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Sample records for age-matched control rats

  1. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  2. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  3. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  4. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  5. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O’Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite® system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns. PMID:26957776

  6. Sensorimotor Control of Tracking Movements at Various Speeds for Stroke Patients as Well as Age-Matched and Young Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Di; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2015-01-01

    There are aging- and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control in daily activities, but their mechanisms have not been well investigated. This study explored speed-, aging-, and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control. Eleven stroke patients (affected sides and unaffected sides) and 20 control subjects (10 young and 10 age-matched individuals) were enrolled to perform elbow tracking tasks using sinusoidal trajectories, which included 6 target speeds (15.7, 31.4, 47.1, 62.8, 78.5, and 94.2 deg/s). The actual elbow angle was recorded and displayed on a screen as visual feedback, and three indicators, the root mean square error (RMSE), normalized integrated jerk (NIJ) and integral of the power spectrum density of normalized speed (IPNS), were used to investigate the strategy of sensorimotor control. Both NIJ and IPNS had significant differences among the four groups (P<0.01), and the values were ranked in the following order: young controls < age-matched controls control. The RMSE increased with the increase in the target speed and the NIJ and IPNS initially declined and then remained steady for all four groups, which indicated a shift from feedback to feedforward control as the target speed increased. The feedback-feedforward trade-off induced by stroke, aging and speed might be explained by a change in the transmission delay and neuromotor noise. The findings in this study improve our understanding of the mechanism underlying the sensorimotor control and neurological changes caused by stroke and aging. PMID:26030289

  7. Stable Schizophrenia Patients Learn Equally Well as Age-Matched Controls and Better than Elderly Controls in Two Sensorimotor Rotary Pursuit Tasks

    PubMed Central

    De Picker, Livia J.; Cornelis, Claudia; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Fransen, Erik; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sensorimotor performance and learning in stable schizophrenia patients, healthy age- and sex-matched controls and elderly controls on two variations of the rotary pursuit: circle pursuit (true motor learning) and figure pursuit (motor and sequence learning). Method: In the circle pursuit, a target circle, rotating with increasing speed along a predictable circular path on the computer screen, must be followed by a cursor controlled by a pen on a writing tablet. In the eight-trial figure pursuit, subjects learn to draw a complex figure by pursuing the target circle that moves along an invisible trajectory between and around several goals. Tasks were administered thrice (day 1, day 2, day 7) to 30 patients with stable schizophrenia (S), 30 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (C), and 30 elderly participants (>65 years; E) and recorded with a digitizing tablet and pressure-sensitive pen. The outcome measure accuracy (% of time that cursor is within the target) was used to assess performance. Results: We observed significant group differences in accuracy, both in circle and figure pursuit tasks (E < S < C, p < 0.01). Strong learning effects were found in each group. Learning curves were similar in circle pursuit but differed between groups in figure pursuit. When corrected for group differences in starting level, the learning gains over the three sessions of schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls were equal and both were larger than those of the elderly controls. Conclusion: Despite the reduced sensorimotor performance that was found in the schizophrenia patients, their sensorimotor learning seems to be preserved. The relevance of this finding for the evaluation of procedural learning in schizophrenia is discussed. The better performance and learning rate of the patients compared to the elderly controls was unexpected and deserves further study. PMID:25505425

  8. Immunity in young adult survivors of childhood leukemia is similar to the elderly rather than age-matched controls: Role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Azanan, Mohamad Shafiq; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; Chua, Ling Ling; Lum, Su Han; Abdul Ghafar, Sayyidatul Syahirah; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul; Lewin, Sharon R; Woo, Yin Ling; Ariffin, Hany; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Many treatment complications that occur late in childhood cancer survivors resemble age-related comorbidities observed in the elderly. An immune phenotype characterized by increased immune activation, systemic inflammation, and accumulation of late-differentiated memory CD57(+) CD28(-) T cells has been associated with comorbidities in the elderly. Here, we explored if this phenotype was present in young adult leukemia survivors following an average of 19 years from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy completion, and compared this with that in age-matched controls. We found that markers of systemic inflammation-IL-6 and human C-reactive protein and immune activation-CD38 and HLA-DR on T cells, soluble CD (sCD)163 from monocytes and macrophages-were increased in survivors compared to controls. T-cell responses specific to cytomegalovirus (CMV) were also increased in survivors compared to controls while CMV IgG levels in survivors were comparable to levels measured in the elderly (>50years) and correlated with IL-6, human C-reactive protein, sCD163, and CD57(+) CD28(-) memory T cells. Immune activation and inflammation markers correlated poorly with prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy exposure. These data suggest that CMV infection/reactivation is strongly correlated with the immunological phenotype seen in young childhood leukemia survivors and these changes may be associated with the early onset of age-related comorbidities in this group. PMID:27129782

  9. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  10. No consistent difference in gray matter volume between individuals with fibromyalgia and age-matched healthy subjects when controlling for affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Michael C; Harris, Richard E; Sundgren, Pia C; Welsh, Robert C; Fernandes, Carlo R; Clauw, Daniel J; Williams, David A

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for the presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p< or =.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={-28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=-.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  11. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  12. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as “the ball is above the cup”, where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6–11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as “the cup is above the drum” or “the bird is below the hat”. Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children’s scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of

  13. Intensively managed young children with type 1 diabetes consume high-fat, low-fiber diets similar to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sanjeev N; Volkening, Lisa K; Quinn, Nicolle; Laffel, Lori M B

    2014-05-01

    Despite significant emphasis on nutrition, older children with diabetes demonstrate poor dietary quality. We tested the hypothesis that dietary quality in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) would be better than age-matched children in the US population. Dietary data from children with T1D (n = 67) aged 2 to 12 years attending a pediatric diabetes clinic were compared with a nationally representative, age-matched sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 1691). Multiple 24-hour dietary recalls were used. Recommended intakes were based on national guidelines, and dietary quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. More children with T1D were overweight or obese compared with children participating in NHANES (42% vs 30%, P = .04). Greater proportions of children with T1D met daily recommendations for vegetables (22% vs 13%, P = .03), whole grains (12% vs 5%, P = .005), and dairy (55% vs 36%, P = .001) compared with NHANES children, whereas similar proportions met daily fruit recommendations (40% vs 33%, P = .2). Less than one-third of all children limited total fat to recommended levels; children with T1D consumed more saturated fat than did NHANES children (14% vs 12% total energy intake, P = .0009). Fiber intakes were very low in both groups. Compared with NHANES children, children with T1D had higher Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores (59.6 vs 49.7, P = .0006) primarily because of lower intakes of added sugars. The nutritional intake of young children with T1D remains suboptimal in the contemporary era of diabetes management. Despite focused nutrition management, young children with T1D consume high-fat, low-fiber diets comparable with youth in the general population. PMID:24916556

  14. Assessment of the cardiac autonomic neuropathy among the known diabetics and age-matched controls using noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests in a South-Indian population: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sukla, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Rao, Nambaru Lakshmana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a rural area of South India, among the known diabetics after comparing them with the age-matched healthy controls, utilizing noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was conducted for 4 months (October 2014 to January 2015) at an Urban Health and Training Center (UHTC) of a Medical College located in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu. The study was conducted among 126 diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients and in 152 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to ensure comparability between the cases and controls and, thus, reduce variability due to demographic variables. All the study subjects (cases and controls) were selected from the patients attending UHTC during the study duration, provided they satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study participants were subjected to undergo noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. The associations were tested using paired t-test for the continuous (mean ± standard deviation) variables. Results: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2% (67/126). On further classification, positive (abnormal) results were obtained in 56 (sympathetic – 44.4%) and 51 (parasympathetic – 40.5%) diabetic cases. Overall, heart rate variation during deep breathing was found to be the most sensitive test to detect parasympathetic autonomic neuropathy while the diastolic blood pressure response to sustained handgrip exercise was the most sensitive method to detect sympathetic neuropathy dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2%. Even though cardiac autonomic neuropathy can be detected by various invasive tests, noninvasive tests remain a key tool to detect

  15. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  16. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  17. Analysis of abstract and concrete word processing in persons with aphasia and age-matched neurologically healthy adults using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-08-01

    The concreteness effect occurs in both normal and language-disordered populations. Research suggests that abstract and concrete concepts elicit differing neural activation patterns in healthy young adults, but this is undocumented in persons with aphasia (PWA). Three PWA and three age-matched controls were scanned using fMRI while processing abstract and concrete words. Consistent with current theories of abstract and concrete word processing, abstract words elicited activation in verbal areas, whereas concrete words additionally activated multimodal association areas. PWA show greater differences in neural activation than age-matched controls between abstract and concrete words, possibly due to an exaggerated concreteness effect. PMID:23548150

  18. Progesterone Treatment Shows Benefit in Female Rats in a Pediatric Model of Controlled Cortical Impact Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Rastafa I.; Peterson, Bethany L.; Stein, Donald G.; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We recently showed that progesterone treatment can reduce lesion size and behavioral deficits after moderate-to-severe bilateral injury to the medial prefrontal cortex in immature male rats. Whether there are important sex differences in response to injury and progesterone treatment in very young subjects has not been given sufficient attention. Here we investigated progesterone’s effects in the same model of brain injury but with pre-pubescent females. Methods Twenty-eight-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats received sham (n = 14) or controlled cortical impact (CCI) (n = 21) injury, were given progesterone (8 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle injections on post-injury days (PID) 1–7, and underwent behavioral testing from PID 9–27. Brains were evaluated for lesion size at PID 28. Results Lesion size in vehicle-treated female rats with CCI injury was smaller than that previously reported for similarly treated age-matched male rats. Treatment with progesterone reduced the effect of CCI on extent of damage and behavioral deficits. Conclusion Pre-pubescent female rats with midline CCI injury to the frontal cortex have reduced morphological and functional deficits following progesterone treatment. While gender differences in susceptibility to this injury were observed, progesterone treatment produced beneficial effects in young rats of both sexes following CCI. PMID:26799561

  19. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 22 Age Matched Male and Female Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek; Masiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this electrophysiological neuroimaging study was to provide a deeper mechanistic understanding of both olanzapine and risperidone pharmacodynamics relative to gender. In doing so, we age-matched 22 men and women and evaluated their resting-state EEG recordings and later used standard low resolution brain Electrotomography to visualize the differences in brain activity amongst the two patient groups. Methods In this investigation, electroencephalogram (EEG) data were analyzed from male and female schizophrenia patients treated with either olanzapine or risperidone, both atypical antipsychotics, during their in-patient stay at the Department of Psychiatry. Twenty-two males and females were age-matched and EEG recordings were analyzed from 19 Ag/AgCl electrodes. Thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). 3D statistical non-paramentric maps for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were finally computed. Results The results indicated that, relative to males patients, females schizophrenia patients had increased neuronal synchronization in delta frequency, slow-wave, EEG band located in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, within the middle frontal gyrus (t= -2.881, p < 0.03580). These findings suggest that females experience greater dopamine (D2) receptor and serotonin (5-HT2) receptor neuronal blockade relative to age-matched males. Further, our finding provided insight to the pharmacodynamics of second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone. Conclusion When compared to male patients, female patients, suffering from schizophrenia, have D2 and 5-HT2 receptors that are blocked more readily than age-matched male schizophrenia patients. Clinically, this may translate into a quicker time to treatment-response in females as compared to male patients. PMID:26617679

  20. Clitoria ternatea root extract enhances acetylcholine content in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rai, K S; Murthy, K D; Karanth, K S; Nalini, K; Rao, M S; Srinivasan, K K

    2002-12-01

    Treatment with 100 mg/kg of Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract (CTR), for 30 days in neonatal and young adult age groups of rat, significantly increased acetylcholine (ACh) content in their hippocampi as compared to age matched controls. Increase in ACh content in their hippocampus may be the neurochemical basis for their improved learning and memory. PMID:12490229

  1. Type 2 diabetes alters bone and marrow blood flow and vascular control mechanisms in the ZDF rat

    PubMed Central

    Stabley, John N.; Prisby, Rhonda D.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Bone health and cardiovascular function are compromised in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether skeletal vascular control mechanisms are altered during the progression of T2DM in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. Responses of the principal nutrient artery (PNA) of the femur from obese ZDF rats with prediabetes, short-term diabetes, and long-term diabetes to endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and –independent (sodium nitroprusside) vasodilation, and KCl, norepinephrine and myogenic vasoconstrictor were determined in vitro. Few changes in the PNA vasomotor responses occurred in the pre-diabetic and short-term diabetic conditions. Endothelium-dependent and –independent vasodilation were reduced, and norepinephrine and myogenic vasoconstriction were enhanced in obese ZDF rats with long-term diabetes relative to lean age-matched controls. Differences in endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the femoral PNA between ZDF rats and controls were abolished by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The passive pressure-diameter response of the femoral PNA was also lower across a range of intraluminal pressures with long-term T2DM. Regional bone and marrow perfusion and vascular conductance, measured in vivo using radiolabeled microspheres, were lower in obese ZDF rats with long-term diabetes. These findings suggest that the profound impairment of the bone circulation may contribute to the osteopenia found to occur in long bones with chronic T2DM. PMID:25817711

  2. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  3. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  4. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17 015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample. PMID:26538188

  5. Heroin snorters versus injectors: comparison on drug use and treatment outcome in age-matched samples.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M J; Chutuape, M A; Stitzer, M L

    1998-12-01

    Drug use histories and treatment outcomes were compared for age, race and gender-matched samples of intravenous (IV; n = 28) versus intranasal (IN; n = 28) opiate abusers entering a 3-day inpatient detoxification unit. Data were derived from the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) interview. Both groups reported daily heroin use prior to detoxification, but IV users reported more days of alcohol and multiple drug use during the past 30 days. Despite age matching, IV users also started using alcohol at an earlier age and accumulated more lifetime months of regular alcohol, cocaine and multidrug use. IV users were more likely to enter treatment following the detox, but no significant outcome differences were noted at 1 and 3 months post-detoxification. The results show that intravenous, as compared to intranasal, opiate users have both a more severe pattern and a more extensive history of the use of non-opiate drugs. PMID:10933336

  6. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  7. Weight control and restraint of laboratory rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Van Breda Kolff, K.

    1979-01-01

    The use of restrained and confined rats in some procedures used in combustion toxicology introduces the problems of obtaining rats of the appropriate size for the apparatus, and of identifying any artifacts resulting from the use of restraint alone. Feeding studies indicate that controlled feeding of fast-growing strains such as the Sprague-Dawley can hold rat size essentially constant for significant periods of time. The undesirable aspects are the need to cage the animals individually, with resultant psychological as well as metabolic effects. Restraint studies of slow-growing strains such as the Fischer 344 indicate that denying access to food and water for periods of several hours at a time interrupts normal gain only temporarily.

  8. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  9. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  10. Secreted proteome profiling in human RPE cell cultures derived from donors with age related macular degeneration and age matched healthy donors.

    PubMed

    An, Eunkyung; Lu, Xiaoning; Flippin, Jessica; Devaney, Joseph M; Halligan, Brian; Hoffman, Eric P; Hoffman, Eric; Strunnikova, Nataly; Csaky, Karl; Hathout, Yetrib

    2006-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by progressive loss of central vision, which is attributed to abnormal accumulation of macular deposits called "drusen" at the interface between the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane. In the most severe cases, drusen deposits are accompanied by the growth of new blood vessels that breach the RPE layer and invade photoreceptors. In this study, we hypothesized that RPE secreted proteins are responsible for drusen formation and choroidal neovascularization. We used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with LC-MS/MS analysis and ZoomQuant quantification to assess differential protein secretion by RPE cell cultures prepared from human autopsy eyes of AMD donors (diagnosed by histological examinations of the macula and genotyped for the Y402H-complement factor H variant) and age-matched healthy control donors. In general, RPE cells were found to secrete a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, complement factors, and protease inhibitors that have been reported to be major constituents of drusen (hallmark deposits in AMD). Interestingly, RPE cells from AMD donors secreted 2 to 3-fold more galectin 3 binding protein, fibronectin, clusterin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and pigment epithelium derived factor than RPE cells from age-matched healthy donors. Conversely, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) was found to be down regulated by 2-fold in AMD RPE cells versus healthy RPE cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis grouped these differentially secreted proteins into two groups; those involved in tissue development and angiogenesis and those involved in complement regulation and protein aggregation such as clusterin. Overall, these data strongly suggest that RPE cells are involved in the biogenesis of drusen and the pathology of AMD. PMID:17022631

  11. Control of ribosome formation in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes of 9 days duration produced a 17% diminution in the rate of total protein synthesis in rat hearts perfused as Langendorff preparations supplied with glucose, plasma levels of amino acids, and 400 ..mu..U/ml insulin. This reduction was attributable to a decrease in efficiency of protein synthesis and total RNA content. Total messenger RNA content decreased in diabetic hearts in proportion to the reduction in total RNA. Diabetes also resulted in diminished ribosome content as reflected by the induction in total RNA. Ribosome production was investigated by monitoring incorporation of (/sup 3/H)phenylalanine into the proteins of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Rates of ribosome formation in diabetic hearts were as fast as control rates in the presence of insulin, and were faster than control rates in the absence of the hormone. These results indicated that ribosome content fell in diabetic hearts despite unchanged or faster rates of ribosome formation.

  12. Inhomogeneous derangement of cardiac autonomic nerve control in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Shamarendra Nath; Arita, Makoto; Ono, Katsushige

    2002-03-01

    The present study compared autonomic nervous function in Kob [Spontaneously Diabetic, Bio-Breeding (BB)] rats with control Wistar rats to determine the development of cardiac neuropathy in diabetic rats. Telemetric ECG signals were obtained from an ECG radio-transmitter placed in a dorsal subcutaneous pouch of male Kob and Wistar rats for 30min every 6h at a sample rate of 5kHz. Heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) were analyzed in each group by power spectrograms obtained by a fast Fourier transform algorithm. RR interval, total power (TP), low frequency (LF) power (0.04-0.67 Hz), high frequency (HF) power (0.79-1.48 Hz) and LF/HF ratio were also measured. The Kob rats had lower HRV than the control Wistar rats; HR, TP, and HF power, but not the LF/HF ratio, in the Kob rats were significantly lower than those of the control rats (p<0.001). However, in the Kob rats the response of these parameters to a muscarinic antagonist (atropine: 2mg/kg) was left intact, but their response to a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol: 4mg/kg) was impeded. Autonomic nervous control of HR in spontaneously diabetic rats was inhomogeneously deranged in terms of the balance in sympathetic and parasympathetic tone, not only in the baseline condition, but also in the regulatory systems, including postsynaptic receptor function. PMID:11922279

  13. Hindlimb suspension diminishes femoral cross-sectional growth in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van der Meulen, M. C.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Carter, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Growth, functional adaptation, and torsional strength were examined in the femora of 39-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to hindlimb suspension for 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 weeks and were compared with measurements for age-matched control animals. Our goal was to understand the effect of reduced loading on the normal age-related changes in femoral properties during growth. The control animals exhibited growth-related increases in all geometric and torsional properties of the femur. The mean body mass and femoral length of the hindlimb-suspended rats were similar to those of the controls throughout the experiment. Over 4 weeks, the femoral cross-sectional and torsional measurements from the hindlimb-suspended rats demonstrated increases in comparison with the basal values (+33% cross-sectional area, +64% polar moment of inertia, +67% ultimate torque, and +181% torsional rigidity), but the age-matched controls showed significantly greater growth-related increases (+71% cross-sectional area, +136% polar moment of inertia, +127% ultimate torque, and +367% torsional rigidity). The differences in femoral structural strength between the hindlimb-suspended animals and the age-matched controls were attributable to differences in altered cross-sectional geometry.

  14. Nicotine attenuates spatial learning deficits induced in the rat by perinatal lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingfu; Suszkiw, Janusz B

    2004-02-27

    Maternally lead (Pb)-exposed, juvenile rats exhibit significant deficits in spatial reference memory acquisition and working memory performance in the Morris water maze (MWM). Acute systemic application of nicotine reverses these deficits without affecting behavioral performance of the age-matched, lead-unexposed control animals. These results suggest that nicotinic agonist treatments can ameliorate learning and memory impairments, presumably by compensating for deficient nicotinic function in developmentally lead-exposed animals. PMID:14746932

  15. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  16. Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy vs standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A non-randomized, age-matched single center trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Yoen TK; Bosscha, Koop; Prins, Hubert A; Lips, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the safety of single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomies with standard four-port cholecystectomies. METHODS: Between January 2011 and December 2012 datas were gathered from 100 consecutive patients who received a single-port cholecystectomy. Patient baseline characteristics of all 100 single-port cholecystectomies were collected (body mass index, age, etc.) in a database. This group was compared with 100 age-matched patients who underwent a conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the same period. Retrospectively, per- and postoperative data were added. The two groups were compared to each other using independent t-tests and χ2-tests, P values below 0.05 were considered significantly different. RESULTS: No differences were found between both groups regarding baseline characteristics. Operating time was significantly shorter in the total single-port group (42 min vs 62 min, P < 0.05); in procedures performed by surgeons the same trend was seen (45 min vs 59 min, P < 0.05). Peroperative complications between both groups were equal (3 in the single-port group vs 5 in the multiport group; P = 0.42). Although not significant less postoperative complications were seen in the single-port group compared with the multiport group (3 vs 9; P = 0.07). No statistically significant differences were found between both groups with regard to length of hospital stay, readmissions and mortality. CONCLUSION: Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the potential to be a safe technique with a low complication rate, short in-hospital stay and comparable operating time. Single-port cholecystectomy provides the patient an almost non-visible scar while preserving optimal quality of surgery. Further prospective studies are needed to prove the safety of the single-port technique. PMID:26328034

  17. Inhibitory control deficits in rats with ventral hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Abela, Andrew R; Dougherty, Stephen D; Fagen, Erin D; Hill, Carolyn J R; Chudasama, Y

    2013-06-01

    Two experiments are reported in which rats with selective hippocampal lesions were tested on 2 prefrontal-dependent tasks. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of lesions of the ventral hippocampus (vHC), dorsal hippocampus (dHC), and sham control surgery on the 5-choice reaction time task. Whereas rats with lesions of the dHC were indistinguishable from sham controls, those with vHC lesions showed increased premature responses and reduced accuracy throughout the experiment. The subsequent administration of systemic escitalopram (5 mg/kg), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, reduced the number of premature responses in the vHC animals to control levels. In contrast, systemic injections of GBR 12909, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, failed to ameliorate the impulsive deficit in the vHC group and, in addition, elevated perseverative responding in the vHC group only. In Experiment 2, we tested a separate group of rats with vHC lesions on a touchscreen visual discrimination and reversal learning task. Rats with vHC lesions acquired the visual discrimination as well as sham controls and showed normal inhibitory control of a previously reinforced response during reversal learning. These data support a role for the vHC in inhibitory control functions, especially in the inhibitory control of impulsive actions. PMID:22615141

  18. Altered dendritic arborization of amygdala neurons in young adult rats orally intubated with Clitorea ternatea aqueous root extract.

    PubMed

    Rai, Kiranmai S; Murthy, K Dilip; Rao, Muddanna S; Karanth, K Sudhakar

    2005-07-01

    Young adult (60 day old) Wistar rats of either sex were orally intubated with 50 mg/kg body weight and 100 mg/kg body weight of aqueous root extract of Clitoria ternatea (CTR) for 30 days, along with age-matched saline controls. These rats were then subjected to passive avoidance tests and the results from these studies showed a significant increase in passive avoidance learning and retention. Subsequent to the passive avoidance tests, these rats were killed by decapitation. The amygdala was processed for Golgi staining and the stained neurons were traced using a camera lucida and analysed. The results showed a significant increase in dendritic intersections, branching points and dendritic processes arising from the soma of amygdaloid neurons in CTR treated rats especially in the 100 mg/kg group of rats, compared with age-matched saline controls. This improved dendritic arborization of amygdaloid neurons correlates with the increased passive avoidance learning and memory in the CTR treated rats as reported earlier. The results suggest that Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract enhances memory by increasing the functional growth of neurons of the amygdala. PMID:16161034

  19. Norepinephrine release and reuptake by hypothalamic synaptosomes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hano, T.; Jeng, Y.; Rho, J.

    1989-03-01

    We compared the overflow of endogenous norepinephrine during electrical field stimulation, the norepinephrine content, and the rate of initial neuronal uptake of (3H)norepinephrine in synaptosomes isolated from hypothalamus and brainstem of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats at 7 and 13 weeks of age. The synaptosomes of two rats, a SHR and a WKY rat control, were simultaneously processed and subjected to the same electrical field stimulation. The overflow of endogenous norepinephrine during electrical stimulation (2 Hz, 2 minutes) in the hypothalamic synaptosomes of 7-week-old SHR was significantly greater, whereas the overflow of 13-week-old SHR was equivalent to the age-matched WKY rat. The norepinephrine content of synaptosomes was about the same in SHR and age-matched controls. There was also significantly enhanced (3H)norepinephrine uptake in the hypothalamic synaptosomes of young SHR, but neither the hypothalamic nor the brainstem samples of 13-week-old SHR showed any significant difference in their rate of (3H)norepinephrine uptake. These data are similar to those we observed (unpublished observations) in perfused mesenteric artery system in which norepinephrine release was significantly elevated during periarterial nerve stimulation only in young SHR. Thus, these results suggest that a parallel enhancement of norepinephrine release in hypothalamus with that of peripheral nervous system may play an important role during development of hypertension in young SHR.

  20. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  1. Impaired growth hormone secretion in neonatal hypothyroid rats: hypothalamic versus pituitary component.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, V; Cella, S G; Bassetti, M; Rizzi, R; Cocchi, D; Muller, E E

    1988-01-01

    In 10-day-old rats made hypothyroid by giving dams propylthiouracil (PTU) in the drinking water since the day of parturition, simultaneous radioimmunoassay (RIA) determinations of basal and stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion, hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-like immunoreactivity (LI) content, immunocytochemical localization of somatotrophs, and hypothalamic GHRH-LI-positive structures were performed. The frequency of somatotrophs was also determined. One-day-old hypothyroid rats, whose mothers had been given PTU since the 14th day of pregnancy, were also used for comparison. In 10-day-old hypothyroid rats, pituitary and plasma GH levels and the number of somatotrophs were considerably lower and plasma TSH levels were significantly higher than those in age-matched control rats; however, GHRH-LI titers in the mediobasal hypothalamus and the morphology of GHRH-LI-positive structures were unaltered. In 1-day-old rats the only alteration present, in addition to elevated plasma TSH levels, was a clear-cut decrease in plasma GH levels. An acute challenge with GHRH (20 ng/100 g body wt, sc) or clonidine (15 micrograms/100 g body wt, sc) induced a clear-cut rise in plasma GH levels 15 min postinjection in 10-day-old control rats but failed to do so in age-matched hypothyroid rats. Both compounds failed to rise plasma GH in both hypothyroid and control 1-day-old rats. Taken together these data indicate that in neonatal and infant rats deprivation of thyroid hormones acts primarily to depress pituitary somatotroph function and that possible changes in GHRH-secreting structures represent a later postnatal event. PMID:3124121

  2. Prolonged performance of a high repetition low force task induces bone adaptation in young adult rats, but loss in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14-18 months of age) and 14 young adult (2.5-6.5 months of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes. PMID:26517953

  3. Diabetes increases susceptibility of primary cultures of rat proximal tubular cells to chemically induced injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Qing; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2009-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we prepared primary cultures of proximal tubular (PT) cells from diabetic rats 30 days after an ip injection of streptozotocin and compared their susceptibility to oxidants (tert-butyl hydroperoxide, methyl vinyl ketone) and a mitochondrial toxicant (antimycin A) with that of PT cells isolated from age-matched control rats, to test the hypothesis that PT cells from diabetic rats exhibit more cellular and mitochondrial injury than those from control rats when exposed to these toxicants. PT cells from diabetic rats exhibited higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher mitochondrial membrane potential, demonstrating that the PT cells maintain the diabetic phenotype in primary culture. Incubation with either the oxidants or mitochondrial toxicant resulted in greater necrotic and apoptotic cell death, greater evidence of morphological damage, greater increases in ROS, and greater decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential in PT cells from diabetic rats than in those from control rats. Pretreatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or a catalase mimetic provided equivalent protection of PT cells from both diabetic and control rats. Despite the greater susceptibility to oxidative and mitochondrial injury, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial glutathione concentrations were markedly higher in PT cells from diabetic rats, suggesting an upregulation of antioxidant processes in diabetic kidney. These results support the hypothesis that primary cultures of PT cells from diabetic rats are a valid model in which to study renal cellular function in the diabetic state.

  4. Different transfer of nociceptive sensitivity from rats with postnatal hippocampal lesions to control rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamotová, Anna; Franek, Miloslav; Vaculín, Simon; St'astný, Frantisek; Bubeníková-Valesová, Vera; Rokyta, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Hippocampal lesions in newborn rats alter the development of mechanisms involved in the processing of nociception. The hippocampal lesion was induced by the bilateral infusion, into the lateral cerebral ventricles, of 0.25 microL of saline containing either 0.25 micromol quinolinic acid (QUIN) and/or 0.25 micromol N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) on postnatal day 12. The same amount of sterile saline was injected into the sham-operated animals (group SHAM). It was expected that the QUIN- and NAAG-lesioned rats would exhibit some differences in thermal pain perception; however, we wanted to know if the control rats would exhibit, at least in part, similar changes in pain perception as their chemically lesioned siblings with which they were housed. Young adult NAAG-injured rats exhibited increased withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick and plantar tests, whereas young adult QUIN-injured animals exhibited only marginally decreased latencies. Nociceptive responses in the SHAM rats paralleled the littermates that had been neonatally treated with QUIN or NAAG, i.e. the responses in the SHAM(QUIN) group decreased, whereas the responses in the SHAM(NAAG) group increased. No significant changes in nociception were observed in intact animals, regardless of which group they were housed with. Our results show that social factors, which were originally demonstrated only for the pain behavior, may also influence basal nociceptive sensitivity in rats. We concluded that the "sham operation" may have had a long-term, nonspecific impact on nociceptive behavior by inducing behavioral mimicry of other animals. PMID:17623020

  5. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  6. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  7. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  8. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  9. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  10. Circulating parathyroid hormone and calcitonin in rats after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Fung, Paul; Popova, Irina A.; Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone and calcithonin, two major calcium-regulating hormones, were measured in the plasma of five experimental groups of rats to evaluate postflight calcium homeostasis after the 14-day Cosmos 2044 flight. Parathyroid hormone values were slightly higher in the flight animals (F) than in the appropriate cage and diet controls (S) (44 +/- 21 vs 21 +/- 4 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but they were the same as in the vivarium controls (V), which had different housing and feeding schedules. The difference in F and V (22 +/- 11 vs 49 +/- 16 pg/ml, P less than 0.05) was most likely due to failure of circulating calcitonin in F to show the normal age-dependent increase which was demonstrated in age-matched controls in a separate experiment. Basal values for parathyroid hormone and calcitonin were unchanged after 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, a flight simulation model, in age-matched and younger rats. From a time course experiment serum calcium was higher and parathyroid hormone lower after 4 wk than in ambulatory controls. Postflight circulating levels of parathyroid hormone appear to reflect disturbances in calcium homeostasis from impaired renal function of undetermined cause, whereas levels of calcitonin reflect depression of a normal growth process.

  11. Neural control of glutamine synthetase activity in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Konagaya, M; Konagaya, Y; Thomas, J W; Banner, C; Mill, J; Max, S R

    1990-05-01

    The mechanism of glutamine synthetase induction in rat skeletal muscle after denervation or limb immobilization was investigated. Adult male rats were subjected to midthigh section of the sciatic nerve. At 1, 2, and 5 h and 1, 2, and 7 days after denervation, rats were killed and denervated, and contralateral control soleus and plantaris muscles were excised, weighted, homogenized, and assayed for glutamine synthetase. Glutamine synthetase activity increased approximately twofold 1 h after denervation in both muscles. By 7 days postdenervation enzyme activity had increased to three times the control level in plantaris muscle and to four times the control level in soleus muscle. Increased enzyme activity after nerve section was associated with increased maximum velocity with no change in apparent Michaelis constant. Immunotitration with an antiglutamine synthetase antibody suggested that denervation caused an increase in the number of glutamine synthetase molecules in muscle. However, Northern-blot analysis revealed no increase in the steady-state level of glutamine synthetase mRNA after denervation. A mixing experiment failed to yield evidence for the presence of a soluble factor involved in regulating the activity of glutamine synthetase in denervated muscle. A combination of denervation and dexamethasone injections resulted in additive increases in glutamine synthetase. Thus the mechanism underlying increased glutamine synthetase after denervation appears to be posttranscriptional and is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid-mediated glutamine synthetase induction previously described by us. PMID:1970709

  12. Clitoria ternatea (Linn) root extract treatment during growth spurt period enhances learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Rai, K S; Murthy, K D; Karanth, K S; Rao, M S

    2001-07-01

    Neonatal rat pups (7 days old) were intubated with either 50 mg/kg body weight or 100 mg/kg body weight of aqueous root extract of Clitoria ternatea (CTR) for 30 days. These rats were then subjected to open field, two compartment passive avoidance and spatial learning (T-Maze) tests (i) immediately after the treatment and (ii) 30 days after the treatment, along with age matched normal and saline control rats. Results showed no change in open field behaviour, but showed improved retention and spatial learning performance at both time points of behavioural tests, indicating the memory enhancing property of CTR which implicates a permanent change in the brain of CTR treated rats. PMID:11881569

  13. Somatomotor and sensory urethral control of micturition in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Pastelín, César; Balog, Brian M.; Zaszczurynski, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    In rats, axons of external urethral sphincter (EUS) motoneurons travel through the anastomotic branch of the pudendal nerve (ABPD) and anastomotic branch of the lumbosacral trunk (ABLT) and converge in the motor branch of the sacral plexus (MBSP). The aim of the present study was to determine in female rats the contribution of these somatomotor pathways and urethral sensory innervation from the dorsal nerve of the clitoris on urinary continence and voiding. EUS electromyographic (EMG) activity during cystometry, leak point pressure (LPP), and voiding efficiency (VE) were assessed in anesthetized virgin Sprague-Dawley female rats before and after transection of the above nerve branches. Transection of the MBSP eliminated EUS EMG, decreased LPP by 50%, and significantly reduced bladder contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. Transection of the ABPD or ABLT decreased EUS EMG discharge and LPP by 25% but did not affect VE. Transection of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris did not affect LPP but reduced contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. We conclude that somatomotor control of micturition is provided by the MBSP with axons travelling through the ABPD and ABLT. Partial somatomotor urethral denervation induces mild urinary incontinence, whereas partial afferent denervation induces voiding dysfunction. ABPD and ABLT pathways could represent a safeguard ensuring innervation to the EUS in case of upper nerve damage. Detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and functional innervation of the urethra will enable more accurate animal models of neural development, disease, and dysfunction in the future. PMID:25339694

  14. Visual cortex controls retinal output in the rat.

    PubMed

    Molotchnikoff, S; Tremblay, F

    1986-07-01

    The first objective of the present investigation was to shed more light on corticofugal influences on the retina by providing an analysis of the type and proportion of retinal ganglion cells that are affected by cooling the visual cortex in rats. The second question was to determine if the pretectum participates in functional cortico-retinal relationships. In urethane-anesthetized and paralyzed hooded rats, axonal activity of retinal ganglion cells was recorded with glass micropipettes at optic chiasm level. Units were classified as ON, OFF, suppressed-by-light and concentric. The visual cortex was inactivated by cooling its surface with a 4 mm2 steel probe using the Peltier effect. The pretectum was blocked with microinjections of 50 to 100 nanoliters of cobalt ions, lidocaine hydrochloride or KCl. The inactivations and recoveries at both sites were monitored by simultaneously recording evoked field potentials. Interrupting corticofugal impulses caused modifications of the evoked discharge pattern in all types of cells. The concentric type was the group least affected by cortical cooling. A common trend emerged suggesting that cooling of the visual cortex led to an enhancement of the initial evoked excitation. This was often followed by an enhanced post-excitatory inhibition. The Pearson coefficient allowed us to measure the degree of similarity between two histograms. When all data were pooled, a weak correlation between control and test histograms (r = 0.29, N = 56) was found, while the control and recovery patterns averaged a correlation of more than twice that size (r = 0.68). In a second series of experiments, the pretectum and visual cortex (VC) were simultaneously inactivated. It is shown that both sites summed their influence and acted synergistically upon the pattern of ganglion cell responses. The results strongly suggest that the visual cortex exerts a major control over the response pattern of thirty percent of retinal ganglion cells, and that the

  15. Optogenetic control of striatal dopamine release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Vance, Zachary B; Sullivan, Ryan P; Bonin, Keith D; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01

    Optogenetic control over neuronal firing has become an increasingly elegant method to dissect the microcircuitry of mammalian brains. To date, examination of these manipulations on neurotransmitter release has been minimal. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of optogenetic stimulation on dopamine neurotransmission in the dorsal striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats. By combining the tight spatial and temporal resolution of both optogenetics and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry we have determined the parameters necessary to control phasic dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of rats in vivo. The kinetics of optically induced dopamine release mirror established models of electrically evoked release, indicating that potential artifacts of electrical stimulation on ion channels and the dopamine transporter are negligible. Furthermore a lack of change in extracellular pH indicates that optical stimulation does not alter blood flow. Optical control over dopamine release is highly reproducible and flexible. We are able to repeatedly evoke concentrations of dopamine release as small as a single dopamine transient (50 nM). A U-shaped frequency response curve exists with maximal stimulation inducing dopamine effluxes exceeding 500 nM. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for understanding the neurobiological basis of dopaminergic-based disorders and provide the framework to effectively manipulate dopamine patterns. PMID:20534006

  16. Psilocybin-induced stimulus control in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Winter, J.C.; Rice, K.C.; Amorosi, D.J.; Rabin, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Although psilocybin has been trained in the rat as a discriminative stimulus, little is known of the pharmacological receptors essential for stimulus control. In the present investigation rats were trained with psilocybin and tests were then conducted employing a series of other hallucinogens and presumed antagonists. An intermediate degree of antagonism of psilocybin was observed following treatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, M100907. In contrast, no significant antagonism was observed following treatment with the 5-HT1A/7 receptor antagonist, WAY-100635, or the DA D2 antagonist, remoxipride. Psilocybin generalized fully to DOM, LSD, psilocin, and, in the presence of WAY-100635, DMT while partial generalization was seen to 2C-T-7 and mescaline. LSD and MDMA partially generalized to psilocybin and these effects were completely blocked by M-100907; no generalization of PCP to psilocybin was seen. The present data suggest that psilocybin induces a compound stimulus in which activity at the 5-HT2A receptor plays a prominent but incomplete role. In addition, psilocybin differs from closely related hallucinogens such as 5-MeO-DMT in that agonism at 5-HT1A receptors appears to play no role in psilocybin-induced stimulus control. PMID:17688928

  17. Psilocybin-induced stimulus control in the rat.

    PubMed

    Winter, J C; Rice, K C; Amorosi, D J; Rabin, R A

    2007-10-01

    Although psilocybin has been trained in the rat as a discriminative stimulus, little is known of the pharmacological receptors essential for stimulus control. In the present investigation rats were trained with psilocybin and tests were then conducted employing a series of other hallucinogens and presumed antagonists. An intermediate degree of antagonism of psilocybin was observed following treatment with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, M100907. In contrast, no significant antagonism was observed following treatment with the 5-HT(1A/7) receptor antagonist, WAY-100635, or the DA D(2) antagonist, remoxipride. Psilocybin generalized fully to DOM, LSD, psilocin, and, in the presence of WAY-100635, DMT while partial generalization was seen to 2C-T-7 and mescaline. LSD and MDMA partially generalized to psilocybin and these effects were completely blocked by M-100907; no generalization of PCP to psilocybin was seen. The present data suggest that psilocybin induces a compound stimulus in which activity at the 5-HT(2A) receptor plays a prominent but incomplete role. In addition, psilocybin differs from closely related hallucinogens such as 5-MeO-DMT in that agonism at 5-HT(1A) receptors appears to play no role in psilocybin-induced stimulus control. PMID:17688928

  18. Enhanced inflammatory response to acute ozone exposure in rats during pregnancy and lactation

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Weideman, P.A.; Sobo, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Experimental evidence from several studies suggests that pregnant animals and women are more susceptible to oxidants than nonpregnant controls. In the study reported here, we sought to determine whether pregnant rats are more sensitive than age-matched virgin females to the inflammatory effects of ozone, a gaseous oxidant of considerable environmental significance. Rats at several stages of pregnancy and lactation, as well as age-matched virgin females, were exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 6 hr. Controls were sham-exposed to pure air for an identical period of time. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 24 hr after the beginning of exposure, and components of the lavage fluid considered to be indicators of inflammation were used to assess the severity of pulmonary inflammation. The results of this experiment showed that significantly enhanced sensitivity to ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation develops during pregnancy, is maintained during lactation, and disappears following lactation. Implicit in this pattern of differential sensitivity in rats is the possibility of a similar pattern of inflammatory response in analogous groups of humans as well as the potential for applicability to other oxidative pollutants.

  19. QT Is Longer in Drug-Free Patients with Schizophrenia Compared with Age-Matched Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kumiko; Ozeki, Yuji; Okayasu, Hiroaki; Takano, Yumiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Hori, Hiroaki; Orui, Masami; Horie, Minoru; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    The potassium voltage-gated channel KCNH2 is a well-known gene in which mutations induce familial QT interval prolongation. KCNH2 is suggested to be a risk gene for schizophrenia. Additionally, the disturbance of autonomic control, which affects the QT interval, is known in schizophrenia. Therefore, we speculate that schizophrenic patients have characteristic features in terms of the QT interval in addition to the effect of antipsychotic medication. The QT interval of patients with schizophrenia not receiving antipsychotics (n = 85) was compared with that of patients with schizophrenia receiving relatively large doses of antipsychotics (n = 85) and healthy volunteers (n = 85). The QT interval was corrected using four methods (Bazett, Fridericia, Framingham or Hodges method). In ANCOVA with age and heart rate as covariates, patients not receiving antipsychotic treatment had longer QT intervals than did the healthy volunteers, but antipsychotics prolonged the QT interval regardless of the correction method used (P<0.01). Schizophrenic patients with and without medication had a significantly higher mean heart rate than did the healthy volunteers, with no obvious sex-related differences in the QT interval. The QT interval prolongation may be manifestation of a certain biological feature of schizophrenia. PMID:24887423

  20. Ergonomic task reduction prevents bone osteopenia in a rat model of upper extremity overuse

    PubMed Central

    BARBE, Mary F.; JAIN, Nisha X.; MASSICOTTE, Vicky S.; POPOFF, Steven N.; BARR-GILLESPIE, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ergonomic workload reduction of switching rats from a high repetition high force (HRHF) lever pulling task to a reduced force and reach rate task for preventing task-induced osteopenic changes in distal forelimb bones. Distal radius and ulna trabecular structure was examined in young adult rats performing one of three handle-pulling tasks for 12 wk: 1) HRHF, 2) low repetition low force (LRLF); or 3) HRHF for 4 wk and than LRLF thereafter (HRHF-to-LRLF). Results were compared to age-matched controls rats. Distal forelimb bones of 12-wk HRHF rats showed increased trabecular resorption and decreased volume, as control rats. HRHF-to-LRLF rats had similar trabecular bone quality as control rats; and decreased bone resorption (decreased trabecular bone volume and serum CTX1), increased bone formation (increased mineral apposition, bone formation rate, and serum osteocalcin), and decreased osteoclasts and inflammatory cytokines, than HRHF rats. Thus, an ergonomic intervention of HRHF-to-LRLF prevented loss of trabecular bone volume occurring with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task. These findings support the idea of reduced workload as an effective approach to management of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and begin to define reach rate and load level boundaries for such interventions. PMID:25739896

  1. Pterostilbene improves glycaemic control in rats fed an obesogenic diet: Involvement of skeletal muscle and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine whether pterostilbene improved glycaemic control in rats showing insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Rats were divided into 3 groups: control group and two groups treated with either 15 mg/kg/d (PT15) or 30 mg/kg/d of pterostilbene (PT30). HOMA-IR was decr...

  2. Respiratory control and substrate effects in the working rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, F M; Malloy, C R

    1992-01-01

    31P n.m.r. spectroscopy was used to measure the concentration of phosphates commonly proposed to control oxidative phosphorylation. The effect of loading conditions, beta-adrenergic stimulation and different substrates (acetate, pyruvate or glucose) was examined under steady-state conditions in the isolated working rat heart. Oxygen consumption and haemodynamic variables were monitored continuously. In response to a 2-fold increase in afterload, there were no significant changes in [ADP], [ATP]/[ADP], or [ATP]/[ADP][Pi]. In the presence of isoprenaline, these variables also tended not to change from afterload. However, isoprenaline, at identical perfusion pressures, consistently decreased the phosphorylation potential and [ATP]/[ADP], but had little effect on [ADP]. Substrates altered the phosphate metabolites in a manner independent of oxygen consumption, and had only minor effects on the relationship between phosphates and work, in contrast with other studies. Thus, metabolites of ATP synthesis are not normally involved in respiratory control. The 31P n.m.r. spectrum can vary greatly, but does not predict oxygen consumption in this preparation. Substrates have no effect on the mechanism of respiratory control. Thus the normal control of respiration in the heart at steady state cannot occur at the level of its substrates. Rather, there must be concerted regulation of the numerous pathways, involving allostery and covalent modification. The attention of future research should be shifted away from the metabolites of ATP and towards identifying the effectors of such regulation. PMID:1417763

  3. Experiment K-6-05. The maturaton of bone and dentin matrices in rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D.; Grynpas, M.; Rosenberg, G.; Durnova, G.

    1990-01-01

    The chemistry, hydroxyapatite crystal size, and maturation of the bone and dentin is characterized in rats exposed to microgravity for 12.5d in a Soviet Biosatellite (Cosmos-1887). Calvarial and vertebral bone ash was subnormal, but contained a normal percent composition of Ca, P, and Mg. These tissues varied from the norm by having lower Ca/P and higher Ca/Mg ratios than any of their age-matched controls (Vivarium and Synchronous Groups). Gradient density analyses (calvaria) indicated a strong shift to the lower sp.gr. fractions which was commensurate with impaired rates of matrix-mineral maturation. X-ray diffraction data were confirmatory. Bone hydroxyapatite crystal growth in Flight rats was preferentially altered in a way to reduce the dimension of their C-axis. Flight rat dentin was normal with respect to age-matched control Ca, P, Mg, and Zn concentrations and their Ca/P and Ca/Mg ratios. These observations affirm the concept that microgravity adversely affects the maturation of newly formed matrix and mineral moieties in bone.

  4. The Role of Metformin in Controlling Oxidative Stress in Muscle of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Mariana Nunes; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can act in muscle, inhibiting the complex I of the electron transport chain and decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Our hypothesis is that the inhibition of complex I can minimize damage oxidative in muscles of hypoinsulinemic rats. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and/or metformin treatment on oxidative stress levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic (D) with an injection of streptozotocin and were submitted to treatment with insulin (D+I), metformin (D+M), or insulin plus metformin (D+I+M) for 7 days. The body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance were evaluated. Then, oxidative stress levels, glutathione antioxidant defense system, and antioxidant status were analyzed in the gastrocnemius muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats. The body weight decreased in D+M compared to ND rats. D+I and D+I+M rats decreased the glycemia and D+I+M rats increased the insulin sensitivity compared to D rats. D+I+M reduced the oxidative stress levels and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in skeletal muscle when compared to D+I rats. In conclusion, our results reveal that dual therapy with metformin and insulin promotes more benefits to oxidative stress control in muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats than insulinotherapy alone. PMID:27579154

  5. The Role of Metformin in Controlling Oxidative Stress in Muscle of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz Vilela, Danielle; Gomes Peixoto, Leonardo; Teixeira, Renata Roland; Belele Baptista, Nathalia; Carvalho Caixeta, Douglas; Vieira de Souza, Adriele; Machado, Hélen Lara; Pereira, Mariana Nunes; Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can act in muscle, inhibiting the complex I of the electron transport chain and decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Our hypothesis is that the inhibition of complex I can minimize damage oxidative in muscles of hypoinsulinemic rats. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and/or metformin treatment on oxidative stress levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic (D) with an injection of streptozotocin and were submitted to treatment with insulin (D+I), metformin (D+M), or insulin plus metformin (D+I+M) for 7 days. The body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance were evaluated. Then, oxidative stress levels, glutathione antioxidant defense system, and antioxidant status were analyzed in the gastrocnemius muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats. The body weight decreased in D+M compared to ND rats. D+I and D+I+M rats decreased the glycemia and D+I+M rats increased the insulin sensitivity compared to D rats. D+I+M reduced the oxidative stress levels and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in skeletal muscle when compared to D+I rats. In conclusion, our results reveal that dual therapy with metformin and insulin promotes more benefits to oxidative stress control in muscle of hypoinsulinemic rats than insulinotherapy alone. PMID:27579154

  6. Development of exoskeletal robotic limbs for a rat controlled by neural signals based on a vehicular neuro-robotic platform RatCar.

    PubMed

    Fukayama, Osamu; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Ryuta; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2012-01-01

    A pair of exoskeletal limbs for a rat has been developed based on a vehicular Brain-Machine Interface "Rat-Car". The "RatCar" is a whole-body motor prosthesis system for a rat developed by the authors, estimating locomotion velocity according to neural signals pattern to move the rat body by the vehicle instead of its original limbs. In this paper, exoskeletal limbs have displaced the wheels for more natural modality of body control. The system was tested by applying peripheral nerve signals from a behaving rat. PMID:23366238

  7. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  8. Long-term physiological T3 supplementation in hypertensive heart disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Weltman, Nathan Y; Pol, Christine J; Zhang, Youhua; Wang, Yibo; Koder, Adrienne; Raza, Sarah; Zucchi, Riccardo; Saba, Alessandro; Colligiani, Daria; Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-09-15

    Animal studies suggest that hypertension leads to cardiac tissue hypothyroidism, a condition that can by itself lead to heart failure. We have previously shown that short-term thyroid hormone treatment in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats near heart failure is beneficial. This study tested the hypothesis that therapeutic, long-term T3 treatment in SHHF rats can prevent or attenuate cardiac dysfunction. Female SHHF rats were treated orally with a physiological T3 dose (0.04 μg/ml) from 12 to 24 mo of age. Age-matched female SHHF and Wistar-Kyoto rats served as hypertensive and normotensive controls, respectively. SHHF rats had reduced serum free thyroid hormone levels and cardiac tissue T3 levels, LV dysfunction, and elevated LV collagen content compared with normotensive controls. Restoration of serum and cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels in T3-treated rats was associated with no change in heart rate, but strong trends for improvement in LV systolic function and collagen levels. For instance, end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, systolic wall stress, and LV collagen levels were no longer significantly different from controls. In conclusion, longstanding hypertension in rats led to chronic low serum and cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels. Long-term treatment with low-dose T3 was safe. While cardiac dysfunction could not be completely prevented in the absence of antihypertensive treatment, T3 may offer additional benefits as an adjunct therapy with possible improvement in diastolic function. PMID:26254335

  9. Digitoxin improves cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fardin, Núbia Mantovan; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Montemor, Jairo Augusto Silva; da Veiga, Glaucia Luciano; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Campos, Ruy R

    2016-06-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with digitoxin on arterial baroreceptor sensitivity for heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) control, cardiopulmonary reflex, and autonomic HR control in an animal model of heart failure (HF) were evaluated. Wistar rats were treated with digitoxin, which was administered in their daily feed (1 mg/kg per day) for 60 days. The following 3 experimental groups were evaluated: sham, HF, and HF treated with digitoxin (HF + DIG). We observed an increase in rSNA in the HF group (190 ± 29 pps, n = 5) compared with the sham group (98 ± 14 pps, n = 5). Digitoxin treatment prevented an increase in rSNA (98 ± 14 pps, n = 7). Therefore, arterial baroreceptor sensitivity was decreased in the HF group (-1.24 ± 0.07 bpm/mm Hg, n = 8) compared with the sham group (-2.27 ± 0.23 bpm/mm Hg, n = 6). Digitoxin did not alter arterial baroreceptor sensitivity in the HF + DIG group. Finally, the HF group showed an increased low frequency band (LFb: 23 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) and a decreased high frequency band (HFb: 77 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) compared with the sham group (LFb: 14 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 86 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9); the HF+DIG group exhibited normalized parameters (LFb: 15 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 85 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9). In conclusion, the benefits of decreasing rSNA are not directly related to improvements in peripheral cardiovascular reflexes; such occurrences are due in part to changes in the central nuclei of the brain responsible for autonomic cardiovascular control. PMID:27082032

  10. Muscarinic receptor plasticity in the brain of senescent rats: down-regulation after repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; Volpe, M.T.; Michalek, H.

    1988-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of Fischer 344 rats to subchronic treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in terms of brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and muscarinic receptor sites. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were sc injected with sublethal doses of DFP for 2 weeks and killed 48 hrs after the last treatment. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of control rats a significant age-related reduction of ChE and of maximum number of /sup 3/H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) was observed. The administration of DFP to senescent rats resulted in more pronounced and longer lasting syndrome of cholinergic stimulation, with marked body weight loss and 60% mortality. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE induced by DFP did not differ between young and senescent rats. As expected, in young rats DFP caused a significant decrease of Bmax, which in the cerebral cortex reached about 40%. In the surviving senescent rats, the percentage decrease of Bmax due to DFP with respect to age-matched controls was very similar to that of young animals, especially in the cerebral cortex. Thus there is great variability in the response of aged rats to DFP treatment, from total failure of adaptive mechanisms resulting in death to considerable muscarinic receptor plasticity.

  11. Resting Glutamate Levels and Rapid Glutamate Transients in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Flinders Sensitive Line Rat: A Genetic Rodent Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R; Stephens, Michelle L; Glaser, Paul EA; Yoshitake, Takashi; Mathé, Aleksander A; Gerhardt, Greg A; Kehr, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the numerous drugs targeting biogenic amines for major depressive disorder (depression), the search for novel therapeutics continues because of their poor response rates (∼30%) and slow onset of action (2–4 weeks). To better understand role of glutamate in depression, we used an enzyme-based microelectrode array (MEA) that was selective for glutamate measures with fast temporal (2 Hz) and high spatial (15 × 333 μm) resolution. These MEAs were chronically implanted into the prefrontal cortex of 3- to 6-month-old and 12- to 15-month-old Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, a validated genetic rodent model of depression. Although no changes in glutamate dynamics were observed between 3 and 6 months FRL and FSL rats, a significant increase in resting glutamate levels was observed in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with the 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats on days 3–5 post-implantation. Our MEA also recorded, for the first time, a unique phenomenon in all the four rat groups of fluctuations in resting glutamate, which we have termed glutamate transients. Although these events lasted only for seconds, they did occur throughout the testing paradigm. The average concentration of these glutamate-burst events was significantly increased in the 12- to 15-month-old FSL rats compared with 3- to 6-month-old FSL and age-matched FRL rats. These studies lay the foundation for future studies of both tonic and phasic glutamate signaling in rat models of depression to better understand the potential role of glutamate signaling in depression. PMID:21525860

  12. Exercise and spirulina control non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and lipid profile in diabetic Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with metabolic dysfunctions, including alterations in circulating lipid levels and fat tissue accumulation, which causes, among other pathologies, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim of the study The objective of this study was to analyse the effects of physical exercise and spirulina intake on the control of NAFLD in diabetic Wistar rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in the animals through intravenous administration of alloxan. The rats were divided into four groups: Diabetic Control (DC) - diabetic rats fed with a control diet and no physical exercise; Diabetic Spirulina (DS) - diabetic rats fed with a diet that included spirulina; Diabetic Spirulina and Exercise (DSE) - diabetic rats fed with a diet that included Spirulina and that exercised; and Diabetic Exercise (DE) - diabetic rats fed with a control diet and that exercised. Results The groups DS, DSE, and DE presented lower plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol than DC, as well as lower levels of total liver lipids in groups DS, DSE, and DE in comparison to DC. Conclusion Thus, spirulina appears to be effective in reducing total circulating levels of LDL-cholesterol and hepatic lipids, alone or in conjunction with physical exercise in diabetic rats. PMID:21569626

  13. Wartime rat control, rodent ecology, and the rise and fall of chemical rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Keiner, Christine

    2005-09-01

    The story of how World War II stimulated the development of DDT, and the ensuing postwar dependence on such chemical insecticides, is well known. However, less recognition has been given to the wartime efforts to synthesize new rodenticides to fight rat-borne epidemics. Baltimore, Maryland served as the site for field tests of the powerful new compound alpha naphthyl thiourea (ANTU) from 1942-1946. This experimental campaign sparked debates over the efficacy of controlling rats via chemical warfare instead of environmental sanitation, which led to the ironic conclusion that urban rat control demanded an ecological, rather than technological, approach. PMID:16087236

  14. Strategic rat control for restoring populations of native species in forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Doug P; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Kreigenhofer, Brigitte; McArthur, Nikki; Govella, Susanne; Barrett, Paul; Richard, Yvan

    2014-06-01

    Forest fragments have biodiversity value that may be enhanced through management such as control of non-native predators. However, such efforts may be ineffective, and research is needed to ensure that predator control is done strategically. We used Bayesian hierarchical modeling to estimate fragment-specific effects of experimental rat control on a native species targeted for recovery in a New Zealand pastoral landscape. The experiment was a modified BACI (before-after-control-impact) design conducted over 6 years in 19 forest fragments with low-density subpopulations of North Island Robins (Petroica longipes). The aim was to identify individual fragments that not only showed clear benefits of rat control, but also would have a high probability of subpopulation growth even if they were the only fragment managed. We collected data on fecundity, adult and juvenile survival, and juvenile emigration, and modeled the data in an integrated framework to estimate the expected annual growth rate (λ) of each subpopulation with and without rat control. Without emigration, subpopulation growth was estimated as marginal (λ = 0.95-1.05) or negative (λ = 0.74-0.90) without rat control, but it was estimated as positive in all fragments (λ = 1.4-2.1) if rats were controlled. This reflected a 150% average increase in fecundity and 45% average increase in adult female survival. The probability of a juvenile remaining in its natal fragment was 0.37 on average, but varied with fragment connectivity. With juvenile emigration added, 6 fragments were estimated to have a high (>0.8) probability of being self-sustaining (λ > 1) with rat control. The key factors affecting subpopulation growth rates under rat control were low connectivity and stock fencing because these factors were associated with lower juvenile emigration and higher fecundity, respectively. However, there was also substantial random variation in adult survival among fragments, illustrating the importance of

  15. Mismatch Negativity (MMN) in Freely-Moving Rats with Several Experimental Controls

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Lauren; Fulham, W. Ross; Todd, Juanita; Budd, Timothy W.; Hunter, Michael; Meehan, Crystal; Penttonen, Markku; Schall, Ulrich; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Michie, Patricia T.

    2014-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a scalp-recorded electrical potential that occurs in humans in response to an auditory stimulus that defies previously established patterns of regularity. MMN amplitude is reduced in people with schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to develop a robust and replicable rat model of MMN, as a platform for a more thorough understanding of the neurobiology underlying MMN. One of the major concerns for animal models of MMN is whether the rodent brain is capable of producing a human-like MMN, which is not a consequence of neural adaptation to repetitive stimuli. We therefore tested several methods that have been used to control for adaptation and differential exogenous responses to stimuli within the oddball paradigm. Epidural electroencephalographic electrodes were surgically implanted over different cortical locations in adult rats. Encephalographic data were recorded using wireless telemetry while the freely-moving rats were presented with auditory oddball stimuli to assess mismatch responses. Three control sequences were utilized: the flip-flop control was used to control for differential responses to the physical characteristics of standards and deviants; the many standards control was used to control for differential adaptation, as was the cascade control. Both adaptation and adaptation-independent deviance detection were observed for high frequency (pitch), but not low frequency deviants. In addition, the many standards control method was found to be the optimal method for observing both adaptation effects and adaptation-independent mismatch responses in rats. Inconclusive results arose from the cascade control design as it is not yet clear whether rats can encode the complex pattern present in the control sequence. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat brain is indeed capable of exhibiting human-like MMN, and that the rat model is a viable platform for the further investigation of the

  16. Processing Words Varying in Personal Familiarity (Based on Reading and Spelling) by Poor Readers and Age-Matched and Reading-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Evelyne; Willows, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate whether performance differences between good and poor readers relate to reading-specific cognitive factors that result from engaging in reading activities and other experiential factors, the authors gave students in Grades 4 and 6 a perceptual identification test of words not only drawn from their personal lexicon but also varying in…

  17. Effects of spaceflight on rat humerus geometry, biomechanics, and biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Zernicke, R. F.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Durnova, G. N.; Li, K. C.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) on the geometric, biomechanical, and biochemical characteristics of humeri of male specific pathogen-free rats were examined. Humeri of age-matched basal control, synchronous control, and vivarium control rats were contrasted with the flight bones to examine the influence of growth and space environment on bone development. Lack of humerus longitudinal growth occurred during the 12.5 days in spaceflight. In addition, the normal mid-diaphysial periosteal appositional growth was affected; compared with their controls, the spaceflight humeri had less cortical cross-sectional area, smaller periosteal circumferences, smaller anterior-posterior periosteal diameters, and smaller second moments of area with respect to the bending and nonbending axes. The flexural rigidity of the flight humeri was comparable to that of the younger basal control rats and significantly less than that of the synchronous and vivarium controls; the elastic moduli of all four groups, nonetheless, were not significantly different. Generally, the matrix biochemistry of the mid-diaphysial cross sections showed no differences among groups. Thus, the spaceflight differences in humeral mechanical strength and flexural rigidity were probably a result of the differences in humeral geometry rather than material properties.

  18. Glucose transporter levels in tissues of spontaneously diabetic Zucker fa/fa rat (ZDF/drt) and viable yellow mouse (Avy/a).

    PubMed

    Slieker, L J; Sundell, K L; Heath, W F; Osborne, H E; Bue, J; Manetta, J; Sportsman, J R

    1992-02-01

    We used antibodies to the fat/muscle glucose transporter (GLUT4) and the liver glucose transporter (GLUT2) to measure levels of these proteins in various tissues of two rodent models of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus: the obese spontaneously diabetic male Zucker fa/fa rat (ZDF/drt) and the male viable yellow Avy/a obese diabetic mouse. The ZDF/drt strain generally develops overt diabetes associated with decreased plasma insulin levels. Depending on the age of the animals, the ZDF/drt rats can be arbitrarily segregated into age-matched obese, mildly diabetic (blood glucose less than 11 mM) and obese, and severely diabetic (blood glucose greater than 20 mM) groups. Avy/a mice are comparably hyperglycemic but unlike the ZDF/drt rats are severely hyperinsulinemic. In both groups of diabetic animals, GLUT4 in adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle was reduced 25-55%, and GLUT2 in liver was increased 30-40%, relative to lean, age-matched controls. However, when the mildly diabetic ZDF/drt rats were compared to the lean controls, the only significant difference was a 25% reduction of GLUT4 in heart. Within all of the ZDF/drt rats (excluding the lean controls), GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle correlated significantly with glycemia. These data suggest that, in these two models of type II diabetes, glucose transporter levels in muscle, adipose tissue, and liver are regulated in a tissue-selective manner in response to changes in insulin and glucose. Furthermore, at least in the ZDF/drt rat, alterations in GLUT2 and/or GLUT4 protein levels appear not to be associated with obesity per se but appear to be secondary to the severely diabetic state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1733808

  19. Berberine attenuates intestinal disaccharidases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Deng, Yuanxiong; Yu, Sen; Lu, Shousi; Xie, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies demonstrated anti-diabetic effects of berberine. However, the facts that berberine had low bioavailability and poor absorption through the gut wall indicated that berberine might exert its antihyperglycaemic effect in the intestinal tract before absorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether berberine attenuates disaccharidase activities and beta-glucuronidase activity in the small intestine of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Two groups of STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with protamine zinc insulin (10 U/Kg) subcutaneously twice daily and berberine (100 mg/Kg) orally once daily for 4 weeks, respectively. Both age-matched normal rats and diabetic control rats received physiological saline only. Fasting blood glucose levels, body weight, intestinal disaccharidase and beta-glucuronidase activities in duodenum, jejunum and ileum were assessed for changes. Our findings suggested that berberine treatment significantly decreases the activities of intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect on intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase of berberine might be one of the mechanisms for berberine as an antihyperglycaemic agent. PMID:18557425

  20. Cognitive control and the anterior cingulate cortex: how conflicting stimuli affect attentional control in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Lori A.; Creer, David J.; McGaughy, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex is critical for cognitive control. One prefrontal subregion, the anterior cingulate cortex, is hypothesized to be necessary to resolve response conflicts, disregard salient distractors and alter behavior in response to the generation of an error. These situations all involve goal-oriented monitoring of performance in order to effectively adjust cognitive processes. Several neuropsychological disorders, e.g., schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive compulsive disorder, are accompanied by morphological changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. These changes are hypothesized to underlie the impairments on tasks that require cognitive control found in these subjects. A novel conflict monitoring task was used to assess the effects on cognitive control of excitotoxic lesions to anterior cingulate cortex in rats. Prior to surgery all subjects showed improved accuracy on the second of two consecutive, incongruent trials. Lesions to the anterior cingulate cortex abolished this. Lesioned animals had difficulty in adjusting cognitive control on a trial-by-trial basis regardless of whether cognitive changes were increased or decreased. These results support a role for the anterior cingulate cortex in adjustments in cognitive control. PMID:25051488

  1. Cognitive control and the anterior cingulate cortex: how conflicting stimuli affect attentional control in the rat.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lori A; Creer, David J; McGaughy, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex is critical for cognitive control. One prefrontal subregion, the anterior cingulate cortex, is hypothesized to be necessary to resolve response conflicts, disregard salient distractors and alter behavior in response to the generation of an error. These situations all involve goal-oriented monitoring of performance in order to effectively adjust cognitive processes. Several neuropsychological disorders, e.g., schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive compulsive disorder, are accompanied by morphological changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. These changes are hypothesized to underlie the impairments on tasks that require cognitive control found in these subjects. A novel conflict monitoring task was used to assess the effects on cognitive control of excitotoxic lesions to anterior cingulate cortex in rats. Prior to surgery all subjects showed improved accuracy on the second of two consecutive, incongruent trials. Lesions to the anterior cingulate cortex abolished this. Lesioned animals had difficulty in adjusting cognitive control on a trial-by-trial basis regardless of whether cognitive changes were increased or decreased. These results support a role for the anterior cingulate cortex in adjustments in cognitive control. PMID:25051488

  2. Adrenoreceptor development in rat cerebrum and the effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nyquist-Battie, C.; Fortney, R.; Gochee, A.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies in the rat have shown that neonatal radiation alters certain aspects of CNS monoaminergic systems including altering cerebral norepinephrine levels (17). To determine if cerebral adrenoreceptor development is also altered by neonatal ionizing radiation, a single dose of whole body gamma-radiation was administered to rats on postnatal day two. This treatment did not alter (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol (beta adrenoreceptor) or (/sup 3/H)-WB4101 (alpha1 adrenoreceptor) binding when cerebra from irradiated animals were compared to age-matched sham-irradiated controls on postnatal days 9, 15 and 35. In contrast, (/sup 3/H)-yohimbine (alpha2-adrenoreceptor) binding was altered in gamma-irradiation, a change manifested on postnatal days 9, 15 and 35 by lower than normal receptor densities (pmoles/g wet weight of tissue) although no radiation-induced changes in K/sub D/ were apparent.

  3. Functional MRI and neural responses in a rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Herman, Peter; Behar, Kevin L.; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that brain plaques and tangles can affect cortical functions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus modify functional activity, we investigated functional responses in an AD rat model (called the Samaritan Alzheimer’s rat achieved by ventricular infusion of amyloid peptide) and age-matched healthy control. High-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and extracellular neural activity measurements were applied to characterize sensory-evoked responses. Electrical stimulation of the forepaw led to BOLD and neural responses in the contralateral somatosensory cortex and thalamus. In AD brain we noted much smaller BOLD activation patterns in the somatosensory cortex (i.e., about 50% less activated voxels compared to normal brain). While magnitudes of BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex were markedly attenuated in AD rats compared to normal rats (by about 50%), the dynamic coupling between the BOLD and neural responses in the cerebral cortex, as assessed by transfer function analysis, remained unaltered between the groups. However thalamic BOLD and neural responses were unaltered in AD brain compared to controls. Thus cortical responses in the AD model were indeed diminished compared to controls, but the thalamic responses in the AD and control rats were quite similar. Therefore these results suggest that Alzheimer’s disease may affect cortical function more than subcortical function, which may have implications for interpreting altered human brain functional responses in fMRI studies of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23648961

  4. Central cholinergic control of vasopressin release in conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iitake, K.; Share, L.; Ouchi, Y.; Crofton, J.T.; Brooks, D.P.

    1986-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of carbachol into conscious rats evoked a substantial increase in vasopressin secretion and blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic blocker, atropine (10 g icv), but not by the nicotinic blocker, hexamethonium (10 g icv). Hexamethonium did, however, block the increase in blood pressure, the decrease in heart rate, and they very small elevation in the plasma vasopressin concentration induced by nicotine (10 g icv). These results indicate that stimulation of either central nicotinic or muscarinic receptors can affect the cardiovascular system and suggest that the cholinergic stimulation of vasopressin secretion may involve primarily muscarinic receptors in the conscious rat.

  5. Homeostatic control of manganese excretion in the neonatal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ballatori, N.; Miles, E.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and suckling animals showed that immature animals have a greatly diminished capacity to excrete manganese and therefore were considered to be unable to regulate tissue manganese concentrations. In contrast, the present studies indicate that suckling rats have the capacity to excrete excess manganese at rates nearly comparable to those of adults. Eight- to 10-day-old rats given a tracer dose of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ (essentially carrier free), either via gavage or by intraperitoneal injection showed little elimination of the /sup 54/Mn until the 18-19th day of life, when there was an abrupt increase in the rate of the metal's excretion. However, when manganese was given in doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg, the young animals excreted from 30-70% of the dose in only 4 days, at which time a new rate of excretion was achieved. This enhanced rate of excretion remained constant until the 18-19th day of life, when it was again accelerated. Biliary excretion of manganese, the primary route for the elimination of the metal, was only 30-60% lower in 14-day-old rats compared with adults at doses ranging from tracer to 10 mg /sup 54/Mn/kg. For both the 14-day-old and adult rats, an apparent biliary transport maximum was reached at a dose of 10 mg Mn/kg. These studies indicate that the excretory pathways for manganese are well developed in the neonatal rat. The avid retention of tracer quantities of manganese by the neonate may be a consequence of the scarcity of this essential trace metal in its diet.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoguang; Li, Wei; Chen, Qingying; Jiang, Yuxin; Lu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the role of hydrogen sulfide on wound healing in diabetic rats. Methods: Experimental diabetes in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (in 0.1 mol/L citrate buffer, Ph 4.5) at dose of 70 mg/kg. Diabetic and age-matched non-diabetic rats were randomly assigned to three groups: untreated diabetic controls (UDC), treated diabetic administrations (TDA), and non-diabetic controls (NDC). Wound Healing Model was prepared by making a round incision (2.0 cm in diameter) in full thickness. Rats from TDA receive 2% sodium bisulfide ointment on wound, and animals from UDC and NDC receive control cream. After treatment of 21 days with sodium bisulfide, blood samples were collected for determination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), antioxidant effects. Granulation tissues from the wound were processed for histological examination and analysis of western blot. Results: The study indicated a significant increase in levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and a decline in activity of coagulation in diabetic rats treated with sodium bisulfide. Sodium bisulfide treatment raised the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, and decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) protein expression in diabetic rats. Conclusions: The findings in present study suggested that hydrogen sulfide accelerates the wound healing in rats with diabetes. The beneficial effect of H2S may be associated with formation of granulation, anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and the increased level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). PMID:26191204

  7. Derangement of autonomic nerve control in rat with right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, S N.; Ono, K

    2002-06-01

    The effects of right ventricular hypertrophy and eventual right ventricular failure on autonomic nerve regulation of heart rate variability were investigated using rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension. ECG signals were obtained from a radio transmitter placed into the subcutaneous pouch in the back of the male MCT-treated and control rats for 30 min every 6 h at a sample rate of 5 kHz with or without injection of atropine (2 mg/kg I.P.) or propranolol (4 mg/kg I.P.), in a room equipped with a climate controller. Heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) were analyzed in each group by power spectrograms obtained by the fast-Fourier transform algorithm. The RR interval, total power (TP), low-frequency (LF) power (0.04-0.73 Hz), high-frequency (HF) power (0.73-2 Hz) and LF/HF (L/H) ratio were measured. HR was significantly increased in the MCT-treated rats (P<0.001), which also presented lower HRV than that of the control Wistar rats; TP (P<0.05) and HF (P<0.05) power, but not the L/H ratio, were significantly lower than that of the control rats. Responses of these parameters to a muscarinic antagonist (atropine: 2 mg/kg) and a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol: 4 mg/kg), however, remained intact in the MCT-treated rats. Only the parasympathetic component of autonomic nervous controls of HRV was deranged in rats with MCT-induced right ventricular failure. PMID:12039652

  8. Impaired diffuse noxious inhibitory controls in specific alternation of rhythm in temperature-stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Itomi, Yasuo; Tsukimi, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Toru

    2016-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain. A hypofunction in descending pain inhibitory systems is considered to be involved in the chronic pain of fibromyalgia. We examined functional changes in descending pain inhibitory systems in rats with specific alternation of rhythm in temperature (SART) stress, by measuring the strength of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC). Hindpaw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical von Frey filament or fiber-specific electrical stimuli by the Neurometer system were used to measure the pain response. To induce DNIC, capsaicin was injected into the intraplantar of the forepaw. SART-stressed rats were established by exposure to repeated cold stress for 4 days. In the control rats, heterotopic intraplantar capsaicin injection increased withdrawal threshold, indicative of analgesia by DNIC. The strength of DNIC was reduced by naloxone (μ-opioid receptor antagonist, intraperitoneally and intracerebroventricularly), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, intrathecally), and WAY-100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist, intrathecally) in the von Frey test. In SART-stressed rats, capsaicin injection did not increase withdrawal threshold in the von Frey test, indicating deficits in DNIC. In the Neurometer test, deficient DNIC in SART-stressed rats were observed only for Aδ- and C-fibers, but not Aβ-fibers stimulation. Analgesic effect of intracerebroventricular morphine was markedly reduced in SART-stressed rats compared with the control rats. Taken together, in SART-stressed rats, capsaicin-induced DNIC were deficient, and a hypofunction of opioid-mediated central pain modulation system may cause the DNIC deficit. PMID:27178898

  9. Insulin binding and glucose uptake of adipocytes in rats adapted to hypergravitational force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Mondon, C. E.; Oyama, J.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 4.15 g for 1 yr and weight and age matched, and lean noncentrifuged rats were used as control groups. Rats exposed to chronic hypergravity (hypergravic rats) were found to show lower ambient insulin levels, greater food intake with smaller body weight gain, and decreased size of isolated adipocytes. The ability of adipocytes from the hypergravic rats to bind insulin was increased. With Scatchard analysis, both number and affinity of receptors were increased. In contrast to the increased binding, glucose transport was found to be decreased in adipocytes from these animals. However, when the data were expressed as a percentage of maximal effect, the half maximal insulin effect for both the hypergravic and lean control groups was produced at an insulin concentration of 0.23 + or - 0.02 ng/ml, which was lower than the insulin concentration of 0.31 + or - 0.02 ng/ml for the weight-matched control group (P less than 0.05). This increased insulin sensitivity in the hypergravic group was accounted for by an increased number of receptors.

  10. Transscleral Controlled Delivery of Geranylgeranylaceton Using a Polymeric Device Protects Rat Retina Against Light Injury.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Nobuhiro; Kaji, Hirokazu; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a transscleral drug delivery device, consisting of a reservoir and controlled-release cover, which were made of photopolymerized polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, combined at different ratios. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a heat-shock protein (HSP) inducer, was loaded into the device. The GGA was released from the device under zero-order kinetics. At both 1 week and 4 weeks after device implantation on rat sclera, HSP70 gene and protein expression were up-regulated in the sclera-choroid-retinal pigment epithelium fraction of rat eyes treated with the GGA-loaded device compared with rat eyes treated with saline-loaded devices or eyes of non-treated rats. Flash electroretinograms were recorded 4 days after white light exposure (8000 lx for 18 h). Electroretinographic amplitudes of the a- and b-waves were preserved significantly in rats treated with GGA-loaded devices compared with rats treated with saline-loaded devices. Histological examination showed that the outer nuclear layer thickness was preserved in rats that had the GGA-loaded device. These results may show that transscleral GGA delivery using our device may offer an alternative method to treat retinal diseases. PMID:26427448

  11. Effects of cocaine on locomotor activity and schedule-controlled behaviors of inbred rat strains.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Goldberg, S R

    1990-10-01

    Effects of cocaine on several behaviors considered to be reflective of psychomotor stimulation were compared in F344/CR1BR and NBR/NIH inbred rat strains. Effects of cocaine on locomotor activity were compared with effects on either bar-press or nose-poke responses maintained under a multiple fixed-interval 3-min, timeout 1-min schedule of food presentation. In locomotor activity experiments, NBR rats were twice as active as F344 rats under baseline conditions and displayed dose-dependent increases in locomotion (5-20 mg/kg). Maximal increases in locomotor activity of F344 rats were only 200% compared to 1000% in NBR rats. In contrast to locomotor activity, no strain differences in the effects of cocaine were observed under the schedules of food delivery. Bar-pressing under the fixed-interval schedule was increased to a maximum of 150% of control in both rat strains. Nose-poke responding under the fixed-interval schedule was not significantly increased, but timeout rates were increased in both strains. These results suggest that NBR and F344 rats do not differ in general sensitivity to stimulant effects of cocaine but exhibit marked differences in responsivity to cocaine that are dependent upon the behavior studied. Further delineation of the behavioral specificity of strain differences in sensitivity to cocaine should help to identify neurobiological substrates underlying unique biologically determined responses to cocaine. PMID:2080195

  12. Experience and cortical control over the pubertal transition to rougher play fighting in rats.

    PubMed

    Foroud, Afra; Whishaw, Ian Q; Pellis, Sergio M

    2004-02-01

    With the onset of puberty, play fighting in rats decreases in frequency and the tactics of attack and defense that are used are rougher. Previous studies have shown that the changes in the frequency of play and in the use of defensive tactics arise independently of social experience. Furthermore, while the former involves subcortical regulation, the latter depends on cortical mechanisms. In this study, the possible mechanisms regulating the developmental changes in the tactics of attack were examined. Two experiments were conducted using male rats. In the first study, rats reared in isolation from weaning were compared to rats reared in pairs, and were tested in the juvenile and early post-pubertal phases (30 and 60 days postnatally). In the second experiment, rats with their cortex removed shortly after birth were compared to sham-treated controls, and were tested in pairs at both the juvenile and early adult phases (30 and 90 days). Two measures of 'roughness,' derived from previous studies, were measured. Results showed that isolation-reared rats had the typical age-related changes in roughness of attack, whereas decorticated rats failed to show this age-related modulation, maintaining, or even exaggerating, the juvenile-typical pattern of attack. These findings suggest that social experience is not needed for this developmental change to occur, and that an intact cortex is needed to regulate this change in behavior. PMID:14739011

  13. Insulin Control of Blood Glucose and GLUT4 Expression in the Skeletal Muscle of Septic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, GP; Cui, P; Cheng, Y; Lu, ZJ; Zhang, LE; Kissoon, N

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Insulin resistance is common in septic patients. The level at which the serum glucose should be maintained using insulin infusions for optimal utilization by skeletal muscles is not yet established. Objective: The objective of the present study was to compare glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) mRNA and GLUT4 expression and glucose utilization at the recommended glucose levels of 6–8 mmol/L (110-140 mg/dL) and 8–10 mmol/L (140–180 mg/dL) in septic rats. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study using 44 Sprague-Dawley rats (260– 330 g). Rats were anaesthetized with gaseous diethyl ether. Catheters were implanted into the jugular vein and artery. Following a laparotomy, rats in the experimental group (n = 36) were rendered septic by standard caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion (O111:[B4], 1 mg/kg). Control animals (n = 8) underwent laparotomy, but no caecal ligation or puncture and no LPS injection. Four experimental groups were studied: sham-operated control, sepsis treated with fluid maintenance only, sepsis treated with fluid and insulin infusion controlling blood glucose concentration at 6–8 mmol/L and sepsis treated with fluid and insulin infusion controlling blood glucose concentration at 8–10 mmol/L. Hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp experiment was done before fluid maintenance and insulin treatment to calculate average glucose infusion rate. Results: All septic rats were markedly hyperglycaemic compared with sham-operated controls two hours after operation. Glucose infusion rate during hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp experiment was slower in septic rats, suggesting that they were insulin resistant. At the 12th and 24th hour, skeletal muscle was taken to observe pathological change and analyse the GLUT4 mRNA and GLUT4 levels. There were more inflammatory cells, less GLUT4 mRNA and GLUT4 expression in the skeletal muscles of septic rats. Insulin increased

  14. Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation of retinal blood vessels is reduced in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Sato, Ayumi; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epinephrine and dopamine on retinal blood vessels in streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats and age-matched control rats to determine whether diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines. Experiments were performed 6-8 weeks after treatment with STZ or the vehicle. The fundus images were captured with the digital fundus camera system for small animals we developed and diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured. Epinephrine increased the diameters of retinal blood vessels, but the vasodilator responses were reduced in diabetic rats. Dopamine produced a biphasic retinal vascular response with an initial vasoconstriction followed by a vasodilation. The vasoconstrictor effects of dopamine on retinal arterioles were enhanced in diabetic rats, whereas the difference between the two groups was abolished by treatment with propranolol. The vasodilator effect of isoproterenol, but not of the activator of adenylyl cyclase colforsin, on retinal blood vessels was reduced in diabetic rats. No difference in vasoconstriction of retinal blood vessels to phenylephrine between non-diabetic and diabetic rats was observed. The vasodilator responses of retinal blood vessels to 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor agonist, were also attenuated in diabetic rats. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines and the impairment of vasodilator responses mediated by beta-adrenoceptors contributes to the alteration. PMID:18585480

  15. Glutathione system in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Arunkumar, Sundaram; Sirajudeen, K N S; Singh, H J

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) forms a part of the antioxidant system that plays a vital role in preventing oxidative stress, and an imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system has been linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the GSH system in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Components of the GSH system, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and total GSH content, were measured in the kidneys of 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Systolic blood pressure of SHR was significantly higher from the age of 6 weeks onwards compared with age-matched WKY rats. GPx activity in the SHR was significantly lower from the age of 8 weeks onwards when compared to that in age-matched WKY rats. No significant differences were evident in the GPx-1 protein abundance, and its relative mRNA levels, GR, GST activity, and total GSH content between SHR and age-matched WKY rats. The lower GPx activity suggests of an impairment of the GSH system in the SHR, which might be due to an abnormality in its protein rather than non-availability of a cofactor. Its role in the development of hypertension in SHR however remains unclear. PMID:20680541

  16. Feed-forward control of preshaping in the rat is mediated by the corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Kim, Sangsoo; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H

    2010-11-01

    Rats are used to model human corticospinal tract (CST) injury and repair. We asked whether rats possess the ability to orient their paw to the reaching target and whether the CST mediates this skill, as it does in primates. To test this ability, called preshaping, we trained rats to reach for pieces of pasta oriented either vertically or horizontally. We measured paw angle relative to the target and asked whether rats used target information attained before contact to preshape the paw, indicating feed-forward control. We also determined whether preshaping improved with practice. We then selectively lesioned the CST in the medullary pyramid contralateral to the reaching forepaw to test whether preshaping relies on the CST. Rats significantly oriented their paw to the pasta orientation before contact, demonstrating feed-forward control. Both preshaping and reaching efficiency improved with practice, while selective CST lesion abrogated both. The loss of preshaping was greatest for pasta oriented vertically, suggesting loss of supination, as seen with human CST injury. The degree of preshaping loss strongly correlated with the amount of skill acquired at baseline, suggesting that the CST mediates the learned component of preshaping. Finally, the amount of preshaping lost after injury strongly correlated with reduced retrieval success, showing an important functional consequence for preshaping. We have thus demonstrated, for the first time, preshaping in the rat and dependence of this skill on the CST. Understanding the basis for this skill and measuring its recovery after injury will be important for studying higher-level motor control in rats. PMID:21044175

  17. Repeated cocaine exposure facilitates the expression of incentive motivation and induces habitual control in rats.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Kimberly H; Maidment, Nigel T; Ostlund, Sean B

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that mere exposure to drugs can induce long-term alterations in the neural systems that mediate reward processing, motivation, and behavioral control, potentially causing the pathological pursuit of drugs that characterizes the addicted state. The incentive sensitization theory proposes that drug exposure potentiates the influence of reward-paired cues on behavior. It has also been suggested that drug exposure biases action selection towards the automatic execution of habits and away from more deliberate goal-directed control. The current study investigated whether rats given repeated exposure to peripherally administered cocaine would show alterations in incentive motivation (assayed using the Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) paradigm) or habit formation (assayed using sensitivity to reward devaluation). After instrumental and Pavlovian training for food pellet rewards, rats were given 6 daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, IP) or saline, followed by a 10-d period of rest. Consistent with the incentive sensitization theory, cocaine-treated rats showed stronger cue-evoked lever pressing than saline-treated rats during the PIT test. The same rats were then trained on a new instrumental action with a new food pellet reward before undergoing a reward devaluation testing. Although saline-treated rats exhibited sensitivity to reward devaluation, indicative of goal-directed performance, cocaine-treated rats were insensitive to this treatment, suggesting a reliance on habitual processes. These findings, when taken together, indicate that repeated exposure to cocaine can cause broad alterations in behavioral control, spanning both motivational and action selection processes, and could therefore help explain aberrations of decision-making that underlie drug addiction. PMID:23646106

  18. Brain nitric oxides synthase in major pelvic ganglia of aged (LETO) and diabetic (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Salama, N; Tamura, M; Tsuruo, Y; Ishimura, K; Kagawa, S

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of aging and diabetes mellitus (DM) on brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) expression in major pelvic ganglia (MPG) of rats. Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (12, 30, and 70 weeks old), which are genetic models with non-insulin-dependent DM (NIDDM), and age-matched nondiabetic Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka controls were used. The MPG of all rats in this study were subjected to cryo-sectioning and staining with bNOS polyclonal AB and rhodamine-conjugated rabbit IgG. Fluorescence intensities of the stained neurons were assessed in randomly selected fields per each specimen. Animals of both groups revealed significant decline in the staining intensity of their neurons with aging and the progress of DM, but diabetic rats showed more decline than controls. In conclusion, both aging and NIDDM could decrease bNOS expression in rat MPG. However, NIDDM has a more evident effect than aging on that expression. The decrease in bNOS may cause a disturbance in functions of the target pelvic structures of these ganglia under both conditions. PMID:12230824

  19. Intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    Increasing studies have shown protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain injury and heart ischemia. However, the effect of intermittent hypoxia on blood glucose metabolism, especially in diabetic conditions, is rarely observed. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent hypoxia influences blood glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic adult rats and age-matched control rats were treated with intermittent hypoxia (at an altitude of 3 km, 4 h per day for 3 weeks) or normoxia as control. Fasting blood glucose, body weight, plasma fructosamine, plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), pancreas β-cell mass, and hepatic and soleus glycogen were measured. Compared with diabetic rats before treatment, the level of fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment was increased (19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L vs. 14.79 ± 5.84 mmol/L, p < 0.05), while it was not different in diabetic rats after hypoxic treatment (13.14 ± 5.77 mmol/L vs. 14.79 ± 5.84 mmol/L, p > 0.05). Meanwhile, fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after hypoxic treatment was also lower than that in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment (13.14 ± 5.77 mmol/L vs. 19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L, p<0.05). Plasma fructosamine in diabetic rats receiving intermittent hypoxia was significantly lower than that in diabetic rats receiving normoxia (1.28 ± 0.11 vs. 1.39 ± 0.11, p < 0.05), while there were no significant changes in body weight, plasma insulin and β-cell mass. HOMA-IR in diabetic rats after hypoxic treatment was also lower compared with diabetic rats after normoxic treatment (3.48 ± 0.48 vs. 3.86 ± 0.42, p < 0.05). Moreover, intermittent hypoxia showed effect on the increase of soleus glycogen but not hepatic glycogen. We conclude that intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and its regulation on muscular

  20. Hyperglycemia inhibits complement-mediated immunological control of S. aureus in a rat model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, Clifford T; Hair, Pamela S; Rohn, Reuben D; Rister, Nicholas S; Krishna, Neel K; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  1. Hyperglycemia Inhibits Complement-Mediated Immunological Control of S. aureus in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Clifford T.; Hair, Pamela S.; Rohn, Reuben D.; Rister, Nicholas S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  2. Histomorphometric Evaluation of the Small Coronary Arteries in Rats Exposed to Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Lousinha, Ana; Antunes, Eduardo; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Brito, José; Martins dos Santos, José

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes induced by industrial noise (IN) have been experimentally observed in several organs. Histological observations of the coronary arteries showed prominent perivascular tissue and fibrosis among IN-exposed rats. The effects on the small arteries are unknown. Objective: To evaluate the histomorphometric changes induced by IN on rat heart small arteries. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats exposed to IN during a maximum period of seven months and 20 age-matched controls were studied. Hearts were transversely sectioned from ventricular apex to atria and a mid-ventricular fragment was selected for analysis. The histological images were obtained with an optical microscope using 400× magnifications. A total of 634 arterial vessels (298 IN-exposed and 336 controls) were selected. The mean lumen-to-vessel wall (L/W) and mean vessel wall-to-perivascular tissue (W/P) ratios were calculated using image J software. Results: There were no differences between exposed and control animals in their L/W ratios (p = 0.687) and time variations in this ratio were non-significant (p = 0.110). In contrast, exposed animals showed lower W/P ratios than control animals (p < 0.001), with significant time variations (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Industrial noise induced an increase in the perivascular tissue of rat small coronary arteries, with significant development of periarterial fibrosis. PMID:25946344

  3. Sanguinate's effect on pial arterioles in healthy rats and cerebral oxygen tension after controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Mullah, Saad H; Abutarboush, Rania; Moon-Massat, Paula F; Saha, Biswajit K; Haque, Ashraful; Walker, Peter B; Auker, Charles R; Arnaud, Francoise G; McCarron, Richard M; Scultetus, Anke H

    2016-09-01

    Sanguinate, a polyethylene glycol-conjugated carboxyhemoglobin, was investigated for cerebral vasoactivity in healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (Study 1) and for its ability to increase brain tissue oxygen pressure (PbtO2) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) - traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Study 2). In both studies ketamine-acepromazine anesthetized rats were ventilated with 40% O2. In Study 1, a cranial window was used to measure the diameters of medium - (50-100μm) and small-sized (<50μm) pial arterioles before and after four serial infusions of Sanguinate (8mL/kg/h, cumulative 16mL/kg IV), volume-matched Hextend, or normal saline. In Study 2, PbtO2 was measured using a phosphorescence quenching method before TBI, 15min after TBI (T15) and then every 10min thereafter for 155min. At T15, rats received either 8mL/kg IV Sanguinate (40mL/kg/h) or no treatment (saline, 4mL/kg/h). Results showed: 1) in healthy rats, percentage changes in pial arteriole diameter were the same among the groups, 2) in TBI rats, PbtO2 decreased from 36.5±3.9mmHg to 19.8±3.0mmHg at T15 in both groups after TBI and did not recover in either group for the rest of the study, and 3) MAP increased 16±4mmHg and 36±5mmHg after Sanguinate in healthy and TBI rats, respectively, while MAP was unchanged in control groups. In conclusion, Sanguinate did not cause vasoconstriction in the cerebral pial arterioles of healthy rats but it also did not acutely increase PbtO2 when administered after TBI. Sanguinate was associated with an increase in MAP in both studies. PMID:27287870

  4. Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in vitamin A-deficient and control rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Anderson, C A; Conner, M W; Newberne, P M

    1985-10-01

    An experimental model was developed for studying ocular infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in vitamin A-deficient (-A) and pair-fed control (+A) rats. The severity and course of the disease was evaluated by clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy and histopathologic observations. Experimental animals were in good health and were infected in the early stages of vitamin deficiency (either prior to or at the beginning of the weight plateau). In all trials the onset of herpetic keratitis was more rapid and the clinical disease more severe in -A rats compared to +A controls. Mean slit lamp scores (which assessed the severity of the corneal disease) increased from 3 to 10 d after infection and were higher (P less than 0.002) in -A rats at all time points and doses of virus tested. The inflammatory response in the cornea and uveal tract of -A rats was significantly higher than that of +A animals. Since ocular HSV disease is a common cause of blindness, the availability of a rat model should be valuable in studies of the role of nutritional factors in host susceptibility and response to viral challenge. Mild vitamin A deficiency increased the severity of experimental corneal HSV infections and resulted in a high incidence of epithelial ulceration and necrosis. PMID:2995622

  5. Effects of Pre-Trial Response Requirements on Self-Control Choices by Rats and Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Parallel experiments with rats and pigeons examined whether the size of a pre-trial ratio requirement would affect choices in a self-control situation. In different conditions, either 1 response or 40 responses were required before each trial. In the first half of each experiment, an adjusting-ratio schedule was used, in which subjects could…

  6. Rhythmic control of endocannabinoids in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marco; Ferreirós, Nerea; Geisslinger, Gerd; Dehghani, Faramarz; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate neuroendocrine networks by directly targeting cannabinoid receptors. The time-hormone melatonin synchronizes these networks with external light condition and guarantees time-sensitive and ecologically well-adapted behaviors. Here, the endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA) showed rhythmic changes in rat pineal glands with higher levels during the light-period and reduced amounts at the onset of darkness. Norepinephrine, the essential stimulus for nocturnal melatonin biosynthesis, acutely down-regulated AEA and other endocannabinoids in cultured pineal glands. These temporal dynamics suggest that AEA exerts time-dependent autocrine and/or paracrine functions within the pineal. Moreover, endocananbinoids may be released from the pineal into the CSF or blood stream. PMID:26061461

  7. The control of glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in chronically volume-expanded rats.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J M; Häberle, D A; Kawata, T

    1988-01-01

    1. Chronic volume expansion by dietary salt loading practically abolishes tubuloglomerular feed-back (TGF) by means of a humoral inhibitor in tubular fluid. Elimination of the vasoconstrictor influence of feed-back does not, however, increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal blood flow (RBF), implying that chronic salt loading induces additional preglomerular vasoconstriction. This being so, the feed-back response which, although absent in free-flowing nephrons, can still be elicited by loop of Henle perfusion with Ringer solution, should be essentially normal, except that nephron GFR at any loop perfusion rate should be lower than in controls. Persistence of RBF, GFR and nephron GFR autoregulation would imply that autoregulation is achieved by a preglomerular resistance control system independent of feed-back. 2. These hypotheses were tested by clearance and micropuncture experiments in rats chronically fed a diet containing 40 g NaCl (kg food)-1. 3. RBF and GFR autoregulation indeed persisted, the former down to 90 mmHg compared with 105 mmHg in controls. In controls, nephron GFR measured distally was autoregulated down to 90 mmHg whereas that measured proximally was autoregulated only above 105 mmHg. In high-salt rats nephron GFR from both sites was autoregulated to 90 mmHg. 4. Loop of Henle perfusion with homologous tubular fluid in high-salt rats confirmed attenuation of feed-back. Loop perfusion with Ringer solution yielded a response comparable to that in controls (maximal reduction of nephron GFR to 57%, compared with 56% in controls). Absolute nephron GFR at any loop perfusion rate was lower in high-salt rats than in controls. 5. These observations confirm the initial hypotheses. Considering feed-back and autoregulation as independent, preglomerular resistance control mechanisms, together with elementary haemodynamic considerations, allows formulation of a renal haemodynamics model whose quantitative predictions regarding characteristics of RBF

  8. Neuregulin improves response to glucose tolerance test in control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Niisuke, Katrin; Veiga, Catarina; Adrover, Anna; Manzano, Anna; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Camps, Marta; Bartrons, Ramon; Zorzano, Antonio; Gumà, Anna

    2016-03-15

    Neuregulin (NRG) is an EGF-related growth factor that binds to the tyrosine kinase receptors ErbB3 and ErbB4, thus inducing tissue development and muscle glucose utilization during contraction. Here, we analyzed whether NRG has systemic effects regulating glycemia in control and type 2 diabetic rats. To this end, recombinant NRG (rNRG) was injected into Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and their respective lean littermates 15 min before a glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed. rNRG enhanced glucose tolerance without promoting the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) or insulin receptor substrates (IRS) in muscle and liver. However, in control rats, rNRG induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) in liver but not in muscle. In liver, rNRG increased ErbB3 tyrosine phosphorylation and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), thus indicating that rNRG activates the ErbB3/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway. rNRG increased glycogen content in liver but not in muscle. rNRG also increased the content of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2), an activator of hepatic glycolysis, and lactate in liver but not in muscle. Increases in lactate were abrogated by wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, in incubated hepatocytes. The liver of ZDF rats showed a reduced content of ErbB3 receptors, entailing a minor stimulation of the rNRG-induced PKB/GSK-3 cascade and resulting in unaltered hepatic glycogen content. Nonetheless, rNRG increased hepatic Fru-2,6-P2 and augmented lactate both in liver and in plasma of diabetic rats. As a whole, rNRG improved response to the GTT in both control and diabetic rats by enhancing hepatic glucose utilization. PMID:26714846

  9. Effect of sodium depletion on the release of /sup 3/Hnorepinephrine from central and peripheral tissue of Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Meldrum, M.J.; Xue, C.S.; Badino, L.; Westfall, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    To study the relationship between sodium intake, the sympathetic nervous system, and hypertension, a study was made of the effects of a 7-9 day dietary restriction of sodium in three different ages of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Field-stimulated (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ( (/sup 3/H)NE) release was measured in portal vein, anterior hypothalamus, and the A2 region of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of 5- to 6-, 10- to 11-, and 28- to 30- week-old SHR and age-matched WKY. A low-sodium diet (0.05% Na+, control 0.5% Na+) significantly lowered stimulated (/sup 3/H)NE release from portal vein and anterior hypothalamus in SHR and WKY at all three ages. However, release from the A2 region was not altered by sodium restriction. The results of the present study suggest that lowered dietary sodium can selectively alter norepinephrine release in both the peripheral and central sympathetic nervous system of SHR and WKY. The results also suggest that the SHR at 5-6 weeks are more sensitive to altered dietary sodium than are age-matched WKY.

  10. [Immediate and long term post-operative controls of rat uterus anastomoses].

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Livani, M F

    1980-11-15

    The Authors examine the immediate control (passage of methylene blue) and the long term control (hysterography, and biopsies at later stages after the interventions) in the microsurgical anastomoses of a rat uterus. The technique of each single investigation is shown and the results are discussed. Particular attention is given to the histological data which ratifies not only anatomical but also physiological outcomes. The differences among the anastomoses carried out in a single and a double layer are verified. PMID:7011342

  11. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  12. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  13. A biologically inspired meta-control navigation system for the Psikharpax rat robot.

    PubMed

    Caluwaerts, K; Staffa, M; N'Guyen, S; Grand, C; Dollé, L; Favre-Félix, A; Girard, B; Khamassi, M

    2012-06-01

    A biologically inspired navigation system for the mobile rat-like robot named Psikharpax is presented, allowing for self-localization and autonomous navigation in an initially unknown environment. The ability of parts of the model (e.g. the strategy selection mechanism) to reproduce rat behavioral data in various maze tasks has been validated before in simulations. But the capacity of the model to work on a real robot platform had not been tested. This paper presents our work on the implementation on the Psikharpax robot of two independent navigation strategies (a place-based planning strategy and a cue-guided taxon strategy) and a strategy selection meta-controller. We show how our robot can memorize which was the optimal strategy in each situation, by means of a reinforcement learning algorithm. Moreover, a context detector enables the controller to quickly adapt to changes in the environment-recognized as new contexts-and to restore previously acquired strategy preferences when a previously experienced context is recognized. This produces adaptivity closer to rat behavioral performance and constitutes a computational proposition of the role of the rat prefrontal cortex in strategy shifting. Moreover, such a brain-inspired meta-controller may provide an advancement for learning architectures in robotics. PMID:22617382

  14. HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Prefrontal Cortex Hyper-Excitability is Enhanced by Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Wesley N; Chen, Lihua; Hu, Xiu-Ti; Napier, T Celeste

    2016-07-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is dysregulated in HIV-1-infected humans and the dysregulation is enhanced by cocaine abuse. Understanding mPFC pathophysiology in this comorbid state has been hampered by the dearth of relevant animal models. To help fill this knowledge gap, electrophysiological assessments were made of mPFC pyramidal neurons (PN) from adult male HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) F344 rats (which express seven of the nine HIV-1 toxic proteins) and non-Tg F344 rats that self-administered cocaine for 14 days (COC-SA), as well as saline-yoked controls (SAL-Yoked) and experimentally naive Tg and non-Tg rats. Forebrain slices were harvested and prepared for whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and in treated rats, this occurred after 14-18 days of forced abstinence. Aged-matched rats were used for immunohistochemical detection of the L-channel protein, Cav1.2-α1c. We determined that: (i) the two genotypes acquired the operant task and maintained similar levels of COC-SA, (ii) forced abstinence from COC-SA enhanced mPFC PN excitability in both genotypes, and neurons from Tg rats exhibited the greatest pathophysiology, (iii) neurons from SAL-Yoked Tg rats were more excitable than those from SAL-Yoked non-Tg rats, and in Tg rats (iv) blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels reduced the enhanced excitability, and (v) Cav1.2-immunoreactivity was increased. These findings provide the first assessment of the mPFC pathophysiology in a rodent model of HIV-1-mediated neuropathology with and without cocaine self-administration. Outcomes reveal an enhanced cortical excitability during chronic exposure to HIV-1 proteins that is excessively exacerbated with cocaine abuse. Such neuropathophysiology may underlie the cognitive dysregulation reported for comorbid humans. PMID:26677947

  15. Effectual comparison of quinoa and amaranth supplemented diets in controlling appetite; a biochemical study in rats.

    PubMed

    Mithila, M V; Khanum, Farhath

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of two current cynosure protein substitutes; quinoa and amaranth in controlling short term food intake and satiety in rats. Experimental rats were allotted to three groups (n = 8 per group) and fed with diets containing casein, quinoa and amaranth as major protein sources, with casein diet kept as control. At the end of the experiment it was observed that the rats ingesting quinoa and amaranth supplemented diets exhibited lesser food intake (p < 0.01) and lesser body weight gain significantly in amaranth (p < 0.05) as compared to control. They seemed to bring down plasma ghrelin levels while meliorating plasma leptin and cholecystokinin (CCK) levels postprandially (p < 0.01). Although both quinoa diet and amaranth diet were effective in improving blood glucose response and maintaining plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and general lipid profiles subsequently after the meal, amaranth diet showed significant effects when compared to control and amaranth diets. There was 15 % improvement in blood glucose profile in the amaranth group with respect to the control at 90 min, where as there was only 3.4 % improvement in the quinoa group. These findings provide a scientific rationale to consider incorporation of these modest cereals in a diet meant to fight against growing obesity and poverty. PMID:26396423

  16. Systemic elevation of interleukin-15 in vivo promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscles of young adult and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that systemic elevation of IL-15 would attenuate apoptosis in skeletal muscles of aged rats. IL-15 was administered to young adult (n=6) and aged (n=6) rats for 14 days. Apoptosis was quantified using an ELISA assay and verified through TUNEL staining of muscle sections. As expected, apoptosis was greater in muscles from aged control rats, compared to age-matched control. Apoptosis was also greater in the muscles from young adult and aged rats treated with IL-15. These increases in apoptosis were associated with decreases in muscle mass of IL-15 treated rats. These data do not support our initial hypothesis and suggest that systemic elevation of IL-15 promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscle. The proposed anti-apoptotic property of IL-15 may be specific to cell-type and/or the degree of muscle pathology present; however, additional research is required to more clearly decipher its role in skeletal muscle. PMID:18555009

  17. Morphometry of in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from control and ozone-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, H.; Tyler, W.S.; Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.

    1983-07-01

    Effects of ambient levels of ozone on cell size and compartments were determined morphometrically for both in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to filtered air or to filtered air with 0.60 ppm ozone. The ozone exposure was 8 hr/day for 3 days. Significant exposure-related compartmental volume density changes of in situ centriacinar macrophages were: decreased endoplasm (p less than 0.01); increased lysosome-like structures (p less than 0.01); decreased primary lysosomes (p less than 0.01); increased small and large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.001); and decreased phagosomes/autophagosomes (p less than 0.05). In lavaged macrophages, the only significant exposure-related change was an increase in the density of large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.01). Mean profile areas of in situ centriacinar macrophages from control and exposed rats were 86.94 micrometers/sup 2/ and 112.04 micrometers/sup 2/, respectively. The average mean cell volume V and mean caliper diameter D of macrophages lavaged from control rats were 1128.45 micrometers/sup 3/ and 12.92 micrometers, respectively, whereas those from exposed rats were 1583.08 micrometers/sup 3/ and 14.46 micrometers, respectively. Exposure-related increases in cell size were seen in both in situ and lavaged macrophages, but more significant differences in cell compartments were seen in the in situ centriacinar macrophages. Morphometry of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after ambient levels of ozone indicated increased uptake, storage, or both rather than cell damage. Comparison of in situ centriacinar and lavaged macrophages from both control and exposed rats revealed significant differences in their volume fractions of nucleus, cytoplasm, ectoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome-like structures, lipid droplets, vacuoles, and phagosome/autophagosomes. These differences between centriacinar and lavaged macrophages indicate different cell populations are sampled by these two methods.

  18. Ketogenic diet does not impair spatial ability controlled by the hippocampus in male rats.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Ogura, Yuji; Furuta, Miyako; Kakehashi, Chiaki; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    A ketogenic diet was recently shown to reduce glutamate accumulation in synaptic vesicles, decreasing glutamate transmission. We questioned whether a ketogenic diet affects hippocampal function, as glutamate transmission is critically involved in visuospatial ability. In the present study, male Wistar rats were maintained on a ketogenic diet containing 10% protein and 90% fat with complements for 3 weeks to change their energy expenditure from glucose-dependent to fat-dependent. Control rats were fed a diet containing 10% protein, 10% fat, and 80% carbohydrates. The fat-dependent energy expenditure induced by the ketogenic diet led to decreased body weight and increased blood ketone production, though the rats in the two groups consumed the same number of calories. The ketogenic diet did not alter food preferences for the control or high-fat diet containing 10% protein, 45% fat, and 45% carbohydrates. Anxiety in the open field was not altered by ingestion the ketogenic diet. However, rats fed the ketogenic diet performed better in the Y-maze test than rats fed the control diet. No difference was observed between the two groups in the Morris water maze test. Finally, Western blot revealed that the hippocampal expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluR1) was significantly increased in mice fed a ketogenic diet. These results suggest that hippocampal function is not impaired by a ketogenic diet and we speculate that the fat-dependent energy expenditure does not impair visuospatial ability. PMID:26111645

  19. Maturation of bone and dentin matrices in rats flown on the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Grynpas, M. D.; Rosenberg, G. D.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry, hydroxyapatite crystal size, and maturational changes in bone and dentin from rats exposed to microgravity for 12 days in a Soviet biosatellite (Cosmos 1887). Bone ash was reduced in vertebrae (L5) but not in the non-weight-bearing calvaria or mandibles. All tissues had a relatively normal percentage composition of Ca, P, and Mg. Nevertheless, flight rat calvaria and vertebral tissues tended to exhibit lower Ca/P and higher Ca/Mg ratios that any of their weight-matched controls groups, and gradient density analysis (calvaria) indicated a strong shift to the fractions lower specific gravity that was commensurate with impaired rates of matrix-mineral maturation. X-ray diffraction data were confirmatory. Bone hydroxyapatite crystal growth in the mandibles of flight rats was preferentially altered in such a way as to reduce their size (C-axis dimension). But in the mandibular diastemal region devoid of muscle attachments, flight rat bone and dentin were normal with respect to the Ca, P, Mg, and Zn concentrations and Ca/P and Ca/Mg ratios of age-matched controls. These observations affirm the concept that while microgravity most adversely affects the maturation of newly formed matrix and mineral moieties in weight-bearing bone, such effects occur throughout the skeleton.

  20. Prenatal Exposure to Lamotrigine: Effects on Postnatal Development and Behaviour in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sathiya, Sekar; Ganesh, Murugan; Kalaivani, Periyathambi; Ranju, Vijayan; Janani, Srinivasan; Pramila, Bakthavachalam; Saravana Babu, Chidambaram

    2014-01-01

    Use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in pregnancy warrants various side effects and also deleterious effects on fetal development. The present study was carried out to assess the effects of prenatal exposure to lamotrigine (LTG) on postnatal development and behavioural alterations of offspring. Adult male and female Sprague Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g b. wt. were allowed to copulate and pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal cytology. Pregnant rats were treated with LTG (11.5, 23, and 46 mg/kg, p.o) from gestational day 3 (GND 3) and this treatment continued till postnatal day 11 (PND 11). Offspring were separated from their dam on day 21 following parturition. LTG, at 46 mg/kg, p.o, produced severe clinical signs of toxicity leading to death of dam between GND 15 and 17. LTG, at 11.5 and 23 mg/kg, p.o, showed significant alterations in offspring's incisors eruption and vaginal opening when compared to age matched controls. LTG (23 mg/kg, p.o) exposed female offspring expressed hyperactive behaviour and decreased GABA-A receptor expression when compared to control rats. These results reveal that prenatal exposure to LTG may impart differential postnatal behavioural alterations between male and female rats which paves way for further investigations. PMID:24967313

  1. Exercise effects on the size and metabolic properties of soleus fibers in hindlimb-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Scot C.; Roy, Roland R.; West, Steve P.; Thomason, Don; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of four-week-long hind-limb suspension (HS) of rats on the size the soleus muscle fibers and the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in dark and light ATPase fibers were investigated together with the efficacy of an endurance exercise (EX) program (daily treadmill exercise for 1.5 h/day at 20 m/min and a 30-percent grade) in ameliorating HS-induced changes. It was found that, in comparison to age-matched controls, the soleus wet weight decreased by 69 and 30 percent in HS and HS-EX rats, respectively, and the percent of dark ATPase fibers increased from 10 percent in controls to 19 and 17 percent, respectively. The values of the integrated fiber activity (activity/min times muscle area) showed a net loss of SDH in both the light and dark ATPase fibers of HS rats, but only in the light ATPase fibers of the HS-EX rats, indicating that exercise ameliorated but did not prevent the muscle fiber atrophy induced by HS.

  2. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects in vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Maria Assunta; Montagnani, Monica; Nacci, Carmela; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background Green tea catechins seem to contribute toward reducing body weight and fat. Objective We aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin of green tea, reduces weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of metabolic syndrome, by increasing motor activity and/or by altering gastrointestinal motility. Design Nine-week-old SHR were randomly assigned to two groups and treated by gavage for 3 weeks with vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide or EGCG (200 mg/kg/day). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats were treated with vehicle alone. The effect of chronic administration of EGCG was evaluated on open-field motor activity and on ex vivo colonic and duodenal motility. Moreover, in vitro acute effect of 20-min incubation with EGCG (100 µM) or vehicle was evaluated in colonic and duodenal specimens from untreated WKY rats and SHR. Results Vehicle-treated SHR were normoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic, and showed a reduction of plasma adiponectin when compared to vehicle-treated WKY rats. In addition, consistent with fasting glucose and insulin values, vehicle-treated SHR were more insulin resistant than age-matched vehicle-treated WKY rats. Chronic treatment for 3 weeks with EGCG improved insulin sensitivity, raised plasma adiponectin levels, and reduced food intake and weight gain in SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR showed increased open-field motor activity (both crossings and rearings) when tested after each week of treatment. The overall hyperactivity of vehicle-treated SHR was significantly reduced to the levels of vehicle-treated WKY rats after 2 and 3 weeks of EGCG treatment. Colonic and duodenal preparations obtained from SHR chronically treated in vivo with EGCG showed reduced responses to carbachol (0.05–5 µM) and increased inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–10 Hz, 13 V, 1 msec, 10-sec train duration), respectively. In vitro acute EGCG

  3. Investigating the Effect of Zinc Chloride to Control External Bleeding in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite all progresses in surgical science, bleeding caused by traffic accidents is still a challenge for surgeons to save patients’ lives. Therefore, introducing an effective method to control external bleeding is an important research priority. Objectives: This study aimed to compare haemostatic effect of zinc chloride and simple suturing to control external bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision (two cm in length and half a cm in depth) was made on shaved back of rats. The hemostasis time was measured once using zinc chloride with different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using simple suturing. Skin tissue was assessed for pathological changes. Due to abnormal distribution of variables in Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: In all the groups, complete hemostasis occurred. Hemostasis times of different concentrations of zinc chloride were significantly less than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Zinc chloride was effective to control external bleeding in rats. PMID:25699284

  4. Chronic Treatment with Ivabradine Does Not Affect Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda C; Paiva, Franciny A; Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia C; Caldeira, Henrique M A; Fontes, Marco A P; de Menezes, Rodrigo C A; Casali, Karina R; Fortes, Gláucia H; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Solbiati, Monica; Montano, Nicola; Dias Da Silva, Valdo J; Chianca, Deoclécio A

    2016-01-01

    A low resting heart rate (HR) would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine-a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels- has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH) or ivabradine (IVA) during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP) and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p = 0.0005) and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11 bpm, p = 0.0146). However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu) (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p > 0.05); HF (nu) (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p > 0.05), any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (tonic sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p = 0.3494). We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p < 0.0001), without affecting RSNA (VEH: 117 ± 16 vs. IVA: 120 ± 9 spikes/s, p = 0.9100) and mean arterial pressure (VEH: 70 ± 4 vs. IVA: 77 ± 6 mmHg, p

  5. Chronic Treatment with Ivabradine Does Not Affect Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda C.; Paiva, Franciny A.; Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia C.; Caldeira, Henrique M. A.; Fontes, Marco A. P.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C. A.; Casali, Karina R.; Fortes, Gláucia H.; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Solbiati, Monica; Montano, Nicola; Dias Da Silva, Valdo J.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2016-01-01

    A low resting heart rate (HR) would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine—a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels- has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH) or ivabradine (IVA) during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP) and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p = 0.0005) and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11 bpm, p = 0.0146). However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu) (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p > 0.05); HF (nu) (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p > 0.05), any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (tonic sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p = 0.3494). We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p < 0.0001), without affecting RSNA (VEH: 117 ± 16 vs. IVA: 120 ± 9 spikes/s, p = 0.9100) and mean arterial pressure (VEH: 70 ± 4 vs. IVA: 77 ± 6 mm

  6. Increased VGLUT3 involved in visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Duan, Li-Ping; Qiao, Pei-Tang; Zhao, Li; Guo, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity of vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3) in a visceral hyperalgesia rat model of irritable bowel syndrome, and the role of mast cells (MCs). METHODS: Transient intestinal infection was induced by oral administration of Trichinella spiralis larvae in rats. On the 100th day post-infection (PI), the rats were divided into an acute cold restraint stress (ACRS) group and a non-stressed group. Age-matched untreated rats served as controls. The abdominal withdrawal reflex was used to measure the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD). The expression levels of VGLUT3 in peripheral and central neurons were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: VGLUT3 expression in the L6S1 dorsal root ganglion cells was significantly higher in the PI group than in the control group (0.32 ± 0.009 vs 0.22 ± 0.008, P < 0.01), and there was no significant difference in the expression of VGLUT3 between MC-deficient rats and their normal wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescence showed that the expression levels of VGLUT3 in PI + ACRS rats were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of the brain compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: VGLUT3 is involved in the pathogenesis of visceral hyperalgesia. Coexpression of c-fos, 5-hydroxytryptamine and VGLUT3 after CRD was observed in associated neuronal pathways. Increased VGLUT3 induced by transient intestinal infection was found in peripheral nerves, and was independent of MCs. Moreover, the expression of VGLUT3 was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in rats with induced infection and stress. PMID:25780293

  7. Adaptation to a cortex controlled robot attached at the pelvis and engaged during locomotion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Giszter, Simon F.

    2011-01-01

    Brain Machine Interfaces (BMIs) should ideally show robust adaptation of the BMI across different tasks and daily activities. Most BMIs have used over-practiced tasks. Little is known about BMIs in dynamic environments. How are mechanically body-coupled BMIs integrated into ongoing rhythmic dynamics, e.g., in locomotion? To examine this we designed a novel BMI using neural discharge in the hindlimb/trunk motor cortex in rats during locomotion to control a robot attached at the pelvis. We tested neural adaptation when rats experienced (a) control locomotion, (b) ‘simple elastic load’ (a robot load on locomotion without any BMI neural control) and (c) ‘BMI with elastic load’ (in which the robot loaded locomotion and a BMI neural control could counter this load). Rats significantly offset applied loads with the BMI while preserving more normal pelvic height compared to load alone. Adaptation occurred over about 100–200 step cycles in a trial. Firing rates increased in both the loaded conditions compared to baseline. Mean phases of cells’ discharge in the step cycle shifted significantly between BMI and the simple load condition. Over time more BMI cells became positively correlated with the external force and modulated more deeply, and neurons’ network correlations on a 100ms timescale increased. Loading alone showed none of these effects. The BMI neural changes of rate and force correlations persisted or increased over repeated trials. Our results show that rats have the capacity to use motor adaptation and motor learning to fairly rapidly engage hindlimb/trunk coupled BMIs in their locomotion. PMID:21414932

  8. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism. PMID:25539664

  9. Effects of pre-trial response requirements on self-control choices by rats and pigeons.

    PubMed

    Mazur, James E

    2012-03-01

    Parallel experiments with rats and pigeons examined whether the size of a pre-trial ratio requirement would affect choices in a self-control situation. In different conditions, either 1 response or 40 responses were required before each trial. In the first half of each experiment, an adjusting-ratio schedule was used, in which subjects could choose a fixed-ratio schedule leading to a small reinforcer, or an adjusting-ratio schedule leading to a larger reinforcer. The size of the adjusting ratio requirement was increased and decreased over trials based on the subject's responses, in order to estimate an indifference point-a ratio at which the two alternatives were chosen about equally often. The second half of each experiment used an adjusting-delay procedure-fixed and adjusting delays to the small and large reinforcers were used instead of ratio requirements. In some conditions, particularly with the reinforcer delays, the rats had consistently longer adjusting delays with the larger pre-trial ratios, reflecting a greater tendency to choose the larger, delayed reinforcer when more responding was required to reach the choice point. No consistent effects of the pre-trial ratio were found for the pigeons in any of the conditions. These results may indicate that rats are more sensitive to the long-term reinforcement rates of the two alternatives, or they may result from a shallower temporal discounting rate for rats than for pigeons, a difference that has been observed in previous studies. PMID:22389527

  10. Control and quantitation of voluntary weight-lifting performance of rats.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Oliver; Gregory, Erik W; Cutlip, Robert G; Miller, G Roger

    2003-07-01

    The present paper describes an exercise model that produces a voluntary hindlimb weight-lifting response. Each rat was operantly conditioned to enter a vertical tube, insert its head into a weighted ring (either 70 g or 700 g), lift the ring until its nose interrupted an infrared detector, and then lower the ring. Load cells measured the external force generated, and displacement transducers measured the vertical displacement of the ring during each lifting and lowering movement. The apparatus and training procedures were computer automated. Peak force, velocity, work, and power were calculated for each movement. Rats in both groups easily acquired the task after 12-15 training sessions, on average, conducted 5 days/wk. Once rats were trained, the lifting patterns were quite stable during several more weeks of posttraining exercise; however, the lighter 70-g load gave rise to more variable performances across rats. Results demonstrate the utility of quantitating the biomechanics of volitional movements and suggest that the present model can establish and maintain controlled repetitive movements necessary for studies of adaptation and/or injury in muscles, tendon, and bone. PMID:12665538

  11. Evaluating retinal circulation using video fluorescein angiography in control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bursell, S E; Clermont, A C; Shiba, T; King, G L

    1992-04-01

    Video fluorescein angiography has been used to evaluate retinal circulatory parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Video fluorescein angiograms were recorded from the retina using a modified retinal fundus camera following a 5 ul bolus injection of sodium fluorescein dye into the jugular vein. Retinal circulatory parameters were measured using computer assisted image analysis. These analyses were performed on 25 diabetic rats with 1 week duration of diabetes and 26 matched, non-diabetic, rats. There was a significant (p = .0001) increase in retinal Mean Circulation Time (MCT) in the diabetic group (1.83 +/- 0.40 s) compared to the control group (1.09 +/- 0.27 s). There were no significant differences in arterial or venous diameters comparing diabetic and control groups. In a separate paired experiment, measurements were made from the same animals both before and after one week duration of diabetes. A paired t-test analysis demonstrated significantly increased MCT times in the 6 diabetic animals (p = .001) while there was no significant differences detected in the 4 corresponding control animals. These results indicate that significant increases in retinal circulation times can be measured as early as 1 week after streptozotocin induced diabetes in this animal model. PMID:1388117

  12. Evaluation of Acid Tolerance of Drugs Using Rats and Dogs Controlled for Gastric Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Sano, Noriyasu; Furuta, Atsutoshi; Igari, Tomoko; Fujioka, Yasushi; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We attempted to establish animal models to evaluate the effects of drug degradation in the stomach on oral bioavailability. In addition, we assessed the utilization of animal studies in determining the need for enteric-coated formulations. In order to control the gastric pH in rats and dogs, appropriate dosing conditions were investigated using pentagastrin and rabeprazole, which stimulate and inhibit gastric acid secretion. Using animals controlled for gastric acid secretion, the area under curve (AUC) ratios (AUC with rabeprazole/AUC with pentagastrin) of all compounds unstable under acidic conditions were evaluated. The AUC ratios of omeprazole and erythromycin, which are administered orally to humans, as enteric-coated tablets, were greater than 1.9 in the rats and dogs controlled for gastric acid secretion. On the contrary, the AUC ratios of clarithromycin, azithromycin, and etoposide (commercially available as a standard immediate-release form) were less than 1.3 each. In conclusion, in vivo models using rats and dogs were optimized to evaluate the effects of gastric acid on the oral bioavailability of drugs, and demonstrated that in vivo models can lead to a better understanding of the oral bioavailability, with respect to the formulation development. PMID:25720462

  13. Role(s) of gravitational loading during developing period on the growth of rat soleus muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Goto, Katsumasa; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Ohira, Takashi; Nakai, Naoya; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2010-03-01

    Effects of gravitational loading or unloading on the gain of the characteristics in soleus muscle fibers were studied in rats. The tail suspension was performed in newborn rats from postnatal day 4 to month 3, and the reloading was allowed for 3 mo in some rats. Single expression of type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) was observed in approximately 82% of fibers in 3-mo-old controls, but the fibers expressing multiple MHC isoforms were noted in the unloaded rats. Although 97% of fibers in 3-mo-old controls had a single neuromuscular junction at the central region of fiber, fibers with multiple nerve endplates were seen in the unloaded group. Faster contraction speed and lower maximal tension development, even after normalization with fiber size, were observed in the unloaded pure type I MHC fibers. These parameters generally returned to the age-matched control levels after reloading. It was suggested that antigravity-related tonic activity plays an important role in the gain of single neural innervation and of slow contractile properties and phenotype in soleus muscle fibers. PMID:20056853

  14. Role(s) of Gravitational Loading on the Growth-Related Transformation of Fiber Phenotype in Rat Soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Fuminori; Goto, Katsumasa; Terada, Masahiro; Ohira, Takashi; Nakai, Naoya; Higo, Yoko; Yoshioka, Toshitada

    2008-06-01

    Effects of gravitational loading or unloading on the gain of the characteristics in soleus muscle fibers were studied in rats. The tail suspension was performed in newborn rats from the postnatal day 4 to month 3 and the reloading was allowed for 3 months in some rats. Single expression of type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) was observed in ~82% fibers in 3month old controls, but fibers expressing multiple MHC iso-forms were noted in the unloaded rats. Responses of fast or slow MHC protein expression to growth and/or unloading were not directly related to mRNA expression. Although 97% fibers in 3month old controls had a single neuromuscular junction at the central region of fiber, fibers with multiple nerve endplates were seen in the unloaded group. Faster contraction speed and lower maximal tension development, even after normalization with fiber size, were observed in the unloaded pure type I MHC fibers. These parameters generally returned to the age-matched control levels after reloading. It was suggested that antigravity-related tonic activity plays an important role in the gain of single neural innervation and of slow contractile properties and phenotype in soleus muscle fibers, which are not directly related to gene expression.

  15. Duodeno-Gastric-Esophageal Reflux—What is Pathologic? Comparison of Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus and Age-Matched Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgarten, Eva; Pütz, Benito; Hölscher, Arnulf H.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to analyse pH- and bile-monitoring data in patients with Barrett’s esophagus and in age- and gender-matched controls. Subjects and Methods Twenty-four consecutive Barrett’s patients (8 females, 16 males, mean age 57 years), 21 patients with esophagitis (10 females, 11 males, mean age 58 years), and 19 healthy controls (8 females, 11 males, mean age 51 years), were included. Only patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy. All groups were investigated with manometry, gastric and esophageal 24-h pH, and simultaneous bile monitoring according to a standardized protocol. A bilirubin absorption >0.25 was determined as noxious bile reflux. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) method was applied to determine the optimal cutoff value of pathologic bilirubin levels. Results Of Barrett’s patients, 79% had pathologic acidic gastric reflux (pH<4 >5% of total measuring time). However, 32% of healthy controls also had acid reflux (p < 0.05) without any symptoms. The median of esophageal bile reflux was 7.8% (lower quartile (LQ)–upper quartile (UQ) = 1.6–17.8%) in Barrett’s patients, in patients with esophagitis, 3.5% (LQ–UQ = 0.1–13.5), and in contrast to 0% (LQ–UQ = 0–1.0%) in controls, p = 0.001. ROC analysis showed the optimal dividing value for patients at more than 1% bile reflux over 24 h (75% sensitivity, 84% specificity). Conclusion An optimal threshold to differentiate between normal and pathological bile reflux into the esophagus is 1% (24-h bile monitoring with an absorbance >0.25). PMID:17436133

  16. Prefrontal cortical neuregulin-ErbB modulation of inhibitory control in rats.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Schetters, Dustin; Hoogeland, Myrthe; Spijker, Sabine; de Vries, Taco J; Pattij, Tommy

    2016-06-15

    Impulse control disturbances are key features of various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, drug addiction, Parkinson disease and schizophrenia. Whereas over the last years accumulating evidence has highlighted monoaminergic modulation of the processes underlying impulse control, investigating novel mechanisms beyond monoamines may provide new intervention strategies to ameliorate impulse control disturbances. Recent work has associated the neuregulin (Nrg)-ErbB pathway with several neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as indicated its involvement in murine measures of impulse control. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this Nrg-ErbB signaling pathway also modulates impulsive action in rats. To this end, a group of rats was trained in the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), an operant paradigm that provides measures of visuospatial attention and inhibitory control processes. Upon stable baseline performance, the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor JNJ-28871063 (JNJ) was intracranially infused into the medioprefrontal cortex prior to test sessions. Results showed that JNJ dose-dependently improved measures of impulsive action. Importantly, other measures in the 5-CSRTT reflecting visuospatial attention or aspects of motivational behavior were not altered by JNJ. In conclusion, the present data strengthen a role for the Nrg-ErbB4 pathway in the prefrontal cortex in cognitive functioning, and in particular point towards involvement in the processes underlying impulse control. PMID:27079641

  17. Effects of spatially extensive control of invasive rats on abundance of native invertebrates in mainland New Zealand forests.

    PubMed

    Ruscoe, Wendy A; Sweetapple, Peter J; Perry, Mike; Duncan, Richard P

    2013-02-01

    Predation on native fauna by non-native invasive mammals is widely documented, but effects of predation at the population level are rarely measured. Eradication of invasive mammals from islands has led to recovery of native biota, but the benefits of controlling invasive mammal populations in settings where eradication is not feasible are less understood. We used various combinations of aerially delivered toxic bait and control measures on the ground to reduce abundances of invasive rats (Rattus rattus) to low levels over large areas on mainland New Zealand and then monitored the abundance of invertebrates on replicated treatment sites to compare with abundances on similar nontreatment sites. We also assessed rat diet by examining stomach contents. Abundance of the rats' most-consumed invertebrate prey item, the large-bodied Auckland tree weta (Hemideina thoracica), increased 3-fold on treatment sites where we maintained rats at <4/ha for approximately 3 years, compared with the nontreatment sites. Auckland tree weta also increased in abundance on sites where rats were controlled with a single aerial-poisoning operation, but rat abundance subsequently increased on these sites and tree weta abundance then declined. Nevertheless, our data suggest that biennial reduction of rat abundances may be sufficient to allow increases in tree weta populations. Other invertebrates that were consumed less often (cave weta [Rhaphidophoridae], spiders [Araneae], and cockroaches [Blattodea]) showed no systematic changes in abundance following rat control. Our results suggest that the significant threat to recruitment and individual survival that predation by rats poses for tree weta can be mitigated by wide-scale aerial pest control. PMID:23020670

  18. Stress-reactive rats (high-avoidance female rats) have a shorter lifespan than stress-nonreactive rats (low-avoidance female rats)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Marumo, Hideki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Although Hatano high-avoidance and low-avoidance rats (HAA and LAA, respectively) have been selectively bred for good versus poor avoidance learning, HAA rats are known to be more reactive to stress than LAA rats. In this study, HAA and LAA female rats were compared during reproductive aging by observing estrous cycles from 8 to 11 months of age. Furthermore, these rats were allowed to live out their natural lifespans, that is, until 24 months of age, in order to compare their survival and to clarify the relationship between reproductive aging and tumor development. At eight months of age, 2 of 35 HAA rats and 20 of 35 LAA rats had abnormal estrous cycles. The median lifespan of the HAA rats (673 days) was shorter than that of the LAA rats (733 days). The incidence of pituitary neoplasia was higher in the HAA rats than in the LAA rats. These results suggest that HAA female rats (i.e., stress-reactive rats) have a shorter lifespan than LAA female rats (i.e., stress-nonreactive rats) and develop pituitary neoplasia, which was one of the causal factors in their accelerated mortality. However, the onset of an age-matched abnormal cycle did not correspond with their lifespan. PMID:27182111

  19. Periodontitis in Rats Induces Systemic Oxidative Stress That Is Controlled by Bone-Targeted Antiresorptives

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Sehkar; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F.; Velsko, Irina M.; Holliday, L. Shannon; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic, polymicrobial inflammatory disease that degrades connective tissue and alveolar bone and results in tooth loss. Oxidative stress has been linked to the onset of periodontal tissue breakdown and systemic inflammation, and the success of antiresorptive treatments will rely on how effectively they can ameliorate periodontal disease–induced oxidative stress during oral infection. Methods Rats were infected with polybacterial inoculum consisting of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, as an oral lavage every other week for 12 weeks. Daily subcutaneous injections of enoxacin, bisenoxacin, alendronate, or doxycycline were administered for 6 weeks after 6 weeks of polybacterial infection in rats. The serum levels of oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, were evaluated in each of the infected, treated, and sham-infected rats. Results Rats infected with the periodontal pathogens displayed a five-fold increase in the oxidative stress index compared with controls as a result of increased levels of serum oxidants and decreases in total antioxidant activity. The overall decrease in antioxidant activity occurred despite increases in three important antioxidant enzymes, suggesting an imbalance between antioxidant macromolecules/small molecules production and antioxidant enzyme levels. Surprisingly, the bone-targeted antiresorptives bis-enoxacin and alendronate inhibited increases in oxidative stress caused by periodontitis. Bis-enoxacin, which has both antiresorptive and antibiotic activities, was more effective than alendronate, which acts only as an antiresorptive. Conclusion To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the increased oxidative stress induced by periodontal infection in rats can be ameliorated by bone-targeted antiresorptives. PMID:25101489

  20. ATP synthesis and export in heart left ventricle mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Seccia, T M; Pierro, P; Vulpis, V; Marra, E; Pirrelli, A; Passarella, S

    1998-04-01

    Use was made of mitochondria isolated from heart left ventricles of either spontaneously hypertensive or age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats used as a control to find out whether hypertrophy (5-week-old rats) or hypertrophy/hypertension (24-week-old rats) can cause change in the mechanisms by which ATP is synthesised via ATP synthase and subsequently exported via the ADP/ATP translocator outside mitochondria. To do this, photometric measurements were made of the rate of ATP appearance in the extramitochondrial phase, which occurs as a result of ADP addition to mitochondria. In mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rats deficit of ATP production was found dependent on changes in the KmADP and Vmax values of both the ADP/ATP translocator and the ATP synthase. The ADP/ATP translocator was found to determine the rate of ATP production outside mitochondria in all the tested samples. In an initial investigation carried out to ascertain how cell ATP deficit can be counterbalanced, an increase in both adenylate kinase and creatine kinase activities was found in both hypertrophy and hypertrophy/hypertension. A possible increase in anaerobic glycolysis was also suggested by the increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. PMID:9852286

  1. Influence of spaceflight on succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of rat ventral horn neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and soma cross-sectional areas (CSA) of neurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the L5 segmental level of the spinal cord in the rat were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after 9 days of recovery on earth. The results were compared to those in age-matched ground-based control rats. Spinal cords were quick-frozen, and the SDH activity and CSA of a sample of neurons with a visible nucleus were determined using a digitizer and a computer-assisted image analysis system. An inverse relationship between CSA and SDH activity of neurons was observed in all groups of rats. No change in mean CSA or mean SDH activity or in the size distribution of neurons was observed following spaceflight or recovery. However, there was a selective decrease in the SDH activity of neurons with soma CSA between 500 and 800 microns2 in the flight rats, and this effect persisted for at least 9 days following return to 1 g. It remains to be determined whether the selected population of motoneurons or the specific motor pools affected by spaceflight may be restricted to specific muscles.

  2. Effects of Spaceflight on Bone Microarchitecture in the Axial and Appendicular Skeleton in Growing Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Keune, Jessica A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight on bone mass, density and microarchitecture in weight bearing (femur and humerus) and non-weight bearing (2nd lumbar vertebra and calvarium) bones in the context of ovarian hormone insufficiency. 12-week-old Fisher 344 rats were ovariectomized 2 weeks before flight and randomized into one of three groups: 1) baseline (n = 6), 2) ground control (n = 12) or 3) spaceflight (n = 12). Additional ground-based ovary-intact rats provided age-matched reference values at baseline (n = 8) and landing (n = 10). Ovariectomy resulted in bone- and bone compartment-specific deficits in cancellous bone volume fraction. Spaceflight resulted in lower cortical bone accrual in the femur but had no effect on cortical bone in the humerus or calvarium. Cancellous bone volume fraction was lower in flight animals compared to ground control animals in lumbar vertebra and distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis; significant differences were not detected in the distal humerus. Bone loss (compared to baseline controls) in the femur metaphysis was associated with lower trabecular number, whereas trabecular thickness and number were lower in the epiphysis. In summary, the effect of spaceflight on bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats was bone-and bone compartment-specific but not strictly related to weight bearing. PMID:26691062

  3. Kinetics and control of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria after dexamethasone treatment

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in order to evaluate the contributions of ATP synthesis and proton leak reactions to the rate of active respiration of liver mitochondria, which is altered following dexamethasone treatment (1.5 mg/kg per day for 5 days). We applied top-down metabolic control analysis and its extension, elasticity analysis, to gain insight into the mechanisms of glucocorticoid regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Liver mitochondria were isolated from dexamethasone-treated, pair-fed and control rats when in a fed or overnight fasted state. Injection of dexamethasone for 5 days resulted in an increase in the fraction of the proton cycle of phosphorylating liver mitochondria, which was associated with a decrease in the efficiency of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process in liver. This increase in proton leak activity occurred with little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, despite a significant decrease in the rate of oxidative phosphorylation. Regulation analysis indicates that mitochondrial membrane potential homoeostasis is achieved by equal inhibition of the mitochondrial substrate oxidation and phosphorylation reactions in rats given dexamethasone. Our results also suggest that active liver mitochondria from dexamethasone-treated rats are capable of maintaining phosphorylation flux for cellular purposes, despite an increase in the energetic cost of mitochondrial ATP production due to increased basal proton permeability of the inner membrane. They also provide a complete description of the effects of dexamethasone treatment on liver mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:15175015

  4. Impact of combined exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic control and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Iris C; Conti, Filipe F; Bernardes, Nathalia; Brito, Janaina de O; Galdini, Elia G; Cavaglieri, Cláudia R; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2015-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aerobic, resistance, or combined exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic control and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into one of five groups: euglycemic sedentary (ES), diabetic ovariectomized sedentary (DOS), diabetic ovariectomized aerobic-trained (DOTA), diabetic ovariectomized resistance-trained (DOTR), or diabetic ovariectomized aerobic+resistance-trained (DOTC). Arterial pressure (AP) was directly recorded and baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by heart rate responses to AP changes. Cardiovascular autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analyses. No differences were observed in body weight and glycemia between diabetic rats. Animals in the DOTC and DOTA groups exhibited an increase in running time, whereas animals in the DOTC and DOTR groups showed greater strength. Trained groups exhibited improvement in total power and the high-frequency band of pulse interval and reduced mortality (vs. DOS). Animals in the DOTC (bradycardic and tachycardic responses) and DOTA (tachycardic responses) groups exhibited attenuation in baroreflex dysfunction that was observed in DOS and DOTR animals, and an improvement in AP variance. In conclusion, all training protocols led to reduced mortality, which may be due to an increase in physical capacity and to cardiovascular and autonomic benefits following training, regardless of any improvement in glycemic control. In this model, the aerobic and combined trainings seem to promote additional cardiovascular autonomic benefits when compared with resistance training alone. PMID:26183482

  5. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  6. Neuronal codes for the inhibitory control of impulsive actions in the rat infralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Ohmura, Yu; Izumi, Takeshi; Matsushima, Toshiya; Amita, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Taku; Yoshida, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Poor impulse control is a debilitating condition observed in various psychiatric disorders and could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. The rat infralimbic cortex (IL), located in the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex, has been implicated in impulse control. To elucidate the neurophysiological basis of impulse control, we recorded single unit activity in the IL of a rat performing a 3-choiceserial reaction time task (3-CSRTT) and 2-choice task (2-CT), which are animal models for impulsivity. The inactivation of IL neuronal activity with an injection of muscimol (0.1 μg /side) disrupted impulse control in the 3-CSRTT. More than 60% (38/56) of isolated IL units were linked to impulse control, while approximately 30% of all units were linked to attentional function in the 3-CSRTT. To avoid confounding motor-related units with the impulse control-related units, we further conducted the 2-CT in which the animals' motor activities were restricted during recording window. More than 30% (14/44) of recorded IL units were linked to impulse control in the 2-CT. Several types of impulse control-related units were identified. Only 16% of all units were compatible with the results of the muscimol experiment, which showed a transient decline in the firing rate immediately before the release of behavioral inhibition. This is the first study to elucidate the neurophysiological basis of impulse control in the IL and to propose that IL neurons control impulsive actions in a more complex manner than previously considered. PMID:26341319

  7. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G.; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  8. Control of burn wound sepsis in rats by methylene blue-mediated photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Control of wound sepsis is an important challenge in traumatology. However, increase in the drug-resistant bacteria makes this challenge considerably difficult in recent years. In this study, we attempted to control burn wound sepsis in rats by photodynamic treatment, which has been reported to be effective against some drug-resistant bacteria. A 20% TBSA (total body surface area) full-thickness burn was made in rat dorsal skin, and five days after injury, a suspension of P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface. At 30 min after infection, a methylene blue (MB) solution was applied to the wound surface; 5 min afterwards, the wound was illuminated with a 665-nm light emitting diode (LED) array for 10 min. This treatment (application of MB and illumination) was repeated 3 times successively. The averaged light intensity on the wound surface was 3.3 mW/cm2, the corresponding total light dose being 5.9 J/cm2. One week after injury, the numbers of bacteria in the blood and liver were counted by colony forming assay. In the liver, the number of bacteria of the treated group was significantly lower than that of the sham control group without photodynamic treatment. In the blood, no bacteria were detected in the treated group, while a certain amount of bacteria was detected in the control group. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MB-mediated PDT with a red LED array to control burn wound sepsis.

  9. Binding of bovine thyrotropin to specific sites in thyroid tissue from control and hemithyroidectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, O.H.; Lambert, W.R.; Amir, S.M.; Ingbar, S.H.

    1985-12-01

    The binding of 125I-bovine thyrotropin to thyroid particulate fractions from sham-operated (control) and hemithyroidectomized rats was compared to determine if a change in either the number of bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (bTSH) binding sites or their affinity for bTSH occurs in physiological situations that evoke changes in the intensity of thyroid stimulation. Following hemithyroidectomy serum TSH levels increase and the remnant thyroid lobe enlarges. Because of compensatory thyroid hypertrophy the concentration of TSH binding sites in the thyroid glands from hemithyroidectomized and control rats was related to particulate protein concentration, to the degree of thyroid cellularity as indicated by DNA concentration, and to the concentration of the plasma membrane markers, 5'-nucleotidase and magnesium-dependent ATPase. In each of four experiments, saturation studies revealed that the maximum specific binding of TSH per unit particulate protein and per thyroid lobe was greater in particulates from remnant than from control thyroid lobes. When related to DNA concentration, the concentration of TSH binding sites in remnant lobes was approximately twice that in control lobes. Because of an increase in plasma membrane markers per lobe after hemithyroidectomy, however, there was no difference in the number of TSH binding sites when related to the concentrations of the membrane marker enzymes in the particulate fractions. As judged from Scatchard analysis, the affinity of TSH binding was lower in remnant than in control lobes. This was partially but not completely due to the increased concentration of particulate protein in the remnant thyroid. These experiments demonstrate that the increase in serum TSH levels after hemithyroidectomy in the rat is associated with alterations in TSH receptor capacity and affinity.

  10. Effects of high-intensity swimming training on GLUT-4 and glucose transport activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Terada, S; Yokozeki, T; Kawanaka, K; Ogawa, K; Higuchi, M; Ezaki, O; Tabata, I

    2001-06-01

    This study was performed to assess the effects of short-term, extremely high-intensity intermittent exercise training on the GLUT-4 content of rat skeletal muscle. Three- to four-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats with an initial body weight ranging from 45 to 55 g were used for this study. These rats were randomly assigned to an 8-day period of high-intensity intermittent exercise training (HIT), relatively high-intensity intermittent prolonged exercise training (RHT), or low-intensity prolonged exercise training (LIT). Age-matched sedentary rats were used as a control. In the HIT group, the rats repeated fourteen 20-s swimming bouts with a weight equivalent to 14, 15, and 16% of body weight for the first 2, the next 4, and the last 2 days, respectively. Between exercise bouts, a 10-s pause was allowed. RHT consisted of five 17-min swimming bouts with a 3-min rest between bouts. During the first bout, the rat swam without weight, whereas during the following four bouts, the rat was attached to a weight equivalent to 4 and 5% of its body weight for the first 5 days and the following 3 days, respectively. Rats in the LIT group swam 6 h/day for 8 days in two 3-h bouts separated by 45 min of rest. In the first experiment, the HIT, LIT, and control rats were compared. GLUT-4 content in the epitrochlearis muscle in the HIT and LIT groups after training was significantly higher than that in the control rats by 83 and 91%, respectively. Furthermore, glucose transport activity, stimulated maximally by both insulin (2 mU/ml) (HIT: 48%, LIT: 75%) and contractions (25 10-s tetani) (HIT: 55%, LIT: 69%), was higher in the training groups than in the control rats. However, no significant differences in GLUT-4 content or in maximal glucose transport activity in response to both insulin and contractions were observed between the two training groups. The second experiment demonstrated that GLUT-4 content after HIT did not differ from that after RHT (66% higher in trained rats than

  11. Repetitive exposure to low-dose X-irradiation attenuates testicular apoptosis in type 2 diabetic rats, likely via Akt-mediated Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuguang; Kong, Chuipeng; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Zhenyu; Wan, Zhiqiang; Jia, Lin; Liu, Qiuju; Wang, Yuehui; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei; Han, Fujun; Cai, Lu

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether repetitive exposure to low-dose radiation (LDR) attenuates type 2 diabetes (T2DM)-induced testicular apoptotic cell death in a T2DM rat model, we examined the effects of LDR exposure on diabetic and age-matched control rats. We found that testicular apoptosis and oxidative stress levels were significantly higher in T2DM rats than in control rats. In addition, glucose metabolism-related Akt and GSK-3β function was downregulated and Akt negative regulators PTP1B and TRB3 were upregulated in the T2DM group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase content were also found to be decreased in T2DM rats. These effects were partially prevented or reversed by repetitive LDR exposure. Nrf2 and its downstream genes NQO1, SOD, and catalase were significantly upregulated by repetitive exposure to LDR, suggesting that the reduction of T2DM-induced testicular apoptosis due to repetitive LDR exposure likely involves enhancement of testicular Akt-mediated glucose metabolism and anti-oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:26704079

  12. Changes in baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in high-fat-fed rats as a predictor of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fardin, Núbia M; Oyama, Lila M; Campos, Ruy R

    2012-08-01

    There is evidence that obesity is associated with increased sympathetic activity and hypertension. However, the mechanisms responsible for these changes are not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the cardiovascular function and the baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) in rats exposed to a high-fat diet over different periods (10 and 20 weeks) compared to control rats. Serum leptin levels were assessed for all time points. Male Wistar rats weighing 150-180 g were used. Four groups of rats were studied: control 10 weeks (Ct10), obese 10 weeks (Ob10), control 20 weeks (Ct20), and obese 20 weeks (Ob20). Blood pressure (BP) and rSNA were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats (1.4 g/kg, intravenous).The sensitivity of rSNA responses to baroreceptor reflex was assessed by changes in BP induced by increasing doses of phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside. Significant and progressive increases in serum leptin levels were found in the obese rats, but not in the control rats. No changes in basal BP or rSNA were found in the Ob10 and Ob20 groups; however, a significant impairment in the baroreceptor sensitivity was observed in the Ob20 group for phenylephrine (slope Ob20: -0.78 ± 0.12 vs. Ct20: -1.00 ± 0.08 potential per second (pps)/mm Hg, P < 0.05) and sodium nitroprusside (slope Ob20: -0.82 ± 0.09 vs. 1.13 ± 0.13 pps/mm Hg, P < 0.05). The results suggest that the baroreceptor dysfunction that controls the rSNA is an initial change in the obesity induced in high-fat-fed rats, which might be a predictor of sympathoexcitation and hypertension associated to obesity. PMID:22257982

  13. Effects of dopamine agents on a schedule-induced polydipsia procedure in the spontaneously hypertensive rat and in Wistar control rats.

    PubMed

    Íbias, Javier; Miguéns, Miguel; Pellón, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has been proposed as an animal model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and typically develops excessive patterns of response under most behavioural protocols. Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is the excessive water consumption that occurs as a schedule effect when food is intermittently delivered and animals are partially food- but not water-deprived. SIP has been used as a model of excessive behaviour, and considerable evidence has involved the dopaminergic system in its development and maintenance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the most common psychostimulants used in ADHD treatment on SIP, comparing their effects in SHRs with rats from control populations. SHR, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar rats were submitted to a multiple fixed time (FT) food schedule with two components: 30 s and 90 s. The acute effects of different dopaminergic compounds were evaluated after 40 sessions of SIP acquisition. All animals showed higher adjunctive drinking under FT 30 s than FT 90 s, and SHRs displayed higher asymptotic SIP levels in FT 90 s compared to WKY and Wistar rats. SHRs were less sensitive to dopaminergic agents than control rats in terms of affecting rates of adjunctive drinking. These differences point to an altered dopaminergic system in the SHR and provide new insights into the neurobiological basis of ADHD pharmacological treatments. PMID:27296274

  14. Relations between contractile responses and. beta. -adrenoceptors in gastric fundus of diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yasushi; Inazu, Masato; Aihara, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuaki; Homma, Ikuo )

    1991-01-01

    Contractile responses to norepinephrine (NE), and the population of {beta}-adrenoceptors, were determined in gastric fundus smooth muscle from rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin(STZ), and age-matched controls. Relaxation and/or contraction of fundus strips of controls and diabetics were induced by 10{sup {minus}5}M NE. Responses to NE were mainly relaxation in gastric fundus isolated from controls, and contraction in fundus isolated from diabetics. Contraction was blocked by 10{sup {minus}8}M prazosin and relaxation was blocked by 10{sup {minus}6}M propranolol. Relaxation by isoproterenol of contraction induced by 10{sup {minus}6}M acetylcholine was significantly less in fundus from diabetics than in that from controls. The number of {beta}-adrenoceptors, measured with ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindorol as a ligand, was significantly less in gastic fundus membrane isolated from diabetics than in that from controls, but affinity was no different. The level of plasma catecholamine was higher in diabetics than in controls. Results suggest that depression of gastric fundus relaxation and increase of contraction by NE in diabetics could be due to fewer {beta}-adrenoceptor binding sites caused by down-regulation by higher catecholamine level in diabetic rats.

  15. Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation via beetroot juice on exercising muscle vascular control in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Scott K; Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2013-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation, via its reduction to nitrite (NO2−) and subsequent conversion to nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen intermediates, reduces blood pressure and the O2 cost of submaximal exercise in humans. Despite these observations, the effects of dietary NO3− supplementation on skeletal muscle vascular control during locomotory exercise remain unknown. We tested the hypotheses that dietary NO3− supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) would reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increase hindlimb muscle blood flow in the exercising rat. Male Sprague–Dawley rats (3–6 months) were administered either NO3− (via beetroot juice; 1 mmol kg−1 day−1, BR n= 8) or untreated (control, n= 11) tap water for 5 days. MAP and hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance (radiolabelled microsphere infusions) were measured during submaximal treadmill running (20 m min−1, 5% grade). BR resulted in significantly lower exercising MAP (control: 137 ± 3, BR: 127 ± 4 mmHg, P < 0.05) and blood [lactate] (control: 2.6 ± 0.3, BR: 1.9 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) compared to control. Total exercising hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (control: 108 ± 8, BR: 150 ± 11 ml min−1 (100 g)−1, P < 0.05) and vascular conductance (control: 0.78 ± 0.05, BR: 1.16 ± 0.10 ml min−1 (100 g)−1 mmHg−1, P < 0.05) were greater in rats that received BR compared to control. The relative differences in blood flow and vascular conductance for the 28 individual hindlimb muscles and muscle parts correlated positively with their percentage type IIb + d/x muscle fibres (blood flow: r= 0.74, vascular conductance: r= 0.71, P < 0.01 for both). These data support the hypothesis that NO3− supplementation improves vascular control and elevates skeletal muscle O2 delivery during exercise predominantly in fast-twitch type II muscles, and provide a potential mechanism by which NO3− supplementation improves metabolic control. PMID:23070702

  16. Spaceflight effects on biomechanical and biochemical properties of rat vertebrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Salem, G. J.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The biomechanical and biochemical responses of lumbar vertebral bodies during a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) were determined for rapidly growing rats (90-day-old, Czechoslovakian-Wistar). By use of age-matched vivarium controls (normal cage environment) and synchronous controls (simulated flight conditions), as well as a basal control group (killed before lift-off on the 1st day of flight), the combined influences of growth and space-flight could be examined. Centra of the sixth lumbar vertebrae (L6) were compressed to 50% strain at a fast strain rate while immersed in physiological buffer (37 degrees C). The body masses of vivarium and synchronous controls were significantly heavier than either the flight or basal controls. The flight group had an L6 vertebral body compressional stiffness that was 39% less than the vivarium controls, 47% less than the synchronous control, and 16% less than the basal controls. In addition, the average initial maximum load of the flight L6 was 22% less than vivarium controls and 18% less than the synchronous controls, whereas the linear compressional load of the flight group averaged 34% less than the vivarium and 25% less than the synchronous groups. The structural properties of the vertebrae from the 12.5-day-younger basal group closely resembled the flight vertebrae. Calcium, phosphorous, and hydroxyproline concentrations were not significantly different among the groups. Nevertheless, the lack of strength and stiffness development in spaceflight, coupled with a smaller proportion of mature hydroxypyridinoline cross-links, suggested that the 12.5 days of spaceflight slowed the maturation of trabecular bone in the vertebral bodies of rapidly growing rats.

  17. Neocerebellar control of the motor activity: experimental analysis in the rat. Comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Cicirata, F; Angaut, P; Pantó, M R; Serapide, M F

    1989-01-01

    The results collected by electrical microstimulation of the nucleus lateralis of the cerebellum in anaesthetized rats may be summarized as follows. The stimulations evoked motor effects in head and forelimb principally whereas hindlimb was only occasionally involved. The movements were prevalently segregated to only one joint (simple movements), in a lesser degree they involved two or three segments (complex movements). Simple and complex movements were apparently distributed in the nuclear mass without topographical segregation or preferentiality. The electromyographic records suggest that the neocerebellar movements are of synergistic nature. A somatotopical organization was evidenced within the nucleus lateralis: 3 specific functional regions were identified in the caudorostral nuclear extension. They concern the forelimb (caudally), head (centrally) and hindlimb (rostrally). This somatotopical organization persisted unmodified following elimination of either the cerebral motor cortex alone or in addition to that of the red nucleus. The nuclear subdivisions of the cerebellar nucleus lateralis showed functional differences: (1) the dorsolateral hump of Goodman et al. was principally involved in lip movements; (2) the subnucleus lateralis parvocellularis elicited movements of single vibrissae, neck and medio-distal segments of the forelimb, prevalently; (3) the magnocellular subdivision essentially controlled both limbs with large prevalence for their medio-proximal segments. To identify the functional role of the different descending pathways which relay the neocerebellum to the cord, the motor effects evoked in intact rats were compared with those elicited in rats submitted to cortical ablation and/or to lesion of the red nucleus region. The integrity of the cerebral cortex was essential only for distalmost forelimb motor activities. After lesion of the rubral region (which concomitantly eliminates corticospinal output), the stimulation of the nucleus lateralis

  18. Correlates of photoreceptor rescue by transplantation of human fetal RPE in the RCS rat.

    PubMed

    Little, C W; Cox, C; Wyatt, J; del Cerro, C; del Cerro, M

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a water maze paradigm as a tool to assess posttransplantation changes in behavior associated with a visual stimulus. A set of dystrophic RCS rats received bilateral injections of freshly isolated human fetal RPE cells into the subretinal space of the superior equatorial hemisphere. Five age-matched control dystrophic RCS rats received subretinal injections of vehicle. All animals were immunosuppressed. At 2 months posttransplantation, each rat was tested in the water escape apparatus. The rat used a single light source, randomly located on the edge of the tank, to locate a submerged platform, placed directly in front of the light. Each rat was timed and videotaped during 10 consecutive trials. The swimming paths and times for all rats were recorded and statistically analyzed. Subsequent to the water escape trials, the eyes were embedded for histologic analysis which included quantitative assessment of photoreceptor cells in predefined retinal regions. The water escape data indicated the differences between the sham and experimental groups changed significantly over time (P = 0.0017). Over time, the transplanted animals learned to use light as a clue (P < 0.0001), whereas the sham animals did not (P = 0.73). Transplanted eyes had a significantly greater mean number of photoreceptors in the superior, grafted region than seen in the inferior region of the same eyes and compared with either region of sham-injected eyes (P = 0.0023). Statistical analyses demonstrated a functional advantage for visually guided behavior in RCS rats transplanted with human fetal RPE cells and a statistically significant PRC rescue effect at 2 months after transplantation. PMID:9454624

  19. Hepatic Isoprenoid Metabolism in a Rat Model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. Kennedy; Mitchell, David A.; Goulah, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated (4 to 7-fold) levels of urinary dolichol and coenzyme Q and substantially longer chain lengths for urinary dolichols have been reported in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) patients, compared to normal subjects. We investigated the possibility of similar alterations in hepatic, nonsterol isoprenoids in a well-established rat model of SLOS. In this model, the ratio of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (Chol) in serum approached 15:1; however, total sterol mass in serum decreased by >80 %. Livers from treated rats had 7DHC/Chol ratios of ~32:1, but the steady-state levels of total sterols were >40 % those of livers from age-matched (3-month-old) control animals. No significant differences in the levels of LDL receptor or HMG-CoA reductase were observed. The levels of dolichol and coenzyme Q were elevated only modestly (by 64 and 31 %, respectively; p < 0.05, N = 6) in the livers of the SLOS rat model compared to controls; moreover, the chain lengths of these isoprenoids were not different in the two groups. We conclude that hepatic isoprenoid synthesis is marginally elevated in this animal model of SLOS, but without preferential shunting to the nonsterol branches (dolichol and coenzyme Q) of the pathway and without alteration of normal dolichol chain lengths. PMID:23361583

  20. Inhibiting Amadori-modified albumin formation improves biomarkers of podocyte damage in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Margo P; Shearman, Clyde W

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that urinary excretion of podocyte proteins is an indicator of podocyte injury, and that podocyte abnormalities and elevated concentrations of Amadori-modified glycated albumin (AGA) are linked to the development of diabetic nephropathy and to each other. We evaluated relationships between urinary markers of podocyte damage, increased AGA and filtration function in rats made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and treated for 8 weeks with a compound that inhibits the formation of AGA, with age-matched nondiabetic and diabetic rats serving as controls. Blood and urine were collected for measurement of glycated albumin, creatinine, albumin, nephrin, podocalyxin, and βig-h3 protein. The elevated circulating concentrations of glycated albumin and higher urinary levels of these podocyte markers as well as of albumin that were observed in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls were significantly reduced in animals receiving test compound, and decrease in urinary biomarkers correlated with reduction in AGA. The results provide evidence that lowering the concentration of AGA, independent of filtration status and hyperglycemia, reduces urinary nephrin, podocalyxin, and βig-h3 protein, linking the increased glycated albumin associated with diabetes to podocyte abnormalities and shedding of podocyte proteins into the urine. PMID:24303153

  1. Decreased catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medullae of chronically diabetic BB-Wistar rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Lelkes, P. I.; Hillard, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Many humans with IDDM eventually lose the capacity to secrete epinephrine from their adrenal medullae. The mechanism for this pathological change is unknown. We hypothesized that this abnormality is attributable to neuropathic changes in the greater splanchnic nerves or in the chromaffin cells that they innervate. To study this hypothesis, we isolated rat adrenal glands, perfused them ex vivo, and measured the epinephrine content of the perfusate under various conditions of stimulation. We used transmural electrical stimulation (20-80 V, at 10 Hz) to induce epinephrine secretion indirectly by selectively activating residual splanchnic nerve terminals within the isolated glands. Under these conditions, epinephrine secretion was severely attenuated in glands from female BB-Wistar rats with diabetes of 4 mo duration compared with their age-matched, nondiabetic controls. These perfused diabetic adrenal medullae also demonstrated decreased catecholamine release in response to direct chromaffin cell depolarization with 20 mM K+, evidence that a functional alteration exists within the chromaffin cells themselves. Nonetheless, total catecholamine content of adrenal medullae from these diabetic rats was not significantly different from controls, indicating that the secretory defect was not simply attributable to a difference in the amount of catecholamines stored and available for release. Herein, we also provide histological evidence of degenerative changes within the cholinergic nerve terminals that innervate these glands.

  2. Distribution of calcium in the rat due to chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ellis, K J; Martino, A; Yasumura, S; Brook, D; Cohn, S H; Letteri, J M

    1977-01-01

    During the 12 weeks following 5/6 nephrectomy in rats with moderate uremia (creatinine 0.7-1.2 mg/100 ml, BUN 53-89 mg/100 ml), no significant increases in total soft tissue calcification were observed. The calcium concentration of skeletal muscle remained unchanged at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. A slight but not significant increase in skin calcium was found. However, a significant decrease in cardiac calcium was found for the uremic animals. Total body calcium as determined by neutron activation analysis was significantly lower in the uremic rat when compared with the age-matched animal. However, when normalized for body weight, the total calcium content in uremic rats did not differ from the controls. Similar findings were observed for the absolute calcium content of the tibia and when normalized for weight. Furthermore, a highly significant linear relationship (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) was established between absolute levels of total body calcium and tibia calcium which was identical for control and uremic groups. PMID:854140

  3. FES control of isometric forces in the rat hindlimb using many muscles.

    PubMed

    Jarc, Anthony M; Berniker, Max; Tresch, Matthew C

    2013-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) attempts to restore motor behaviors to paralyzed limbs by electrically stimulating nerves and/or muscles. This restoration of behavior requires specifying commands to a large number of muscles, each making an independent contribution to the ongoing behavior. Efforts to develop FES systems in humans have generally been limited to preprogrammed, fixed muscle activation patterns. The development and evaluation of more sophisticated FES control strategies is difficult to accomplish in humans, mainly because of the limited access of patients for FES experiments. Here, we developed an in vivo FES test platform using a rat model that is capable of using many muscles for control and that can therefore be used to evaluate potential strategies for developing flexible FES control strategies. We first validated this FES test platform by showing consistent force responses to repeated stimulation, monotonically increasing muscle recruitment with constant force directions, and linear summation of costimulated muscles. These results demonstrate that we are able to differentially control the activation of many muscles, despite the small size of the rat hindlimb. We then demonstrate the utility of this platform to test potential FES control strategies, using it to test our ability to effectively produce open-loop control of isometric forces. We show that we are able to use this preparation to produce a range of endpoint forces flexibly and with good accuracy. We suggest that this platform will aid in FES controller design, development, and evaluation, thus accelerating the development of effective FES applications for the restoration of movement in paralyzed patients. PMID:23303688

  4. Spontaneous epileptiform activity in rat neocortex after controlled cortical impact injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lie; Afroz, Sonia; Michelson, Hillary B; Goodman, Jeffrey H; Valsamis, Helen A; Ling, Douglas S F

    2010-08-01

    A hallmark of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the development of post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE). However, the mechanisms underlying PTE remain poorly understood. In this study, we used a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model in rats to examine post-traumatic changes in neocortical excitability. Neocortical slices were prepared from rats at 7-9 days (week 1) and 14-16 days (week 2) after CCI injury. By week 2, we observed a substantial gray matter lesion with a cavity that extended to the hippocampal structure. Fluoro-Jade B staining of slices revealed active neuronal degeneration during weeks 1 and 2. Intracellular and extracellular recordings obtained from layer V revealed evoked and spontaneous epileptiform discharges in neocortices of CCI-injured rats. At week 1, intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells revealed evoked epileptiform firing that was synchronized with population events recorded extracellularly, suggestive of increased excitability. This activity was characterized by bursts of action potentials that were followed by recurrent, repetitive after-discharges. At week 2, both spontaneous and evoked epileptiform firing were recorded in slices from injured rats. The evoked discharges resembled those observed at week 1, but with longer burst durations. Spontaneous activity included prolonged, ictal-like discharges lasting up to 8-10 sec, and briefer interictal-like burst events (<1 sec). These results indicate that during the first 2 weeks following severe CCI injury, there is a progressive development of neocortical hyperexcitability that ultimately leads to spontaneous epileptiform firing, suggesting a rapid epileptogenic process. PMID:20504156

  5. Effect of L-NAME-induced hypertension on melatonin receptors and melatonin levels in the pineal gland and the peripheral organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Benova, Miroslava; Herichova, Iveta; Stebelova, Katarina; Paulis, Ludovit; Krajcirovicova, Kristina; Simko, Fedor; Zeman, Michal

    2009-04-01

    Melatonin plays a role in blood pressure (BP) control. The aim of this study was to determine whether melatonin concentrations and melatonin receptor levels are altered in L-NAME-treated, NO-deficient hypertensive rats. Two groups of male adult Wistar rats were investigated: rats (n=36) treated with NO-synthase inhibitor L-NAME (40 mg kg(-1)) and age-matched controls (n=36). BP was measured weekly by tail-cuff plethysmography. After 4 weeks, L-NAME administration increased BP (178+/-1 vs. control 118+/-1 mm Hg). At the end of treatment, rats were killed in regular 4 h intervals over a 24-h period. Melatonin concentrations in the plasma, pineal gland, heart and kidney and melatonin receptor (MT(1)) density in the aorta were determined. A significant daily rhythm of melatonin concentrations was found in the blood, pineal gland, kidney and heart of both control and hypertensive rats. Peak nighttime pineal melatonin concentrations were higher in L-NAME-treated rats than in controls (3.38+/-0.48 vs. 1.75+/-0.33 ng per pineal gland). No differences between both groups were found in melatonin concentrations in blood, kidney and heart or in the MT(1) receptor density in the aorta. Our results suggest that L-NAME treatment enhances melatonin production in the pineal gland, potentially by decreasing an inhibitory effect of NO on melatonin production in the pineal gland. However, the enhanced pineal melatonin formation was insufficient to increase melatonin concentrations in circulation, heart and kidney of L-NAME-treated rats, indicating an increased use of melatonin in hypertensive animals. PMID:19262491

  6. [Chronological analyses of neuropathological and molecular biological changes in affected spinal cord of HTLV-I-infected rat (HAM rat disease)].

    PubMed

    Ohya, O

    2000-03-01

    The author chronologically analyzed neuropathological aspects of the demyelination process in spinal cords of a rat model of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) from early asymptomatic to late disease stage for clarifying the pathogenetic roles of HTLV-I in central nervous system. There was no significant difference in histopathological and immunohistochemical findings between the rats within 7 months after the HTLV-I infection and age-matched controls. The first sign of demyelination was the appearance of apoptotic cell death beginning at 7 months after the infection and the apoptotic cell number gradually increased to 12 cells per a whole horizontal section of the spinal cord, in contrast to 5 cells in the control rats. The majority of the apoptotic cells were shown to be oligodendrocytes by immunohistochemical stain with an anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody. Increment of activated microglia/macrophages started at 9 months after the infection and they rapidly increased from 15 months to reach 600 cells per a whole horizontal section, in contrast to 300 cells in the control rats. Rapid increase of gemistocytic astrocytes was found from 20 months after the infection (the late disease stage). Molecular analysis of the spinal cords revealed that HTLV-I provirus DNA was evident as early as 4 months after the infection, and massages of HTLV-I pX and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha began to be expressed at 7 months, just before or at the same time as the appearance of the apoptotic cells. The collective evidence suggests that the apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes, which may be induced either directly by the local expression of HTLV-I or indirectly by upregulated cytotoxic humoral mediators, such as TNF-alpha, through the transactive function of p40 Tax, is the major cause of chronic progressive myelopathy in WKAH rats with HTLV-I infection. PMID:10791252

  7. (-)-Epicatechin administration and exercising skeletal muscle vascular control and microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; White, Michael J; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2013-01-15

    Consumption of the dietary flavanol (-)-epicatechin (EPI) is associated with enhanced endothelial function and augmented skeletal muscle capillarity and mitochondrial volume density. The potential for EPI to improve peripheral vascular function and muscle oxygenation during exercise is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that EPI administration in healthy rats would improve treadmill exercise performance secondary to elevated skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance [VC, blood flow/mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and improved skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation. Rats received water (control, n = 12) or 4 mg/kg EPI (n = 12) via oral gavage daily for 24 days. Exercise endurance capacity and peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2) peak) were measured via treadmill runs to exhaustion. MAP (arterial catheter) and blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured and VC was calculated during submaximal treadmill exercise (25 m/min, 5% grade). Spinotrapezius muscle microvascular O(2) pressure (Po(2mv)) was measured (phosphorescence quenching) during electrically induced twitch (1 Hz) contractions. In conscious rats, EPI administration resulted in lower (↓~5%) resting (P = 0.03) and exercising (P = 0.04) MAP. There were no differences in exercise endurance capacity, Vo(2) peak, total exercising hindlimb blood flow (control, 154 ± 13; and EPI, 159 ± 8 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P = 0.68), or VC (control, 1.13 ± 0.10; and EPI, 1.24 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.21) between groups. Following anesthesia, EPI resulted in lower MAP (↓~16%) but did not impact resting Po(2mv) or any kinetics parameters (P > 0.05 for all) during muscle contractions compared with control. EPI administration (4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) improved modestly cardiovascular function (i.e., ↓MAP) with no impact on exercise performance, total exercising skeletal muscle blood flow and VC, or contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats. PMID:23144313

  8. An indirect electric field-induced control in directional migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyoun-Hyang; Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Seo, Cheong; Jeong, Je Hoon; Yoo, Yeong-Eun; Lee, Dae Hoon

    2014-12-01

    We present the efficacy of an indirect E-field on the directional migration of rat mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). To avoid current flow through culture media and cell, E-fields were generated without exposing electrodes directly to the cell media. MSC migration was observed during wound closure in presence of indirect E-field. MSC migration depended on the E-field strength and occurs predominantly in the anodal direction. Indirect E-field therapy proved as tentative tool for controlled cell movement and healing.

  9. Stimulus-controlled responding for ethanol in AA and Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hyytiä, P; Sinclair, J D

    1991-01-01

    A method for establishing stimulus control of ethanol responding was developed. After acquisition of lever pressing for oral ethanol, rats of the high-drinking AA (Alko, Alcohol) line and of the moderate-drinking Wistar strain were subjected to alternating 20-min alcohol access periods signaled by a stimulus light, and 40-min nonaccess periods with no light. Ethanol responding during access periods progressively increased and decreased during nonaccess. These changes were faster in the AAs than the Wistars, probably related to differential reinforcement from ethanol. In a second experiment, rats responding under stimulus control were given periods of alcohol deprivation of 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, indicated by a stimulus light. Deprivations shorter than 24 h increased the first-hour intake after renewed access by the AAs, but the Wistars showed no increase until after a 24-h deprivation. The results show stimulus control of ethanol responding and demonstrate the applicability of the procedure for causing ethanol responding to occur at a time chosen by the experimenter. PMID:2069738

  10. The supraoptic nucleus: a morphological and quantitative study in control and hypophysectomised rats.

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, D; Ramos, J; Gonzalez, C; Fernandez-Viadero, C

    1990-01-01

    Several quantitative and morphometric parameters were analysed in the pars principalis of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus in control and hypophysectomised rats at several postnatal ages. The cell number in the control group remained approximately constant from Day 1, when it was 5034 +/- 348 (mean +/- S.D.M.), until Day 90 when the number of cells was 5234 +/- 110. In the group that was hypophysectomised on Day 60, the number of neurons on Day 90 was 1366 +/- 131, which represents a loss of 74% of the neurons. Morphometric parameters on Day 90 indicated a significant difference in nuclear size, 52.1 +/- 6.7 microns 2 in controls and 57.3 +/- 6.8 microns 2 in the hypophysectomised group. Based on these results, it is concluded that there is no postnatal loss of neurons in the pars principalis of the SON in normal rats. As a consequence of the stress induced by hypophysectomy, the remaining cell population undergoes adaptive changes in the nuclear RNA synthesis machinery of neurohypophyseal hormone precursors in order to compensate for the reduction in the number of neurosecretory neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2384330

  11. Controlled temperature tissue fusion: Ho:YAG laser welding of rat intestine in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilesiz, Inci F.; Chan, Eric K.; Welch, Ashley J.; Thomsen, Sharon L.

    1995-05-01

    The results of a closed loop thermal feedback controlled laser-assisted tissue welding study in vivo are reported. A series of experiments was carried out to study and compare the weld strength and healing response of sutured and laser welded rat enterotomies with and without temperature feedback control (TFC) using a cryogenically cooled Ho:YAG laser. Although assignment of animals to three groups (control sutured, laser welded with and without TFC) and four observation periods (1, 3, 7, and 21 days) was randomized, several laser welded enterotomies without TFC had complications resulting in death of the animals. Those experiments were repeated. From the failure rates encountered, it is shown that TFC improves the quality of laser-assisted enterotomy closures.

  12. Effect of nifedipine on coronary capillary geometry in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Kazda, S; Turek, Z

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe quantitatively changes in the coronary capillary network resulting from hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and a potential effect of long-term treatment of these animals with nifedipine. Age-matched male SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 27 weeks. Four experimental groups were analyzed: (1) untreated SHR, (2) nifedipine-treated SHR, (3) untreated control WKY rats, and (4) nifedipine-treated WKY rats. Treatment significantly decreased systolic blood pressure in SHR, although normotensive pressures were not reached. SHR had significantly higher cardiac weight, which decreased in nifedipine-treated rats, but values remained above those in control animals. Morphometric evaluation revealed lower capillary density and larger capillary domain area in hearts from SHR, which were partially attenuated by treatment with nifedipine. Capillary domain area was also significantly larger at arteriolar portions compared with domains supplied at venular portions. Capillary segment length was consistently shorter on the venular than arteriolar portion of the capillary, whereas no differences were observed between hearts from WKY rats and SHR. Treatment with nifedipine resulted in a prolongation of segment length. Reconstruction of the three-dimensional capillary supply unit (capillary domain area times capillary segment length) revealed significant differences between the amount of tissue supplied by a capillary at its arteriolar portion than more distally, which was detectable in all experimental groups. In hypertrophic hearts from SHR this tissue volume is increased mainly because of longer intercapillary distances and larger domains, especially on arteriolar portions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8039845

  13. A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Improves Erectile Function in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Wang, Bohan; Du, Chuanjun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Zhewei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Recent studies have indicated that A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling is essential for penile erection. Thus, we hypothesize that diabetic ED may be attributed to impaired A2B adenosine signaling. To test this hypothesis, we generated diabetic rats by injecting streptozocin as animal model. After 12 weeks, immunohistochemistry staining was used to localize the expression of ADORA2B. Western Blot and quantitative PCR were employed to determine ADORA2B expression level. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) measurement was used to evaluate erectile function. Diabetic rats received a single intravenous injection of BAY 60-6583, an ADORA2B agonist, or vehicle solution, at 60 min before the ICP measurement. The results showed that ADORA2B expressed in the nerve bundle, smooth muscle, and endothelium in penile tissue of control mice. Western Blot and quantitative PCR results indicated that the expression levels of ADORA2B protein and mRNA were significantly reduced in penile tissues of diabetic rats. Functional studies showed that the erectile response induced by electrical stimulation was remarkably decreased in diabetic rats, compared with age-matched control rats. However, at 60 min after BAY 60-6583 treatment, the erectile function was improved in diabetic rats, suggesting that enhancement of ADORA2B signaling may improve erectile function in diabetic ED. This preclinical study has revealed a previously unrecognized therapeutic possibility of BAY 60-6583 as an effective and mechanism-based drug to treat diabetic ED. In conclusion, we propose that impaired A2B adenosine signaling is one of the pathological mechanisms of diabetic ED. PMID:26447087

  14. Changes in the Fracture Resistance of Bone with the Progression of Type 2 Diabetes in the ZDSD Rat.

    PubMed

    Creecy, Amy; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Merkel, Alyssa R; O'Neal, Dianne; Makowski, Alexander J; Granke, Mathilde; Voziyan, Paul; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have a higher fracture risk compared to non-diabetics, even though their areal bone mineral density is normal to high. Identifying the mechanisms whereby diabetes lowers fracture resistance requires well-characterized rodent models of diabetic bone disease. Toward that end, we hypothesized that bone toughness, more so than bone strength, decreases with the duration of diabetes in ZDSD rats. Bones were harvested from male CD(SD) control rats and male ZDSD rats at 16 weeks (before the onset of hyperglycemia), at 22 weeks (5-6 weeks of hyperglycemia), and at 29 weeks (12-13 weeks of hyperglycemia). There were at least 12 rats per strain per age group. At 16 weeks, there was no difference in either body weight or glucose levels between the two rat groups. Within 2 weeks of switching all rats to a diet with 48 % of kcal from fat, only the ZDSD rats developed hyperglycemia (>250 mg/dL). They also began to lose body weight at 21 weeks. CD(SD) rats remained normoglycemic (<110 mg/dL) on the high-fat diet and became obese (>600 g). From micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis of a lumbar vertebra and distal femur, trabecular bone volume did not vary with age among the non-diabetic rats but was lower at 29 weeks than at 16 weeks or at 22 weeks for the diabetic rats. Consistent with that finding, μCT-derived intra-cortical porosity (femur diaphysis) was higher for ZDSD following ~12 weeks of hyperglycemia than for age-matched CD(SD) rats. Despite an age-related increase in mineralization in both rat strains (μCT and Raman spectroscopy), material strength of cortical bone (from three-point bending tests) increased with age only in the non-diabetic CD(SD) rats. Moreover, two other material properties, toughness (radius) and fracture toughness (femur), significantly decreased with the duration of T2D in ZDSD rats. This was accompanied by the increase in the levels of the pentosidine (femur). However, pentosidine was not

  15. Posttraumatic seizures and epilepsy in adult rats after controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kevin M; Miller, Eric R; Lepsveridze, Eka; Kharlamov, Elena A; Mchedlishvili, Zakaria

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) has been modeled with different techniques of experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) using mice and rats at various ages. We hypothesized that the technique of controlled cortical impact (CCI) could be used to establish a model of PTE in young adult rats. A total of 156 male Sprague-Dawley rats of 2-3 months of age (128 CCI-injured and 28 controls) was used for monitoring and/or anatomical studies. Provoked class 3-5 seizures were recorded by video monitoring in 7/57 (12.3%) animals in the week immediately following CCI of the right parietal cortex; none of the 7 animals demonstrated subsequent spontaneous convulsive seizures. Monitoring with video and/or video-EEG was performed on 128 animals at various time points 8-619 days beyond one week following CCI during which 26 (20.3%) demonstrated nonconvulsive or convulsive epileptic seizures. Nonconvulsive epileptic seizures of >10s were demonstrated in 7/40 (17.5%) animals implanted with 2 or 3 depth electrodes and usually characterized by an initial change in behavior (head raising or animal alerting) followed by motor arrest during an ictal discharge that consisted of high-amplitude spikes or spike-waves with frequencies ranging between 1 and 2Hz class 3-5 epileptic seizures were recorded by video monitoring in 17/88 (19%) and by video-EEG in 2/40 (5%) CCI-injured animals. Ninety of 156 (58%) animals (79 CCI-injured, 13 controls) underwent transcardial perfusion for gross and microscopic studies. CCI caused severe brain tissue loss and cavitation of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere associated with cell loss in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, hilus, and dentate granule cells, and thalamus. All Timm-stained CCI-injured brains demonstrated ipsilateral hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting in the inner molecular layer. These results indicate that the CCI model of TBI in adult rats can be used to study the structure-function relationships that underlie epileptogenesis and PTE. PMID

  16. Stem cell therapy restores viscoelastic properties of myocardium in rat model of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubiano, Andres; Qi, Yanfei; Guzzo, Dominic; Rowe, Kyle; Pepine, Carl; Simmons, Chelsey

    2016-06-01

    Extensive remodeling of the myocardium is seen in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including systemic hypertension. Stem cell therapy has been proposed to improve the clinical outcomes of hypertension, and we hypothesized that changes in mechanical properties of the myocardium would accompany the progression of disease and the results of treatment conditions. Using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a model of hypertension, we treated 13-week-old hypertensive rats with a single injection of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) isolated from a normotensive control. We indented the isolated ventricles of control, untreated sham-injected SHR, and ADSC-treated SHR hearts with a custom cantilever-based system and fit the resulting data to a standard linear solid model. SHR animals had higher blood pressure (198.4±25.9mmHg) and lower ejection fraction (69.9±4.2%) than age-matched control animals (109.0±1.6mmHg, 88.2±1.3%), and increased viscoelastic properties accompanied these clinical changes (right ventricle effective stiffness, SHR: 21.97±5.10kPa, Control: 13.14±3.48kPa). ADSC-treated animals saw improvement in clinical parameters compared to the untreated SHR group, which was also accompanied by a significant restoration of viscoelastic properties of the myocardium (ACSD-treated SHR: 9.77±6.96kPa). PMID:26748260

  17. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves.

    PubMed

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C; McClain, Michael A; Lagoda, Gwen A; Burnett, Arthur L; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (~42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs. PMID:23733025

  18. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C.; McClain, Michael A.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (˜42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs.

  19. Findings in Historical Control Harlan RCCHanTM: WIST Rats from 4-, 13-, 26-Week Studies.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Brad; Skaggs, Hollie

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle control Harlan RCCHan™: WIST rats were examined to provide control data for subsequent studies. Sixty male and 60 female rats were sacrificed after 4, 13, and 26 weeks (360 animals total) of daily oral gavage dosing with reverse osmosis water. At necropsy, body weights, organ weights, and macroscopic findings were recorded, and tissues were collected for histopathology. Mean terminal body and organ weight data demonstrated expected age-related trends. Macroscopic findings occurred sporadically, generally at singular or at very low incidence, and with no observable age-related trend. The most frequent observation was discoloration of the stomach mucosa. Neoplastic microscopic findings were uncommon (one endometrial stromal polyp; one hepatocellular adenoma; one C-cell adenoma; and one sarcoma, NOS). The most common and/or notable nonneoplastic microscopic findings included basophilic tubules and mononuclear cell infiltration in the kidney, macrophage infiltration in pulmonary alveoli, and mononuclear infiltration in the liver of males and females, and myocardial degeneration/necrosis and mononuclear cell infiltration in the heart of males. Female reproductive tracts were staged to establish a representative baseline distribution. Diestrus, proestrus, estrus, and metestrus were diagnosed 45.8%, 11.9%, 30.5%, and 11.9%, respectively, at 4 weeks and 27.6%, 13.8%, 50.0%, and 8.6%, respectively, at 13 weeks. PMID:23033222

  20. A novel turning behavior control method for rat-robot through the stimulation of ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kedi; Zhang, Jiacheng; Zhou, Hong; Lee, Ji Chao Tristan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2016-02-01

    The concept of a rat-robot was initially introduced in 2002, bringing to the field, a novel area of research using modern research into neuroscience and robotics. This paper brings to the table, a study into the method best used for navigation systems in a rat-robot. Current research is epitomized by the use of reward-based spatial navigation, combining the concept of an induced reward sensation as well as a 'virtual touch' sensation to control the movement of the rat-robot. However, such methods are plagued by limitations affecting the success rate as well as preparation procedures which may have varying effects on different rats, even under similar conditions. Hence, this paper studies the stimulation of two different portions of the brain to induce a turning motion within the rat, namely the Ventral Posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus as well as the Barrel-Field (BF) cortex and demonstrates the preferential usage of VPM as the choice use of navigational control in a rat-robot. PMID:26546880

  1. Classification of BMI control commands from rat's neural signals using extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbum; Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Jinkwon; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Lee, Myoungho

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed machine learning algorithm referred to as Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) was used to classify machine control commands out of time series of spike trains of ensembles of CA1 hippocampus neurons (n = 34) of a rat, which was performing a target-to-goal task on a two-dimensional space through a brain-machine interface system. Performance of ELM was analyzed in terms of training time and classification accuracy. The results showed that some processes such as class code prefix, redundancy code suffix and smoothing effect of the classifiers' outputs could improve the accuracy of classification of robot control commands for a brain-machine interface system. PMID:19860924

  2. An Exploration of the Control of Micturition Using a Novel in Situ Arterially Perfused Rat Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Sadananda, Prajni; Drake, Marcus J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to develop and refine a decerebrate arterially perfused rat (DAPR) preparation that allows the complete bladder filling and voiding cycle to be investigated without some of the restrictions inherent with in vivo experimentation [e.g., ease and speed of set up (30 min), control over the extracellular milieu and free of anesthetic agents]. Both spontaneous (naturalistic bladder filling from ureters) and evoked (in response to intravesical infusion) voids were routinely and reproducibly observed which had similar pressure characteristics. The DAPR allows the simultaneous measurement of bladder intra-luminal pressure, external urinary sphincter–electromyogram (EUS–EMG), pelvic afferent nerve activity, pudendal motor activity, and permits excellent visualization of the entire lower urinary tract, during typical rat filling and voiding responses. The voiding responses were modulated or eliminated by interventions at a number of levels including at the afferent terminal fields (intravesical capsaicin sensitization–desensitization), autonomic (ganglion blockade with hexamethonium), and somatic motor (vecuronium block of the EUS) outflow and required intact brainstem/hindbrain-spinal coordination (as demonstrated by sequential hindbrain transections). Both innocuous (e.g., perineal stimulation) and nociceptive (tail/paw pinch) somatic stimuli elicited an increase in EUS–EMG indicating intact sensory feedback loops. Spontaneous non-micturition contractions were observed between fluid infusions at a frequency and amplitude of 1.4 ± 0.9 per minute and 1.4 ± 0.3 mmHg, respectively and their amplitude increased when autonomic control was compromised. In conclusion, the DAPR is a tractable and useful model for the study of neural bladder control showing intact afferent signaling, spinal and hindbrain co-ordination and efferent control over the lower urinary tract end organs and can be extended to study bladder pathologies and trial novel

  3. Altered response of protein synthesis to nutritional state and endurance training in old rats.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, L; Valluy, M C; Serrurier, B; Prugnaud, J; Obled, C; Guezennec, C Y; Mirand, P P

    1995-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the loss of muscle protein mass during aging could be explained by a reduced sensitivity of muscle protein synthesis to feeding and exercise. Male Wistar rats aged 12 and 24 mo were exercised by treadmill running for 4 mo. Protein synthesis was measured by the flooding dose method in tibialis anterior, soleus, and liver of conscious rested, trained rats and age-matched controls in the postprandial or in the postabsorptive state. No marked change with age could be detected in basal muscle protein synthesis. In contrast, protein synthesis was stimulated in adult but not in old rats by feeding in tibialis anterior and by exercise in soleus. In liver, protein synthesis was not modified by age but was stimulated by feeding and by exercise, which improved the response to feeding. We conclude that the impact of nutrition on muscle protein synthesis is blunted in old age, which could contribute to the age-related loss of nutrition-sensitive muscle proteins. PMID:7864110

  4. Ultrastructural changes in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Dheen, S T; Tay, S S; Wong, W C

    1994-01-01

    Ultrastructural and morphometric studies were undertaken on the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats over a period of 1 y. At 3 d, a few dendrites showing electron-dense cytoplasm and dilated rER were dispersed in the neuropil among seemingly normal neuronal somata. At 1-6 months, the somata contained numerous vacuoles of various sizes which probably originated from fragmented and dilated rER. Numerous unidentifiable vacuolated and electron-dense neuronal profiles were also seen in the neuropil. At 9-12 months, the number of degenerating electron-dense axon terminals and dendrites was markedly increased in diabetic rats. Glial cells containing electron-dense debris in their cytoplasm were involved in phagocytosis. At all time intervals studied, the mean cross-sectional cell area and mean cross-sectional nuclear area of supraoptic nuclei neurons of diabetic rats were significantly increased in comparison with age-matched controls injected with normal saline. The causative factors for these changes are not clear. However, it is suggested that the osmotic stress caused by chronic dehydration in the diabetic animals may be partly or wholly responsible for these ultrastructural changes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7928649

  5. Vascular Injury After Whole Thoracic X-Ray Irradiation in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N. Wu, Q. M.S.; Maeder, M.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.; Jacobs, E.R.; Medhora, M.; Molthen, R.C.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To study vascular injury after whole thoracic irradiation with single sublethal doses of X-rays in the rat and to develop markers that might predict the severity of injury. Methods and Materials: Rats that received 5- or 10-Gy thorax-only irradiation and age-matched controls were studied at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 1, 2, 5, and 12 months. Several pulmonary vascular parameters were evaluated, including hemodynamics, vessel density, total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Results: By 1 month, the rats in the 10-Gy group had pulmonary vascular dropout, right ventricular hypertrophy, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, increased dry lung weights, and decreases in total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, as well as pulmonary artery distensibility. In contrast, irradiation with 5 Gy resulted in only a modest increase in right ventricular weight and a reduction in lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. Conclusion: In a previous investigation using the same model, we observed that recovery from radiation-induced attenuation of pulmonary vascular reactivity occurred. In the present study, we report that deterioration results in several vascular parameters for {<=}1 year after 10 Gy, suggesting sustained remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Our data support clinically relevant injuries that appear in a time- and dose-related manner after exposure to relatively low radiation doses.

  6. Experimental exposure of rats to methylene chloride at varying controlled barometric altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Lillquist, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated combined effects of three methylene chloride (MC) volume/volume concentrations (0,50, and 500 ppm) at three controlled barometric altitudes (760, 640, and 560 torr). This provided a three by three study design. For each scenario, three altitude acclimated (6 days) adult male rats were studied for eight hours in a nose-only inhalation chamber. Blood (0.35 mL) was drawn from the cannulated left carotid artery of each rat at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours and hematocrit, pO[sub 2], pCO[sub 2], pH , total hemoglobin (Hb) and carboxyhemoglobin (CHb) were measured. Time, MC concentration and altitude had significant effects on CHb production. CHb increased with increasing MC concentration over time. Increased barometric altitude (reduced partial pressure of MC vapor at altitude for equal ppm concentrations) resulted in lower blood CHb levels. A statistical model was derived to explain variation in CHb levels for these three independent variables (r = 0.983). The data were applied to an equation assessing the impact of altitude, MC concentration and time on the potential oxygen carrying capacity (POCC) of blood. The POCC of HB in the blood was calculated using blood Hb, CHb levels, Hb oxygen saturation (based on the blood pO[sub 2] and the oxygen dissociation curve for rats), and oxygen binding potential of Hb. It was determined for the altitudes and MC concentrations used, polycythemia associated with increased altitude had a greater impact on POCC than decreased pO[sub 2]. A regression equation was derived modeling variation in POCC of blood for the three independent variables (r = 0.995). This study demonstrated that altitude affects airborne ppm MC concentrations. This ultimately impacts CHb levels and oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. These finding indicate that occupationally acceptable ppm MC exposure levels at altitude do need barometric pressure correction.

  7. Endothelin and endothelium-derived relaxing factor control of basal renovascular tone in hydronephrotic rat kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Hoffend, J; Zou, A P; Dietrich, M S; Schlottmann, K; Cavarape, A; Steinhausen, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the control of renal vascular tone by endothelin (ET) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) under basal conditions, we infused intravenously anti-ET-1/3 antibodies (a-ET-1/3) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in split hydronephrotic rat kidneys. 2. A 25 min I.V. infusion of a-ET-1/3 (4.0 x 10(-13) mol kg-1 min-1) induced a time-dependent vasodilatation of arcuate (16.5%) and interlobular arteries (18.6%) as well as an increase of glomerular blood flow (GBF) by 32%. 3. Inhibition of EDRF synthesis by L-NAME produced a marked vasoconstriction of arcuate arteries (17.1%) and efferent (20.1%) arterioles and a decrease of GBF by 43%. 4. Co-infusion of a-ET-1/3 and L-NAME induced efferent vasoconstriction by 19.5%, whereas preglomerular vessel diameters remained unchanged. 5. The specificity of a-ET-1/3 effects was confirmed by simultaneous I.V. application of a-ET-1/3 and ET-1 (160 ng I.V.) which produced no significant vascular effects. Injection of ET-1 alone constricted arcuate arteries and decreased glomerular blood flow by 25%. 6. Experiments in normal rat kidneys with a-ET-1/3 I.V. revealed an increase of renal blood flow by 21%. 7. Our results demonstrate a physiological control of basal vascular tone in larger preglomerular arterioles by ET and EDRF. Efferent arteriolar tone is predominantly controlled by EDRF. PMID:8271216

  8. Fine structural abnormalities of the placenta in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gewolb, I H; Merdian, W; Warshaw, J B; Enders, A C

    1986-11-01

    In the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat, the placenta is larger and the fetus is smaller than normal. To study cellular differences that might contribute to the size and functional disparity between diabetic and control placentas, a light- and electron-microscopic analysis was performed on 14-, 18-, and 22-day (term) control and diabetic placentas. Diabetic placentas, especially later in gestation, were marked by the presence of large numbers of glycogen-distended cells in the basal zone. Within the placental labyrinth, the trophoblastic layers of the interhemal membrane were significantly thicker in the diabetic placentas on days 18 and 22, and large accumulations of liid droplets were present, especially in the inner two trophoblastic layers. In normal placentas there is a marked thinning of the placental barrier in the labyrinth by day 22 of gestation, making the thickness of the labyrinthine layers in age-matched diabetic placentas even more impressive. Finally, the labyrinth of 22-day diabetic placentas contained more glycogen and rough endoplasmic reticulum in the inner trophoblastic layer, a feature that is found in less-mature (18-day) control placentas. Thus, the diabetic placentas have a number of features that are consistent with functional immaturity/dysmaturity. Cytologic evidence confirms the presence of increased glycogen and lipid reserves in both the junctional zone and the cellular area between maternal and fetal blood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3758495

  9. The Physiological Role of Arcuate Kisspeptin Neurons in the Control of Reproductive Function in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beale, K.E.; Kinsey-Jones, J.S.; Gardiner, J.V.; Harrison, E.K.; Thompson, E.L.; Hu, M.H.; Sleeth, M.L.; Sam, A.H.; Greenwood, H.C.; McGavigan, A.K.; Dhillo, W.S.; Mora, J.M.; Li, X.F.; Franks, S.; Bloom, S.R.; O'Byrne, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin plays a pivotal role in pubertal onset and reproductive function. In rodents, kisspeptin perikarya are located in 2 major populations: the anteroventral periventricular nucleus and the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). These nuclei are believed to play functionally distinct roles in the control of reproduction. The anteroventral periventricular nucleus population is thought to be critical in the generation of the LH surge. However, the physiological role played by the ARC kisspeptin neurons remains to be fully elucidated. We used bilateral stereotactic injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding kisspeptin antisense into the ARC of adult female rats to investigate the physiological role of kisspeptin neurons in this nucleus. Female rats with kisspeptin knockdown in the ARC displayed a significantly reduced number of both regular and complete oestrous cycles and significantly longer cycles over the 100-day period of the study. Further, kisspeptin knockdown in the ARC resulted in a decrease in LH pulse frequency. These data suggest that maintenance of ARC-kisspeptin levels is essential for normal pulsatile LH release and oestrous cyclicity. PMID:24424033

  10. 24-hour control of body temperature in rats. I. Integration of behavioral and autonomic effectors.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1994-07-01

    Some studies suggest that the nocturnal elevation in core temperature (Tc) of the rat is mediated by an elevation in the set point. The role of set point can be assessed if behavioral effectors are measured simultaneously with other thermoregulatory effectors and Tc over a 24-h period. Selected ambient temperature (STa) and motor activity (MA) were measured in rats housed in a temperature gradient system with a 12:12-h photoperiod (lights on 0600 h). Tc and heart rate (HR) were monitored by telemetry. During the light phase, STa, Tc, HR, and MA were relatively stable with values 29.0 degrees C, 37.1 degrees C, 310 beats/min, and 1-2 m/h, respectively. During the light-to-dark transition there were abrupt elevations in Tc, HR, and MA but no change in STa. STa decreased during the dark phase and reached a nadir of 23 degrees C at 0500 h. All variables recovered to basal levels within 3-4 h after the onset of the light phase. Overall, autonomic effectors control the elevation in Tc during the onset of the dark phase while behavioral effectors have little if any role. Behavioral thermoregulation is important in two ways: 1) the selection of cooler Ta values at night to prevent an excess elevation in Tc and 2) a preference for cooler Ta values before the light phase to facilitate the recovery of Tc. PMID:8048648

  11. Dynamic behavioural changes in the Spontaneously Hyperactive Rat: 3. Control by reinforcer rate changes and predictability.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Sagvolden, Geir; Taylor, Eric; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-03-17

    Variable intervals are widely believed to produce steady rates of responding. However, based on the calming effect of unpredictability in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) we hypothesised that an animal model of this disorder, the Spontaneously Hyperactive (or Hypertensive) Rat, would become less active following particularly variable sequences of interval-lengths in a variable interval schedule. From a large dataset of holepokes and tray-reports by rats in a variable interval reinforcement schedule, we extracted numerous short sequences of intervals on the basis of the first, second, and third derivatives of reinforcement timing (i.e. rate, acceleration, and jerk) in recent intervals. Sets of selected intervals were compared with one another to elucidate the effect of these different derivatives on behaviour in the current interval. Results show that SHR are more active after richer recent reinforcement; after decelerating reinforcers; and after predictable reinforcers. The hypothesis is supported. In conclusion, SHR behaviour largely complies with the Extended Temporal Difference model which in turn has been previously validated against published data in ADHD. The Extended TD model therefore is able to account for two species' behaviour in a wide range of experimental paradigms. SHR are similar in several respects to group averages of children with ADHD, except that SHR have reduced variability and perform actions faster than controls. Hyperactivity in the SHR is very dependent on momentary environmentally determined states, which is an important area for future investigation of ADHD. PMID:18824035

  12. Reflex control of rat tail sympathetic nerve activity by abdominal temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shafton, Anthony D; Kitchener, Peter; McKinley, Michael J; McAllen, Robin M

    2014-01-01

    The thermoregulatory reflex effects of warming and cooling in the abdomen were investigated in 4 urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were shaved and surrounded by a water-perfused silastic jacket. Skin temperature under the jacket was recorded by thermocouples at 3 sites and brain temperature was monitored by a thermocouple inserted lateral to the hypothalamus. A heat exchanger made from an array of silicon tubes in parallel loops was placed through a ventral incision into the abdomen; it rested against the intestinal serosa and the temperature of this interface was monitored by a thermocouple. Few- or multi-unit postganglionic activity was recorded from sympathetic nerves supplying tail vessels (tail SNA). Intra-abdominal temperature was briefly lowered or raised between 35–41 °C by perfusing the heat exchanger with cold or warm water. Warming the abdomen inhibited tail SNA while cooling it excited tail SNA in all 4 animals. We also confirmed that cooling the trunk skin activated tail SNA. Multivariate analysis of tail SNA with respect to abdominal, brain and trunk skin temperatures revealed that all had highly significant independent inhibitory actions on tail SNA, but in these experiments abdominal temperature had the weakest and brain temperature the strongest effect. We conclude that abdominal temperature has a significant thermoregulatory action in the rat, but its influence on cutaneous vasomotor control appears to be weaker than that of skin or brain temperatures.

  13. Autonomic control of heart rate and blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats during aversive classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hatton, D C; Buchholz, R A; Fitzgerald, R D

    1981-12-01

    An examination was made of the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses of 7-9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and genetical control Wistar/Kyoto (WKY) rats during aversive classical conditioning. Subsequent to the development of conditioned responding (CRs), assessments were made of the effects of selective autonomic blockade by methyl atropine (10 mg/kg), phentolamine (2 mg/kg), and propranolol (2 mg/kg). The CR complex in the two strains consisted of pressor BP CRs in conjunction with vagally mediated decelerative HR CRs in the SHR strain and sympathetically mediated accelerative HR CRs in the WKY strain. The decelerative SHR HR CR did not appear to be secondary to baroreceptor reflex activity, although such activity did appear to be involved in the pressor BP and decelerative HR orienting response (OR) and unconditioned response (UR) complex of the SHRs on the initial application of the CS and the US, respectively. Augmented pressor BP ORs, CRs, and URs in the SHRs relative to the WKYs and differential drug effects on BP and HR baselines of the two strains suggested the presence of enhanced sympathetic activity in the SHRs that was not reflected in the SHR decelerative HR CR. Phentolamine unmasked evidence of reflex beta 2-vasodilation deficiency in the SHRs that could have contributed to the enhancement of their BP OR and CR. PMID:7320284

  14. Insular neural system controls decision-making in healthy and methamphetamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Katahira, Kentaro; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Nakamura, Akihiro; Wang, Tian; Nagai, Taku; Sato, Jun; Sawada, Makoto; Ohira, Hideki; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-07-21

    Patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders such as substance-related and addictive disorders exhibit altered decision-making patterns, which may be associated with their behavioral abnormalities. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying such impairments are largely unknown. Using a gambling test, we demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH)-treated rats chose a high-risk/high-reward option more frequently and assigned higher value to high returns than control rats, suggestive of changes in decision-making choice strategy. Immunohistochemical analysis following the gambling test revealed aberrant activation of the insular cortex (INS) and nucleus accumbens in METH-treated animals. Pharmacological studies, together with in vivo microdialysis, showed that the insular neural system played a crucial role in decision-making. Moreover, manipulation of INS activation using designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug technology resulted in alterations to decision-making. Our findings suggest that the INS is a critical region involved in decision-making and that insular neural dysfunction results in risk-taking behaviors associated with altered decision-making. PMID:26150496

  15. Insular neural system controls decision-making in healthy and methamphetamine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Katahira, Kentaro; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Nakamura, Akihiro; Wang, Tian; Nagai, Taku; Sato, Jun; Sawada, Makoto; Ohira, Hideki; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders such as substance-related and addictive disorders exhibit altered decision-making patterns, which may be associated with their behavioral abnormalities. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying such impairments are largely unknown. Using a gambling test, we demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH)-treated rats chose a high-risk/high-reward option more frequently and assigned higher value to high returns than control rats, suggestive of changes in decision-making choice strategy. Immunohistochemical analysis following the gambling test revealed aberrant activation of the insular cortex (INS) and nucleus accumbens in METH-treated animals. Pharmacological studies, together with in vivo microdialysis, showed that the insular neural system played a crucial role in decision-making. Moreover, manipulation of INS activation using designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug technology resulted in alterations to decision-making. Our findings suggest that the INS is a critical region involved in decision-making and that insular neural dysfunction results in risk-taking behaviors associated with altered decision-making. PMID:26150496

  16. Trimethyltin Modulates Reelin Expression and Endogenous Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Developing Rats.

    PubMed

    Toesca, Amelia; Geloso, Maria Concetta; Mongiovì, Adriana Maria; Furno, Alfredo; Schiattarella, Arcangelo; Michetti, Fabrizio; Corvino, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein involved in the modulation of synaptic plasticity and essential for the proper radial migration of cortical neurons during development and for the integration and positioning of dentate granular cell progenitors; its expression is down-regulated as brain maturation is completed. Trimethyltin (TMT) is a potent neurotoxicant which causes selective neuronal death mainly localised in the CA1-CA3/hilus hippocampal regions. In the present study we analysed the expression of reelin and the modulation of endogenous neurogenesis in the postnatal rat hippocampus during TMT-induced neurodegeneration (TMT 6 mg/kg). Our results show that TMT administration induces changes in the physiological postnatal decrease of reelin expression in the hippocampus of developing rats. In particular, quantitative analysis of reelin-positive cells evidenced, in TMT-treated animals, a persistent reelin expression in the stratum lacunosum moleculare of Cornu Ammonis and in the molecular layer of Dentate Gyrus. In addition, a significant decrease in the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled newly-generated cells was also detectable in the subgranular zone of P21 TMT-treated rats compared with P21 control animals; no differences between P28 TMT-treated rats and age-matched control group were observed. In addition the neuronal commitment of BrdU-positive cells appeared reduced in P21 TMT-treated rats compared with P28 TMT-treated animals. Thus TMT treatment, administrated during development, induces an early reduction of endogenous neurogenesis and influences the hippocampal pattern of reelin expression in a temporally and regionally specific manner, altering the physiological decrease of this protein. PMID:26915108

  17. Effects of hypothyroidism on vascular /sup 125/I-albumin permeation and blood flow in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, R.G.; Pugliese, G.; Chang, K.; Speedy, A.; Province, M.A.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1989-05-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on vascular 125I-albumin permeation and on blood flow were assessed in multiple tissues of male Sprague-Dawley rats rendered hypothyroid by dietary supplementation with 0.5% (wt/wt) 2-thiouracil or by thyroidectomy. In both thiouracil-treated and thyroidectomized rats, body weights, kidney weight, arterial blood pressure, and pulse rate were decreased significantly v age-matched controls. After 10 to 12 weeks of thiouracil treatment, 125I-albumin permeation was increased significantly in the kidney, aorta, eye (anterior uvea, choroid, retina), skin, and new granulation tissue, remained unchanged in brain, sciatic nerve, and heart, and was decreased in forelimb skeletal muscle. A similar pattern was observed in thyroidectomized rats, except that increases in 125I-albumin permeation for all tissues were smaller than those observed in thiouracil-treated rats, and 125I-albumin permeation in retina did not differ from controls. In both thiouracil-treated and thyroidectomized rats, changes in blood flow (assessed with 15-microns, 85Sr-labeled microspheres) relative to the decrease in arterial blood pressure were indicative of a decrease in regional vascular resistance except in the choroid and in the kidney, in which vascular resistance was increased significantly. Glomerular filtration rate was decreased, but filtration fraction and urinary excretion of albumin remained unchanged by thiouracil treatment and thyroidectomy. These results indicate that vascular hemodynamics and endothelial cell barrier functional integrity are modulated in many different tissues by the thyroid. In view of the correspondence of hypothyroid- and diabetes-induced vascular permeability changes, these results raise the possibility that altered thyroid function in diabetes may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease.

  18. Daily voluntary exercise alters the cardiovascular response to hemorrhage in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joslyn K; Hayward, Linda F

    2011-02-24

    The present study tested the hypothesis that voluntary wheel-exercised rats would better tolerate severe hemorrhage (HEM) compared to age matched sedentary (SED) controls. Conscious rats housed with (EX, n = 8) or without (SED, n = 8) a running wheel for 6 weeks underwent a 30% total blood volume HEM over 15 min and were euthanized 90 min later and brain tissue was processed for Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI). Both EX and SED groups displayed typical responses to HEM (initial tachycardia followed by decreased HR and MAP) but at the end of HEM, mean arterial pressure (93 ± 6 vs 58 ± 3 mm Hg) and heart rate (316 ± 17 vs. 247 ± 22 bpm,) were higher in the EX vs. SED animals and 60 min following the end of HEM, HR remained significantly elevated in the EX vs SED animals. The altered HR response to HEM in the EX animals was linked to a significant difference in sympatho-vagal drive identified by heart rate variability analysis and an augmented baroreflex response to hypotension tested in a separate group of animals (n = 4-5/group). In many of the brain regions analyzed, EX rats displayed lower levels of FLI compared to SED rats. Significantly lower levels of FLI in the EX vs SED rats were identified in the middle and caudal external lateral subnucleus of the lateral parabrachial nucleus and the dorsal cap of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. These results suggest that enhanced tolerance to HEM following daily exercise may result from an EX-induced reduction in excitation or exaggerated inhibition in central circuits involved in autonomic control. PMID:21215710

  19. Effect of natural honey from Ilam and metformin for improving glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ozra; Heidari, Reza; Rahmani, Fatima; Farokhi, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s): Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem and one of the five leading causes of death globally. In the present study, the effect of Metformin with natural honey was investigated on glycemia in the Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar male rats were randomly divided into six groups including C: non diabetic rats received distilled water, CH: non diabetic rats received honey, CD: diabetic rats administered with distilled water, DM: Metformin treated diabetic rats, DH: honey treated diabetic rats, and DMH: diabetic rats treated with a combination of Metformin and natural honey. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg; i.p.). The animals were treated by oral gavage once daily for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and their blood samples collected. Amount of glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, total bilirubin, and albumin were determined in serum. Results: Group CD: showed hyperglycemia (252.2±4.1 mg/dl), while level of blood glucose was significantly (p<0.01) reduced in groups DH (124.2±2.7 mg/dl), DM (108.0±3.4 mg/dl), and DMH (115.4±2.1 mg/dl). Honey in combination with Metformin significantly (p<0.01) reduced level of bilirubin but Metformin alone did not reduce bilirubin. Honey alone and in combination with Metformin also significantly reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, VLDL and increased HDL, but Metformin did not reduced triglycerides and increased HDL. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrated that consuming natural honey with Metformin improves glycemic control and is more useful than consuming Metformin alone. The higher therapeutic effect of Ilam honey on lipid abnormalities than Tualang honey was also evident. PMID:25050251

  20. Increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in the cerebellum of the x-irradiated dystonic rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dopico, A.M.; Rios, H.; Mayo, J.; Zieher, L.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The exposure of the cephalic end of rats to repeated doses of x-irradiation (150 rad) immediately after birth induces a long-term increase in the noradrenaline (NA) content of cerebellum (CE) (+ 37.8%), and a decrease in cerebellar weight (65.2% of controls), which results in an increased NA concentration (+ 109%). This increase in the neurotransmitter level is accompanied by a dystonic syndrome and histological abnormalities: Purkinje cells (the target cells for NA afferents to CE) fail to arrange in a characteristic monolayer, and their primary dendritic tree appears randomly oriented. The injection of reserpine 0.9 and 1.2 mg/kg ip to adult rats for 18 h depletes cerebellar NA content in both controls (15.7 {plus minus} 4 ng/CE and 2.8 {plus minus} 1.5 ng/CE, respectively) and x-irradiated rats (17.1 {plus minus} 1 ng/CE and 8.3 {plus minus} 2 ng/CE, respectively). The activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in CE of adult rats, measured by an in vitro assay, is significantly increased in neonatally x-irradiated animals when compared to age-matched controls (16.4 {plus minus} 1.4 vs 6.32 {plus minus} 0.6 nmol CO2/h/mg prot., p less than 0.01). As observed for NA levels, a net increase in TH activity induced by the ionizing radiation is also measured: 308.9 {plus minus} 23.8 vs 408.2 {plus minus} 21.5 nmol CO2/h/CE, p less than 0.01 (controls and x-treated, respectively). These results suggest that x-irradiation at birth may induce an abnormal sprouting of noradrenergic afferents to CE. The possibility that these changes represent a response of the NA system to the dystonic syndrome is discussed.

  1. Differential Effects of Controllable Stress Exposure on Subsequent Extinction Learning in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hadad-Ophir, Osnat; Brande-Eilat, Noa; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in fear extinction are thought to be related to various anxiety disorders. While failure to extinguish conditioned fear may result in pathological anxiety levels, the ability to quickly and efficiently attenuate learned fear through extinction processes can be extremely beneficial for the individual. One of the factors that may affect the efficiency of the extinction process is prior experience of stressful situations. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to controllable stress, which is suggested to induce stress resilience, can affect subsequent fear extinction. Here, following prolonged two-way shuttle (TWS) avoidance training and a validation of acquired stress controllability, adult rats underwent either cued or contextual fear-conditioning (FC), followed by an extinction session. We further evaluated long lasting alterations of GABAergic targets in the medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC), as these were implicated in FC and extinction and stress controllability. In cued, but not in contextual fear extinction, within-session extinction was enhanced following controllable stress compared to a control group. Interestingly, impaired extinction recall was detected in both extinction types following the stress procedure. Additionally, stress controllability-dependent alterations in GABAergic markers expression in infralimbic (IL), but not prelimbic (PL) cortex, were detected. These alterations are proposed to be related to the within-session effect, but not the recall impairment. The results emphasize the contribution of prior experience on coping with subsequent stressful experiences. Moreover, the results emphasize that exposure to controllable stress does not generally facilitate future stress coping as previously claimed, but its effects are dependent on specific features of the events taking place. PMID:26793083

  2. Alterations in Glutathione Redox Metabolism, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Function in the Left Ventricle of Elderly Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Howarth, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    The Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat is a genetic model in which the homozygous (FA/FA) male animals develop obesity and type 2 diabetes. Morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular complications, due to increased oxidative stress and inflammatory signals, are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. The precise molecular mechanism of contractile dysfunction and disease progression remains to be clarified. Therefore, we have investigated molecular and metabolic targets in male ZDF (30–34 weeks old) rat heart compared to age matched Zucker lean (ZL) controls. Hyperglycemia was confirmed by a 4-fold elevation in non-fasting blood glucose (478.43 ± 29.22 mg/dL in ZDF vs. 108.22 ± 2.52 mg/dL in ZL rats). An increase in reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in ZDF rats. A significant increase in CYP4502E1 activity accompanied by increased protein expression was also observed in diabetic rat heart. Increased expression of other oxidative stress marker proteins, HO-1 and iNOS was also observed. GSH concentration and activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and GSH reductase, were, however, significantly increased in ZDF heart tissue suggesting a compensatory defense mechanism. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, Complex I and Complex IV were significantly reduced in the heart ventricle of ZDF rats in comparison to ZL rats. Western blot analysis has also suggested a decreased expression of IκB-α and phosphorylated-JNK in diabetic heart tissue. Our results have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in ZDF rats might be associated, at least in part, with altered NF-κB/JNK dependent redox cell signaling. These results might have implications in the elucidation of the mechanism of disease progression and designing strategies for diabetes prevention. PMID:23203193

  3. Genetic mapping of Eutr1, a locus controlling E2-induced pyometritis in the Brown Norway rat, to RNO5.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Pandey, Jyotsna; Lachel, Cynthia M; Murrin, Clare R; Flood, Lisa A; Pennington, Karen L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Tochacek, Martin; McComb, Rodney D; Meza, Jane L; Wendell, Douglas L; Shull, James D

    2005-11-01

    In certain rat strains, chronic estrogen administration can lead to pyometritis, an inflammation of the uterus accompanied by infection and the accumulation of intraluminal pus. In this article, we report that the Brown Norway (BN) rat is highly susceptible to pyometritis induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). The susceptibility of the BN rat to E2-induced pyometritis appears to segregate as a recessive trait in crosses to the resistant August x Copenhagen Irish (ACI) strain. In a (BN x ACI)F(2) population, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis on rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). Our data are most consistent with a model in which the BN allele of this locus, designated Eutr1 (Estrogen-induced uterine response 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to control E2-induced pyometritis. Furthermore, we have confirmed the contribution of Eutr1 to E2-induced uterine pyometritis using an RNO5 congenic rat strain. In addition to Eutr1, we obtained evidence suggestive of linkage for five additional loci on RNO2, 4, 11, 17, and X that control susceptibility to E2-induced pyometritis in the (BN x ACI)F(2) population. PMID:16284801

  4. Sympathetic neural control of indoleamine metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. J.; Hsuan, M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the acceleration in rat pineal biosynthetic activity in response to prolonged exposure to darkness or to immobilization were investigated in animals whose pineals were surgically denervated. Some animals were adrenalectomized to remove one potential source of circulating catecholamines, and some were subjected to a partial chemical sympathectomy accomplished by a series of intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. Results suggest that N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity can be enhanced either by release of norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals within the pineal or from sympathetic nerve terminals elsewhere. The stress of immobilization stimulates the pineal by increasing circulating catecholamines. Photic control of pineal function requires intact pineal sympathetic innervation, since the onset of darkness apparently does not cause a sufficient rise in circulating catecholamines to stimulate the pineal. The present studies suggest that nonspecific stress triggers increased biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin; it is possible that this hormone may participate in mechanisms of adaptation.

  5. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy of rat-tail tendon with controlled mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, I.; Goulam Houssen, Y.; Tran, V.; Allain, J.-M.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2013-06-01

    We combined polarization-resolved SHG microscopy with mechanical assays in rat-tail-tendon and measured collagen remodeling upon controlled stretching. This approach aimed to analyze the relationship between macroscopic response and sub-micrometer scale organization of collagen fibrils. We observed a straightening of the crimps followed by a sliding of the fibrils with increasing stretching of the tendon fascicles. Polarization resolution of the SHG images provided complementary information about the orientation dispersion of collagen fibrils within the focal volume and enabled monitoring of collagen remodeling at the sub-micrometer scale. Our approach can be readily generalized to other tissues and should bring new valuable information about biomechanics of microstructured tissues.

  6. Biosynthesis of collagen crosslinks. III. In vivo labeling and stability of lung collagen in rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Reiser, K.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mCi (each) of (3H)lysine at Day 11 of neonatal life to label their lung collagen. Five weeks later, half of the animals were given an intratracheal injection of 1.5 U of bleomycin sulfate via a tracheostomy; control animals received saline intratracheally by the same technique. Age-matched groups of control and bleomycin-treated rats were killed, and their lung collagen was analyzed at zero (control animals only), 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 wk after bleomycin administration, a time course appropriate for development of pulmonary fibrosis in this animal model. We measured radioactivity in hydroxylysine and in the difunctional collagen crosslinks hydroxylysinonorleucine and dihydroxylysinonorleucine at each time point. No evidence of breakdown of this pool of mature, preformed collagen was observed in lungs of either the control or the bleomycin-treated rats. We also measured the total lung content of hydroxypyridinium, a trifunctional collagen crosslink, by its intrinsic fluorescence. There was no evidence of collagen degradation in lungs of either group of rats by this criterion either. We conclude that there is no biochemically detectable turnover of mature lung collagen, defined as that pool of lung collagen that is obligatorily extracellular (i.e., crosslinked and containing labeled hydroxylysine from an injection of precursor 5 to 15 wk earlier), in either normal rat lungs or lungs of rats made fibrotic with bleomycin. Statistical analysis of the data suggests that our methodology was sensitive and precise enough to have detected turnover of less than 0.5% of lung collagen per day, some 20-fold less than estimates of lung collagen turnover that have been suggested to be occurring in vivo by others using different techniques and presumably studying different pools of lung collagen.

  7. Whisker Movements Reveal Spatial Attention: A Unified Computational Model of Active Sensing Control in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Prescott, Tony J.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial attention is most often investigated in the visual modality through measurement of eye movements, with primates, including humans, a widely-studied model. Its study in laboratory rodents, such as mice and rats, requires different techniques, owing to the lack of a visual fovea and the particular ethological relevance of orienting movements of the snout and the whiskers in these animals. In recent years, several reliable relationships have been observed between environmental and behavioural variables and movements of the whiskers, but the function of these responses, as well as how they integrate, remains unclear. Here, we propose a unifying abstract model of whisker movement control that has as its key variable the region of space that is the animal's current focus of attention, and demonstrate, using computer-simulated behavioral experiments, that the model is consistent with a broad range of experimental observations. A core hypothesis is that the rat explicitly decodes the location in space of whisker contacts and that this representation is used to regulate whisker drive signals. This proposition stands in contrast to earlier proposals that the modulation of whisker movement during exploration is mediated primarily by reflex loops. We go on to argue that the superior colliculus is a candidate neural substrate for the siting of a head-centred map guiding whisker movement, in analogy to current models of visual attention. The proposed model has the potential to offer a more complete understanding of whisker control as well as to highlight the potential of the rodent and its whiskers as a tool for the study of mammalian attention. PMID:24086120

  8. Increasing oxidative stress with molsidomine increases blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats but not normotensive controls.

    PubMed

    Fortepiani, Lourdes A; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2005-09-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have a higher level of oxidative stress and exhibit a greater depressor response to a superoxide scavenger, tempol, than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). This study determined whether an increase in oxidative stress with a superoxide/NO donor, molsidomine, would amplify the blood pressure in SHR. Male SHR and WKY were given molsidomine (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or vehicle (0.01% ethanol) for 1 wk, and blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, nitrate and nitrite excretion (NOx), renal superoxide production, and expression of renal antioxidant enzymes, Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were measured. Renal superoxide and NOx were higher in control SHR than in WKY. Molsidomine increased superoxide by approximately 35% and NOx by 250% in both SHR and WKY. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was also higher in control SHR than WKY. Molsidomine increased MAP by 14% and caused renal vasoconstriction in SHR but reduced MAP by 16%, with no effect on renal hemodynamics, in WKY. Renal expression of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD was not different between SHR and WKY, but expression of catalase and GPx were approximately 30% lower in kidney of SHR than WKY. The levels of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD were not increased with molsidomine in either WKY or SHR. Renal catalase and GPx expression was increased by 300-400% with molsidomine in WKY, but there was no effect in SHR. Increasing oxidative stress elevated blood pressure further in SHR but not WKY. WKY are likely protected because of higher bioavailable levels of NO and the ability to upregulate catalase and GPx. PMID:15905221

  9. Cholinergic control over attention in rats prone to attribute incentive salience to reward cues

    PubMed Central

    Paolone, Giovanna; Angelakos, Christopher C.; Meyer, Paul J.; Robinson, Terry E.; Sarter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Some rats (sign-trackers, ST) are especially prone to attribute incentive salience to reward cues, relative to others (goal-trackers, GT). Thus, reward cues are more likely to promote maladaptive reward-seeking behavior in ST than GT. Here, we asked whether ST and GT differ on another trait that can contribute to poor restraint over behavior evoked by reward cues. We report that, relative to GT, ST have poor control over attentional performance, due in part to insufficient cholinergic stimulation of cortical circuitry. We found that, relative to GT, ST showed poor performance on a sustained attention task (SAT). Furthermore, their performance fluctuated rapidly between periods of good to near-chance performance. This finding was reproduced using a separate cohort of rats. As demonstrated earlier, performance on the SAT was associated with increases in extracellular levels of cortical acetylcholine (ACh); however, SAT performance-associated increases in ACh levels were significantly attenuated in ST relative to GT. Consistent with the view that the modulatory effects of ACh involves stimulation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), systemic administration of the partial nAChR agonist ABT-089 improved SAT performance in ST and abolished the difference between SAT-associated ACh levels in ST and GT. Neither the nonselective nAChR agonist nicotine nor the psychostimulant amphetamine improved SAT performance. These findings suggest that individuals who have a propensity to attribute high incentive salience to reward cues also exhibit relatively poor attentional control. A combination of these traits may render individuals especially vulnerable to disorders such as obesity and addiction. PMID:23658172

  10. Differential control of vasomotion by angiotensins in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patrícia M; Xavier, Carlos H; Alzamora, Andreia C; Santos, Robson A S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria J

    2015-10-01

    The central and peripheral renin-angiotensin systems are known for playing a key role in cardiovascular control. In the present study, we evaluated the hemodynamic effects produced by nanoinjections of angiotensin II (Ang II) or angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of adult male normotensive (Wistar-WT) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Animals were anesthetized (urethane 1.2g/kg) and instrumented for recording blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and blood flow (BF) in the femoral, renal or mesenteric arteries. Afterwards, rats were positioned in a stereotaxic and prepared for nanoinjections (100 nl) of saline (NaCl 0.9%), Ang-(1-7) (40 ng) or Ang II (40 ng) into the RVLM. The vascular resistance (VR) was calculated by ΔMAP/ΔBF ratio. In WT, Ang-(1-7) or Ang II caused equipotent pressor effects that were not accompanied by changes in vascular resistance. However, MAP changes were greater in SHR. This strain also showed a concomitant increase in relative vascular resistance (ΔVR/VRbaseline) of renal (0.31 ± 0.07 and 0.3 ± 0.07 vs. 0.02 ± 0.01; Ang-(1-7), Ang II and Saline, respectively) and mesenteric beds (0.3 ± 0.06 and 0.33 ± 0.04 vs. 0.05 ± 0.02; Ang-(1-7), Ang II and saline, respectively). We conclude that Ang II and Ang-(1-7) at the RVLM control the vascular resistance of renal and mesenteric beds during hypertension. PMID:26390943

  11. Controlled ingestion of kaolinite (5%) modulates enteric nitrergic innervation in rats.

    PubMed

    Voinot, Florian; Fischer, Caroline; Schmidt, Camille; Ehret-Sabatier, Laurence; Angel, Fabielle

    2014-08-01

    We have previously shown that kaolinite slowed down gastric emptying and intestinal transit and induced changes in enteric mechanical activities. As gastric emptying and intestinal transit have been shown to be regulated by nitric oxide (NO), the effect of an imposed ingestion of kaolinite on enteric nitrergic innervation was determined. Kaolinite has also been shown to increase plasmatic levels of leptin. Therefore, the responses of enteric neurons in the presence of leptin after kaolinite ingestion were determined, and a possible role of nitrergic neurons was evaluated in rats using organ bath technique. Our results showed that kaolinite modulates activities of enteric nerves at 14 days of ingestion. Exogenous l-NNA produced a decrease in nerve stimulation (NS)-induced relaxation in both jejunum and colon of control groups. At 14 days of kaolinite ingestion, this effect of l-NNA was significantly reduced only in the jejunum. Although l-NNA did not affect NS-induced contraction in jejunum and colon of control animals, it increased the amplitude of the NS-induced contraction in the colon of rats at 14 days of kaolinite ingestion. Leptin inhibitory effects on ENS in the jejunum were also altered at 14 days of ingestion. These differences were masked in the presence of l-NNA. Our data give evidence that changes in mechanical activities induced by kaolinite might be due to alterations in inhibitory (nitrergic and/or other) innervation at 14 days of kaolinite ingestion and to modifications of leptin effects on the responses to intramural nerve stimulation. PMID:23799940

  12. The cytokine temporal profile in rat cortex after controlled cortical impact

    PubMed Central

    Dalgard, Clifton L.; Cole, Jeffrey T.; Kean, William S.; Lucky, Jessica J.; Sukumar, Gauthaman; McMullen, David C.; Pollard, Harvey B.; Watson, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral inflammatory responses may initiate secondary cascades following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Changes in the expression of both cytokines and chemokines may activate, regulate, and recruit innate and adaptive immune cells associated with secondary degeneration, as well as alter a host of other cellular processes. In this study, we quantified the temporal expression of a large set of inflammatory mediators in rat cortical tissue after brain injury. Following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) on young adult male rats, cortical and hippocampal tissue of the injured hemisphere and matching contralateral material was harvested at early (4, 12, and 24 hours) and extended (3 and 7 days) time points post-procedure. Naïve rats that received only anesthesia were used as controls. Processed brain homogenates were assayed for chemokine and cytokine levels utilizing an electrochemiluminescence-based multiplex ELISA platform. The temporal profile of cortical tissue samples revealed a multi-phasic injury response following brain injury. CXCL1, IFN-γ, TNF-α levels significantly peaked at four hours post-injury compared to levels found in naïve or contralateral tissue. CXCL1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α levels were then observed to decrease at least 3-fold by 12 hours post-injury. IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-13 levels were also significantly elevated at four hours post-injury although their expression did not decrease more than 3-fold for up to 24 hours post-injury. Additionally, IL-1β and IL-4 levels displayed a biphasic temporal profile in response to injury, which may suggest their involvement in adaptive immune responses. Interestingly, peak levels of CCL2 and CCL20 were not observed until after four hours post-injury. CCL2 levels in injured cortical tissue were significantly higher than peak levels of any other inflammatory mediator measured, thus suggesting a possible use as a biomarker. Fully elucidating chemokine and cytokine signaling properties after brain injury may

  13. Somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons contribute to lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of control and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Boyett, J M; Buckmaster, P S

    2001-01-01

    Lateral inhibition, a feature of neuronal circuitry that enhances signaling specificity, has been demonstrated in the rat dentate gyrus. However, neither the underlying neuronal circuits, nor the ways in which these circuits are altered in temporal lobe epilepsy, are completely understood. This study examines the potential contribution of one class of inhibitory interneurons to lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of both control and epileptic rats. The retrograde tracer wheat germ ag-glutinin-apo-horse radish peroxidase-gold (WGA-apo-HRP-gold) was injected into the septal dentate gyrus. Neurons double-labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the retrograde tracer are concentrated in the hilus and may contribute to lateral inhibition. Neurons double-labeled for somatostatin and the retrograde tracer account for at least 28% of GAD-positive neurons with axon projections appropriate for generating lateral inhibition in control rats. Despite an overall loss of somatostatin-expressing cells in epileptic animals, the number of somatostatin-positive interneurons with axon projections appropriate for generating lateral inhibition is similar to that seen in controls. These findings suggest that somatostatinergic interneurons participate in lateral inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus of both control and epileptic rats, and that surviving somatostatinergic interneurons might sprout new axon collaterals in epileptic animals. PMID:11530846

  14. Intermittent ethanol consumption depresses endocannabinoid-signaling in the dorsolateral striatum of rat.

    PubMed

    Adermark, Louise; Jonsson, Susanne; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Recent research suggests that adaptations elicited by drugs of abuse share common features with traditional learning models, and that drugs of abuse cause long-term changes in behavior by altering synaptic function and plasticity. In this study, endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling in the dorsolateral striatum, a brain region vital for habit formation, was evaluated in acutely isolated brain slices from ethanol (EtOH)-consuming rats and control rats. EtOH-consuming rats had free access to a 20% EtOH solution for three 24 hour sessions a week during seven weeks and consumed an average of 3.4 g/kg per session. eCB-mediated long-lasting disinhibition (DLL) of population spike (PS) amplitude induced by moderate frequency stimulation was impaired in EtOH-consuming rats, and was not restored by the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (10 μM). The lack of DLL could be linked to a reduced GABA(A) receptor tone, since bicuculline-mediated disinhibition of striatal output was significantly reduced in slices from EtOH-consuming rats. However, eCB signaling induced by high frequency stimulation (HFS) was also impaired in slices from EtOH-consuming rats and isolated control rats. Activation of presynaptic cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1R) with WIN55,212-2 (250 nM, 1 μM) significantly modulated PS amplitude in slices from age-matched control rats while slices from EtOH-consuming rats remained unaffected, indicating that eCB signaling is inhibited at a level that is downstream from CB1R activation. Intermittent alcohol intake for seven weeks might thus be sufficient to modulate a presynaptic mechanism that needs to be synergized with CB1R activation for induction of long-term depression (LTD). In conclusion, alcohol consumption inhibits striatal eCB signaling in a way that could be of importance for understanding the neurological underpinnings of addictive behavior. PMID:21251919

  15. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  16. Transcriptional expression study in the central nervous system of rats: what gene should be used as internal control?

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Ana Carolina; Lazzari, Virgínia Meneghini; Agnes, Grasiela; Almeida, Silvana; Giovenardi, Márcia; da Veiga, Ana Beatriz Gorini

    2014-01-01

    Objective A growing number of published articles report the expression of specific genes with different behavior patterns in rats. The levels of messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts are usually analyzed by reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and quantified after normalization with an internal control or reference gene (housekeeping gene). Nevertheless, housekeeping genes exhibit different expression in the central nervous system, depending on the physiological conditions and the area of the brain to be studied. The choice of a good internal control gene is essential for obtaining reliable results. This study evaluated the expression of three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, cyclophilin A, and ubiquitin C) in different areas of the central nervous system in rats (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex). Methods Wistar rats (virgin females, n=6) during the diestrum period were used. Total ribonucleic acid was extracted from each region of the brain; the complementary deoxyribonucleic acid was synthesized by reverse transcription and amplified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using SYBR™ Green and primers specific for each one of the reference genes. The stability of the expression was determined using NormFinder. Results Beta-actin was the most stable gene in the hippocampus and striatum, while cyclophilin A and ubiquitin C showed greater stability in the prefrontal cortex and the olfactory bulb, respectively. Conclusion Based on our study, further studies of gene expression using rats as animal models should take into consideration these results when choosing a reliable internal control gene. PMID:25295456

  17. Glycogen metabolism in the liver of the neonatal gsd/gsd and control (GSD/GSD) rat.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D G; Neville, S D; Brinkman, M; Filsell, O H

    1982-01-01

    1. The metabolism of hepatic glycogen, labelled with [6-3H]glucose at day 19.5 of gestation and with 14C from [U-14C]galactose at delivery, was followed for 10 h in food-deprived gsd/gsd and control (GSD/GSD) neonatal rats. 2. In the affected pups glycogen was maintained at 12% (w/w) and there was no loss of incorporated radioactivity. 3. The 3H and 14C in glycogen from the controls were both decreased by 80%, but 14C was removed at 0--5 h and [6-3H]glucose at 5--10 h. 4. Blood glucose concentrations in the unaffected neonatal rats fell from 5.3 mM at 20 min to 1.7 mM after 10 h. In the gsd/gsd pups blood glucose concentration was decreased from 2 mM at birth to 0.3 mM at 2.5 h: it was maintained at 0.8 mM between 5 and 10 h. 5. In neonatal rats that had been dead for 10 h, hepatic glycogen was decreased by 34% in the controls and by 22% in the gsd/gsd pups. These results demonstrate that liver from the affected rats contains glycogenolytic activity, but that it is not expressed in living tissue. PMID:6953968

  18. Effect of N-acetylcysteine in hearts of rats submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Filho, Luiz Dantas; Saad, Karen Ruggeri; Saad, Paulo Fernandes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; da Silva, Sônia Maria; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pharmacological therapy is a strategy for the prevention of complications associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury that occurs after volume replacement in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine associated with fluid resuscitation in cardiac injury in a rat hemorrhagic shock model. Methods Mice Wister male rats were randomly and subjected to controlled hemorrhagic shock for 60 min. and then, subjected to resuscitation with Ringer lactate. In a group of six animals, 150mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine were added to fluid volume replacement. The animals were observed for 120 min and after this period, were euthanized and cardiac tissue was collected for histopathological analysis and measurement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and pro-and anti-inflammatory interleukin. Results Cardiac tissue of the group treated with N-acetylcysteine showed lower concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (0.20±0.05 vs. 0.27±0.05, P=0.014) and reduced histopathological damage and edema when compared to the group whose volume replacement occurred only with Ringer lactate. There was no difference in the expression of cytokines interleukin 6 (2,138.29±316.89 vs. 1,870.16±303.68, P=0.091) and interleukin 10 (1.019,83±262,50 vs. 848.60±106.5, P=0.169) between the treated groups. Conclusion The association of N-acetylcysteine on volume replacement attenuates oxidative stress in the heart, as well myocardial damage and edema, but does not modify the expression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26107448

  19. Feasibility of rat hair as a quality control material for the determination of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeun; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Jihyun; In, Sanghwan; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-04-01

    A quality control material (QCM) is a necessity in hair drug analysis, but it is not always easy to have an authentic hair sample containing various target drugs and metabolites. In the present study, the feasibility of rat hair as a QCM was examined for its application in the determination of methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AP) in human hair. MA was administered to lean Zucker rats, from which only pigmented hair was collected for the preparation of a QCM. The rat hair was then washed, homogenized and finally bottled. Both homogeneity and stability were examined in order to demonstrate the suitability of rat hair as a QCM in hair drug analysis. The concentrations of MA and AP in each bottle were determined using extraction with 1% HCl in methanol at 38°C followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride. Furthermore, the prepared QCM was used in an inter-laboratory quality assurance program. In the homogeneity test, no significant difference was observed between bottles of the QCM. The statistical results also showed no significant trends in stability for three months at room temperature. An inter-laboratory quality assurance program was also performed successfully using this material. Thus, rat hair will be useful as an alternative QCM sample for the determination of a variety of drugs and their metabolites in human hair. PMID:21544724

  20. Investigation of oxidant stress and vasodepression to glyceryl trinitrate in the obese Zucker rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Laight, David W; Kengatharan, K M; Gopaul, Nitin K; Änggård, Erik E; Carrier, Martin J

    1998-01-01

    We examined the relationship between oxidant stress and the vasodepressor activity of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in vivo, including rapid GTN tolerance development, in 13-week old obese and age-matched lean Zucker rats which had been maintained for 4 weeks on either control diet or diets enriched with the lipophilic, chain-breaking antioxidants vitamin E (0.5% w w−1) or probucol (0.5% w w−1) or the superoxide anion scavenger tiron (1% w v−1 in drinking water).The basal plasma level of the isoprostane 8-epi-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, was elevated by approximately 5 fold in the obese Zucker rat and markedly reduced by dietary lipophilic antioxidants and depressed by dietary tiron.Vasodepression to bolus does GTN (0.1–100 μg kg−1 i.v.), but not endothelium-dependent vasodepression to bolus dose acetylcholine (ACh, 0.02–2.0 μg kg−1 i.v.), was impaired in obese animals and completely restored by dietary antioxidants.Nitrate tolerance developed in vivo during a 1 h infusion of GTN (40 μg kg−1 min−1 i.v.) appeared more severe in obese animals. However, rapid nitrate tolerance was not affected by dietary antioxidants in either the obese or lean Zucker rat.We therefore provide evidence that elevated oxidant stress in the obese Zucker rat is associated with an impairment in nitrate vasodepressor activity. However, our data are not consistent with either a role for oxidant stress in rapid nitrate tolerance development in the anaesthetized Zucker rat or the aggravation of this tolerance by pre-existing oxidant stress. PMID:9831930

  1. Multimodal Highlighting of Structural Abnormalities in Diabetic Rat and Human Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Plamann, Karsten; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to highlight structural corneal changes in a model of type 2 diabetes, using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). The abnormalities were also characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in rat and human corneas. Methods Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were observed at age 12 weeks (n = 3) and 1 year (n = 6), and compared to age-matched controls. After in vivo CCM examination, TEM and SHG microscopy were used to characterize the ultrastructure and the three-dimensional organization of the abnormalities. Human corneas from diabetic (n = 3) and nondiabetic (n = 3) patients were also included in the study. Results In the basal epithelium of GK rats, CCM revealed focal hyper-reflective areas, and histology showed proliferative cells with irregular basement membrane. In the anterior stroma, extracellular matrix modifications were detected by CCM and confirmed in histology. In the Descemet's membrane periphery of all the diabetic corneas, hyper-reflective deposits were highlighted using CCM and characterized as long-spacing collagen fibrils by TEM. SHG microscopy revealed these deposits with high contrast, allowing specific detection in diabetic human and rat corneas without preparation and characterization of their three-dimensional organization. Conclusion Pathologic findings were observed early in the development of diabetes in GK rats. Similar abnormalities have been found in corneas from diabetic patients. Translational Relevance This multidisciplinary study highlights diabetes-induced corneal abnormalities in an animal model, but also in diabetic donors. This could constitute a potential early marker for diagnosis of hyperglycemia-induced tissue changes. PMID:24049714

  2. The antihypertensive effect of ethyl acetate extract from red raspberry fruit in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Han; Liu, Ji Wen; Ufur, Halmurat; He, Geng Sheng; Liqian, Hai; Chen, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the antihypertensive effect of Xinjiang red raspberry fruit ethyl acetate extract (EER) on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and its possible mechanism from antioxidant perspective. Materials and Methods: The SHR rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, and treated with EER low dose (EERL, 100 mg/kg/d), high dose (EERH, 200 mg/kg/d), and water (SHR) through gastric gavage daily for 5 weeks. Another 8 age-matched male Wistar–Kyoto rats were used as normotensive group (WKY). The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured by noninvasive tail-cuff method once a week. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected and serum concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialchehyche (MDA), and plasma endothelin (ET) were determined. Results: Treatment of SHR rats with EER lowered the blood pressure compared with that treated with water (SHR), and the high dose showed more significant reduction in blood pressure. Treatment of SHR rats with EER increased serum NO and SOD levels and lowered ET and MDA levels. As compared with control group, NO levels were increased significantly in EERL (P < 0.01), SOD was elevated more significantly in both EERL and EERH (P < 0.01); MDA was decreased significantly in EERH group (P < 0.05), whereas plasma ET decreased more significantly in the EERH group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The red raspberry extracts demonstrated a dose-dependent antihypertensive effects in SHR and this may be related to increased NO activation and improved vascular endothelial dysfunction via antioxidation. These results confirmed that raspberries rich in polyphenols have potential cardiovascular protective effects. PMID:21472074

  3. Cellular Inflammatory Infiltrate in Pneumonitis Induced by a Single Moderate Dose of Thoracic X Radiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Sara; Ghosh, Swarajit N.; Fish, Brian L.; Bodiga, Sreedhar; Tomic, Rade; Kumar, Gagan; Morrow, Natalya V.; Moulder, John E.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Medhora, Meetha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to characterize the infiltrating inflammatory cells during pneumonitis caused by moderate doses of radiation. Two groups of male rats (WAG/RijCmcr, 8 weeks old) were treated with single 10- or 15-Gy doses of thoracic X radiation; a third group of age-matched animals served as controls. Only 25% rats survived the 15-Gy dose. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and whole lung mounts were subjected to cytological and histological evaluation after 8 weeks for distribution of resident macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mast cells. There was a modest increase in airway and airspace-associated neutrophils in lungs from rats receiving 15 Gy. Mast cells (detected by immunohistochemistry for tryptase) increased over 70% with 10 Gy and over 13-fold after 15 Gy, with considerable leakage of tryptase into blood vessels and airways. Circulating levels of eight inflammatory cytokines were not altered after 10 Gy but appeared to decrease after 15 Gy. In summary, there were only modest increases in cellular inflammatory infiltrate during pneumonitis after a non-lethal dose of 10 Gy, but there was a dramatic rise in mast cell infiltration after 15 Gy, suggesting that circulating levels of mast cell products may be useful markers of severe pneumonitis. PMID:20334527

  4. Changes in Nitrergic and Tachykininergic Pathways in Rat Proximal Colon In Response to Chronic Treatment With Otilonium Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Gianluca; Gibbons, Simon J.; Arumugam, Saravanaperumal Siva; Malysz, John; Sha, Lei; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Linden, David R.; Evangelista, Stefano; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as a spasmolytic in the treatment of the functional bowel disorder irritable bowel syndrome. Although its acute effects on colonic relaxation are well-characterized, little is known about the effects of chronic administration of OB on enteric neurons, neuromuscular transmission, and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), key regulators of the gut function. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with OB in drinking water at a dose of 2 mg/kg for 30 days. The colons of OB-treated and age-matched control rats were studied by confocal immunohistochemistry to detect immunoreactivity (IR) in myenteric plexus neurons for nitrergic and tachykininergic markers, and also by microelectrode electrophysiology. Results Using immunohistochemistry, chronic OB administration did not change total neuron number, assessed by anti-Hu IR, but resulted in a significant increase in NK1 receptor positive neurons, a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expressing neurons, and a reduction in volume of substance P in nerve fibers in the myenteric plexus. Chronic OB administration potentiated inhibitory and excitatory junction potentials evoked by repetitive electrical field stimulation. The various types of colonic ICC, detected by Kit IR, were not altered nor were slow waves or smooth muscle membrane potential. Conclusions and Inferences Chronic treatment with OB caused significant changes in the nitrergic and tachykinergic components of the myenteric plexus and in both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the rat colon. PMID:25930994

  5. Flux control exerted by overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase over palmitoyl-CoA oxidation and ketogenesis is lower in suckling than in adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, S; Lascelles, C V; Zammit, V A; Quant, P A

    1996-01-01

    We examined the potential of overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) to control the hepatic catabolism of palmitoyl-CoA in suckling and adult rats, using a conceptually simplified model of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. By applying top-down control analysis, we quantified the control exerted by CPT I over total carbon flux from palmitoyl-CoA to ketone bodies and carbon dioxide. Our results show that in both suckling and adult rat, CPT I exerts very significant control over the pathways under investigation. However, under the sets of conditions we studied, less control is exerted by CPT I over total carbon flux in mitochondria isolated from suckling rats than in those isolated from adult rats. Furthermore the flux control coefficient of CPT I changes with malonyl-CoA concentration and ATP turnover rate. PMID:8912677

  6. Comparison of effects of chronic and acute administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester to the rat on inhibition of nitric oxide-mediated responses.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, C E; Allcock, G H; Warner, T D

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in vivo and in vitro, in the isolated perfused kidney and in rings of rat thoracic aorta, were measured in rats treated chronically with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; approx, 70 mg kg-1) and compared to responses in age-matched control animals, and age-matched animals after the acute administration of L-NAME (3-100 mumol kg-1). Parallel experiments examined alterations in responsiveness in rings of trachea and anococcygeus muscles taken from the same animals. 2. Chronic oral administration of L-NAME elevated the blood pressure in anaesthetized animals from 114 +/- 5 mmHg to 153 +/- 11 mmHg (n = 5). The hypotensive responses to both acetylcholine (1 nmol kg-1) and sodium nitroprusside (10 nmol kg-1) were enhanced by chronic L-NAME treatment (n = 5-7) whereas acute L-NAME administration enhanced only the response to sodium nitroprusside (n = 5). 3. After chronic treatment with L-NAME, the basal perfusion pressure in the isolated perfused kidney was elevated. However, vasodilator responses to either acetylcholine (1 nmol) or sodium nitroprusside (3 nmol) were unaltered (n = 5-7). The vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the administration of acute L-NAME (0.1 - 100 microM; n = 5), such that significant inhibition was seen at 10 microM L-NAME. The response to sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by L-NAME.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7541283

  7. Enhancement of Amygdaloid Neuronal Dendritic Arborization by Fresh Leaf Juice of Centella asiatica (Linn) During Growth Spurt Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Muddanna Rao, S.; Gurumadhva Rao, S.

    2009-01-01

    Centella asiatica (CeA) is a creeping herb, growing in moist places in India and other Asian Countries. Ayurvedic system of medicine, an alternate system of medicine in India, uses leaves of CeA for memory enhancement. Here, we have investigated the role of CeA fresh leaf juice treatment during growth spurt period of rats on dendritic morphology of amygdaloid neurons, one of the regions concerned with learning and memory. The present study was conducted on neonatal rat pups. The rat pups (7-days-old) were fed with 2, 4 and 6 ml/kg body of fresh leaf juice of CeA for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. After the treatment period, the rats were killed, brains removed and amygdaloid neurons impregnated with Silver nitrate (Golgi staining). Amygdaloid neurons were traced using camera lucida and dendritic branching points (a measure of dendritic arborization) and intersections (a measure dendritic length) quantified. These data were compared with those of age-matched control rats. The results showed a significant increase in dendritic length (intersections) and dendritic branching points along the length of dendrites of the amygdaloid neurons of rats treated with 4 and 6 ml/kg body weight/day of CeA for longer periods of time (i.e. 4 and 6 weeks). We conclude that constituents/active principles present in CeA fresh leaf juice has neuronal dendritic growth stimulating property; hence it can be used for enhancing neuronal dendrites in stress and other neurodegenerative and memory disorders. PMID:18955230

  8. Optimal time duration for low-pressure controlled reperfusion to efficiently protect ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Bopassa, J C; Nemlin, C; Sebbag, L; Rodriguez, C; Ovize, M; Ferrera, R

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have shown the capacity of low-pressure (LP) reperfusion to protect the ischemic heart. The present study sought to determine the optimal time for the application of LP reperfusion. Isolated rat hearts (n = 30) were exposed to 40 minutes of global warm ischemia followed by 70 minutes of reperfusion. Reperfusion was performed under LP (LP = 70 cm H(2)O) for 0 (control group), 5 (group LP-5), 10 (group LP-10), 30 (group LP-30), or 60 (group LP-60) minutes. Following the LP period the hearts were reperfused with normal pressure (100 cm H(2)O) until the end of reperfusion. Cardiac function was assessed during reperfusion using the Langendorff model. Myocardial necrosis was assessed by measuring LDH leakage in the coronary effluents. Functional recovery was reduced among the control and LP-5 groups with rate-pressure products (RPP) averaging 3788 +/- 499 and 5333 +/- 892 mm Hg/min, respectively. RPP was significantly improved in other groups with RPP averaging 7363 +/- 1159, 7441 +/- 863, and 7269 +/- 692 mm Hg/min in LP-10, LP-30, and LP-60 (P < .01). Similarly, necrosis measured by LDH leakage was significantly reduced in LP-10, LP-30, and LP-60 hearts (P < .01). This study demonstrated that LP reperfusion improves postischemic contractile dysfunction and attenuates necrosis when applied for at least 10 minutes. PMID:17954191

  9. Uteroplacental insufficiency programmes vascular dysfunction in non-pregnant rats: compensatory adaptations in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Marc Q; Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Dragomir, Nicoleta M; Parry, Laura J; Wlodek, Mary E

    2012-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We have previously shown that intrauterine growth restriction caused by uteroplacental insufficiency programmes uterine vascular dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness in adult female rat offspring. The aim of this study was to investigate vascular adaptations in growth restricted female offspring when they in turn become pregnant. Uteroplacental insufficiency was induced in WKY rats by bilateral uterine vessel ligation (Restricted) or sham surgery (Control) on day 18 of pregnancy. F0 pregnant females delivered naturally at term. F1 Control and Restricted offspring were mated at 4 months of age and studied on day 20 of pregnancy. Age-matched non-pregnant F1 Control and Restricted females were also studied. Wire and pressure myography were used to test endothelial and smooth muscle function, and passive mechanical wall properties, respectively, in uterine, mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries of all four groups. Collagen and elastin fibres were quantified using polarized light microscopy and qRT-PCR. F1 Restricted females were born 10–15% lighter than Controls (P <0.05). Non-pregnant Restricted females had increased uterine and renal artery stiffness compared with Controls (P <0.05), but this difference was abolished at day 20 of pregnancy. Vascular smooth muscle and endothelial function were preserved in all arteries of non-pregnant and pregnant Restricted rats. Collagen and elastin content were unaltered in uterine arteries of Restricted females. Growth restricted females develop compensatory vascular changes during late pregnancy, such that region-specific vascular deficits observed in the non-pregnant state did not persist in late pregnancy. PMID:22586217

  10. Effects of Encapsulated Propolis on Blood Glycemic Control, Lipid Metabolism, and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Chen, Minli; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Hu, Fuliang

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the encapsulated propolis on blood glycemic control, lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. The animal characteristics and biological assays of body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin act index (IAI), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique were used to determine these effects. Our findings show that oral administration of encapsulated propolis can significantly inhibit the increasing of FBG and TG in T2DM rats and can improve IAI and M value in euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp experiment. There was no significant effects on body weight, TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C in T2DM rats treated with encapsulated propolis. In conclusion, the results indicate that encapsulated propolis can control blood glucose, modulate lipid metabolism, and improve the insulin sensitivity in T2DM rats. PMID:21716678

  11. CO2 laser soldering of arteriotomy incisions in blood vessels of rats using a temperature-controlled fiber optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshem, David; Vasilyev, Tamar; Ravid, Avi; Gat, Andrea; Kariv, Naam; Katzir, Abraham; Gur, Eyal

    2003-06-01

    Background and objectives: Conventional methods for microvascular anastomosis are normally based on suturing, using special thin nylon sutures. These methods suffer from major drawbacks, which include: anastomosis, which is not watertight, and sutures or clips that cause an inflammatory response. In order to obtain better results, we introduced a procedure based on CO2 laser soldering. We tested the system on arteriotomy incisions in rat blood vessels, in vivo. Materials and methods: We used a fiber optic based laser soldering system, with a temperature control capability. Arteriotomy incisions of lengths 4+/-1mm were performed on the femoral arteries of 48 wistar rats: 24 rats in the control group (suture) and 24 rats in the test group (laser soldering). We conducted two follow-up periods: 7 days and 21 days after the surgical procedure, for each group. Flow tests and histology examination were done in order to evaluate the quality of the procedures. Results: The patency rate was 84% for both groups, soldered and sutured. The sutured group showed a significant foreign body reaction (p < 0.05), which was not observed in the soldered group. We found no evidence of thermal damage in the soldered blood vessels. Conclusions: We can conclude that laser soldering is a less traumatic procedure, compared with the conventional suturing technique. It is potentially a faster technique and easier to master.

  12. Effects of Long-Term Daily Administration of Prostaglandin-E2 on Maintaining Elevated Proximal Tibial Metaphyseal Cancellous Bone Mass in Male Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Mori, Satoshi; Li, Xiao Jian; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2)) on cancellous bone in proximal tibial metaphysis were studied in 7 month old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3, and 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/day and sacrificed after 60, 120, and 180 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double fluorescent-labeled undecalcified bone specimens. After 60 days of treatment, PGE(sub 2) produced diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, increased trabecular bone area, eroded and labeled trabecular perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate at all dose levels when compared with age-matched controls. In rats given PGE(sub 2) for longer time periods (120 and 180 days), trabecular bone area, diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, labeled perimeter, mineral apposition, and bone formation rates were sustained at the elevated levels achieved earlier at 60-day treatment. The eroded perimeter continued to increase until 120 days, then plateau. The observation that continuous systemic PGE(sub 2) administration to adult male rats elevated metaphyseal cancellous bone mass to 3.5-fold of the control level within 60 days and maintained it for another 120 days indicates that the powerful skeletal anabolic effects of PGE2 can be sustained with continuous administration .

  13. Motor System Development Depends on Experience: A Microgravity Study of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Kerry D.; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Kalb, Robert; Hillman, Dean; DeFelipe, Javier; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Animals move about their environment by sensing their surroundings and making adjustments according to need. All animals take the force of gravity into account when the brain and spinal cord undertake the planning and execution of movements. To what extent must animals learn to factor in the force of gravity when making neural calculations about movement? Are animals born knowing how to respond to gravity, or must the young nervous system learn to enter gravity into the equation? To study this issue, young rats were reared in two different gravitational environments (the one-G of Earth and the microgravity of low Earth orbit) that necessitated two different types of motor operations (movements) for optimal behavior. We inquired whether those portions of the young nervous system involved in movement, the motor system, can adapt to different gravitational levels and, if so, the cellular basis for this phenomenon. We studied two groups of rats that had been raised for 16 days in microgravity (eight or 14 days old at launch) and compared their walking and righting (ability to go from upside down to upright) and brain structure to those of control rats that developed on Earth. Flight rats were easily distinguished from the age-matched ground control rats in terms of both motor function and central nervous system structure. Mature surface righting predominated in control rats on the day of landing (R+O), while immature righting predominated in the flight rats on landing day and 30 days after landing. Some of these changes appear to be permanent. Several conclusions can be drawn from these studies: (1) Many aspects of motor behavior are preprogrammed into the young nervous system. In addition, several aspects of motor behavior are acquired as a function of the interaction of the developing organism and the rearing environment; (2) Widespread neuroanatomical differences between one-G- and microgravity-reared rats indicate that there is a structural basis for the adaptation

  14. Attenuation of nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine in streptozotocin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Kaneko, Yoshiko; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Diabetes alters retinal hemodynamics, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the regulation of retinal circulation. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects the nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, i.p.) and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Under artificial ventilation, rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (100 microg/kg, i.v.) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye. Methoxamine was used to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured by a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens. The vasodilator responses of retinal arterioles were assessed by measuring changes in diameters of the vessels. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and the age-matched controls, acetylcholine increased diameters of retinal arterioles in a dose-dependent manner. The vasodilator responses to acetylcholine in diabetic rats were smaller than those in control rats. The nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-independent vasodilation of retinal arterioles observed under treatment with combination of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.) were also attenuated by diabetes. Diabetes did not alter the dilator responses of retinal arterioles to sodium nitroprusside and forskolin. These results suggest that diabetes impairs EDHF-mediated vasodilation of retinal arterioles induced by acetylcholine. The impaired EDHF-mediated vasodilation may contribute to alteration of retinal hemodynamics in diabetes. PMID:17079193

  15. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Rate in Diabetic Rats: Disparity Between Techniques Due to Redistribution of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Leskova, Wendy; Watts, Megan N.; Carter, Patsy R.; Eshaq, Randa S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Reports of altered retinal blood flow in experimental models of type I diabetes have provided contrasting results, which leads to some confusion as to whether flow is increased or decreased. The purpose of our study was to evaluate early diabetes-induced changes in retinal blood flow in diabetic rats, using two distinctly different methods. Methods. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and retinal blood flow rate was measured under anesthesia by a microsphere infusion technique, or by an index of flow based on the mean circulation time between arterioles and venules. Measurements in STZ rats were compared to age-matched nondiabetic controls. In addition, the retinal distribution of fluorescently-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was viewed by confocal microscopy in excised flat mounts. Results. Retinal blood flow rate was found to decrease by approximately 33% in the STZ rats compared to controls (P < 0.001) as assessed by the microsphere technique. However, in striking contrast, the mean circulation time through the retina was found to be almost 3× faster in the STZ rats (P < 0.01). This contradiction could be explained by flow redistribution through the superficial vessels of the diabetic retina, with this possibility supported by our observation of significantly fewer RBCs flowing through the deeper capillaries. Conclusions. We conclude that retinal blood flow rate is reduced significantly in the diabetic rat, with a substantial decrease of flow through the capillaries due to shunting of blood through the superficial layer, allowing rapid transit from arterioles to venules. PMID:23572104

  16. Dose dependent effects of nitrate supplementation on cardiovascular control and microvascular oxygenation dynamics in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott K; Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-05-30

    High dose nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR, 1 mmol/kg/day) lowers mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and improves skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery/utilization matching thereby raising microvascular O2 pressure (PO2mv). We tested the hypothesis that a low dose of NO3(-) supplementation, consistent with a diet containing NO3(-) rich vegetables (BRLD, 0.3 mmol/kg/day), would be sufficient to cause these effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a low dose of NO3(-) (0.3 mmol/kg/day; n=12), a high dose (1 mmol/kg/day; BRHD, n=6) or tap water (control, n=10) for 5 days. MAP, heart rate (HR), blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) and vascular conductance (VC) were measured during submaximal treadmill exercise (20 m/min, 5% grade, equivalent to ~60% of maximal O2 uptake). Subsequently, PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180 s of electrically-induced twitch contractions (1 Hz, ~6 V) of the surgically-exposed spinotrapezius muscle. BRLD and BRHD lowered resting (control: 139 ± 4, BRLD: 124 ± 5, BRHD: 128 ± 9 mmHg, P<0.05, BRLD vs. control) and exercising (control: 138 ± 3, BRLD: 126 ± 4, BRHD: 125 ± 5 mmHg, P<0.05) MAP to a similar extent. For BRLD this effect occurred in the absence of altered exercising hindlimb muscle(s) blood flow or spinotrapezius PO2mv (rest and across the transient response at the onset of contractions, all P>0.05), each of which increased significantly for the BRHD condition (all P<0.05). Whereas BRHD slowed the PO2mv kinetics significantly (i.e., >mean response time, MRT; control: 16.6 ± 2.1, BRHD: 23.3 ± 4.7s) following the onset of contractions compared to control, in the BRLD group this effect did not reach statistical significance (BRLD: 20.9 ± 1.9s, P=0.14). These data demonstrate that while low dose NO3(-) supplementation lowers MAP during exercise it does so in the absence of augmented muscle blood flow, VC and PO2mv; all of which are elevated at a higher

  17. Effects of a ferment soy product on the adipocyte area reduction and dyslipidemia control in hypercholesterolemic adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheik, Nadia Carla; Rossi, Elizeu Antônio; Guerra, Ricardo Luís Fernandes; Tenório, Neuli Maria; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia Maria; Viana, Fabiana Pavan; Manzoni, Marla Simone Jovenasso; Carlos, Iracilda Zeponni; Leão da Silva, Patrícia; Vendramini, Regina Célia; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda

    2008-01-01

    Background Available data on the effects of a fermented soy product enriched with Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus Jugurti on circulating lipids and adiposity are not completely settled. This study aimed to observe the effects of a fermented soy product enriched with Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus Jugurti on central obesity and dyslipidemia control in Wistar adult male rats. Methods Over a period of 8 weeks, animals had "ad libitum" food intake and water consumption as well as body weight and food consumption was monitored. The animals were assigned to four different experimental groups: Control Group (C); Control + Fermented Product Group (CPF); Hypercholesterolemic diet group (H); and Hypercholesterolemic + Fermented Product Group (HPF). The HPF and CPF groups received an intragastric administration of 1 ml of fermented product daily. After the experimental period the animals were killed by decapitation, blood was collected to measure cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol plasma concentration. Adipocyte circumference, lipolysis and lipogenis rates were measures using epididymal and retroperitoneal white adipose tissues. Results The results demonstrated that 1 ml/day/rat of the fermented soy product promoted important benefits such as reduced cholesterolemia in hypercholesterolemic diet group and the adipocyte circumference in both control and hypercholesterolemic diet group. Conclusion The fermented soy product enriched with Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus Jugurti decreased circulating lipids levels and reduced adipocyte area in rats. PMID:19087298

  18. ACUTE EXPOSURE TO MOLINATE ALTERS NEUROENDOCRINE CONTROL OF OVULATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molinate, a thiocarbamate herbicide, has been shown previously to impair reproductive capability in the male rat. In a two-generation study, molinate exposure to female rats resulted in altered pregnancy outcome. However, published data is lacking on the effects of acute exposure...

  19. DOES IRON OR HEME CONTROL RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and/or allylisopropylacetamide administration to rat pups did not evoke a premature induction of hepatic d-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Administration of iron to adult rats did not alter d-aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity and ha...

  20. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-β expression.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shabeena; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Rashid; Siddiqui, Waseem A

    2013-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175-200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-β to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. PMID:24041758

  1. Female spontaneously diabetic Torii fatty rats develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-like hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yukihito; Motohashi, Yu; Muramatsu, Makoto; Katsuda, Yoshiaki; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Sasase, Tomohiko; Yamada, Takahisa; Matsui, Tohru; Kume, Shinichi; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the histological features of the liver in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rats compared with age-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. METHODS: Female SDT Leprfa (SDT fatty) rats and age-matched SD rats were fed ad libitum. Body weight and biochemical parameters, such as serum glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels as well as fatty acid and TG accumulation in the liver were evaluated at 8 wk of age in the non-fasting state and at 8-wk intervals from 8 to 40 wk of age. Histopathological examinations of the liver were performed using hematoxylin and eosin and Sirius Red staining as well as double staining for ED-1 and toluidine blue. The expression of genes involved in TG synthesis, inflammation, and fibrosis was examined in the liver. RESULTS: SDT fatty rats showed significantly increased body weight compared with SD rats. Serum glucose, TG, and TC levels were significantly higher in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats. The serum AST and ALT levels in SDT fatty rats were significantly elevated at 8 wk of age compared with the levels in SD rats. Hepatic TG content was marked in SDT fatty rats from 8 to 32 wk of age. Histopathologically, severe hepatosteatosis accompanied by inflammation was observed at 8 wk of age, and fibrosis started to occur at 32 wk of age. Furthermore, Sirius Red and ED-1 staining were increased in the liver at 32 wk of age. Hepatic gene expression related to TG synthesis, inflammation and fibrosis tended to increase in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats, and the gene expression related to TG secretion was decreased in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats. CONCLUSION: Female SDT fatty rats have the potential to become an important animal model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26290633

  2. Roles of Zinc and Iron on Bone Health in a Rat Model of Osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Danhua

    Bone is one of the most vital organs in animals, serving as both structural and protective functions. Remodeling of bone is an important indicator of bone health, and disorders in bone remodeling may lead to bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis increases risk of bone fracture and even death, and much more preferable to be happened in postmenopausal women due to great changes in hormones. Micronutrients, such as Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe), would as well influence bone health in different manners. That Zn would promote bone health is widely accepted, for the reasons Zn increases osteoblast cell proliferation and differentiation, inhibits osteoclast cell activities, and forms alkaline phosphatase that does help to maintain bone metabolism. Diseases caused by Fe overload is usually related to osteoporosis. Ferric ion could facilitate osteoclast differentiation, inhibit osteoblast and alkaline phosphatase activities, and interfere with hydroxyapatite crystal growth and depositions. However, changes of concentrations and distributions for Zn and Fe in osteoporotic bones are seldom studied. In this thesis, ovariectomized rat femur bones are used as a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Rats from different ages and health conditions are categorized as 6 AM (6-month age matched control), 6 OVX (6-month ovariectomized control), 12 AM (12-month age matched control), 12 OVX (12-month ovariectomized control). The trace elements Zn and Fe is studied through Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence (SRXRF). Elemental maps are used to observe changes in distribution, and further quantitative analysis is used to discover changes in concentration among different animal groups. Both the decrease of Zn and the increase of Fe are significant from healthy to osteoporotic bones (p<0.05). In the meanwhile, accumulation of Zn (p<0.05) and Fe (p>0.1) is also observed over age in healthy groups. Both elements show changes in distribution, that healthy animals present a more even

  3. Temporal Evaluation of Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy and Hyperplasia in Male Rats Secondary to Chronic Volume Overload

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Plante, Eric; Janicki, Joseph S.; Brower, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The temporal myocardial remodeling induced by chronic ventricular volume overload in male rats was examined. Specifically, left ventricular (LV) cardiomyocyte length and width, sarcomere length, and number of nuclei were measured in male rats (n = 8 to 17) at 1, 3, 5, 7, 21, 35, and 56 days after creation of an infrarenal aortocaval fistula. In contrast to previously published reports of progressive increases in cardiomyocyte length and cross-sectional area at 5 days post-fistula and beyond in female hearts, cardiomyocyte length and width did not increase significantly in males during the first 35 days of volume overload. Furthermore, a significant decrease in cardiomyocyte length relative to age-matched controls, together with a reduced number of sarcomeres per cell, was noted in male hearts at 5 days post-fistula. There was a concurrent increase in the percentage of mononucleated cardiomyocytes from 11.6% to 18% at 5 days post-fistula. These initial differences could not be attributed to cardiomyocyte proliferation, and treatment with a microtubule stabilizing agent prevented them from occurring. The subsequent significant increase in LV weight without corresponding increases in cardiomyocyte dimensions is indicative of hyperplasia. Thus, these findings indicate hyperplasia resulting from cytokinesis of cardiomyocytes is a key mechanism, independent of hypertrophy, that contributes to the significant increase in LV mass in male hearts subjected to chronic volume overload. PMID:20651227

  4. Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Biegon, A.; Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Polat, U.; Biegon, A.

    2009-12-21

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments, the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed 1 or 8 weeks post-implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [(3)H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at 1 as well as 8 weeks post-implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance 2 and 8 weeks post-implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS.

  5. Space flight affects magnocellular supraoptic neurons of young prepuberal rats: transient and permanent effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Ovejero, D.; Trejo, J. L.; Ciriza, I.; Walton, K. D.; Garcia-Segura, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of microgravity on postural control and volume of extracellular fluids as well as stress associated with space flight may affect the function of hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons. Since environmental modifications in young animals may result in permanent alterations in neuroendocrine function, the present study was designed to determine the effect of a space flight on oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic magnocellular hypothalamic neurons of prepuberal rats. Fifteen-day-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were flown aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-90, Neurolab mission, experiment 150) for 16 days. Age-matched litters remained on the ground in cages similar to those of the flight animals. Six animals from each group were killed on the day of landing and eight animals from each group were maintained under standard vivarium conditions and killed 18 weeks after landing. Several signs of enhanced transcriptional and biosynthetic activity were observed in magnocellular supraoptic neurons of flight animals on the day of landing compared to control animals. These include increased c-Fos expression, larger nucleoli and cytoplasm, and higher volume occupied in the neuronal perikaryon by mitochondriae, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes and cytoplasmic inclusions known as nematosomes. In contrast, the volume occupied by neurosecretory vesicles in the supraoptic neuronal perikarya was significantly decreased in flight rats. This decrease was associated with a significant decrease in oxytocin and vasopressin immunoreactive levels, suggestive of an increased hormonal release. Vasopressin levels, cytoplasmic volume and c-Fos expression returned to control levels by 18 weeks after landing. These reversible effects were probably associated to osmotic stimuli resulting from modifications in the volume and distribution of extracellular fluids and plasma during flight and landing. However, oxytocin levels were still reduced at 18 weeks after landing in flight

  6. In-vivo CO2 laser rat urinary bladder welding with silver halide fiber optic radiometric temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Bernard; Eyal, Ophir; Belotserkovsky, Edward; Shenfeld, Ofer; Kariv, Noam; Goldwasser, Benad; Katzir, Abraham

    1995-05-01

    Laser welding has been used for connecting various tissues in the body. In urology such welding has the advantage of forming an immediate water tight seal. We have developed a fiberoptic system that makes it possible to monitor and control the temperature of the tissue during welding. In previous work we demonstrated that this system could be successfully used to weld punctures in the urinary bladder of rats. It was found that optimal welding was obtained at a temperature of 55 degree(s)C. In this work we used the same system for welding of large openings (cystotomy) in the urinary bladder of rats. In early experiments we used stay sutures and decompressing catheters. It was later found that complete closure can be obtained with CO2-laser welding alone. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using temperature controlled laser welding as an efficient surgical tool.

  7. Control of phosphofructokinase from rat skeletal muscle. Effects of fructose diphosphate, AMP, ATP, and citrate.

    PubMed

    Tornheim, K; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-12-10

    Under conditions used previously for demonstrating glycolytic oscillations in muscle extracts (pH 6.65, 0.1 to 0.5 mM ATP), phosphofructokinase from rat skeletal muscle is strongly activated by micromolar concentrations of fructose diphosphate. The activation is dependent on the presence of AMP. Activation by fructose diphosphate and AMP, and inhibition by ATP, is primarily due to large changes in the apparent affinity of the enzyme for the substrate fructose 6-phosphate. These control properties can account for the generation of glycolytic oscillations. The enzyme was also studied under conditions approximating the metabolite contents of skeletal muscle in vivo (pH 7.0, 10mM ATP, 0.1 mM fructose 6-phosphate). Under these more inhibitory conditions, phosphofructokinase is strongly activated by low concentrations of fructose diphosphate, with half-maximal activation at about 10 muM. Citrate is a potent inhibitor at physiological concentrations, whereas AMP is a strong activator. Both AMP and citrate affect the maximum velocity and have little effect on affinity of the enzyme for fructose diphosphate. PMID:12161

  8. Temporal control in rats: analysis of nonlocalized effects from short interfood intervals.

    PubMed Central

    Higa, J J; Pierson, D

    1998-01-01

    The present experiment analyzed temporal control of postreinforcement pause duration during within-session changes in the criterion for reinforcement (interfood interval, IFI). Analysis of interval-by-interval changes in the pause revealed localized and nonlocalized effects from short intervals that caused specific changes in performance. In Phase 1, rats were presented with five consecutive 15-s IFIs intercalated into a series of 60-s IFIs. The 15-s set decreased the pause in adjacent and more remote 60-s intervals. In Phase 2, two sets of 15-s intervals were intercalated. The spacing between the two sets varied so that 0, 5, 10, or 15 60-s IFIs separated the sets. The postreinforcement pause tracked all changes in the IFI duration, and the localized effect from a short set extended beyond the next interval to the next few 60-s IFIs. Effects from one set, however, did not combine with a second set: Changes in the pause after two sets were the same regardless of the spacing between sets. PMID:9684344

  9. Saikosaponin a protects TBI rats after controlled cortical impact and the underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiang; Miao, Guozhuan; Tao, Xiaogang; Hao, Shuyu; Zhang, Hao; Li, Huan; Hou, Zonggang; Tian, Runfa; Lu, Te; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hongwei; Liu, Baiyun

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response plays a significant role in neuronal cell death and functional deficits after Traumatic brain injury (TBI). Importantly, anti-inflammatory agents have neuroprotective effects. To date, however, no studies have investigated the neuroprotective effects of Saikosaponin a (SSa) after TBI. In the present study, rats with controlled cortical impact (CCI) were used to investigate the neuroprotective effects of SSa. The results showed that SSa reduced body weight loss, improved neurological functions andcognition, and reduced brain edema and blood brain barrier permeability after CCI. Moreover, SSa inhibited aquaporin-4 (AQP-4), matrix metalloprotein-9 (MMP-9), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (c-JNK), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The reduction in the loss of occludin mediated by SSa may partially account for its neuroprotective effects. Together, our results suggest that SSa appears to counteract the inflammatory response and neurological function deficits after TBI and possibly via an anti-inflammatory response and inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27069547

  10. Dose dependent effects of nitrate supplementation on cardiovascular control and microvascular oxygenation dynamics in healthy rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Scott K.; Hirai, Daniel M.; Copp, Steven W.; Holdsworth, Clark T.; Allen, Jason D.; Jones, Andrew M.; Musch, Timothy I.; Poole, David C.

    2014-01-01

    High dose nitrate (NO3-) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR, 1 mmol/kg/day) lowers mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and improves skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery/utilization matching thereby raising microvascular O2 pressure (PO2mv). We tested the hypothesis that a low dose of NO3- supplementation, consistent with a diet containing NO3- rich vegetables (BRLD, 0.3 mmol/kg/day), would be sufficient to cause these effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a low dose of NO3- (0.3 mmol/kg/day; n=12), a high dose (1 mmol/kg/day; BRHD, n=6) or tap water (control, n=10) for 5 days. MAP, heart rate (HR), blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) and vascular conductance (VC) were measured during submaximal treadmill exercise (20 m/min, 5% grade, equivalent to ∼60% of maximal O2 uptake). Subsequently, PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180 s of electrically-induced twitch contractions (1 Hz, ∼6 volts) of the surgically-exposed spinotrapezius muscle. BRLD and BRHD lowered resting (control: 139±4, BRLD: 124±5, BRHD: 128±9 mmHg, P<0.05) and exercising (control: 138±3, BRLD: 126±4, BRHD: 125±5 mmHg, P<0.05) MAP to a similar extent. For BRLD this effect occurred in the absence of altered exercising hindlimb muscle(s) blood flow or spinotrapezius PO2mv (rest and across the transient response at the onset of contractions, all P>0.05), each of which increased significantly for the BRHD condition (all P<0.05). Whereas BRHD slowed the PO2mv kinetics significantly (i.e., >mean response time, MRT; control: 16.6±2.1, BRHD: 23.3±4.7 s) following the onset of contractions compared to control, in the BRLD group this effect did not reach statistical significance (BRLD: 20.9±1.9 s, P=0.14). These data demonstrate that while low dose NO3- supplementation lowers MAP it does so in the absence of augmented muscle blood flow, VC and PO2mv; all of which are elevated at a higher dose. Thus, in healthy animals, a high dose of NO3

  11. Event-related brain potentials, bilateral electrodermal activity and Mangina-Test performance in learning disabled/ADHD pre-adolescents with severe behavioral disorders as compared to age-matched normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mangina, C A; Beuzeron-Mangina, J H; Grizenko, N

    2000-07-01

    The most frequently encountered developmental problems of learning disabilities/ADHD often co-exist with severe behavioral disorders. As a direct consequence, this condition opens the way to delinquency, school drop-out, depression, suicide, substance abuse, work absenteeism, and other psycho-social complications. In this paper, we are presenting a selective overview of our previous research and its clinical applications in this field as it relates to our present research data pertaining to the effects of our original Memory Workload Paradigm on the event-related brain potentials in differentiating normal and pathological pre-adolescents (learning disabled/ADHD with concomitant severe behavioral disorders such as oppositional and conduct). In addition, it provides data on the bilateral electrodermal activity during cognitive workload and Mangina-Test performance of pathological and normal pre-adolescents conducted in separate sessions. The results of our present research indicate that a significant memory load effect for the P450 latency (F(3,27)=4.98, P<0.01) and the P450 amplitude (F(3,27)=3.57, P<0.05) was present for normal pre-adolescents which was absent in pathological pre-adolescents. Moreover, enhanced N450 ERP amplitudes to our Memory Workload Paradigm in pre-frontal and frontal regions clearly differentiated normal from pathological pre-adolescents (F(1, 18)=12.21, P<0.004). Furthermore, significant differences between normal and pathological groups were found in bilateral electrodermal activity (F(1,18)=23.86, P<0.001) and on the Mangina-Test performance (F(1,18)=75.35, P<0.001). Our present research findings provide an original and valuable demonstration of an integrative and effective clinical psychophysiological application of central (ERPs), autonomic (bilateral electrodermal activity) and neuro-psychometric aspects (Mangina-Test) which characterize normal and pathological pre-adolescents and underpin the neurophysiological basis of learning disabled/ADHD with severe behavioral disorders as opposed to normal subjects. PMID:10828376

  12. Adaptation to a cortex-controlled robot attached at the pelvis and engaged during locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Giszter, Simon F

    2011-02-23

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) should ideally show robust adaptation of the BMI across different tasks and daily activities. Most BMIs have used overpracticed tasks. Little is known about BMIs in dynamic environments. How are mechanically body-coupled BMIs integrated into ongoing rhythmic dynamics, for example, in locomotion? To examine this, we designed a novel BMI using neural discharge in the hindlimb/trunk motor cortex in rats during locomotion to control a robot attached at the pelvis. We tested neural adaptation when rats experienced (1) control locomotion, (2) "simple elastic load" (a robot load on locomotion without any BMI neural control), and (3) "BMI with elastic load" (in which the robot loaded locomotion and a BMI neural control could counter this load). Rats significantly offset applied loads with the BMI while preserving more normal pelvic height compared with load alone. Adaptation occurred over ∼100-200 step cycles in a trial. Firing rates increased in both the loaded conditions compared with baseline. Mean phases of the discharge of cells in the step cycle shifted significantly between BMI and the simple load condition. Over time, more BMI cells became positively correlated with the external force and modulated more deeply, and the network correlations of neurons on a 100 ms timescale increased. Loading alone showed none of these effects. The BMI neural changes of rate and force correlations persisted or increased over repeated trials. Our results show that rats have the capacity to use motor adaptation and motor learning to fairly rapidly engage hindlimb/trunk-coupled BMIs in their locomotion. PMID:21414932

  13. The effect of thermal burns on the release of collagenase from corneas of vitamin A--deficient and controls rats.

    PubMed

    Seng, W L; Glogowski, J A; Wolf, G; Berman, M B; Kenyon, K R; Kiorpes, T C

    1980-12-01

    A mild trauma in the form of a thermal burn was applied to corneas of vitamin A--deficient rats and their pair-fed controls. The control corneas routinely showed rapid re-epithelialization without stromal changes. The corneas of deficient rats recovered more slowly, frequently exhibiting stromal edema, leukoma, and sometimes ulceration. Because collagenase is thought to initiate collagen destruction in corneal ulceration, the relationships among vitamin A status, severity of trauma, and collagenase levels were determine. Mild thermal burns were found to cause corneas from less severely deficient rats to ulcerate rarely but no release increased levels of collagenase, mainly on the first day of culture, as in the case of nonburned, severely deficient rats. Comparable burns of corneas of pair-fed control rats resulted in no ulceration and in very little collagenase release. Severe burns of either pair-fed control or normal rat corneas caused ulceration and collagenase release, but collagenase activity was maximal on the second and third days of culture. Differences in vitamin A status at time of burning gave rise to different patterns of collagenase. By following the development of the vitamin deficiency, it was determined that little active collagenase is released after mild burns of corneas in animals in the pre--weight plateau stage but that much more active enzyme is released when animals are in weight plateau or 5% weight loss stages. Studies of the effect of recovery from vitamin A deficiency on the response to mild thermal burn indicated that the longer the interval between feeding vitamin A and the burn, the lower the postburn level of collagenase in the day 1 medium. Thus it would appear that restitution of vitamin A status decreased the level of active collagenase after the mild thermal burn. The system developed here can be used to study the biochemical basis for ulceration in vitamin A deficiency, and the possibility exists that the ulceration

  14. How the thyroid controls metabolism in the rat: different roles for triiodothyronine and diiodothyronines.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, M; Lanni, A; Lombardi, A; Goglia, F

    1997-01-01

    1. Although the first evidence of a relationship between the thyroid and metabolism was reported in 1895, the mechanism by which thyroid hormones influence resting metabolic rate in whole animals is still poorly understood. This paper reports an attempt to test whether diiodothyronines (T2s) and triiodothyronine (T3) have different roles in the control of resting metabolism (RM). 2. Changes in resting metabolic rate were measured in hypothyroid rats treated acutely (25 micrograms (100 g body weight)-1) either with one of the T2s or with T3. Injection of T3 induced an increase of about 35% in RM that started 25-30 h after the injection and lasted until 5-6 days after the injection, the maximal value being observed at 50-75 h. The injection of T2s evoked a temporally different pattern of response. The increases in RM started 6-12 h after the injection, had almost disappeared after 48 h, and the maximal stimulation was observed at 28-30 h. 3. When actinomycin D (an inhibitor of protein synthesis) and T3 were given together, the stimulation of RM was almost completely abolished. The simultaneous injection of actinomycin D and either of the T2s, on the other hand, did not cause any attenuation of the stimulation seen with the T2s alone. 4. Following chronic treatment (3 weeks) with either T3 or T2s there was a stimulation of organ growth only after the administration of T3. 5. Chronic administration of either T2s or T3 to hypothyroid rats significantly enhanced the oxidative capacity of each of the tissues considered. In the case of T2s the stimulation was almost the same whether it was expressed as an increase in specific activity or total tissue activity. In the case of T3 the increases were, in the main, secondary to the hypertrophic or hyperplastic effect. 6. These results indicate that T2s and T3 exert different effects on RM. The effects of T2s are rapid and possibly mediated by their direct interaction with mitochondria. Those of T3 are slower and more prolonged

  15. Disorder of G2-M Checkpoint Control in Aniline-Induced Cell Proliferation in Rat Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Khan, M. Firoze

    2015-01-01

    Aniline, a toxic aromatic amine, is known to cause hemopoietic toxicity both in humans and animals. Aniline exposure also leads to toxic response in spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and the eventual formation of tumors on chronic in vivo exposure. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation, which could eventually contribute to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. Despite our demonstration that cell proliferation was associated with deregulation of G1 phase cyclins and increased expression of G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), molecular mechanisms, especially the regulation of G2 phase and contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in aniline-induced splenic cellular proliferation remain largely unclear. This study therefore, mainly focused on the regulation of G2 phase in an animal model preceding a tumorigenic response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day) in drinking water or drinking water only (controls) for 30 days, and expression of G2 phase cyclins, CDK1, CDK inhibitors and miRNAs were measured in the spleen. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in cell cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclins A, B and CDK1, particularly phosphor-CDK1, and decreases in CDK inhibitors p21 and p27, which could promote the splenocytes to go through G2/M transition. Our data also showed upregulation of tumor markers Trx-1 and Ref-1 in rats treated with aniline. More importantly, we observed lower expression of miRNAs including Let-7a, miR-15b, miR24, miR-100 and miR-125, and greater expression of CDK inhibitor regulatory miRNAs such as miR-181a, miR-221 and miR-222 in the spleens of aniline-treated animals. Our findings suggest that significant increases in the expression of cyclins, CDK1 and aberrant regulation of miRNAs could lead to an accelerated G2/M transition of the splenocytes, and potentially to a

  16. Rat models of acute inflammation: a randomized controlled study on the effects of homeopathic remedies

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Anita; Bellavite, Paolo; Bertani, Simone; Chiarotti, Flavia; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background One of the cardinal principles of homeopathy is the "law of similarities", according to which patients can be treated by administering substances which, when tested in healthy subjects, cause symptoms that are similar to those presented by the patients themselves. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of pre-clinical (in vitro and animal) studies aimed at evaluating the pharmacological activity or efficacy of some homeopathic remedies under potentially reproducible conditions. However, in addition to some contradictory results, these studies have also highlighted a series of methodological difficulties. The present study was designed to explore the possibility to test in a controlled way the effects of homeopathic remedies on two known experimental models of acute inflammation in the rat. To this aim, the study considered six different remedies indicated by homeopathic practice for this type of symptom in two experimental edema models (carrageenan- and autologous blood-induced edema), using two treatment administration routes (sub-plantar injection and oral administration). Methods In a first phase, the different remedies were tested in the four experimental conditions, following a single-blind (measurement) procedure. In a second phase, some of the remedies (in the same and in different dilutions) were tested by oral administration in the carrageenan-induced edema, under double-blind (treatment administration and measurement) and fully randomized conditions. Seven-hundred-twenty male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 170–180 g were used. Six homeopathic remedies (Arnica montana D4, Apis mellifica D4, D30, Atropa belladonna D4, Hamamelis virginiana D4, Lachesis D6, D30, Phosphorus D6, D30), saline and indomethacin were tested. Edema was measured using a water-based plethysmometer, before and at different times after edema induction. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student t test. Results In the first phase of experiments, some

  17. Studies on the control of 4-aminobutyrate metabolism in 'synaptosomal' and free rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J M; Clark, J B

    1976-01-01

    1. The specific activities of 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.19) and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16) were significantly higher in brain mitochondria of non-synaptic origin (fraction M) than those derived from the lysis of synaptosomes (fraction SM2). 2. The metabolisms of 4-aminobutyrate in both 'free' (non-synaptic, fraction M) and 'synaptic' (fraction SM2) rat brain mitochondria was studied under various conditions. 3. It is proposed that 4-aminobutyrate enters both types of brain mitochondria by a non-carrier-mediated process. 4. The rate of 4-aminobutyrate metabolism was in all cases higher in the 'free' (fraction M) brain mitochondria than in the synaptic (fraction SM2) mitochondria, paralleling the differences in the specific activities of the 4-aminobutyrate-shunt enzymes. 5. The intramitochondrial concentration of 2-oxoglutarate appears to be an important controlling parameter in the rate of 4-aminobutyrate metabolism, since, although 2-oxoglutarate is required, high concentrations (2.5 mM) of extramitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate inhibit the formation of aspartate via the glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase. 6. The redox state of the intramitochondrial NAD pool is also important in the control of 4-aminobutyrate metabolism; NADH exhibits competitive inhibition of 4-aminobutyrate metabolism by both mitochondrial populations with an apparent Ki of 102 muM. 7. Increased potassium concentrations stimulate 4-aminobutyrate metabolsim in the synaptic mitochondria but not in 'free' brain mitochondria. This is discussed with respect to the putative transmitter role of 4-aminobutyrate. PMID:188415

  18. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  19. Glucocorticoid control of rat growth hormone gene expression: Effect on cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleic acid production and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertz, B.J.; Gardner, D.G.; Baxter, J.D. )

    1987-12-01

    The effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone on the production and degradation of rat GH (rGH) cytoplasmic mRNA was studied in cultured rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells. The incorporation of (3H)uridine into both rGH cytoplasmic mRNA and the pyrimidine nucleotide precursor pool was determined in hormone-treated and control cells. From these measurements glucocorticoid effects on absolute production rates of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA were determined and compared to effects on rGH mRNA accumulation. Rat GH mRNA half-life was then calculated based on a first-order decay model. Rat GH mRNA half-life was also directly assayed by: (1) pulse-chase studies and (2) measuring the kinetics of decay of rGH mRNA in cells after transfer from serum-containing to hormone-deficient media. From these independent analyses rGH mRNA half-life estimates ranged from 28-55 h in different experiments. Within individual experiments there was little variability of rGH mRNA decay rates; glucocorticoids were found not to alter the stability of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA. Glucocorticoid induction of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation was accounted for solely on the basis of increased mRNA production.

  20. Age-dependent increase of etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain of ROS overproducing OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Jagadeesan; Sinitsina, Olga; Vasunina, Elena A.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Laval, Jacques; Bartsch, Helmut . E-mail: h.bartsch@dkfz.de

    2005-10-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) play a role in aging and degenerative diseases. To correlate oxidative stress and LPO-derived DNA damage, we determined etheno-DNA-adducts in liver and brain from ROS overproducing OXYS rats in comparison with age-matched Wistar rats. Liver DNA samples from 3- and 15-month-old OXYS and Wistar rats were analyzed for 1,N {sup 6}-ethenodeoxyadenosine ({epsilon}dA) and 3,N {sup 4}-ethenodeoxycytidine ({epsilon}dC) by immunoaffinity/{sup 32}P-postlabelling. While {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC levels were not different in young rats, adduct levels were significantly higher in old OXYS rats when compared to old Wistar or young OXYS rats. Frozen rat brain sections were analyzed for {epsilon}dA by immunostaining of nuclei. Brains from old OXYS rats accumulated {epsilon}dA more frequently than age-matched Wistar rats. Our results demonstrate increased LPO-induced DNA damage in organs of OXYS rats which correlates with their known shorter life-span and elevated frequency of chronic degenerative diseases.

  1. GABAergic control of the activity of the central nucleus of the amygdala in low- and high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    Skórzewska, Anna; Lehner, Małgorzata; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Krząścik, Paweł; Płaźnik, Adam

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in amygdala nuclei in low- (LR) and high-anxiety (HR) rats after repeated corticosterone administration and acute injection of the benzodiazepine midazolam. The animals were divided into LR and HR groups based on the duration of their conditioned freezing in a contextual fear test (CFT). Repeated daily administration of corticosterone (20 mg/kg s.c.) for 21 injections increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field and reduced body weight in both the LR and HR groups. These effects of corticosterone administration were more pronounced in the HR group. Moreover, in the HR group, chronic corticosterone administration increased the duration of freezing in the CFT test compared with the appropriate control group and treated LR rats. The behavioral effects in HR rats were accompanied by an increase in the expression of c-Fos in the lateral (LA) and central (CeA) nuclei of the amygdala and by a decrease in GABA-A alpha-2 subunit density in the CeA. Acute midazolam administration significantly attenuated the neophobia and conditioned fear responses, decreased c-Fos expression in the LA and CeA, and increased alpha-2 subunit density in the CeA only in the HR group. These studies have shown that HR rats are more susceptible to the anxiogenic effects of chronic corticosterone administration, which are associated with the attenuation of GABAergic control over the amygdala output that controls emotional responses. The current data may increase understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for individual differences in the psychopathological processes induced by repeated administration of high doses of glucocorticoids or by elevated levels of these hormones, which are associated with chronic stress and affective pathology. PMID:26318100

  2. Light-controlled relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum using NOBL-1, a novel nitric oxide releaser

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Yuji; Ieda, Naoya; Fukamoto, Ayako; Kataoka, Tomoya; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum could be controlled with NOBL-1, a novel, light-controllable nitric oxide (NO) releaser. Materials and Methods Fifteen-week-old male Wistar-ST rats were used. The penile corpus cavernosum was prepared and used in an isometric tension study. After noradrenaline (10-5 M) achieved precontraction, the penile corpus cavernosum was irradiated by light (470–500 nm) with and without NOBL-1 (10-6 M). In addition, we noted rats' responses to light with vardenafil (10-6 M), a phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor. Next, responses to light in the presence of a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) (10-5 M), were measured. All measurements were performed in pretreated L-NAME (10-4 M) conditions to inhibit endogenous NO production. Results Corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, was unchanged by light irradiation in the absence of NOBL-1. However, in the presence of NOBL-1, corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, relaxed in response to light irradiation. After blue light irradiation ceased, tension returned. In addition, the light response was obviously enhanced in the presence of a PDE-5 inhibitor. Conclusions This study showed that rat corpus cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation can be light-controlled using NOBL-1, a novel, light sensitive NO releaser. Though further in vivo studies are needed to investigate possible usefulness, NOBL-1 may be prove to be a useful tool for erectile dysfunction therapy, specifically in the field of penile rehabilitation. PMID:27195321

  3. Carrier-mediated transport controls hydroxyproline catabolism in heart mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Seccia, T M; Marra, E; Minervini, G M; Vulpis, V; Pirrelli, A; Passarella, S

    1996-11-01

    In this study we have investigated hydroxyproline transport in rat heart mitochondria and, in particular, in heart left ventricle mitochondria isolated from both spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar-Kyoto rats. Hydroxyproline uptake by mitochondria, where its catabolism takes place, occurs via a carrier-mediated process as demonstrated by the occurrence of both saturation kinetics and the inhibition shown by phenylsuccinate and the thiol reagent mersalyl. In any case, hydroxyproline transport was found to limit the rate of mitochondrial hydroxyproline catabolism. A significant change in Vmax and Km values was found in mitochondria from hypertensive/hypertrophied rats in which the Km value decreases and the Vmax value increases with respect to normotensive rats, thus accounting for the increase of hydroxyproline metabolism due to its increased concentration in a hypertrophic/hypertensive state. PMID:8915003

  4. UPREGULATION OF BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR EXPRESSION IN NODOSE GANGLIA AND THE LOWER BRAINSTEM OF HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Brown, Alexandra L.; Page, Mollie P.; Brooks, Virginia L.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension leads to structural and functional changes at baroreceptor synapses in the medial nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Our previous studies show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by rat nodose ganglion (NG) neurons, including baroreceptor afferents and their central terminals in the medial NTS. We hypothesized that hypertension leads to upregulation of BDNF expression in NG neurons. To test this hypothesis, we used two mechanistically distinct models of hypertension: the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. Young adult SHRs, whose blood pressure was significantly elevated compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats, exhibited dramatic upregulation of BDNF mRNA and protein in the NG. BDNF transcripts from exon 4, known to be regulated by activity, and exon 9 (protein-coding region) showed the largest increases. Electrical stimulation of dispersed NG neurons with patterns that mimic baroreceptor activity during blood pressure elevations led to increases in BDNF mRNA that were also mediated through promoter 4. The increase in BDNF content of the NG in vivo was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of BDNF-immunoreactive NG neurons. Moreover, upregulation of BDNF in cell bodies of NG neurons was accompanied by a significant increase in BDNF in the NTS region, the primary central target of NG afferents. A dramatic increase in BDNF in the NG was also detected in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Together, our study identifies BDNF as a candidate molecular mediator of activity-dependent changes at baroafferent synapses during hypertension. PMID:23172808

  5. Upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in nodose ganglia and the lower brainstem of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Brown, Alexandra L; Page, Mollie P; Brooks, Virginia L; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2013-02-01

    Hypertension leads to structural and functional changes at baroreceptor synapses in the medial nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Our previous studies show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by rat nodose ganglion (NG) neurons, including baroreceptor afferents and their central terminals in the medial NTS. We hypothesized that hypertension leads to upregulation of BDNF expression in NG neurons. To test this hypothesis, we used two mechanistically distinct models of hypertension, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. Young adult SHRs, whose blood pressure was significantly elevated compared with age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats, exhibited dramatic upregulation of BDNF mRNA and protein in the NG. BDNF transcripts from exon 4, known to be regulated by activity, and exon 9 (protein-coding region) showed the largest increases. Electrical stimulation of dispersed NG neurons with patterns that mimic baroreceptor activity during blood pressure elevations led to increases in BDNF mRNA that were also mediated through promoter 4. The increase in BDNF content of the NG in vivo was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of BDNF-immunoreactive NG neurons. Moreover, upregulation of BDNF in cell bodies of NG neurons was accompanied by a significant increase in BDNF in the NTS region, the primary central target of NG afferents. A dramatic increase in BDNF in the NG was also detected in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Together, our study identifies BDNF as a candidate molecular mediator of activity-dependent changes at baroafferent synapses during hypertension. PMID:23172808

  6. Imaging radiation pneumonitis in a rat model of a radiological terrorism incident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert; Wu, QingPing; Krenz, Gary; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Moulder, John E.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a rat model of single, sub-lethal thoracic irradiation. Our irradiation protocol is considered representative of exposures near the detonation site of a dirty bomb or small nuclear device. The model is being used to investigate techniques for identifying, triaging and treating possible victims. In addition to physiological markers of right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular resistance, and arterial distensibility, we present two methods for quantifying microvascular density. We used methods including microfocal X-ray imaging to investigate changes in lung structure/function resulting from radiation exposure. Radiation pneumonitis is a complication in subjects receiving thoracic irradiation. A radiographic hallmark of acute radiation pneumonitis is a diffuse infiltrate corresponding to the radiation treatment field. We describe two methods for quantifying small artery dropout that occurs in the model at the same time-period. Rats were examined 3-days, 2-weeks, 1-month (m), 2-m, 5-m, and 12-m post-irradiation and compared with aged-matched controls. Right ventricular hypertrophy and increases in pulmonary vascular resistance were present during the pneumonitis phase. Vascular injury was dependent on dose and post-irradiation duration. Rats irradiated with 5 Gy had few detectable changes, whereas 10 Gy resulted in a significant decrease in both microvascular density and arterial distensibility around 2- m, the decrease in each lessening, but extending through 12-m. In conclusion, rats irradiated with a 10 Gy dose had changes in vascular structure concurrent with the onset of radiation pneumonitis that were detectable with our imaging techniques and these structural changes persist after resolution of the pneumonitis.

  7. Differential Effects of Radiation and Age on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Ann M; Shi, Lei; Olson, John; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 50% of adults and ∼100% of children who survive >6 months after fractionated partial or whole-brain radiotherapy develop cognitive impairments. Noninvasive methods are needed for detecting and tracking the radiation-induced brain injury associated with these impairments. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to detect structural changes associated with brain injury in our rodent model of fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) induced cognitive impairment and to compare those changes with alterations that occur during the aging process. Middle aged rats were given a clinically relevant dose of fWBI (40 Gy: two 5 Gy fractions/wk for 4 wk) and scanned approximately one year post-irradiation to obtain whole-brain T2 and diffusion tensor images (DTI); control groups of sham-irradiated age-matched and young rats were also scanned. No gross structural changes were evident in the T2 structural images, and no detectable fWBI-induced DTI changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) were found in heavily myelinated white matter (corpus callosum, cingulum, and deep cortical white matter). However, significant fWBI-induced variability in FA distribution was present in the superficial parietal cortex due to an fWBI-induced decline in FA in the more anterior slices through parietal cortex. Young rats had significantly lower FA values relative to both groups of older rats, but only within the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that targets of the fWBI-induced change in this model may be the less myelinated or unmyelinated axons, extracellular matrix, or synaptic fields rather than heavily myelinated tracts. PMID:20599817

  8. Insulin nonattenuation of vasoactive agent-induced responses in mesangial cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Inishi, Y; Okuda, T; Arakawa, T; Yasuda, C; Ohara, M; Kurokawa, K

    1995-03-01

    We recently found that insulin attenuates intracellular calcium transients and cell contraction caused by vasoactive agents in cultured rat mesangial cells. Because altered glomerular function may be causally related to the evolution of hypertension, we examined in the present study the effects of insulin on the functions of mesangial cells derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of 4- and 8-weeks of age. Age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as controls. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured with Fura-2 method in suspended mesangial cells. Pretreatment of mesangial cells with 5 micrograms/ml insulin for 120 minutes did not affect basal [Ca2+]i in either WKY or SHR mesangial cells. However, insulin pretreatment significantly attenuated [Ca2+]i transients to vasoactive agents in WKY mesangial cells. In contrast, [Ca2+]i transients to these agents were not attenuated by insulin in SHR mesangial cells. Additionally, SHR mesangial cell contraction in response to angiotensin II (Ang II) was not altered by insulin, while WKY mesangial cell contraction to Ang II was, as in normal Wistar rats, significantly reduced by insulin. Since we previously showed the possibility that the attenuation of calcium signal by insulin is via insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor, we also examined the effect of IGF-I. In contrast to WKY mesangial cells, IGF-I-induced attenuation of [Ca2+]i responses to platelet activating factor was absent in SHR mesangial cells. [125I]-IGF-I binding in SHR mesangial cells was not significantly different from that in WKY mesangial cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752589

  9. Effect of previous strength training episode and retraining on facilitation of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and contractile properties after long-term detraining in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sukho; Hong, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Kijeong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of previous strength training and retraining following long-term cessation of exercise on muscle mass and contractile properties. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=24) aged eight weeks were randomly assigned one of the four groups: control (CON), detraining (DT), training (TR), and retraining (RT). The training regimen consisted of climbing ladder 5×3 sets, once every third day for eight weeks with weight attached to the tail. The weight carried during each training session was initially 50% of body weight and progressively increased by 10% per session. The rats in DT were detained for 20 weeks followed by eight weeks strength training. The rats in the both TR and RT groups underwent eight weeks training. DT was age matched new training group while RT was retraining group after 20 weeks of detraining. Soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscles were harvested in order to measure the weight, and in situ contractile properties of FHL were measured including specific twitch tension (Spt) and specific tetanic tension (Spo). TR showed significant increase in muscle mass compared to CON (P<0.05). DT and RT showed significant increase in muscle mass when compared to all other groups (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference in Spt and Spo among the groups. The present study showed that previous strength training facilitates retraining-induced muscle hypertrophy following long-term cessation of exercise. PMID:27162768

  10. Effect of previous strength training episode and retraining on facilitation of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and contractile properties after long-term detraining in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukho; Hong, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Kijeong

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of previous strength training and retraining following long-term cessation of exercise on muscle mass and contractile properties. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=24) aged eight weeks were randomly assigned one of the four groups: control (CON), detraining (DT), training (TR), and retraining (RT). The training regimen consisted of climbing ladder 5×3 sets, once every third day for eight weeks with weight attached to the tail. The weight carried during each training session was initially 50% of body weight and progressively increased by 10% per session. The rats in DT were detained for 20 weeks followed by eight weeks strength training. The rats in the both TR and RT groups underwent eight weeks training. DT was age matched new training group while RT was retraining group after 20 weeks of detraining. Soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscles were harvested in order to measure the weight, and in situ contractile properties of FHL were measured including specific twitch tension (Spt) and specific tetanic tension (Spo). TR showed significant increase in muscle mass compared to CON (P<0.05). DT and RT showed significant increase in muscle mass when compared to all other groups (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference in Spt and Spo among the groups. The present study showed that previous strength training facilitates retraining-induced muscle hypertrophy following long-term cessation of exercise. PMID:27162768

  11. Effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass and hepatic lipids in rats with combined methionine-choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Seki, Azusa; Sato, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hideo; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, James K

    2011-05-01

    The present study examined changes of cancellous and cortical bone in rats with combined methionine-choline deficiency (MCD). In addition, the effects of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass and hepatic lipids were investigated in rats with MCD. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups of ten, including an age-matched control (standard diet) group, an MCD diet group, and an MCD diet+vitamin K2 (menatetrenone at 30mg/kg/d orally, 5 times a week) group. After the one-month experimental period, histomorphometric analysis was performed on cortical and cancellous bone from the tibial diaphysis and proximal metaphysis, respectively, while histological examination of the liver was performed after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and Oil Red O. MCD rats displayed weight loss, diffuse and centrilobular fatty changes of the liver, and a decrease of the cancellous bone volume per tissue volume (BV/TV) and percent cortical area (Ct Ar) as a result of decreased trabecular, periosteal, and endocortical bone formation along with increased trabecular and endocortical bone resorption. Administration of vitamin K2 to rats with MCD attenuated weight loss, accelerated the decrease of cancellous BV/TV due to an increase of bone remodeling, and ameliorated the decrease of percent Ct Ar by increasing periosteal and endocortical bone formation. Vitamin K2 administration also prevented MCD-induced diffuse fatty change of the liver. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of vitamin K2 on cortical bone mass and hepatic lipid metabolism in rats with MCD. The loss of cancellous bone mass could possibly have been due to re-distribution of minerals to cortical bone. PMID:21352961

  12. The acceptability of rat trap use over pesticides for rodent control in two poor urban communities in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rodent infestations are a public health problem in poor urban communities. The use of illegal street pesticides to control rodent infestations with resulting poisonings is an additional public health concern receiving limited attention in many developing countries, including South Africa. Methods Participants in a household intervention in two poor urban areas of Cape Town, South Africa, received two high quality rat traps. Reported in this article are the results of a follow-up survey conducted six months after distribution to assess community perceived acceptability of using rat traps instead of toxic pesticides (N = 175). Results Of the 175 respondents that were followed up, 88% used the traps and only 35% continued using pesticides after the intervention. The analysis identified perceived effectiveness of the traps (prevalence odds ratio 18.00, 95% confidence interval 4.62 to 70.14), being male (prevalence odds ratio 8.86, 95% confidence interval 1.73 to 45.19), and the willingness to buy traps from an informal market (prevalence odds ratio 17.75, 95% confidence interval 4.22 to 74.57) as significantly associated with the acceptance of trap use. Conclusions Rat traps, when introduced to poor urban communities, are acceptable as an alternative to toxic pesticides for rodent control. Sustainability of trap use, however, needs to be researched, especially cost and cost-benefit. PMID:22554267

  13. Involvement of oxidative stress in the regulation of NPY/CART-mediated appetite control in amphetamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chen, Pei-Ni; Yu, Ching-Han; Chen, Chia-Hui; Tsai, Tsung-Ta; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2015-05-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) treatment can suppress appetite and increase oxidative stress in the brain. AMPH-induced appetite suppression is associated with the regulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the hypothalamus. The present study explored whether antioxidants, including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GP), were involved in this NPY/CART-mediated appetite control. Rats were treated daily with AMPH for four days. Changes in food intake and expression levels of hypothalamic NPY, CART, GST, and GP were examined and compared. Results showed that, in AMPH-treated rats, (1) food intake and NPY expression decreased, while CART, GST, and GP expression increased; (2) NPY knockdown in the brain enhanced the decrease in NPY and the increases in CART, GST, and GP expression; and (3) central inhibition of reactive oxygen species production decreased GST and GP and modulated AMPH anorexia and the expression levels of NPY and CART. The present results suggest that oxidative stress in the brain participates in regulating NPY/CART-mediated appetite control in AMPH-treated rats. These results may advance the knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism of AMPH-evoked or NPY/CART-mediated appetite suppression. PMID:25825358

  14. Roles of mitochondria and temperature in the control of intracellular calcium in adult rat sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kang, S H; Carl, A; McHugh, J M; Goff, H R; Kenyon, J L

    2008-04-01

    We recorded Ca2+ current and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+](i)) in isolated adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at 20 and 30 degrees C. In neurons bathed in tetraethylammonium and dialyzed with cesium, warming reduced resting [Ca2+](i) from 87 to 49 nM and the time constant of the decay of [Ca2+](i) transients (tau(r)) from 1.3 to 0.99s (Q(10)=1.4). The Buffer Index, the ratio between Ca2+ influx and Delta[Ca2+](i) (f I(ca)d(t)/Delta[Ca2+]i) , increased two- to threefold with warming. Neither inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase by intracellular sodium orthovanadate nor inhibition of Ca2+ uptake by the endoplasmic reticulum by thapsigargin plus ryanodine were necessary for the effects of warming on these parameters. In contrast, inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter by intracellular ruthenium red largely reversed the effects of warming. Carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP, 500 nM) increased resting [Ca2+](i) at 30 degrees C. Ten millimolar intracellular sodium prolonged the recovery of [Ca2+](i) transients to 10-40s. This effect was reversed by an inhibitor of mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca2+ -exchange (CGP 37157, 10 microM). Thus, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is necessary for the temperature-dependent increase in Ca2+ buffering and mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes contribute to the control of [Ca2+](i) between 50 and 150 nM at 30 degrees C. PMID:17716728

  15. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Snowdin, Jacob W.; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G.; Kamath, Vasudeva G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3′-azido-3′-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis. PMID:26248377

  16. Early alterations in soleus GLUT-4, glucose transport, and glycogen in voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Halseth, Amy E.

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) by juvenile female rats was used as a noninterventional model of soleus muscle functional overload to study the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity by the glucose transporter (GLUT-4 isoform) protein level and glycogen concentration. Soleus total protein content was significantly greater (+18%;P greater than 0.05) than in age-matched controls after 1 wk of WR, and this hypertrophic response continued in weeks 2-4 (+24-32%). GLUT-4 protein was 39% greater than in controls in 1-wk WR soleus, and this adaptation was accompanied by a similar increase in in vitro insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity(+29%). After 2 and 4 wk of WR, however, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity had returned to control levels, despite a continued elevation (+25-28%) of GLUT-4 protein. At these two time points, glycogen concentration was significantly enhanced in WR soleus (+21-42%), which coincided with significant reductions in glycogen synthase activity ratios (-23 to-41%). These results indicate that, in this model of soleus muscle functional overload, the GLUT-4 protein level may initially regulate insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in the absence of changes in other modifying factors. However,this regulation of glucose transport activity by GLUT-4 protein may be subsequently overridden by elevated glycogen concentration.

  17. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of /sup 32/P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve.

  18. Light-induced pH changes in the intact retinae of normal and early diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Double-barreled H(+)-selective microelectrodes were used to measure local extracellular concentration of H(+) ([H(+)]o) in the retina of dark-adapted anesthetized Long-Evans rats. The microelectrode advanced in steps of 30 μm throughout the retina from the vitreal surface to retinal pigment epithelium and then to the choroid, recording changes in [H(+)]o evoked by light stimulation. Recordings were performed in diabetic rats 1-3 months after intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin and the results were compared with data obtained in age-matched control animals. Brief light stimulation (2.5 s) evoked changes of [H(+)]o with amplitudes of a few nM. Throughout the retina, there was a transient initial acidification for ∼200 ms followed by steady alkalinization, although amplitudes and kinetics of these components were slightly variable in different retinal layers. No significant difference was found when the light-induced [H(+)]o changes recorded in various retinal layers of early diabetic rats were compared with the [H(+)]o changes from corresponding layers of control animals. Also, when H(+)-selective microelectrodes were located in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer, an increase in H(+) was recorded, whose time course and amplitude were similar in control and diabetic rats. However, a striking difference between light-induced [H(+)]o changes in controls and diabetics was observed in the choriocapillaris, in the thin layer (10-20 μm) distal to the basal membrane of the RPE. In control rats, choroidal [H(+)]o decreased in a few cases, but much more often practically did not change. In contrast, diabetic rats demonstrated either an increase (in half of the cases) or no change in choroidal [H(+)]o. The data suggest that the active participation of the choroidal blood supply in stabilization of [H(+)]o could be partially compromised already at early stages of diabetes in rats. Interestingly, it appeared that the acid removal by the choroidal

  19. Bone mineral density, microarchitectural and mechanical alterations of osteoporotic rat bone under long-term whole-body vibration therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pengfei; Tang, Zhurong; Qing, Fangzhu; Chen, Xuening; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Yujiang; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-01-01

    Low-magnitude, high-frequency whole body vibration (WBV) is receiving increasing interest as a non-pharmacological anti-osteoporosis approach. However, the long-term effect of WBV therapy is seldom studied. In this study, the efficacy of 16-week WBV (0.3g, 30 Hz) on bone mineral density (BMD), microarchitectural parameters and mechanical properties of ovariectomized rat femur were examined by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), ex vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and fracture test. To the best of our knowledge, 16 weeks of WBV administration (20 min/day) is currently the longest duration on rodent. The longitudinal BMD change showed that positive effect of WBV on ovariectomized rat femoral neck diminished with prolonged administration duration. In addition, 16-week of WBV treatment was found to cause significantly reduction in the mean BMD, trabecular BMD (Tb.BMD), trabecular bone volume ration (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N) and maximum load in femoral neck of ovariectomized rat. Metaphyseal Tb.BMD and BV/TV were also significantly decreased in WBV treated ovariectomized group than non-treated controls. Whole-femur DMA was demonstrated as a sensitive tool in distinguishing osteoporotic femur from healthy aged-matched controls, in terms of decreased storage modulus (E') and loss factor (tan δ). However, E' and tan δ are not enhanced by 16-week WBV treatment. Together, these findings indicate that administration duration played an important role in the effect of WBV. 16-week WBV may exacerbate trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized rat femur, especially in trabecular-rich femoral neck region. An optimal WBV protocol including administration duration should be established prior to long-term clinical practice. PMID:26398779

  20. 31P-NMR analysis of congestive heart failure in the SHHF/Mcc-facp rat heart.

    PubMed

    Michael O'Donnell, J; Narayan, P; Bailey, M Q; Abduljalil, A M; Altschuld, R A; McCune, S A; Robitaille, P M

    1998-02-01

    31P-NMR was used to monitor myocardial bioenergetics in compensated and failing SHHF/MCC-fa(cp) (SHF) rat hearts. The SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) (spontaneous hypertension and heart failure) rat is a relatively new genetic model in which all individuals spontaneously develop congestive heart failure, most during the second year of life. Failing SHF rat hearts displayed a pronounced decrease in resting PCr:ATP ratios (P<0.001), which was explained by a significant (P<0. 0001) drop in total creatine (47.2+/-3.1 nmol/mg protein) v age matched controls (106+/-3 nmol/mg protein). In end stage failure, NMR determined PCr was 2.9+/-0.1 micro mol/g wet weight under basal conditions. In contrast, 6- and 20-month-old controls and compensated SHFs had PCr values of 5.3+/-0.1, and 5.1+/-0.5 and 5. 1+/-0.2 micro mol/g wet weight. Both compensated and failing SHF hearts were metabolically compromised when the rate pressure product (RPP) was increased, as evidenced by an increase in Pi and a drop in PCr. Compensated SHF hearts, however, were able to increase rate pressure products (RRP, mmHg X beats/min) from 44.5+/-1.4 to 66.6+/-3. 4 K with dobutamine infusion, whereas hearts in end-stage failure were able to increase their RPP from baseline values of 27+/-4 K to only 37+/-7 K. The data indicate that a pronounced decline in PCr and total creatine signals the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to decompensation and failure in the SHF rat model of hypertensive cardiomyopathy. PMID:9515000

  1. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  2. The regulation of glucose transport in the heart of control and diabetic rats: With special emphasis on the glucose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pleta, M. de Leoz.

    1989-01-01

    Glucose transport regulation with insulin and high perfusion pressure in the perfused rat hearts from control and diabetic rat hearts was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-cytochalasin B binding assay was used to study the distribution of glucose transporters within the subcellular membranes fractionated by linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation. In the present study, insulin increased glucose uptake in the perfused heart of control and diabetic animals. This coincided with an increase of glucose transporters on the plasma membrane. The increase in glucose transporters on the plasma membrane could not be accounted for by a decrease of glucose transporters from the microsomal membranes. High perfusion pressure did not change the number of glucose transporters on the plasma membrane compared to basal in the control and diabetic animals, though it increased glucose uptake above that observed for insulin in the control. Instead, high perfusion pressure altered the distribution of glucose transporters within the subcellular membranes in reverse to that with insulin, increasing an intermediate membrane pool believed to reside between the plasma membrane and microsomal membranes as well as the intracellular membrane pool.

  3. Perirhinal Cortex Hyperexcitability in Pilocarpine-Treated Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Ruba; Longo, Daniela; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex (PC), which is heavily connected with several epileptogenic regions of the limbic system such as the entorhinal cortex and amygdala, is involved in the generation and spread of seizures. However, the functional alterations occurring within an epileptic PC network are unknown. Here, we analyzed this issue by using in vitro electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry in brain tissue obtained from pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and age-matched, nonepileptic controls (NECs). Neurons recorded intracellularly from the PC deep layers in the two experimental groups had similar intrinsic and firing properties and generated spontaneous depolarizing and hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potentials with comparable duration and amplitude. However, spontaneous and stimulus-induced epileptiform discharges were seen with field potential recordings in over one-fifth of pilocarpine-treated slices but never in NEC tissue. These network events were reduced in duration by antagonizing NMDA receptors and abolished by NMDA + non-NMDA glutamatergic receptor antagonists. Pharmacologically isolated isolated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials had reversal potentials for the early GABAA receptor-mediated component that were significantly more depolarized in pilocarpine-treated cells. Experiments with a potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 antibody identified, in pilocarpine-treated PC, a significant immunostaining decrease that could not be explained by neuronal loss. However, interneurons expressing parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y were found to be decreased throughout the PC, whereas cholecystokinin-positive cells were diminished in superficial layers. These findings demonstrate synaptic hyper-excitability that is contributed by attenuated inhibition in the PC of pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and underscore the role of PC networks in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:20865722

  4. Hypercholesterolemia abrogates an increased resistance of diabetic rat hearts to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Adameová, A; Kuzelová, M; Andelová, E; Faberová, V; Pancza, D; Svec, P; Ziegelhöffer, A; Ravingerová, T

    2007-01-01

    Both, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypercholesterolemia (HCH) are known as risk factors of ischemic heart disease, however, the effects of experimental DM, as well as of HCH alone, on ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury are not unequivocal. We have previously demonstrated an enhanced resistance to ischemia-induced arrhythmias in rat hearts in the acute phase of DM. Our objectives were thus to extend our knowledge on how DM in combination with HCH, a model that is relevant to diabetic patients with altered lipid metabolism, may affect the size of myocardial infarction and susceptibility to arrhythmias. A combination of streptozotocin (STZ; 80 mg/kg, i.p.) and the fat-cholesterol diet (1% cholesterol, 1% coconut oil; FCHD) was used as a double-disease model mimicking DM and HCH simultaneosly occurring in humans. Following 5 days after STZ injection and FCHD leading to increased blood glucose and cholesterol levels, anesthetized open-chest diabetic, diabetic-hypercholesterolemic (DM-HCH) and age-matched control rats were subjected to 6-min ischemia (occlusion of LAD coronary artery) followed by 10 reperfusion to test susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in the in vivo experiments and to 30-min ischemia and subsequent 2-h reperfusion for the evaluation of the infarct size (IS) in the Langendorff-perfused hearts. The incidence of the most life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular fibrillation, was significantly increased in the DM-HCH rats as compared with non-diabetic control animals (100% vs. 50%; p<0.05). Likewise, arrhythmia severity score (AS) was significantly higher in the DM-HCH rats than in the controls (4.9+/-0.2 vs. 3.5+/-0.5; p<0.05), but was not increased in the diabetic animals (AS 3.7+/-0.9; p>0.05 vs. controls). Diabetic hearts exhibited a reduced IS (15.1+/-3.0% of the area at risk vs. 37.6+/-2.8% in the control hearts; p<0.05), however, a combination of DM and HCH increased the size of myocardial infarction to that observed in

  5. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-β expression

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shabeena; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Rashid; Siddiqui, Waseem A.

    2013-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175–200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-β to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. - Highlights: • The nephroprotective effect of TRF in type-2 diabetic rats was investigated. • Treatment with TRF improved glycemic status, lipid profile and renal functions in rats

  6. An Indian herbal formula (SKV) for controlling voluntary ethanol intake in rats with chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, E R; Shanmugasundaram, K R

    1986-08-01

    Chronic ethanol ingestion in rats showed metabolic and physiological changes similar to alterations reported in human alcoholics. There was a lowering of blood glucose concentration, urea and plasma proteins and elevated concentrations of serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Administration of SKV, an Ayurvedic formula produced by fermentation of cane sugar with raisins and 12 herbal ingredients brought down voluntary ethanol ingestion in the rats and increased food intake. ECG and EEG studies in alcoholic rats showed cardiac depression, augmentation of frequency and amplitude of the alpha, delta and theta waves and weakness in the beta waves. These changes were reversed during SKV-induced voluntary alcohol restriction. The involvement in the ECG and EEG wave patterns was associated with improvement in blood glucose, plasma protein levels and reduction in gamma glutamyl transpeptidase activities. SKV appeared to have no adverse reaction with ethanol (it contains 1-2% ethanol) and appears to be a promising way to combat alcoholism. PMID:3796018

  7. Learning and memory in rats exposed pre- and postnatally to alcohol. An attempt at pharmacological control.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Konstantinova, E R; Petkov, V V; Vaglenova, J V

    1991-01-01

    Using conditioned-reflex methods for active and passive avoidance with punishment reinforcement, we found pronounced memory deficits in 12-week old rats exposed perinatally to alcohol (FAS rats). Impairment of memory was observed not only with the high dose of 9 g ethanol/kg body weight (ingested with tap water in a 6% solution) to which dams were exposed during pregnancy and lactation, but also with the ten-fold lower dose of 1 g ethanol/kg body weight (0.6% ethanol). The nootropic drugs citicholine, piracetam and meclofenoxate administered orally for five days before the training session were effective in decreasing memory deficits; particularly pronounced was the effect of piracetam and meclofenoxate. The benzodiazepine tranquilizer diazepam additionally impaired learning and memory in FAS rats. It is suggested that nootropics could be used to decrease the cognitive disturbances in some humans born to alcoholic mothers. PMID:1870356

  8. Effects of Patterned Sound Deprivation on Short- and Long-Term Plasticity in the Rat Thalamocortical Auditory System In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, Chloe N.; Rosen, Laura G.; Rodier, Simon G.; Dringenberg, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal sensory experience plays a significant role in the maturation and synaptic stabilization of sensory cortices, such as the primary auditory cortex (A1). Here, we examined the effects of patterned sound deprivation (by rearing in continuous white noise, WN) during early postnatal life on short- and long-term plasticity of adult male rats using an in vivo preparation (urethane anesthesia). Relative to age-matched control animals reared under unaltered sound conditions, rats raised in WN (from postnatal day 5 to 50–60) showed greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) of field potentials in A1 induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN). In contrast, analyses of short-term plasticity using paired-pulse stimulation (interstimulus intervals of 25–1000 ms) did not reveal any significant effects of WN rearing. However, LTP induction resulted in a significant enhancement of paired-pulse depression (PPD) for both rearing conditions. We conclude that patterned sound deprivation during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of heightened, juvenile-like long-term plasticity (LTP) into adulthood. Further, the enhanced PPD following LTP induction provides novel evidence that presynaptic mechanisms contribute to thalamocortical LTP in A1 under in vivo conditions. PMID:26881106

  9. Early life ethanol exposure causes long-lasting disturbances in rat mesenchymal stem cells via epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Leu, Yu-Wei; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Chien-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Liu, Yu Ming; Lee, Yen-Hui; Kuo, Shan-Tsu; Hsiao, Shu-Huei

    2014-10-24

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a birth defect due to maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main somatic stem cells in adults and may contribute to tissue homeostasis and repair in adulthood, we investigated whether early life ethanol exposure affects MSCs and contributes to the propensity for disease onset in later life. Using a rodent model of FAS, we found that ethanol exposure (5.25g/kg/day) from postnatal days 4 to 9 in rat pups (mimic of human third trimester) caused long-term anomalies in bone marrow-derived MSCs. MSCs isolated from ethanol-exposed animals were prone to neural induction but resistant to osteogenic and adipogenic inductions compared to their age-matched controls. The altered differentiation may contribute to the severe trabecular bone loss seen in ethanol-exposed animals at 3months of age as well as overt growth retardation. Expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, aP2, and PPARγ were substantially inhibited, but BDNF was up-regulated in MSCs isolated from ethanol-exposed 3month-old animals. Several signaling pathways were distorted in ethanol-exposed MSCs via altered trimethylation at histone 3 lysine 27. These results demonstrate that early life ethanol exposure can have long-term impacts in rat MSCs by both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:25264105

  10. Low control over palatable food intake in rats is associated with habitual behavior and relapse vulnerability: individual differences.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johannes W; Meijboom, Karin E; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic poses an enormous and growing threat to public health. However, the neurobehavioral mechanisms of overeating and obesity are incompletely understood. It has been proposed that addiction-like processes may underlie certain forms of obesity, in particular those associated with binge eating disorder. To investigate the role of addiction-like processes in obesity, we adapted a model of cocaine addiction-like behavior in rats responding for highly palatable food. Here, we tested whether rats responding for highly palatable chocolate Ensure would come to show three criteria of addiction-like behavior, i.e., high motivation, continued seeking despite signaled non-availability and persistence of seeking despite aversive consequences. We also investigated whether exposure to a binge model (a diet consisting of alternating periods of limited food access and access to highly palatable food), promotes the appearance of food addiction-like behavior. Our data show substantial individual differences in control over palatable food seeking and taking, but no distinct subgroup of animals showing addiction-like behavior could be identified. Instead, we observed a wide range extending from low to very high control over palatable food intake. Exposure to the binge model did not affect control over palatable food seeking and taking, however. Animals that showed low control over palatable food intake (i.e., scored high on the three criteria for addiction-like behavior) were less sensitive to devaluation of the food reward and more prone to food-induced reinstatement of extinguished responding, indicating that control over palatable food intake is associated with habitual food intake and vulnerability to relapse. In conclusion, we present an animal model to assess control over food seeking and taking. Since diminished control over food intake is a major factor in the development of obesity, understanding its behavioral and neural underpinnings may facilitate

  11. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex inactivation impairs impulse control but does not affect delay-discounting in rats.

    PubMed

    Feja, Malte; Koch, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Maladaptive levels of impulsivity are found in several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as ADHD, addiction, aggression and schizophrenia. Intolerance to delay-of-gratification, or delay-discounting, and deficits in impulse control are dissociable forms of impulsivity top-down controlled by the prefrontal cortex, with the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) suggested to be critically involved. The present study used transient inactivation of the rats' vmPFC via bilateral microinfusion of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (0.05, 0.5 μg/0.3 μl) to analyse its relevance for impulse control in a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and delay-discounting in a Skinner box. Intra-vmPFC injection of low-dose muscimol impaired impulse control indicated by enhanced premature responding in the 5-CSRTT, while flattening the delay-dependent shift in the preference of the large reward in the delay-discounting task. Likewise, high-dose muscimol did not affect delay-discounting, though raising the rate of omissions. On the contrary, 5-CSRTT performance was characterised by deficits in impulse and attentional control. These data support the behavioural distinction of delay-discounting and impulse control on the level of the vmPFC in rats. Reversible inactivation with muscimol revealed an obvious implication of the vmPFC in the modulation of impulse control in the 5-CSRTT. By contrast, delay-discounting processes seem to be regulated by other neuronal pathways, with the vmPFC playing, if at all, a minor role. PMID:24556205

  12. Ezetimibe improves hepatic steatosis in relation to autophagy in obese and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene; Kim, Lisa; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki-Won; Park, Sung-Woo; Park, Cheol-Young

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether ezetimibe ameliorates hepatic steatosis and induces autophagy in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Male age-matched lean control LETO and obese and diabetic OLETF rats were administered either PBS or ezetimibe (10 mg/kg per day) via stomach gavage for 20 wk. Changes in weight gain and energy intake were regularly monitored. Blood and liver tissue were harvested after overnight fasting at the end of study. Histological assessment was performed in liver tissue. The concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), and total cholesterol (TC) in blood and TG, FFA, and TG in liver tissue were measured. mRNA and protein abundance involved in autophagy was analyzed in the liver. To investigate the effect of ezetimibe on autophagy and reduction in hepatic fat accumulation, human Huh7 hepatocytes were incubated with ezetimibe (10 μmol/L) together with or without palmitic acid (PA, 0.5 mmol/L, 24 h). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to demonstrate effect of ezetimibe on autophagy formation. Autophagic flux was measured with bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of autophagy and following immunoblotting for autophagy-related protein expression. RESULTS: In the OLETF rats that received ezetimibe (10 mg/kg per day), liver weight were significantly decreased by 20% compared to OLETF control rats without changes in food intake and body weight (P < 0.05). Lipid parameters including TG, FFA, and TC in liver tissue of ezetimibe-administrated OLETF rats were dramatically decreased at least by 30% compared to OLETF controls (P < 0.01). The serum glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and lipid profiles were also improved by ezetimibe (P < 0.05). In addition, autophagy-related mRNA expression including ATG5, ATG6, and ATG7 and the protein level of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) were significantly increased in the liver in rats that received ezetimibe (P < 0.05). Likewise, for hepatocytes

  13. The effects of dietary fish oil on exercising skeletal muscle vascular and metabolic control in chronic heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Clark T; Copp, Steven W; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Sims, Gabrielle E; Hageman, Karen S; Stebbins, Charles L; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2014-03-01

    Impaired vasomotor control in chronic heart failure (CHF) is due partly to decrements in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mediated vasodilation. Exercising muscle blood flow (BF) is augmented with polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation via fish oil (FO) in healthy rats. We hypothesized that FO would augment exercising muscle BF in CHF rats via increased NO-bioavailability. Myocardial infarction (coronary artery ligation) induced CHF in Sprague-Dawley rats which were subsequently randomized to dietary FO (20% docosahexaenoic acid, 30% eicosapentaenoic acid, n = 15) or safflower oil (SO, 5%, n = 10) for 6-8 weeks. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), blood [lactate], and hindlimb muscles BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest, during treadmill exercise (20 m·min(-1), 5% incline) and exercise + N(G)-nitro-l-arginine-methyl-ester (l-NAME) (a nonspecific NOS inhibitor). FO did not change left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (SO: 14 ± 2; FO: 11 ± 1 mm Hg, p > 0.05). During exercise, MAP (SO: 128 ± 3; FO: 132 ± 3 mm Hg) and blood [lactate] (SO: 3.8 ± 0.4; FO: 4.6 ± 0.5 mmol·L(-1)) were not different (p > 0.05). Exercising hindlimb muscle BF was lower in FO than SO (SO: 120 ± 11; FO: 93 ± 4 mL·min(-1)·100 g(-1), p < 0.05) but was not differentially affected by l-NAME. Specifically, 17 of 28 individual muscle BF's were lower (p < 0.05) in FO demonstrating that PUFA supplementation with FO in CHF rats does not augment muscle BF during exercise but may lower metabolic cost. PMID:24552370

  14. Rat Injury Model under Controlled Field-Relevant Primary Blast Conditions: Acute Response to a Wide Range of Peak Overpressures

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10–20 kHz) than in other two groups (7–8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work. PMID:23362798

  15. INTERACTION OF AMBIENT TEMPERATURE AND MICROWAVE POWER DENSITY ON SCHEDULE-CONTROLLED BEHAVIOR IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most guidelines of microwave exposure do not explicitly address effects of ambient temperature. The experiment revealed that ambient temperature potentiates the behavioral effects of intensity of irradiation. Sixty-four adult male Long-Evans rats were trained to insert their head...

  16. Caloric restriction or telmisartan control dyslipidemia and nephropathy in obese diabetic Zücker rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The obese Zücker diabetic fatty male rat (ZDF:Gmi™-fa) is an animal model of type II diabetes associated with obesity and related metabolic disturbances like dyslipidaemia and diabetic nephropathy. In addition, diabetic dyslipidaemia has been linked to vascular and glomerular damage too. Dietary fat restriction is a current strategy to tackle obesity and, telmisartan, as a renoprotective agent, may mediate cholesterol efflux by activating PPARγ. To test the hypothesis that both therapeutical alternatives may influence dyslipidaemia and nephropathy in the ZDF rat, we studied their effect on development of diabetes. Methods Male Zücker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats received a low-calorie diet, vehicle or telmisartan for 9 weeks. Blood samples were obtained for analyses of lipids and lipoproteins, LDL-oxidisability, HDL structural and functional properties. Urinalysis was carried out to estimate albumin loss. At the end of the experimental period, rats were sacrificed, liver extracted and APOA1 mRNA quantified. Results Results indicated that low-calorie diet and telmisartan can slower the onset of overt hyperglycaemia and renal damage assessed as albuminuria. Both interventions decreased the oxidative susceptibility of LDL and hepatic APOA1 mRNA expression but only dietary restriction lowered hyperlipidaemia. Conclusion Either a dietary or pharmacologic interventions with telmisartan have important beneficial effects in terms of LDL oxidative susceptibility and progression of albuminuria in obesity related type II diabetes. PMID:24468233

  17. A Novel Role for the Rat Retrosplenial Cortex in Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Hindley, Emma L.; Haddon, Josephine E.; Vann, Seralynne D.; Aggleton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    By virtue of its frontal and hippocampal connections, the retrosplenial cortex is uniquely placed to support cognition. Here, we tested whether the retrosplenial cortex is required for frontal tasks analogous to the Stroop Test, i.e., for the ability to select between conflicting responses and inhibit responding to task-irrelevant cues. Rats first…

  18. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICANT-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE CONTROL OF OVULATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the female rat, the large surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary into the general circulation that takes place on the afternoon of the day of vaginal proestrus is both a measurable and functional hormonal event. ince its occurrence is necessary for the expression...

  19. Oral administration of piperine for the control of aflatoxin intoxication in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gagini, Thalita B.; Silva, Robson E.; Castro, Isabela S.; Soares, Breno A.; Lima, Marco E.F.; Brito, Marilene F.; Mazur, Carlos; Direito, Glória M.; Danelli, Maria das Graças M.

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins that have important toxic effects on human and animal health, even if consumed at low doses. The oral administration of piperine (1.12 mg/kg) during 23 days in rats seemingly interfered with the toxicity of aflatoxins, decreasing hepatic injuries and the leukocyte depletion in experimentally intoxicated animals. PMID:24031502

  20. Adverse effects of high-intensity sweeteners on energy intake and weight control in male and obesity-prone female rats

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Sample, Camille H.; Davidson, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-intensity sweeteners has been proposed as a method to combat increasing rates of overweight and obesity in the human population. However, previous work with male rats suggests that consumption of such sweeteners might contribute to, rather than ameliorate, weight gain. The goals of the present experiments were to assess whether intake of high-intensity sweeteners is associated with increased food intake and body weight gain in female rats; to evaluate whether this effect depends on composition of the maintenance diet (i.e., standard chow compared to diets high in energy, fat and sugar [HE diets]); and to determine whether the phenotype of the rats with regard to propensity to gain weight on HE diets affects the consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners. The data demonstrated that female rats fed a low-fat, standard laboratory chow diet did not gain extra weight when fed yogurt dietary supplements sweetened with saccharin compared to those fed glucose-sweetened dietary supplements. However, female rats maintained on a “Westernized” diet high in fat and sugar (HE diet) showed significant increases in energy intake, weight gain and adiposity when given saccharin-sweetened compared to glucose-sweetened yogurt supplements. These differences were most pronounced in female rats known to be prone to obesity prior to the introduction of the yogurt diets. Both selectively-bred Crl:OP[CD] rats, and outbred Sprague-Dawley rats fed an HE diet showing high levels of weight gain (DIO rats) had increased weight gain in response to consuming saccharin-sweetened compared to glucose-sweetened supplements. However, in male rats fed an HE diet, saccharin-sweetened supplements produced extra weight gain regardless of obesity phenotype. These results suggest that the most negative consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners may occur in those most likely to use them for weight control, females consuming a “Westernized” diet and already prone to

  1. Adverse effects of high-intensity sweeteners on energy intake and weight control in male and obesity-prone female rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Sample, Camille H; Davidson, Terry L

    2013-04-01

    The use of high-intensity sweeteners has been proposed as a method to combat increasing rates of overweight and obesity in the human population. However, previous work with male rats suggests that consumption of such sweeteners might contribute to, rather than ameliorate, weight gain. The goals of the present experiments were to assess whether intake of high-intensity sweeteners is associated with increased food intake and body weight gain in female rats; to evaluate whether this effect depends on composition of the maintenance diet (i.e., standard chow compared with diets high in energy, fat, and sugar [HE diets]); and to determine whether the phenotype of the rats with regard to propensity to gain weight on HE diets affects the consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners. The data demonstrated that female rats fed a low-fat, standard laboratory chow diet did not gain extra weight when fed yogurt dietary supplements sweetened with saccharin compared with those fed glucose-sweetened dietary supplements. However, female rats maintained on a "Westernized" diet high in fat and sugar (HE diet) showed significant increases in energy intake, weight gain, and adiposity when given saccharin-sweetened compared with glucose-sweetened yogurt supplements. These differences were most pronounced in female rats known to be prone to obesity prior to the introduction of the yogurt diets. Both selectively bred Crl:OP[CD] rats and outbred Sprague-Dawley rats fed an HE diet showing high levels of weight gain (diet-induced obese [DIO] rats) had increased weight gain in response to consuming saccharin-sweetened compared with glucose-sweetened supplements. However, in male rats fed an HE diet, saccharin-sweetened supplements produced extra weight gain regardless of obesity phenotype. These results suggest that the most negative consequences of consuming high-intensity sweeteners may occur in those most likely to use them for weight control, females consuming a "Westernized" diet

  2. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  3. Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis of the Effects of Chronic Centrifugation on the Structural Development of the Musculoskeletal System of the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amtmann, E.; Kimura, T.; Oyama, J.; Doden, E.; Potulski, M.

    1979-01-01

    At the age of 30 days female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a 3.66 m radius centrifuge and subsequently exposed almost continuously for 810 days to either 2.76 or 4.15 G. An age-matched control group of rats was raised near the centrifuge facility at earth gravity. Three further control groups of rats were obtained from the animal colony and sacrificed at the age of 34, 72 and 102 days. A total of 16 variables were simultaneously factor analyzed by maximum-likelihood extraction routine and the factor loadings presented after-rotation to simple structure by a varimax rotation routine. The variables include the G-load, age, body mass, femoral length and cross-sectional area, inner and outer radii, density and strength at the mid-length of the femur, dry weight of gluteus medius, semimenbranosus and triceps surae muscles. Factor analyses on A) all controls, B) all controls and the 2.76 G group, and C) all controls and centrifuged animals, produced highly similar loading structures of three common factors which accounted for 74%, 68% and 68%. respectively, of the total variance. The 3 factors were interpreted as: 1. An age and size factor which stimulates the growth in length and diameter and increases the density and strength of the femur. This factor is positively correlated with G-load but is also active in the control animals living at earth gravity. 2. A growth inhibition factor which acts on body size, femoral length and on both the outer and inner radius at mid-length of the femur. This factor is intensified by centrifugation.

  4. Coronavirus infection in the laboratory rat: immunization trials using attenuated virus replicated in L-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Percy, D H; Scott, R A

    1991-01-01

    Sixty-nine specific pathogen-free male Wistar rats approximately eight weeks of age were used to evaluate the efficacy of an attentuated strain of sialodacryoadenitis (SDA) virus in providing protection against infection on subsequent challenge with virulent SDA virus. Fifty-four animals were inoculated intranasally with approximately 10(3.5) median cell culture infectious doses of the 25th passage of SDA virus in L-2 cells. Randomly-selected vaccinated animals were killed in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of attenuated virus by histopathological examination of the salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and lower respiratory tract, and titration of sera for antibody to SDA virus. At three months and six months postvaccination (pv), animals were selected at random and challenged with virulent SDA virus. Seronegative, age-matched animals were also challenged, and served as controls. In animals examined at six to ten days pv, lesions were absent in submandibular and parotid salivary glands and lacrimal glands, but transient lesions were present in major airways of the lower respiratory tract. In a comparison of the incidence and extent of lesions, and antibody titers in challenged vaccinates and seronegative controls, lesions were minimal or absent in vaccinates compared to challenged naive rats, particularly in animals inoculated at three months pv. In addition, antibody titers in challenged vaccinates were much higher than were postinoculation titers in inoculated controls. In a comparison of lesions in salivary and lacrimal glands in vaccinated and control animals challenged at six months pv, there was a significant reduction in the number of animals without lesions in the vaccinated group (p = less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1653100

  5. Impaired glucose homeostasis after a transient intermittent hypoxic exposure in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Pae, Eung-Kwon; Ahuja, Bhoomika; Kim, Marieyerie; Kim, Gyuyoup

    2013-11-22

    This initial report presents a neonatal rat model with exposure to a transient intermittent hypoxia (IH), which results in a persisting diabetes-like condition in the young rats. Twenty-five male pups were treated at postnatal day 1 with IH exposure by alternating the level of oxygen between 10.3% and 20.8% for 5h. The treated animals were then maintained in normal ambient oxygen condition for 3 week and compared to age-matched controls. The IH treated animals exhibited a significantly higher fasting glucose level than the control animals (237.00 ± 19.66 mg/dL vs. 167.25 ± 2.95 mg/dL; P=0.003); and a significantly lower insulin level than the control (807.0 ± 72.5 pg/mL vs. 1839.8 ± 377.6 pg/mL; P=0.023). There was no difference in the mass or the number of insulin producing beta cells as well as no indicative of inflammatory changes; however, glucose tolerance tests showed a significantly disturbed glucose homeostasis. In addition, the amount of C-peptide secreted from the islets harvested from the IH animals were decreased significantly (from 914 pM in control to 809 pM in IH; P=0.0006) as well. These observations demonstrate that the neonatal exposure to the IH regimen initiates the development of deregulation in glucose homeostasis without infiltration of inflammatory cells. PMID:24183722

  6. Restoring and maintaining bone in osteopenic female rat skeleton: I. Changes in bone mass and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, L. Y.; Jee, W. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Kimmel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This experiment contains the crucial data for the lose, restore, and maintain (LRM) concept, a practical approach for reversing existing osteoporosis. The LRM concept uses anabolic agents to restore bone mass and architecture (+ phase) and then switches to an agent with the established ability to maintain bone mass, to keep the new bone (+/- phase). The purpose of this study was to learn whether switching to an agent known chiefly for its ability to maintain existing bone mass preserves new bone induced by PGE2 in osteopenic, estrogen-depleted rats. The current study had three phases, the bone loss (-), restore (+), and maintain (+/-) phases. We ovariectomized (OX) or sham ovariectomized (sham-OX) 5.5-month-old female rats (- phase). The OX rats were treated 5 months postovariectomy with 1-6 mg PGE2 per kg/day for 75 days to restore lost cancellous bone mass (+ phase), and then PGE2 treatment was stopped and treatment began with 1 or 5 micrograms/kg of risedronate, a bisphosphonate, twice a week for 60 days (+/- phase). During the loss (-) phase, the cancellous bone volume of the proximal tibial metaphysis in the OX rat fell to 19% of initial and 30% of age-matched control levels. During the restore (+) phase, the cancellous bone volume in OX rats doubled. When PGE2 treatment was stopped, however, and no special maintenance efforts were made during the maintain (+/-) phase, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone disappeared. In contrast, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone persisted when the PGE2 treatment was followed by either a 1 or 5 micrograms treatment of risedronate per kg given twice a week for 60 days during the maintain (+/-) phase. The tibial shaft demonstrated very little cortical bone loss during the loss (-) phase in OX rats. The tibial shaft cortical bone fell some 8%. During the restore (+) phase, new cortical bone in OX rats increased by 22%. When PGE2 treatment was stopped and nothing was given during the maintain (+/-) phase, however, all but the PGE2

  7. Effects of long-term malnutrition and rehabilitation on the hippocampal formation of the adult rat. A morphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, J P; Madeira, M D; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the numerical density of dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cells of adult rats is reduced after lengthy periods of low-protein diet. In this study, the total number of these neurons was estimated, together with those for the hilar and CA1 pyramidal cells in order to obtain a complete and unbiased insight into the effects of malnutrition and rehabilitation from malnutrition on the structure of the hippocampal formation. Groups of 2-month-old rats were fed a low protein diet (8% casein) for 6, 12 and 18 months and compared with age-matched control and recovery rats. The recovery group was fed a low protein diet for 6 months and then switched to normal diet during the same period. Total numbers of neurons of each hippocampal region were calculated from their numerical density, estimated with the physical disector, and from the volume of the respective cell layers, after correction for the tissue shrinkage factor. The total number of granule, hilar, CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells was reduced in all groups of malnourished rats including the recovery group. No differences were found between malnourished and recovery groups. These findings indicate that a prolonged low protein diet, started in adult life, leads to a deficit in neuronal numbers in the hippocampal formation, and that it may also disrupt the normal process of cell acquisition in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, our data support the view that the morphological alterations induced by a low protein intake are irreversible. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7592001

  8. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate therapy: assessment of the alveolar bone structure in rats - a blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Viviane N; Langie, Renan; Etges, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of zoledronic acid exposure on structures of the alveolar bone of rats. The sample was composed of 42 male Wistar rats. Animals in the T1 and T2 groups received weekly doses of 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneal zoledronic acid for 3 weeks, while animals in the T3 group received the same treatment for 8 weeks. The control groups C1, C2 and C3 received equivalent doses of saline. The first upper molars of Wistar rats in the C2, T2, C3 and T3 groups were extracted. Cone-beam computerized tomography scans were performed, and the image density was analysed by grey levels. The presence and type of inflammatory infiltrate, vascularization and bone necrosis were assigned by histological qualitative scores. Histomorphometric analysis of bone density was performed in the groups without extraction. No significant differences were found in the bone grey density estimated by grey-level value and histomorphometric analysis between the C1 and T1 groups (P > 0.05). The grey levels in the T3 group were lower (P < 0.05) than in the C3 group, corresponding to the bone defect. Histological assessments showed the presence of bone necrosis in the T3 group and lower levels of bone remodelling in the test groups (T2 and T3) compared to the control groups (C2 and C3). The results of qualitative analyses did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Zoledronic acid-exposed animals showed maxillary changes including reduced grey levels, the presence of bone necrosis and a higher prevalence of inflammatory signs. PMID:26119047

  9. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate therapy: assessment of the alveolar bone structure in rats – a blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Viviane N; Langie, Renan; Etges, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of zoledronic acid exposure on structures of the alveolar bone of rats. The sample was composed of 42 male Wistar rats. Animals in the T1 and T2 groups received weekly doses of 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneal zoledronic acid for 3 weeks, while animals in the T3 group received the same treatment for 8 weeks. The control groups C1, C2 and C3 received equivalent doses of saline. The first upper molars of Wistar rats in the C2, T2, C3 and T3 groups were extracted. Cone-beam computerized tomography scans were performed, and the image density was analysed by grey levels. The presence and type of inflammatory infiltrate, vascularization and bone necrosis were assigned by histological qualitative scores. Histomorphometric analysis of bone density was performed in the groups without extraction. No significant differences were found in the bone grey density estimated by grey-level value and histomorphometric analysis between the C1 and T1 groups (P > 0.05). The grey levels in the T3 group were lower (P < 0.05) than in the C3 group, corresponding to the bone defect. Histological assessments showed the presence of bone necrosis in the T3 group and lower levels of bone remodelling in the test groups (T2 and T3) compared to the control groups (C2 and C3). The results of qualitative analyses did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Zoledronic acid-exposed animals showed maxillary changes including reduced grey levels, the presence of bone necrosis and a higher prevalence of inflammatory signs. PMID:26119047

  10. Systemic immunotherapy delays photoreceptor cell loss and prevents vascular pathology in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Kyger, Madison; Worley, Aneta; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Degenerative retinopathies, including retinitis pigmentosa, age-related retinal degeneration, autoimmune retinopathy, and related diseases affect millions of people around the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment for most of those diseases. We investigated systemic recombinant T-cell receptor ligand (RTL) immunotherapy for preventing retinal degeneration and vascular damage in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat model of retinal degeneration. Methods RCS rats were treated with RTL220 tethered to interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) peptide or control RTL101 without peptide by subcutaneous administration starting at the onset of photoreceptor degeneration or after the degenerative process began daily or every other day and performed for a 13-week period. The retinal cross sections and whole mounts were prepared to determine histopathology, leaking vessels, and formation of vascular complexes. Immunofluorescent studies evaluated microglia and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 chemokine in treated retinas. Optokinetic studies were performed to determine visual acuity. Results Systemic treatment with RTL220 prevented decreases in outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and showed a significantly higher number of nuclei than control rats treated with RTL101 or vehicle. RTL220 was also effective in protecting retinal vasculature from leakage and the formation of abnormal vascular complexes even when the treatment was administered after the degenerative process was initiated. Visual acuity measurement showed that rats treated with RTL220 performed significantly better than those with RTL101 and untreated age-matched controls at P60 and P90. Biodistribution studies showed that RTL220 cleared slowly from the administration site. Moreover, RTL220-treated retinas had a significantly reduced number of activated microglia in the subretinal space, decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in the retina, inhibited T

  11. Fluorescein angiography of the newborn rat. Implications in oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Larrazabal, L I; Penn, J S

    1990-05-01

    The current technique was developed to characterize the morphologic changes in the retinas of oxygen-reared rats, as an animal model of retinopathy of prematurity. Past studies have used ink perfusion to observe the retinal vasculature, but this method is static and requires the sacrifice of the subject. Fluorescein angiography, however, is dynamic and relatively noninvasive, and allows the survival of the animal for further study. The fundus camera cannot be used because the source of light that is focused in an annulus is too large for the pupil size of a young (approximately 14-day-old) rat. To overcome this, a Nikon inverted microscope (Diaphot-TMD) was used. Using the proper exciting and barrier filters for fluorescene, a photographic sequence was made by rapidly focusing to the plane of the retinal vessels. To our knowledge, similar photographs have not been previously published. This technique was used in newborn pigmented ratlings that were 1) exposed to 80% oxygen for the first 14 days of life; 2) exposed to 80% oxygen for the first 21 days of life; or 3) exposed for the first 14 days followed by 7 days in room air. Age-matched controls were raised simultaneously in room air and evaluated with the same technique. Differences were observed between treatments in the amount of retinal capillary loss, and in the tortuosity and diameter of the major retinal vessels. The hyaloid system also varied between treatment groups. Oxygen-exposed rats showed a persistence of the hyaloid vessels that was particularly prominent in the group returned to room air before analysis. Comparisons are made to past results obtained with other histologic techniques. PMID:2335449

  12. Pomegranate vinegar attenuates adiposity in obese rats through coordinated control of AMPK signaling in the liver and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of pomegranate vinegar (PV) on adiposity was investigated in high-fat diet (HF)-induced obese rats. Methods The rats were divided into 5 groups and treated with HF with PV or acetic acid (0, 6.5 or 13% w/w) for 16 weeks. Statistical analyses were performed by the Statistical Analysis Systems package, version 9.2. Results Compared to control, PV supplementation increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to changes in mRNA expressions: increases for hormone sensitive lipase and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and decreases for sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ (PPARγ) in adipose tissue; increases for PPARα and carnitinepalmitoyltransferase-1a (CPT-1a) and decrease for SREBP-1c in the liver. Concomitantly, PV reduced increases of body weight (p = 0.048), fat mass (p = 0.033), hepatic triglycerides (p = 0.005), and plasma triglycerides (p = 0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that PV attenuates adiposity through the coordinated control of AMPK, which leads to promotion of lipolysis in adipose tissue and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in the liver. PMID:24180378

  13. Relative Importance of the Arcuate and Anteroventral Periventricular Kisspeptin Neurons in Control of Puberty and Reproductive Function in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, M. H.; Li, X. F.; McCausland, B.; Li, S. Y.; Gresham, R.; Kinsey-Jones, J. S.; Gardiner, J. V.; Sam, A. H.; Bloom, S. R.; Poston, L.; Lightman, S. L.; Murphy, K. G.

    2015-01-01

    Kisspeptin plays a critical role in pubertal timing and reproductive function. In rodents, kisspeptin perikarya within the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) and anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) nuclei are thought to be involved in LH pulse and surge generation, respectively. Using bilateral microinjections of recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding kisspeptin antisense into the ARC or AVPV of female rats at postnatal day 10, we investigated the relative importance of these two kisspeptin populations in the control of pubertal timing, estrous cyclicity, and LH surge and pulse generation. A 37% knockdown of kisspeptin in the AVPV resulted in a significant delay in vaginal opening and first vaginal estrous, abnormal estrous cyclicity, and reduction in the occurrence of spontaneous LH surges, although these retained normal amplitude. This AVPV knockdown had no effect on LH pulse frequency, measured after ovariectomy. A 32% reduction of kisspeptin in the ARC had no effect on the onset of puberty but resulted in abnormal estrous cyclicity and decreased LH pulse frequency. Additionally, the knockdown of kisspeptin in the ARC decreased the amplitude but not the incidence of LH surges. These results might suggest that the role of AVPV kisspeptin in the control of pubertal timing is particularly sensitive to perturbation. In accordance with our previous studies, ARC kisspeptin signaling was critical for normal pulsatile LH secretion in female rats. Despite the widely reported role of AVPV kisspeptin neurons in LH surge generation, this study suggests that both AVPV and ARC populations are essential for normal LH surges and estrous cyclicity. PMID:25875299

  14. Contribution of cutaneous inputs from the hindpaw to the control of locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Filipe, Vítor M

    2007-01-25

    The influence of reduced feedback from the cutaneous receptors in the hindpaw in rat locomotion is still unclear. To evaluate this question, we conducted a detailed hindlimb kinematic analysis in animals, which suffered complete loss of thermal sensation. Two-dimensional hindlimb kinematics, temporal and spatial measurements, and walking track analysis were performed in rats before and during hypothermic anesthesia. The walking velocity, duration of the step cycle and stance phase, and stride length between the two testing conditions were statistically indistinguishable. Swing phase duration was significantly decreased during sensory loss. Analysis of angular motion revealed an increased hip and knee extension and an ankle joint with increased flexion during the step cycle under plantar anesthesia. Also after plantar cooling, the hip and knee angular velocity was significantly affected along the step cycle. The remarkably geometric similarity of the angle-angle plots obtained in our experiments reflected an interjoint coordination; however, the interpretation of the cyclogram perimeter revealed a larger excursion by the ankle and hip in their respective joint spaces in rats deprived of sensation. Examination of the horizontal position of the ankle with respect to the hip and the extension before toe-off revealed no major changes, whereas, there was a slight decrease in distance of the hip to the ground during sensory loss. Also, the walking tracks revealed a significant functional deficit following reduced cutaneous information of the plantar aspect of the hindpaw. We therefore conclude that sensory feedback from the hindpaw is important in the maintenance of normal rat locomotion. PMID:17084913

  15. Method for diagnosis and control of aerobic training in rats based on lactate threshold.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joyce F; Masuda, Masako O; Pompeu, Fernando A M S

    2005-04-01

    We propose a protocol for determination of lactate threshold (LT) and test the validity of one aerobic training based on LT in rats. In group I, V(LTi) (velocity at LT before training) was determined in all rats (n=10), each rat training at its own V(LTi) and in group II, animals (n=7) ran at 15 m min(-1), the mean V(LTi) of group I. The training consisted of daily runs at V(LTi) for 50 min, 5 days/week, for 4 weeks. In group I, this program increased V(LT) (V(LTi) 14.90+/-1.49 m min(-1) and V(LTf), after training, 22.60+/-1.17 m min(-1)) and the velocity at exhaustion (19.50+/-1.63 m min(-1) and 27.60+/-1.17 m min(-1)). [Lactate] at LT (2.62+/-0.43 mmol L(-1) versus 2.11+/-0.15 mmol L(-1)) and relative values of LT (76+/-3% versus 82+/-2%) stayed unaltered. In group II the V(LTf) was 20+/-1.8 m.mim(-1), the [lactate] at the LT, 2.02+/-0.17 mmol.L(-1); the exhaustion speed, 23.57+/-2.11 m.mim(-1) and relative value of LT, 82.71+/-2.29%. There were no significant differences in these parameters between groups I and II. Thus, this protocol based on LT is effective and the mean V(LT) determined in a small number of healthy untrained rats can be used for aerobic training in a larger group of healthy animals of same gender and age. PMID:15936699

  16. Susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin-induced rat death is controlled by a single chromosome 10 locus that includes rNlrp1.

    PubMed

    Newman, Zachary L; Printz, Morton P; Liu, Shihui; Crown, Devorah; Breen, Laura; Miller-Randolph, Sharmina; Flodman, Pamela; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2010-05-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is a bipartite protease-containing toxin and a key virulence determinant of Bacillus anthracis. In mice, LT causes the rapid lysis of macrophages isolated from certain inbred strains, but the correlation between murine macrophage sensitivity and mouse strain susceptibility to toxin challenge is poor. In rats, LT induces a rapid death in as little as 37 minutes through unknown mechanisms. We used a recombinant inbred (RI) rat panel of 19 strains generated from LT-sensitive and LT-resistant progenitors to map LT sensitivity in rats to a locus on chromosome 10 that includes the inflammasome NOD-like receptor (NLR) sensor, Nlrp1. This gene is the closest rat homolog of mouse Nlrp1b, which was previously shown to control murine macrophage sensitivity to LT. An absolute correlation between in vitro macrophage sensitivity to LT-induced lysis and animal susceptibility to the toxin was found for the 19 RI strains and 12 additional rat strains. Sequencing Nlrp1 from these strains identified five polymorphic alleles. Polymorphisms within the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the Nlrp1 protein were perfectly correlated with LT sensitivity. These data suggest that toxin-mediated lethality in rats as well as macrophage sensitivity in this animal model are controlled by a single locus on chromosome 10 that is likely to be the inflammasome NLR sensor, Nlrp1. PMID:20502689

  17. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities. PMID:22098534

  18. The effect of sumatriptan on nitric oxide synthase enzyme production after iatrogenic inflammation in the brain stem of adolescent rats: A randomized, controlled, experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Demirpence, Savas; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Kiray, Müge; Tugyan, Kazim; Yilmaz, Osman; Köse, Galip

    2009-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disabling disorder of childhood and adolescence. Despite advances in the understanding of migraine pathophysiology, treatment remains a challenge. Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the production of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes in the brain stem of adolescent rats, using an experimental model of migraine, and the effect of sumatriptan pretreatment on the production of the NOS enzymes. Methods: Male adolescent (aged ~2 months) Wistar rats were used in the study. The animals were anesthetized using pentobarbital. The trigeminovascular system was stimulated by injecting a proinflammatory molecule, carrageenan, into the cis-terna magna of the anesthetized rats. The animals were divided into 3 groups of equal size: (1) the study group, in which the rats were treated with sumatriptan succinate 2 hours before intracisternal carrageenan injection; (2) the sham group, in which the rats were not administered intracisternal carrageenan injection or sumatriptan pretreatment; and (3) the control group, in which the rats were administered intracisternal carrageenan injection but were not pretreated with sumatriptan. In the control and study groups, the rats were euthanized using ether anesthesia 1 hour after intracisternal carrageenan injection. Rats in the sham group were euthanized 1 hour after intracisternal catheterization. Brain tissue was removed and endothelial NOS (eNOS), neuronal NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) immunohistochemistry was performed. Results: Twenty-one rats were randomized into 3 groups of 7. The mean values of the immunolabeling intensities for eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS enzymes in the brain stem were significantly lower in the sham group compared with the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively). The mean values of the immunolabeling intensities of eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS in the brain stem were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group (P = 0

  19. Spatial learning and memory is preserved in rats after early development in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, Meredith D.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Steward, Oswald

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the cognitive mapping abilities of rats that spent part of their early development in a microgravity environment. Litters of male and female Sprague-Dawley rat pups were launched into space aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration space shuttle Columbia on postnatal day 8 or 14 and remained in space for 16 days. These animals were designated as FLT groups. Two age-matched control groups remained on Earth: those in standard vivarium housing (VIV) and those in housing identical to that aboard the shuttle (AGC). On return to Earth, animals were tested in three different tasks that measure spatial learning ability, the Morris water maze (MWM), and a modified version of the radial arm maze (RAM). Animals were also tested in an open field apparatus to measure general activity and exploratory activity. Performance and search strategies were evaluated in each of these tasks using an automated tracking system. Despite the dramatic differences in early experience, there were remarkably few differences between the FLT groups and their Earth-bound controls in these tasks. FLT animals learned the MWM and RAM as quickly as did controls. Evaluation of search patterns suggested subtle differences in patterns of exploration and in the strategies used to solve the tasks during the first few days of testing, but these differences normalized rapidly. Together, these data suggest that development in an environment without gravity has minimal long-term impact on spatial learning and memory abilities. Any differences due to development in microgravity are quickly reversed after return to earth normal gravity.

  20. Systemic and characteristic metabolites in the serum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at different stages as revealed by a (1)H-NMR based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Diao, Chengfeng; Zhao, Liangcai; Guan, Mimi; Zheng, Yongquan; Chen, Minjiang; Yang, Yunjun; Lin, Li; Chen, Weijian; Gao, Hongchang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a typical heterogeneous metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Investigating the changes in metabolic pathways during the evolution of diabetes mellitus may contribute to the understanding of its metabolic features and pathogenesis. In this study, serum samples were collected from diabetic rats and age-matched controls at different time points: 1 and 9 weeks after streptozotocin (STZ) treatment. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabonomics with quantitative analysis was performed to study the metabolic changes. The serum samples were also subjected to clinical chemistry analysis to verify the metabolic changes observed by metabonomics. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) demonstrated that the levels of serum metabolites in diabetic rats are different from those in control rats. These findings indicate that the metabolic characteristics of the two groups are markedly different at 1 and 9 weeks. Quantitative analysis showed that the levels of some metabolites, such as pyruvate, lactate, citrate, acetone, acetoacetate, acetate, glycerol, and valine, varied in a time-dependent manner in diabetic rats. These results suggest that serum metabolites related to glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, gluconeogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, branched-chain amino acid metabolism, and the tyrosine metabolic pathways are involved in the evolution of diabetes. The metabolic changes represent potential features and promote a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of diabetes mellitus. This work further suggests that (1)H NMR metabonomics is a valuable approach for providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. PMID:24448714

  1. Mechanisms responsible for postmenopausal hypertension in a rat model: Roles of the renal sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo O; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in postmenopausal women is less well controlled than in age-matched men. The aging female SHR is a model of postmenopausal hypertension that is mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and by the renal sympathetic nervous system. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that renal denervation would lower the blood pressure in old female SHR and would attenuate the antihypertensive effects of AT1 receptor antagonism. Retired breeder female SHR were subjected to right uninephrectomy (UNX) and left renal denervation (RD) or UNX and sham, and 2 weeks later, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP; radiotelemetry) was measured for 4 days, and then rats were treated with angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist, losartan (40 mg/kg/day po) for 6 days. Renal denervation reduced MAP in old females compared to sham (172 ± 6 vs. 193 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Losartan reduced MAP in both sham and RD rats similarly (numerically and by percentage) (142 ± 10 vs. 161 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05 vs. RD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). However, female SHR rats remained significantly hypertensive despite both pharmacological intervention and RD. The data suggest that both the renal sympathetic nervous system and the RAS have independent effects to control the blood pressure in old female SHR. Since the denervated rats treated with losartan remained hypertensive, the data also suggest that other mechanisms than the RAS and renal sympathetic nervous system contribute to the hypertension in old female SHR. The data also suggest that multiple mechanisms may mediate the elevated blood pressure in postmenopausal women. PMID:26811052

  2. Effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bones in orchidectomized and/or sciatic neurectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Yeh, James K; Takeda, Tsuyoshi

    2003-04-01

    We examined the effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bones in orchidectomized and/or sciatic neurectomized rats. Ninety male Sprague-Dawley rats, 3 months of age, were randomized by stratified weight method into nine groups with 10 rats in each group: baseline control (BLC), age-matched intact control (IN), IN+vitamin K2 administration (K), orchidectomy (ORX), ORX+K, unilateral sciatic neurectomy (NX), NX+K, ORX+NX (ONX), and ONX+K. Vitamin K2 (menatetrenone) was administered orally twice a week at a dose of 30 mg/kg each. After 10 weeks of feeding, the tibial shaft and proximal tibia were processed for cortical and cancellous bone histomorphometric analyses, respectively. An ORX-induced reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain and ORX-induced cancellous bone loss were attributable to increased endocortical and trabecular bone turnover, respectively. NX- and ONX-induced reductions in maturation-related cortical bone gain were attributable to decreased periosteal bone formation and increased endocortical bone turnover, while NX- and ONX-induced cancellous bone loss was attributable to increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. ORX-induced cancellous bone loss was more pronounced when combined with immobilization. Vitamin K2 administration did not significantly alter any parameters in IN rats. Vitamin K2 administration in ORX rats suppressed endocortical bone resorption and trabecular bone turnover, retarding a reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain and cancellous bone loss. This effect on cancellous bone loss was primarily because of prevention of a reduction of trabecular thickness. Vitamin K2 administration in NX and ONX rats suppressed bone resorption and stimulated bone formation (mineralization), with retardation of a reduction of trabecular thickness without any significant effect on cancellous bone mass, and suppressed endocortical bone resorption, retarding a reduction in maturation-related cortical bone gain

  3. Effects of treadmill exercise and training frequency on anabolic signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Evasio; Le Douairon Lahaye, Solène; Flati, Vincenzo; Assanelli, Deodato; Corsetti, Giovanni; Speca, Silvia; Bernabei, Roberto; Calvani, Riccardo; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is the most effective intervention against sarcopenia of aging; however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating training-induced adaptations are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, it is unclear whether exercise training initiated late in life affects myocyte anabolic signaling in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, we sought to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and training frequency on anabolic pathways, including insulin signaling, in the skeletal muscle of old rats. Aged (14-16-month-old) male Wistar rats were trained on a treadmill for 3 (EX3) or 5 days/week (EX5) during 8 weeks and compared with age-matched sedentary controls (SED). Four-month-old rats were used as young controls (YC). Protein expression levels of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), activated (phosphorylated) mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and glucose transporter GLUT4 were determined in quadriceps muscle extracts via immunoblotting. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed by histochemical staining, while electron microscopy was employed to quantify the sarcomere volume (V(src)). Body weight (BW) increased, whereas muscle weight (MW) and V(src) decreased with age. EX5, but not EX3 increased MW and V(src), without affecting BW. The expression of IR and GLUT4 was higher in SED rats relative to the YC group. Conversely, protein levels of IRS-1 and p-mTOR as well as COX activity were reduced in advanced age. Compared with SED rats, EX3 animals displayed reduced IR expression and increased IRS-1 levels and COX activity. The expression of GLUT 4 and p-mTOR was unaffected by EX3. EX5 up-regulated IRS-1 and p-mTOR expression and COX activity, while decreasing GLUT4 levels, with no effect on IR expression. In summary, substantial impairments in muscle anabolic pathways, including insulin signaling, were detected in aged sedentary rats. These changes were ameliorated by exercise training, concomitant with

  4. Atp13a2 expression in the periaqueductal gray is decreased in the Pink1 -/- rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2016-05-16

    Vocal communication deficits are common in Parkinson disease (PD). Widespread alpha-synuclein pathology is a common link between familial and sporadic PD, and recent genetic rat models based on familial genetic links increase the opportunity to explore vocalization deficits and their associated neuropathologies. Specifically, the Pink1 knockout (-/-) rat presents with early, progressive motor deficits, including significant vocal deficits, at 8 months of age. Moreover, this rat model exhibits alpha-synuclein pathology compared to age-matched non-affected wildtype (WT) controls. Aggregations are specifically dense within the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a brainstem region involved in the coordination of emotional and volitional control of vocalizations. Here, we investigated changes in gene expression within the PAG at 8 months of age in Pink1 -/- rats compared to WT. Our data demonstrate that Pink1 -/- rat mRNA expression levels of alpha-synuclein are comparable to WT. However, Pink1 -/- rats show significantly decreased levels of Atp13a2, a transmembrane lysosomal P5-type ATPase suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed abnormal aggregation. We found no difference in the expression of glucocerebrosidase (Gba) or the CASP8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator (Cflar). Further, we show that mRNA expression levels of dopaminergic markers including Th, D1 and D2 receptor as well as GABA signaling markers including Gaba-A and glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2) do not differ between genotypes. However, we found that glutamate decarboxylase 1 (Gad1) is significantly reduced in this PD model suggesting possible disruption of neurotransmission within the PAG. These results are the first to suggest the hypothesis that alpha-synuclein aggregation in this model is not a result of increased transcription, but rather a deficit in the breakdown and clearance, and that the observed vocal deficits may be related to impaired neural transmission. Altogether, these findings are

  5. Biliary and renal excretions of cefpiramide in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, I; Hasegawa, T; Nadai, M; Wang, L; Haghgoo, S; Tagaya, O; Nabeshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Eisai hyperbilirubinemic mutant rats (EHBRs) with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia were recently derived from Sprague-Dawley rats (SDRs). The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the beta-lactam antibiotic cefpiramide (CPM), which is mainly excreted into bile, were investigated in 10- and 20-week-old EHBRs and were compared with those in 20-week-old healthy SDRs. The pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM after an intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg of body weight were estimated for each rat by noncompartmental methods. When compared with age-matched healthy SDRs, significant decreases (by approximately 30%) in the systemic clearance of CPM were observed in 20-week-old EHBRs. The biliary clearance of CPM in 20-week-old EHBRs markedly decreased to less than 10% of that in age-matched healthy SDRs, while total urinary recovery of unchanged CPM increased to threefold and renal clearance doubled. However, no significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM were observed between the two groups of EHBRs. There were no significant differences among the three groups in the steady-state volume of distribution of CPM. The present study indicates that hyperbilirubinemia induces an increase in the urinary excretion ability of CPM in return for a reduction in the biliary excretion. PMID:7695332

  6. Enhancement of Hippocampal CA3 Neuronal Dendritic Arborization by Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract Treatment in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthi, Kosuri Kalyan; Avadhani, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the traditional system of medicine, the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Gg) (family: Leguminosae) have been in clinical use for centuries. Aim: In the present study, we investigated the role of aqueous extract of root of Gg treatment on the dendritic morphology of hippocampal Cornu Ammonis area three (CA3) neurons, one of the regions concerned with learning and memory, in 1- month- old male Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extract of root of Gg was administered orally in four doses (75, 150, 225 and 300 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. After the treatment period, all experimental animals were subjected to spatial learning (Morris water maze, Hebb-William's maze and elevated plus maze) tests. At the end of the spatial memory tests, the rats were deeply anesthetized with Pentobarbitone and killed their brains were removed rapidly and fixed in rapid Golgi fixative. Hippocampal CA3 neurons were traced using camera lucida, and dendritic arborization and intersections were quantified. These data were compared to those of age-matched control rats. Results: The aqueous root extract of Gg in the dose of 150 and 225 mg/kg/p.o showed a significant (P < 0.01) enhancement of dendritic arborization (dendritic branching points) and dendritic intersections along the length of both apical and basal dendrites in hippocampal (CA3) pyramidal neurons is comparable to control. Conclusion: Based on our results obtained, we conclude that constituents present in aqueous root extract of Gg have neuronal dendritic growth stimulating properties. PMID:24678192

  7. Short-term and long-term effects of repeated social defeat during adolescence or adulthood in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ver Hoeve, E S; Kelly, G; Luz, S; Ghanshani, S; Bhatnagar, S

    2013-09-26

    Accumulating evidence suggests that adolescence represents a sensitive period during which social stressors influence adult behavior and stress reactivity. However, relatively little is known about the impact of social stress in adolescence on behaviors or stress reactivity in females. In this study, we exposed adolescent or adult female rats to the repeated social stress of defeat for seven consecutive days. Repeated defeat resulted in distinctly different behavioral repertoires during defeat in adolescent compared to adult female rats. Adolescent females exhibited more play and avoidant behaviors and adult females exhibited more active and aggressive behaviors toward the resident female. Examination of the short-term effects of social defeat using the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) indicated that adolescents, regardless of their exposure to social defeat, showed increased time immobile and decreased time swimming compared to adults. Adolescent rats exposed to defeat also exhibited increased climbing compared to their age-matched naïve counterparts. These effects dissipated with age. Interestingly, no effects of defeat were observed in adult females, however, when these females were re-assessed in the FST 30 days after the end of defeat, we observed increased swimming at the expense of climbing. Using exposure to a novel restraint to assess stress reactivity, we found that stress during adolescence and adulthood led to lower basal adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations and that both stressed and control adolescent groups exhibited a delay in recovery in adulthood compared to stressed and control adult groups. Fos protein analysis further suggested that cortical/thalamic structures serve as potential substrates that mediate these long-term impacts of stress during adolescence. Thus, repeated social stress during adolescence produces different patterns of effects as compared with repeated social stress during adulthood. PMID:23402852

  8. Urban Rat Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littig, K. S.; And Others

    This guide is for use in the classroom and field training of inspection and operational personnel who serve in planned community rodent-control programs. The urban rat survey may be used as the primary means of obtaining information on rat infestations and the conditions favoring rat populations in urban communities. It provides the data necessary…

  9. A comparison of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic agonists on inhibitory control performance in rats perinatally exposed to PCBs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Abby E; Miller, Mellessa M; Nelms Sprowles, Jenna L; Levine, Lauren R; Sable, Helen J K

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are very stable environmental contaminants whose exposure induces a number of health and cognitive concerns. Currently, it is well known that PCB exposure leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. It is also well known that dopamine (DA) depletion within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. However, what is not well established is whether or not the inhibitory control problems found following PCB exposure are mediated by DA depletion in mPFC. This study was an investigation into the link between perinatal exposure to PCBs, the effect of this exposure on DA neurotransmission in the mPFC, and inhibitory-control problems during adulthood using a rodent model. The current study served to determine if microinjections of different DA agonists (the presynaptic DA transporter inhibitor and vesicular monoamine transporter agonist bupropion, the postsynaptic DA receptor 2 (DAD2) agonist quinpirole, and the postsynaptic DA receptor 1 (DAD1) agonist SKF81297) directly into the mPFC would differentially improve performance on an inhibitory control task in rats perinatally exposed to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture. Findings suggest several significant sex-based differences on differential reinforcement of low rates (DRL) 15 performance as well as some evidence of differential effectiveness of the DA agonists based on PCB exposure group. PMID:26022001

  10. A Comparison of Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Dopaminergic Agonists on Inhibitory Control Performance in Rats Perinatally Exposed to PCBs

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Abby E.; Miller, Mellessa M.; Nelms Sprowles, Jenna L.; Levine, Lauren R.; Sable, Helen J. K.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are very stable environmental contaminants whose exposure induces a number of health and cognitive concerns. Currently, it is well known that PCB exposure leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. It is also well known that dopamine (DA) depletion within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) leads to poor performance on inhibitory control tasks. However, what is not well established is whether or not the inhibitory control problems found following PCB exposure are mediated by DA depletion in mPFC. This study was an investigation into the link between perinatal exposure to PCBs, the effect of this exposure on DA neurotransmission in the mPFC, and inhibitory-control problems during adulthood using a rodent model. The current study served to determine if microinjections of different DA agonists (the presynaptic DA transporter inhibitor and vesicular monoamine transporter agonist bupropion, the postsynaptic DA receptor 2 (DAD2) agonist quinpirole, and the postsynaptic DA receptor 1 (DAD1) agonist SKF81297) directly into the mPFC would differentially improve performance on an inhibitory control task in rats perinatally exposed to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture. Findings suggest several significant sex-based differences on differential reinforcement of low rates (DRL) 15 performance as well as some evidence of differential effectiveness of the DA agonists based on PCB exposure group. PMID:26022001

  11. Protective Effects of Antioxidant Fortified Diet on Renal Function and Metabolic Profile in Obese Zucker Rat

    PubMed Central

    Slyvka, Yuriy; Inman, Sharon R.; Malgor, Ramiro; Jackson, Edwin J.; Yee, Jennifer; Oshogwemoh, Olusayo; Adame, John; Nowak, Felicia V.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications, including nephropathy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that a diet fortified with antioxidants would be beneficial to delay or prevent the progression of this disease. Male and female Zucker fa/fa rats were fed a control or an antioxidant (AO) fortified diet starting at four weeks of age. Metabolic parameters, renal function and renal histopathology were analyzed at 6, 13 and 20 weeks of age. Females on the AO diet had significantly lower blood glucose at 6 and 13 weeks, less severe renal pathology at 20 weeks, and higher glomerular filtration rates (GFR) at 20 weeks than age matched females on the regular diet (p < 0.05). Metabolic parameters including blood glucose, insulin resistance and serum cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP), worsened with age in both males and females, as expected. GFR decreased and renal pathology also became more severe with age. Finally, females on the AO diet had higher GFRs and lower MAP at 20 weeks than males on the same diet. This may denote a protective effect of the AO diet in females, but not in males. These findings may have implications for the role of antioxidants as therapy in humans with T2DM. PMID:19051067

  12. Sustained hypoxia modulates mitochondrial DNA content in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2008-03-01

    The effects of placental insufficiency and preterm birth on neurodevelopment can be modeled in experimental settings of neonatal hypoxia in rodents. Here, rat pups were reared in reduced oxygen (9.5%) for 11 days, starting on postnatal day 3 (P3). This led to a significant reduction in brain and body weight gain in hypoxic pups compared to age-matched normoxia-reared controls, plausibly reflecting an inability to fulfill the energetic needs of normal growth and development. Adaptive processes designed to augment energetic capacity in eukaryotes include stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. We show that after 11 days of sustained hypoxia, the levels of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A are elevated and the content of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is greater in the hypoxic P14 pup brain compared to normoxic conditions. Corresponding immunohistochemical analyses reveal increased density of mtDNA in large cortical neurons. In contrast, no changes in mtDNA content are observed in the brain of pups reared for 24 h (P3-P4) under hypoxic conditions. Together, these data suggest that prolonged inadequate oxygenation may trigger a compensatory increase in neuronal mitochondrial DNA content to partially mitigate compromised energy homeostasis and reduced energetic capacity in the developing hypoxic brain. PMID:18078825

  13. Melatonin is a redundant entraining signal in the rat circadian system.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Pavel; Nováková, Marta; Polidarová, Lenka; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2016-07-01

    The role of melatonin in maintaining proper function of the circadian system has been proposed but very little evidence for such an effect has been provided. To ascertain the role, the aim of the study was to investigate impact of long-term melatonin absence on regulation of circadian system. The parameters of behavior and circadian clocks of rats which were devoid of the melatonin signal due to pinealectomy (PINX) for more than one year were compared with those of intact age-matched controls. PINX led to a decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and a shortening of the free-running period of the activity rhythm driven by the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in constant darkness. However, the SCN-driven rhythms in activity and feeding were not affected and remained well entrained in the light/dark cycle. In contrast, in these conditions PINX had a significant effect on amplitudes of the clock gene expression rhythms in the duodenum and also partially in the liver. These results demonstrate the significant impact of long-term melatonin absence on period of the central clock in the SCN and the amplitudes of the peripheral clocks in duodenum and liver and suggest that melatonin might be a redundant but effective endocrine signal for these clocks. PMID:27167607

  14. Whisker Deprivation Drives Two Phases of Inhibitory Synapse Weakening in Layer 4 of Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pourzia, Olivia; Feldman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory synapse development in sensory neocortex is experience-dependent, with sustained sensory deprivation yielding fewer and weaker inhibitory synapses. Whether this represents arrest of synapse maturation, or a more complex set of processes, is unclear. To test this, we measured the dynamics of inhibitory synapse development in layer 4 of rat somatosensory cortex (S1) during continuous whisker deprivation from postnatal day 7, and in age-matched controls. In deprived columns, spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) and evoked IPSCs developed normally until P15, when IPSC amplitude transiently decreased, recovering by P16 despite ongoing deprivation. IPSCs remained normal until P22, when a second, sustained phase of weakening began. Delaying deprivation onset by 5 days prevented the P15 weakening. Both early and late phase weakening involved measurable reduction in IPSC amplitude relative to prior time points. Thus, deprivation appears to drive two distinct phases of active IPSC weakening, rather than simple arrest of synapse maturation. PMID:26840956

  15. Evaluating the control: minipump implantation and breathing behavior in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Ian J; Mudery, Jordan A; Barreda, Santiago; Taska, David J; Bailey, E Fiona

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated genioglossus (GG) gross motoneuron morphology, electromyographic (EMG) activities, and respiratory patterning in rat pups allowed to develop without interference (unexposed) and pups born to dams subjected to osmotic minipump implantation in utero (saline-exposed). In experiment 1, 48 Sprague-Dawley rat pups (Charles-River Laboratories), ages postnatal day 7 (P7) through postnatal day 10 (P10), were drawn from two experimental groups, saline-exposed (n = 24) and unexposed (n = 24), and studied on P7, P8, P9, or P10. Pups in both groups were sedated (Inactin hydrate, 70 mg/kg), and fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the GG muscle of the tongue and intercostal muscles to record EMG activities during breathing in air and at three levels of normoxic hypercapnia [inspired CO2 fraction (FiCO2 ): 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09]. Using this approach, we assessed breathing frequency, heart rate, apnea type, respiratory event types, and respiratory stability. In experiment 2, 16 rat pups were drawn from the same experimental groups, saline-exposed (n = 9) and unexposed (n = 7), and used in motoneuron-labeling studies. In these pups a retrograde dye was injected into the GG muscle, and the brain stems were subsequently harvested and sliced. Labeled GG motoneurons were identified with microscopy, impaled, and filled with Lucifer yellow. Double-labeled motoneurons were reconstructed, and the number of primary projections and soma volumes were calculated. Whereas pups in each group exhibited the same number (P = 0.226) and duration (P = 0.093) of respiratory event types and comparable motoneuron morphologies, pups in the implant group exhibited more central apneas and respiratory instability relative to pups allowed to develop without interference. PMID:27402557

  16. STEATORRHEA AND HYPEROXALURIA OCCUR AFTER GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY IN OBESE RATS REGARDLESS OF DIETARY FAT OR OXALATE

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Benjamin K.; Ellen, Joseph; Khan, Saeed R.; Hatch, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of dietary fat and oxalate on fecal fat excretion and urine parameters in a rat model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Materials and Methods Diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats underwent sham (Control, n=16) or RYGB (n=19) surgery. Once recovered, animals were fed ad lib normal calcium, high fat (40%) diet with (Ox) or without (No Ox) 1.5% potassium oxalate for 5 weeks, then normal (10%) fat diet for 2 weeks. Stool and urine were collected after each period. Fecal fat was determined by gas chromatography and urine metabolites by assay spectrophotometry. Results Daily fecal fat excretion remained low in controls on either diet. RYGB animals, however, ingested similar food quantity as controls yet had 8-fold higher fecal fat excretion (p<0.001) and heavier stools (p=0.02). On high fat, RYGB Ox had 5-fold increase in urine oxalate excretion (p<0.001) while RYGB No Ox had 2-fold increase in urine calcium (p<0.01) versus controls. Lowering dietary fat in RYGB Ox animals led to a 50% decrease in oxalate excretion (p<0.01), a 30% reduction in urinary calcium, and an increase in urine pH by 0.3 units (p<0.001). Conclusions In this RYGB model, high fat feeding resulted in steatorrhea, hyperoxaluria, and low urine pH, partially reversible by lowering dietary fat and oxalate content. RYGB animals on normal fat and no oxalate diets excreted twice as much oxalate as age-matched, sham controls. Although RYGB-hyperoxaluria appears primarily gut and diet-mediated, secondary causes of oxalogenesis from liver or other mechanisms deserve further exploration. PMID:23499748

  17. Mediation of muscular control of rhinarial motility in rats by the nasal cartilaginous skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Kleinfeld, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    The Rhinarium is the rostral-most area of the snout that surrounds the nostrils, and is hairless in most mammals. In rodents, it participates in coordinated behaviors, active tactile sensing, and active olfactory sensing. In rats, the Rhinarium is firmly connected to the nasal cartilages, and its motility is determined by movements of the rostral end of the nasal cartilaginous skeleton. Here we demonstrate the nature of different cartilaginous regions that form the Rhinarium and the nasofacial muscles that deform these regions during movements of the nasal cartilaginous skeleton. These muscles, together with the dorsal nasal cartilage that was described here, function as a rhinarial motor plant. PMID:24249396

  18. The implication of protein malnutrition on cardiovascular control systems in rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda C.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2015-01-01

    The malnutrition in early life is associated with metabolic changes and cardiovascular impairment in adulthood. Deficient protein intake-mediated hypertension has been observed in clinical and experimental studies. In rats, protein malnutrition also increases the blood pressure and enhances heart rate and sympathetic activity. In this review, we discuss the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on the resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate and their variabilities, cardiovascular reflexes sensitivity, cardiac autonomic balance, sympathetic and renin-angiotensin activities and neural plasticity during adult life. These insights reveal an interesting prospect on the autonomic modulation underlying the cardiovascular imbalance and provide relevant information on preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26388783

  19. A detailed analysis of the erythropoietic control system in the human, squirrel, monkey, rat and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The erythropoiesis modeling performed in support of the Body Fluid and Blood Volume Regulation tasks is described. The mathematical formulation of the species independent model, the solutions to the steady state and dynamic versions of the model, and the individual species specific models for the human, squirrel monkey, rat and mouse are outlined. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the species independent model response to parameter changes and how those responses change from species to species is presented. The species to species response to a series of simulated stresses directly related to blood volume regulation during space flight is analyzed.

  20. Impaired Purinergic Regulation of the Glial (Müller) Cell Volume in the Retina of Transgenic Rats Expressing Defective Polycystin-2.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Pannicke, Thomas; Hollborn, Margrit; Kolibabka, Matthias; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Retinal glial (Müller) cells possess an endogenous purinergic signal transduction cascade which normally prevents cellular swelling in osmotic stress. The cascade can be activated by osmotic or glutamate receptor-dependent ATP release. We determined whether activation of this cascade is altered in Müller cells of transgenic rats that suffer from a slow photoreceptor degeneration due to the expression of a truncated human cilia gene polycystin-2 (CMV-PKD21/703 HA). Age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats served as control. Retinal slices were superfused with a hypoosmotic solution (60 % osmolarity). Müller cells in retinas of PKD21/703 rats swelled immediately in hypoosmotic stress; this was not observed in control retinas. Pharmacological blockade of P2Y1 or adenosine A1 receptors induced osmotic swelling of Müller cells from control rats. The swelling induced by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist was mediated by induction of oxidative-nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, production of inflammatory lipid mediators, and a sodium influx from the extracellular space. Exogenous VEGF or glutamate prevented the hypoosmotic swelling of Müller cells from PKD21/703 rats; this effect was mediated by activation of the purinergic signaling cascade. In neuroretinas of PKD21/703 rats, the gene expression levels of P2Y1 and A1 receptors, pannexin-1, connexin 45, NTPDases 1 and 2, and various subtypes of nucleoside transporters are elevated compared to control. The data may suggest that the osmotic swelling of Müller cells from PKD21/703 rats is caused by an abrogation of the osmotic ATP release while the glutamate-induced ATP release is functional. In the normal retina, ATP release and autocrine P2Y1 receptor activation serve to inhibit the induction of oxidative-nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and production of inflammatory lipid mediators, which otherwise will induce a sodium influx and cytotoxic Müller cell swelling under anisoosmotic conditions. Purinergic

  1. Enucleation-induced rat adrenal gland regeneration: expression profile of selected genes involved in control of adrenocortical cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1-8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  2. Enucleation-Induced Rat Adrenal Gland Regeneration: Expression Profile of Selected Genes Involved in Control of Adrenocortical Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1–8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  3. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on the evoked cortical activity of controls and of brain-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Lür, György; Rákos, Gabriella; Juhász-Vedres, Gabriella; Farkas, Tamás; Kis, Zsolt; Toldi, József

    2006-01-01

    1. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are sex hormone precursors which exert marked neurotrophic and/or neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system (CNS). 2. In the present electrophysiological experiments, we studied the effects of peripherally administered DHEAS on responses of the primary somatosensory (SSI) and motor cortices (MI) of (i) anesthetized controls and (ii) MI focal cold-lesioned rats. (iii) The effects of DHEAS on the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were also studied in vitro brain slices. DHEAS (50 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 12 h before and immediately after cold lesion induction. The anesthetized rats were fixed in a stereotaxic frame, the SSI and MI were exposed, and control SSI and MI responses were evoked by contralateral whisker pad stimulation. After registration of the evoked responses for a 35-min period, a copper cylinder (2 mm in diameter) cooled with a mixture of acetone and dry ice (-78 degrees C) was applied to produce a lesion in the MI and the registration of the evoked responses was then continued for an additional 360 min. 3. In the controls, DHEAS administration resulted in slight increases in amplitude of both the SSI and the MI responses. After focal cold lesion induction, the most significant reduction in amplitude was observed at the focus of the lesion in the primary MI, but the amplitudes of the SSI responses were also decreased. After 3-5 h of lesion induction, the amplitudes started to increase around the injury in the primary MI, while the SSI response had already started to recover 2 h after induction of the MI lesion. In the course of the postlesion recovery period, the MI responses peripherally to the center of the lesion frequently exhibited extremely high and low amplitudes. The paired-pulse paradigm revealed changing, but basically high levels of disinhibition and facilitation in extended cortical areas after focal cortical cold lesion induction. The deviations

  4. Control of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the rat spinal dorsal horn by the nucleoside transporter ENT1.

    PubMed

    Ackley, Michael A; Governo, Ricardo J M; Cass, Carol E; Young, James D; Baldwin, Stephen A; King, Anne E

    2003-04-15

    Adenosine modulates nociceptive processing in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In other tissues, membrane transporters influence profoundly the extracellular levels of adenosine. To investigate the putative role of nucleoside transporters in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn, we employed immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of substantia gelatinosa neurons in slices of rat spinal cord in vitro. The rat equilibrative nucleoside transporter (rENT1) was revealed by antibody staining to be abundant in neonatal and mature dorsal horn, especially within laminae I-III. This was confirmed by immunoblots of dorsal horn homogenate. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), a potent non-transportable inhibitor of rENT1, attenuated synaptically evoked EPSCs onto lamina II neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of an adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine produced a parallel rightward shift in the NBMPR concentration-effect curve. The effects of NBMPR were partially reversed by adenosine deaminase, which facilitates the metabolic degradation of adenosine. The modulation by NBMPR of evoked EPSCs was mimicked by exogenous adenosine or the selective A1 receptor agonist, 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl adenosine. NBMPR reduced the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous miniature EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked currents, an effect that is consistent with presynaptic modulation. These data provide the first direct evidence that nucleoside transporters are able to critically modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission. PMID:12611914

  5. Effect of enflurane on the baroreflex control of heart rate in decerebrate rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Young; Nam, Sang Bum; Lee, Youn Woo; Han, Dong Woo; Cho, Nam Ryong; Lee, Jong Seok

    2004-06-30

    Volatile anesthetics alter the arterial baroreflex (BRX) but its mechanisms are poorly understood. This study was designed to determine the effect of 1 and 2 minimal alveolar concentrations (MAC) of enflurane on the BRX parameters in unanesthetized brain stem-intact and decerebrate rats. Under enflurane anesthesia, the femoral artery and both femoral vein were catheterized for pressor (phenylephrine) and depressor (nitroprusside) drug delivery and continuous blood pressure measurements. Decerebration was performed at midcollicular level. BRX tests were performed in 3 time periods; before enflurane (conscious brain-intact), during 1 or 2 MAC enflurane exposure 1 hour after a sham operation or a decerebration operation, and 2 hours after the termination of enflurane (zero enflurane). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were fitted to a sigmoid logistic equation, the Boltzman equation. The curve of best fit was obtained with a computer program. 1 MAC and 2 MAC of enflurane shifted MAP-HR baroreflex curves to the left in the all groups and significantly attenuated the baroreflex range. The slope of conscious intact period and zero enflurane period of each group did not change significantly, but during the enflurane period the slope was significantly lowered. Enflurane depressed the baroreflex sensitivity (slope) and the HR range in a similar dose-dependent manner in both brain stem-intact and decerebrate rats. Such results draw into question whether the suprapontine sites contribute to enflurane's actions on cardiovascular autonomic regulation. PMID:15227737

  6. Poultry egg components as cereal bait additives for enhancing rodenticide based control success and trap index of house rat, Rattus rattus

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neena; Kanwar, Deepia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the acceptance and efficacy of cereal bait containing different concentrations of poultry egg components in laboratory and poultry farms to control house rat, Rattus rattus (R. rattus). Methods Acceptance of cereal bait containing different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10%) of poultry egg components such as egg shell powder (ESP), egg albumin (EA) and crushed egg shell as bait additives were studied after exposing them to different groups of rats in bi-choice with bait without additive. Behaviour of rats towards cereal bait containing 2% concentration of different egg components was recorded in no-choice conditions through Food Scale Consumption Monitor. In poultry farm predominantly infested with R. rattus, acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait containing 2% EA and ESP was evaluated. Trap success of single rat traps containing chapatti pieces smeared with 2% EA and 2% ESP was also evaluated in poultry farm. Results In bi-choice tests, significantly (P<0.05) higher preference was observed for baits containing 2% and 5% ESP and all the three concentrations of EA compared to plain bait by female rats and that of baits containing 5% and 10% EA by male rats. In no-choice test, non-significantly higher consumption, number of bouts made and time spent towards bait containing 2% EA was found by rats of both sexes. In poultry farm, acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait containing 2% EA and ESP was significantly (P<0.05) more than 2% zinc phosphide bait without additive. No significant difference was, however, found in trap success of single rat traps containing chapatti pieces smeared with 2% concentration of EA and ESP placed in the poultry farm. Conclusions Present data support the use of 2% egg albumin and egg shell powder in cereal bait to enhance acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait against R. rattus. This may further help in checking the spread of rodent borne diseases to animals and humans. PMID:25183108

  7. Signs of iron deficiency in copper-deficient and control rats fed bovine hemoglobin as the sole source of iron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined whether hemoglobin (Hgb) as the sole source of dietary Fe could sustain normal Fe status in growing rats. Because adequate Cu status is required for efficient Fe absorption in the rat, we also determined the effects of Cu deficiency on Fe status of rats fed Fe as Hgb. One group of 24 r...

  8. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study, we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  9. Early cardiovascular changes occurring in diet-induced, obese insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Huisamen, Barbara; Dietrich, Daneel; Bezuidenhout, Nicole; Lopes, John; Flepisi, Brian; Blackhurst, Dee; Lochner, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is recognized as a cluster of disturbances associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Over the past two decades, the number of people with the metabolic syndrome has increased at an alarming rate. This increase is associated with the global epidemic of both obesity and diabetes. Cardiovascular mortality is increased among diabetics and obesity-related insulin-resistant patients, and obesity is currently recognized as independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to establish the effects of a short period of an altered diet on the heart using a rat model of hyperphagia-induced obesity (diet supplemented with sucrose and condensed milk for 8 weeks = DIO) compared to age-matched controls. Isolated, perfused hearts were subjected to global or regional ischaemia/reperfusion. Function on reperfusion was recorded and infarct size determined. A plasma lipid profile was established via HPLC-based methods and proteins involved in metabolic signalling determined either by western blotting or RT-PCR. 8 weeks of diet resulted in whole-body but not myocardial insulin resistance, increased plasma triglyceride and phospholipid levels as well as increased lipid peroxidation. Despite the similar baseline function, hearts from DIO animals showed significantly poorer postischaemic recovery than controls (41.9 % RPP recovery vs 57.9 %, P < 0.05, n = 7-11/group) but surprisingly, smaller infarct size (24.95 ± 1.97 vs 47.26 ± 4.05 % of the area at risk, P < 0.005, n = 8/group). Basal phosphorylation of PKB/Akt was elevated but IRS-1 and SERCA-2 expression severely downregulated. In conclusion, after only 8 weeks of a slight change in diet, the rat heart shows signs of metabolic remodelling. Some of these changes may be protective but others may be detrimental and eventually lead to maladaptation. PMID:22638648

  10. Combinatorial Motor Training Results in Functional Reorganization of Remaining Motor Cortex after Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Jones, Theresa A; Kozlowski, Dorothy A; Adkins, DeAnna L

    2016-04-15

    Cortical reorganization subsequent to post-stroke motor rehabilitative training (RT) has been extensively examined in animal models and humans. However, similar studies focused on the effects of motor training after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are lacking. We previously reported that after a moderate/severe TBI in adult male rats, functional improvements in forelimb use were accomplished only with a combination of skilled forelimb reach training and aerobic exercise, with or without nonimpaired forelimb constraint. Thus, the current study was designed to examine the relationship between functional motor cortical map reorganization after experimental TBI and the behavioral improvements resulting from this combinatorial rehabilitative regime. Adult male rats were trained to proficiency on a skilled reaching task, received a unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) over the forelimb area of the caudal motor cortex (CMC). Three days post-CCI, animals began RT (n = 13) or no rehabilitative training (NoRT) control procedures (n = 13). The RT group participated in daily skilled reach training, voluntary aerobic exercise, and nonimpaired forelimb constraint. This RT regimen significantly improved impaired forelimb reaching success and normalized reaching strategies, consistent with previous findings. RT also enlarged the area of motor cortical wrist representation, derived by intracortical microstimulation, compared to NoRT. These findings indicate that sufficient RT can greatly improve motor function and improve the functional integrity of remaining motor cortex after a moderate/severe CCI. When compared with findings from stroke models, these findings also suggest that more intense RT may be needed to improve motor function and remodel the injured cortex after TBI. PMID:26421759

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus control and atherosclerosis prevention in a non-obese rat model using duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XUAN; HUANG, ZHEN; RAN, WENHUA; LIAO, GANG; ZHA, LANG; WANG, ZIWEI

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent disease worldwide and during its conventional treatment, vascular complications remain unavoidable. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is able to induce the remission of T2DM. However, studies of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), a modified procedure of GBP, are being carried out to investigate its ability to induce the remission of T2DM and protect the aorta from atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of DJB on the rate of T2DM remission and the prevention of atherosclerosis in the aorta in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes without obesity, and to explore the mechanism of DJB in protecting the aorta from atherosclerosis. A T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Surgery was performed to analyze its effects on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, inflammation and pathological changes. Furthermore, changes in c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKβ) genes in the aorta following DJB surgery were examined. Levels of blood glucose, lipids, insulin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly elevated in the T2DM diabetic model compared with the non-diabetic control. A gradual recovery was observed in the DJB group following surgery. Foam cells and atherosclerotic plaques appeared in the ascending aortic tissue in the sham-surgery and T2DM groups, whereas only slight lesions were observed in the DJB group. The expression levels of JNK1 and IKKβ genes in the aorta were significantly increased in the sham-operated and T2DM groups compared with those in the DJB and normal control groups. The present study demonstrated that DJB caused remission of T2DM without weight loss in non-obese rats. Thus, DJB may delay or prevent the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in the aorta and this may occur through the JNK1 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. PMID:25120614

  12. Coordinated Recruitment of Cortical-Subcortical Circuits and Ascending Dopamine and Serotonin Neurons During Inhibitory Control of Cocaine Seeking in Rats.

    PubMed

    Navailles, Sylvia; Guillem, Karine; Vouillac-Mendoza, Caroline; Ahmed, Serge H

    2015-09-01

    People with cocaine addiction retain some degree of prefrontal cortex (PFC) inhibitory control of cocaine craving, a brain capacity that may underlie the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction. Similar findings were recently found in rats after extended access to and escalation of cocaine self-administration. Rats' inhibitory control of cocaine seeking was flexible, sufficiently strong to suppress cocaine-primed reinstatement and depended, at least in part, on neuronal activity within the prelimbic (PL) PFC. Here, we used a large-scale and high-resolution Fos mapping approach to identify, beyond the PL PFC, how top-down and/or bottom-up PFC-subcortical circuits are recruited during inhibition of cocaine seeking. Overall, we found that effective inhibitory control of cocaine seeking is associated with the coordinated recruitment of different top-down cortical-striatal circuits originating from different PFC territories, and of different bottom-up dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) midbrain subsystems that normally modulate activity in these circuits. This integrated brain response suggests that rats concomitantly engage and experience intricate cognitive and affective processes when they have to inhibit intense cocaine seeking. Thus, even after extended drug use, rats can be successfully trained to engage whole-brain inhibitory control mechanisms to suppress cocaine seeking. PMID:24872521

  13. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Do Not Correspond to Neuronal Hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Muthusamy, Siva; Lee, Dianne E.; Ibrahim, Wael G.; Nair, Anand; Koziol, Deloris; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A.

    2016-01-01

    Motor and behavioral abnormalities are common presentations among individuals with HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We investigated whether longitudinal motor and behavioral performance in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (Tg), a commonly used neuro-HIV model, corresponded to in vivo neuronal death/dysfunction, by using rotarod and open field testing in parallel to [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrated that age-matched non-Tg wild type (WT) rats outperformed the HIV-1 Tg rats at most time points on rotarod testing. Habituation to rotarod occurred at 8 weeks of age (fifth weekly testing session) in the WT rats but it never occurred in the Tg rats, suggesting deficits in motor learning. Similarly, in open field testing, WT rats outperformed the Tg rats at most time points, suggesting defective exploratory/motor behavior and increased emotionality in the Tg rat. Despite the neurobehavioral abnormalities, there were no concomitant deficits in 18F-FDG uptake in Tg rats on PET compared to age-matched WT rats and no significant longitudinal loss of FDG uptake in either group. The negative PET findings were confirmed using 14C- Deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography in 32 week-old Tg and WT rats. We believe that the neuropathology in the HIV-1 Tg rat is more likely a consequence of neuronal dysfunction rather than overt neurodegeneration/neuronal cell death, similar to what is seen in HIV-positive patients in the post-ART era. PMID:27010205

  14. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Do Not Correspond to Neuronal Hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Reid, William C; Casas, Rafael; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Muthusamy, Siva; Lee, Dianne E; Ibrahim, Wael G; Nair, Anand; Koziol, Deloris; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A

    2016-01-01

    Motor and behavioral abnormalities are common presentations among individuals with HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We investigated whether longitudinal motor and behavioral performance in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (Tg), a commonly used neuro-HIV model, corresponded to in vivo neuronal death/dysfunction, by using rotarod and open field testing in parallel to [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrated that age-matched non-Tg wild type (WT) rats outperformed the HIV-1 Tg rats at most time points on rotarod testing. Habituation to rotarod occurred at 8 weeks of age (fifth weekly testing session) in the WT rats but it never occurred in the Tg rats, suggesting deficits in motor learning. Similarly, in open field testing, WT rats outperformed the Tg rats at most time points, suggesting defective exploratory/motor behavior and increased emotionality in the Tg rat. Despite the neurobehavioral abnormalities, there were no concomitant deficits in 18F-FDG uptake in Tg rats on PET compared to age-matched WT rats and no significant longitudinal loss of FDG uptake in either group. The negative PET findings were confirmed using 14C- Deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography in 32 week-old Tg and WT rats. We believe that the neuropathology in the HIV-1 Tg rat is more likely a consequence of neuronal dysfunction rather than overt neurodegeneration/neuronal cell death, similar to what is seen in HIV-positive patients in the post-ART era. PMID:27010205

  15. Effects of controlled liver injury and ethanol pretreatment on monoethylglycine xylidide formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Druckenbrod, R W; Mendenhall, C L; Myre, S A; Stanberry, E A; Schroeder, T J

    1991-01-01

    Measuring the monoethylglycine xylidide (MEGX) serum level 15-30 min after intravenous administration of lidocaine has been shown to be an accurate predictor of early success in liver transplants. This study evaluates the changes in the MEGX formation test associated with changes in liver mass and ethanol pretreatment in a rat model. Mean MEGX levels were significantly higher for the sham-operated group versus each of the partially hepatectomized groups at 15, 30, and 45 min after injection. No differences between mean MEGX levels for either of the surgically treated groups could be distinguished. Ethanol pretreatment and body weight had no effect on MEGX levels at any of the time points tested in this model. PMID:2057523

  16. Evidence for 5-HT1A receptor control of pineal melatonin concentrations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nathan, P J; Burrows, G D; Norman, T R

    1998-08-01

    The effect of some serotonin agonists on day and night-time melatonin in the pineal gland was investigated in male rats. Dose dependent increases in nocturnal melatonin concentrations were observed for all serotonin agonists investigated. Statistically significant increases were observed only for D-fenfluramine (20 mg/kg) and the full 5-HT1A agonists S(+)-20499 (10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg) and flesinoxan (20 mg/kg). Both paroxetine and D-fenfluramine dose dependently increased day-time pineal melatonin, but only for D-fenfluramine (20 mg/kg) was there a statistically significant increase. The data suggest that acute increases in synaptic serotonin concentrations can be used to manipulate day- or night-time melatonin. Data suggests an influence of the 5-HT1A receptor subtype in mediating nocturnal melatonin concentrations, perhaps through a functional coupling to beta1-adrenoceptors on the pineal gland. PMID:9716310

  17. Neuronal repair. Asynchronous therapy restores motor control by rewiring of the rat corticospinal tract after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wahl, A S; Omlor, W; Rubio, J C; Chen, J L; Zheng, H; Schröter, A; Gullo, M; Weinmann, O; Kobayashi, K; Helmchen, F; Ommer, B; Schwab, M E

    2014-06-13

    The brain exhibits limited capacity for spontaneous restoration of lost motor functions after stroke. Rehabilitation is the prevailing clinical approach to augment functional recovery, but the scientific basis is poorly understood. Here, we show nearly full recovery of skilled forelimb functions in rats with large strokes when a growth-promoting immunotherapy against a neurite growth-inhibitory protein was applied to boost the sprouting of new fibers, before stabilizing the newly formed circuits by intensive training. In contrast, early high-intensity training during the growth phase destroyed the effect and led to aberrant fiber patterns. Pharmacogenetic experiments identified a subset of corticospinal fibers originating in the intact half of the forebrain, side-switching in the spinal cord to newly innervate the impaired limb and restore skilled motor function. PMID:24926013

  18. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  19. Local delivery of parathyroid hormone-related protein-derived peptides coated onto a hydroxyapatite-based implant enhances bone regeneration in old and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Lozano, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Irene; Sánchez-Salcedo, Sandra; López-Herradón, Ana; Mulero, Francisca; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, María L; Vallet-Regí, María; Esbrit, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and aging are associated with bone fragility and increased fracture risk. Both (1-37) N- and (107-111) C-terminal parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) exhibit osteogenic properties. We here aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of either PTHrP (1-37) or PTHrP (107-111) loaded into gelatin-glutaraldehyde-coated hydroxyapatite (HA-Gel) foams to improve bone repair of a transcortical tibial defect in aging rats with or without DM, induced by streptozotocin injection at birth. Diabetic old rats showed bone structural deterioration compared to their age-matched controls. Histological and μ-computerized tomography studies showed incomplete bone repair at 4 weeks after implantation of unloaded Ha-Gel foams in the transcortical tibial defects, mainly in old rats with DM. However, enhanced defect healing, as shown by an increase of bone volume/tissue volume and trabecular and cortical thickness and decreased trabecular separation, occurred in the presence of either PTHrP peptide in the implants in old rats with or without DM. This was accompanied by newly formed bone tissue around the osteointegrated HA-Gel implant and increased gene expression of osteocalcin and vascular endothelial growth factor (bone formation and angiogenic markers, respectively), and decreased expression of Sost gene, a negative regulator of bone formation, in the healing bone area. Our findings suggest that local delivery of PTHrP (1-37) or PTHrP (107-111) from a degradable implant is an attractive strategy to improve bone regeneration in aged and diabetic subjects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2060-2070, 2016. PMID:27086979

  20. Expression of proteins associated with adipocyte lipolysis was significantly changed in the adipose tissues of the obese spontaneously hypertensive/NDmcr-cp rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiology of the metabolic syndrome is complex, and is determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The present study was designed to identify genes and proteins in the adipose tissues with altered expression in the spontaneously hypertensive/NIH –corpulent rat, SHR/NDmcr-cp (CP) and to find possible molecular targets associated with the pathogenesis or progression of obesity related to the metabolic syndrome. Methods We extracted RNAs and proteins from the epididymal adipose tissues in CP, SHR/Lean (Lean), and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and performed microarray analysis and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) linked to a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Results The results showed different mRNA and protein expression levels in the adipose tissue: oligo DNA microarray identified 33 genes that were significantly (P < 0.01) up-regulated and 17 genes significantly down-regulated in CP compared with WKY and Lean rats at both 6 and 25 weeks of age. The affected genes-proteins were associated with lipolytic enzymes stimulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling. Further analysis using the 2D-DIGE connected with MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis, the expression of monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) was significantly up-regulated and that of carboxylesterase 3 (CES3) was significantly down-regulated in 6- and 25-week-old CP compared with age-matched control (WKY and Lean rats). Conclusions Our results suggest the possible involvement of proteins associated with adipocyte lipolysis in obesity related to the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24468282

  1. Exposure to estrogen and ionizing radiation causes epigenetic dysregulation, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and genome instability in the mammary gland of ACI rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The impact of environmental mutagens and carcinogens on the mammary gland has recently received a lot of attention. Among the most generally accepted carcinogenic agents identified as factors that may increase breast cancer incidence are ionizing radiation and elevated estrogen levels. However, the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland aberrations associated with radiation and estrogen exposure still need to be further elucidated, especially the interplay between elevated hormone levels and radiation. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated molecular changes induced in rat mammary gland tissue by estrogen, ionizing radiation, and the combined action of these two carcinogens using a well-established ACI rat model. We found that continuous exposure of intact female ACI rats to elevated levels of estrogen or to both estrogen and radiation resulted in significant hyperproliferative changes in rat mammary glands. In contrast, radiation exposure alone did not induce hyperplasia. Interestingly, despite the obvious disparity in mammary gland morphology, we did not detect significant differences in the levels of genomic methylation among animals exposed to estrogen, radiation, or both agents together. Specifically, we observed a significant global genomic hypomethylation at 6 weeks of exposure. However, by 12 and 18 weeks, the levels of global DNA methylation returned to those of age-matched controls. We also found that combined exposure to radiation and estrogen significantly altered the levels of histone H3 and H4 methylation and acetylation. Most importantly, we for the first time demonstrated that estrogen and radiation exposure caused a significant induction of p42/44 MAPK and p38 pathways that was paralleled by elevated levels of H3S10 phosphorylation, a well-established biomarker of genome and chromosome instability. The precise role of MAPK pathways and their inter-relationship with H3S10 phosphorylation and genome instability in mammary gland tissues needs

  2. Low-intensity voluntary running lowers blood pressure with simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and insulin sensitivity in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Wei; Qian, Feng-Lei; Wang, Jian; Tao, Tao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Lie; Lu, Ai-Yun; Chen, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of voluntary running at different intensity levels on blood pressure, endothelium-dependent vessel dysfunction and insulin resistance in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with severe hypertension. Ten-month-old male and female SHR with severe hypertension were assigned to voluntary running at either low intensity (30% of maximal aerobic velocity) or moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic velocity) on a motor-driven treadmill for 6 weeks, 20 min per day and 7 days per week. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats and SHR were kept under sedentary conditions as controls. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the tail-cuff method. At the end of the exercise training, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipids assay, and aortae were isolated to examine their function in vitro. Low-intensity but not moderate-intensity running significantly lowered blood pressure in both male and female SHR (p<0.01). There was significant impairment in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in SHR (p<0.01), which was improved by low-intensity training (p<0.05). Nitric oxide synthase blockade abrogated the improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Hypertensive rats had elevated blood glucose and insulin levels with lowered insulin sensitivity that was ameliorated by low-intensity running. A significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides were found in exercised SHR. In conclusion, low-intensity voluntary exercise lowers hypertension in aged SHR with severe hypertension. Exercise-induced simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation and insulin sensitivity may act concomitantly in attenuating cardiovascular risk factors in aged hypertensive rats with significantly high blood pressure. PMID:18497475

  3. Diet composition exacerbates or attenuates soman toxicity in rats: implied metabolic control of nerve agent toxicity.

    PubMed

    Myers, Todd M; Langston, Jeffrey L

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the role of diet composition on nerve agent toxicity, rats were fed four distinct diets ad libitum for 28 d prior to challenge with 110 μg/kg (1.0 LD(50), sc) soman. The four diets used were a standard rodent diet, a choline-enriched diet, a glucose-enriched diet, and a ketogenic diet. Body weight was recorded throughout the study. Toxic signs and survival were evaluated at key times for up to 72 h following soman exposure. Additionally, acquisition of discriminated shuttlebox avoidance performance was characterized beginning 24h after soman challenge and across the next 8 d (six behavioral sessions). Prior to exposure, body weight was highest in the standard diet group and lowest in the ketogenic diet group. Upon exposure, differences in soman toxicity as a function of diet became apparent within the first hour, with mortality in the glucose-enriched diet group reaching 80% and exceeding all other groups (in which mortality ranged from 0 to 6%). At 72 h after exposure, mortality was 100% in the glucose-enriched diet group, and survival approximated 50% in the standard and choline-enriched diet groups, but equaled 87% in the ketogenic diet group. Body weight loss was significantly reduced in the ketogenic and choline-enriched diet groups, relative to the standard diet group. At 1 and 4h after exposure, rats in the ketogenic diet group had significantly lower toxic sign scores than all other groups. The ketogenic diet group performed significantly better than the standard diet group on two measures of active avoidance performance. The exacerbated soman toxicity observed in the glucose-enriched diet group coupled with the attenuated soman toxicity observed in the ketogenic diet group implicates glucose availability in the toxic effects of soman. This increased glucose availability may enhance acetylcholine synthesis and/or utilization, thereby exacerbating peripheral and central soman toxicity. PMID:21396400

  4. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  5. Hypoxia Alters Ocular Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Rat and Calf Models: Implications for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Rajendra S.; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; LaFlamme, Daniel J.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic hypoxia, a key stimulus for neovascularization, has been implicated in the pathology of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and wet age related macular degeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic hypoxia on drug transporter mRNA expression and activity in ocular barriers. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (PB = 380 mm Hg) for 6 weeks and neonatal calves were maintained under hypobaric hypoxia (PB = 445 mm Hg) for 2 weeks. Age matched controls for rats and calves were maintained at ambient altitude and normoxia. The effect of hypoxia on transporter expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR analysis of transporter mRNA expression in hypoxic and control rat choroid-retina. Effect of hypoxia on the activity of PEPT, OCT, ATB0+, and MCT transporters was evaluated using in vitro transport studies of model transporter substrates across calf cornea and sclera-choroid-RPE (SCRPE). Results Quantitative gene expression analysis of 84 transporters in rat choroid-retina showed that 29 transporter genes were up regulated or down regulated by ≥1.5-fold in hypoxia. Nine ATP binding cassette (ABC) families of efflux transporters including MRP3, MRP4, MRP5, MRP6, MRP7, Abca17, Abc2, Abc3, and RGD1562128 were up regulated. For solute carrier family transporters, 11 transporters including SLC10a1, SLC16a3, SLC22a7, SLC22a8, SLC29a1, SLC29a2, SLC2a1, SLC3a2, SLC5a4, SLC7a11, and SLC7a4 were up regulated, while 4 transporters including SLC22a2, SLC22a9, SLC28a1, and SLC7a9 were down regulated in hypoxia. Of the 3 aquaporin (Aqp) water channels, Aqp-9 was down regulated and Aqp-1 was up regulated during hypoxia. Gene expression analysis showed down regulation of OCT-1, OCT-2, and ATB0+ and up regulation of MCT-3 in hypoxic rat choroid-retina, without any effect on the expression of PEPT-1 and PEPT-2 expression. Functional activity assays of PEPT, OCT, ATB0+, and MCT transporters in

  6. The flux control coefficient of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I on palmitate beta-oxidation in rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Spurway, T D; Sherratt, H A; Pogson, C I; Agius, L

    1997-01-01

    Two important factors that determine the flux of hepatic beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids are the availability of fatty acid and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I). Using Metabolic Control Analysis, the flux control coefficient of CPT I in rat hepatocyte monolayers was determined by titration with 2-[6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir), which is converted to Etomoxir-CoA, an irreversible inhibitor of CPT I. We measured CPT I activity and flux through beta-oxidation at 0.2 mM and 1.0 mM palmitate to simulate substrate concentrations in fed and fasted states. Rates of beta-oxidation were 4.5-fold higher at 1. 0 mM palmitate compared with 0.2 mM palmitate. Flux control coefficients of CPT I, estimated by two independent methods, were similar: 0.67 and 0.79 for 0.2 mM palmitate, and 0.68 and 0.77 for 1 mM palmitate. It is concluded that the regulatory potential of CPT I is similar at low and high physiological concentrations of palmitate. PMID:9173869

  7. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  8. Dietary-Induced Chronic Hypothyroidism Negatively Affects Rat Follicular Development and Ovulation Rate and Is Associated with Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li; Rijntjes, Eddy; Swarts, Hans; Bunschoten, Annelies; van der Stelt, Inge; Keijer, Jaap; Teerds, Katja

    2016-04-01

    The long-term effects of chronic hypothyroidism on ovarian follicular development in adulthood are not well known. Using a rat model of chronic diet-induced hypothyroidism initiated in the fetal period, we investigated the effects of prolonged reduced plasma thyroid hormone concentrations on the ovarian follicular reserve and ovulation rate in prepubertal (12-day-old) and adult (64-day-old and 120-day-old) rats. Besides, antioxidant gene expression, mitochondrial density and the occurrence of oxidative stress were analyzed. Our results show that continuous hypothyroidism results in lower preantral and antral follicle numbers in adulthood, accompanied by a higher percentage of atretic follicles, when compared to euthyroid age-matched controls. Not surprisingly, ovulation rate was lower in the hypothyroid rats. At the age of 120 days, the mRNA and protein content of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) were significantly increased while catalase (CAT) mRNA and protein content was significantly decreased, suggesting a disturbed antioxidant defense capacity of ovarian cells in the hypothyroid animals. This was supported by a significant reduction in the expression of peroxiredoxin 3 ( ITALIC! Prdx3), thioredoxin reductase 1 ( ITALIC! Txnrd1), and uncoupling protein 2 ( ITALIC! Ucp2) and a downward trend in glutathione peroxidase 3 ( ITALIC! Gpx3) and glutathione S-transferase mu 2 ( ITALIC! Gstm2) expression. These changes in gene expression were likely responsible for the increased immunostaining of the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal. Together these results suggest that chronic hypothyroidism initiated in the fetal/neonatal period results in a decreased ovulation rate associated with a disturbance of the antioxidant defense system in the ovary. PMID:26962119

  9. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E.; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R.; Skoda, Erin M.; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3 mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20-min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca2+-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  10. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  11. Dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and activity of mature granule cells born following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Song, Xueying; Zhu, Dexiao; Wang, Xiaochen; Hao, Aijun; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the potential role of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in the development of epilepsy, we quantitatively analyzed the geometry of apical dendrites, synaptic transmission, and activation levels of normotopically distributed mature newborn granule cells in the rat. SE in male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 6 and 7 weeks old) lasting for more than 2 h was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. The complexity, spine density, miniature post-synaptic currents, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression of granule cells born 5 days after SE were studied between 10 and 17 weeks after CAG-GFP retroviral vector-mediated labeling. Mature granule cells born after SE had dendritic complexity similar to that of granule cells born naturally, but with denser mushroom-like spines in dendritic segments located in the outer molecular layer. Miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) were similar between the controls and rats subjected to SE; however, smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude with a trend toward less frequent was found in mature granule cells born after SE. After maturation, granule cells born after SE did not show denser Arc expression in the resting condition or 2 h after being activated by pentylenetetrazol-induced transient seizure activity than vicinal GFP-unlabeled granule cells. Thus our results suggest that normotopic granule cells born after pilocarpine-induced SE are no more active when mature than age-matched, naturally born granule cells. PMID:26500490

  12. Species comparisons of bronchoalveolar lavages from guinea pigs and rats exposed in vivo to diesel exhaust for one year

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Weller, M.A.; Barnhart, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    Male Hartly guinea pigs and Fischer rats 344 were exposed to diesel exhaust (DE) concentrations at 0, 250, and 1500 micrograms/m3 in short terms, as well as long term experiments up to one year. The effects of inhaled DE on these rodents were evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Both the morphological and functional studies of free lung cells and the biochemical and immunologic studies of the supernatant lavage fluid provided the basis for a quantitative species comparison of the pulmonary responses of exposed guinea pigs and rats versus age matched controls. Following inhalation of 250 micrograms DE/m3, there were little or no significant changes in either species. In contrast, at higher DE concentration, leukocytic infiltration and elevation of specific proteins in lavage fluids were observed in both species. The findings occurred and persisted in both species. Some of the responses were species specific (e.g., the specific type of exudative leukocytes, appearance of reactive monocytes, and different amounts of free DE particles and debris in the lavage fluid). Other responses were similar in both species. Among them, the emergence and increase of lymphocytes was evidence of immunologic responses. Biochemical data from the supernatant fluid correlates with the changes in cellular population in the lavage. The responses appear to be dose and duration dependent. These data indicate that species differences occur. However, it is clear that the alveolar macrophage and granulocytic leukocytes continue to exert effective defense at the DE dose-durations studied. In general, rats appeared more resistant to DE exposure than guinea pigs.

  13. Control of the Synthesis of Fatty-Acid Synthetase in Rat Liver by Insulin, Glucagon, and Adenosine 3′:5′ Cyclic Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, M. R.; Nepokroeff, Carl M.; Porter, John W.

    1972-01-01

    The usual increase in the activity of liver fatty-acid synthetase that occurs on refeeding of a fat-free diet to previously fasted rats is abolished in diabetic animals. Insulin specifically restores this increase by enhancement of the rate of synthesis of fatty-acid synthetase. However, glucagon and cyclic AMP inhibit the increase in the activity of fatty-acid synthetase. Therefore, the concentration of fatty-acid synthetase in rat liver is under the control of the relative concentrations of insulin and glucagon. PMID:4345502

  14. A platform for controlled dual-drug delivery to the retina: protective effects against light-induced retinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Nobuhiro; Kaji, Hirokazu; Onami, Hideyuki; Katsukura, Yuki; Ishikawa, Yumi; Nezhad, Zhaleh Kashkouli; Sampei, Kaori; Iwata, Satoru; Ito, Shuntaro; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Osumi, Noriko; Mashima, Yukihiko; Abe, Toshiaki

    2014-10-01

    Controlled transscleral co-delivery of two drugs, edaravone (EDV) and unoprostone (UNO), using a platform that comprises a microfabricated reservoir, controlled-release cover, and drug formulations, which are made of photopolymerized poly(ethyleneglycol) dimethacrylates, shows synergistic retinal neuroprotection against light injury in rats when compared with single-drug-loaded devices. The device would offer a safer therapeutic method than intravitreal injections for retinal disease treatments. PMID:24753450

  15. Quantification of rat retinal growth and vascular population changes after single and split doses of proton irradiation: translational study using stereology methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Xiao W.; Archambeau, John O.; Kubinova, Lucie; Boyle, Soames; Petersen, Georgia; Grove, Roger; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified architectural and population changes in the rat retinal vasculature after proton irradiation using stereology. A 100 MeV conformal proton beam delivered 8, 14, 20 and 28 Gy as single and split doses to the whole eye. The vascular networks were prepared from retinal digests. Stereological methods were used to obtain the area of the retina and unbiased estimates of microvessel/artery/vein endothelial, pericyte and smooth muscle population, and vessel length. The retinal area increased progressively in the unirradiated, age-matched controls and in the retinas irradiated with 8 and 14 Gy, indicating uniform progressive retinal growth. No growth occurred after 20 and 28 Gy. Regression analysis of total endothelial cell number in all vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) after irradiation documented a progressive time- and dose-dependent cell loss occurring over 15 to 24 months. The difference from controls was significant (P<0.01) after 28 Gy given in single and split doses and after 20 Gy given as a split dose (P<0.05). Total vessel length in microvessel was significantly shortened at 20 and 28 Gy compared to that of controls (P<0.05). No evident dose recovery was observed in the endothelial populations after split doses. At 10 Gy, the rate of endothelial cell loss, a dose parameter used to characterize the time- and dose-dependent loss of the endothelial population, was doubled.

  16. Hormonal influence on the secretory immune system of the eye: androgen control of secretory component production by the rat exorbital gland.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D A; Bloch, K J; Allansmith, M R

    1984-01-01

    Androgens are known to regulate the level of secretory component (SC) in tears of male rats. The purpose of the present study was to explore the underlying mechanism of this hormone action by (i) identifying the ocular tissue(s) involved in SC production; and (ii) determining whether androgens increase SC production by this tissue. We also examined whether androgen administration influenced the concentration of SC in tears of female rats. Ocular tissues from adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in the presence or absence of cycloheximide in the incubation medium. Secretory component in the culture media was measured by an RIA which detects primarily free SC. Analysis of media obtained after incubation of exorbital (lacrimal) glands, 'lid' tissues, globes, and Harderian glands revealed that only exorbital glands released substantial amounts of SC. This exorbital gland production of SC, which was significantly greater in tissues from male rats, as compared to those of female rats, was reduced by approximately 50% when cycloheximide was present in the culture medium. To determine whether SC production by exorbital glands was influenced by androgens, orchiectomized glands was influenced by androgens, orchiectomized rats were administered either saline or testosterone (2.0 mg/day for 4 days), and exorbital glands were cultured 24 hr after the last injection. Testosterone treatment in vivo induced a significant, cycloheximide-sensitive increase in SC production in vitro, compared to the glandular SC output of saline-injected controls. It is interesting that similar androgen treatment of ovariectomized females also resulted in elevated tear SC concentrations and enhanced output of SC by their exorbital glands in vitro. These findings indicate that the exorbital gland is primarily responsible for SC production in the rat eye and that androgens may modulate the synthesis of SC in this gland. PMID:6735436

  17. Neural control of skeletal muscle cholinesterase: a study using organ-cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, B; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1979-01-01

    1. It has been proposed that the influence of innervation on the cholinesterase activity (ChE) of skeletal muscle and on end-plate ChE in particular is mediated by trophic substance(s) moved by axonal transport and released from nerve. We have tested this hypothesis using rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) and diaphragm muscles denervated in vitro for several days and then maintained in organ culture to assay putative trophic substance(s). 2. The cholinesterase activity (ChE) of rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscles decreased dramatically after 5 days of denervation in vivo as previously reported. The ChE of rat e.d.l. muscles denervated in vivo for 3 days and then maintained in organ culture for 2 days was essentially identical to that of muscles denervated 5 days in vivo. 3. The ChE OF E.D.L. MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN MAINTAINED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM SUPPLEMENTED WITH SCIATIC NERVE OR INNERVATED MUSCLE EXTRACT WAS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN THAT OF MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 5 DAYS OR DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN CULTURED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM ALONE. Supplementing the culture medium with brain or spinal cord extract also significantly increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 4. Supplementing the culture medium with liver or spleen extract or with the extract of muscle denervated for 3--7 days in vivo before extraction did not increase the ChE or organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 5. The effect of muscle extract on the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles was dose dependent and occurred gradually reaching a maximum after approximately 24 h of culture. 6. Substance(s) which increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles were found to accumulate in transected sciatic nerve in the region just proximal to the site of transection where substances moved by axonal transport are known to accumulate. 7. Media conditioned with neurally stimulated e.d.l. or diaphragm muscles caused a substantial and

  18. Effect of memantine on plasma concentrations of carbamazepine and phenytoin in rats: A controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Bonary, Amir Reza Karami; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Tamizi, Elnaz; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Samini, Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients, especially those with Alzheimer's disease, may be prescribed memantine and an antiepileptic drug concurrently. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the interaction of memantine with phenobarbital (an enzyme inducer) and chloramphenicol (an enzyme inhibitor) on plasma concentrations of carbamazepine (CBZ), CBZ-10,11-epoxide (CBZE), and phenytoin in an experimental model. Methods: Eight groups of rats (200–230 g) were treated for 14 days each. In groups 1 and 2, phenobarbital 50 mg/kg was administered daily as an enzyme inducer 60 minutes before CBZ 50 mg/kg or phenytoin 30 mg/kg administration, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, chloramphenicol 300 mg/kg was administered daily as an enzyme inhibitor 60 minutes before CBZ or phenytoin administration, respectively. In groups 5 and 6, memantine 20 mg/kg was administered daily 60 minutes before CBZ or phenytoin, respectively. In group 7, CBZ alone was administered daily; in group 8, phenytoin alone was administered daily. Two hours after the last intragastric gavage, animals were anesthetized with ether and 2 mL of blood was drawn from the heart into a syringe containing EDTA. A validated method developed in this study was used for simultaneous determination of CBZ, CBZE, and phenytoin concentrations in rat plasma. Results: The study comprised 8 groups of 9 male adult Wistar rats each. Compared with groups 7 and 8, concurrent use of CBZ or phenytoin with phenobarbital (groups 1 and 2) was associated with significantly lower mean (SEM) plasma concentrations of CBZ (3.45 [0.16] vs 2.20 [0.21] μg/mL; P < 0.001) and phenytoin (3.68 [0.09] vs 1.63 [0.15] μg/mL; P < 0.001) and a significantly higher plasma CBZE concentration (9.85 [0.29] vs 11.18 [0.29] μg/mL; P < 0.05). Concurrent use of CBZ or phenytoin with chloramphenicol (groups 3 and 4) was associated with significantly higher plasma concentrations of CBZ (4.81 [0.17] μg/mL; P < 0.001) and phenytoin (6.24 [0.22] μg/mL; P < 0

  19. Effect of polyphenol-containing azuki bean (Vigna angularis) extract on blood pressure elevation and macrophage infiltration in the heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shin; Mukai, Yuuka; Yamate, Jyoji; Kato, Jun; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Hatai, Asako; Sagai, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    1. Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction and renal damage, and it has also been shown to have pro-inflammatory actions that increase the formation of reactive oxygen species. Macrophage infiltration has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Azuki beans are known to contain pro-anthocyanidins, a group of polyphenolic bioflavonoids with remarkable radical-scavenging activities in vitro. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of polyphenol-containing azuki bean extract (ABE) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and macrophage infiltration in the heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Spontaneously hypertensive rats and control normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were divided into two groups fed either 0 or 0.8% ABE in their diets. Tail SBP and macrophage kinetics in the heart and kidney were examined. 3. The SBP of the SHR group was higher than that of age-matched WKY rats throughout the treatment period. After 8 weeks of treatment, the increased SBP in ABE-treated SHR was significantly less than that in untreated SHR. 4. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-stimulated superoxide (O2-) production was enhanced in the kidney and heart in SHR and WKY rats compared with levels in the absence of NADH or NADPH. The NADPH-stimulated superoxide (O2-) levels in the kidney in untreated SHR was significantly higher than that in untreated WKY rats. The (O2-) levels in ABE-treated SHR were significantly decreased compared with the untreated SHR group. 5. In immunohistochemical analyses, the number of macrophages in the heart and in the glomeruli and tubulointerstitium of the kidney was significantly higher in ABE-untreated SHR than in ABE-untreated WKY rats. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in the number of macrophages in ABE-treated SHR compared with the untreated SHR. There were significant positive

  20. Effects of chronic heart failure on neuronal nitric oxide synthase-mediated control of microvascular O2 pressure in contracting rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Steven W; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of the skeletal muscle microvascular O2 delivery/ ratio (which sets the microvascular O2 pressure, ). Given the pervasiveness of endothelial dysfunction in CHF, this NO-mediated dysregulation is attributed generally to eNOS. It is unknown whether nNOS-mediated regulation is altered in CHF. We tested the hypothesis that CHF impairs nNOS-mediated control. In healthy and CHF (left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP): 6 ± 1 versus 14 ± 1 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05) rats spinotrapezius muscle blood flow (radiolabelled microspheres), (phosphorescence quenching), and (Fick calculation) were measured before and after 0.56 mg kg−1 i.a. of the selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC). In healthy rats, SMTC increased baseline (Control: 29.7 ± 1.4, SMTC: 34.4 ± 1.9 mmHg, P < 0.05) by reducing (↓20%) without any effect on blood flow and speeded the mean response time (MRT, time to reach 63% of the overall kinetics response, Control: 24.2 ± 2.0, SMTC: 18.5 ± 1.3 s, P < 0.05). In CHF rats, SMTC did not alter baseline (Control: 25.7 ± 1.6, SMTC: 28.6 ± 2.1 mmHg, P > 0.05), at rest, or the MRT (Control: 22.8 ± 2.6, SMTC: 21.3 ± 3.0 s, P > 0.05). During the contracting steady-state, SMTC reduced blood flow (↓15%) and (↓15%) in healthy rats such that was unaltered (Control: 19.8 ± 1.7, SMTC: 20.7 ± 1.8 mmHg, P > 0.05). In marked contrast, in CHF rats SMTC did not change contracting steady-state blood flow, , or (Control: 17.0 ± 1.4, SMTC: 17.7 ± 1.8 mmHg, P > 0.05). nNOS-mediated control of skeletal muscle microvascular function is compromised in CHF versus healthy rats. Treatments designed to ameliorate microvascular dysfunction in CHF may benefit by targeting improvements in nNOS function. PMID:22687613

  1. Adaptation to elastic loads and BMI robot controls during rat locomotion examined with point-process GLMs.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Cajigas, Iahn; Brown, Emery N; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Currently little is known about how a mechanically coupled BMI system's actions are integrated into ongoing body dynamics. We tested a locomotor task augmented with a BMI system driving a robot mechanically interacting with a rat under three conditions: control locomotion (BL), "simple elastic load" (E) and "BMI with elastic load" (BMI/E). The effect of the BMI was to allow compensation of the elastic load as a function of the neural drive. Neurons recorded here were close to one another in cortex, all within a 200 micron diameter horizontal distance of one another. The interactions of these close assemblies of neurons may differ from those among neurons at longer distances in BMI tasks and thus are important to explore. A point process generalized linear model (GLM), was used to examine connectivity at two different binning timescales (1 ms vs. 10 ms). We used GLM models to fit non-Poisson neural dynamics solely using other neurons' prior neural activity as covariates. Models at different timescales were compared based on Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit and parsimony. About 15% of cells with non-Poisson firing were well fitted with the neuron-to-neuron models alone. More such cells were fitted at the 1 ms binning than 10 ms. Positive connection parameters ("excitation" ~70%) exceeded negative parameters ("inhibition" ~30%). Significant connectivity changes in the GLM determined networks of well-fitted neurons occurred between the conditions. However, a common core of connections comprising at least ~15% of connections persisted between any two of the three conditions. Significantly almost twice as many connections were in common between the two load conditions (~27%), compared to between either load condition and the baseline. This local point process GLM identified neural correlation structure and the changes seen across task conditions in the rats in this neural subset may be intrinsic to cortex or due to feedback and input reorganization in adaptation

  2. Historical control background incidence of spontaneous thyroid and parathyroid glands lesions of rats and CD-1 mice used in 104-week carcinogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Kaori; Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Petterino, Claudio; Bradley, Alys

    2016-07-01

    The incidence and range of spontaneous thyroid and parathyroid glands findings were determined in control Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats, and CD-1 mice from 104-week carcinogenicity studies carried out between 1998 and 2010 at Charles River Edinburgh. In both strains of rats and in CD-1 mice, non-proliferative lesions of the thyroid or parathyroid glands were generally uncommon apart from some findings in CD-1 mice such as ultimobranchial duct/cyst (5.72%), follicular distension/dilatation (3.84%), and cystic follicles (3.53%). In Han-Wistar rats, thyroid proliferative lesions were slightly more frequent in males than in females, but in Sprague-Dawley rats, they were of similar incidence in both sexes. The most common findings overall in Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats were C-cell hyperplasia (48.11% and 36.56%, respectively) and adenoma (10.87% and 9.52%, respectively), follicular cell hyperplasia (4.21% and 0.91%, respectively) and adenoma (4.32% and 1.36%, respectively). Secondary neoplastic lesions either in thyroid or parathyroid gland were poorly represented. PMID:27559247

  3. Historical control background incidence of spontaneous thyroid and parathyroid glands lesions of rats and CD-1 mice used in 104-week carcinogenicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Kaori; Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Petterino, Claudio; Bradley, Alys

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and range of spontaneous thyroid and parathyroid glands findings were determined in control Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats, and CD-1 mice from 104-week carcinogenicity studies carried out between 1998 and 2010 at Charles River Edinburgh. In both strains of rats and in CD-1 mice, non-proliferative lesions of the thyroid or parathyroid glands were generally uncommon apart from some findings in CD-1 mice such as ultimobranchial duct/cyst (5.72%), follicular distension/dilatation (3.84%), and cystic follicles (3.53%). In Han-Wistar rats, thyroid proliferative lesions were slightly more frequent in males than in females, but in Sprague-Dawley rats, they were of similar incidence in both sexes. The most common findings overall in Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats were C-cell hyperplasia (48.11% and 36.56%, respectively) and adenoma (10.87% and 9.52%, respectively), follicular cell hyperplasia (4.21% and 0.91%, respectively) and adenoma (4.32% and 1.36%, respectively). Secondary neoplastic lesions either in thyroid or parathyroid gland were poorly represented. PMID:27559247

  4. Atp13a2 expression in the periaqueductal gray is decreased in the Pink1 −/− rat model of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Stevenson, Sharon A.; Ciucci, Michelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Vocal communication deficits are common in Parkinson disease (PD). Widespread alpha-synuclein pathology is a common link between familial and sporadic PD, and recent genetic rat models based on familial genetic links increase the opportunity to explore vocalization deficits and their associated neuropathologies. Specifically, the Pink1 knockout (−/−) rat presents with early, progressive motor deficits, including significant vocal deficits, at 8 months of age. Moreover, this rat model exhibits alpha-synuclein pathology compared to age-matched non-affected wildtype (WT) controls. Aggregations are specifically dense within the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a brainstem region involved in the coordination of emotional and volitional control of vocalizations. Here, we investigated changes in gene expression within the PAG at 8 months of age in Pink1 −/− rats compared to WT. Our data demonstrate that Pink1 −/− rat mRNA expression levels of alpha-synuclein are comparable to WT. However, Pink1 −/− rats show significantly decreased levels of Atp13a2, a transmembrane lysosomal P5-type ATPase suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed abnormal aggregation. We found no difference in the expression of glucocerebrosidase (Gba) or the CASP8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator (Cflar). Further, we show that mRNA expression levels of dopaminergic markers including Th, D1 and D2 receptor as well as GABA signaling markers including Gaba-A and glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2) do not differ between genotypes. However, we found that glutamate decarboxylase 1 (Gad1) is significantly reduced in this PD model suggesting possible disruption of neurotransmission within the PAG. These results are the first to suggest the hypothesis that alpha-synuclein aggregation in this model is not a result of increased transcription, but rather a deficit in the breakdown and clearance, and that the observed vocal deficits may be related to impaired neural transmission. Altogether, these

  5. Role of parafacial nuclei in control of breathing in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Huckstepp, Robert T R; Cardoza, Kathryn P; Henderson, Lauren E; Feldman, Jack L

    2015-01-21

    Contiguous brain regions associated with a given behavior are increasingly being divided into subregions associated with distinct aspects of that behavior. Using recently developed neuronal hyperpolarizing technologies, we functionally dissect the parafacial region in the medulla, which contains key elements of the central pattern generator for breathing that are important in central CO2-chemoreception and for gating active expiration. By transfecting different populations of neighboring neurons with allatostatin or HM4D Gi/o-coupled receptors, we analyzed the effect of their hyperpolarization on respiration in spontaneously breathing vagotomized urethane-anesthetized rats. We identify two functionally separate parafacial nuclei: ventral (pFV) and lateral (pFL). Disinhibition of the pFL with bicuculline and strychnine led to active expiration. Hyperpolarizing pFL neurons had no effect on breathing at rest, or changes in inspiratory activity induced by hypoxia and hypercapnia; however, hyperpolarizing pFL neurons attenuated active expiration when it was induced by hypercapnia, hypoxia, or disinhibition of the pFL. In contrast, hyperpolarizing pFV neurons affected breathing at rest by decreasing inspiratory-related activity, attenuating the hypoxia- and hypercapnia-induced increase in inspiratory activity, and when present, reducing expiratory-related abdominal activity. Together with previous observations, we conclude that the pFV provides a generic excitatory drive to breathe, even at rest, whereas the pFL is a conditional oscillator quiet at rest that, when activated, e.g., during exercise, drives active expiration. PMID:25609622

  6. [Control System Design and Test of Digital Comprehensive Training Treadmill for Rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulin; Ma, Guanpo; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Xiufang

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the design of a treadmill of comprehensive training experiment for rats. The treadmill is composed of six tracks and two of them were designed as conventional plane, two were designed to swing right and left, and two were designed to swing back and forth. The power was provided by six motors. The MSP430F149 is used as core to adjust the swing rate and the grade of electric shock. The IAR for MSP430 is used to design the software. The speed of the six tracks could be adjusted between 0 and 30 m/min. The swing tracks of back and forth can be swung for 3-25 times per minute and the swing tracks of right and left for 3-32 times. The electric shock can be divided into three levels, i. e. strong, middle, and weak level for each track. The digital comprehensive training treadmill can meet different training needs, and provide experimental data for mechanism research of some related diseases. PMID:27079093

  7. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  8. Role of Parafacial Nuclei in Control of Breathing in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huckstepp, Robert T.R.; Cardoza, Kathryn P.; Henderson, Lauren E.

    2015-01-01

    Contiguous brain regions associated with a given behavior are increasingly being divided into subregions associated with distinct aspects of that behavior. Using recently developed neuronal hyperpolarizing technologies, we functionally dissect the parafacial region in the medulla, which contains key elements of the central pattern generator for breathing that are important in central CO2-chemoreception and for gating active expiration. By transfecting different populations of neighboring neurons with allatostatin or HM4D Gi/o-coupled receptors, we analyzed the effect of their hyperpolarization on respiration in spontaneously breathing vagotomized urethane-anesthetized rats. We identify two functionally separate parafacial nuclei: ventral (pFV) and lateral (pFL). Disinhibition of the pFL with bicuculline and strychnine led to active expiration. Hyperpolarizing pFL neurons had no effect on breathing at rest, or changes in inspiratory activity induced by hypoxia and hypercapnia; however, hyperpolarizing pFL neurons attenuated active expiration when it was induced by hypercapnia, hypoxia, or disinhibition of the pFL. In contrast, hyperpolarizing pFV neurons affected breathing at rest by decreasing inspiratory-related activity, attenuating the hypoxia- and hypercapnia-induced increase in inspiratory activity, and when present, reducing expiratory-related abdominal activity. Together with previous observations, we conclude that the pFV provides a generic excitatory drive to breathe, even at rest, whereas the pFL is a conditional oscillator quiet at rest that, when activated, e.g., during exercise, drives active expiration. PMID:25609622

  9. Controlled bending instability in the healing of diaphyseal osteotomies in the rat femur.

    PubMed

    Mølster, A O; Gjerdet, N R; Langeland, N; Lekven, J; Alho, A

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-six rats underwent a midshaft transverse osteotomy followed by osteosynthesis with an intramedullary nail, so that the effect of bending instability on time to union and on the mechanical properties of experimental diaphyseal fracture could be evaluated. Rotation was reduced by cementing both nail ends to the bone. Rigid nails made of stainless steel were used on one group and flexible nails made of polyacetal resin were used on another group. Serial radiographs were evaluated at 4-6-week intervals. Twelve animals with either nail type were killed at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks. Both femora were mechanically tested and the callus diameters were measured. There was no significant difference in time to union between the two groups. The cross-sectional area of callus was significantly higher at 8 and 16 weeks in femora with flexible nails. The strength, toughness, and resilience of the bone increased in this group until 24 weeks. Between 16 and 24 weeks, these parameters did not improve in femora with rigid nails. Poorer mechanical properties in femora with steel nails are interpreted as an effect of stress protection of the bone. This study, therefore, indicates that flexible nails prevent stress protection effects without delaying union. PMID:3819909

  10. Differences in control of parasympathetic vasodilation between submandibular and sublingual glands in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshiya; Ishii, Hisayoshi

    2015-12-01

    We examined blood flow in the submandibular gland (SMGBF) and sublingual gland (SLGBF) during electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the lingual nerve (LN) in the urethane-anesthetized rats using a laser speckle imaging flow meter. LN stimulation elicited intensity- and frequency-dependent SMGBF and SLGBF increases, and the magnitude of the SMGBF increase was higher than that of the SLGBF increase. The increase in both glands was significantly inhibited by intravenous administration of the autonomic cholinergic ganglion blocker hexamethonium. The antimuscarinic agent atropine markedly inhibited the SMGBF increase and partly inhibited the SLGBF increase. The atropine-resistant SLGBF increase was significantly inhibited by infusion of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor antagonist, although administration of VIP receptor antagonist alone had no effect. The recovery time to the basal blood flow level was shorter after LN stimulation than after administration of VIP. However, the recovery time after LN stimulation was significantly delayed by administration of atropine in a dose-dependent manner to the same level as after administration of VIP. Our results indicate that 1) LN stimulation elicits both a parasympathetic SMGBF increase mainly evoked by cholinergic fibers and a parasympathetic SLGBF increase evoked by cholinergic and noncholinergic fibers, and 2) VIP-ergic mechanisms are involved in the noncholinergic SLGBF increase and are activated when muscarinic mechanisms are deactivated. PMID:26354847

  11. Double-blind, vehicle-controlled randomized twelve-month neurodevelopmental toxicity study of common aluminum salts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Poirier, J; Semple, H; Davies, J; Lapointe, R; Dziwenka, M; Hiltz, M; Mujibi, D

    2011-10-13

    This good laboratory practice (GLP) study of aluminum salts in Sprague-Dawley rats was conducted according to double-blind, vehicle-controlled randomized design by exposing offspring to aluminum citrate in-utero, through lactation, and then in drinking water post-weaning. Three dose levels were used: 30, 100, 300 mg Al/kg bw/day, in addition to control groups that received either water or a sodium citrate solution (27.2 g/L). Endpoints were assessed in both female and male pups: behavioral (motor activity, T-maze, auditory startle, the Functional Observational Battery (FOB) with domains targeting autonomic function, activity, neuromuscular function, sensimotor function, and physiological function), cognitive function (Morris swim maze), brain weight, clinical chemistry, hematology, tissue/blood levels of aluminum and neuropathology. The most notable treatment-related effect observed in the offspring was renal pathology, most prominently in the male pups. Higher mortality and significant morbidity were observed in the male pups in the high Al-citrate dose group; leading to euthanization of this group at day 89. There was evidence for dose-response relationships between neuromuscular measurements-hind-limb and fore-limb grip strength-and Al-treatment in both males and females, although some of the effects may be secondary to body weight changes. No consistent treatment-related effects were observed in ambulatory counts (motor activity) in the different cohorts. No significant effects were observed for the auditory startle response, T-maze tests (pre-weaning day 23 cohort) or the Morris water maze test (day 120 cohort). None of the lesions seen on histopathological examination of brain tissues of the day 364 group was reported as treatment-related and, as these were also seen in the control group, were likely due to aging. In conclusion, these results indicate that concentrations of aluminum in the drinking water that are required to produce minimally detectable

  12. Beta-adrenergic control of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation in hepatocytes from juvenile, adult and adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Cao, D; Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1983-01-01

    Changes in isoprenaline-sensitive phospholipid methyltransferase were studied in hepatocytes isolated from juvenile, mature and adrenalectomized rats. Isoprenaline produced greater stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats than in mature animals. Similarly, isoprenaline stimulated phospholipid methyltransferase in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats but had no effect in mature animals. Isoprenaline-mediated activation of phospholipid methyltransferase in adrenalectomized rats was time- and dose-dependent. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized rats incubated with [Me-3H]methionine or [3H]-ethanolamine the addition of isoprenaline increased the amount of radioactivity incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. The activation by isoprenaline of phospholipid methyltransferase was abolished by the beta-blocker propranolol and by insulin. These results indicate that rat liver the occupation of functional beta-receptors causes a stimulation of phospholipid methylation. It is suggested that, as reported previously, cyclic AMP activates phospholipid methyltransferase. PMID:6320796

  13. Upregulation of renal and vascular nitric oxide synthase in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Ni, Z; Oveisi, F

    1998-06-01

    The available data on the role of the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the genesis of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are limited and contradictory. In an attempt to address this issue, male SHR were studied during the early phase of evolution of hypertension (age 8 to 12 weeks) to distinguish the primary changes of NO metabolism from those caused by advanced hypertension, vasculopathy, and aging late in the course of the disease. A group of age-matched male Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) served as controls. The SHR exhibited a marked rise in arterial blood pressure and a significant increase in urinary excretion and plasma concentration of NO metabolites (nitrite/nitrate [NOx]). Likewise, the SHR showed a significant elevation of thoracic aorta NO synthase (NOS) activity coupled with significant increases of kidney, aorta, inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) proteins. In an attempt to determine whether the enhanced L-arginine/NO pathway is a consequence of hypertension, studies were repeated using 3-week-old animals before the onset of hypertension. The study revealed significant increases in urinary NOx excretion as well as vascular eNOS and renal iNOS proteins. In conclusion, the L-arginine/NO pathway is upregulated in young SHR both before and after the onset of hypertension. Thus, development of hypertension is not due to a primary impairment of NO production in SHR. On the contrary, NO production is increased in young SHR both before and after the onset of hypertension. PMID:9622137

  14. Hyperglycemia-Induced Abnormalities in Rat and Human Corneas: The Potential of Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Kowalczuk, Laura; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Plamann, Karsten; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    Background Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet’s membrane, in the posterior cornea. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet’s membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily generalized to

  15. Reduced ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation after progressive resistance exercise in growing adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Nokleby, Jessica J; Thicke, Bethany M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate moderate intensity progressive resistance exercise (PRE) in growing adolescent rats and its effect on muscle hypertrophy (defined as an increase in fiber cross-sectional area [CSA]). We hypothesized that in adolescent animals moderate intensity PRE would increase (a) fiber CSA; (b) myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content; and (c) expression and phosphorylation of cell signaling molecules involved in translational regulation, compared with that in age-matched sedentary (SED) controls. In the PRE group, 3-week-old male rats were trained to climb a vertical ladder as a mode of PRE training such that by 10 weeks all animals in the PRE group had progressed to carry an additional 80% of their body weight per climb. In agreement with our hypotheses, we observed that 10 weeks of moderate PRE in adolescent animals was sufficient to increase the CSA of muscle fibers and increase MyHC content. The average muscle fiber CSA increased by >10%, and the total MyHC content increased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the PRE group compared with that in the SED animals. Concurrently, we investigated sustained changes in the expression and phosphorylation of key signaling molecules that are previously identified regulators of hypertrophy in adult animal models. Contrary to our hypotheses, expression and phosphorylation of the translational regulators mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt were not increased in the PRE group. In addition, we observed that the ratio of phosphorylated-to-unphosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) was reduced over sixfold in PRE animals (p < 0.05) and that total rpS6 protein levels were unchanged between PRE and SED animals (p > 0.05). We conclude that moderate intensity PRE is sufficient to induce muscle hypertrophy in adolescent animals, whereas the signaling mechanisms associated with muscle hypertrophy may differ between growing adolescents and adults. PMID:22614147

  16. Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hirshler, Yafit (Kuttner); Polat, Uri; Biegon, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed one week or eight weeks post implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [3H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and two and eight weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at one week as well as eight weeks post implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance two and eight weeks post implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS. PMID:20026042

  17. A low noise remotely controllable wireless telemetry system for single-unit recording in rats navigating in a vertical maze.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Wu, Jin-Shang; Hyland, Brian; Lu, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Jia Jin Jason

    2008-08-01

    The use of cables for recording neural activity limits the scope of behavioral tests used in conscious free-moving animals. Particularly, cable attachments make it impossible to record in three-dimensional (3D) mazes where levels are vertically stacked or in enclosed spaces. Such environments are of particular interest in investigations of hippocampal place cells, in which neural activity is correlated with spatial position in the environment. We developed a flexible miniaturized Bluetooth-based wireless data acquisition system. The wireless module included an 8-channel analogue front end, digital controller, and Bluetooth transceiver mounted on a backpack. Our bidirectional wireless design allowed all data channels to be previewed at 1 kHz sample rate, and one channel, selected by remote control, to be sampled at 10 kHz. Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity are highly susceptible to ambient electrical noise due to the high electrode impedance. Through careful design of appropriate shielding and hardware configuration to avoid ground loops, mains power and Bluetooth hopping frequency noise were reduced sufficiently to yield signal quality comparable to those recorded by wired systems. With this system we were able to obtain single-unit recordings of hippocampal place cells in rats running an enclosed vertical maze, over a range of 5 m. PMID:18509686

  18. Endocrinological control and cellular localization of rat testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3. 4. 15. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Velletri, P.A.; Aquilano, D.R.; Bruckwick, E.; Tsai-Morris, C.H.; Dufau, M.L.; Lovenberg, W.

    1985-06-01

    Hypophysectomy of prepubescent (3-week-old) rats prevented the pubertal development of testicular, but not pulmonary, angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1). Additionally, hypophysectomy resulted in a loss of testicular converting enzyme activity in 10-week-old rats that had achieved puberty and had developed enzyme activity. Hormone regimens consisting of FSH/LH (7.5 U/rat X day), hCG (10 U/rat X day), or testosterone (1 mg/rat X day) were employed to ascertain their ability to maintain activity in hypophysectomized rats. All three of the above hormone regimens, if initiated on the first day after hypophysectomy of 10-week-old rats, were capable of maintaining testicular converting enzyme activity. Centrifugal elutriation of dispersed testicular cells indicated that the majority of enzyme activity in mature rats was associated with the germinal cells, a result consistent with the data accumulated from the hormonal studies. Lastly, (/sup 3/H)captopril bound specifically to cellular fractions enriched in germinal cells. The above studies suggest that the pituitary gland is required for the development and maintenance of testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme in the rat by stimulating steroidogenesis in the testes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of converting enzyme activity to androgen coupled with the centrifugal elutriation and (/sup 3/H) captopril binding studies strongly support the notion that testicular converting enzyme is associated with germinal cells.

  19. Architectural and Biochemical Adaptations in Skeletal Muscle and Bone Following Rotator Cuff Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Eugene J.; Killian, Megan L.; Choi, Anthony J.; Lin, Evie; Choo, Alexander D.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Lim, Chanteak T.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Galatz, Leesa M.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injury to the rotator cuff can cause irreversible changes to the structure and function of the associated muscles and bones. The temporal progression and pathomechanisms associated with these adaptations are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of structural muscle and osseous changes in a rat model of a massive rotator cuff tear. Methods: Supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle architecture and biochemistry and humeral and scapular morphological parameters were measured three days, eight weeks, and sixteen weeks after dual tenotomy with and without chemical paralysis via botulinum toxin A (BTX). Results: Muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area increased over time in the age-matched control animals, decreased over time in the tenotomy+BTX group, and remained nearly the same in the tenotomy-alone group. Tenotomy+BTX led to increased extracellular collagen in the muscle. Changes in scapular bone morphology were observed in both experimental groups, consistent with reductions in load transmission across the joint. Conclusions: These data suggest that tenotomy alone interferes with normal age-related muscle growth. The addition of chemical paralysis yielded profound structural changes to the muscle and bone, potentially leading to impaired muscle function, increased muscle stiffness, and decreased bone strength. Clinical Relevance: Structural musculoskeletal changes occur after tendon injury, and these changes are severely exacerbated with the addition of neuromuscular compromise. PMID:25834081

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  1. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  2. Losing control under ketamine: suppressed cortico-hippocampal drive following acute ketamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Jones, Matthew W; Blockeel, Anthony J; Adams, Rick A; Stephan, Klaas E; Friston, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic doses of the psychotomimetic ketamine alter the spectral characteristics of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical network activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of cross-spectral densities, we quantify the putative synaptic mechanisms underlying ketamine effects in terms of changes in directed, effective connectivity between dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal (dCA1-mPFC) cortex of freely moving rats. We parameterize dose-dependent changes in spectral signatures of dCA1-mPFC local field potential recordings, using neural mass models of glutamatergic and GABAergic circuits. Optimizing DCMs of theta and gamma frequency range responses, model comparisons suggest that both enhanced gamma and depressed theta power result from a reduction in top-down connectivity from mPFC to the hippocampus, mediated by postsynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). This is accompanied by an alteration in the bottom-up pathway from dCA1 to mPFC, which exhibits a distinct asymmetry: here, feed-forward drive at AMPA receptors increases in the presence of decreased NMDAR-mediated inputs. Setting these findings in the context of predictive coding suggests that NMDAR antagonism by ketamine in recurrent hierarchical networks may result in the failure of top-down connections from higher cortical regions to signal predictions to lower regions in the hierarchy, which consequently fail to respond consistently to errors. Given that NMDAR dysfunction has a central role in pathophysiological theories of schizophrenia and that theta and gamma rhythm abnormalities are evident in schizophrenic patients, the approach followed here may furnish a framework for the study of aberrant hierarchical message passing (of prediction errors) in schizophrenia-and the false perceptual inferences that ensue. PMID:25053181

  3. Differential interactions engendered by benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations on schedule-controlled responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Barak W; Platt, Donna M; Rowlett, James K

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are positive allosteric modulators of the GABAA receptor and are prescribed as anxiolytics, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants. While these drugs clearly have clinical value, their use is associated with unwanted side effects such as sedation and motor impairment. Neuroactive steroids are endogenous modulators of GABAA receptors and recent evidence has shown that combinations of the triazolo-benzodiazepine triazolam and the endogenous neuroactive steroid pregnanolone can produce both supra-additive anxiolytic effects and infra-additive reinforcing effects. In the present study, we investigated these same combinations as well as combinations of two clinically-relevant drugs from different chemical classes, the 1, 4 substituted (7-nitro) benzodiazepine clonazepam and the synthetic neuroactive steroid ganaxolone, in rats trained under a 10-response, fixed ratio (FR) schedule of food reinforcement. All four drugs induced a significant and dose-dependent suppression of food-maintained responding. From the dose-response functions, ED50s (i.e., the doses that engendered 50% of the maximum rate-decreasing effect) were generated for each drug. Dose-response functions for combinations of triazolam/pregnanolone, clonazepam/ganaxolone, triazolam/ganaxolone, and clonazepam/pregnanolone were then determined. Isobolographic analysis of the rate-decreasing effects of these combinations revealed that the potencies of the triazolam/pregnanolone combinations were supra-additive while the clonazepam/ganaxolone combinations were additive or infra-additive in relation to predicted values based on dose-additive effects. Furthermore, mixtures of clonazepam/pregnanolone were supra-additive while triazolam/ganaxolone combinations were additive, infra-additive and supra-additive. These results suggest that the ability of benzodiazepine and neuroactive steroid combinations to attenuate rates of food-maintained responding depends critically on both the constituent drugs and the

  4. Hypertrophy induced KIF5B controls mitochondrial localization and function in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; de Jong, Anne Margreet; Bloks, Vincent W; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with growth and functional changes of cardiomyocytes, including mitochondrial alterations, but the latter are still poorly understood. Here we investigated mitochondrial function and dynamic localization in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) stimulated with insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) or phenylephrine (PE), mimicking physiological and pathological hypertrophic responses, respectively. A decreased activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) (state 3) was observed in permeabilized NRVCs stimulated with PE, whereas this was improved in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. In contrast, in intact NRVCs, mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) was increased in PE stimulated NRVCs, but remained constant in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. After stimulation with PE, mitochondria were localized to the periphery of the cell. To study the differences in more detail, we performed gene array studies. IGF1 and PE stimulated NRVCs did not reveal major differences in gene expression of mitochondrial encoding proteins, but we identified a gene encoding a motor protein implicated in mitochondrial localization, kinesin family member 5b (Kif5b), which was clearly elevated in PE stimulated NRVCs but not in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. We confirmed that Kif5b gene and protein expression were elevated in animal models with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Silencing of Kif5b reverted the peripheral mitochondrial localization in PE stimulated NRVCs and diminished PE induced increases in mitochondrial OCR, indicating that KIF5B dependent localization affects cellular responses to PE stimulated NRVCs. These results indicate that KIF5B contributes to mitochondrial localization and function in cardiomyocytes and may play a role in pathological hypertrophic responses in vivo. PMID:27094714

  5. Skeletal Muscle Vascular Control During Exercise: Impact of Nitrite Infusion During Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition in Healthy Rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott K; Glean, Angela A; Holdsworth, Clark T; Wright, Jennifer L; Fees, Alex J; Colburn, Trenton D; Stabler, Thomas; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2016-03-01

    The nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent pathway of nitric oxide (NO) production in which nitrite (NO2 (-)) is reduced to NO may have therapeutic applications for those with cardiovascular diseases in which the NOS pathway is downregulated. We tested the hypothesis that NO2 (-) infusion would reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increase skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance (VC) during exercise in the face of NOS blockade via L-NAME. Following infusion of L-NAME (10 mg kg(-1), L-NAME), male Sprague-Dawley rats (3-6 months, n = 8) exercised without N(G)-nitro-L arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and after infusion of sodium NO2 (-) (7 mg kg(-1); L-NAME + NO2 (-)). MAP and hindlimb skeletal muscle BF (radiolabeled microsphere infusions) were measured during submaximal treadmill running (20 m min(-1), 5% grade). Across group comparisons were made with a published control data set (n = 11). Relative to L-NAME, NO2 (-) infusion significantly reduced MAP (P < 0.03). The lower MAP in L-NAME+NO2 (-) was not different from healthy control animals (control: 137 ± 3 L-NAME: 157 ± 7, L-NAME + NO2 (-): 136 ± 5 mm Hg). Also, NO2 (-) infusion significantly increased VC when compared to L-NAME (P < 0.03), ultimately negating any significant differences from control animals (control: 0.78 ± 0.05, L-NAME: 0.57 ± 0.03, L-NAME + NO2 (-); 0.69 ± 0.04 mL min(-1) 100 g(-1) mm Hg(-1)) with no apparent fiber-type preferential effect. Overall, hindlimb BF was decreased significantly by L-NAME; however, in L-NAME + NO2 (-), BF improved to a level not significantly different from healthy controls (control: 108 ± 8, L-NAME: 88 ± 3, L-NAME + NO2 (-): 94 ± 6 mL min(-1) 100 g(-1), P = 0.38 L-NAME vs L-NAME + NO2 (-)). Individuals with diseases that impair NOS activity, and thus vascular function, may benefit from a NO2 (-)-based therapy in which NO bioavailability is elevated in an NOS-independent manner. PMID:26272082

  6. Dosimetry considerations in the enhanced sensitivity of male Wistar rats to chronic ethylene glycol-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A. Wilson, D.M.; Hard, G.C.; Stebbins, K.E.; Bartels, M.J.; Soelberg, J.J.; Dryzga, M.D.; Gingell, R.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2008-04-15

    less sensitive strain), a significant difference was observed in oxalate clearances between young rats (i.e. Wistar clearance < F344) but not in age-matched old rats. Regardless, the ratios of oxalate:inulin clearances in these two strains of rats, including those exposed to ethylene glycol, were all < 1, suggesting that a fraction of the filtered oxalate is reabsorbed. Other species, including humans, typically have clearance ratios > 1 and are more effective at clearing oxalic acid by both glomerular filtration and active secretion. Thus, the lower renal clearance and kidney accumulation of oxalates in male Wistar rats enhances their sensitivity, which will be a factor in human risk assessments. The benchmark dose values (BMD05, BMDL05) were 170 mg/kg/day and 150 mg/kg/day for nephropathy, and 170 mg/kg/day and 160 mg/kg/day for birefringent crystals, using incidence times severity data in each case. The NOAEL of 150 mg/kg/day is the same as that reported after 16-week exposure and appears to be a threshold dose below which no renal toxicity occurs, regardless of exposure duration.

  7. Mission control team structure and operational lessons learned from the 2009 and 2010 NASA desert RATS simulated lunar exploration field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ernest R.; Badillo, Victor; Coan, David; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; Rosenbaum, Megan; Smart, Tifanie; Stone, Jeffry; Stueber, Ronald; Welsh, Daren; Guirgis, Peggy; Looper, Chris; McDaniel, Randall

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is an annual field test of advanced concepts, prototype hardware, and potential modes of operation to be used on human planetary surface space exploration missions. For the 2009 and 2010 NASA Desert RATS field tests, various engineering concepts and operational exercises were incorporated into mission timelines with the focus of the majority of daily operations being on simulated lunar geological field operations and executed in a manner similar to current Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The field test for 2009 involved a two week lunar exploration simulation utilizing a two-man rover. The 2010 Desert RATS field test took this two week simulation further by incorporating a second two-man rover working in tandem with the 2009 rover, as well as including docked operations with a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). Personnel for the field test included the crew, a mission management team, engineering teams, a science team, and the mission operations team. The mission operations team served as the core of the Desert RATS mission control team and included certified NASA Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) flight controllers, former flight controllers, and astronaut personnel. The backgrounds of the flight controllers were in the areas of Extravehicular Activity (EVA), onboard mechanical systems and maintenance, robotics, timeline planning (OpsPlan), and spacecraft communicator (Capcom). With the simulated EVA operations, mechanized operations (the rover), and expectations of replanning, these flight control disciplines were especially well suited for the execution of the 2009 and 2010 Desert RATS field tests. The inclusion of an operations team has provided the added benefit of giving NASA mission operations flight control personnel the opportunity to begin examining operational mission control techniques, team compositions, and mission scenarios. This also gave the mission operations

  8. Effect of etidronate on bone in orchidectomized and sciatic neurectomized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, J; Takeda, T; Katsumata, T; Tanaka, T; Ichimura, S; Toyama, Y

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether etidronate treatment could prevent bone loss caused by orchidectomy (ORX) and unilateral sciatic neurectomy (NX) in adult male rats. Seventy-four male Wistar rats, aged 10 months, were randomly divided into eight groups: baseline controls (n = 10); age-matched sham-operated controls (AMC; n = 9); ORX (n = 9); NX (n = 10); ORX + NX (n = 9); ORX + etidronate treatment (ORX + E; n = 7); NX + E (n = 10); and ORX + NX + E (n = 10). Etidronate treatment (10 mg/kg per day subcutaneously) was initiated 2 weeks after surgery and was continued for 2 weeks. Four weeks after surgery, bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal and middle tibia (PT and MT, respectively), distal and middle femur (DF and MF, respectively), and fourth lumbar vertebral body (LVB) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (Model DCS-600, Aloka, Tokyo, Japan). The mechanical properties of the MF and third LVB were measured by three-point bending and compression tests, respectively. Levels of urinary deoxypyridinoline (Dpd) and serum osteocalcin (Oc) were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Four weeks of aging had no significant effects on BMD, bone mechanical properties, or bone markers. ORX significantly increased the levels of urinary Dpd and serum Oc, which resulted in significant decreases in BMD of the PT, MT, DF, MF, and fourth LVB, as well as the mechanical strength (maximum load) of the MF and third LVB. NX significantly increased levels of urinary Dpd and decreased levels of serum Oc, resulting in a significant decrease in BMD of the PT, DF, and fourth LVB. The ORX-induced decrease in BMD of the PT was more pronounced when combined with NX. Etidronate treatment for NX, ORX, and ORX + NX rats significantly decreased levels of urinary Dpd and serum Oc, resulting in complete prevention of loss of BMD and/or bone mechanical strength. The present study demonstrates the efficacy of etidronate treatment for prevention

  9. The effect of levosimendan on myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Poyraz, Fatih; Kip, Gülay; Erdem, Özlem; Alkan, Metin; Arslan, Mustafa; Özer, Abdullah; Şivgin, Volkan; Çomu, Faruk Metin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an important cause of myocardial damage by means of oxidative, inflammatory, and apoptotic mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential cardio protective effects of levosimendan in a diabetic rat model of myocardial I/R injury. Methods A total of 18 streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar Albino rats (55 mg/kg) were randomly divided into three equal groups as follows: the diabetic I/R group (DIR) in which myocardial I/R was induced following left thoracotomy, by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 60 min, followed by 2 h of reperfusion; the diabetic I/R levosimendan group (DIRL), which underwent I/R by the same method while taking levosimendan intraperitoneal 12 µg kg−1; and the diabetic control group (DC) which underwent sham operations without tightening of the coronary sutures. As a control group (C), six healthy age-matched Wistar Albino rats underwent sham operations similar to the DC group. Two hours after the operation, the rats were sacrificed and the myocardial tissue samples were examined by light microscopy for evidence of myonecrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Results Myonecrosis findings were significantly different among groups (p=0.008). Myonecrosis was more pronounced in the DIR group compared with the C, DC, and DIRL groups (p=0.001, p=0.007 and p=0.037, respectively). Similarly, the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration showed significant difference among groups (p<0.0001). Compared with C, DC, and DIRL groups, the inflammatory cell infiltration was significantly higher among the DIR group (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, and p=0.020, respectively). Also, myocardial tissue edema was significantly different among groups (p=0.006). The light microscopic myocardial tissue edema levels were significantly higher in the DIR group than the C, DC, and DIRL groups (p=0.001, p=0.037, and p=0.014, respectively). Conclusion Taken together, our data indicate that

  10. Alterations of prefrontal cortical microRNAs in methamphetamine self-administering rats: From controlled drug intake to escalated drug intake.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao-Yue; Cao, Dan-Ni; Chen, Ying; Wang, Lv; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-01-12

    Drug addiction is a process that transits from recreative and regular drug use into compulsive drug use. The two patterns of drug use, controlled drug intake and escalated drug intake, represent different stages in the development of drug addiction; and escalation of drug use is a hallmark of addiction. Accumulating studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in drug addiction. However, the molecular adaptations in escalation of drug use, as well as the difference in the adaptations between escalated and controlled drug use, remain unclear. In the present study, 28 altered miRNAs in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were found in the groups of controlled methamphetamine self-administration (1h/session) and escalated self-administration (6h/session), and some of them were validated. Compared with saline control group, miR-186 was verified to be up-regulated while miR-195 and miR-329 were down-regulated in the rats with controlled methamphetamine use. In the rats with escalated drug use, miR-127, miR-186, miR-222 and miR-24 were verified to be up-regulated while miR-329 was down-regulated compared with controls. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis indicated that the predicted targets of these verified miRNAs involved in the processes of neuronal apoptosis and synaptic plasticity. However, the putative regulated molecules may be different between controlled and escalated drug use groups. Taken together, we detected the altered miRNAs in rat PFC under the conditions of controlled methamphetamine use and escalated use respectively, which may extend our understanding of the molecular adaptations underlying the transition from controlled drug use to addiction. PMID:26592480

  11. The role of vibrissal sensing in forelimb position control during travelling locomotion in the rat (Rattus norvegicus, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Niederschuh, Sandra J; Witte, Hartmut; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-02-01

    In the stem lineage of therians, a comprehensive reorganization of limb and body mechanics took place to provide dynamic stability for rapid locomotion in a highly structured environment. At what was probably the same time, mammals developed an active sense of touch in the form of movable mystacial vibrissae. The rhythmic movements of the limbs and vibrissae are controlled by central pattern-generating networks which might interact with each other in sensorimotor control. To test this possible interaction, we studied covariation between the two by investigating speed-dependent adjustments in temporal and spatial parameters of forelimb and vibrissal kinematics in the rat. Furthermore, the possible role of carpal vibrissae in connecting the two oscillating systems was explored. We compared locomotion on continuous and discontinuous substrates in the presence and absence of the mystacial or/and carpal vibrissae across a speed range of 0.2-0.5m/s and found that a close coupling of the kinematics of the two oscillating systems appears to be precluded by their differential dependence on the animal's speed. Speed-related changes in forelimb kinematics mainly occur in temporal parameters, whereas vibrissae change their spatial excursion. However, whisking frequency is always high enough that at least one whisk cycle falls into the swing phase of the limb, which is the maximum critical period for sensing the substrate on which the forepaw will be placed. The influence of tactile cues on forelimb positional control is more subtle than expected. Tactile cues appear to affect the degree of parameter variation but not average parameters or the failure rate of limbs during walking on a perforated treadmill. The carpal vibrissae appear to play a role in sensing the animal's speed by measuring the duration of the stance phase. The absence of this cue significantly reduces speed-related variation in stride frequency and vibrissal protraction. PMID:25547567

  12. Midbrain control of spinal nociception discriminates between responses evoked by myelinated and unmyelinated heat nociceptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Simon; Lumb, Bridget M

    2006-09-01

    Descending control of spinal nociception is a major determinant of normal and chronic pain. Myelinated (A-fibre) and unmyelinated (C-fibre) nociceptors convey different qualities of the pain signal (first and second pain, respectively), and they play different roles in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states. It is of considerable importance, therefore, to determine whether descending control has differential effects on the central processing of A- vs. C-nociceptive input. In anaesthetised rats, biceps femoris EMG was recorded to monitor the thresholds and encoding properties of responses evoked by fast (7.5 degrees Cs(-1)) or slow (2.5 degrees Cs(-1)) rates of skin heating of the dorsal surface of a hindpaw to preferentially activate myelinated or unmyelinated heat nociceptors, respectively. Activation of neurones in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) by microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (DLH) or bicuculline (BIC) significantly increased response thresholds to slow rates of heating (P<0.001), but not those to fast rates of heating (P>0.05). The ability of the EMG to encode the stimulus intensity of fast rates of skin heating remained intact and unaltered (r2=0.99, P<0.001) following BIC but not DLH injection. In contrast, encoding of the stimulus intensity of slow rates of skin heating was abolished following BIC and DLH injection. The functional significance of differential descending control of the central processing of C- and A-nociceptive inputs is discussed with respect to role of the PAG in mediating antinociception as part of active coping strategies in emergency situations and the role of C- and A-nociceptive inputs in animal models of chronic pain. PMID:16650581

  13. The rostral ventromedial medulla control of cutaneous vasomotion of paws and tail in the rat: implication for pain studies.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Huang, Gan; Mouraux, André; Le Bars, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Thermal neutrality in rodents is achieved by large cyclic variations of the sympathetic drive of the vasomotion of the tail and paws, the most widely used target organs in current acute or chronic animal models of pain. Given the pivotal functional role of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in nociception and rostral medullary raphe (rMR) in thermoregulation, two largely overlapping brain regions, we aimed at circumscribing the brainstem regions that are the source of premotor afferents to sympathetic preganglionic neurons that control the vasomotor tone of the tail and hind paws. A thermometric infrared camera recorded indirectly the vasomotor tone of the tail and hind paws. During the control period, the rat was maintained in vasoconstriction by preserving a stable, homogeneous, and constant surrounding temperature, slightly below the core temperature. The functional blockade of the RVM/rMR by the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (0.5 nmol, 50 nl) elicited an extensive increase of the temperature of the paws and tail, associated with a slight decrease of blood pressure and heart rate. Both the increased heat loss through vasodilatation and the decrease heart-induced heat production elicited a remarkable reduction of the central temperature. The effective zones were circumscribed to the parts of the RVM/rMR facing the facial nucleus. They match very exactly the brain regions often described as specifically devoted to the control of nociception. Our data support and urge on the highest cautiousness regarding the interpretation of results aimed at studying the effects of any pharmacological manipulations of RVM/rMR with the usual tests of pain. PMID:26581872

  14. Physiological and theoretical analysis of K+ currents controlling discharge in neonatal rat mesencephalic trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Del Negro, C A; Chandler, S H

    1997-02-01

    Whole cell voltage- and current-clamp recordings were obtained from mesencephalic trigeminal sensory (Mes 5) neurons identified visually in thin brain stem slices of neonatal rats with the use of infrared video microscopy. These cells exhibited accommodation in spike discharge responses to depolarizing current injection protocols whose duration differed as a function of holding potential (-50 vs. -65 mV). Several spikes were elicited before the membrane response accommodated from -50 mV, whereas from -65 mV only single action potentials were evoked. In response to similar protocols, application of the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (50 microM to 2 mM) caused sustained repetitive spiking whereas tetraethylammonium (TEA) (10-30 mM) did not cause repetitive spiking. In voltage clamp, 4-AP application (100 microM) revealed a sustained outward current (I4-AP) that was active between -60 and -30 mV. I4-AP was responsible for suppressing sustained repetitive spiking behavior, producing accommodation under normal circumstances. TEA application in voltage clamp revealed a sustained outward current evoked positive to -40 mV. Two transient outward currents (TOCs) were identified by prepulse protocols typically used to characterize A-type currents: a 4-AP-insensitive fast TOC, and a slow TOC (ITOC-S) sensitive to 4-AP (> 500 microM). A Ca(2+)-dependent outward current that activated positive to -30 mV was also characterized. A mathematical model of a Mes 5 neuron was assembled from our voltage-clamp records to simulate the dynamic interaction of outward currents during membrane excitation. We conclude that in Mes 5 neurons, the 4-AP-sensitive currents ITOC-S and I4-AP determine the duration of spike trains. In particular, the noninactivating I4-AP determines whether cells exhibit sustained repetitive discharge or accommodate in response to depolarizing current. Neurotransmitter modulation of this current or modulation of the resting membrane potential could modify

  15. Effects of testicular transfixation on seminiferous tubule morphology and sperm parameters of prepubertal, pubertal, and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carina T; De Souza, Diogo B; Costa, Waldemar S; Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2015-10-15

    Orchiopexy is performed as part of cryptorchidism and testicular torsion treatment. The inflammation caused by the needle and suture penetration has been suggested to be one of the possible causes of subfertility after parenchymal transfixation of the testicles. The purpose of the present study was to investigate testicular alterations after parenchymal transfixation sutures at different ages in rats. Prepubertal, pubertal, and adult rats were submitted to parenchymal suturing (without tying the knots, thus avoiding local ischemic injury) of the right testicle, which was maintained for 4 hours. All animals were subjected to euthanasia on completion of 14 weeks of life. The right testicles were studied as the sutured testicles, whereas the left organs were studied as contralateral. One age-matched control group of rats that was not submitted to any procedure was used for comparison. During euthanasia, sperm were collected from the tail of the epididymal and evaluated for concentration, motility, and viability. Samples from testicular tissue were collected for morphologic analysis. Sperm analysis indicated that only the adult operated animals presented reductions in motility (38.2% of adult vs. 54.1% of control; P = 0.02) and viability (16.6% of adult vs. 24.6% of control; P = 0.003). Several morphologic alterations were noted both in sutured and in contralateral testes at all ages. For instance, the seminiferous epithelium volumetric density of right testicles was reduced from 50.4% in controls to 32.3% in prepubertal operated animals, 45.3% in pubertal operated animals, and 39.4% in adult operated animals (P < 0.05). The seminiferous epithelium volumetric density was also reduced to 39.9% and 39.0% in contralateral testicles of animals operated before and after puberty, respectively (P < 0.05). The animals operated on before puberty and in adulthood showed more testicular morphologic alterations, as seminiferous tubule volumetric density, seminiferous tubule length

  16. Evaluation for roles of neurosteroids in modulating forebrain mechanisms controlling vasopressin secretion and related phenomena in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi

    2015-06-01

    Anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) that regulates autonomic functions through a GABAergic mechanism possesses neuroactive steroid (NS)-synthesizing ability. Although NS can exert effects by acting on a certain type of GABAA-receptor (R), it is not clear whether NS may operate to modulate AV3V GABAergic activity for controlling autonomic functions. This study aimed to investigate the issue. AV3V infusion with a GABAA antagonist bicuculline increased plasma vasopressin (AVP), glucose, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate in rats. These events were abolished by preinjecting its agonist muscimol, whereas the infusion with allopregnanolone, a NS capable of potentiating GABAA-R function, affected none of the variables in the absence or presence of such bicuculline actions. Similarly, AV3V infusion with pregnanolone sulfate, a NS capable of antagonizing GABAA-R, produced no effect on those variables. AV3V infusion with muscimol was effective in inhibiting the responses of plasma AVP or glucose, or BP to an osmotic loading or bleeding. However, AV3V infusion with aminoglutethimide, a NS synthesis inhibitor, did not affect any of the variables in the absence or presence of those stimuli. These results suggest that NS may not cause acute effects on the AV3V GABAergic mechanism involved in regulating AVP release and other autonomic function. PMID:25598212

  17. Prenatal diazepam exposure alters respiratory control system and GABAA and adenosine receptor gene expression in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Picard, Nathalie; Guénin, Stéphanie; Perrin, Yolande; Hilaire, Gérard; Larnicol, Nicole

    2008-07-01

    In experimental animals, prenatal diazepam exposure has clearly been associated with behavioral disturbances. Its impact on newborn breathing has not been documented despite potential deleterious consequences for later brain development. We addressed this issue in neonatal rats (0-2 d) born from dams, which consumed 2 mg/kg/d diazepam via drinking fluid throughout gestation. In vivo, prenatal diazepam exposure significantly altered the normoxic-breathing pattern, lowering breathing frequency (105 vs. 125 breaths/min) and increasing tidal volume (16.2 vs. 12.7 mL/kg), and the ventilatory response to hypoxia, inducing an immediate and marked decrease in tidal volume (-30%) absent in controls. In vitro, prenatal diazepam exposure significantly increased the respiratory-like frequency produced by pontomedullary and medullary preparations (+38% and +19%, respectively) and altered the respiratory-like response to application of nonoxygenated superfusate. Both in vivo and in vitro, the recovery from oxygen deprivation challenges was delayed by prenatal diazepam exposure. Finally, real-time PCR showed that prenatal diazepam exposure affected mRNA levels of alpha1 and alpha2 GABAA receptor subunits and of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in the brainstem. These mRNA changes, which are region-specific, suggest that prenatal diazepam exposure interferes with developmental events whose impact on the respiratory system maturation deserves further studies. PMID:18360306

  18. Compensation of rodent pests after removal: control of two rat species in an irrigated farming system in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter R.; Tuan, Nguyen Phu

    2005-11-01

    Rodent pests have a strong capacity to recover rapidly from imposed reductions in abundance, but it is unclear how populations compensate to removal when farmers apply rodent control. The response of two rat species to rodent control was monitored using regular live-trapping in an irrigated lowland mixed rice agroecosystem. Rice field rats, Rattus argentiventer (52% of rodent captures), and lesser rice field rats, Rattus losea (29%), were removed using trap-barrier systems (TBS) at two sites while rice crops were present. The TBS was a plastic fence that enclosed a small field planted 3 weeks prior to the surrounding fields and set with multiple-capture cage-traps to capture rats that were attracted to the early-planted crop. Demographic responses of rats were compared to two untreated sites. There was a reduction in abundance of rodents on treated sites relative to untreated sites during the summer rice crop (by 45% and 28% for R. argentiventer and R. losea, respectively) an increase in abundance during the winter season (31% and 69%), and a mixed response during the spring rice crop (39% decrease and 41% increase). There was an increase in the proportion of juveniles captured on treated sites relative to untreated sites post-treatment (148% and 158%) and the body mass was lower on treated sites post-treatment (males: 13% and 41%; females: 22% and 22%). Older, larger animals were removed by the TBS and the rodent populations were compensating through high recruitment of young and high immigration into treated sites. No clear patterns were observed in the occurrence of adult breeding females for either R. argentiventer or R. losea. Rodent management, should therefore, occur over large areas (> 100 ha) to reduce the chance of reinvasion.

  19. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular fluid output (assessed by lithium clearance) and excretion rates. The present study examined the reason for these increases. The first series of experiments showed that one cause is volume overloading. This can occur if the servo system is activated from the start, i.e., during the establishment of a suitably high urine flow rate by constant infusion of hypotonic glucose solution. The second series of experiments showed that replacement of blood samples with donor blood can also lead to increases in fractional lithium excretion and accompanying increases in water and sodium excretion, a problem not seen when blood samples are replaced with the animal's own red blood cells resuspended in isotonic saline. When these pitfalls are avoided, servo-controlled sodium and fluid replacement is a reliable technique that makes it possible to study the effects of natriuretic and/or diuretic stimuli without interference from unwanted changes in extracellular volume. PMID:17693706

  20. Schwann cells generated from neonatal skin-derived precursors or neonatal peripheral nerve improve functional recovery after acute transplantation into the partially injured cervical spinal cord of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Joseph S; Bretzner, Frederic; Biernaskie, Jeff; Assinck, Peggy; Jiang, Yuan; Arisato, Hiroki; Plunet, Ward T; Borisoff, Jaimie; Liu, Jie; Miller, Freda D; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2015-04-29

    The transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs) holds considerable promise as a therapy for spinal cord injury, but the optimal source of these cells and the best timing for intervention remains debatable. Previously, we demonstrated that delayed transplantation of SCs generated from neonatal mouse skin-derived precursors (SKP-SCs) promoted repair and functional recovery in rats with thoracic contusions. Here, we conducted two experiments using neonatal rat cells and an incomplete cervical injury model to examine the efficacy of acute SKP-SC transplantation versus media control (Experiment 1) and versus nerve-derived SC or dermal fibroblast (Fibro) transplantation (Experiment 2). Despite limited graft survival, by 10 weeks after injury, rats that received SCs from either source showed improved functional recovery compared with media- or fibroblast-treated animals. Compared with media treatment, SKP-SC-transplanted rats showed enhanced rubrospinal tract (RST) sparing/plasticity in the gray matter (GM) rostral to injury, particularly in the absence of immunosuppression. The functional benefits of SC transplantations over fibroblast treatment correlated with the enhanced preservation of host tissue, reduced RST atrophy, and/or increased RST sparing/plasticity in the GM. In summary, our results indicate that: (1) early transplantation of neonatal SCs generated from skin or nerve promotes repair and functional recovery after incomplete cervical crush injury; (2) either of these cell types is preferable to Fibros for these purposes; and (3) age-matched SCs from these two sources do not differ in terms of their reparative effects or functional efficacy after transplantation into the injured cervical spinal cord. PMID:25926450

  1. Children with ADHD Show No Deficits in Plantar Foot Sensitivity and Static Balance Compared to Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, Gunther; Neubert, Tom; Worenz, Andreas; Milani, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate plantar foot sensitivity and balance control of ADHD (n = 21) impaired children compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Thresholds were measured at 200 Hz at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot area of both feet (hallux, first metatarsal head (METI) and heel). Body balance was…

  2. Sex differences in myelin-associated protein levels within and density of projections between the orbital frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of adult rats: implications for inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D W; Daniel, J M

    2015-08-01

    Impulsive actions and decisions often lead to undesirable outcomes. Lesion and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and dorsal striatum (dSTR) play key roles in inhibitory control. It has been proposed that greater OFC input into the dSTR reflects enhanced top-down cognitive control and less impulsive responding. We previously reported a sex difference in inhibitory control, such that female rats make fewer impulsive errors than do male rats. The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in the OFC and dSTR of young adult male and female rats. In Experiment 1, we measured levels of two myelin-associated proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), in the OFC and dSTR. Western blot data revealed that females had significantly higher levels of both MBP and PLP in the OFC but similar levels in the dSTR as compared to males. In Experiment 2, we infused the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), into the OFC and measured the density of BDA in the dSTR. BDA was visualized using histochemistry followed by light microscopy imaging and densitometry analysis. Density of BDA in the dSTR was significantly greater in females as compared to males indicating that the projections from the OFC to dSTR may be greater in females as compared to males. Our results suggest a potential neuroanatomical sex difference that may contribute to the reported differences in inhibitory control levels of male and female rats. PMID:26002313

  3. Effects of vitamin C and melatonin on cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer in a cholestatic rat model: A controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Rezvanjoo, Babak; Rashidi, Samira; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Beheshtiha, Seyed Hamed Shirazi; Samini, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    Background: Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is one of the defense mechanisms against free radicals. Cysteamine is a cytotoxic agent, acting through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide, and may decrease defense activity of SOD against ROS and induce duodenal ulcer. Melatonin is a suicidal antioxidant that has a protective effect against ROS and cytoprotective effect through inhibition of the decrease in SOD activity. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to assess the effects of pretreatment with vitamin C and melatonin on cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer. Secondary aims were to compare the ulcerogenic effect of cysteamine and the antiulcer effects of vitamin C and melatonin. Methods: This study was performed in male Wistar rats (200–250 g) in 3 groups of equal size (n = 24): bile duct ligation-induced cholestasis (test), sham, and control groups. In the test and sham groups, laparotomy was performed under general anesthesia and the common bile duct was identified; in sham rats, the common bile duct was left in situ, but in test rats, the common bile duct was isolated and doubly ligated to induce cholestasis. Animals in each group were also divided into 4 equal subgroups (n = 6). These subgroups were treated with vitamin C plus cysteamine, melatonin plus cysteamine, cysteamine alone, and saline, respectively. All animals were euthanized via overdose of ether anesthesia 24 hours after the last injection of cysteamine or saline, and 0.5 mL of blood was collected from the heart ventricle. The duodenum was cut open, washed with saline, fixed, and prepared for calculation of ulcer index (Szabo method) and histopathologic assessment. SOD activity was measured using a branded enzyme kit. Results: In all 3 groups, animals treated with cysteamine had significantly increased mean (SE) ulcer index (test, 4.00 [0.10] vs 1.17 [0.30]; sham, 3.83 [0.16] vs 0.50 [0.22]; control, 3.67 [0.21] vs 0 [0]) and

  4. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  5. Acute inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels impairs skeletal muscle vascular control in rats during treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Steven W.; Ferguson, Scott K.; Sims, Gabrielle E.; Poole, David C.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel is part of a class of inward rectifier K+ channels that can link local O2 availability to vasomotor tone across exercise-induced metabolic transients. The present investigation tested the hypothesis that if KATP channels are crucial to exercise hyperemia, then inhibition via glibenclamide (GLI) would lower hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance during treadmill exercise. In 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure, blood lactate concentration, and hindlimb muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest (n = 6) and during exercise (n = 6–8, 20, 40, and 60 m/min, 5% incline, i.e., ∼60–100% maximal O2 uptake) under control and GLI conditions (5 mg/kg intra-arterial). At rest and during exercise, mean arterial pressure was higher (rest: 17 ± 3%, 20 m/min: 5 ± 1%, 40 m/min: 5 ± 2%, and 60 m/min: 5 ± 1%, P < 0.05) with GLI. Hindlimb muscle BF (20 m/min: 16 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 30 ± 9%, and 60 m/min: 20 ± 8%) and vascular conductance (20 m/min: 20 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 33 ± 8%, and 60 m/min: 24 ± 8%) were lower with GLI during exercise at 20, 40, and 60 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all) but not at rest. Within locomotory muscles, there was a greater fractional reduction present in muscles comprised predominantly of type I and type IIa fibers at all exercise speeds (P < 0.05). Additionally, blood lactate concentration was 106 ± 29% and 44 ± 15% higher during exercise with GLI at 20 and 40 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05). That KATP channel inhibition reduces hindlimb muscle BF during exercise in rats supports the obligatory contribution of KATP channels in large muscle mass exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:25820394

  6. Evidence for a trigeminal mesencephalic-hypoglossal nuclei loop involved in controlling vibrissae movements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Saccone, Salvatore; Stanzani, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies performed in rats showed that the whisker-pad motor innervation involves not only the facial nerve, but also some hypoglossal neurons whose axons travel within the trigeminal infraorbital nerve (ION) and target the extrinsic muscles surrounding the whisker-pad macrovibrissae. Furthermore, the electrical stimulation of the ION induced an increase in the EMG activity of these muscles, while the hypoglossal nucleus stimulation elicited evoked potentials and single motor unit responses. However, the existence of a neural network able to involve the XIIth nucleus in macrovibrissae whisking control was totally unknown until now. Since other recent experiments demonstrated that: (1) the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) neurons respond to both spontaneous and artificial movements of macrovibrissae, and (2) the Me5 peripheral terminals provide a monosynaptic sensory innervation to the macrovibrissae, the present study was aimed at analyzing a possible role of the Me5 nucleus as a relay station in the sensory-motor loop that involves the XIIth nucleus neurons in rhythmic whisking control. Two tracers were used in the same animal: Fluoro Gold, which was injected into the whisker pad to retrogradely label the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons, and Dil, which was instead injected into the Me5 to label its projections to these hypoglossal neurons. Results demonstrated that terminals of the Me5 neurons monosynaptically target the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons. The functional role of this sensory-motor connection is discussed, with particular regard to a hypothesized proprioceptive reflex in whisker-pad extrinsic muscles that can be elicited by the activation of the Me5 macrovibrissae receptors. PMID:26645304

  7. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone After its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-(Prostaglandin E2) induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+16%, +25% and +34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  8. Loss of Prostaglandin E2-induced Extra Cortical Bone after its Withdrawal in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the fate of PGE2-induced new cortical bone mass after withdrawal of PGE2 administration. Seven-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections of 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60 days and then withdrawn for 60 and 120 days (on/off treatment). Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent-labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). In a previous report we showed that after 60, 120 and 180 days of daily PGE2 (on)treatment, a new steady state was achieved marked by increased total bone area (+ 16%, +25% and + 34% with 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day) when compared to age-matched controls. The continuous PGE2 treatment stimulated periosteal and endocortical lamellar bone formation, activated endocortical woven trabecular bone formation and intracortical bone resorption. These responses increased cortical bone mass since the bone formation exceeded bone resorption. The current study showed that after withdrawal of PGE2 for 60 and 120 days, the extra endocortical bone, which was induced by the first 60-days treatment, was resorbed, but the new subperiosteal bone persisted resulting in a tibial shaft with larger cross sectional and marrow areas. Despite that, there was still the same amount of bone mass in these shafts as in age-related controls. A new steady state was achieved after 60 days of withdrawal, in which the bone mass and bone formation activity approximated that of age-related controls. It was concluded that maintaining the extra PGE2-induced cortical bone mass depends on continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  9. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements. PMID:25105541

  10. Urantide improves atherosclerosis by controlling C-reactive protein, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, JUAN; XIE, LI-DE; SONG, CHENG-JUN; MAO, XIAO-XIA; YU, HAI-RONG; YU, QUAN-XIN; REN, LI-QUN; SHI, YAN; XIE, YA-QIN; LI, YING; LIU, SHA-SHA; YANG, XIAO-HONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of urantide on the expression status of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the inflammatory cytokines monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in the aortas of rats with atherosclerosis (AS), and to identify its underlying mechanisms. The effects of urantide in a rat model of AS and in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were analyzed via hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining and ELISA. The results in vivo demonstrated that urantide downregulated the expression of inflammatory mediators CRP and MCP-1 and upregulated the expression of TGF-β. The results in vitro indicated that urantide inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs. In addition, urantide reduced the expression of CRP and downregulated the secretion of TGF-β in the culture supernatant. In conclusion, urantide ameliorated the arterial inflammatory damage that was observed in the AS rat model at the cell and tissue levels by controlling the expression of CRP and the inflammatory cytokines MCP-1 and TGF-β. Therefore, urantide may be a potential agent for the complementary treatment of AS. PMID:24926360

  11. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded glomeruli suggests depletion of glomerular filtration barrier proteins in two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Finne, Kenneth; Vethe, Heidrun; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Dahl, Tone D.; Tenstad, Olav; Berven, Frode S.; Reed, Rolf K.; Vikse, Bjørn Egil

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that hypertension may cause glomerular damage, but the molecular mechanisms involved are still incompletely understood. Methods In the present study, we used formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue to investigate changes in the glomerular proteome in the non-clipped kidney of two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats, with special emphasis on the glomerular filtration barrier. 2K1C hypertension was induced in 6-week-old Wistar Hannover rats (n = 6) that were sacrificed 23 weeks later and compared with age-matched sham-operated controls (n = 6). Tissue was stored in FFPE tissue blocks and later prepared on tissue slides for laser microdissection. Glomeruli without severe morphological damage were isolated, and the proteomes were analysed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results 2K1C glomeruli showed reduced abundance of proteins important for slit diaphragm complex, such as nephrin, podocin and neph1. The podocyte foot process had a pattern of reduced abundance of transmembrane proteins but unchanged abundances of the podocyte cytoskeletal proteins synaptopodin and α-actinin-4. Lower abundance of important glomerular basement membrane proteins was seen. Possible glomerular markers of damage with increased abundance in 2K1C were transgelin, desmin and acyl-coenzyme A thioesterase 1. Conclusions Microdissection and tandem mass spectrometry could be used to investigate the proteome of isolated glomeruli from FFPE tissue. Glomerular filtration barrier proteins had reduced abundance in the non-clipped kidney of 2K1C hypertensive rats. PMID:25129444

  12. Early depolarizing GABA controls critical period plasticity in the rat visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Deidda, Gabriele; Allegra, Manuela; Cerri, Chiara; Naskar, Shovan; Bony, Guillaume; Zunino, Giulia; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Cancedda, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hyperpolarizing and inhibitory GABA regulates “critical periods” for plasticity in sensory cortices. Here, we examine the role of early, depolarizing GABA in controlling plasticity mechanisms. We report that brief interference with depolarizing GABA during early development prolonged critical period plasticity in visual cortical circuits, without affecting overall development of the visual system. The effects on plasticity were accompanied by dampened inhibitory neurotransmission, down-regulation of BDNF expression, and reduced density of extracellular matrix-perineuronal nets. Early interference with depolarizing GABA decreased perinatal BDNF signaling, and pharmacological increase of BDNF signaling during GABA interference rescued the effects on plasticity and its regulators later in life. We conclude that depolarizing GABA exerts a long-lasting, selective modulation of plasticity of cortical circuits by a strong crosstalk with BDNF. PMID:25485756

  13. Control of action potential propagation by intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, C; Lipp, P; Lüscher, H R; Niggli, E

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of intracellular Ca2+ in action potential (AP) propagation, whole-cell recordings of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells were carried out while Ca2+ was simultaneously measured with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 2. Flash photolytic liberation of a Ca2+ buffer during trains of APs which partly failed to invade the DRG cell body immediately lowered intracellular Ca2+ and restored safe AP propagation. Furthermore, the speed of the propagated AP was reduced considerably when intracellular Ca2+ was increased by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+. 3. Both results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ regulates the safety factor for AP propagation and may thus provide a control mechanism for synaptic integration, which acts pre- as well as postsynaptically. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8821131

  14. Excitatory orexinergic innervation of rat nucleus incertus--Implications for ascending arousal, motivation and feeding control.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Anna; Siwiec, Marcin; Grabowiecka, Agnieszka; Blasiak, Tomasz; Czerw, Anna; Blasiak, Ewa; Kania, Alan; Rajfur, Zenon; Lewandowski, Marian H; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    Orexin/hypocretin peptides play a central role in the integrated control of feeding/reward and behavioural activation, principally via interactions with other neural systems. A brainstem area involved in behavioural activation is the nucleus incertus (NI), located in the posterior ventromedial central grey. Several studies have implicated NI in control of arousal/stress and reward/feeding responses. Orexin receptor mRNA expression identifies NI as a putative target of orexin modulation. Therefore, in this study we performed neural tract-tracing and immunofluorescence staining to characterise the orexinergic innervation of NI. Our results indicate a convergent innervation of the NI area by different orexin neuron populations, with an abundance of orexin-A-containing axons making putative synaptic contacts with relaxin-3-positive NI neurons. The influence of orexin-A on NI neuron activity was investigated using patch-clamp recordings. Orexin-A depolarised the majority (64%) of recorded neurons and this effect was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin and glutamate and GABA receptor antagonists, indicating a likely postsynaptic action. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that in 'type I' NI neurons comprising relaxin-3-positive cells, orexin-A acted via L-type calcium channels, whereas in 'type II' relaxin-3-negative neurons, activation of a sodium/calcium exchanger was involved. A majority of the orexin-A sensitive neurons tested for the presence of orexin receptor mRNA, were OX2 mRNA-positive. Immunohistochemical staining for putative orexin receptors on NI neurons, confirmed stronger expression of OX2 than OX1 receptors. Our data demonstrate a strong influence of orexin-A on NI neurons, consistent with an important role for this hypothalamic/tegmental circuit in the regulation of arousal/vigilance and motivated behaviours. PMID:26265304