulness of the model is illustrated through its application to precipitation of yttrium hydroxynitrate, YHN. Kinetic parameters calculated from the model equations and system-specific solution chemistry are used to describe several aspects of the effect of pH on YHN precipitation. Implications for simultaneous precipitation of more than one cation type are discussed with examples. Effects of solution chemistry, precipitator design, and solvent choice are considered.

  8. Population size drives industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation and is under genetic control.

    PubMed

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Aigle, Michel; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Bely, Marina; Sicard, Delphine

    2011-04-01

    Alcoholic fermentation (AF) conducted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been exploited for millennia in three important human food processes: beer and wine production and bread leavening. Most of the efforts to understand and improve AF have been made separately for each process, with strains that are supposedly well adapted. In this work, we propose a first comparison of yeast AFs in three synthetic media mimicking the dough/wort/grape must found in baking, brewing, and wine making. The fermentative behaviors of nine food-processing strains were evaluated in these media, at the cellular, populational, and biotechnological levels. A large variation in the measured traits was observed, with medium effects usually being greater than the strain effects. The results suggest that human selection targeted the ability to complete fermentation for wine strains and trehalose content for beer strains. Apart from these features, the food origin of the strains did not significantly affect AF, suggesting that an improvement program for a specific food processing industry could exploit the variability of strains used in other industries. Glucose utilization was analyzed, revealing plastic but also genetic variation in fermentation products and indicating that artificial selection could be used to modify the production of glycerol, acetate, etc. The major result was that the overall maximum CO(2) production rate (V(max)) was not related to the maximum CO(2) production rate per cell. Instead, a highly significant correlation between V(max) and the maximum population size was observed in all three media, indicating that human selection targeted the efficiency of cellular reproduction rather than metabolic efficiency. This result opens the way to new strategies for yeast improvement. PMID:21357433

  9. Comparative acceptability of transnasal esophagoscopy and capsule esophagoscopy: a randomized controlled trial in a veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Chak, Amitabh; Alashkar, Bronia M.; Isenberg, Gerard A.; Chandar, Apoorva K.; Greer, Katarina B.; Hepner, Ashley; Pulice, Richard D.; Vemana, Srikrishna; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Faulx, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Background EGD screening for Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is costly with insufficient evidence to support its effectiveness. Objective To compare acceptance and tolerability of 2 novel unsedated office-based endoscopic screening techniques. Design Randomized block study design with allocation concealment. Setting Outpatient clinic setting at a Veteran Affairs (VA) medical center. Patients A total of 184 veterans with or without GERD symptoms. Interventions (1) Transnasal esophagoscopy (TNE); (2) Capsule esophagoscopy (ECE). Main outcome measurements (1) Acceptance of TNE and ECE; (2) Tolerability of TNE and ECE and effectiveness of BE screening. Results Esophageal screening was accepted by 184 of 1210 (15.2%) veterans. The majority were men (96%) and African American (58%) with a mean age of 58. 9 (8.1) years. Five (5%) TNE subjects and 2 (2%) ECE subjects refused the assigned procedure after randomization (p = 0.25). Eleven (12.6%) patients randomized to TNE crossed the minimal clinically important threshold for overall procedure tolerability as opposed to none randomized to ECE (p = 0.001). Effectiveness of BE screening was not significantly different in both procedures (TNE vs. ECE = 3.2% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.47). Overall, BE was present in 8 of 75 (10.6%) whites, and 0 of 107 African American veterans (p < 0.001). Limitations General veteran population may not reflect the screening population for BE. Conclusions Despite a small proportion of veterans expressing interest in esophageal screening, both TNE and ECE were feasible in the outpatient clinic setting and accepted by >95% who did. Screening was only effective in Caucasians. Moderate differences in tolerability between TNE and ECE notwithstanding, cost considerations along with availability of equipment and trained personnel should guide the modality to be used for BE screening. PMID:24973176

  10. Target-controlled infusion and population pharmacokinetics of landiolol hydrochloride in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Takayuki; Yamagishi, Akio; Suno, Manabu; Nakade, Susumu; Honda, Naoki; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Sugawara, Ami; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of landiolol in healthy male volunteers and gynecological patients. In this study, we determined the PK parameters of landiolol in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods Eight patients scheduled to undergo peripheral arterial surgery were enrolled in the study. After inducing anesthesia, landiolol hydrochloride was administered at target plasma concentrations of 500 and 1,000 ng/mL for 30 minutes each. A total of 112 data points of plasma concentration were collected from the patients and used for the population PK analysis. A population PK model was developed using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling software program (NONMEM). Results The patients had markedly decreased heart rates at 2 minutes after initiation of landiolol hydrochloride administration; however, systolic blood pressures were lower than the baseline values at only five time points. The concentration time course of landiolol was best described by a two-compartment model with lag time. The estimates of PK parameters were as follows: total body clearance, 30.7 mL/min/kg; distribution volume of the central compartment, 65.0 mL/kg; intercompartmental clearance, 48.3 mL/min/kg; distribution volume of the peripheral compartment, 54.4 mL/kg; and lag time, 0.633 minutes. The predictive performance of this model was better than that of the previous model. Conclusion The PK parameters of landiolol were best described by a two-compartment model with lag time. Distribution volume of the central compartment and total body clearance of landiolol in patients with peripheral arterial disease were approximately 64% and 84% of those in healthy volunteers, respectively. PMID:25653534

  11. Differences in Eye Movements Control among Dyslexic, Retarded and Normal Readers in the Spanish Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martos, F. J.; Vila, J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the relationship between dyslexia and eye movement control in Spanish-speaking children. Finds no significant differences between dyslexic and retarded readers in their eye movements during reading tasks only; no significant differences between retarded and normal readers in ocular tracking but differences between each of the groups and…

  12. Social Support, Perceived Control, and Well-Being: A Study of an Environmentally Stressed Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Mary J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 92 elderly residents of area targeted for massive redevelopment. Findings revealed that each health, control, and support emerged as independent predictors of affect and life satisfaction, and that affect was significantly lower for those with no close support figure than for those with one close relationship. (Author/NB)

  13. Zero Tolerance for Marginal Populations: Examining Neoliberal Social Controls in American Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    This study's purpose is to investigate the expansion of social control efforts in American elementary and secondary school settings, particularly the use of zero-tolerance policies. These policies entail automatic punishments, such as suspensions, expulsions, and referrals to the juvenile and criminal justice systems for a host of school-based…

  14. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Mellitus-A Population Based Study in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuchen; Wang, Rui; Ma, Xiuqiang; Zhao, Yanfang; Lu, Jian; Wu, Cheng; He, Jia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes in Shanghai, China. A sample of 3600 residents aged from 18 to 80 years selected by a randomized stratified multiple-stage sampling method in Shanghai was investigated, with blood samples collected. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol), or previous diagnosis by a physician. Adequate control of diabetes was taken as a level of HbA1c < 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) among people with treated diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis was used to explore associated factors for diabetes and prediabetes. In the 3136 participants suitable for analysis, the prevalences of diabetes, prediabetes, and previously diagnosed diabetes were 15.91%, 37.37%, and 4.46%, respectively. Among those with diabetes, only 28.06% were aware of their condition, 25.85% were currently undergoing medication treatment, and 12.42% achieved glycaemic control. Logistic regression showed that old age, preobesity, obesity, elevated triglyceride (TG), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), and lower education level were associated with an increased risk of diabetes; old age, obesity, elevated TG, and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were associated with an increased risk of prediabetes, while male sex and rural residence were associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. In summary, the state of diabetes in China is alarming; the rates of awareness, treatment, and control were relatively low. More efforts should be made to promote the prevention and control of diabetes in china. PMID:27213415

  15. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Mellitus—A Population Based Study in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yuchen; Wang, Rui; Ma, Xiuqiang; Zhao, Yanfang; Lu, Jian; Wu, Cheng; He, Jia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes in Shanghai, China. A sample of 3600 residents aged from 18 to 80 years selected by a randomized stratified multiple-stage sampling method in Shanghai was investigated, with blood samples collected. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol), or previous diagnosis by a physician. Adequate control of diabetes was taken as a level of HbA1c < 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) among people with treated diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis was used to explore associated factors for diabetes and prediabetes. In the 3136 participants suitable for analysis, the prevalences of diabetes, prediabetes, and previously diagnosed diabetes were 15.91%, 37.37%, and 4.46%, respectively. Among those with diabetes, only 28.06% were aware of their condition, 25.85% were currently undergoing medication treatment, and 12.42% achieved glycaemic control. Logistic regression showed that old age, preobesity, obesity, elevated triglyceride (TG), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), and lower education level were associated with an increased risk of diabetes; old age, obesity, elevated TG, and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were associated with an increased risk of prediabetes, while male sex and rural residence were associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. In summary, the state of diabetes in China is alarming; the rates of awareness, treatment, and control were relatively low. More efforts should be made to promote the prevention and control of diabetes in china. PMID:27213415

  16. Estimation of the probability of exposure to machining fluids in a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Uk; Colt, Joanne S; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Armenti, Karla R; Johnson, Alison; Silverman, Debra T; Stewart, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    We describe an approach for estimating the probability that study subjects were exposed to metalworking fluids (MWFs) in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer. Study subject reports on the frequency of machining and use of specific MWFs (straight, soluble, and synthetic/semi-synthetic) were used to estimate exposure probability when available. Those reports also were used to develop estimates for job groups, which were then applied to jobs without MWF reports. Estimates using both cases and controls and controls only were developed. The prevalence of machining varied substantially across job groups (0.1->0.9%), with the greatest percentage of jobs that machined being reported by machinists and tool and die workers. Reports of straight and soluble MWF use were fairly consistent across job groups (generally 50-70%). Synthetic MWF use was lower (13-45%). There was little difference in reports by cases and controls vs. controls only. Approximately, 1% of the entire study population was assessed as definitely exposed to straight or soluble fluids in contrast to 0.2% definitely exposed to synthetic/semi-synthetics. A comparison between the reported use of the MWFs and U.S. production levels found high correlations (r generally >0.7). Overall, the method described here is likely to have provided a systematic and reliable ranking that better reflects the variability of exposure to three types of MWFs than approaches applied in the past. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resources: a list of keywords in the occupational histories that were used to link study subjects to the metalworking fluids (MWFs) modules; recommendations from the literature on selection of MWFs based on type of machining operation, the metal being machined and decade; popular additives to MWFs; the number and proportion of controls who

  17. Fenitrothion: an alternative insecticide for the control of deltamethrin-resistant populations of Triatoma infestans in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Picollo, M I; Spillmann, C; Mougabure-Cueto, G

    2014-03-01

    Deltamethrin-based campaigns to control Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) have decreased in success as a result of the development of insecticide resistance. We compared the in vitro effects of the pyrethroid deltamethrin and two doses of the organophosphate fenitrothion, presented on different materials, on T. infestans from La Esperanza, Argentina. Laboratory tests demonstrated a decrease in susceptibility to deltamethrin in the field population [LD50 : 30.32 nanograms per insect (ng/i)] compared with the reference population (LD50 : 0.13 ng/i), giving a high resistance ratio of 233.42. By contrast, similar susceptibility to fenitrothion was assessed in both the field and reference populations (LD50 : 21.65 ng/i and 21.38 ng/i, respectively). The effectiveness of the formulated insecticides varied according to the surfaces to which they were applied. The application of fenitrothion formulations to glass or brick resulted in mortality of 90-100%. The application of fenitrothion formulations to wood or mud caused mortality in the range of 6.7-56.7%. Resistant insects presented low mortality when exposed to the deltamethrin formulation and high mortality when exposed to fenitrothion formulations. Moreover, the insecticides demonstrated residual activity only when applied to glass. The present work demonstrates that fenitrothion is an alternative to pyrethroids for the management of deltamethrin-resistant insects in La Esperanza. However, this effectiveness is not sustained over time. PMID:23668748

  18. Polymorphisms of STAT4 and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease: A case-control study in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Houbao; Liu, Jianbing; Zhang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhengting; Liu, Jie; Lu, Shunyuan; Xu, Wangyang; Zhong, Jie; Wang, Zhugang

    2013-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a transcription factor involved in the signaling pathways of several cytokines, playing an essential role in the development of inflammation in various immune-mediated diseases. Genetic association studies have shown that the STAT4 gene was significantly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Spanish and Caucasian populations. However, these associations in other ethnic populations remain unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the role of the STAT4 rs7574865 and rs7582694 polymorphisms on IBD in 562 unrelated Chinese Han subjects by assessing distributions of genotypes and allele frequencies. Results showed that neither rs7574865 [Crohn's disease (CD): P=0.66, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.21; ulcerative colitis (UC): P=0.43, OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.56-1.28; IBD: P=0.52, OR=0.93, 95% CI 0.73-1.17] nor rs7582694 (CD: P=0.40, OR=1.12, 95% CI 0.86-1.44; UC: P=0.50, OR=0.86, 95% CI 0.56-1.33; IBD: P=0.62, OR=1.06, 95% CI 0.83-1.36) was significantly associated with IBD, although the genotype frequency of rs7574865 varied in patients and the controls. In conclusion, our data did not support that STAT4 variants contribute to IBD susceptibility in the Chinese Han population. PMID:24648942

  19. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Di Liberto, M.; Comparin, T.; Kock, T.; Ölschläger, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-01-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping-induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites. PMID:25501387

  20. Statin use and risk of glioma: population-based case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph Rudolf; Becker, Claudia; Jick, Susan Sara; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, Michael Fred

    2016-09-01

    Statins have been reported to decrease the incidence of cancer, but the risk of glioma among statin users has been investigated in only two prior observational studies, both of them suggesting a modest protective effect of statins. We conducted a matched case-control study using data from the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink to analyse use of statins among 2469 cases with glioma and 24,690 controls. We performed conditional logistic regression analysis to calculate relative risks, estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) adjusting for multiple confounding factors. As compared with non-use of statins, use of statins was not associated with risk of glioma (OR for ≥90 prescriptions=0.75; 95 % CI 0.48-1.17). Our findings do not support previous sparse evidence of a possible inverse association between statin use and glioma risk. PMID:27041698

  1. Controls of stream chemistry and fish populations in the Neversink watershed, Catskill Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Burns, Douglas A.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Lovett, Gary M.

    2001-01-01

    The Neversink Watershed Study was initiated in 1991 to develop an understanding of the key natural processes that control water quality within the forested, 166 km 2 (64 mi 2 ),Neversink River watershed;part of the New York City drinking water supply system,in the Catskill Mountain region of New York.The study entailed (1)hydrological investigations of water movement from the atmosphere to streams,(2) biogeochemical investigations of nitrogen and calcium,important nutrients in forest and aquatic ecosystems whose availability has been altered by acidic deposition,(3)an investigation of elevational patterns in atmospheric deposition,and (4)fisheries investigations to determine the relative importance of physical habitat and acidic deposition in controlling the abundance and diversity of fish species in the watershed.This report summarizes the results of these investigations,which have also been presented, in detail,in peer-reviewed technical articles and reports that are cited throughout the text.

  2. Biogeochemical controls on the bacterial population in the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, S. B.; Koch, B. P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Pohl, C.; Kattner, G.; Yamasaki, S.; Lara, R. J.

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about bacterial dynamics in the oligotrophic ocean, particularly about its cultivable population. We examined the abundance of total and cultivable bacteria in relation to changes in biogeochemical conditions in the eastern Atlantic Ocean with special regard to Vibrio spp., a group of bacteria that can cause diseases in human and aquatic organisms. Surface, deep water and plankton samples (<20 μm, 20-55 μm and >55 μm) were collected between 50° N and 24° S. Chlorophyll-a was very low (<0.3 μg l-1) in most areas of the nutrient-poor Atlantic, except at a few locations near upwelling regions. In surface water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations were 64-95 μM C and 2-10 μM N accounting for ≥90 % and ≥76 % of total organic C and N, respectively. DOC and DON gradually decreased to ~45 μM C and <5 μM N in the bottom water while dissolved inorganic nutrients (Si, P, N) increased with depth. In the surface layer, culture independent total bacteria, represented by 4´-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts, ranged mostly between 107 and 108 cells l-1, while cultivable bacterial counts (CBC) and Vibrio spp. were found at concentrations of 104-107 and 102-105 colony forming units (CFU) l-1, respectively. Most bacteria (>99 %) were found in the nanoplankton fraction (<20 μm), however, bacterial abundance did not correlate with suspended particulates (chlorophyll-a, particulate organic C and N). Instead, we found a highly significant correlation between bacterial abundance and temperature (p < 0.001) and a significant correlation with DOC and DON. Among the cultivable bacteria, the abundance of Vibrio was also highly significantly correlated with DOC and DON (p < 0.0005 and p < 0.005, respectively). In cold waters of the mid-pelagic and abyssal zones, CBC was 50 to 100-times lower than in the surface layer; however, cultivable Vibrio spp. could be isolated from the bathypelagic zone and even near the seafloor

  3. Algal populations controlled by fish herbivory across a wave exposure gradient on southern temperate shores.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David I; Schiel, David R

    2010-01-01

    Consumers that forage across habitats can affect communities by altering the abundance and distribution of key species. In marine communities, studies of trophic interactions have generally focused on the effects of herbivorous and predatory invertebrates on benthic algae and mussel populations. However, large mobile consumers that move across habitats, such as fishes, can strongly affect community dynamics through consumption of habitat-dominating species, but their effects often vary over environmental gradients. On temperate rocky shores, herbivorous fishes are generally a small part of the fish fauna compared to the tropics, and there is sparse evidence that they play a major direct role in algal community dynamics, particularly of large brown algae that dominate many reefs. In New Zealand, however, a wide-ranging herbivorous fish, Odax pullus, feeds exclusively on macroalgae, including Durvillaea antarctica, a large low-intertidal fucoid reaching 10 m in length and 70 kg in mass. In four experiments we tested the extent of fish herbivory and how it was affected by algal canopy structure across a gradient of wave exposure at multiple sites. Exclusion experiments showed that fish impacts greatly reduced the cover and biomass of Durvillaea and that these effects decreased with increasing wave stress and algal canopy cover, effectively restricting the alga to exposed conditions. Almost all plants were entirely removed by fish where there was a sparse algal canopy in sheltered and semi-exposed sites, but there was significantly less grazing in exposed sites. Recruit Durvillaea beneath canopies were less affected by fish grazing, but they grew slowly. Successful natural recruitment, therefore, occurred almost exclusively on exposed shores outside canopies where many plants escaped severe grazing, and growth to maturity was far greater than elsewhere. Such large and direct impacts on the local and regional distribution of large brown algal populations by mobile

  4. Effects of land use on bird populations and pest control services on coffee farms.

    PubMed

    Railsback, Steven F; Johnson, Matthew D

    2014-04-22

    Global increases in both agriculture and biodiversity awareness raise a key question: Should cropland and biodiversity habitat be separated, or integrated in mixed land uses? Ecosystem services by wildlife make this question more complex. For example, birds benefit agriculture by preying on pest insects, but other habitat is needed to maintain the birds. Resulting land use questions include what areas and arrangements of habitat support sufficient birds to control pests, whether this pest control offsets the reduced cropland, and the comparative benefits of "land sharing" (i.e., mixed cropland and habitat) vs. "land sparing" (i.e., separate areas of intensive agriculture and habitat). Such questions are difficult to answer using field studies alone, so we use a simulation model of Jamaican coffee farms, where songbirds suppress the coffee berry borer (CBB). Simulated birds select habitat and prey in five habitat types: intact forest, trees (including forest fragments), shade coffee, sun coffee, and unsuitable habitat. The trees habitat type appears to be especially important, providing efficient foraging and roosting sites near coffee plots. Small areas of trees (but not forest alone) could support a sufficient number of birds to suppress CBB in sun coffee; the degree to which trees are dispersed within coffee had little effect. In simulations without trees, shade coffee supported sufficient birds to offset its lower yield. High areas of both trees and shade coffee reduced pest control because CBB was less often profitable prey. Because of the pest control service provided by birds, land sharing was predicted to be more beneficial than land sparing in this system. PMID:24711377

  5. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California.

    PubMed

    Cornel, Anthony J; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Mulligan Iii, F Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV) trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath) after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas. PMID:27158450

  6. Water nitrates and CNS birth defects: a population-based case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuckle, T.E.; Sherman, G.J.; Corey, P.N.; Walters, D.; Lo, B.

    1988-03-01

    The relation between maternal exposure to nitrates in drinking water and risk of delivering an infant with a central nervous system (CNS) malformation was examined by means of a case-control study in New Brunswick, Canada. All cases of CNS defects for a high and a low prevalence area of New Brunswick, for the years 1973-1983, were included in the study. Controls were selected randomly from the livebirth files for the province, matched on county of maternal residence and date of birth. One hundred and thirty (130) cases were identified and individually matched with two controls each. Individual water samples were collected from the case and control mother's address given on the birth or stillbirth records. The study revealed that the effect of nitrate exposure in water was modified by whether the source of the drinking water was a private well or a public municipal distribution system. Compared to a baseline nitrate level of 0.1 ppm, exposure to nitrate levels of 26 ppm from private well water sources was associated with a moderate, but not statistically significant, increase in risk (risk odds ratio = 2.30; 95% confidence interval = 0.73-7.29). If the source of drinking water was a municipal distribution system or a private spring, an increase in nitrate exposure was associated with a decrease in risk of delivering a CNS-malformed infant; however, these effect estimates were not statistically significant. The positive increase in risk with nitrate exposure from well water sources requires further study using a larger case series and a larger proportion of exposures to nitrate levels exceeding 5 ppm.

  7. Surveillance, insecticide resistance and control of an invasive Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population in California

    PubMed Central

    Cornel, Anthony J.; Holeman, Jodi; Nieman, Catelyn C.; Lee, Yoosook; Smith, Charles; Amorino, Mark; Brisco, Katherine K.; Barrera, Roberto; Lanzaro, Gregory C.; Mulligan III, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent establishment in California of Aedes aegypti in 2013 has created new challenges for local mosquito abatement and vector control districts. Studies were undertaken to identify effective and economical strategies to monitor the abundance and spread of this mosquito species as well as for its control. Overall, BG Sentinel (BGS) traps were found to be the most sensitive trap type to measure abundance and spread into new locations. Autocidal-Gravid-Ovitraps (AGO-B), when placed at a site for a week, performed equally to BGS in detecting the presence of female Ae. aegypti. Considering operational cost and our findings, we recommend use of BGS traps for surveillance in response to service requests especially in locations outside the known infestation area. We recommend AGO-Bs be placed at fixed sites, cleared and processed once a week to monitor mosquito abundance within a known infestation area. Long-term high density placements of AGO-Bs were found to show promise as an environmentally friendly trap-kill control strategy. California Ae. aegypti were found to be homozygous for the V1016I mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel gene, which is implicated to be involved in insecticide resistance. This strain originating from Clovis, California was resistant to some pyrethroids but not to deltamethrin in bottle bio-assays. Sentinel cage ultra-low-volume (ULV) trials using a new formulation of deltamethrin (DeltaGard®) demonstrated that it provided some control (average of 56% death in sentinel cages in a 91.4 m spray swath) after a single truck mounted aerial ULV application in residential areas. PMID:27158450

  8. [The control of solid waste with the participation of a low-income population].

    PubMed

    de Abreu, J L

    1990-10-01

    Two studies were undertaken with a view to improving the health conditions of a shanty town area in the city of S. Paulo, Brazil. The objective was to modify littering behavior and to implement litter-control procedures with the participation of the inhabitants. Results demonstrated the adequacy of the procedures adopted and suggest a possible contribution on the part of psychology to public health. PMID:2101532

  9. Effects of land use on bird populations and pest control services on coffee farms

    PubMed Central

    Railsback, Steven F.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Global increases in both agriculture and biodiversity awareness raise a key question: Should cropland and biodiversity habitat be separated, or integrated in mixed land uses? Ecosystem services by wildlife make this question more complex. For example, birds benefit agriculture by preying on pest insects, but other habitat is needed to maintain the birds. Resulting land use questions include what areas and arrangements of habitat support sufficient birds to control pests, whether this pest control offsets the reduced cropland, and the comparative benefits of “land sharing” (i.e., mixed cropland and habitat) vs. “land sparing” (i.e., separate areas of intensive agriculture and habitat). Such questions are difficult to answer using field studies alone, so we use a simulation model of Jamaican coffee farms, where songbirds suppress the coffee berry borer (CBB). Simulated birds select habitat and prey in five habitat types: intact forest, trees (including forest fragments), shade coffee, sun coffee, and unsuitable habitat. The trees habitat type appears to be especially important, providing efficient foraging and roosting sites near coffee plots. Small areas of trees (but not forest alone) could support a sufficient number of birds to suppress CBB in sun coffee; the degree to which trees are dispersed within coffee had little effect. In simulations without trees, shade coffee supported sufficient birds to offset its lower yield. High areas of both trees and shade coffee reduced pest control because CBB was less often profitable prey. Because of the pest control service provided by birds, land sharing was predicted to be more beneficial than land sparing in this system. PMID:24711377

  10. CD209 in inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study in the Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Concepción; Oliver, Javier; Mendoza, Juan Luis; Gómez-García, María; Taxonera, Carlos; Gómez, Luis M; López-Nevot, Miguel A; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Martínez, Alfonso; Martín, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background The etiology of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD), considered together as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), involves environmental and genetic factors. Although some genes are already known, the genetics underlying these diseases is complex and new candidates are continuously emerging. The CD209 gene is located in a region linked previously to IBD and a CD209 functional polymorphism (rs4804803) has been associated to other inflammatory conditions. Our aim was to study the potential involvement of this CD209 variant in IBD susceptibility. Methods We performed a case-control study with 515 CD patients, 497 UC patients and 731 healthy controls, all of them white Spaniards. Samples were typed for the CD209 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4804803 by TaqMan technology. Frequency comparisons were performed using χ2 tests. Results No association between CD209 and UC or CD was observed initially. However, stratification of UC patients by HLA-DR3 status, a strong protective allele, showed that carriage of the CD209_G allele could increase susceptibility in the subgroup of HLA-DR3-positive individuals (p = 0.03 OR = 1.77 95% CI 1.04–3.02, vs. controls). Conclusion A functional variant in the CD209 gene, rs4804803, does not seem to be influencing Crohn's disease susceptibility. However, it could be involved in the etiology or pathology of Ulcerative Colitis in HLA-DR3-positive individuals but further studies are necessary. PMID:18070336

  11. Control of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease among Multinational Patient Population in the Arabian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Arafah, Mohamed; Al-Hinai, Ali T.; Shehab, Abdullah; Al-Tamimi, Omer; Al-Awadhi, Mahmoud; Al-Herz, Shorook; Al-Anazi, Faisal; Al-Nemer, Khalid; Metwally, Othman; Al-Khadra, Akram; Fakhry, Mohammed; Elghetany, Hossam; Medani, Abdel R.; Yusufali, Afzal H.; Al-Jassim, Obaid; Al-Hallaq, Omar; Baslaib, Fahad O.A.S.; Amin, Haitham; Santos, Raul D.; Al-Waili, Khalid; Al-Hashmi, Khamis; Al-Rasadi, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the control of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in the Centralized Pan-Middle East Survey on the undertreatment of hypercholesterolaemia (CEPHEUS) in the Arabian Gulf. Of the 4398 enrolled patients, overall mean age was 57 ± 11 years, 60% were males, 13% were smokers, 76% had diabetes, 71% had metabolic syndrome and 78% had very high ASCVD risk status. The proportion of subjects with body mass index <25 kg/m2, HbA1c <7% (in diabetics), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) <2.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dL) and <1.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) for high and very high ASCVD risk cohorts, respectively and controlled blood pressure (<140/90 mmHg) was 14, 26, 31% and 60%, respectively. Only 1.4% of the participants had all of their CVD risk factors controlled with significant differences among the countries (P < .001). CVD risk goal attainment rates were significantly lower in those with very high ASCVD risk compared with those with high ASCVD risk status (P < .001). Females were also, generally, less likely to attain goals when compared with males (P < .001). PMID:26496982

  12. Generation of isolated ultra-short attosecond pulses by coherent control of the population of excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Li, Peng-Cheng; Liao, Sheng-Lun; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-01-01

    We present an ab-initio theoretical investigation of the enhancement of ultra-broad super-continuum harmonic spectra by coherently controlling the electron quantum paths of the helium atom and He+ ion. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved by means of the time-dependent generalized pseudo-spectral method, allowing non-uniform and optimal spatial grid discretization and accurate and efficient propagation of the wave function in space and time. The population of the first two low-lying excited states of He+ is selectively controlled by adding low intensity, high frequency laser pulses to a two color mid-infrared laser field. Although the intensity of the added field is weak, its high frequency makes the subsequent ionization probability from excited states become much larger than for the case of many photons (mid-IR filed), even though the intensity is smaller. We found that the intensity of the attosecond pulse generated by superposing a range of synchronized high harmonics is significantly enhanced by 20 orders of magnitude. Similar calculations have been performed for the neutral He atoms. We found that an intense and ultra-short isolated 18 as can be generated directly. To understand the underlying mechanism of such dramatic enhancement and the role of electron quantum paths, we perform wavelet time-frequency transform of high harmonic spectra. The results show that we can selectively control the domination of the two distinct long and short electron trajectories by controlling the population of different excited states.

  13. Genetic Association between Presenilin 2 Polymorphisms and Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia of Lewy Body Type in a Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayako; Shibata, Nobuto; Kasanuki, Koji; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Ohnuma, Tohru; Takeshita, Yoshihide; Kawai, Eri; Takayama, Toshiki; Nishioka, Kenya; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Hisashi; Arai, Heii

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Common polymorphisms affect gene activity and increase the risk of AD. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms in the PSEN2 gene showed Lewy body dementia (LBD) phenotypes clinically. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether PSEN2 gene polymorphisms were associated with AD or LBD. Methods Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gene were analyzed using a case-control study design comprising 288 AD patients, 76 LBD patients, and 105 age-matched controls. Results Linkage disequilibrium (LD) examination showed strong LD from rs1295645 to rs8383 on the gene in our cases from Japan. There were no associations between the SNPs studied here and AD onset, and haplotypic analyses did not detect genetic associations between AD and the PSEN2 gene. Although the number of the cases was small, the SNPs studied did not modify the risk of developing LBD in a Japanese population. Conclusion The common SNPs of the PSEN2 gene did not affect the risk of AD or LBD in a Japanese population. Because genetic variability of the PSEN2 gene is associated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in AD and LBD, further detailed analyses considering BPSD of both diseases would be required. PMID:27065294

  14. Landau-Zener population control and dipole measurement of a two-level-system bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. S.; Gladchenko, S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Burin, A. L.; Osborn, K. D.

    2014-09-01

    Tunneling two-level systems (TLSs), present in dielectrics at low temperatures, have been recently studied for fundamental understanding and superconducting device development. According to a recent theory by Burin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 157002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.157002], the TLS bath of any amorphous dielectric experiences a distribution of Landau-Zener transitions if exposed to simultaneous fields. In this experiment we measure amorphous insulating films at millikelvin temperatures with a microwave field and a swept electric field bias using a superconducting resonator. We find that the maximum dielectric loss per microwave photon with the simultaneous fields is approximately the same as that in the equilibrium state, in agreement with the generic material theory. In addition, we find that the loss depends on the fields in a way which allows for the separate extraction of the TLS bath dipole moment and density of states. This method allows for the study of the TLS dipole moment in a diverse set of disordered films, and provides a technique for continuously inverting their population.

  15. Investigation of mtDNA control region sequences in a Tibetan population sample from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Ke; Yao, Jun; Han, Xuan; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Wang, Bao-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial hypervariable region sequences including HVI and HVII (15,751-520) were investigated from 174 unrelated Tibetan individuals living in Tibet Autonomous Region in People's Republic of China. The resulted sequences were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). This sequence variability rendered a high gene diversity value (0.9940 ± 0.0021) and a high random match probability (0.0118) was determined with PIC of 0.9882. Among a total of 174 samples, 217 polymorphic sites were identified, which defined 135 haplotypes. A total of 135 different haplotypes were detected, 113 of them were unique and 22 were shared. The most common haplogroup was M9a1a1c1b1 (16.09%), followed by A11 (6.32%), A (5.17%), R (4.60%), A15 (4.60%), and G3a1 (3.45). The proportions of macro-haplogroups M, N, and L were 54.60%, 42.53%, and 2.87%, respectively. By principal component analysis (PCA), there was no special cluster between Tibetans and other populations except that the structure of Tibetans closely resembled that of Uygur in component 2. PMID:25423521

  16. Sleep quality among internally displaced Georgian adolescents and population-based controls.

    PubMed

    Sakhelashvili, Irine; Eliozishvili, Marine; Lortkipanidze, Nani; Oniani, Nikoloz; Cervena, Katerina; Darchia, Nato

    2016-09-01

    Sleep problems in children and adolescents are a significant public health concern and may be linked to a variety of psychoemotional difficulties. This study aimed to evaluate sleep quality and associated factors in conflict-affected Georgian adolescents after 9 months of forced displacement. Thirty-three internally displaced adolescents (mean age 11.4 years) and 33 adolescents (mean age 10.8 years) from the general population completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Parents completed the Children's Sleep-Wake Scale and provided information on their socioeconomic status (SES) and the adolescents' sleep behavior, academic performance, and peer social relationships. The groups differed significantly in sleep quality, peer relationships, SES, and CDI scores. In the internally displaced group, the only significant predictor of sleep quality was SES, which increased the predictive capacity of the model (demographic and psychosocial variables) by 20% in the hierarchical analyses. The most significant predictor in the non-internally displaced group was CDI. This research indicates that displacement may affect sleep quality and psychosocial functioning. The importance of family SES as a contributing factor to displaced adolescents' poor sleep quality is highlighted. An integrated approach designed to improve the psychosocial environment of internally displaced adolescents is needed for their protection. PMID:26311481

  17. Sarcoma risk and dioxin emissions from incinerators and industrial plants: a population-based case-control study (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, Paola; Ricci, Paolo; Bovo, Emanuela; Casula, Alessandro; Gattolin, Massimo; Fiore, Anna Rita; Chiosi, Francesco; Guzzinati, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether environmental exposure to dioxin affects the general population. The aim of this research is to evaluate sarcoma risk in relation to the environmental pollution caused by dioxin emitted by waste incinerators and industrial sources of airborne dioxin. The study population lives in a part of the Province of Venice (Italy), where a population-based cancer registry (Veneto Tumour Registry – RTV) has been active since 1987. Methods Two hundred and five cases of visceral and extravisceral sarcoma, confirmed by microscopic examination, diagnosed from 01.01.1990 to 31.12.1996, were extracted from the RTV database. Diagnoses were revised using the actual pathology reports and clinical records. For each sarcoma case, three controls of the same age and sex were randomly selected from the population files of the Local Health Units (LHUs). The residential history of each subject, whether case or control, was reconstructed, address by address, from 1960 to the date of diagnosis. All waste incinerators and industrial sources of airborne dioxin in the Province of Venice were taken into account, as was one very large municipal waste incinerator outside the area but close to its boundaries. The Industrial Source Complex Model in Long Term mode, version 3 (ISCLT3), was used to assess the level of atmospheric dispersion. A specific value for exposure was calculated for each point (geo-referenced address) and for each calendar year; the exposure value for each subject is expressed as the average of specific time-weighted values. The analysis takes into account 172 cases and 405 controls, aged more than 14 years. Results The risk of developing a sarcoma is 3.3 times higher (95% Confidence Interval – 95% CI: 1.24 – 8.76) among subjects, both sexes, with the longest exposure period and the highest exposure level ; a significant excess of risk was also observed in women (Odds Ratio OR = 2.41, 95% CI: 1.04 – 5.59) and for cancers of the connective

  18. Seasonal patterns and control of gas exchange in local populations of the Mediterranean evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flexas, Jaume; Gulías, Javier; Jonasson, Sven; Medrano, Hipólito; Mus, Mauricio

    2001-02-01

    We examined temporal and spatial variations in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intrinsic water-use efficiency, sub-stomatal CO 2 concentration, apparent carboxylation efficiency and chlorophyll fluorescence in the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus. The study was done at the extremes of a precipitation and temperature gradient on the coast and in the mountains of Mallorca, Spain, with gas exchange measurements at different times of the year, and combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in a controlled experiment. The objectives were to relate annual variation in photosynthetic functions to environmentally induced constraints and to quantify to which extent local differences in climate can affect photosynthesis in shrub populations. In the mountain population, net photosynthesis peaked in spring and autumn, when water was abundant and temperature was moderately high. It was reduced in winter paralleling reduced carboxylation efficiency. Photosynthesis was at the annual minimum in summer at both sites due to drought-induced stomata closure combined with impaired function of the Calvin cycle. The coastal population maintained high photosynthesis in mid winter but had a pronounced decline in spring, and the summer decline lasted longer than in the mountains. Integrated over the seasons, net photosynthesis was about 25 % lower in the coastal than in the mountain population, in spite of maintained high mid winter photosynthesis. Hence, the reduction at the coast was mainly due to early onset of drought in spring and a long period of summer drought, showing that local climatic differences can cause pronounced spatial differences in plant carbon balance. As a consequence, similar differences probably also occur as a function of year-to-year variability of precipitation patterns and temperatures.

  19. Childhood Leukemia and 50 Hz Magnetic Fields: Findings from the Italian SETIL Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Salvan, Alberto; Ranucci, Alessandra; Lagorio, Susanna; Magnani, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    We report on an Italian case-control study on childhood leukemia and exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). Eligible for inclusion were 745 leukemia cases, aged 0–10 years at diagnosis in 1998–2001, and 1475 sex- and age-matched population controls. Parents of 683 cases and 1044 controls (92% vs. 71%) were interviewed. ELF-MF measurements (24–48 h), in the child’s bedroom of the dwelling inhabited one year before diagnosis, were available for 412 cases and 587 controls included in the main conditional regression analyses. The magnetic field induction was 0.04 μT on average (geometric mean), with 0.6% of cases and 1.6% of controls exposed to >0.3 μT. The impact of changes in the statistical model, exposure metric, and data-set restriction criteria was explored via sensitivity analyses. No exposure-disease association was observed in analyses based on continuous exposure, while analyses based on categorical variables were characterized by incoherent exposure-outcome relationships. In conclusion, our results may be affected by several sources of bias and they are noninformative at exposure levels >0.3 μT. Nonetheless, the study may contribute to future meta- or pooled analyses. Furthermore, exposure levels among population controls are useful to estimate attributable risk. PMID:25689995

  20. Childhood leukemia and 50 Hz magnetic fields: findings from the Italian SETIL case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salvan, Alberto; Ranucci, Alessandra; Lagorio, Susanna; Magnani, Corrado

    2015-02-01

    We report on an Italian case-control study on childhood leukemia and exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). Eligible for inclusion were 745 leukemia cases, aged 0-10 years at diagnosis in 1998-2001, and 1475 sex- and age-matched population controls. Parents of 683 cases and 1044 controls (92% vs. 71%) were interviewed. ELF-MF measurements (24-48 h), in the child's bedroom of the dwelling inhabited one year before diagnosis, were available for 412 cases and 587 controls included in the main conditional regression analyses. The magnetic field induction was 0.04 μT on average (geometric mean), with 0.6% of cases and 1.6% of controls exposed to >0.3 μT. The impact of changes in the statistical model, exposure metric, and data-set restriction criteria was explored via sensitivity analyses. No exposure-disease association was observed in analyses based on continuous exposure, while analyses based on categorical variables were characterized by incoherent exposure-outcome relationships. In conclusion, our results may be affected by several sources of bias and they are noninformative at exposure levels >0.3 μT. Nonetheless, the study may contribute to future meta- or pooled analyses. Furthermore, exposure levels among population controls are useful to estimate attributable risk. PMID:25689995

  1. Conducting experimental research in marginalised populations: clinical and methodological implications from a mixed-methods randomised controlled trial in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lowther, Keira; Harding, Richard; Ahmed, Aabid; Gikaara, Nancy; Ali, Zippy; Kariuki, Hellen; Sherr, Lorraine; Simms, Victoria; Selman, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies to test interventions for people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are essential to ensure appropriate and effective clinical care. The implications of study participation on outcome data in such populations have been discussed theoretically, but rarely empirically examined. We aimed to explore the effects of participating in a randomised controlled trial conducted in an HIV clinic in Mombasa, Kenya. We report qualitative data from the Treatment Outcomes in Palliative Care trial, which evaluated the impact of a nurse-led palliative care intervention for HIV positive adults on antiretroviral therapy compared to standard care. Participants in both arms attended five monthly quantitative data collection appointments. Post-trial exit, 10 control and 20 intervention patients participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews, analysed using thematic analysis. We found benefit attributed to the compassion of the research team, social support, communication, completion of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) and material support (transport reimbursement). Being treated with compassion and receiving social support enabled participants to build positive relationships with the research team, which improved mental health and well-being. Open and non-judgmental communication made participants feel accepted. Participants described how repeated completion of the PROMs was a prompt for reflection, through which they began to help themselves and self-care. Participant reimbursements relieved financial hardship and enabled them to fulfil their social responsibilities, enhancing self-worth. These findings emphasise the importance of compassion, support and effective communication in the clinical encounter, particularly in stigmatised and isolated populations, and the potential of the integration of simple PROMs to improve patient outcomes. Participation in research has unexpected positive benefits for participants, which should be

  2. Outcome-Based Quality Control by a Dental Reference Profile of a Population-Based Study (SHIP-0)

    PubMed Central

    Samietz, Stefanie; Söhnel, Andreas; Schwahn, Christian; Holtfreter, Birte; Mundt, Torsten; Meisel, Peter; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kocher, Thomas; Biffar, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to develop an instrument for quality control in dental practices. We compared the number of teeth of subjects of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-0) with those from patients of dental practices. Methods. Patients from seven dental practices (n = 1,497) were randomly sampled by age strata and gender for a period of two years. Dental status derived from patient files was transformed into practice profiles using age-specific number of teeth as a parameter. Practice profiles were compared with a nomogram, which was based on the age-specific number of teeth of 3,990 SHIP-0 participants regularly visiting the dentist. Further, negative binomial regression models were evaluated to model associations between the number of teeth with age and dental practices, including interactions. Results. The practice profiles ranged between the 45th and 95th quantile curves of the reference population SHIP-0. The rate ratios (RR) for the number of missing teeth ranged from 0.37 to 0.67 (p < 0.001) between the different dental practices, indicating lower risk for higher numbers of missing teeth in comparison to SHIP-0. Conclusions. This study showed considerable differences between dental practices and the reference population of SHIP-0 regarding the pattern of tooth loss and confirms the value of nomograms to compare age-specific numbers of teeth between patients of dental practices and a population-based-study as a tool for quality control. For further analyses, the socioeconomic status of patients and relevant risk factors will be used to adjust for structural differences in order to improve the validity of the comparisons. PMID:27347549

  3. The sterile insect technique for controlling populations of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) on Reunion Island: mating vigour of sterilized males.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Clelia F; Jacquet, Maxime; Gilles, Jeremie; Lemperiere, Guy; Maquart, Pierre-Olivier; Quilici, Serge; Schooneman, François; Vreysen, Marc J B; Boyer, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Reunion Island suffers from high densities of the chikungunya and dengue vector Aedes albopictus. The sterile insect technique (SIT) offers a promising strategy for mosquito-borne diseases prevention and control. For such a strategy to be effective, sterile males need to be competitive enough to fulfil their intended function by reducing wild mosquito populations in natura. We studied the effect of irradiation on sexual maturation and mating success of males, and compared the sexual competitiveness of sterile versus wild males in the presence of wild females in semi-field conditions. For all untreated or sterile males, sexual maturation was completed within 13 to 20 h post-emergence and some males were able to inseminate females when 15 h old. In the absence of competition, untreated and sterile males were able to inseminate the same number of virgin females during 48 h, in small laboratory cages: an average of 93% of females was inseminated no matter the treatment, the age of males, and the sex ratio. Daily mating success of single sterile males followed the same pattern as for untreated ones, although they inseminated significantly fewer females after the ninth day. The competitiveness index of sterile males in semi-field conditions was only 0.14 when they were released at 1-day old, but improved to 0.53 when the release occurred after a 5-day period in laboratory conditions. In SIT simulation experiments, a 5:1 sterile to wild male ratio allowed a two-fold reduction of the wild population's fertility. This suggests that sterile males could be sufficiently competitive to mate with wild females within the framework of an SIT component as part of an AW-IPM programme for suppressing a wild population of Ae. albopictus in Reunion Island. It will be of interest to minimise the pre-release period in controlled conditions to ensure a good competitiveness without increasing mass rearing costs. PMID:23185329

  4. Conducting experimental research in marginalised populations: clinical and methodological implications from a mixed-methods randomised controlled trial in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Keira; Harding, Richard; Ahmed, Aabid; Gikaara, Nancy; Ali, Zippy; Kariuki, Hellen; Sherr, Lorraine; Simms, Victoria; Selman, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Experimental studies to test interventions for people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are essential to ensure appropriate and effective clinical care. The implications of study participation on outcome data in such populations have been discussed theoretically, but rarely empirically examined. We aimed to explore the effects of participating in a randomised controlled trial conducted in an HIV clinic in Mombasa, Kenya. We report qualitative data from the Treatment Outcomes in Palliative Care trial, which evaluated the impact of a nurse-led palliative care intervention for HIV positive adults on antiretroviral therapy compared to standard care. Participants in both arms attended five monthly quantitative data collection appointments. Post-trial exit, 10 control and 20 intervention patients participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews, analysed using thematic analysis. We found benefit attributed to the compassion of the research team, social support, communication, completion of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) and material support (transport reimbursement). Being treated with compassion and receiving social support enabled participants to build positive relationships with the research team, which improved mental health and well-being. Open and non-judgmental communication made participants feel accepted. Participants described how repeated completion of the PROMs was a prompt for reflection, through which they began to help themselves and self-care. Participant reimbursements relieved financial hardship and enabled them to fulfil their social responsibilities, enhancing self-worth. These findings emphasise the importance of compassion, support and effective communication in the clinical encounter, particularly in stigmatised and isolated populations, and the potential of the integration of simple PROMs to improve patient outcomes. Participation in research has unexpected positive benefits for participants, which

  5. Weight Misperception and Unhealthy Weight Control Behaviors Among Sexual Minorities in the General Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Hadland, Scott E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Goodenow, Carol S.; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Gay, lesbian and bisexual youth may experience significant body dissatisfaction. We examined sexual orientation differences in self-perceived weight status and prevalence of potentially dangerous weight control behaviors in a representative sample of adolescents. Methods Data were obtained from 12,984 youth between 2003–2009 over four cycles of the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a statewide survey of 9th–12th grade students. Self-perceived weight status and past-month unhealthy weight control behaviors (fasting >24 hours, using diet pills, and vomiting/using laxatives) were compared among gay/lesbian, bisexual, self-identified heterosexual youth with same-sex partners, unsure youth, and exclusively heterosexual youth using logistic regression, adjusting for age and race/ethnicity. Results Compared to exclusively heterosexual males, heterosexual males with prior same-sex partners and bisexual males were more likely to self-perceive as overweight despite being of healthy weight/underweight (respectively, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68–4.05; and AOR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.64–4.00). Compared to exclusively heterosexual females, lesbians and bisexual females were more likely to self-perceive as being of healthy weight/underweight despite being overweight/obese (respectively, AOR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.15–8.71; and AOR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.20–3.33). Unhealthy weight control behaviors were significantly more prevalent among sexual minority males (32.5%; AOR, 4.38; 95% CI, 3.38–5.67) and females (34.7%; AOR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.85–2.78) when considered together relative to exclusively heterosexual males (9.7%) and females (18.8%). Conclusions One-third of sexual minority youth engage in hazardous weight control behaviors. Future research should investigate underlying mechanisms and determine whether clinicians should routinely screen for these behaviors. PMID:24182939

  6. A population-competition model for analyzing transverse optical patterns including optical control and structural anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Y. C.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Binder, R.; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of a low-dimensional population-competition (PC) model suitable for analysis of the dynamics of certain modulational instability patterns in extended systems. The model is applied to analyze the transverse optical exciton-polariton patterns in semiconductor quantum well microcavities. It is shown that, despite its simplicity, the PC model describes quite well the competitions among various two-spot and hexagonal patterns when four physical parameters, representing density saturation, hexagon stabilization, anisotropy, and switching beam intensity, are varied. The combined effects of the last three parameters are given detailed considerations here. Although the model is developed in the context of semiconductor polariton patterns, its equations have more general applicability, and the results obtained here may benefit the investigation of other pattern-forming systems. The simplicity of the PC model allows us to organize all steady state solutions in a parameter space ‘phase diagram’. Each region in the phase diagram is characterized by the number and type of solutions. The main numerical task is to compute inter-region boundary surfaces, where some steady states either appear, disappear, or change their stability status. The singularity types of the boundary points, given by Catastrophe theory, are shown to provide a simple geometric overview of the boundary surfaces. With all stable and unstable steady states and the phase boundaries delimited and characterized, we have attained a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the four-parameter phase diagram. We analyze this rich structure in detail and show that it provides a transparent and organized interpretation of competitions among various patterns built on the hexagonal state space.

  7. Antidepressants and Gastric Cancer: A Nationwide Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no epidemiological study has reported on whether an association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer exists. Herein, we aim to investigate the possible association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer incidence. Methods Using a nested case-control design, we identified 26289 cases with gastric cancer and 127984 controls from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The data were analyzed using a conditional logistic regression model adjusting for possible confounding variables. Results We found antidepressant use did not increase the risk of gastric cancer. The lack of an association between antidepressant prescription and elevated gastric cancer incidence was apparent for across selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic agents (TCAs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA), trazodone, mirtazapine and bupropion. There were slightly decreased gastric cancer risks of SSRIs use (≧28 DDD group, adjusted OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.78–0.96). Sensitive analysis showed SSRIs, TCAs, and SNRIs did not increase gastric cancer risks significantly even in the group with peptic ulcer history. Conclusions An association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer was not apparent in this analysis. PMID:26606417

  8. Polysomnographic characteristics in nonmalignant chronic pain populations: A review of controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Bjurstrom, Martin F; Irwin, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Sleep and pain are critical homeostatic systems that interact in a bidirectional manner. Complaints of sleep disturbance are ubiquitous among patients with chronic pain disorders, and conversely, patients with persistent insomnia symptoms commonly report suffering from chronic pain. Sleep deprivation paradigms demonstrate that partial or complete sleep loss induce hyperalgesia, possibly due to shared mechanistic pathways including neuroanatomic and molecular substrates. Further, chronic pain conditions and sleep disturbances are intertwined through comorbidities, which together cause detrimental psychological and physical consequences. This critical review examines 29 polysomnography studies to evaluate whether nonmalignant chronic pain patients, as compared to controls, show differences in objective measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture. Whereas these controlled studies did not reveal a consistent pattern of objective sleep disturbances, alterations of sleep continuity were commonly reported. Alterations of sleep architecture such as increases in light sleep or decreases in slow-wave sleep were less commonly reported and findings were mixed and also inconsistent. Methodological flaws were identified, which complicated interpretation and limited conclusions; hence, recommendations for future research are suggested. Knowledge of abnormalities in the sleep process has implications for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions, which might also direct the development of novel intervention strategies. PMID:26140866

  9. Increased prevalence of eosinophilia in a hemodialysis population: Longitudinal and case control studies.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Sarah; Corbett, Richard; Duncan, Neill; Ashby, Damien

    2016-07-01

    Eosinophilia is commonly found in patients with clinical reactions to the hemodialysis circuit. With modern membranes, such reactions have become less common, but they may be under diagnosed in patients with subtle symptoms, in whom the presence of eosinophilia is an important diagnostic feature. Two case reports are presented, along with a hemodialysis study of the frequency and clinical associations of eosinophilia. In three hemodialysis facilities, all current hemodialysis patients with persistent eosinophilia (greater than 1 × 10(9) /L for 3 months) were identified. Control patients without eosinophilia (less than 0.5 × 10(9) /L for 3 months) matched for age, gender, and ethnicity were identified from the same facilities. A historical cohort of patients, dialyzing at the same facilities 5 years ago, was screened for the presence of persistent eosinophilia. From 510 patients, 24 cases of persistent eosinophilia were identified (4.7%). The median eosinophil count was 1.75 × 10(9) /L (range 1.1-7.5 × 10(9) /L). The prevalence in a historical cohort 5 years previously was significantly less at 1.5% (P = 0.046). Compared to controls, patients with eosinophilia were more likely to be on an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (41.7% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.049), had a lower C-reactive protein (10 vs. 24 mg/L, P = 0.02) and were more likely to be using a fistula for access (P = 0.049). Over the following 12 months, there was no difference in the mean number of hospital admission days between cases and controls (7.6 vs. 11.5 days, P = 0.54), and no difference in mortality over 29 months (25.0% vs. 29.2%, P = 1.00). Eosinophilia remains not uncommon in hemodialysis patients, and in most cases reflects allergy to components of the dialysis circuit, which is usually subclinical. The overall prognosis for asymptomatic patients appears to be favourable. PMID:26749440

  10. Daily Physical Activities and Sports in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer and Healthy Controls: A Population-Based Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rueegg, Corina S.; von der Weid, Nicolas X.; Rebholz, Cornelia E.; Michel, Gisela; Zwahlen, Marcel; Grotzer, Michael; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Healthy lifestyle including sufficient physical activity may mitigate or prevent adverse long-term effects of childhood cancer. We described daily physical activities and sports in childhood cancer survivors and controls, and assessed determinants of both activity patterns. Methodology/Principal Findings The Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a questionnaire survey including all children diagnosed with cancer 1976–2003 at age 0–15 years, registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry, who survived ≥5years and reached adulthood (≥20years). Controls came from the population-based Swiss Health Survey. We compared the two populations and determined risk factors for both outcomes in separate multivariable logistic regression models. The sample included 1058 survivors and 5593 controls (response rates 78% and 66%). Sufficient daily physical activities were reported by 52% (n = 521) of survivors and 37% (n = 2069) of controls (p<0.001). In contrast, 62% (n = 640) of survivors and 65% (n = 3635) of controls reported engaging in sports (p = 0.067). Risk factors for insufficient daily activities in both populations were: older age (OR for ≥35years: 1.5, 95CI 1.2–2.0), female gender (OR 1.6, 95CI 1.3–1.9), French/Italian Speaking (OR 1.4, 95CI 1.1–1.7), and higher education (OR for university education: 2.0, 95CI 1.5–2.6). Risk factors for no sports were: being a survivor (OR 1.3, 95CI 1.1–1.6), older age (OR for ≥35years: 1.4, 95CI 1.1–1.8), migration background (OR 1.5, 95CI 1.3–1.8), French/Italian speaking (OR 1.4, 95CI 1.2–1.7), lower education (OR for compulsory schooling only: 1.6, 95CI 1.2–2.2), being married (OR 1.7, 95CI 1.5–2.0), having children (OR 1.3, 95CI 1.4–1.9), obesity (OR 2.4, 95CI 1.7–3.3), and smoking (OR 1.7, 95CI 1.5–2.1). Type of diagnosis was only associated with sports. Conclusions/Significance Physical activity levels in survivors were lower than recommended, but

  11. Reduced spillover transmission of Mycobacterium bovis to feral pigs (Sus scofa) following population control of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Nugent, G; Whitford, J; Yockney, I J; Cross, M L

    2012-06-01

    In New Zealand, bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is present in domestic cattle and deer herds primarily as the result of on-going disease transmission from the primary wildlife host, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). However, bTB is also present in other introduced free-ranging mammalian species. Between 1996 and 2007, we conducted a series of studies to determine whether poison control of possum populations would have any effect on the prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis infection in sympatric feral pigs (Sus scrofa). We compared trends in the prevalence of bTB infection in feral pigs in six study areas: possum numbers were reduced in three areas, but not in the other three, effectively providing a thrice-replicated before-after-control-intervention design. Before possum control, the overall prevalence of culture-confirmed M. bovis infection in feral pigs was 16.7-94.4%, depending on area. Infection prevalence varied little between genders but did vary with age, increasing during the first 2-3 years of life but then declining in older pigs. In the areas in which possum control was applied, M. bovis prevalence in feral pigs fell to near zero within 2-3 years, provided control was applied successfully at the whole-landscape scale. In contrast, prevalence changed much less or not at all in the areas with no possum control. We conclude that feral pigs in New Zealand acquire M. bovis infection mainly by inter-species transmission from possums, but then rarely pass the disease on to other pigs and are end hosts. This is in contrast to the purported role of pigs as bTB maintenance hosts in other countries, and we suggest the difference in host status may reflect differences in the relative importance of the oral route of infection in different environments. Despite harbouring M. bovis infection for a number of years, pigs in New Zealand do not sustain bTB independently, but are good sentinels for disease prevalence in possum populations. PMID:21849098

  12. Risk Factors for Acute Toxoplasma gondii Diseases in Taiwan: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ting-Yi; Kuo, Ming-Chu; Chen, Chang-Hsun; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Kao, Cheng-Feng; Ji, Dar-Der; Fang, Chi-Tai

    2014-01-01

    Although human toxoplasmosis is a notifiable disease in Taiwan since 2007, little is known about its risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the risk factors for acute Toxoplasma gondii diseases in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide population-based case-control study. Cases of acute human toxoplasmosis notified to the Taiwan Centers for Diseases Control (Taipei, Taiwan) during 2008–2013 were compared with controls that were randomly selected from healthy T. gondii-seronegative blood donors who participated in a nationwide T. gondii seroepidemiologic study during 2009–2010. Cases and controls were matched according to age, gender and residency at an 1∶8 ratio. Structured questionnaires were used to gather information regarding risk factors. A total of 30 laboratory-confirmed acute T. gondii disease cases and 224 controls were enrolled. The most common clinical manifestation of the cases was flu-like symptoms (n = 20), followed by central nervous system disease (n = 4), ocular diseases (n = 3), abortion (n = 2), and congenital infection (n = 1). Multivariate conditional logistic regression showed that raw clam consumption (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–9.9) and having a cat in the household (adjusted OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.1–7.9) were two independent risk factors for acute T. gondii disease. We conclude that raw shellfish consumption and domestic cat exposure were risk factors for acquiring acute T. gondii diseases in Taiwan. This finding may guide future research and control policies. PMID:24609112

  13. Evolutionary dynamics and population control during in vitro selection and amplification with multiple targets.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua; Fan, Xiaochun; Ni, Zhuoyu; Lis, John T

    2002-01-01

    Iterative cycles of in vitro selection and amplification allow rare functional nucleic acid molecules, aptamers, to be isolated from large sequence pools. Here we present an analysis of the progression of a selection experiment that simultaneously yielded two families of RNA aptamers against two disparate targets: the intended target protein (B52/SRp55) and the partitioning matrix. We tracked the sequence abundance and binding activity to reveal the enrichment of the aptamers through successive generations of selected pools. The two aptamer families showed distinct trajectories of evolution, as did members within a single family. We also developed a method to control the relative abundance of an aptamer family in selected pools. This method, involving specific ribonuclease digestion, can be used to reduce the background selection for aptamers that bind the matrix. Additionally, it can be used to isolate a full spectrum of aptamers in a sequential and exhaustive manner for all the different targets in a mixture. PMID:12458799

  14. Determinants of mortality from severe dengue in Brazil: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Giselle Hentzy; de Fátima Duarte, Eliane; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Although increases in severity of mortality from dengue infection have been observed in Brazil, their determinants are not fully known. A case-control study was conducted by using the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, including patients with severe dengue during 2000-2005. Cases were defined as patients that died and controls were those who survived. Hierarchical multivariate logistic regression was performed. During the study period, there were 12,321 severe cases of dengue and 1,062 deaths. Factors independently associated with death included age ≥ 50 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.59-3.29), < 4 years of schooling (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.47-2.28), a rural area (OR =2.84, 95% CI = 2.19-3.69), hospitalization (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.17-1.73), and a high hematocrit (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.85-3.28). Factors associated with a lower chance of dying were female sex (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), history of previous dengue (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.99), positive tourniquet test result (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.33-0.66), laboratory diagnosis of dengue (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.61-0.92), and a platelet count of 50,000-100,000 cells/mm(3) (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The risk profile identified in this study should serve to direct public health interventions to minimize deaths. PMID:23400577

  15. Socioeconomic factors and the risk of anencephaly in a Mexican population: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco Muñoz, Julia; Lacasaña, Marina; Borja Aburto, Victor Hugo; Torres Sánchez, Luisa Elvira; García García, Ana María; López Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to evaluate the association between socioeconomic level (as measured by maternal education, maternal occupation, and monthly family income) and anencephaly. METHODS: The authors conducted a case-control study using data from the Epidemiological Surveillance System Register for Neural Tube Defects for three states of the Mexican Republic: Puebla, Guerrero and the State of Mexico. Mothers of 151 cases of infants born with anencephaly and mothers of 151 control infants born during the period March 2000 to February 2001 were interviewed about their socioeconomic characteristics and other factors including reproductive history, use of prenatal care, use of tobacco and alcohol, fever during pregnancy, and folic acid supplementation. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, a risk gradient was seen with decreasing maternal education. Women with less than a primary school education (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2, 7.6) and women who had completed primary school but had not completed junior high school (adjusted OR=2.2; 95% CI 0.9, 5.7) had higher risks of giving birth to an infant with anencephaly, compared to women with a higher educational level. A monthly income < or = 1,000 pesos (approximately dollars 100 U.S.) was also associated with a higher risk of anencephaly (OR=2.5; 95% CI 1.2, 5.1). Women employed in industry or agriculture during the acute risk period (three months prior to conception to one month after conception) had a risk 6.5 times (95% CI 1.4, 29.6) that of professional and business women. CONCLUSIONS: This study helps to identify groups that may be especially vulnerable to this type of congenital malformation so that primary and secondary preventive strategies can be targeted to these groups. PMID:15736330

  16. Combined effect of hemipteran control and liquid bait on Argentine ant populations.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, R J; Bambara, S B; Silverman, J

    2010-10-01

    The invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), has become a worldwide problem capable of inflicting significant ecological and economic injury on urban, agricultural, and natural environments. The mobility of this pest ant has long been noted, rapidly moving nests to new food resources and then away as resources are depleted. This ant, like many pest ant species, has a special affinity for honeydew excreted by phloem-feeding Hemiptera. We investigated the effect of various hemipteran control strategies on terrapin scale densities and measured their indirect effect on local Argentine ant densities and foraging effort. We then determined whether this indirect treatment strategy improved the performance of an ant bait. We predicted that Argentine ants would move nests away from trees treated for Hemiptera and then move nests back when a liquid bait was offered, followed by a decline in ant numbers due to intake of the toxicant. A horticultural oil spray and soil application of the systemic insecticide, imidacloprid, had no effect on terrapin scale numbers. However, trunk-injected dicrotophos caused a reduction in scale and a decline in local Argentine ant nest density and canopy foraging effort. We also recorded a reduction in local Argentine ant ground foraging when large amounts of liquid bait were applied, and we found no evidence that combining dicrotophos with liquid ant bait performed better than each treatment alone. We suggest that a strategy of combined hemipteran control plus application of liquid ant bait can reduce local Argentine ant densities, when both components of this system are highly efficacious. PMID:21061981

  17. Dietary factors and breast cancer risk: a case control study among a population in Southern France.

    PubMed

    Bessaoud, Faïza; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Gerber, Mariette

    2008-01-01

    This case-control study examined different food groups in relation to breast cancer. Between 2002 and 2004, 437 cases and 922 controls matched according to age and area of residence were interviewed. Diet was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios (Ors) were computed across levels of various dietary intakes identified by two methods: the "classical" and the "spline" methods. Neither of the 2 methods found an association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and breast cancer. Results of the 2 methods showed a nonsignificant decreased association with cooked vegetables intake as well as legumes and fish consumption. Whereas the spline method showed no association, the classical method showed significant associations related to the lowest consumption of raw vegetables or dairy products and breast cancer risk: Adjusted OR for raw vegetable consumption between (67.4 and 101.3 g/day) vs. (< 67.4 g/day) was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.43-0.93]. Adjusted OR for dairy consumption between (134.3 and 271.2 g/day) vs. (< 134.3 g/day) was 1.57 (95% CI = 1.06-2.32). However, the overall results were not consistent. Compared to the classical method, the use of the spline method showed a significant association for cereal, meat, and olive oil. Cereal and olive oil were inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Breast cancer risk increased by 56% for each additional 100 g/day of meat consumption. Studies using novel methodological techniques are needed to confirm the dietary threshold responsible for changes in breast cancer risk. New approaches that consist in analyzing dietary patterns rather than dietary food are necessary. PMID:18444149

  18. Occupational risk factors for small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kaerlev, Linda; Teglbjaerg, Peter Stubbe; Sabroe, Svend; Kolstad, Henrik A; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Eriksson, Mikael; Guénel, Pascal; Hardell, Lennart; Cyr, Diane; Ballard, Terri; Zambon, Paola; Morales Suárez-Varela, María M; Stang, Andreas; Olsen, Jorn

    2002-06-01

    Small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC) is a rare disease of unknown etiology but with an age-, sex-, and place-specific occurrence that may indicate an occupational origin. A European multicenter population-based case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident SBC cases between 35 and 69 years of age (n = 101) were identified, together with 3335 controls sampled from the catchment area of the cases. Histological review performed by a reference pathologist left 99 cases for study; 84 cases and 2070 population controls were interviewed. The industries most closely associated (a twofold or more odds ratio [OR]) with SBC, taking into account a 10-year time lag after exposure were, among women, employment in wholesale industry of food and beverages (OR, 8.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 34.9]) and among men, manufacture of motor vehicle bodies (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 22.4), footwear (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 16.1), and metal structures (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 10.4). The identified high-risk occupations with an OR above 2 were shoemakers, structural metal preparers, construction painters and other construction workers, bookkeepers, machine fitters, and welders (men). The OR for regular occupational use of organic solvents for at least half a year was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.2). Exposure to rust-preventive paint containing lead was suggested as another potential occupational exposure (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 107). This explorative study suggests an association between certain occupational exposures and SBC, but some of these associations could be attributable to chance. All findings should be regarded as tentative. PMID:12085477

  19. Antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase inhibition activity and prostate cancer risk: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Jukka K; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor properties may have prostate cancer preventive effects. We evaluated the association between antiepileptic drug use and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. The study included all new prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Finland in 1995-2002 and matched controls (24,657 case-control pairs) identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Population Register Center, respectively. Information on antiepileptic drug purchases was obtained from the national prescription reimbursement database. Odds ratios and their 95 % confidence intervals were estimated using age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis. Compared to never-users of antiepileptic drugs, the overall prostate cancer risk was decreased among users of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproic acid (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.47, 95 % CI 0.24-0.92; OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.71-0.94, and OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.42-0.92, respectively), but not among users of other antiepileptic drugs. Overall prostate cancer risk decreased in a dose-dependent manner by cumulative amount, duration and yearly dosage (intensity) of HDAC inhibitors valproic acid and carbamazepine. The risk of advanced prostate cancer was decreased only among carbamazepine users (OR 0.65, 95 % CI 0.44-0.96). Our results support possible prostate cancer preventive effects of HDAC inhibitors. However, also phenobarbital use was associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, despite not having HDAC inhibiting activity. The mechanism of action for antiepileptic drugs in prostate cancer deserves further study. PMID:27038166

  20. Driving following Kava Use and Road Traffic Injuries: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Fiji (TRIP 14)

    PubMed Central

    Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Robinson, Elizabeth; Herman, Josephine; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between kava use and the risk of four-wheeled motor vehicle crashes in Fiji. Kava is a traditional beverage commonly consumed in many Pacific Island Countries. Herbal anxiolytics containing smaller doses of kava are more widely available. Methods Data for this population-based case-control study were collected from drivers of ‘case’ vehicles involved in serious injury-involved crashes (where at least one road user was killed or admitted to hospital for 12 hours or more) and ‘control’ vehicles representative of ‘driving time’ in the study base. Structured interviewer administered questionnaires collected self-reported participant data on demographic characteristics and a range of risk factors including kava use and potential confounders. Unconditional logistic regression models estimated odds ratios relating to the association between kava use and injury-involved crash risk. Findings Overall, 23% and 4% of drivers of case and control vehicles, respectively, reported consuming kava in the 12 hours prior to the crash or road survey. After controlling for assessed confounders, driving following kava use was associated with a four-fold increase in the odds of crash involvement (Odds ratio: 4.70; 95% CI: 1.90–11.63). The related population attributable risk was 18.37% (95% CI: 13.77–22.72). Acknowledging limited statistical power, we did not find a significant interaction in this association with concurrent alcohol use. Conclusion In this study conducted in a setting where recreational kava consumption is common, driving following the use of kava was associated with a significant excess of serious-injury involved road crashes. The precautionary principle would suggest road safety strategies should explicitly recommend avoiding driving following kava use, particularly in communities where recreational use is common. PMID:26930404

  1. Key Source Habitats and Potential Dispersal of Triatoma infestans Populations in Northwestern Argentina: Implications for Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Cecere, María C.; Fernández, María del Pilar; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Kitron, Uriel; Cohen, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans —the principal vector of the infection that causes Chagas disease— defies elimination efforts in the Gran Chaco region. This study identifies the types of human-made or -used structures that are key sources of these bugs in the initial stages of house reinfestation after an insecticide spraying campaign. Methodology and Principal Findings We measured demographic and blood-feeding parameters at two geographic scales in 11 rural communities in Figueroa, northwest Argentina. Of 1,297 sites searched in spring, 279 (21.5%) were infested. Bug abundance per site and female fecundity differed significantly among habitat types (ecotopes) and were highly aggregated. Domiciles (human sleeping quarters) had maximum infestation prevalence (38.7%), human-feeding bugs and total egg production, with submaximal values for other demographic and blood-feeding attributes. Taken collectively peridomestic sites were three times more often infested than domiciles. Chicken coops had greater bug abundance, blood-feeding rates, engorgement status, and female fecundity than pig and goat corrals. The host-feeding patterns were spatially structured yet there was strong evidence of active dispersal of late-stage bugs between ecotopes. Two flight indices predicted that female fliers were more likely to originate from kitchens and domiciles, rejecting our initial hypothesis that goat and pig corrals would dominate. Conclusions and Significance Chicken coops and domiciles were key source habitats fueling rapid house reinfestation. Focusing control efforts on ecotopes with human-fed bugs (domiciles, storerooms, goat corrals) would neither eliminate the substantial contributions to bug population growth from kitchens, chicken coops, and pig corrals nor stop dispersal of adult female bugs from kitchens. Rather, comprehensive control of the linked network of ecotopes is required to prevent feeding on humans, bug population growth, and bug dispersal simultaneously. Our

  2. AG490 and PF431396 Sensitive Tyrosine Kinase Control the Population Heterogeneity of Basal STAT1 Activity in Ube1l Deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Now, Hesung; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    A population often contains distinct sub-populations, thereby increasing the complexity of the overall heterogeneity. However, the cellular origin and biological relevance of sub-populations in cell population have not been clearly identified. Here we demonstrated the novel roles of ISGylation, which is an IFN-induced post-translational modification, controlling heterogeneity at the population level in cultured adherent cells. Without UBE1L, an E1 enzyme of ISGylation, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) exhibited low viral resistance despite high STAT1 and ISG expression compared with the wild-type MEF. We observe that Ube1l−/− MEF populations consist of two behaviorally distinguishable sub-populations with distinct basal STAT1 activity, while wild-type MEF populations are unimodal. This population heterogeneity in Ube1l knock-out cells was perturbed by tyrosine kinase inhibitors, AG490 and PF431396. In contrast, the neutralization of type I IFN did not affect population heterogeneity. Based on these results, we concluded that UBE1L functions to adjust basal immunological states with the regulation of population heterogeneity. PMID:27427993

  3. Cadmium exposure and risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort and case-control studies among the general and occupational populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Xun, Pengcheng; Nishijo, Muneko; Carter, Sue; He, Ka

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association of cadmium exposure with the risk of prostate cancer in both the general and occupational populations. Online database searches were performed for studies of prostate cancer risk and cadmium exposure. Twelve cohort studies (5 in the general, 7 in occupational populations) and 9 case-control studies (3 in the general, 6 in occupational populations) were identified. Five/seven cohort studies in the general and occupational populations consist of 78,263/13, 434 participants with a mean follow-up of 12.1/43.0 years, respectively. Case-control studies include 334 cases/670 controls in the general population, and 1,315 cases/4,477 controls in occupational populations. Comparing the highest to the lowest category of cadmium exposure in the general population, the weighted relative risk of prostate cancer incidence and mortality among cohort studies, and the weighted odds ratio in case-control studies were 1.05 (95%CI [0.91, 1.22]), 0.83 (95%CI [0.35, 1.98]), and 1.27 (95%CI [0.58,2.78]), respectively. For occupational populations, the weighted OR in case-control studies was 1.17 (95%CI [0.85, 1.62]), and the weighted standardized mortality ratio in cohort studies was 98 (95%CI [75, 126]). Accumulated epidemiological evidence does not support the hypothesis that cadmium exposure may increase the risk of prostate cancer in either the general or occupational populations. PMID:27174617

  4. Association Between Benzodiazepine Use and Epilepsy Occurrence: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Harnod, Tomor; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective case-control study to evaluate the association between the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) use and epilepsy occurrence by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We recruited 1065 participants who ages 20 years or older and newly diagnosed with epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 345) between 2004 and 2011 and assigned them to the epilepsy group. We subsequently frequency-matched them with participants in a control group (n = 4260) according to sex, age, and index year at a 1:4 ratio. A logistic regression model was employed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for association of epilepsy with BZD exposure. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to estimate the dose-response relationship between BZD levels and epilepsy risk. The adjusted OR (aOR) for the association of epilepsy with BZD exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68-2.42). The aOR for an average BZD dose increased to 1.26 for the participants on <0.01 defined daily dose (DDD), and increased to 4.32 for those on ≥1.50 DDD. On average, when the DDD of BZD exposure increased by 100 units, the epilepsy risk increase by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01-1.04, P = 0.003). The annual BZD exposure day ranges were significantly associated with epilepsy (2-7 days: aOR = 1.67; 8-35 days: aOR = 3.16; and ≥35 days: aOR = 5.60). Whenever the annual BZD exposure increased by 30 days, the risk of epilepsy notably increased by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01-1.04, P < 0.001). In addition, users who quit BZD for more than 6 months still exhibited a higher risk of epilepsy than did the non-BZD users. A considerable increase in epilepsy occurrence was observed in ones with BZD use, particularly in those with prolonged use, multiple exposure, and high-dose consumption. PMID:26376408

  5. The use of risk assessment to decide the control strategy for bluetongue in Italian ruminant populations.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Armando; MacDiarmid, Stuart; Calistri, Paolo; Conte, Annamaria; Savini, Lara; Nannini, Donatella; Weber, Steve

    2004-12-01

    The affiliation, assessment and management of risks is a traditional part of veterinary medicine. In the past, veterinary services involved in this type of activity usually assessed risks qualitatively. However, since the 1990s, quantitative methods have become increasingly important. The establishment of the World Trade Organization in 1994, and the promulgation of its Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the "SPS Agreement") led to an increased application of import risk analysis and to significant improvements in the methodology of risk analysis as applied to international trade policy for animals and animal products. However, there was very little development of risk analysis in veterinary fields other than international trade and management of health risks to consumers of animal products and little has been published on its use in the choice and definition of control or prophylaxis strategies for animal diseases. This article describes a quantitative risk assessment, which was undertaken in Italy to help choose an appropriate national response strategy following an incursion of bluetongue, an infectious disease of sheep and goats. The results obtained in this study support the use of risk analysis as a tool to assist in choosing an appropriate animal disease management strategy. The use of risk analysis in the evaluation of disease management strategies also offers advantages in international trade. It makes easier the comparison of different strategies applied in the various countries, and thus facilitates the assessment of equivalence of the guarantees provided by different strategies. PMID:15660625

  6. Identifying gender differences in reported occupational information from three U.S. population-based case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Sarah J.; Colt, Joanne S.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Armenti, Karla R.; Baris, Dalsu; Blair, Aaron; Cerhan, James R.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Faith; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Hartge, Patricia; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Severson, Richard; Silverman, Debra T.; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence suggests that gender-blind assessment of exposure may introduce exposure misclassification, but few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries. We pooled control responses to job-, industry-, and exposure-specific questionnaires (modules) that asked detailed questions about work activities from three US population-based case-control studies to examine gender differences in work tasks and their frequencies. Methods We calculated the ratio of female to male controls that completed each module. For four job modules (assembly worker, machinist, health professional, janitor/cleaner) and for subgroups of jobs that completed those modules, we evaluated gender differences in task prevalence and frequency using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests, respectively. Results The 1,360 female and 2,245 male controls reported 6,033 and 12,083 jobs, respectively. Gender differences in female:male module completion ratios were observed for 39 of 45 modules completed by ≥20 controls. Gender differences in task prevalence varied in direction and magnitude. For example, female janitors were significantly more likely to polish furniture (79% vs. 44%), while male janitors were more likely to strip floors (73% vs. 50%). Women usually reported more time spent on tasks than men. For example, the median hours per week spent degreasing for production workers in product manufacturing industries was 6.3 for women and 3.0 for men. Conclusions Observed gender differences may reflect actual differences in tasks performed or differences in recall, reporting, or perception, all of which contribute to exposure misclassification and impact relative risk estimates. Our findings reinforce the need to capture subject-specific information on work tasks. PMID:24683012

  7. Disease and disaster: Optimal deployment of epidemic control facilities in a spatially heterogeneous population with changing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Gaythorpe, Katy; Adams, Ben

    2016-05-21

    Epidemics of water-borne infections often follow natural disasters and extreme weather events that disrupt water management processes. The impact of such epidemics may be reduced by deployment of transmission control facilities such as clinics or decontamination plants. Here we use a relatively simple mathematical model to examine how demographic and environmental heterogeneities, population behaviour, and behavioural change in response to the provision of facilities, combine to determine the optimal configurations of limited numbers of facilities to reduce epidemic size, and endemic prevalence. We show that, if the presence of control facilities does not affect behaviour, a good general rule for responsive deployment to minimise epidemic size is to place them in exactly the locations where they will directly benefit the most people. However, if infected people change their behaviour to seek out treatment then the deployment of facilities offering treatment can lead to complex effects that are difficult to foresee. So careful mathematical analysis is the only way to get a handle on the optimal deployment. Behavioural changes in response to control facilities can also lead to critical facility numbers at which there is a radical change in the optimal configuration. So sequential improvement of a control strategy by adding facilities to an existing optimal configuration does not always produce another optimal configuration. We also show that the pre-emptive deployment of control facilities has conflicting effects. The configurations that minimise endemic prevalence are very different to those that minimise epidemic size. So cost-benefit analysis of strategies to manage endemic prevalence must factor in the frequency of extreme weather events and natural disasters. PMID:26992574

  8. Body Mass Index, Smoking and Hypertensive Disorders during Pregnancy: A Population Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gudnadóttir, Thuridur A; Bateman, Brian T; Hernádez-Díaz, Sonia; Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur; Zoega, Helga

    2016-01-01

    While obesity is an indicated risk factor for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy has been shown to be inversely associated with the development of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effects of high body mass index and smoking on hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. This was a case-control study based on national registers, nested within all pregnancies in Iceland 1989-2004, resulting in birth at the Landspitali University Hospital. Cases (n = 500) were matched 1:2 with women without a hypertensive diagnosis who gave birth in the same year. Body mass index (kg/m2) was based on height and weight at 10-15 weeks of pregnancy. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals as measures of association, adjusting for potential confounders and tested for additive and multiplicative interactions of body mass index and smoking. Women's body mass index during early pregnancy was positively associated with each hypertensive outcome. Compared with normal weight women, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio for any hypertensive disorder was 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.3) for overweight women and 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.3) for obese women. The odds ratio for any hypertensive disorder with obesity was 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.8-8.6) among smokers and 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1-4.3) among non-smokers. The effect estimates for hypertensive disorders with high body mass index appeared more pronounced among smokers than non-smokers, although the observed difference was not statistically significant. Our findings may help elucidate the complicated interplay of these lifestyle-related factors with the hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. PMID:27010734

  9. Body Mass Index, Smoking and Hypertensive Disorders during Pregnancy: A Population Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gudnadóttir, Thuridur A.; Bateman, Brian T.; Hernádez-Díaz, Sonia; Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur; Zoega, Helga

    2016-01-01

    While obesity is an indicated risk factor for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy has been shown to be inversely associated with the development of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effects of high body mass index and smoking on hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. This was a case-control study based on national registers, nested within all pregnancies in Iceland 1989–2004, resulting in birth at the Landspitali University Hospital. Cases (n = 500) were matched 1:2 with women without a hypertensive diagnosis who gave birth in the same year. Body mass index (kg/m2) was based on height and weight at 10–15 weeks of pregnancy. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals as measures of association, adjusting for potential confounders and tested for additive and multiplicative interactions of body mass index and smoking. Women’s body mass index during early pregnancy was positively associated with each hypertensive outcome. Compared with normal weight women, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio for any hypertensive disorder was 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3–2.3) for overweight women and 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.2–4.3) for obese women. The odds ratio for any hypertensive disorder with obesity was 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.8–8.6) among smokers and 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1–4.3) among non-smokers. The effect estimates for hypertensive disorders with high body mass index appeared more pronounced among smokers than non-smokers, although the observed difference was not statistically significant. Our findings may help elucidate the complicated interplay of these lifestyle-related factors with the hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. PMID:27010734

  10. Statins are Associated With a Reduced Risk of Brain Cancer: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian K; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether statin utilization is associated with brain cancer risk.A population-based case-control study was conducted using nationally representative claims data from the National Health Insurance Bureau in Taiwan. Cases included all patients 50 years and older who received an index diagnosis of brain cancer between 2004 and 2011. Our controls were matched by age, sex, and index date. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression.We examined 213 brain cancer cases and 852 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.50-1.18) and the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.37-0.96). Compared with no use of statins, the adjusted ORs were 0.68 (95% CI = 0.38-1.24) for the group having been prescribed with statins with cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) below 144.67 DDDs and 0.50 (95% CI = 0.28-0.97) for the group with the cumulative statin use of 144.67 DDDs or more.The results of this study suggest that statins may reduce the risk of brain cancer. PMID:27124024

  11. Health Care Visits as a Risk Factor for Tuberculosis in Taiwan: A Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sung-Ching; Chen, Chien-Chou; Chiang, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Fang, Chi-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess whether health care visits of nontuberculous patients are a risk factor for contracting tuberculosis. Methods. We conducted a case–control study nested within the cohort of 1 million individuals from the health insurance database in Taiwan between 2003 and 2010. We identified incident cases of tuberculosis through International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and prescription of antituberculosis drugs. We identified 4202 case participants and 16 808 control participants matched by age, gender, and date of diagnosis to estimate the association between frequency of health care visits and incidence of tuberculosis. Results. Frequency of health care visits was associated with increased risk of tuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner after adjustment for other medical comorbidities (P for trend < .001). Compared with individuals with fewer than 5 visits per year, those with more than 30 had a 77% increase in tuberculosis risk (adjusted odds ratio = 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.60, 1.97). Conclusions. Frequent health care visits of nontuberculous patients appear to be a risk factor for contracting tuberculosis. Public Health Implications. Efforts should focus on educating the general population to avoid unnecessary hospital visits, strengthening active case finding, and intensifying infection control in all health care settings. PMID:27196655

  12. Where do these bugs come from? Phenotypic structure of Triatoma infestans populations after control interventions in the Argentine Chaco.

    PubMed

    Gaspe, María Sol; Provecho, Yael Mariana; Piccinali, Romina Valeria; Gürtler, Ricardo Esteban

    2015-05-01

    House re-invasion by native triatomines after insecticide-based control campaigns represents a major threat for Chagas disease vector control. We conducted a longitudinal intervention study in a rural section (Area III, 407 houses) of Pampa del Indio, northeastern Argentina, and used wing geometric morphometry to compare pre-spray and post-spray (re-infestant bugs) Triatoma infestans populations. The community-wide spraying with pyrethroids reduced the prevalence of house infestation by T. infestans from 31.9% to < 1% during a four-year follow-up, unlike our previous studies in the neighbouring Area I. Two groups of bug collection sites differing in wing shape variables before interventions (including 221 adults from 11 domiciles) were used as a reference for assigning 44 post-spray adults. Wing shape variables from post-spray, high-density bug colonies and pre-spray groups were significantly different, suggesting that re-infestant insects had an external origin. Insects from one house differed strongly in wing shape variables from all other specimens. A further comparison between insects from both areas supported the existence of independent re-infestation processes within the same district. These results point to local heterogeneities in house re-infestation dynamics and emphasise the need to expand the geographic coverage of vector surveillance and control operations to the affected region. PMID:25946158

  13. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with related controls within a unique African American population

    PubMed Central

    Barnado, A; Wheless, L; Meyer, AK; Gilkeson, GS; Kamen, DL

    2012-01-01

    The patient’s perspective of how their health affects their function is health-related quality of life (HRQOL). HRQOL is poorer in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Few HRQOL studies in SLE patients have focused on African Americans despite an increased disease burden compared with Caucasians. The African American Gullah population of South Carolina has a homogeneous genetic and environmental background and a high prevalence of multi-patient families with SLE. Demographics, medical history, and Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were measured within a cohort of Gullah SLE cases and related controls. Compared with related controls (n = 37), cases (n = 89) had a lower Physical Component Summary (PCS, 41.8 vs. 52.3, p < 0.01), but not Mental Component Summary (MCS, 55.0 vs. 56.0, p = 0.70). The difference in PCS was no longer significant upon adjustment for working status, disability, and medical conditions. None of the 11 SLE American College of Rheumatology criteria, disease duration, or Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index were associated with either PCS or MCS. Cases and controls had similar MCS scores. We hypothesize that this lack of effect of SLE on MCS may be due to disease-coping mechanisms interplaying with cultural factors unique to the Gullah. PMID:22031537

  14. Environmentally friendly tool to control mosquito populations without risk of insecticide resistance: the Lehmann’s funnel entry trap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current malaria control strategies have cut down the malaria burden in many endemic areas, however the emergence and rapid spread of insecticide and drug resistance undermine the success of these efforts. There is growing concern that malaria eradication will not be achieved without the introduction of novel control tools. One approach that has been developed in the last few years is based on house screening to reduce indoor mosquito vector densities and consequently decrease malaria transmission. Here screening and trapping were combined in one tool to control mosquito populations. The trap does not require an insecticide or even an attractant, yet it effectively collects incoming resistant and susceptible mosquitoes and kills them. Results Performance of the funnel entry trap was tested in low and high malaria vector density areas. An overall reduction of 70 to 80% of mosquito density was seen in both. Species and molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae identification indicated no variation in the number of Anopheles arabiensis and the molecular forms of An. gambiae between houses and traps. Mosquitoes collected in the traps and in houses were highly resistant to pyrethroids (0.9 kdr-based mechanism). Conclusion There is a global consensus that new intervention tools are needed to cross the last miles in malaria elimination/eradication. The funnel entry trap showed excellent promise in suppressing mosquito densities even in area of high insecticide resistance. It requires no chemicals and is self-operated. PMID:23758904

  15. The Genetic Control of Grain Protein Content under Variable Nitrogen Supply in an Australian Wheat Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Mahjourimajd, Saba; Taylor, Julian; Rengel, Zed; Khabaz-Saberi, Hossein; Kuchel, Haydn; Okamoto, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation has been observed in both protein concentration in wheat grain and total protein content (protein yield). Here we describe the genetic analysis of variation for grain protein in response to nitrogen (N) supply and locate significant genomic regions controlling grain protein components in a spring wheat population. In total, six N use efficiency (NUE) field trials were carried out for the target traits in a sub-population of doubled haploid lines derived from a cross between two Australian varieties, RAC875 and Kukri, in Southern and Western Australia from 2011 to 2013. Twenty-four putative Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for protein-related traits were identified at high and low N supply and ten QTL were identified for the response to N for the traits studied. These loci accounted for a significant proportion of the overall effect of N supply. Several of the regions were co-localised with grain yield QTL and are promising targets for further investigation and selection in breeding programs. PMID:27438012

  16. The Genetic Control of Grain Protein Content under Variable Nitrogen Supply in an Australian Wheat Mapping Population.

    PubMed

    Mahjourimajd, Saba; Taylor, Julian; Rengel, Zed; Khabaz-Saberi, Hossein; Kuchel, Haydn; Okamoto, Mamoru; Langridge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation has been observed in both protein concentration in wheat grain and total protein content (protein yield). Here we describe the genetic analysis of variation for grain protein in response to nitrogen (N) supply and locate significant genomic regions controlling grain protein components in a spring wheat population. In total, six N use efficiency (NUE) field trials were carried out for the target traits in a sub-population of doubled haploid lines derived from a cross between two Australian varieties, RAC875 and Kukri, in Southern and Western Australia from 2011 to 2013. Twenty-four putative Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for protein-related traits were identified at high and low N supply and ten QTL were identified for the response to N for the traits studied. These loci accounted for a significant proportion of the overall effect of N supply. Several of the regions were co-localised with grain yield QTL and are promising targets for further investigation and selection in breeding programs. PMID:27438012

  17. Prevalence of cardiac sarcoidosis in white population: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Martusewicz-Boros, Magdalena M.; Boros, Piotr W.; Wiatr, Elżbieta; Zych, Jacek; Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a life-threatening and underdiagnosed manifestation of the disease, which requires a complicated and expensive diagnostic pathway. There is a need for simple tool for practitioners to determine the risk of CS without access to specialized equipment. The aim of study was to determine the prevalence of CS in a group of patients diagnosed with or followed up because of sarcoidosis. A secondary objective was the search for factors associated with heart involvement. We performed a prospective case–control study (screening analysis) in consecutive sarcoidosis patients collected from October 2012 to September 2015. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging was performed to confirm or exclude cardiac involvement in all patients. The study was conducted in a hospital-based referral center for patients with sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases. Analysis was performed in a group of 201 patients (all white) with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis, mean age 41.4 ± 10.2, 121 of them (60.2%) males. Four patients with previously recognized cardiac diseases, which make CMR imaging for CS inconclusive, were not included. Cardiac involvement was detected by CMR in 49 patients (24.4%). Factors associated with an increased risk of CS (univariate analyses) included male sex (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 1.21–5.16, P = 0.01), cardiac-related symptoms (OR: 3.53; 1.81–6.89, P = 0.0002), extrathoracic sarcoidosis (OR: 3.48; 1.77–6.84, P = 0.0003), elevated serum NT-proBNP (OR: 3.82; 1.55–9.42, P = 0.004), any electrocardiography abnormality (OR: 5.38; 2.48–11.67, P = 0.0001), and contemporary radiological progression sarcoidosis in the lungs (OR: 2.98; 1.52–5.84, P = 0.001). Abnormalities in echocardiography and Holter ECG were also risk factors, but not significant in multivariate analyses. A CS Risk Index was developed using a multivariate model to predict CS, achieving an accuracy of 82%, sensitivity of 50

  18. Association of gastrointestinal gland cancer susceptibility loci with esophageal carcinoma among the Chinese Han population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqi; Zhang, Baoping; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Long; Geng, Tingting; Li, Haipeng; Fu, Xiaowei; Xue, Xiaolei; Liu, Mingwei; Tong, Ruifeng; Jin, Tianbo; Zhang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a common malignancy worldwide. Previous studies indicated that gastrointestinal gland cancer and EC share some susceptibility loci. Our aim was to identify new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with EC by investigating whether known gastrointestinal cancers susceptibility loci are found in EC patients. A Chinese Han population case-control study was conducted to assess SNP associations with EC risk. Twenty-six SNPs were selected from gastrointestinal cancer susceptibility loci, and 360 EC patients and 310 controls were genotyped for these SNPs using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. The association of SNP frequencies with EC was analyzed by chi-square tests, and genetic model analysis. After Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) p value screening, we