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Sample records for age-matched controls performed

  1. Age-Matched, Case-Controlled Comparison of Clinical Indicators for Development of Entropion and Ectropion

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Kevin S.; Czyz, Craig N.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.; Burns, John A.; Everman, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the clinical findings associated with involutional entropion and ectropion and compare them to each other and to age-matched controls. Methods. Prospective, age-matched cohort study involving 30 lids with involutional entropion, 30 lids with involutional ectropion, and 52 age-matched control lids. Results. The statistically significant differences associated with both the entropion and ectropion groups compared to the control group were presence of a retractor dehiscence, presence of a “white line,” occurrence of orbital fat prolapse in the cul-de-sac, decreased lower lid excursion, increased lid laxity by the snapback test, and an increased lower lid distraction. Entropion also differed from the control group with an increased lid crease height and decreased lateral canthal excursion. Statistically significant differences associated with entropion compared to ectropion were presence of a retractor dehiscence, decreased lateral canthal excursion, and less laxity in the snapback test. Conclusion. Entropic and ectropic lids demonstrate clinically and statistically significant anatomical and functional differences from normal, age-matched lids. Many clinical findings associated with entropion are also present in ectropion. Entropion is more likely to develop with a pronounced retractor deficiency. Ectropion is more likely to develop with diminished elasticity as measured by the snapback test. PMID:24734167

  2. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  3. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  4. Preserved Learning during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test in Patients with Schizophrenia, Age-Matched Controls, and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Claudia; De Picker, Livia J.; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Morrens, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit–symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol–digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning, and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition, the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (N = 30) were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N = 30) and healthy elderly volunteers (N = 30) during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test (SDST). The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time) and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time). The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7). Symbol–digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning. Results: The repetition of the same symbol–digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing. Conclusion: The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed was found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, a large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the

  5. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  6. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  7. Oral contraceptive use among female elite athletes and age-matched controls and its relation to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Brynhildsen, J; Lennartsson, H; Klemetz, M; Dahlquist, P; Hedin, B; Hammar, M

    1997-10-01

    Exogenous and endogenous female sex steroids may influence the risk of low back pain. The fact that back pain is a very common symptom during pregnancy supports this theory. Back pain is also more common among female than male athletes. Oral contraceptives have been suggested to increase the risk of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the prevalence of low back pain is higher among oral contraceptive users than non-users and if it differs between women taking part in different sports. A questionnaire was sent to female elite athletes in volleyball (n = 205), basketball (n = 150), and soccer (n = 361) as well as to age-matched controls (n = 113). The questionnaire comprised questions about age, constitution, occupation, parity, and use of contraceptive method as well as previous and current back pain and possible consequences of the back problems. The response rate was 85%. Between 42% and 52% of the women in the different groups used oral contraceptives. The groups were similar in most background variables, except that the volleyball and basketball players were taller. The prevalence of current low back pain was between 21% and 34% in the different athlete groups, with an average of 30%, whereas only 18% of the controls suffered from low back pain (p 0.01). The prevalence of low back pain within each group--athletes as well as controls--was similar in women who used and did not use oral contraceptives. This study does not support the theory that low back pain is affected by the use of oral contraceptives. Instead, constitutional factors and mechanical stress during intense physical activity are probably more important.

  8. Sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma: a comparison with age-matched controls and correlation with disease variables.

    PubMed

    Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sivasomboon, Chate; Wichainun, Ramjai; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2006-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of ocular and oral sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and scleroderma (Scl). The ocular symptoms and sign (the Schirmer's 1 test) and the oral sicca symptoms and sign (the Saxon's test) in each of 50 RA, SLE and Scl patients were compared with their age-matched controls. The correlation between the presence of sicca symptoms and signs with their clinical activity was also determined. Ocular sicca symptoms were found more common in patients with RA (38% vs 18%, p < 0.05), SLE (36% vs 14%, p < 0.05) and Scl (54% vs 16%, p < 0.01), and oral sicca symptoms were found more common in SLE (22% vs 0%, p < 0.01), and Scl (16% vs 4%, p < 0.05) than their controls. However, only RA patients had a significantly higher proportion of positive Schimer-1 test compared with their controls (p < 0.01). There was no strong correlation between sicca symptoms or signs and other clinical or laboratory variables (age, disease duration, disease activity, disease severity, and antibody to Ro and La antigens) in these three groups. In conclusion, sicca symptoms were seen significantly more common in Thai patients with connective tissue diseases, but the symptoms did not show a good correlation with the clinical and laboratory variables.

  9. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  10. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  11. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys.

  12. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control.

    PubMed

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference "creatinine independent" GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  13. Functional Aspects of Gait in Essential Tremor: A Comparison with Age-Matched Parkinson’s Disease Cases, Dystonia Cases, and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Rao, Ashwini K.

    2015-01-01

    Background An understanding of the functional aspects of gait and balance has wide ramifications. Individuals with balance disorders often restrict physical activity, travel, and social commitments to avoid falling, and loss of balance confidence, itself, is a source of disability. We studied the functional aspects of gait in patients with essential tremor (ET), placing their findings within the context of two other neurological disorders (Parkinson’s disease [PD] and dystonia) and comparing them with age-matched controls. Methods We administered the six-item Activities of Balance Confidence (ABC-6) Scale and collected data on number of falls and near-falls, and use of walking aids in 422 participants (126 ET, 77 PD, 46 dystonia, 173 controls). Results Balance confidence was lowest in PD, intermediate in ET, and relatively preserved in dystonia compared with controls. This ordering reoccurred for each of the six ABC-6 items. The number of near-falls and falls followed a similar ordering. Use of canes, walkers, and wheelchairs was elevated in ET and even greater in PD. Several measures of balance confidence (ABC-6 items 1, 4, 5, and 6) were lower in torticollis cases than in those with blepharospasm, although the two groups did not differ with respect to falls or use of walking aids. Discussion Lower balance confidence, increased falls, and greater need for walking aids are variably features of a range of movement disorder patients compared to age-matched controls. While most marked among PD patients, these issues affected ET patients as well and, to a small degree, some patients with dystonia. PMID:26056611

  14. Semiquantitative proteomic analysis of human hippocampal tissues from Alzheimer’s disease and age-matched control brains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia affecting people over 65 years of age. The hallmarks of AD are the extracellular deposits known as amyloid β plaques and the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, both of which are the principal players involved in synaptic loss and neuronal cell death. Tau protein and Aβ fragment 1–42 have been investigated so far in cerebrospinal fluid as a potential AD biomarkers. However, an urgent need to identify novel biomarkers which will capture disease in the early stages and with better specificity remains. High-throughput proteomic and pathway analysis of hippocampal tissue provides a valuable source of disease-related proteins and biomarker candidates, since it represents one of the earliest affected brain regions in AD. Results In this study 2954 proteins were identified (with at least 2 peptides for 1203 proteins) from both control and AD brain tissues. Overall, 204 proteins were exclusively detected in AD and 600 proteins in control samples. Comparing AD and control exclusive proteins with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) literature-based proteome, 40 out of 204 AD related proteins and 106 out of 600 control related proteins were also present in CSF. As most of these proteins were extracellular/secretory origin, we consider them as a potential source of candidate biomarkers that need to be further studied and verified in CSF samples. Conclusions Our semiquantitative proteomic analysis provides one of the largest human hippocampal proteome databases. The lists of AD and control related proteins represent a panel of proteins potentially involved in AD pathogenesis and could also serve as prospective AD diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:23635041

  15. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as "the ball is above the cup", where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6-11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as "the cup is above the drum" or "the bird is below the hat". Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children's scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of improvement, even

  16. Immunity in young adult survivors of childhood leukemia is similar to the elderly rather than age-matched controls: Role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Azanan, Mohamad Shafiq; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; Chua, Ling Ling; Lum, Su Han; Abdul Ghafar, Sayyidatul Syahirah; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul; Lewin, Sharon R; Woo, Yin Ling; Ariffin, Hany; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Many treatment complications that occur late in childhood cancer survivors resemble age-related comorbidities observed in the elderly. An immune phenotype characterized by increased immune activation, systemic inflammation, and accumulation of late-differentiated memory CD57(+) CD28(-) T cells has been associated with comorbidities in the elderly. Here, we explored if this phenotype was present in young adult leukemia survivors following an average of 19 years from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy completion, and compared this with that in age-matched controls. We found that markers of systemic inflammation-IL-6 and human C-reactive protein and immune activation-CD38 and HLA-DR on T cells, soluble CD (sCD)163 from monocytes and macrophages-were increased in survivors compared to controls. T-cell responses specific to cytomegalovirus (CMV) were also increased in survivors compared to controls while CMV IgG levels in survivors were comparable to levels measured in the elderly (>50years) and correlated with IL-6, human C-reactive protein, sCD163, and CD57(+) CD28(-) memory T cells. Immune activation and inflammation markers correlated poorly with prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy exposure. These data suggest that CMV infection/reactivation is strongly correlated with the immunological phenotype seen in young childhood leukemia survivors and these changes may be associated with the early onset of age-related comorbidities in this group. PMID:27129782

  17. Comparison of younger and older breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls on specific and overall QoL domains

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Daggy, Joanne; Smith, Lisa; Cohee, Andrea; Ziner, Kim W.; Haase, Joan E.; Miller, Kathy; Pradhan, Kamnesh; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Cella, David; Ansari, Bilal; Sledge, George W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Younger survivors (YS) of breast cancer often report more survivorship symptoms such as fatigue, depression, sexual difficulty, and cognitive problems than older survivors (OS). We sought to determine the effect of breast cancer and age at diagnosis on Quality of Life (QoL) by comparing 3 groups: 1) YS diagnosed at age 45 or before, 2) OS diagnosed between 55 and 70, and, 3) for the YS, age-matched controls (AC) of women not diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods Using a large Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) data base, we recruited 505 YS who were ages 45 or younger when diagnosed and 622 OS diagnosed at 55 to 70. YS, OS, and AC were compared on physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and overall QoL variables. Results Compared to both AC and to OS, YS reported more depressive symptoms (p=.005) and fatigue (p<.001), poorer self-reported attention function (p<.001), and poorer sexual function (p<.001) than either comparison group. However, YS also reported a greater sense of personal growth (p<.001) and perceived less social constraint (p<.001) from their partner than AC. Conclusions YS reported worse functioning than AC relative to depression, fatigue, attention, sexual function, and spirituality. Perhaps even more important, YS fared worse than both AC and OS on body image, anxiety, sleep, marital satisfaction, and fear of recurrence, indicating that YS are at greater risk for long term QoL problems than survivors diagnosed at a later age. PMID:24891116

  18. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  19. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  20. Intensively-Managed Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Consume High-Fat, Low-Fiber Diets Similar to Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Volkening, Lisa K.; Quinn, Nicolle; Laffel, Lori M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant emphasis on nutrition, older children with diabetes demonstrate poor dietary quality. We tested the hypothesis that dietary quality in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) would be better than age-matched children in the US population. Dietary data from children with T1D (n=67), ages 2–12 years, attending a pediatric diabetes clinic were compared to a nationally representative, age-matched sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, n=1691). Multiple 24-hour dietary recalls were used. Recommended intakes were based on national guidelines, and dietary quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). More children with T1D were overweight or obese compared to children participating in NHANES (42% vs. 30%, p=0.04). Greater proportions of children with T1D met daily recommendations for vegetables (22% vs. 13%, p=0.03), whole grains (12% vs. 5%, p=0.005), and dairy (55% vs. 36%, p=0.001) compared to NHANES children while similar proportions met daily fruit recommendations (40% vs. 33%, p=0.2). Less than one-third of all children limited total fat to recommended levels; children with T1D consumed more saturated fat than NHANES children (14% vs. 12% total energy intake, p=0.0009). Fiber intakes were very low in both groups. Compared to NHANES children, children with T1D had higher HEI-2005 scores (59.6 vs. 49.7, p=0.0006) primarily due to lower intakes of added sugars. The nutritional intake of young children with T1D remains suboptimal in the contemporary era of diabetes management. Despite focused nutrition management, young children with T1D consume high-fat, low-fiber diets comparable to youth in the general population. PMID:24916556

  1. Assessment of the cardiac autonomic neuropathy among the known diabetics and age-matched controls using noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests in a South-Indian population: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sukla, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Rao, Nambaru Lakshmana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a rural area of South India, among the known diabetics after comparing them with the age-matched healthy controls, utilizing noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was conducted for 4 months (October 2014 to January 2015) at an Urban Health and Training Center (UHTC) of a Medical College located in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu. The study was conducted among 126 diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients and in 152 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to ensure comparability between the cases and controls and, thus, reduce variability due to demographic variables. All the study subjects (cases and controls) were selected from the patients attending UHTC during the study duration, provided they satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study participants were subjected to undergo noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. The associations were tested using paired t-test for the continuous (mean ± standard deviation) variables. Results: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2% (67/126). On further classification, positive (abnormal) results were obtained in 56 (sympathetic – 44.4%) and 51 (parasympathetic – 40.5%) diabetic cases. Overall, heart rate variation during deep breathing was found to be the most sensitive test to detect parasympathetic autonomic neuropathy while the diastolic blood pressure response to sustained handgrip exercise was the most sensitive method to detect sympathetic neuropathy dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2%. Even though cardiac autonomic neuropathy can be detected by various invasive tests, noninvasive tests remain a key tool to detect

  2. Processing Words Varying in Personal Familiarity (Based on Reading and Spelling) by Poor Readers and Age-Matched and Reading-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Evelyne; Willows, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate whether performance differences between good and poor readers relate to reading-specific cognitive factors that result from engaging in reading activities and other experiential factors, the authors gave students in Grades 4 and 6 a perceptual identification test of words not only drawn from their personal lexicon but also varying in…

  3. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain.

  4. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  5. Seventy-year-old habitual volleyball players have larger tibial cross-sectional area and may be differentiated from their age-matched peers by the osteogenic index in dynamic performance.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Linnamo, V; Komi, P V; Selänne, H; Heinonen, A

    2010-07-01

    The osteogenicity of a given exercise may be estimated by calculating an osteogenic index (OI) consisting of magnitude and rate of strain. Volleyball involves repetitive jumping and requires high power output and thus may be expected to be beneficial to bone and performance. The purpose of the present study was to examine if habitual volleyball playing is reflected in OI. Ten elderly habitual volleyball players [age 69.9 (SD 4.4) years] and ten matched controls volunteered [age 69.7 (4.2) years] as subjects. Distal tibia (d), tibial mid-shaft (50) and femoral neck (FN) bone characteristics were measured using pQCT and DXA. To estimate skeletal rigidity, cross-sectional area (ToA(50)), and compressive (BSI(d)) and bending strength indices (SSImax(50)) were calculated. Maximal performance was assessed with eccentric ankle plantar flexion, isometric leg press and countermovement jump (CMJ). A fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated from the acceleration of the center of mass during the CMJ. Maximal acceleration (MAG) and mean magnitude frequency (MMF) were selected to represent the constituents of OI. OI was calculated as the sum of the products of magnitudes and corresponding frequencies. Volleyball players had 7% larger ToA(50) and 37% higher power in CMJ, 15% higher MAG and 36% higher OI (P controls. No difference was observed in leg press, plantar flexion or the MMF (P >or= 0.646). In conclusion, habitual volleyball players may be differentiated from their matched peers by their dynamic jumping performance, and the differences are reflected in the magnitude but not rate of loading.

  6. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals.

  7. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  8. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  9. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 22 Age Matched Male and Female Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek; Masiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this electrophysiological neuroimaging study was to provide a deeper mechanistic understanding of both olanzapine and risperidone pharmacodynamics relative to gender. In doing so, we age-matched 22 men and women and evaluated their resting-state EEG recordings and later used standard low resolution brain Electrotomography to visualize the differences in brain activity amongst the two patient groups. Methods In this investigation, electroencephalogram (EEG) data were analyzed from male and female schizophrenia patients treated with either olanzapine or risperidone, both atypical antipsychotics, during their in-patient stay at the Department of Psychiatry. Twenty-two males and females were age-matched and EEG recordings were analyzed from 19 Ag/AgCl electrodes. Thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). 3D statistical non-paramentric maps for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were finally computed. Results The results indicated that, relative to males patients, females schizophrenia patients had increased neuronal synchronization in delta frequency, slow-wave, EEG band located in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, within the middle frontal gyrus (t= -2.881, p < 0.03580). These findings suggest that females experience greater dopamine (D2) receptor and serotonin (5-HT2) receptor neuronal blockade relative to age-matched males. Further, our finding provided insight to the pharmacodynamics of second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone. Conclusion When compared to male patients, female patients, suffering from schizophrenia, have D2 and 5-HT2 receptors that are blocked more readily than age-matched male schizophrenia patients. Clinically, this may translate into a quicker time to treatment-response in females as compared to male patients. PMID:26617679

  10. Performance of microprocessor controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.S.; Turner, L.W.; Overhults, D.G. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    United States animal production systems are at the threshold of a major new method for daily management of environmental control -- the integrated microprocessor-based environmental control system. Widespread adoption of this technology has the potential for dramatic improvement in production efficiencies through lower management costs, improved energy savings, and better feed conversion efficiencies. However, the technical problems of transient surge protection and appropriate mechanical backup systems have not been adequately addressed by the industry. The goals of this research were to identify the degree to which transient surge protection was being provided by current manufacturers, and to illustrate the implementation of microprocessor environmental control systems with mechanical backup. Transient open circuit over-voltage tests (ANSI/IEEE C62.41-1980) were performed on 16 environmental control units: a maximum of 800 V spike was applied to the power supplies, and up to 100 V spike applied to temperature sensor lines. Under these relatively mild tests, no failures were noted due to power supply transients, but three units failed when subjected to transients on their temperature sensor lines. Mechanical backup systems were designed to provide essential life-support during critical conditions of extreme outside conditions and extreme animal densities. The design and installation of environmental control systems for (1) a gestation unit and (2) a broiler house was performed. An overview of the process, and difficulties noted, is presented. Both systems incorporated mechanical backups. 20 refs.

  11. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  12. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  13. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  14. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  15. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  16. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control. PMID:26228573

  17. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control.

  18. Cognitive Linguistic Performances of Multilingual University Students Suspected of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Signe-Anita; Laine, Matti

    2011-01-01

    High-performing adults with compensated dyslexia pose particular challenges to dyslexia diagnostics. We compared the performance of 20 multilingual Finnish university students with suspected dyslexia with 20 age-matched and education-matched controls on an extensive test battery. The battery tapped various aspects of reading, writing, word…

  19. Physical performance of nontransplanted childhood ALL survivors is comparable to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Taskinen, Mervi H; Kurimo, Marita; Kanerva, Jukka; Hovi, Liisa

    2013-05-01

    Physical fitness is an essential feature of overall health. Our objective was to compare the physical performance between nontransplanted acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients (study patients), healthy controls, and ALL patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Forty-five ALL patients (median age, 13.3 y) treated without cranial irradiation were compared with 34 ALL patients (12.0 y) treated with SCT and total body irradiation and 522 age-matched and sex-matched controls. Their physical performance was assessed by 6 muscle tests measuring speed and dynamic endurance, flexibility, acceleration, maximal speed, and speed differentiation. The patients were tested at a minimum of 3 years after treatment. The muscle test results of the study patients did not differ from that of the healthy controls. The study patients had normal body mass indexes (BMI). Only 42% of them exercised at least once a week. Those who exercised >3 times a week and those with a BMI below median had better results. SCT patients had inferior results in 4 out of 6 tests. The physical performance of nontransplanted ALL patients did not differ from that of healthy controls. A higher physical exercise activity and a BMI below median positively correlated with better muscle performance, supporting the importance of encouraging ALL survivors to exercise and avoid obesity.

  20. High performance magnetically controllable microturbines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ku, Jin-Feng; He, Yan; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xia, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Reported in this paper is two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) fabrication of magnetic microturbines with high surface smoothness towards microfluids mixing. As the key component of the magnetic photoresist, Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were carefully screened for homogeneous doping. In this work, oleic acid stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles synthesized via high-temperature induced organic phase decomposition of an iron precursor show evident advantages in particle morphology. After modification with propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (PO(3)-TMPTA, a kind of cross-linker), the magnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously doped in acrylate-based photoresist for TPP fabrication of microstructures. Finally, a magnetic microturbine was successfully fabricated as an active mixing device for remote control of microfluids blending. The development of high quality magnetic photoresists would lead to high performance magnetically controllable microdevices for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. PMID:20721411

  1. Computed tomography-guided in vivo cardiac orientation and correlation with ECG in individuals without structural heart disease and in age-matched obese and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Sathananthan, Gnalini; Aggarwal, Gunjan; Zahid, Simmi; Byth, Karen; Chik, William; Friedman, Daniel; Thiagalingam, Aravinda

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac axis in a structurally normal heart is influenced by a number of factors. We investigated the anatomical and electrical cardiac axes in middle-aged individuals without structural heart disease and compared this with age-matched obese and older individuals without structural heart disease. A retrospective study of controls included those between 30 and 60 years old with a normal body mass index (BMI), who were then compared with obese individuals between 30 and 60 years old and with individuals more than 60 years old with a normal BMI. The anatomical cardiac axis was determined along the long axis by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and correlated with the electrical cardiac axis on a surface electrocardiogram (ECG) in the frontal plane. A total of 124 patients were included. In the controls (n = 59), the mean CT axis was 38.1° ± 7.8° whilst the mean ECG axis was 51.8° ± 26.6°, Pearson r value 0.12 (P = 0.365). In the obese (n = 36), the mean CT axis was 25.1° ± 6.2° whilst the mean ECG axis was 20.1° ± 23.9°, Pearson r value 0.05 (P = 0.808). In the older group (n = 29), the mean CT axis was 34.4° ± 9.1° whilst the mean ECG axis was 34.4° ± 30.3°, Pearson r value 0.26 (P = 0.209). Obese individuals have a more leftward rotation of both axes than age-matched normals (P <0.0001), which could be secondary to elevation of the diaphragm. Older individuals have a more leftward rotation only of their electrical cardiac axis (P = 0.01), which could be a normal variant or reflect underlying conduction disturbances in this age group.

  2. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  3. Handwriting performance in the absence of visual control in writer's cramp patients: Initial observations

    PubMed Central

    Chakarov, Vihren; Hummel, Sibylla; Losch, Florian; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2006-01-01

    Background The present study was aimed at investigating the writing parameters of writer's cramp patients and control subjects during handwriting of a test sentence in the absence of visual control. Methods Eight right-handed patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy volunteers as age-matched control subjects participated in the study. The experimental task consisted in writing a test sentence repeatedly for fifty times on a pressure-sensitive digital board. The subject did not have visual control on his handwriting. The writing performance was stored on a PC and analyzed off-line. Results During handwriting all patients developed a typical dystonic limb posture and reported an increase in muscular tension along the experimental session. The patients were significantly slower than the controls, with lower mean vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper and they could not reach the endmost letter of the sentence in the given time window. No other handwriting parameter differences were found between the two groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that during writing in the absence of visual feedback writer's cramp patients are slower and could not reach the endmost letter of the test sentence, but their level of automatization is not impaired and writer's cramp handwriting parameters are similar to those of the controls except for even lower vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper, which is probably due to a changed strategy in such experimental conditions. PMID:16594993

  4. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex T.; Etcheverry, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable. PMID:26045630

  5. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  6. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  7. Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance

    SciTech Connect

    Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

  8. THE SNS RESONANCE CONTROL COOLING SYSTEM CONTROL VALVE UPGRADE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  9. Age effects on attentional blink performance in meditation.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sara; Müller, Notger G; Melloni, Lucia

    2009-09-01

    Here we explore whether mental training in the form of meditation can help to overcome age-related attentional decline. We compared performance on the attentional blink task between three populations: A group of long-term meditation practitioners within an older population, a control group of age-matched participants and a control group of young participants. Members of both control groups had never practiced meditation. Our results show that long-term meditation practice leads to a reduction of the attentional blink. Meditation practitioners taken from an older population showed a reduction in blink as compared to a control group taken from a younger population, whereas, the control group age-matched to the meditators' group revealed a blink that was comparatively larger and broader. Our results support the hypothesis that meditation practice can: (i) alter the efficiency with which attentional resources are distributed and (ii) help to overcome age-related attentional deficits in the temporal domain.

  10. Solar Sail Attitude Control Performance Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bladt, Jeff J.; Lawrence, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    Performance of two solar sail attitude control implementations is evaluated. One implementation employs four articulated reflective vanes located at the periphery of the sail assembly to generate control torque about all three axes. A second attitude control configuration uses mass on a gimbaled boom to alter the center-of-mass location relative to the center-of-pressure producing roll and pitch torque along with a pair of articulated control vanes for yaw control. Command generation algorithms employ linearized dynamics with a feedback inversion loop to map desired vehicle attitude control torque into vane and/or gimbal articulation angle commands. We investigate the impact on actuator deflection angle behavior due to variations in how the Jacobian matrix is incorporated into the feedback inversion loop. Additionally, we compare how well each implementation tracks a commanded thrust profile, which has been generated to follow an orbit trajectory from the sun-earth L1 point to a sub-L1 station.

  11. Thermal control surfaces experiment flight system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.; Zwiener, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) is the most complex system, other than the LDEF, retrieved after long term space exposure. The TCSE is a microcosm of complex electro-optical payloads being developed and flow by NASA and the DoD including SDI. The objective of TCSE was to determine the effects of the near-Earth orbital environment and the LDEF induced environment on spacecraft thermal control surfaces. The TCSE was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive post flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit space environment. The TCSE was the first space experiment to measure the optical properties of thermal control surfaces the way they are routinely measured in a lab. The performance of the TCSE confirms that low cost, complex experiment packages can be developed that perform well in space.

  12. Performance measurement: A tool for program control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    Performance measurement is a management tool for planning, monitoring, and controlling as aspects of program and project management--cost, schedule, and technical requirements. It is a means (concept and approach) to a desired end (effective program planning and control). To reach the desired end, however, performance measurement must be applied and used appropriately, with full knowledge and recognition of its power and of its limitations--what it can and cannot do for the project manager. What is the potential of this management tool? What does performance measurement do that a traditional plan vs. actual technique cannot do? Performance measurement provides an improvement over the customary comparison of how much money was spent (actual cost) vs. how much was planned to be spent based on a schedule of activities (work planned). This commonly used plan vs. actual comparison does not allow one to know from the numerical data if the actual cost incurred was for work intended to be done.

  13. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the occupant

  14. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  15. Performance TTradeoffs in Distributed Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Holly

    Large scale systems consisting of many interacting subsystems are often controlled in a distributed fashion due to inherent limitations in computation, communication, or sensing. Here, individual agents must make decisions based on local, often incomplete information. This dissertation focuses on understanding performance tradeoffs in distributed control systems, specifically focusing on using a game theoretic framework to assign agent control laws. Performance of a distributed control law is determined by (1) the degree with which it meets a stated objective, (2) the amount of time it takes to converge, (3) agents' informational requirements, and (4) vulnerability to adversarial manipulation. The three main research questions addressed in this work are: • When is fast convergence to near-optimal behavior possible in a distributed system? We design a distributed control law which converges to a near-optimal configuration in a time that is near-linear in the number of agents. This worst case convergence time is an improvement over existing algorithms whose worst-case convergence times are exponential in the number of agents. • Can agents in a distributed system learn near-optimal correlated behavior despite severely limited information about one another's behavior? We design a distributed control law that imposes limited informational requirements for individual agents and converges to near-optimal correlated behavior. • How does the structure of agent interaction impact a distributed control system's vulnerability to adversarial manipulation? We derive a graph theoretical condition that ensures resilience to adversarial manipulation, and we examine the conditions under which an adversary can manipulate collective behavior in a distributed control system, simply by influencing small subsets of agents.

  16. Performance of microprocessor controllers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.S.; Turner, L.W.; Overhults, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    United States animal production systems are at the threshold of a major new method for daily management of environmental control -- the integrated microprocessor-based environmental control system. Widespread adoption of this technology has the potential for dramatic improvement in production efficiencies through lower management costs, improved energy savings, and better feed conversion efficiencies. However, the technical problems of transient surge protection and appropriate mechanical backup systems have not been adequately addressed by the industry. The goals of this research were to identify the degree to which transient surge protection was being provided by current manufacturers, and to illustrate the implementation of microprocessor environmental control systems with mechanical backup. Transient open circuit over-voltage tests (ANSI/IEEE C62.41-1980) were performed on 16 environmental control units: a maximum of 800 V spike was applied to the power supplies, and up to 100 V spike applied to temperature sensor lines. Under these relatively mild tests, no failures were noted due to power supply transients, but three units failed when subjected to transients on their temperature sensor lines. Mechanical backup systems were designed to provide essential life-support during critical conditions of extreme outside conditions and extreme animal densities. The design and installation of environmental control systems for (1) a gestation unit and (2) a broiler house was performed. An overview of the process, and difficulties noted, is presented. Both systems incorporated mechanical backups. 20 refs.

  17. Optimal performance of constrained control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, P. Scott, Jr.; Gavin, Henri P.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method to compute optimal open-loop trajectories for systems subject to state and control inequality constraints in which the cost function is quadratic and the state dynamics are linear. For the case in which inequality constraints are decentralized with respect to the controls, optimal Lagrange multipliers enforcing the inequality constraints may be found at any time through Pontryagin’s minimum principle. In so doing, the set of differential algebraic Euler-Lagrange equations is transformed into a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem for states and costates whose solution meets the necessary conditions for optimality. The optimal performance of inequality constrained control systems is calculable, allowing for comparison to previous, sub-optimal solutions. The method is applied to the control of damping forces in a vibration isolation system subjected to constraints imposed by the physical implementation of a particular controllable damper. An outcome of this study is the best performance achievable given a particular objective, isolation system, and semi-active damper constraints.

  18. Orion Entry Flight Control Stability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Alan L.; Loe, Greg R.; Seiler, Pete

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Spacecraft will be required to perform entry and landing functions for both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Lunar return missions, utilizing only the Command Module (CM) with its unique systems and GN&C design. This paper presents the current CM Flight Control System (FCS) design to support entry and landing, with a focus on analyses that have supported its development to date. The CM FCS will have to provide for spacecraft stability and control while following guidance or manual commands during exo-atmospheric flight, after Service Module separation, translational powered flight required of the CM, atmospheric flight supporting both direct entry and skip trajectories down to drogue chute deploy, and during roll attitude reorientation just prior to touchdown. Various studies and analyses have been performed or are on-going supporting an overall FCS design with reasonably sized Reaction Control System (RCS) jets, that minimizes fuel usage, that provides appropriate command following but with reasonable stability and control margin. Results from these efforts to date are included, with particular attention on design issues that have emerged, such as the struggle to accommodate sub-sonic pitch and yaw control without using excessively large jets that could have a detrimental impact on vehicle weight. Apollo, with a similar shape, struggled with this issue as well. Outstanding CM FCS related design and analysis issues, planned for future effort, are also briefly be discussed.

  19. Adaptive Performance Seeking Control Using Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control and Positive Gradient Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1997-01-01

    Performance Seeking Control attempts to find the operating condition that will generate optimal performance and control the plant at that operating condition. In this paper a nonlinear multivariable Adaptive Performance Seeking Control (APSC) methodology will be developed and it will be demonstrated on a nonlinear system. The APSC is comprised of the Positive Gradient Control (PGC) and the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control (FMRLC). The PGC computes the positive gradients of the desired performance function with respect to the control inputs in order to drive the plant set points to the operating point that will produce optimal performance. The PGC approach will be derived in this paper. The feedback control of the plant is performed by the FMRLC. For the FMRLC, the conventional fuzzy model reference learning control methodology is utilized, with guidelines generated here for the effective tuning of the FMRLC controller.

  20. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  1. Attitude Control Performance of IRVE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.; Gsell, Valerie T.; Bowden, Ernest L.

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating both the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator in the reentry heating environment and the effect of an offset center of gravity on the aeroshell's flight L/D. The reentry vehicle separated from the launch vehicle, released and inflated its aeroshell, reoriented for atmospheric entry, and mechanically shifted its center of gravity before reaching atmospheric interface. Performance data from the entire mission was telemetered to the ground for analysis. This paper discusses the IRVE-3 mission scenario, reentry vehicle design, and as-flown performance of the attitude control system in the different phases of the mission.

  2. TRMM On Orbit Attitude Control System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Placanica, Sam; Morgenstern, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Attitude Control System (ACS) along with detailed in-flight performance results for each operational mode. The TRMM spacecraft is an Earth-pointed, zero momentum bias satellite launched on November 27, 1997 from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy. Launched to provide a validation for poorly known rainfall data sets generated by global climate models, TRMM has demonstrated its utility by reducing uncertainties in global rainfall measurements by a factor of two. The ACS is comprised of Attitude Control Electronics (ACE), an Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA), Digital Sun Sensors (DSS), Inertial Reference Units (IRU), Three Axis Magnetometers (TAM), Coarse Sun Sensors (CSS), Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTB), Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWA), Engine Valve Drivers (EVD) and thrusters. While in Mission Mode, the ESA provides roll and pitch axis attitude error measurements and the DSS provide yaw updates twice per orbit. In addition, the TAM in combination with the IRU and DSS can be used to provide pointing in a contingency attitude determination mode which does not rely on the ESA. Although the ACS performance to date has been highly successful, lessons were learned during checkout and initial on-orbit operation. This paper describes the design, on-orbit checkout, performance and lessons learned for the TRMM ACS.

  3. Training to improve manual control in 7-8 and 10-12 year old children: Training eliminates performance differences between ages.

    PubMed

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Fath, Aaron J; Watson, Carol A; Flatters, Ian; Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2015-10-01

    Many children have difficulty producing movements well enough to improve in perceptuo-motor learning. We have developed a training method that supports active movement generation to allow improvement in a 3D tracing task requiring good compliance control. We previously tested 7-8 year old children who exhibited poor performance and performance differences before training. After training, performance was significantly improved and performance differences were eliminated. According to the Dynamic Systems Theory of development, appropriate support can enable younger children to acquire the ability to perform like older children. In the present study, we compared 7-8 and 10-12 year old school children and predicted that younger children would show reduced performance that was nonetheless amenable to training. Indeed, the pre-training performance of the 7-8 year olds was worse than that of the 10-12 year olds, but post-training performance was equally good for both groups. This was similar to previous results found using this training method for children with DCD and age-matched typically developing children. We also found in a previous study of 7-8 year old school children that training in the 3D tracing task transferred to a 2D drawing task. We now found similar transfer for the 10-12 year olds.

  4. Training To Improve Manual Control In 7–8 And 10–12 Year Old Children: Training Eliminates Performance Differences Between Ages

    PubMed Central

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Fath, Aaron J.; Watson, Carol A; Flatters, Ian; Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Many children have difficulty producing movements well enough to improve in perceptuo-motor learning. We have developed a training method that supports active movement generation to allow improvement in a 3D tracing task requiring good compliance control. We previously tested 7–8 year old children who exhibited poor performance and performance differences before training. After training, performance was significantly improved and performance differences were eliminated. According to the Dynamic Systems Theory of development, appropriate support can enable younger children to acquire the ability to perform like older children. In the present study, we compared 7–8 and 10–12 year old school children and predicted that younger children would show reduced performance that was nonetheless amenable to training. Indeed, the pre-training performance of the 7–8 year olds was worse than that of the 10–12 year olds, but post-training performance was equally good for both groups. This was similar to previous results found using this training method for children with DCD and age-matched typically developing children. We also found in a previous study of 7–8 year old school children that training in the 3D tracing task transferred to a 2D drawing task. We now found similar transfer for the 10–12 year olds. PMID:26241334

  5. Neurocognitive control in dance perception and performance.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Bettina; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz; Cross, Emily S; Jola, Corinne; Honisch, Juliane; Stevens, Catherine J

    2012-02-01

    Dance is a rich source of material for researchers interested in the integration of movement and cognition. The multiple aspects of embodied cognition involved in performing and perceiving dance have inspired scientists to use dance as a means for studying motor control, expertise, and action-perception links. The aim of this review is to present basic research on cognitive and neural processes implicated in the execution, expression, and observation of dance, and to bring into relief contemporary issues and open research questions. The review addresses six topics: 1) dancers' exemplary motor control, in terms of postural control, equilibrium maintenance, and stabilization; 2) how dancers' timing and on-line synchronization are influenced by attention demands and motor experience; 3) the critical roles played by sequence learning and memory; 4) how dancers make strategic use of visual and motor imagery; 5) the insights into the neural coupling between action and perception yielded through exploration of the brain architecture mediating dance observation; and 6) a neuroesthetics perspective that sheds new light on the way audiences perceive and evaluate dance expression. Current and emerging issues are presented regarding future directions that will facilitate the ongoing dialog between science and dance.

  6. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  7. An Introduction to Controller Performance Assessment in Process Control Class through Stiction in Control Valves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Ranganathan; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan; Harris, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a simple liquid level experiment that can be used to teach nonlinear phenomena in process control through stiction in control valves. This experiment can be used to introduce the undergraduate students to the area of Controller Performance Assessment (CPA). The experiment is very easy to set-up and demonstrate. While…

  8. Controlling human fixed-interval performance.

    PubMed

    Weiner, H

    1969-05-01

    Both high and relatively constant rates of responding without post-reinforcement pauses and lower rates with pauses after reinforcement are produced by human subjects under fixed-interval (FI) schedules. Such FI rates and patterns may be controlled when subjects are provided with different histories of conditioning and different conditions of response cost (reinforcement penalties per response). Subjects with a conditioning history under ratio schedules typically produce high and relatively constant rates of responding under FI schedules; this responding does not change systematically with changes in FI value. In contrast, subjects with a history under schedules which produce little or no responding between reforcements [such as differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) schedules] tend to pause after reinforcement and respond at low rates under FI schedules, whether or not they also have ratio conditioning histories; cost increases the likelihood of this type of performance. For DRL-history subjects, post-reinforcement pauses increase and response rates decrease as FI values increase.

  9. Design of a Performance-Adaptive PID Control System Based on Modeling Performance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toru

    In industrial processes represented by petroleum and refinery processes, it is necessary to establish the performance-driven control strategy in order to improve the productivity, which the control performance is firstly evaluated, and the controller is reconstructed. This paper describes a design scheme of performance-adaptive PID controllers which are based on the above control mechanism. According to the proposed control scheme, the system identification works corresponding to the result of modeling performance assessment, and PID parameters are computed using the newly estimated system parameters. In calculating the PID parameters, the desired control performance is considered. The behaviour of the proposed control scheme is numerically examined in some simulation examples.

  10. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  11. Comparing the PPAT Drawings of Boys with AD/HD and Age-Matched Controls Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munley, Maripat

    2002-01-01

    Explores whether children with AD/HD respond differently to a specific art directive. Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale to evaluate the drawings, results indicate three elements that would most accurately predict the artists into the AD/HD group: color prominence, details of objects and environments, and line quality. (Contains 29…

  12. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD.

  13. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study.

    PubMed

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  14. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  15. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  16. Performance of fluidically controlled oscillating jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, T.; Vasudevan, B.; Prabhu, A.

    An experimental investigation on a fluidically controlled oscillating jet is reported. The flow inside the fluidic nozzle shows a feedback mechanism different from what is currently accepted. Although large spread angles can be obtained with fluidically oscillated jets, entrainment of secondary flow seems less than that in a steady jet.

  17. Locus of Control and Performance: Widening Applicabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manichander, T.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to explain the evidence which indicates that internal perception of control is positively related to academic achievement, this paper suggests that mediating motivational and cognitive reactions, which differentiate internals from externals, may account for this relationship. Furthermore, on the basis of data which suggest that the…

  18. Mariner Mars 1971 attitude control subsystem flight performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L.

    1973-01-01

    The flight performance of the Mariner 71 attitude control subsystem is discussed. Each phase of the mission is delineated and the attitude control subsystem is evaluated within the observed operational environment. Performance anomalies are introduced and discussed within the context of general performance. Problems such as the sun sensor interface incompatibility, gas valve leaks, and scan platform dynamic coupling effects are given analytical considerations.

  19. Robust high-performance control for robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Model-based and performance-based control techniques are combined for an electrical robotic control system. Thus, two distinct and separate design philosophies were merged into a single control system having a control law formulation including two distinct and separate components, each of which yields a respective signal componet that is combined into a total command signal for the system. Those two separate system components include a feedforward controller and feedback controller. The feedforward controller is model-based and contains any known part of the manipulator dynamics that can be used for on-line control to produce a nominal feedforward component of the system's control signal. The feedback controller is performance-based and consists of a simple adaptive PID controller which generates an adaptive control signal to complement the nomical feedforward signal.

  20. Robust high-performance control for robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Model-based and performance-based control techniques are combined for an electrical robotic control system. Thus, two distinct and separate design philosophies have been merged into a single control system having a control law formulation including two distinct and separate components, each of which yields a respective signal component that is combined into a total command signal for the system. Those two separate system components include a feedforward controller and a feedback controller. The feedforward controller is model-based and contains any known part of the manipulator dynamics that can be used for on-line control to produce a nominal feedforward component of the system's control signal. The feedback controller is performance-based and consists of a simple adaptive PID controller which generates an adaptive control signal to complement the nominal feedforward signal.

  1. Impact of Advance Control on Microturbine Generation System Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil Mat Hussin, Ahmad; Zamri Che Wanik, Mohd

    2013-06-01

    Advance control employed in microturbine generation system (MTGS) is expected to improve its performance in responding to grid faults. This paper compares the effect of advance control of MTGS power conversion topology on the performance in riding through the grid faults. The analysis and investigation study through simulation shows there is no significant different on MTGS output performance even advance control is employed for its rectifier.

  2. Perturbing engine performance measurements to determine optimal engine control settings

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-12-30

    Methods and systems for optimizing a performance of a vehicle engine are provided. The method includes determining an initial value for a first engine control parameter based on one or more detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine, determining a value of an engine performance variable, and artificially perturbing the determined value of the engine performance variable. The initial value for the first engine control parameter is then adjusted based on the perturbed engine performance variable causing the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. Operation of the vehicle engine is controlled based on the adjusted initial value for the first engine control parameter. These acts are repeated until the engine performance variable approaches the target engine performance variable.

  3. Continuous performance measurement in flight systems. [sequential control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, E. M.; Sloan, N. A.; Zeskind, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The desired response of many man machine control systems can be formulated as a solution to an optimal control synthesis problem where the cost index is given and the resulting optimal trajectories correspond to the desired trajectories of the man machine system. Optimal control synthesis provides the reference criteria and the significance of error information required for performance measurement. The synthesis procedure described provides a continuous performance measure (CPM) which is independent of the mechanism generating the control action. Therefore, the technique provides a meaningful method for online evaluation of man's control capability in terms of total man machine performance.

  4. An optimal performance control scheme for a 3D crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamed, Z.; Husain, A. R.; Tokhi, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal performance control scheme for control of a three dimensional (3D) crane system including a Zero Vibration shaper which considers two control objectives concurrently. The control objectives are fast and accurate positioning of a trolley and minimum sway of a payload. A complete mathematical model of a lab-scaled 3D crane is simulated in Simulink. With a specific cost function the proposed controller is designed to cater both control objectives similar to a skilled operator. Simulation and experimental studies on a 3D crane show that the proposed controller has better performance as compared to a sequentially tuned PID-PID anti swing controller. The controller provides better position response with satisfactory payload sway in both rail and trolley responses. Experiments with different payloads and cable lengths show that the proposed controller is robust to changes in payload with satisfactory responses.

  5. Enhanced control performance and application to fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishodia, Vikram

    The inverted-pendulum virtual control lab, a simulation environment for teaching advanced concepts of process control, is designed using the LabVIEW software tool. Significant advantages of using this simulation tool for pedagogical purposes include avoiding the potential issue of schedule conflicts for securing equipment-access time in a physical laboratory and providing a learning resource that becomes accessible to students located in remote geographical places. A set of tuning relationships are proposed for standard proportional-integral controllers and proportional double-integral controllers for the purpose of tracking the slope of a ramp trajectory. Three different performance metrics are investigated to serve as the criteria for optimality, and a numerical optimization procedure is used to minimize each metric over 20,000 different plants. The proportional integral controller with tuning parameters selected to optimize value of the integral of the time-weighted absolute error is recommended for tracking the slope of a ramp trajectory. A generalized predictive control (GPC) strategy is proposed for a fuel cell system, where the controller incorporates a measured disturbance in the control design. The control objective is to maintain oxygen excess ratio at a prescribed constant value. The performance of the GPC control design is compared with that of the controllers proposed in literature for various scenarios including model uncertainty. The GPC controller has zero offset when the performance variable is measured and performs better than competing designs offered in the literature. The GPC controller is also robust with respect to model uncertainty. A battery of observers with a switching strategy is proposed for estimating the value of the performance variable when it is not measured. The GPC controller with a battery of observers has no offset demonstrating better performance than analogous designs proposed in literature. However, the control performance

  6. Comparison between the performance of two classes of fuzzy controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janabi, T. H.; Sultan, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an application comparison between two classes of fuzzy controllers: the Clearness Transformation Fuzzy Controller (CTFC) and the CRI-based Fuzzy Controller. The comparison is performed by studying the application of the controllers to simulation examples of nonlinear systems. The CTFC is a new approach for the organization of fuzzy controllers based on a cognitive model of parameter driven control, the notion of fuzzy patterns to represent fuzzy knowledge and the Clearness Transformation Rule of Inference (CTRI) for approximate reasoning. The approach facilitates the implementation of the basic modules of the controller: the fuzzifier, defuzzifier, and the control protocol in a rule-based architecture. The CTRI scheme for approximate reasoning does not require the formation of fuzzy relation matrices yielding improved performance in comparison with the traditional organization of fuzzy controllers.

  7. Dynamic Curvature Steering Control for Autonomous Vehicle: Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizzat Zakaria, Muhammad; Zamzuri, Hairi; Amri Mazlan, Saiful

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses the design of dynamic curvature steering control for autonomous vehicle. The lateral control and longitudinal control are discussed in this paper. The controller is designed based on the dynamic curvature calculation to estimate the path condition and modify the vehicle speed and steering wheel angle accordingly. In this paper, the simulation results are presented to show the capability of the controller to track the reference path. The controller is able to predict the path and modify the vehicle speed to suit the path condition. The effectiveness of the controller is shown in this paper whereby identical performance is achieved with the benchmark but with extra curvature adaptation capabilites.

  8. Preliminary supersonic flight test evaluation of performance seeking control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1993-01-01

    Digital flight and engine control, powerful onboard computers, and sophisticated controls techniques may improve aircraft performance by maximizing fuel efficiency, maximizing thrust, and extending engine life. An adaptive performance seeking control system for optimizing the quasi-steady state performance of an F-15 aircraft was developed and flight tested. This system has three optimization modes: minimum fuel, maximum thrust, and minimum fan turbine inlet temperature. Tests of the minimum fuel and fan turbine inlet temperature modes were performed at a constant thrust. Supersonic single-engine flight tests of the three modes were conducted using varied after burning power settings. At supersonic conditions, the performance seeking control law optimizes the integrated airframe, inlet, and engine. At subsonic conditions, only the engine is optimized. Supersonic flight tests showed improvements in thrust of 9 percent, increases in fuel savings of 8 percent, and reductions of up to 85 deg R in turbine temperatures for all three modes. The supersonic performance seeking control structure is described and preliminary results of supersonic performance seeking control tests are given. These findings have implications for improving performance of civilian and military aircraft.

  9. Human manual control performance in hyper-gravity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Torin K; Newman, Michael C; Merfeld, Daniel M; Oman, Charles M; Young, Laurence R

    2015-05-01

    Hyper-gravity provides a unique environment to study how misperceptions impact control of orientation relative to gravity. Previous studies have found that static and dynamic roll tilts are perceptually overestimated in hyper-gravity. The current investigation quantifies how this influences control of orientation. We utilized a long-radius centrifuge to study manual control performance in hyper-gravity. In the dark, subjects were tasked with nulling out a pseudo-random roll disturbance on the cab of the centrifuge using a rotational hand controller to command their roll rate in order to remain perceptually upright. The task was performed in 1, 1.5, and 2 G's of net gravito-inertial acceleration. Initial performance, in terms of root-mean-square deviation from upright, degraded in hyper-gravity relative to 1 G performance levels. In 1.5 G, initial performance degraded by 26 % and in 2 G, by 45 %. With practice, however, performance in hyper-gravity improved to near the 1 G performance level over several minutes. Finally, pre-exposure to one hyper-gravity level reduced initial performance decrements in a different, novel, hyper-gravity level. Perceptual overestimation of roll tilts in hyper-gravity leads to manual control performance errors, which are reduced both with practice and with pre-exposure to alternate hyper-gravity stimuli.

  10. Biotechnology-based odour control: design criteria and performance data.

    PubMed

    Quigley, C; Easter, C; Burrowes, P; Witherspoon, J

    2004-01-01

    As neighbouring areas continue to encroach upon wastewater treatment plants, there is an increasing need for odour control to mitigate potential negative offsite odorous impacts. One technology that is gaining widespread acceptance is biotechnology, which utilises the inherent ability of certain microorganisms to biodegrade offensive odorous compounds. Two main advantages of this form of treatment over other odour control technologies include the absence of hazardous chemicals and relatively low operation and maintenance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to provide information related to odour control design criteria used in sizing/selecting biotechnology-based odour control technologies, and to provide odour removal performance data obtained from several different biotechnology-based odour control systems. CH2M HILL has collected biotechnology-based odour control performance data over the last several years in order to track the continued performance of various biofilters and biotowers over time. Specifically, odour removal performance data have been collected from soil-, organic- and inorganic-media biofilters and inert inorganic media biotowers. Results indicate that biotechnology-based odour control is a viable and consistent technology capable of achieving high removal performance for odour and hydrogen sulphide. It is anticipated that the information presented in this paper will be of interest to anyone involved with odour control technology evaluation/selection or design review.

  11. Biotechnology-based odour control: design criteria and performance data.

    PubMed

    Quigley, C; Easter, C; Burrowes, P; Witherspoon, J

    2004-01-01

    As neighbouring areas continue to encroach upon wastewater treatment plants, there is an increasing need for odour control to mitigate potential negative offsite odorous impacts. One technology that is gaining widespread acceptance is biotechnology, which utilises the inherent ability of certain microorganisms to biodegrade offensive odorous compounds. Two main advantages of this form of treatment over other odour control technologies include the absence of hazardous chemicals and relatively low operation and maintenance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to provide information related to odour control design criteria used in sizing/selecting biotechnology-based odour control technologies, and to provide odour removal performance data obtained from several different biotechnology-based odour control systems. CH2M HILL has collected biotechnology-based odour control performance data over the last several years in order to track the continued performance of various biofilters and biotowers over time. Specifically, odour removal performance data have been collected from soil-, organic- and inorganic-media biofilters and inert inorganic media biotowers. Results indicate that biotechnology-based odour control is a viable and consistent technology capable of achieving high removal performance for odour and hydrogen sulphide. It is anticipated that the information presented in this paper will be of interest to anyone involved with odour control technology evaluation/selection or design review. PMID:15484776

  12. Performance analysis of reactive congestion control for ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Kenji; Oie, Yuji; Murata, Masayuki; Miyahara, Hideo

    1995-05-01

    In ATM networks, preventive congestion control is widely recognized for efficiently avoiding congestion, and it is implemented by a conjunction of connection admission control and usage parameter control. However, congestion may still occur because of unpredictable statistical fluctuation of traffic sources even when preventive control is performed in the network. In this paper, we study another kind of congestion control, i.e., reactive congestion control, in which each source changes its cell emitting rate adaptively to the traffic load at the switching node (or at the multiplexer). Our intention is that, by incorporating such a congestion control method in ATM networks, more efficient congestion control is established. We develop an analytical model, and carry out an approximate analysis of reactive congestion control algorithm. Numerical results show that the reactive congestion control algorithms are very effective in avoiding congestion and in achieving the statistical gain. Furthermore, the binary congestion control algorithm with pushout mechanism is shown to provide the best performance among the reactive congestion control algorithms treated here.

  13. Inhibitory Control Predicts Language Switching Performance in Trilingual Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linck, Jared A.; Schwieter, John W.; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of domain-general inhibitory control in trilingual speech production. Taking an individual differences approach, we examined the relationship between performance on a non-linguistic measure of inhibitory control (the Simon task) and a multilingual language switching task for a group of fifty-six native English (L1)…

  14. Aging and Concurrent Task Performance: Cognitive Demand and Motor Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albinet, Cedric; Tomporowski, Phillip D.; Beasman, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    A motor task that requires fine control of upper limb movements and a cognitive task that requires executive processing--first performing them separately and then concurrently--was performed by 18 young and 18 older adults. The motor task required participants to tap alternatively on two targets, the sizes of which varied systematically. The…

  15. In-flight performance optimization for rotorcraft with redundant controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Gurbuz Taha

    A conventional helicopter has limits on performance at high speeds because of the limitations of main rotor, such as compressibility issues on advancing side or stall issues on retreating side. Auxiliary lift and thrust components have been suggested to improve performance of the helicopter substantially by reducing the loading on the main rotor. Such a configuration is called the compound rotorcraft. Rotor speed can also be varied to improve helicopter performance. In addition to improved performance, compound rotorcraft and variable RPM can provide a much larger degree of control redundancy. This additional redundancy gives the opportunity to further enhance performance and handling qualities. A flight control system is designed to perform in-flight optimization of redundant control effectors on a compound rotorcraft in order to minimize power required and extend range. This "Fly to Optimal" (FTO) control law is tested in simulation using the GENHEL model. A model of the UH-60, a compound version of the UH-60A with lifting wing and vectored thrust ducted propeller (VTDP), and a generic compound version of the UH-60A with lifting wing and propeller were developed and tested in simulation. A model following dynamic inversion controller is implemented for inner loop control of roll, pitch, yaw, heave, and rotor RPM. An outer loop controller regulates airspeed and flight path during optimization. A Golden Section search method was used to find optimal rotor RPM on a conventional helicopter, where the single redundant control effector is rotor RPM. The FTO builds off of the Adaptive Performance Optimization (APO) method of Gilyard by performing low frequency sweeps on a redundant control for a fixed wing aircraft. A method based on the APO method was used to optimize trim on a compound rotorcraft with several redundant control effectors. The controller can be used to optimize rotor RPM and compound control effectors through flight test or simulations in order to

  16. Monitoring the Performance of a Neuro-Adaptive Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gupta, Pramod

    2004-01-01

    Traditional control has proven to be ineffective to deal with catastrophic changes or slow degradation of complex, highly nonlinear systems like aircraft or spacecraft, robotics, or flexible manufacturing systems. Control systems which can adapt toward changes in the plant have been proposed as they offer many advantages (e.g., better performance, controllability of aircraft despite of a damaged wing). In the last few years, use of neural networks in adaptive controllers (neuro-adaptive control) has been studied actively. Neural networks of various architectures have been used successfully for online learning adaptive controllers. In such a typical control architecture, the neural network receives as an input the current deviation between desired and actual plant behavior and, by on-line training, tries to minimize this discrepancy (e.g.; by producing a control augmentation signal). Even though neuro-adaptive controllers offer many advantages, they have not been used in mission- or safety-critical applications, because performance and safety guarantees cannot b e provided at development time-a major prerequisite for safety certification (e.g., by the FAA or NASA). Verification and Validation (V&V) of an adaptive controller requires the development of new analysis techniques which can demonstrate that the control system behaves safely under all operating conditions. Because of the requirement to adapt toward unforeseen changes during operation, i.e., in real time, design-time V&V is not sufficient.

  17. Experimental performance evaluation of human balance control models.

    PubMed

    Huryn, Thomas P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Croft, Elizabeth A; Koehle, Michael S; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-11-01

    Two factors commonly differentiate proposed balance control models for quiet human standing: 1) intermittent muscle activation and 2) prediction that overcomes sensorimotor time delays. In this experiment we assessed the viability and performance of intermittent activation and prediction in a balance control loop that included the neuromuscular dynamics of human calf muscles. Muscles were driven by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The performance of the different controllers was compared based on sway patterns and mechanical effort required to balance a human body load on a robotic balance simulator. All evaluated controllers balanced subjects with and without a neural block applied to their common peroneal and tibial nerves, showing that the models can produce stable balance in the absence of natural activation. Intermittent activation required less stimulation energy than continuous control but predisposed the system to increased sway. Relative to intermittent control, continuous control reproduced the sway size of natural standing better. Prediction was not necessary for stable balance control but did improve stability when control was intermittent, suggesting a possible benefit of a predictor for intermittent activation. Further application of intermittent activation and predictive control models may drive prolonged, stable FES-controlled standing that improves quality of life for people with balance impairments. PMID:24771586

  18. Nonlinear Performance Seeking Control using Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control and the Method of Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1997-01-01

    Performance Seeking Control (PSC) attempts to find and control the process at the operating condition that will generate maximum performance. In this paper a nonlinear multivariable PSC methodology will be developed, utilizing the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control (FMRLC) and the method of Steepest Descent or Gradient (SDG). This PSC control methodology employs the SDG method to find the operating condition that will generate maximum performance. This operating condition is in turn passed to the FMRLC controller as a set point for the control of the process. The conventional SDG algorithm is modified in this paper in order for convergence to occur monotonically. For the FMRLC control, the conventional fuzzy model reference learning control methodology is utilized, with guidelines generated here for effective tuning of the FMRLC controller.

  19. Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort Controller Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Raney, David L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper covers the simulation and evaluation of a controller design for the Crew Module (CM) Launch Abort System (LAS), to measure its ability to meet the abort performance requirements. The controller used in this study is a hybrid design, including features developed by the Government and the Contractor. Testing is done using two separate 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) computer simulation implementations of the LAS/CM throughout the ascent trajectory: 1) executing a series of abort simulations along a nominal trajectory for the nominal LAS/CM system; and 2) using a series of Monte Carlo runs with perturbed initial flight conditions and perturbed system parameters. The performance of the controller is evaluated against a set of criteria, which is based upon the current functional requirements of the LAS. Preliminary analysis indicates that the performance of the present controller meets (with the exception of a few cases) the evaluation criteria mentioned above.

  20. Design and performance comparison of fuzzy logic based tracking controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Jani, Yashvant

    1992-01-01

    Several camera tracking controllers based on fuzzy logic principles have been designed and tested in software simulation in the software technology branch at the Johnson Space Center. The fuzzy logic based controllers utilize range measurement and pixel positions from the image as input parameters and provide pan and tilt gimble rate commands as output. Two designs of the rulebase and tuning process applied to the membership functions are discussed in light of optimizing performance. Seven test cases have been designed to test the performance of the controllers for proximity operations where approaches like v-bar, fly-around and station keeping are performed. The controllers are compared in terms of responsiveness, and ability to maintain the object in the field-of-view of the camera. Advantages of the fuzzy logic approach with respect to the conventional approach have been discussed in terms of simplicity and robustness.

  1. Performance limitations for networked control systems with plant uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Ming; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Cheng, Xin-Ming; Yuan, Fu-Shun

    2016-04-01

    There has recently been significant interest in performance study for networked control systems with communication constraints. But the existing work mainly assumes that the plant has an exact model. The goal of this paper is to investigate the optimal tracking performance for networked control system in the presence of plant uncertainty. The plant under consideration is assumed to be non-minimum phase and unstable, while the two-parameter controller is employed and the integral square criterion is adopted to measure the tracking error. And we formulate the uncertainty by utilising stochastic embedding. The explicit expression of the tracking performance has been obtained. The results show that the network communication noise and the model uncertainty, as well as the unstable poles and non-minimum phase zeros, can worsen the tracking performance.

  2. Operator performance with alternative manual control modes in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted at the JPL comparing alternative manual control modes using the JPL Advanced Teleoperator system are described. Of particular interest were control modes that provide force reflection to the operator. The task selected for the experiment is a portion of the Solar Maximum Satellite Repair procedure we developed to demonstrate the repair of the Solar Maximum Satellite with teleoperators. The seven manual control modes evaluated in the experiment are combinations of manual position or resolved motion rate control with alternative control schemes for force reflection and remote manipulator compliance. Performance measures used were task completion times, average force and torque exerted during the execution of the task, and cumulative force and torque exerted. The results were statistically analyzed and they show that, in general, force reflection significantly improves operator performance and indicate that a specific force-reflecting scheme may yield the best performance among the control modes we tested. Also, our experiment showed that, for the selected task, the position control modes were preferable to the rate control modes and slave manipulator compliance reduced task interaction forces and torques.

  3. [The quality control based on the predictable performance].

    PubMed

    Zheng, D X

    2016-09-01

    The clinical performance can only be evaluated when it comes to the last step in the conventional way of prosthesis. However, it often causes the failure because of the unconformity between the expectation and final performance. Resulting from this kind of situation, quality control based on the predictable results has been suggested. It is a new idea based on the way of reverse thinking, and focuses on the need of patient and puts the final performance of the prosthesis to the first place. With the prosthodontically driven prodedure, dentists can complete the unification with the expectation and the final performance. PMID:27596338

  4. Hardware support for software controlled fast reconfiguration of performance counters

    DOEpatents

    Salapura, Valentina; Wisniewski, Robert W

    2013-09-24

    Hardware support for software controlled reconfiguration of performance counters may include a plurality of performance counters collecting one or more counts of one or more selected activities. A storage element stores data value representing a time interval, and a timer element reads the data value and detects expiration of the time interval based on the data value and generates a signal. A plurality of configuration registers stores a set of performance counter configurations. A state machine receives the signal and selects a configuration register from the plurality of configuration registers for reconfiguring the one or more performance counters.

  5. Hardware support for software controlled fast reconfiguration of performance counters

    DOEpatents

    Salapura, Valentina; Wisniewski, Robert W.

    2013-06-18

    Hardware support for software controlled reconfiguration of performance counters may include a plurality of performance counters collecting one or more counts of one or more selected activities. A storage element stores data value representing a time interval, and a timer element reads the data value and detects expiration of the time interval based on the data value and generates a signal. A plurality of configuration registers stores a set of performance counter configurations. A state machine receives the signal and selects a configuration register from the plurality of configuration registers for reconfiguring the one or more performance counters.

  6. Aircraft performance and control in downburst wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    The methods developed for analyses of the winds and of aircraft performance during an investigation of a downburst wind-shear-induced accident have been utilized in a more general study of aircraft performance in such encounters. The computed responses of a generic, large transport aircraft to take-off and approach encounters with a downburst wind field were used in examining the effects of performance factors and control procedures on the ability of the aircraft to survive. Obvious benefits are seen for higher initial encounter speeds, maximum thrust-weight values typical of two-engined aircraft, and immediacy of pilot response. The results of controlling to a constant, predetermined, pitch attitude are demonstrated. Control algorithms that sacrifice altitude for speed appear to provide a higher level of survivability, but guidance displays more explicitly defining flightpath than those commonly in use might be required.

  7. PTS performance by flight- and control-group macaques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.; Gulledge, J. P.; Shlyk, G. G.; Vasilieva, O. N.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 25 young monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained with the Psychomotor Test System, a package of software tasks and computer hardware developed for spaceflight research with nonhuman primates. Two flight monkeys and two control monkeys were selected from this pool and performed a psychomotor task before and after the Bion 11 flight or a ground-control period. Monkeys from both groups showed significant disruption in performance after the 14-day flight or simulation (plus one anesthetized day of biopsies and other tests), and this disruption appeared to be magnified for the flight animal.

  8. Controlling Rater Stringency Error in Clinical Performance Rating: Further Validation of a Performance Rating Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    Prior research in a single clinical training setting has shown Cason and Cason's (1981) simplified model of their performance rating theory can improve rating reliability and validity through statistical control of rater stringency error. Here, the model was applied to clinical performance ratings of 14 cohorts (about 250 students and 200 raters)…

  9. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  10. Stability and control of maneuvering high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Berry, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    The stability and control of a high-performance aircraft was analyzed, and a design methodology for a departure prevention stability augmentation system (DPSAS) was developed. A general linear aircraft model was derived which includes maneuvering flight effects and trim calculation procedures for investigating highly dynamic trajectories. The stability and control analysis systematically explored the effects of flight condition and angular motion, as well as the stability of typical air combat trajectories. The effects of configuration variation also were examined.

  11. Survey of control performance in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Zheng, Yicong; Kosut, Robert; Brun, Todd; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-08-01

    There is a rich variety of physics underlying the fundamental gating operations for quantum information processing (QIP). A key aspect of a QIP system is how noise may enter during quantum operations and how suppressing or correcting its effects can best be addressed. Quantum control techniques have been developed to specifically address this effort, although a detailed classification of the compatibility of controls schemes with noise sources found in common quantum systems has not yet been performed. This work numerically examines the performance of modern control methods for suppressing decoherence in the presence of noise forms found in viable quantum systems. The noise-averaged process matrix for controlled one-qubit and two-qubit operations are calculated across noise found in systems driven by Markovian open quantum dynamics. Rather than aiming to describe the absolute best control scheme for a given physical circumstance, this work serves instead to classify quantum control behavior across a large class of noise forms so that opportunities for improving QIP performance may be identified.

  12. TMD-Based Structural Control of High Performance Steel Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Gun; Kyum Kim, Moon

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of structural control using tuned mass damper (TMD) for suppressing excessive traffic induced vibration of high performance steel bridge. The study considered 1-span steel plate girder bridge and bridge-vehicle interaction using HS-24 truck model. A numerical model of steel plate girder, traffic load, and TMD is constructed and time history analysis is performed using commercial structural analysis program ABAQUS 6.10. Results from analyses show that high performance steel bridge has dynamic serviceability problem, compared to relatively low performance steel bridge. Therefore, the structural control using TMD is implemented in order to alleviate dynamic serviceability problems. TMD is applied to the bridge with high performance steel and then vertical vibration due to dynamic behavior is assessed again. In consequent, by using TMD, it is confirmed that the residual amplitude is appreciably reduced by 85% in steady-state vibration. Moreover, vibration serviceability assessment using 'Reiher-Meister Curve' is also remarkably improved. As a result, this paper provides the guideline for economical design of I-girder using high performance steel and evaluates the effectiveness of structural control using TMD, simultaneously.

  13. Performance control strategies for oil-fired residential heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.

    1990-07-01

    Results are reported of a study of control system options which can be used to improve the combustion performance of residential, oil-fired heating equipment. Two basic control modes were considered in this program. The first is service required'' signals in which an indication is provided when the flame quality or heat exchanger cleanliness have degraded to the point that a service call is required. The second control mode is excess-air trim'' in which the burner would essentially tune itself continuously for maximum efficiency. 35 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Performance Analysis of Chemotaxis Controllers: Which has Better Chemotaxis Controller, Escherichia coli or Paramecium caudatum?

    PubMed

    Azuma, Shun-Ichi; Owaki, Katsuya; Shinohara, Nobuhiro; Sugie, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the biological phenomenon in which organisms move to a more favorable location in an environment with a chemical attractant or repellent. Since chemotaxis is a typical example of the environmental response of organisms, it is a fundamental topic in biology and related fields. We discuss the performance of the internal controllers that generate chemotaxis. We first propose performance indices to evaluate the controllers. Based on these indices, we evaluate the performance of two controller models of Escherichia coli and Paramecium caudatum. As a result, it is disclosed that the E. coli-type controller achieves chemotaxis quickly but roughly, whereas the P. caudatum-type controller achieves it slowly but precisely. This result will be a biological contribution from a control theoretic point of view. PMID:26336141

  15. Review of End-of-Life Thermal Control Coating Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Kline, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    White thermal control coatings capable of long term performance are needed for Fission Surface Power (FSP) where heat from a nuclear reactor placed on the surface of the Moon must be rejected to the environment. The threats to thermal control coating durability on the lunar surface are electrons, protons, and ultraviolet radiation. The anticipated damage to the coating is a gradual darkening over time. The increase in solar absorptance would, in essence, add a cyclic heat load to the radiator. The greater the darkening, the greater the added heat load. The cyclic heat load could ultimately impart a cyclic influence on FSP system performance. No significant change in emittance is anticipated. Optical properties degradation data were found in the open literature for the Z-93 series of thermal control paints. Additional optical properties degradation data were found from the Lunar Orbiter V mission, the Optical Properties Monitor, and the Materials International Space Station Experiment. Anticipated end-of-life thermal control coating performance for a FSP installation is postulated. With the FSP installation located away from landing and launching areas, and out of line-of-sight, lunar dust from human activity may not be a threat. The benefits of investing in next generation thermal control paint chemistry are explored.

  16. Modeling-Error-Driven Performance-Seeking Direct Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V.; Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Burken, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a stable discrete-time adaptive law that targets modeling errors in a direct adaptive control framework. The update law was developed in our previous work for the adaptive disturbance rejection application. The approach is based on the philosophy that without modeling errors, the original control design has been tuned to achieve the desired performance. The adaptive control should, therefore, work towards getting this performance even in the face of modeling uncertainties/errors. In this work, the baseline controller uses dynamic inversion with proportional-integral augmentation. Dynamic inversion is carried out using the assumed system model. On-line adaptation of this control law is achieved by providing a parameterized augmentation signal to the dynamic inversion block. The parameters of this augmentation signal are updated to achieve the nominal desired error dynamics. Contrary to the typical Lyapunov-based adaptive approaches that guarantee only stability, the current approach investigates conditions for stability as well as performance. A high-fidelity F-15 model is used to illustrate the overall approach.

  17. Performance evaluation on vibration control of MR landing gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Nam, Y. J.; Yamane, R.; Park, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the applicability of the developed MR damper to the landing gear system for the attenuating undesired shock and vibration in the landing and taxing phases. First of all, the experimental model of the MR damper is derived based on the results of performance evaluations. Next, a simplified skyhook controller, which is one of the most straightforward, but effective approaches for improving ride comport in vehicles with active suspensions, is formulated. Then, the vibration control performances of the landing gear system using the MR damper are theoretically evaluated in the landing phase of the aircraft. A series of simulation analyses show that the proposed MR damper with the skyhook controller is effective for suppressing undesired vibration of the aircraft body. Finally, the effectiveness of the simulation results are additionally verified via HILS (Hardware-in-the-loop-simulation) method.

  18. Cost and performance of activated carbon injection for mercury control

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-15

    Activated carbon injection (ACI) is one technology being developed to absorb mercury from mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants. In 2003/04, the USDOE and NETL selected 14 projects to test and evaluate mercury control technologies. While field testing is still ongoing, DOE/NETL recently completed an economic analysis of mercury control for six test sites spanning three ACI variations - conventional powdered activated carbon (PAC), brominated PAC and conventional PAC combined with a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) applied to the coal. To evaluate the progress of the field testing program and discern the performance of ACI, a data adjustment methodology was developed to account for baseline methane capture. This data were used to perform economic analyses to achieve low, mid and high levels of mercury control. The costs are given in the article. Full details are available on the DOE/NETL website, www.netl.doe.gov. 2 figs., 1 photo.

  19. Control system performance in a modern daylighted office building

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, C.; Fountain, M., Selkowitz, S.; Jewell, J.

    1990-10-01

    Lockheed Building 157 is one of the United States' largest experiments in contemporary daylighting. Built in 1983, the five story structure houses 3,000 employees and uses daylight for ambient illumination throughout its 56,000-m{sup 2} office interior. A continuously dimmable fluorescent lighting system supplements interior daylight under the control of open-loop ceiling-mounted photosensors. In 1985 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) began a year-long program to measure lighting system performance in the building. Data from this study indicated that architectural features of the building performed admirably, admitting significant daylight to large areas of the open plan interior. Operational savings, however, were limited by inappropriate performance of the control system in many of the building's lighting circuits. LBL recently completed a follow-up investigation of the lighting systems in Building 157 addressing the interaction between daylight and the lighting control system with the goal of improving control system performance. We modified a 1,700-m{sup 2} test zone by relocating the photosensors, attenuating the photosensor control signal, changing the response pattern of the photosensors, and implementing a LBL-developed calibration procedure, Following these modifications, we installed four data-acquisition systems and collected detailed data describing illuminance and lighting power demand during two week periods in the summer, equinox, and winter seasons. This paper presents a comparison of lighting system performance before and after the LBL modifications. Analysis of the data indicates our modifications were successful in maintaining interior illuminance at the target of 350 lux with minimal electric energy consumption. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Stability and Performance Metrics for Adaptive Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Nguyen, Nhan; VanEykeren, Luarens

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of verifying adaptive control techniques for enabling safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions. Since the adaptive systems are non-linear by design, the existing control verification metrics are not applicable to adaptive controllers. Moreover, these systems are in general highly uncertain. Hence, the system's characteristics cannot be evaluated by relying on the available dynamical models. This necessitates the development of control verification metrics based on the system's input-output information. For this point of view, a set of metrics is introduced that compares the uncertain aircraft's input-output behavior under the action of an adaptive controller to that of a closed-loop linear reference model to be followed by the aircraft. This reference model is constructed for each specific maneuver using the exact aerodynamic and mass properties of the aircraft to meet the stability and performance requirements commonly accepted in flight control. The proposed metrics are unified in the sense that they are model independent and not restricted to any specific adaptive control methods. As an example, we present simulation results for a wing damaged generic transport aircraft with several existing adaptive controllers.

  1. North American Electric Reliability Council's new control performance standard-oriented automatic generation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Maojun

    A comprehensive Automatic Generation Control (AGC) Simulator has been developed to provide realistic simulation enviromnent for evaluating different AGC algorithms with respect to NERC's (North American Electric Reliability Council) old control criteria and new control performance standards. It can simulate multiple interconnected control areas with net interchanges among them, with one study control area that consists of ten units of different types and sizes, and other equivalent external control areas with two units modeled for each area. Each control area has its own one-month worth of load data that is based on the actual recordings provided by major electric utilities of the United States, while the study area's load also includes a separate set of non-conforming load (NCL) data. The simulator can simulate all of the major types of generating units, and a delay logic has been added to unit models so that the responses of unit models can be closer to that of real units. A unit can be operating in three modes---base loaded mode, manual dispatch mode, and automatic mode. Simplified schemes of unit commitment and economic dispatch are also developed. A new NERC's control performance standard (CPS) oriented AGC logic has been designed and tested by the comprehensive and realistic AGC simulator mentioned above. The new AGC logic includes the CPS1 control, two methods of the CPS2 control, the DCS control, and the prioritized control coordination scheme. Simulation results indicate that the new AGC can achieve better CPS1 and CPS2 control performances with less amount of control effort. A very short-term load predictor is developed, and its application in different AGC algorithms has been studied. The control performance effects of non-conforming load, including its type and magnitude, and total regulating capacity are investigated. In addition, a set of operator-friendly control performance status displays are designed. An IEEE journal paper has been generated from

  2. Controller design and performance of the Spacelab instrument pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelker, A.

    The Spacelab instrument pointing system (IPS) is designed for high-precision pointing of space experiments. The IPS demonstrated its performance during the maiden flight on the Shuttle in July 1985. The control system provides three-axis pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range for a variety of experiments. The envisaged pointing accuracy as well as the structural flexibility of the plant and disturbances imposed challenging requirements on the controller design. The control system comprises a feedback loop with attenuation filters and PID control as well as feed-forward compensation of external disturbances. Based on optical sensor and gyro measurements the attitude is determined via a special version of the Kalman filter.

  3. Control Performance of Vehicle Abs Featuring ER Valve Pressure Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. S.; Choi, S. B.; Wereley, N. M.

    In this work, an electrically controllable anti-lock brake system (ABS) for passenger vehicle is developed by utilizing electrorheological (ER) fluid. A pressure modulator which consists of a cylindrical ER valve and the hydraulic booster is constructed in order to achieve sufficient brake pressure variation during ABS operation. The principal design parameters of the modulator are determined by considering ER properties as well as required braking pressure. After investigating pressure controllability of the modulator, a vehicle model which is integrated with the proposed pressure modulator is formulated to design yaw rate controller. A sliding mode controller is designed to obtain desired yaw rate, and the friction forces between roads and wheels are estimated via the estimator. Braking performances of the proposed ABS under various roads are evaluated through the hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (HILS) and the steering stability during braking operation is demonstrated by undertaking split-μ test.

  4. Switching LPV Control for High Performance Tactical Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Bei; Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines a switching Linear Parameter-Varying (LPV) control approach to determine if it is practical to use for flight control designs within a wide angle of attack region. The approach is based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. The full parameter space is partitioned into overlapping subspaces and a family of LPV controllers are designed, each suitable for a specific parameter subspace. The hysteresis switching logic is used to accomplish the transition among different parameter subspaces. The proposed switching LPV control scheme is applied to an F-16 aircraft model with different actuator dynamics in low and high angle of attack regions. The nonlinear simulation results show that the aircraft performs well when switching among different angle of attack regions.

  5. Human performance: An essential element in materials control and accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Allentuck, J.

    1996-10-01

    The importance of the role of human performance in the successful and effective operation of many activities throughout many industries has been well documented. Most closely related to the materials control and accountability area is the work in human factors that has been ongoing in the U.S. nuclear industry since the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1979. Research related to the role of human reliability, human-system interface, and organization and management influences has been and is still being conducted to identify ways to enhance the safe and effective operation of nuclear facilities. This paper will discuss these human performance areas and how they relate to the materials control and accountability area. Particular attention will be focussed on the notion of {open_quotes}safety culture{close_quotes} and how it can be defined and measured for understanding the values and attitudes held by individuals working in the materials control area. It is widely believed that the culture of an organization, which reflects the expectations and values of the management of an organization, is a key element to the operation of that organization. The human performance element is one which has not received a great deal of consideration in the materials control and accountability area and yet it will be demonstrated that it is an essential component to ensure the success of safeguards activities.

  6. Procrastination, deadlines, and performance: self-control by precommitment.

    PubMed

    Ariely, Dan; Wertenbroch, Klaus

    2002-05-01

    Procrastination is all too familiar to most people. People delay writing up their research (so we hear!), repeatedly declare they will start their diets tomorrow, or postpone until next week doing odd jobs around the house. Yet people also sometimes attempt to control their procrastination by setting deadlines for themselves. In this article, we pose three questions: (a) Are people willing to self-impose meaningful (i.e., costly) deadlines to overcome procrastination? (b) Are self-imposed deadlines effective in improving task performance? (c) When self-imposing deadlines, do people set them optimally, for maximum performance enhancement? A set of studies examined these issues experimentally, showing that the answer is "yes" to the first two questions, and "no" to the third. People have self-control problems, they recognize them, and they try to control them by self-imposing costly deadlines. These deadlines help people control procrastination, hit they are not as effective as some externally imposed deadlines in improving task performance.

  7. Anticipatory synergy adjustments reflect individual performance of feedforward force control.

    PubMed

    Togo, Shunta; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We grasp and dexterously manipulate an object through multi-digit synergy. In the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, multi-digit synergy is defined as the coordinated control mechanism of fingers to stabilize variable important for task success, e.g., total force. Previous studies reported anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs) that correspond to a drop of the synergy index before a quick change of the total force. The present study compared ASA's properties with individual performances of feedforward force control to investigate a relationship of those. Subjects performed a total finger force production task that consisted of a phase in which subjects tracked target line with visual information and a phase in which subjects produced total force pulse without visual information. We quantified their multi-digit synergy through UCM analysis and observed significant ASAs before producing total force pulse. The time of the ASA initiation and the magnitude of the drop of the synergy index were significantly correlated with the error of force pulse, but not with the tracking error. Almost all subjects showed a significant increase of the variance that affected the total force. Our study directly showed that ASA reflects the individual performance of feedforward force control independently of target-tracking performance and suggests that the multi-digit synergy was weakened to adjust the multi-digit movements based on a prediction error so as to reduce the future error.

  8. Lumbopelvic control and pitching performance of professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Ajit M W; McKenzie, Christopher S; Borchers, James R; Best, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    This study assessed the correlation between lumbopelvic control during a single-leg balancing task and in-game pitching performance in Minor-League baseball pitchers. Seventy-five healthy professional baseball pitchers performed a standing lumbopelvic control test during the last week of spring training for the 2008 and 2009 seasons while wearing a custom-designed testing apparatus, the "Level Belt." With the Level Belt secured to the waist, subjects attempted to transition from a 2-leg to a single-leg pitching stance and balance while maintaining a stable pelvic position. Subjects were graded on the maximum sagittal pelvic tilt from a neutral position during the motion. Pitching performance, number of innings pitched (IP), and injuries were compared for all subjects who pitched at least 50 innings during a season. The median Level Belt score for the study group was 7°. Two-sample t-tests with equal variances were used to determine if pitchers with a Level Belt score <7° or ≥7° were more likely to perform differently during the baseball season, and chi-square analysis was used to compare injuries between groups. Subjects scoring <7° on the Level Belt test had significantly fewer walks plus hits per inning than subjects scoring ≥7° (walks plus hits per inning pitched, 1.352 ± 0.251 vs. 1.584 ± 0.360, p = 0.013) and significantly more IP during the season (IP, 78.89 ± 38.67 vs. 53.38 ± 42.47, p = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the number of pitchers injured between groups. These data suggest that lumbopelvic control influences overall performance for baseball pitchers and that a simple test of lumbopelvic control can potentially identify individuals who have a better chance of pitching success.

  9. Performance of silvered Teflon (trademark) thermal control blankets on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Gary; Stuckey, Wayne; Hemminger, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Silverized Teflon (Ag/FEP) is a widely used passive thermal control material for space applications. The material has a very low alpha/e ratio (less than 0.1) for low operating temperatures and is fabricated with various FEP thicknesses (as the Teflon thickness increases, the emittance increases). It is low outgassing and, because of its flexibility, can be applied around complex, curved shapes. Ag/FEP has achieved multiyear lifetimes under a variety of exposure conditions. This has been demonstrated by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Solar Max, Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes (SCATHA), and other flight experiments. Ag/FEP material has been held in place on spacecraft by a variety of methods: mechanical clamping, direct adhesive bonding of tapes and sheets, and by Velcro(TM) tape adhesively bonded to back surfaces. On LDEF, for example, 5-mil blankets held by Velcro(TM) and clamping were used for thermal control over 3- by 4-ft areas on each of 17 trays. Adhesively bonded 2- and 5-mil sheets were used on other LDEF experiments, both for thermal control and as tape to hold other thermal control blankets in place. Performance data over extended time periods are available from a number of flights. The observed effects on optical properties, mechanical properties, and surface chemistry will be summarized in this paper. This leads to a discussion of performance life estimates and other design lessons for Ag/FEP thermal control material.

  10. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  11. Design and performance of Skylab thermal/environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, G. D.; Littles, J. W.; Patterson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The function of the thermal/environmental control systems was to provide a comfortable thermal environment for the crew, to cool electronic components, to supply a controlled oxygen/nitrogen atmosphere, and to remove moisture, carbon dioxide, odors, and trace contaminants from the atmosphere. A separate refrigeration system was used to chill and freeze food and biomedical samples and to provide cold water for drinking. This paper describes system design and compares in-flight performance to preflight predictions. A discussion of in-flight anomalies and corrective actions is also included.

  12. SPS phase control system performance via analytical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Kantak, A. V.; Chie, C. M.; Booth, R. W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A solar power satellite transmission system which incorporates automatic beam forming, steering, and phase control is discussed. The phase control concept centers around the notation of an active retrodirective phased array as a means of pointing the beam to the appropriate spot on Earth. The transmitting antenna (spacetenna) directs the high power beam so that it focuses on the ground-based receiving antenna (rectenna). A combination of analysis and computerized simulation was conducted to determine the far field performance of the reference distribution system, and the beam forming and microwave power generating systems.

  13. Control performance evaluation of railway vehicle MR suspension using fuzzy sky-ground hook control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, G. S.; Yoo, W. H.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents control performance evaluation of railway vehicle featured by semi-active suspension system using magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. In order to achieve this goal, a nine degree of freedom of railway vehicle model, which includes car body and bogie, is established. The wheel-set data is loaded from measured value of railway vehicle. The MR damper system is incorporated with the governing equation of motion of the railway vehicle model which includes secondary suspension. To illustrate the effectiveness of the controlled MR dampers on suspension system of railway vehicle, the control law using the sky-ground hook controller is adopted. This controller takes into account for both vibration control of car body and increasing stability of bogie by adopting a weighting parameter between two performance requirements. The parameters appropriately determined by employing a fuzzy algorithm associated with two fuzzy variables: the lateral speed of the car body and the lateral performance of the bogie. Computer simulation results of control performances such as vibration control and stability analysis are presented in time and frequency domains.

  14. A fuzzy logic based spacecraft controller for six degree of freedom control and performance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Hoblit, Jeffrey; Jani, Yashvant

    1991-01-01

    The development philosophy of the fuzzy logic controller is explained, details of the rules and membership functions used are given, and the early results of testing of the control system for a representative range of scenarios are reported. The fuzzy attitude controller was found capable of performing all rotational maneuvers, including rate hold and rate maneuvers. It handles all orbital perturbations very efficiently and is very responsive in correcting errors.

  15. Thermal control surfaces experiment (SOO69) flight systems performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal control surfaces experiment (TCSE) was the most complex hardware system aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The TCSE system consists of a scanning spectroreflectometer that measured test samples mounted on a rotatable carousel assembly. A microprocessor based data system controlled all aspects of TCSE system operation. Power was provided by four primary batteries. Flight measurement and housekeeping data were stored on a tape recorder for postflight analysis. The TCSE is a microcosm of complex electro-optical payloads being developed by NASA, DoD, and the aerospace community. The TCSE provides valuable data on the performance of these systems in space. The TCSE flight system and its excellent performance on the LDEF mission are described. A few operational anomalies were encountered and are discussed. Initial post-flight tests show that the TCSE system remains functional although some degradation in the optical measurements were observed. The results of these tests are also presented.

  16. Lithography imaging control by enhanced monitoring of light source performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Lalovic, Ivan; Seong, Nakgeuon; Rechsteiner, Gregory; Thornes, Joshua; D'havé, Koen; Van Look, Lieve; Bekaert, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Reducing lithography pattern variability has become a critical enabler of ArF immersion scaling and is required to ensure consistent lithography process yield for sub-30nm device technologies. As DUV multi-patterning requirements continue to shrink, it is imperative that all sources of lithography variability are controlled throughout the product life-cycle, from technology development to high volume manufacturing. Recent developments of new ArF light-source metrology and monitoring capabilities have been introduced in order to improve lithography patterning control.[1] These technologies enable performance monitoring of new light-source properties, relating to illumination stability, and enable new reporting and analysis of in-line performance.

  17. Enhancing supply chain performance with improved order-control policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilakantan, K.

    2010-09-01

    This article takes up the study of the dynamics of a single product in a prototype three-stage supply chain system, at the downstream warehouse end of the chain, under a responsive chain strategy. The dynamics under various ordering policies and the parameters which will yield desired responses are systematically analysed, both for deterministic and stochastic systems. Higher-order control policies are then proposed and analysed. The considered key performance criteria are the permanent inventory deviations from the desired levels, or the offset, the maximum dip in inventory, the 'undershoot', the damping effect and decay rates, and the duration of time in the negative region, for deterministic systems; and additionally, the inventory variance for stochastic systems. It is shown that the disadvantages of the conventional (proportional-integral-derivative) control policies, like large negative deviations, low decay rates, and high inventory variance, can be overcome by the use of higher-order control policies proposed herein.

  18. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  19. Performance and robustness of hybrid model predictive control for controllable dampers in building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik A.; Elhaddad, Wael M.; Wojtkiewicz, Steven F.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of strategies have been developed over the past few decades to determine controllable damping device forces to mitigate the response of structures and mechanical systems to natural hazards and other excitations. These "smart" damping devices produce forces through passive means but have properties that can be controlled in real time, based on sensor measurements of response across the structure, to dramatically reduce structural motion by exploiting more than the local "information" that is available to purely passive devices. A common strategy is to design optimal damping forces using active control approaches and then try to reproduce those forces with the smart damper. However, these design forces, for some structures and performance objectives, may achieve high performance by selectively adding energy, which cannot be replicated by a controllable damping device, causing the smart damper performance to fall far short of what an active system would provide. The authors have recently demonstrated that a model predictive control strategy using hybrid system models, which utilize both continuous and binary states (the latter to capture the switching behavior between dissipative and non-dissipative forces), can provide reductions in structural response on the order of 50% relative to the conventional clipped-optimal design strategy. This paper explores the robustness of this newly proposed control strategy through evaluating controllable damper performance when the structure model differs from the nominal one used to design the damping strategy. Results from the application to a two-degree-of-freedom structure model confirms the robustness of the proposed strategy.

  20. Flight controller alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Rosekind, Mark R.; Dinges, David F.; Miller, Donna L.; Gillen, Kelly A.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Aguilar, Ronald D.; Smith, Roy M.

    1994-01-01

    Decreased alertness and performance associated with fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption are issues faced by a diverse range of shiftwork operations. During STS operations, MOD personnel provide 24 hr. coverage of critical tasks. A joint JSC and ARC project was undertaken to examine these issues in flight controllers during MOD shiftwork operations. An initial operational test of procedures and measures was conducted during STS-53 in Dec. 1992. The study measures included a background questionnaire, a subjective daily logbook completed on a 24 hr. basis (to report sleep patterns, work periods, etc.), and an 8 minute performance and mood test battery administered at the beginning, middle, and end of each shift period. Seventeen Flight controllers representing the 3 Orbit shifts participated. The initial results clearly support further data collection during other STS missions to document baseline levels of alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations. These issues are especially pertinent for the night shift operations and the acute phase advance required for the transition of day shift personnel into the night for shuttle launch. Implementation and evaluation of the countermeasure strategies to maximize alertness and performance is planned. As STS missions extend to further extended duration orbiters, timelines and planning for 24 circadian disruption will remain highly relevant in the MOD environment.

  1. Add-on simple adaptive control improves performance of classical control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Haim; Rusnak, Ilan

    2014-12-01

    The Simple Adaptive Control (SAC) controls an augmented plant that comprises the true plant with parallel feed-forward. The Almost Strictly Positive Real (ASPR) property of the augmented plant leads to asymptotic following. Prior publications have shown that, based only on the prior knowledge on stabilizability properties of systems (usually available), the parallel feed-forward configuration (PFC) allows adaptive control of realistic systems, even if they are both unstable and non-minimum phase. However, it was commonly thought that the PFC addition requires a price when compared with good linear time invariant (LTI) designs that do not use any addition to the plant. The paper shows that the use of SAC with PFC as Add-On to LTI system design improves the performance. Although SAC directly controls the augmented error, it always gives improved performance, i.e., smaller tracking error and reduced sensitivity to plant disturbance, with respect to the best LTI controller.

  2. Voice onset time of voiceless bilabial and velar stops in 3-year-old bilingual children and their age-matched monolingual peers

    PubMed Central

    FABIANO-SMITH, LEAH; BUNTA, FERENC

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates aspects of voice onset time (VOT) of voiceless bilabial and velar stops in monolingual and bilingual children. VOT poses a special challenge for bilingual Spanish- and English-speaking children because although this VOT distinction exists in both languages, the values differ for the same contrast across Spanish and English. Twenty-four 3-year-olds participated in this study (8 bilingual Spanish–English, 8 monolingual Spanish and 8 monolingual English). The VOT productions of /p/ and /k/ in syllable-initial stressed singleton position were compared across participants. Non-parametric statistical analyses were performed to examine differences (1) between monolinguals and bilinguals and (2) between English and Spanish. The main findings of the study were that monolingual and bilingual children generally differed on VOT in English, but not in Spanish. No statistically significant differences were found between the Spanish and the English VOT of the bilingual children, but the VOT values did differ significantly for monolingual Spanish-versus monolingual English-speaking participants. Our findings were interpreted in terms of Flege’s Speech Learning Model, finding possible evidence for equivalence classification. PMID:21787142

  3. Performance monitoring following conflict: internal adjustments in cognitive control?

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; Clayson, Peter E; Baldwin, Scott A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of strategic conflict-related adjustments in cognitive control processes on indices of performance monitoring. Previous research has examined the ability of parametric task-related manipulations to bias attention to errors; however, the present study sought to elucidate the effects of internal adjustments in control mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex on error-related conflict processing. High-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were obtained from 124 healthy individuals (68 female, 66 male) during a modified Eriksen flanker task. Behavioral measures (i.e., error rates, response times [RTs]) and N2 amplitudes showed significant conflict adaptation (i.e., previous-trial congruencies influenced current-trial measures). For error trials, the error-related negativity (ERN) was more negative for errors on high-conflict (i.e., incongruent) trials following high-conflict trials relative to errors on high-conflict trials following low-conflict (i.e., congruent) trials. These findings indicate that error-related conflict-monitoring processes adjust according to the post-conflict recruitment of strategic cognitive control and suggest an ongoing interplay between conflict and internal adjustments in control resources. Interpretations from the perspective of the conflict monitoring theory of cognitive control, the reinforcement learning theory, and the response-outcome theory of the ERN are discussed.

  4. Performance seeking control (PSC) for the F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.

    1995-01-01

    The performance seeking control algorithm optimizes total propulsion system performance. This adaptive, model-based optimization algorithm has been successfully flight demonstrated on two engines with differing levels of degradation. Models of the engine, nozzle, and inlet produce reliable, accurate estimates of engine performance. But, because of an observability problem, component levels of degradation cannot be accurately determined. Depending on engine-specific operating characteristics PSC achieves various levels performance improvement. For example, engines with more deterioration typically operate at higher turbine temperatures than less deteriorated engines. Thus when the PSC maximum thrust mode is applied, for example, there will be less temperature margin available to be traded for increasing thrust.

  5. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, D; Müller, U K; Stamhuis, E J; de Kat, R; van Gestel, W; Veldhuis, L L M; Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A; Videler, J J; van Leeuwen, J L

    2007-04-26

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings, presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance. That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models, which extrapolated the wing's performance envelope from aerodynamic theory. Here we describe the aerodynamic and structural performance of actual swift wings, as measured in a wind tunnel, and on this basis build a semi-empirical glide model. By measuring inside and outside swifts' behavioural envelope, we show that choosing the most suitable sweep can halve sink speed or triple turning rate. Extended wings are superior for slow glides and turns; swept wings are superior for fast glides and turns. This superiority is due to better aerodynamic performance-with the exception of fast turns. Swept wings are less effective at generating lift while turning at high speeds, but can bear the extreme loads. Finally, our glide model predicts that cost-effective gliding occurs at speeds of 8-10 m s(-1), whereas agility-related figures of merit peak at 15-25 m s(-1). In fact, swifts spend the night ('roost') in flight at 8-10 m s(-1) (ref. 11), thus our model can explain this choice for a resting behaviour. Morphing not only adjusts birds' wing performance to the task at hand, but could also control the flight of future aircraft.

  6. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control

    SciTech Connect

    Létourneau, Daniel McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. Methods: The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3–4 times/week over a period of 10–11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ±0.5 and ±1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. Results: The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ±0.22 mm for most MLC leaves

  7. Factory performance evaluations of engineering controls for asphalt paving equipment.

    PubMed

    Mead, K R; Mickelsen, R L; Brumagin, T E

    1999-08-01

    This article describes a unique analytical tool to assist the development and implementation of engineering controls for the asphalt paving industry. Through an agreement with the U.S. Department of Transportation, the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) requested that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) assist U.S. manufacturers of asphalt paving equipment with the development and evaluation of engineering controls. The intended function of the controls was to capture and remove asphalt emissions generated during the paving process. NIOSH engineers developed a protocol to evaluate prototype engineering controls using qualitative smoke and quantitative tracer gas methods. Video recordings documented each prototype's ability to capture theatrical smoke under "managed" indoor conditions. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), released as a tracer gas, enabled quantification of the capture efficiency and exhaust flow rate for each prototype. During indoor evaluations, individual prototypes' capture efficiencies averaged from 7 percent to 100 percent. Outdoor evaluations resulted in average capture efficiencies ranging from 81 percent down to 1 percent as wind gusts disrupted the ability of the controls to capture the SF6. The tracer gas testing protocol successfully revealed deficiencies in prototype designs which otherwise may have gone undetected. It also showed that the combination of a good enclosure and higher exhaust ventilation rate provided the highest capture efficiency. Some manufacturers used the stationary evaluation results to compare performances among multiple hood designs. All the manufacturers identified areas where their prototype designs were susceptible to cross-draft interferences. These stationary performance evaluations proved to be a valuable method to identify strengths and weaknesses in individual designs and subsequently optimize those designs prior to expensive analytical field studies. PMID:10462852

  8. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position—behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active. PMID:27683546

  9. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position-behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active. PMID:27683546

  10. Control strategy for maximum anaerobic co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    García-Gen, Santiago; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M

    2015-09-01

    A control strategy for optimising the performance of anaerobic co-digestion in terms of methane productivity, digestate quality and process stability is presented. A linear programming approach is adopted to calculate the feeding of multiple substrates for maximum methane productivity, subjected to restrictions based on experimental and heuristic knowledge. Process stability is quantitatively assessed by an empirical diagnosis function comparing alkalinity ratio measurements against reference values (outputs between (-1,1]). A second empirical diagnosis function is defined to compare methane flow rate measurements against a reference value of maximum capacity (outputs between (0,1]). A variable-gain control function (outputs between (-1,1]), derived from the diagnosis functions, is defined to determine the quantitative change applied to the most active constraint of the substrate blend optimisation problem leading to a new set-point of feeding substrates blend. The control strategy works in a closed-loop architecture under which the process performance for each blend of substrates is continuously assessed. The system was successfully validated in a 1 m(3) hybrid Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket - Anaerobic Filter (UASB-AF) reactor, treating blends of substrates (gelatine, glycerine and pig manure supernatant) at OLR values between 0.71 and 6.33 gCOD/L d over a period of 210 days at mesophilic conditions. PMID:26001824

  11. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position—behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active.

  12. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position-behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active.

  13. Performance seeking control: Program overview and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A flight test evaluation of the performance-seeking control (PSC) algorithm on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control research aircraft was conducted for single-engine operation at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The model-based PSC system was developed with three optimization modes: minimum fuel flow at constant thrust, minimum turbine temperature at constant thrust, and maximum thrust at maximum dry and full afterburner throttle settings. Subsonic and supersonic flight testing were conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility covering the three PSC optimization modes and over the full throttle range. Flight results show substantial benefits. In the maximum thrust mode, thrust increased up to 15 percent at subsonic and 10 percent at supersonic flight conditions. The minimum fan turbine inlet temperature mode reduced temperatures by more than 100 F at high altitudes. The minimum fuel flow mode results decreased fuel consumption up to 2 percent in the subsonic regime and almost 10 percent supersonically. These results demonstrate that PSC technology can benefit the next generation of fighter or transport aircraft. NASA Dryden is developing an adaptive aircraft performance technology system that is measurement based and uses feedback to ensure optimality. This program will address the technical weaknesses identified in the PSC program and will increase performance gains.

  14. The effects of bedrest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 2: Control task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.; Peters, R. A.; Dimarco, R. J.; Allen, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simplified space shuttle reentry simulation performed on the NASA Ames Research Center Centrifuge is described. Anticipating potentially deleterious effects of physiological deconditioning from orbital living (simulated here by 10 days of enforced bedrest) upon a shuttle pilot's ability to manually control his aircraft (should that be necessary in an emergency) a comprehensive battery of measurements was made roughly every 1/2 minute on eight military pilot subjects, over two 20-minute reentry Gz vs. time profiles, one peaking at 2 Gz and the other at 3 Gz. Alternate runs were made without and with g-suits to test the help or interference offered by such protective devices to manual control performance. A very demanding two-axis control task was employed, with a subcritical instability in the pitch axis to force a high attentional demand and a severe loss-of-control penalty. The results show that pilots experienced in high Gz flying can easily handle the shuttle manual control task during 2 Gz or 3 Gz reentry profiles, provided the degree of physiological deconditioning is no more than induced by these 10 days of enforced bedrest.

  15. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

  16. Human performance under two different command and control paradigms.

    PubMed

    Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A; Salmon, Paul M; Jenkins, Daniel P

    2014-05-01

    The paradoxical behaviour of a new command and control concept called Network Enabled Capability (NEC) provides the motivation for this paper. In it, a traditional hierarchical command and control organisation was pitted against a network centric alternative on a common task, played thirty times, by two teams. Multiple regression was used to undertake a simple form of time series analysis. It revealed that whilst the NEC condition ended up being slightly slower than its hierarchical counterpart, it was able to balance and optimise all three of the performance variables measured (task time, enemies neutralised and attrition). From this it is argued that a useful conceptual response is not to consider NEC as an end product comprised of networked computers and standard operating procedures, nor to regard the human system interaction as inherently stable, but rather to view it as a set of initial conditions from which the most adaptable component of all can be harnessed: the human. PMID:24094585

  17. Control Software for a High-Performance Telerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Finger, William

    2005-01-01

    A computer program for controlling a high-performance, force-reflecting telerobot has been developed. The goal in designing a telerobot-control system is to make the velocity of the slave match the master velocity, and the environmental force on the master match the force on the slave. Instability can arise from even small delays in propagation of signals between master and slave units. The present software, based on an impedance-shaping algorithm, ensures stability even in the presence of long delays. It implements a real-time algorithm that processes position and force measurements from the master and slave and represents the master/slave communication link as a transmission line. The algorithm also uses the history of the control force and the slave motion to estimate the impedance of the environment. The estimate of the impedance of the environment is used to shape the controlled slave impedance to match the transmission-line impedance. The estimate of the environmental impedance is used to match the master and transmission-line impedances and to estimate the slave/environment force in order to present that force immediately to the operator via the master unit.

  18. Control Design and Performance Analysis for Autonomous Formation Flight Experimentss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Caleb Michael

    Autonomous Formation Flight is a key approach for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and managing traffic in future high density airspace. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) have made it possible for the physical demonstration and validation of autonomous formation flight concepts inexpensively and eliminates the flight risk to human pilots. This thesis discusses the design, implementation, and flight testing of three different formation flight control methods, Proportional Integral and Derivative (PID); Fuzzy Logic (FL); and NonLinear Dynamic Inversion (NLDI), and their respective performance behavior. Experimental results show achievable autonomous formation flight and performance quality with a pair of low-cost unmanned research fixed wing aircraft and also with a solo vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) quadrotor.

  19. Experimentally determined aeroacoustic performance and control of several sonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aeroacoustic performance of several model sonic inlets. The results were analyzed to indicate how inlet aeroacoustic characteristics were affected by inlet design and operating conditions. A system for regulating sonic inlet noise reduction was developed and tested. Results indicate that pressure losses at forward velocity may be substantially less than those at static conditions. This is particularly true for translating centerbody inlets with the centerbody extended in the approach and landing position. Operation to simulated takeoff incidence angles of 50 degrees was demonstrated with good inlet performance. Inlet sound pressure level reduction was regulation was regulated to within approximately + or - 1 dB by controlling inlet surface static pressure measured at the diffuser exit.

  20. POPCORN: a Supervisory Control Simulation for Workload and Performance Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.; Battiste, V.; Lester, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-task simulation of a semi-automatic supervisory control system was developed to provide an environment in which training, operator strategy development, failure detection and resolution, levels of automation, and operator workload can be investigated. The goal was to develop a well-defined, but realistically complex, task that would lend itself to model-based analysis. The name of the task (POPCORN) reflects the visual display that depicts different task elements milling around waiting to be released and pop out to be performed. The operator's task was to complete each of 100 task elements that ere represented by different symbols, by selecting a target task and entering the desired a command. The simulated automatic system then completed the selected function automatically. Highly significant differences in performance, strategy, and rated workload were found as a function of all experimental manipulations (except reward/penalty).

  1. Cost and performance of Group 2 boiler NOx controls

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.; Maibodi, M.; Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted to assist EPA in developing the Phase II NO{sub x} rule under Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990 (the Act). The specific purpose of this study was to assess the performance and capital and total levelized costs of NO{sub x} controls pertinent to Group 2 boilers. Group 2 boilers are all coal-fired boilers that are not dry-bottom wall-fired and tangentially fired and include cell burner-fired, cyclone-fired, wet-bottom, vertically fired, stoker-fired, and fluidized-bed boilers.

  2. Design and Performance of the Monopulse Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.; Gudim, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Ka-band (32-GHz) monopulse tracking has been chosen for the upcoming NASA missions. This decision requires an increased pointing accuracy of the Deep Space Network antenna servo systems that are maintained in a noisy environment. The noise sources include wind gusts, encoder imperfections, and Block V Receiver (BVR) noise. This article describes the selection of the position and monopulse controllers for the improved tracking accuracy and presents the results of the linear and nonlinear simulations to confirm that servo performance meets the requirements.

  3. Archon: A modern controller for high performance astronomical CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredthauer, Greg

    2014-08-01

    The rapid evolution of commercial FPGAs and analog ICs has enabled the development of Archon, a new modular high performance astronomical CCD controller. CCD outputs are digitized by 16-bit 100 MHz ADCs with differential AC-coupled preamplifiers. The raw data stream from an ADC can be stored in parallel with standard image data into three onboard 512 MB frame buffers. Pixel values are computed using digital correlated double sampling. At low pixel rates (< 1 MHz), the dynamic range achievable by averaging hundreds of ADC samples per pixel can exceed 16 bits, so an option to store 32 bits per pixel is provided. CCD clocks are generated by 14-bit 100 MHz DACs. The scripted timing core driving the clocks can generate a new target voltage for each clock every 10 ns, and the clock slew rates are individually programmable. CCD biases are derived from 16-bit DACs, are continuously monitored for voltage and current, and power up and down in a customizable sequence. Communication between the controller and a host computer occurs over a gigabit Ethernet interface (fiber or copper). A CCD configuration is specified by a simple text file. Together, these features simplify the tuning and debugging of scientific CCDs, and enable CCD-limited imaging. I present details of the controller architecture, examples of CCD tuning, and measured performance data of the controller alone (dynamic range of 108 dB at 100 kHz and 98 dB at 1 MHz) and in combination with an STA1600LN CCD.

  4. Dual Engine application of the Performance Seeking Control algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, F. D.; Nobbs, S. G.; Stewart, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Dual Engine Performance Seeking Control (PSC) flight/propulsion optimization program has been developed and will be flown during the second quarter of 1993. Previously, only single engine optimization was possible due to the limited capability of the on-board computer. The implementation of Dual Engine PSC has been made possible with the addition of a new state-of-the-art, higher throughput computer. As a result, the single engine PSC performance improvements already flown will be demonstrated on both engines, simultaneously. Dual Engine PSC will make it possible to directly compare aircraft performance with and without the improvements generated by PSC. With the additional thrust achieved with PSC, significant improvements in acceleration times and time to climb will be possible. PSC is also able to reduce deceleration time from supersonic speeds. This paper traces the history of the PSC program, describes the basic components of PSC, discusses the development and implementation of Dual Engine PSC including additions to the code, and presents predictions of the impact of Dual Engine PSC on aircraft performance.

  5. Adaptive postural control for joint immobilization during multitask performance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li

    2014-01-01

    Motor abundance is an essential feature of adaptive control. The range of joint combinations enabled by motor abundance provides the body with the necessary freedom to adopt different positions, configurations, and movements that allow for exploratory postural behavior. This study investigated the adaptation of postural control to joint immobilization during multi-task performance. Twelve healthy volunteers (6 males and 6 females; 21-29 yr) without any known neurological deficits, musculoskeletal conditions, or balance disorders participated in this study. The participants executed a targeting task, alone or combined with a ball-balancing task, while standing with free or restricted joint motions. The effects of joint configuration variability on center of mass (COM) stability were examined using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The UCM method separates joint variability into two components: the first is consistent with the use of motor abundance, which does not affect COM position (VUCM); the second leads to COM position variability (VORT). The analysis showed that joints were coordinated such that their variability had a minimal effect on COM position. However, the component of joint variability that reflects the use of motor abundance to stabilize COM (VUCM) was significant decreased when the participants performed the combined task with immobilized joints. The component of joint variability that leads to COM variability (VORT) tended to increase with a reduction in joint degrees of freedom. The results suggested that joint immobilization increases the difficulty of stabilizing COM when multiple tasks are performed simultaneously. These findings are important for developing rehabilitation approaches for patients with limited joint movements. PMID:25329477

  6. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  7. Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

    2011-01-14

    This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009

  8. In-flight adaptive performance optimization (APO) control using redundant control effectors of an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Practical application of real-time (or near real-time) Adaptive Performance Optimization (APO) is provided for a transport aircraft in steady climb, cruise, turn descent or other flight conditions based on measurements and calculations of incremental drag from a forced response maneuver of one or more redundant control effectors defined as those in excess of the minimum set of control effectors required to maintain the steady flight condition in progress. The method comprises the steps of applying excitation in a raised-cosine form over an interval of from 100 to 500 sec. at the rate of 1 to 10 sets/sec of excitation, and data for analysis is gathered in sets of measurements made during the excitation to calculate lift and drag coefficients C.sub.L and C.sub.D from two equations, one for each coefficient. A third equation is an expansion of C.sub.D as a function of parasitic drag, induced drag, Mach and altitude drag effects, and control effector drag, and assumes a quadratic variation of drag with positions .delta..sub.i of redundant control effectors i=1 to n. The third equation is then solved for .delta..sub.iopt the optimal position of redundant control effector i, which is then used to set the control effector i for optimum performance during the remainder of said steady flight or until monitored flight conditions change by some predetermined amount as determined automatically or a predetermined minimum flight time has elapsed.

  9. ITER Scenario Performance Simulations Assessing Control and Vertical Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T; Ferron, J; Humphreys, D; Jackson, G; Leuer, J; LoDestro, L; Luce, T; Meyer, W; Pearlstein, L; Welander, A

    2008-05-20

    In simulating reference scenarios proposed for ITER operation, we also explore performance of the poloidal field (PF) and central solenoid (CS) coil systems using a controller to maintain plasma shape and vertical stability during the discharge evolution. We employ a combination of techniques to evaluate system constraints and stability using time-dependent transport simulations of ITER discharges. We have begun the process of benchmarking these simulations with experiments on the DIII-D tokamak. Simulations include startup on the outside limiter, X-point formation and current ramp up to full power, plasma burn conditions at 15MA and 17MA, and ramp down at the end of the pulse. We also simulate perturbative events such as H-to-L back transitions. Our results indicate the viability of proposed ITER operating modes.

  10. Voltage-Controlled Sapphire Oscillator: Design, Development, and Preliminary Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    We present the design for a new short-term frequency standard, the voltage-controlled sapphire oscillator, as a practical and lower-cost alternative to a cryogenic sapphire oscillator operating at liquid helium temperatures. Performance goals are a frequency stability of 1 x 10^-14 (1 second equal to or less than tau equal to or less than 100 seconds), more than 2 years of continuous operation, and practical operability. Key elements include the sapphire resonator, low-power and long-life cryocooler, frequency compensation method, and cryo-Pound design. We report the design verification, experimental results, and test results of the cryocooler environmental sensitivity, as well as a preliminary stability measurement.

  11. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Aims Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. Method The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. Results In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. Conclusion DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality. PMID:26766911

  12. Toward high performance radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems using spectral control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiawa; Chan, Walker; Stelmakh, Veronika; Celanovic, Ivan; Fisher, Peter

    2016-12-01

    This work describes RTPV-PhC-1, an initial prototype for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) system using a two-dimensional photonic crystal emitter and low bandgap thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell to realize spectral control. We validated a system simulation using the measurements of RTPV-PhC-1 and its comparison setup RTPV-FlatTa-1 with the same configuration except a polished tantalum emitter. The emitter of RTPV-PhC-1 powered by an electric heater providing energy equivalent to one plutonia fuel pellet reached 950 °C with 52 W of thermal input power and produced 208 mW output power from 1 cm2 TPV cell. We compared the system performance using a photonic crystal emitter to a polished flat tantalum emitter and found that spectral control with the photonic crystal was four times more efficient. Based on the simulation, with more cell areas, better TPV cells, and improved insulation design, the system powered by a fuel pellet equivalent heat source is expected to reach an efficiency of 7.8%.

  13. MAP Attitude Control System Design and Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. F.; ODonnell, J. R.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. To make a full-sky map of cosmic microwave background fluctuations, a combination fast spin and slow precession motion will be used that will cover the entire celestial sphere in six months. The spin rate should be an order of magnitude higher than the precession rate, and each rate should be tightly controlled. The sunline angle should be 22.5 +/- 0.25 deg. Sufficient attitude knowledge must be provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation of 1.3 arc-minutes RSS three axes. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to acquire and hold the sunline at initial acquisition, and in the event of a failure. Finally. the spacecraft must be able to slew to the proper burn orientations and to the proper off-sunline attitude to start the compound spin. The design and flight performance of the Attitude Control System on MAP that meets these requirements will be discussed.

  14. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-01

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  15. Performance improvement of robots using a learning control scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, Ramuhalli; Chiang, Pen-Tai; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Many applications of robots require that the same task be repeated a number of times. In such applications, the errors associated with one cycle are also repeated every cycle of the operation. An off-line learning control scheme is used here to modify the command function which would result in smaller errors in the next operation. The learning scheme is based on a knowledge of the errors and error rates associated with each cycle. Necessary conditions for the iterative scheme to converge to zero errors are derived analytically considering a second order servosystem model. Computer simulations show that the errors are reduced at a faster rate if the error rate is included in the iteration scheme. The results also indicate that the scheme may increase the magnitude of errors if the rate information is not included in the iteration scheme. Modification of the command input using a phase and gain adjustment is also proposed to reduce the errors with one attempt. The scheme is then applied to a computer model of a robot system similar to PUMA 560. Improved performance of the robot is shown by considering various cases of trajectory tracing. The scheme can be successfully used to improve the performance of actual robots within the limitations of the repeatability and noise characteristics of the robot.

  16. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors.

    PubMed

    Esplandiu, Maria J; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-28

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators. PMID:27036470

  17. Designs and performance of microprocessor-controlled knee joints.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Julius; Westebbe, Bettina; Bellmann, Malte; Kraft, Marc

    2014-02-01

    In this comparative study, three transfemoral amputee subjects were fitted with four different microprocessor-controlled exoprosthetic knee joints (MPK): C-Leg, Orion, Plié2.0, and Rel-K. In a motion analysis laboratory, objective gait measures were acquired during level walking at different velocities. Subsequent technical analyses, which involved X-ray computed tomography, identified the functional mechanisms of each device and enabled corroboration of the performance in the gait laboratory by the engineering design of the MPK. Gait measures showed that the mean increase of the maximum knee flexion angle at different walking velocities was closest in value to the unaffected contralateral knee (6.2°/m/s) with C-Leg (3.5°/m/s; Rel-K 17.0°/m/s, Orion 18.3°/m/s, and Plié2.0 28.1°/m/s). Technical analyses corroborated that only with Plié2.0 the flexion resistances were not regulated by microprocessor control at different walking velocities. The muscular effort for the initiation of the swing phase, measured by the minimum hip moment, was found to be lowest with C-Leg (-82.1±14.1 Nm; Rel-K -83.59±17.8 Nm, Orion -88.0±16.3 Nm, and Plié2.0 -91.6±16.5 Nm). Reaching the extension stop at the end of swing phase was reliably executed with both Plié2.0 and C-Leg. Abrupt terminal stance phase extension observed with Plié2.0 and Rel-K could be attributed to the absence of microprocessor control of extension resistance.

  18. PAN-811 inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death of human Alzheimer's disease-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells via suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valery M; Dancik, Chantée M; Pan, Weiying; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Lebowitz, Michael S; Ghanbari, Hossein A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role in neurotoxicity associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative stress has been shown to be a prominent and early feature of vulnerable neurons in AD. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells are affected at an early stage. Exposure to oxidative stress induces the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes cell damage in the form of protein, lipid, and DNA oxidations. Elevated ROS levels are also associated with increased deposition of amyloid-beta and formation of senile plaques, a hallmark of the AD brain. If enhanced ROS exceeds the basal level of cellular protective mechanisms, oxidative damage and cell death will result. Therefore, substances that can reduce oxidative stress are sought as potential drug candidates for treatment or preventative therapy of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PAN-811, also known as 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone or Triapine, is a small lipophilic compound that is currently being investigated in several Phase II clinical trials for cancer therapy due to its inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase activity. Here we show PAN-811 to be effective in preventing or reducing ROS accumulation and the resulting oxidative damages in both AD-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells.

  19. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    than 135 watts of heater power. 4) The LHP reservoir control heater power is limited to 15 watts with a 70 percent duty cycle. 5) The voltage of the power supply can vary between 26 volts direct current and 34 volts direct current during the spacecraft lifetime. A design analysis shows that a single LTCS can satisfy these requirements. However, shutdown of· the LHP is particularly challenging and the shutdown heater must be wired in series with two reservoir thermostats and two CCHP thermostats at different set points. An LTCS demonstration unit has been tested to verify these performance characteristics experimentally prior to proceeding to the final LTCS design and fabrication. Test results showed that the LHP shutdown scheme would be able to shut down the LHP as designed and the reservoir control heater can maintain the ATLAS mass simulator within the plus or minus 1 degrees Centigrade accuracy under various combinations of the heat load, sink temperature, and power supply voltage.

  20. NEW HIGHER PERFORMANCE LOW COST SELECTIVE SOLAR RADIATION CONTROL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Ellison; Buddie Dotter; David Tsu

    2003-10-28

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., ECD, has developed a new high-speed low-cost process for depositing high quality dielectric optical coatings--Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD). This process can deposit SiO{sub x} about 10 times faster than the state-of-the-art conventional technology, magnetron sputtering, at about 1/10th the cost. This process is also being optimized for depositing higher refractive index materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and TiO{sub 2}. In this program ECD, in collaboration with Southwall Technologies, Inc. (STI), demonstrated that this process can be used to fabricate high performance low cost Selective Solar Radiation Control (SSRC) films for use in the automotive industry. These coatings were produced on thin (2 mil thick) PET substrates in ECD's pilot roll-to-roll pilot MPECVD deposition machine. Such film can be laminated with PVB in a vehicle's windows. This process can also be used to deposit the films directly onto the glass. Such highly selective films, with a visible transmission (T{sub vis}) of > 70% and a shading coefficient of < 60% can significantly reduce the heat entering a car from solar radiation. Consequently, passenger comfort is increased and the energy needed to operate air conditioning (a/c) systems is reduced; consequently smaller a/c systems can be employed resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency.

  1. Measurement of performance using acceleration control and pulse control in simulated spacecraft docking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Nine commercial airline pilots served as test subjects in a study to compare acceleration control with pulse control in simulated spacecraft maneuvers. Simulated remote dockings of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station were initiated from 50, 100, and 150 meters along the station's -V-bar (minus velocity vector). All unsuccessful missions were reflown. Five way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) with one between factor, first mode, and four within factors (mode, bloch, range, and trial) were performed on the data. Recorded performance measures included mission duration and fuel consumption along each of the three coordinate axes. Mission duration was lower with pulse mode, while delta V (fuel consumption) was lower with acceleration mode. Subjects used more fuel to travel faster with pulse mode than with acceleration mode. Mission duration, delta V, X delta V, Y delta V., and Z delta V all increased with range. Subjects commanded the OMV to 'fly' at faster rates from further distances. These higher average velocities were paid for with increased fuel consumption. Asymmetrical transfer was found in that the mode transitions could not be predicted solely from the mission duration main effect. More testing is advised to understand the manual control aspects of spaceflight maneuvers better.

  2. DEGRADATION OF EMISSIONS CONTROL PERFORMANCE OF WOODSTOVES IN CRESTED BUTTE, CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the degradation of emissions control performance of woodstoves in Crested Butte, Colorado. Four seasons of field monitoring of EPA-certified woodstoves in and around Crested Butte has demonstrated some significant failures in emissions control performance. In...

  3. Robust high-performance control for robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1989-01-01

    A robust control scheme to accomplish accurate trajectory tracking for an integrated system of manipulator-plus-actuators is proposed. The control scheme comprises a feedforward and a feedback controller. The feedforward controller contains any known part of the manipulator dynamics that can be used for online control. The feedback controller consists of adaptive position and velocity feedback gains and an auxiliary signal which is simply generated by a fixed-gain proportional/integral/derivative controller. The feedback controller is updated by very simple adaptation laws which contain both proportional and integral adaptation terms. By introduction of a simple sigma modification to the adaptation laws, robustness is guaranteed in the presence of unmodeled dynamics and disturbances.

  4. A line-of-sight performance criterion for controller design of a proposed laboratory model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1990-01-01

    A line-of-sight performance criterion is derived for a proposed Controls Structures Interaction model, and its many uses in the control design process for fine pointing control are illustrated. A linearized line-of-sight (LOS) criterion is used for direct controller design and as a performance measure to judge different control methodologies. Numerical simulation results are shown where the three approaches: linear quadratic Gaussian theory, robust eigensystem assignment, and local velocity feedback are used for vibration control. Results indicate that the linear quadratic Gaussian controller, which incorporates a linearized LOS weighting matrix directly, yields good performance without wasting energy to control motions that have no influence on the LOS.

  5. Performance of an active control system with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1988-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are used to control the structural vibrations of flexible beams, and a modified independent modal space control method is employed to select the optimal location, control gains, and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators. The method minimizes both the vibration amplitudes of the beams to which these actuators are bonded and the input control effort needed to suppress these vibrations. The effects of the actuators and the bonding layers on the elastic and inertial properties of the composite flexible beams is taken into account.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Architecture and Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline control law for research into adaptive elements and other advanced flight control law components. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation; the simulation results show excellent handling qualities throughout the limited flight envelope. A simple angular momentum formulation was chosen because it can be included in the stability proofs for many basic adaptive theories, such as model reference adaptive control. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as basic as possible to simplify the addition of the adaptive elements. Those design choices are explained, along with their predicted impact on the handling qualities.

  7. Effect of cooling water impurities on deposit control polymer performance

    SciTech Connect

    Amjad, Z.; Zuhl, R.W.; Zibrida, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    The performance of polymeric inhibitors in treating recirculating cooling water systems is influenced by many factors, including pH, temperature, makeup water quality, and heat exchanger metallurgy. Impurities such as metal ions and suspended matter impact the performance of polymeric inhibitors used in phosphate-based treatment cooling water programs.

  8. Role of Contextual Control in Second Language Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washio, Yukiko; Houmanfar, Ramona

    2007-01-01

    Transfer of training from an instructional environment to a natural environment may bring about ineffective language performance by bilingual individuals. In that regard, this study was designed to demonstrate the effect of such a transition on individuals' language performance. A series of Japanese and English words were used as sample and…

  9. Manual control analysis of drug effects on driving performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, A.; Ziedman, K.; Moskowitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of secobarbital, diazepam, alcohol, and marihuana on car-driver transfer functions obtained using a driving simulator were studied. The first three substances, all CNS depressants, reduced gain, crossover frequency, and coherence which resulted in poorer tracking performance. Marihuana also impaired tracking performance but the only effect on the transfer function parameters was to reduce coherence.

  10. Hardware support for software controlled fast multiplexing of performance counters

    SciTech Connect

    Salapura, Valentina; Wisniewski, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Performance counters may be operable to collect one or more counts of one or more selected activities, and registers may be operable to store a set of performance counter configurations. A state machine may be operable to automatically select a register from the registers for reconfiguring the one or more performance counters in response to receiving a first signal. The state machine may be further operable to reconfigure the one or more performance counters based on a configuration specified in the selected register. The state machine yet further may be operable to copy data in selected one or more of the performance counters to a memory location, or to copy data from the memory location to the counters, in response to receiving a second signal. The state machine may be operable to store or restore the counter values and state machine configuration in response to a context switch event.

  11. Hardware support for software controlled fast multiplexing of performance counters

    DOEpatents

    Salapura, Valentina; Wisniewski, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Performance counters may be operable to collect one or more counts of one or more selected activities, and registers may be operable to store a set of performance counter configurations. A state machine may be operable to automatically select a register from the registers for reconfiguring the one or more performance counters in response to receiving a first signal. The state machine may be further operable to reconfigure the one or more performance counters based on a configuration specified in the selected register. The state machine yet further may be operable to copy data in selected one or more of the performance counters to a memory location, or to copy data from the memory location to the counters, in response to receiving a second signal. The state machine may be operable to store or restore the counter values and state machine configuration in response to a context switch event.

  12. Beyond capacity limitations: determinants of word recall performance on verbal working memory span tasks in children with SLI.

    PubMed

    Mainela-Arnold, Elina; Evans, Julia L

    2005-08-01

    Reduced verbal working memory capacity has been proposed as a possible account of language impairments in specific language impairment (SLI). Studies have shown, however, that differences in strength of linguistic representations in the form of word frequency affect list recall and performance on verbal working memory tasks. This suggests that verbal memory capacity and long-term linguistic knowledge may not be distinct constructs. It has been suggested that linguistic representations in SLI are weak in ways that result in a breakdown in language processing on tasks that require manipulation of unfamiliar material. In this study, the effects of word frequency, long-term linguistic knowledge, and serial order position on recall performance in the competing language processing task (CLPT) were investigated in 10 children with SLI and 10 age-matched peers (age 8 years 6 months to 12 years 4 months). The children with SLI recalled significantly fewer target words on the CLPT as compared with their age-matched controls. The SLI group did not differ, however, in their ability to recall target words having high word frequency but were significantly poorer in their ability to recall words on the CLPT having low word frequency. Differences in receptive and expressive language abilities also appeared closely related to performance on the CLPT, suggesting that working memory capacity is not distinct from language knowledge and that degraded linguistic representations may have an effect on performance on verbal working memory span tasks in children with SLI.

  13. Object Correlation and Maneuver Detection Using Optimal Control Performance Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, M.; Scheeres, D.

    2010-09-01

    Object correlation and maneuver detection are persistent problems in space surveillance and space object catalog maintenance. This paper demonstrates the utility of using quadratic trajectory control cost, an analog to the trajectory L2-norm in control, as a distance metric with which to both correlate object tracks and detect maneuvers using Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs), real-time sensor measurement residuals, and prior state uncertainty. State and measurement uncertainty are incorporated into the computation, and distributions of optimal control usage are computed. Both UCT correlation as well as maneuver detection are demonstrated in several scenarios Potential avenues for future research and contributions are summarized.

  14. Thermal hydraulic performance of naturally aspirated control rod housing assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, G.T.; Randolph, H.W.; Paik, I.K.; Foti, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    Savannah River Site reactors are comprised of heat generating fuel/target assemblies, control rods which regulate reactor power, and heavy water which acts as the coolant and as a moderator. The fuel/target assemblies are cooled by the downflow of heavy water while the control rods are cooled via upflow. Five control rods are grouped with two safety rods in seven-channel assemblies called septifoils. Under normal operating conditions, the reactor power level, radial shape flux and axial power flux are regulated by the positioning of the control rods. The control rods are solid rods of a lithium-aluminum alloy with an thin aluminum outer sheath. Lithium is a good absorber of neutrons and, thus control rod temperatures rise with reactor power. At conditions of sufficiently high reactor power and degraded coolant flow, the control rods could heat sufficiently to cause a metallurigical failure of the sheath leading to molten material coming in contact with water and the possibility of a steam explosion. An accident has been postulated as part of the analysis involving the safety upgrade of Savannah River Site reactors in which the housing is not seated on the pin. Coolant from the upflow pin would not be directed into the housing but, into the moderator space surrounding the housing. Only naturally aspirated cooling due to buoyancy effects would be available to cool the control rods and the coolant mass flow rate would drop significantly from its nominal value. In this study, the mechanisms and limits of cooling heated rods housed in an unseated septifoil are addressed. Experiments were conducted on a shortened, prototypic housing with electrically heated rods to gain an understanding of the phenomena governing the cooling in such a case and develop data which can be used to evaluate predictive models. These experiments are described, their results discussed, and the predictions of current models is presented.

  15. Thermal hydraulic performance of naturally aspirated control rod housing assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, G.T.; Randolph, H.W.; Paik, I.K. ); Foti, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Savannah River Site reactors are comprised of heat generating fuel/target assemblies, control rods which regulate reactor power, and heavy water which acts as the coolant and as a moderator. The fuel/target assemblies are cooled by the downflow of heavy water while the control rods are cooled via upflow. Five control rods are grouped with two safety rods in seven-channel assemblies called septifoils. Under normal operating conditions, the reactor power level, radial shape flux and axial power flux are regulated by the positioning of the control rods. The control rods are solid rods of a lithium-aluminum alloy with an thin aluminum outer sheath. Lithium is a good absorber of neutrons and, thus control rod temperatures rise with reactor power. At conditions of sufficiently high reactor power and degraded coolant flow, the control rods could heat sufficiently to cause a metallurigical failure of the sheath leading to molten material coming in contact with water and the possibility of a steam explosion. An accident has been postulated as part of the analysis involving the safety upgrade of Savannah River Site reactors in which the housing is not seated on the pin. Coolant from the upflow pin would not be directed into the housing but, into the moderator space surrounding the housing. Only naturally aspirated cooling due to buoyancy effects would be available to cool the control rods and the coolant mass flow rate would drop significantly from its nominal value. In this study, the mechanisms and limits of cooling heated rods housed in an unseated septifoil are addressed. Experiments were conducted on a shortened, prototypic housing with electrically heated rods to gain an understanding of the phenomena governing the cooling in such a case and develop data which can be used to evaluate predictive models. These experiments are described, their results discussed, and the predictions of current models is presented.

  16. How Gulf of Mexico operators design and perform sand control

    SciTech Connect

    Fahel, R.A. ); Brienen, J. )

    1993-09-01

    A variety of gravel packing techniques are used in deep water. There are no standardized offshore procedures, so companies tailor methods based on experience and philosophy. In 1990, Oryx Energy conducted an in-depth study of sand control techniques while preparing for a platform decision. Histories of existing deep-water projects were traced, with special emphasis on sand control. This article presents specific completion equipment, and wellbore preparation, perforating, stimulating and gravel packing techniques used by six companies.

  17. Performance analysis of Integrated Communication and Control System networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halevi, Y.; Ray, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents statistical analysis of delays in Integrated Communication and Control System (ICCS) networks that are based on asynchronous time-division multiplexing. The models are obtained in closed form for analyzing control systems with randomly varying delays. The results of this research are applicable to ICCS design for complex dynamical processes like advanced aircraft and spacecraft, autonomous manufacturing plants, and chemical and processing plants.

  18. Optimal control of 2-wheeled mobile robot at energy performance index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliński, Krzysztof J.; Mazur, Michał

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the optimal control method at the energy performance index towards motion control of the 2-wheeled mobile robot. With the use of the proposed method of control the 2-wheeled mobile robot can realise effectively the desired trajectory. The problem of motion control of mobile robots is usually neglected and thus performance of the realisation of the high level control tasks is limited.

  19. The effects of controls and controllable and storage loads on the performance of stand-alone photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cull, R. C.; Eltimsahy, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Stand-alone photovoltaic systems have been modeled and analyzed from sunlight in to consumer product out. By including the consumer product in the analysis, concepts such as 'product storage' (a storage tank for water or cold-plates for refrigeration) and loads controllable by the system controller have been added to the system analysis. From a controls analysis viewpoint, this adds state variables to the system. The result is that the system controller can make operating control decisions on the energy flow between these various system elements to optimize system performance and reduce system cost. The effects on system performance of various control schemes employing these concepts are presented. Analysis of water pumping and/or refrigeration systems show possible performance improvements of greater than 15% with the addition of controllable loads with product storage.

  20. Flight performance of Skylab attitude and pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab attitude and pointing control system (APCS) requirements are briefly reviewed and the way in which they became altered during the prelaunch phase of development is noted. The actual flight mission (including mission alterations during flight) is described. The serious hardware failures that occurred, beginning during ascent through the atmosphere, also are described. The APCS's ability to overcome these failures and meet mission changes are presented. The large around-the-clock support effort on the ground is discussed. Salient design points and software flexibility that should afford pertinent experience for future spacecraft attitude and pointing control system designs are included.

  1. Energy Efficient Engine: Control system component performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitler, R. S.; Bennett, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An Energy Efficient Engine (E3) program was established to develop technology for improving the energy efficiency of future commercial transport aircraft engines. As part of this program, General Electric designed and tested a new engine. The design, fabrication, bench and engine testing of the Full Authority Digital Electronic Control (FADEC) system used for controlling the E3 Demonstrator Engine is described. The system design was based on many of the proven concepts and component designs used on the General Electric family of engines. One significant difference is the use of the FADEC in place of hydromechanical computation currently used.

  2. Photodetector performance enhancement using an electron accelerator controlled by light.

    PubMed

    Srithanachai, Itsara; Dilla Zainol, Farrah; Ueamanapong, Surada; Niemcharoen, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-07-20

    A new method of photodetector performance enhancement using an embedded optical accelerator circuit within the photodetector is proposed. The principle of optical tweezer generation using a light pulse within a PANDA ring is also reviewed. By using a modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA microring resonator, which is embedded within the photodetector circuit, the device performance can be improved by using an electron injection technique, in which electrons can be trapped by optical tweezers generated by a PANDA ring resonator. Finally, electrons can move faster within the device via the optical waveguide without trapping center in the silicon bulk to the contact, in which the increase in photodetector current is seen. Simulation results obtained have shown that the device's light currents are increased by the order of four, and the switching time is increased by the order of five. This technique can be used for better photodetector performance and other semiconductor applications in the future.

  3. Multivariate economic performance assessment of an MPC controlled electric arc furnace.

    PubMed

    Wei, Donghui; Craig, Ian K; Bauer, Margret

    2007-06-01

    Economic performance is very important to advanced process control projects investigating whether the investment of control technology is worthwhile. In this paper economic performance assessment of a simulated electric arc furnace is conducted. The dependence of controlled variables and the corresponding economic impact are highlighted.

  4. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  5. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... UNIFORM NATIONAL DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved]...

  6. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  7. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  8. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  9. DBP CONTROL IN DRINKING WATER: COST AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is currently attempting to balance the complex trade-offs in chemical and microbial risks associated with controlling disinfection and disinfection byproducts (D/DBP) in drinking water. In attempting to achieve this balance, the...

  10. College Students and Academic Performance: A Case of Taking Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phylis M.; Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Wortman, Thomas I.

    2004-01-01

    College students face a myriad of pressures and challenges in the academic environment as they seek to maintain optimal performance or even to remain in the academic program. In 2002, it was reported that more than 30% of first-year students did not return for their second year of college (Smith), and only 40% are reported to actually compete…

  11. College Students and Academic Performance: A Case of Taking Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phylis M.; Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Wortman, Thomas I.

    2009-01-01

    College students face a myriad of pressures and challenges in the academic environment as they seek to maintain optimal performance or even to remain in the academic program. In 2002, it was reported that more than 30% of first-year students did not return for their second year of college (Smith), and only 40% are reported to actually compete…

  12. Controlled synthesis of bismuth oxyiodide toward optimization of photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenxing; Ma, Zhijun; Chen, Xiaofeng; He, Xin; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-11-01

    A new investigation on the variation rule of the structure, morphology, chemical composition and photocatalytic performance of bismuth oxyiodide synthesized by solvothermal method as a function of reaction conditions was performed here. The composition and morphology of the product could be determined by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the particle size together with content of iodide in bismuth oxyiodide decrease with the increase of the concentration of reaction precursors. Hollow Bi4O5I2 microsphere with specific surface area as high as 120.88 m2 g-1 can be easily synthesized when the concentration of the reaction precursors finally increased to 62.5 mM. Photocatalytic water purification performance of the as-prepared samples was evaluated by using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model contaminant. The results revealed that the hollow Bi4O5I2 exhibited the best performance among all the bismuth oxyodide synthesized here for the degradation of RhB under visible light irradiation. Meanwhile, the formation mechanism of the hierarchical hollow structure of bismuth oxyiodide was investigated by the dissolution-recrystallization mechanism.

  13. Contextual Control of Extinguished Conditioned Performance in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havermans, Remco C.; Keuker, Jantien; Lataster, Timeke; Jansen, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Animal research has shown that extinguished conditioned performance is modulated by the environmental context in which extinction treatment has occurred. When the conditioned stimulus is presented outside the extinction context, conditioned responding is renewed. In two experiments, whether a renewal effect can also be found in humans was…

  14. Arranging computer architectures to create higher-performance controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques for integrating microprocessors, array processors, and other intelligent devices in control systems are reviewed, with an emphasis on the (re)arrangement of components to form distributed or parallel processing systems. Consideration is given to the selection of the host microprocessor, increasing the power and/or memory capacity of the host, multitasking software for the host, array processors to reduce computation time, the allocation of real-time and non-real-time events to different computer subsystems, intelligent devices to share the computational burden for real-time events, and intelligent interfaces to increase communication speeds. The case of a helicopter vibration-suppression and stabilization controller is analyzed as an example, and significant improvements in computation and throughput rates are demonstrated.

  15. Inflight performance of the Ulysses reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGarry, Andrew; Berry, William; Parker, David

    1997-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been exploring the heliosphere since October 1990 in a six-year polar orbit. Despite varying operational demands, the pressure-fed monopropellant hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) has experienced few problems. The observed anomalies, having minimal operational impact, include plume impingement effects, electrical power overload effects and hydrazine gas generation effects. These anomalies are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the first observation of gas in the hydrazine propellant. The relatively low gas generation rate is attributed to: the use of high purity hydrazine; the configuration of the spin-stabilized spacecraft; the extensive use of titanium alloys; and the efficiency of the thermal control of the propellant tank which maintains a temperature of 21 C.

  16. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  17. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kontos, A P; Huppert, T J; Beluk, N H; Elbin, R J; Henry, L C; French, J; Dakan, S M; Collins, M W

    2014-12-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18-45 years with a recent (15-45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X's and O's) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion.

  18. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, T. J.; Beluk, N. H.; Elbin, R. J.; Henry, L. C.; French, J.; Dakan, S. M.; Collins, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/ patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18–45 years with a recent (15–45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X’s and O’s) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion. PMID:24477579

  19. Analytical and experimental performance of optimal controller designs for a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.; Batterton, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of modern optimal control theory were applied to the design of a control system for a supersonic inlet. The inlet control problem was approached as a linear stochastic optimal control problem using as the performance index the expected frequency of unstarts. The details of the formulation of the stochastic inlet control problem are presented. The computational procedures required to obtain optimal controller designs are discussed, and the analytically predicted performance of controllers designed for several different inlet conditions is tabulated. The experimental implementation of the optimal control laws is described, and the experimental results obtained in a supersonic wind tunnel are presented. The control laws were implemented with analog and digital computers. Comparisons are made between the experimental and analytically predicted performance results. Comparisons are also made between the results obtained with continuous analog computer controllers and discrete digital computer versions.

  20. Evaluating the performances of statistical and neural network based control charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Kok Ban; Ong, Hong Choon

    2015-10-01

    Control chart is used widely in many fields and traditional control chart is no longer adequate in detecting a sudden change in a particular process. So, run rules which are built in into Shewhart X ¯ control chart while Exponential Weighted Moving Average control chart (EWMA), Cumulative Sum control chart (CUSUM) and neural network based control chart are introduced to overcome the limitation regarding to the sensitivity of traditional control chart. In this study, the average run length (ARL) and median run length (MRL) in the shifts in the process mean of control charts mentioned will be computed. We will show that interpretations based only on the ARL can be misleading. Thus, MRL is also used to evaluate the performances of the control charts. From this study, neural network based control chart is found to possess a better performance than run rules of Shewhart X ¯ control chart, EWMA and CUSUM control chart.

  1. Decoupling congestion control and error control mechanisms in TCP and evaluating their performance over broadband satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Gu, Xuemai

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to better evaluate the performance of TCP over broadband satellite networks. We decouple the most crucial parts of TCP that impact its performance in broadband satellite environments, namely congestion control and error control mechanisms. And then we re-design these two function blocks and make them become two individual parts. With these re-designed modules, we have investigated the interactions between various currently existing TCP congestion control and error control schemes, as well as their impact on TCP performance over a geostationary broadband satellite link with long propagation delay and high bit error rate. Simulation results have shown that some combinations of different congestion control and error control mechanisms can waste satellite link bandwidth with large numbers of retransmission packets and unnecessary retransmission packets. And the modified TCP NewReno implementation can avoid high amount of retransmissions and unnecessary retransmissions.

  2. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.M. ); Fein, G. ); Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F. )

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m[sup 2] and 73 cd/m[sup 2]. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  3. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.M.; Fein, G.; Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F.

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m{sup 2} and 73 cd/m{sup 2}. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  4. Role of Contextual Control in Second Language Performance

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Yukiko; Houmanfar, Ramona

    2007-01-01

    Transfer of training from an instructional environment to a natural environment may bring about ineffective language performance by bilingual individuals. In that regard, this study was designed to demonstrate the effect of such a transition on individuals' language performance. A series of Japanese and English words were used as sample and comparisons in a matching procedure. Differential conditioning was implemented in the presence two types of contextual stimuli. After three sets of relations were established, the physical configuration of the contextual stimuli was changed to more subtle appearances, and the number of variations in the contextual stimuli was increased. Measures of percent correct and response latency were used to show the negative influence on second language performance. Percent correct responses decreased with the subtle contextual stimuli for 11 out of 14 participants, and average response latency increased with the increased number of variations in the last phase. These findings indicate that the change in environmental stimuli will be a significant participatory factor in training of second languages. PMID:22477380

  5. Supination control increases performance in sideward cutting movements in tennis.

    PubMed

    Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Brizuela, Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; García-Belenguer, Ana C; Crespo, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the effects of tennis shoe characteristics on performance during sideward cutting movements followed by direction changes. Five tennis players (age = 21.5 +/- 0.8 years, mass = 75.2 +/- 2.8 kg, and height = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m) participated in the study and 10 tennis shoes were tested. Several footwear mechanical parameters were analyzed: Shore A hardness, longitudinal and transverse flexibility, midsole height at heel, presence of heel counters, and weight. A force plate was used to measure the kinetic variables, and two video cameras were used to perform a three-dimensional photogrammetric analysis. Results revealed that subject-footwear interaction was statistically not significant (p > 0.05) for the kinetic and kinematic variables. Only contact time (p = 0.008) and supination movement (p = 0.009) were footwear dependent. Positive correlations between contact time and first supination peak (r = 0.783, p = 0.007) and second supination peak (r = 0.730, p = 0.016) were observed. Impulse was not changed, which means shoes limiting supination allowed tennis players to perform faster sideward cutting movements.

  6. Fluidic Control of Nozzle Flow: Some Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federspiel, John; Bangert, Linda; Wing, David; Hawkes, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program that investigated the use of a secondary air stream to control the amount of flow through a convergent-divergent nozzle. These static tests utilized high pressure, ambient temperature air that was injected at the throat of the nozzle through an annular slot. Multiple injection slot sizes and injection angles were tested. The introduction of secondary flow was made in an opposing direction to the primary flow and the resulting flow field caused the primary stream to react as though the physical throat size had been reduced. The percentage reduction in primary flow rate was generally about twice the injected flow rate. The most effective throttling was achieved by injecting through the smallest slot in an orientation most nearly opposed to the approaching primary flow. Thrust edliciency, as measured by changes in nozzle thrust coefficient, was highest at high nozzle pressure ratios, NPR. The static test results agreed with predictions obtained prior from PABSD, a fully viscous computational fluid dynamics program. Since use of such an injection system on gas turbine engine exhaust nozzles would be primarily at high NPRs, it was concluded that fluidic control holds promise for reducing nozzle weight and complexity on future systems.

  7. Design and Performance of the H_infinity Controller for the Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2011-02-01

    The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers are currently implemented at the beam-waveguide (BWG) antennas. Each BWG antenna has a different set of LQG coefficients, obtained by tuning and testing each controller individually. Individual coefficients for each antenna are necessary, since the antenna dynamics are not identical and the derivation of the LQG coefficients is a labor-intensive process. Hence, the process could be simplified by using single set of coefficients for all BWG antennas. The purpose of the work reported here is to develop a single set of servo coefficients for all BWG antennas. This is achieved by using the H_infinity controller approach and a robust design technique. In this article, the analysis of the H_infinity controller was performed, and the results obtained (by executing over 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations) showed that it is feasible to use a single set of the H_infinity controller coefficients at all BWG antennas, and that the H_infinity controller performance is similar to or exceeds the "standard" LQG controller performance, i.e., except for the DSS-25 antenna controller performance. Note that the latter controller was derived exceptionally strong. At the remaining antennas, the controller coefficients are weaker, and they represent the "standard" LQG performance. This approach simplifies the development of the controller coefficients for BWG antennas, and simplifies the servo performance evaluation, since the performance should be similar for all six BWG antennas.

  8. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  9. Semi-active vibration control based on unsymmetrical synchronized switch damping: Analysis and experimental validation of control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li; Nie, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In semi-active synchronized switch damping (SSD) approaches for structural vibration control, the damping effect is achieved by properly switching the voltage on the piezoelectric actuators. Unsymmetrical SSD switch circuit has been designed in the previous paper to increase the effective voltage range on the PZT actuator for improvement of the control performance. In this study, analysis and experimental validation of control performance of a synchronized switch damping system based on the unsymmetrical switch circuit are carried out. First the model of an unsymmetrical SSD system is presented and the working principle is introduced. The general expression of the switched voltage on the piezoelectric actuator is derived. Based on its periodicity in steady-state control, the harmonic components of the actuator voltage are derived using Fourier series expansion. Next, the displacement response of the system is derived under combined actions of the excitation and switched voltage. Finally, a setup of a flexible beam with unsymmetrical switch circuit is used to demonstrate the control performance under different voltage sources and to verify the theoretical results. The results show that the control performance mainly depends on the voltage range on the PZT. A higher effective voltage range can be generated in unsymmetrical SSDV than in symmetrical SSDV and better control performance can be achieved at the same negative actuator voltage. The unsymmetrical SSDV makes better utilization of the actuator capability.

  10. Reynolds Number Effects on the Performance of Lateral Control Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number on the performance of outboard spoilers and ailerons was investigated on a generic subsonic transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility over a chord Reynolds number range 41 from 3x10(exp 6) to 30xl0(exp 6) and a Mach number range from 0.50 to 0.94, Spoiler deflection angles of 0, 10, 15, and 20 deg and aileron deflection angles of -10, 0, and 10 deg were tested. Aeroelastic effects were minimized by testing at constant normalized dynamic pressure conditions over intermediate Reynolds number ranges. Results indicated that the increment in rolling moment due to spoiler deflection generally becomes more negative as the Reynolds number increases from 3x10(exp 6) to 22x10(exp 6) with only small changes between Reynolds numbers of 22x10(exp 6) and 30x10(exp 6). The change in the increment in rolling moment coefficient with Reynolds number for the aileron deflected configuration is generally small with a general trend of increasing magnitude with increasing Reynolds number.

  11. Inhibition control and working memory capacity in children with SLI

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Klara; Kelmenson, Lyudmyla; Pinkhasova, Milana

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the “inefficient inhibition hypothesis” (IIH; Bjorklund & Harnishfeger, 1990; Wilson & Kipp, 1998) in three groups: children with specific language impairment (SLI), age-matched and language-matched controls. The IIH suggests that individuals with efficient inhibition skills perform better on working memory tasks because they are able to keep out irrelevant information from working memory. Children with SLI show processing capacity limitations. This study examined whether the working memory limitations are impacted by inhibition problems in this population. Working memory capacity was measured with a listening span task and children’s inhibition errors were categorized. These errors reflected either immediate or delayed inhibition problems and they indicated either contextual distractions or perseverations. Children with SLI produced more inhibition errors than their peers in most categories. The results show an association between inhibition control and working memory capacity, but the direction of causality is not clear. PMID:18545677

  12. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). Any new source... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection...

  13. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection...

  14. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection...

  15. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). Any new source... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection...

  16. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection...

  17. Predictors of Performance in Introductory Finance: Variables within and beyond the Student's Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, Fred; Wang, Zhaobo; Betz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This study examined variables that are within and beyond the control of students in explaining variations in performance in an introductory finance course. Regression models were utilized to consider whether the variables within the student's control have a greater impact on course performance relative to the variables beyond the student's…

  18. High Performance, Robust Control of Flexible Space Structures: MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Many spacecraft systems have ambitious objectives that place stringent requirements on control systems. Achievable performance is often limited because of difficulty of obtaining accurate models for flexible space structures. To achieve sufficiently high performance to accomplish mission objectives may require the ability to refine the control design model based on closed-loop test data and tune the controller based on the refined model. A control system design procedure is developed based on mixed H2/H(infinity) optimization to synthesize a set of controllers explicitly trading between nominal performance and robust stability. A homotopy algorithm is presented which generates a trajectory of gains that may be implemented to determine maximum achievable performance for a given model error bound. Examples show that a better balance between robustness and performance is obtained using the mixed H2/H(infinity) design method than either H2 or mu-synthesis control design. A second contribution is a new procedure for closed-loop system identification which refines parameters of a control design model in a canonical realization. Examples demonstrate convergence of the parameter estimation and improved performance realized by using the refined model for controller redesign. These developments result in an effective mechanism for achieving high-performance control of flexible space structures.

  19. Flight tests for the assessment of task performance and control activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, H. J.; Hummes, D.

    1982-01-01

    The tests were performed with the helicopters BO 105 and UH-1D. Closely connected with tactical demands the six test pilots' task was to minimize the time and the altitude over the obstacles. The data reduction yields statistical evaluation parameters describing the control activity of the pilots and the achieved task performance. The results are shown in form of evaluation diagrams. Additionally dolphin tests with varied control strategy were performed to get more insight into the influence of control techniques. From these test results recommendations can be derived to emphasize the direct force control and to reduce the collective to pitch crosscoupling for the dolphin.

  20. Performance-Based Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control for Networked Industrial Processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Qiu, Jianbin; Yin, Shen; Gao, Huijun; Fan, Jialu; Chai, Tianyou

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the performance-based control design problem for double-layer networked industrial processes is investigated. At the device layer, the prescribed performance functions are first given to describe the output tracking performance, and then by using backstepping technique, new adaptive fuzzy controllers are designed to guarantee the tracking performance under the effects of input dead-zone and the constraint of prescribed tracking performance functions. At operation layer, by considering the stochastic disturbance, actual index value, target index value, and index prediction simultaneously, an adaptive inverse optimal controller in discrete-time form is designed to optimize the overall performance and stabilize the overall nonlinear system. Finally, a simulation example of continuous stirred tank reactor system is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  1. Performance Comparison Between Lqr and Pid Controllers for AN Inverted Pendulum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, A. N. K.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahmat, M. F.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the time specification performance between two conventional controllers for an inverted pendulum system. The goal is to determine which control strategy delivers better performance with respect to pendulum's angle and cart's position. The inverted pendulum represents a challenging control problem, which continually moves toward an uncontrolled state. Two controllers are presented such as Linear-Quadratic-Regulator (LQR) and Proportional-Integral-Derivatives (PID) controllers for controlling the linearized system of inverted pendulum model. Simulation study has been done in Matlab simulink environment shows that both controllers are capable to control multi output inverted pendulum system successfully. The result shows that LQR produced better response compared to PID control strategies and is presented in time domain.

  2. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report; Fourth Quarter - Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1998-02-01

    The INEEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used to measure performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as goals in themselves. These indicators should be used by management as tools to focus priorities, attention, and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices.

  3. Performance characteristics of rules for internal quality control: probabilities for false rejection and error detection.

    PubMed

    Westgard, J O; Groth, T; Aronsson, T; Falk, H; de Verdier, C H

    1977-10-01

    When assessing the performance of an internal quality control system, it is useful to determine the probability for false rejections (pfr) and the probability for error detection (ped). These performance characteristics are estimated here by use of a computer stimulation procedure. The control rules studied include those commonly employed with Shewhart-type control charts, a cumulative sum rule, and rules applicable when a series of control measurements are treated as a single control observation. The error situations studied include an increase in random error, a systematic shift, a systematic drift, and mixtures of these. The probability for error detection is very dependent on the number of control observations and the choice of control rules. No one rule is best for detecting all errors, thus combinations of rules are desirable. Some appropriate combinations are suggested and their performance characteristics are presented.

  4. Frequent Deadlines: Evaluating the Effect of Learner Control on Healthcare Executives' Performance in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Lawrence V.; Ivanitskaya, Lana V.; Bastian, Nathaniel D.; Erofeev, Dmitry A.; Mendez, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    In a three-group, gender-matched, preexisting knowledge-controlled, randomized experiment, we evaluated the effect of learner control over study pace on healthcare executives' performance in an online statistics course. Overall, frequent deadlines enhanced distribution of practice and improved learning. Students with less control over pace (in…

  5. Prediction and control as determinants of behavioural uncertainty: effects on task performance and heart rate reactivity.

    PubMed

    Baker, S R; Stephenson, D

    2000-01-01

    Control or control-belief is often viewed as being directly instrumental in facilitating coping mechanisms in aversive situations, and yet the empirical evidence for the beneficial effects of control is inconclusive. In this study we investigated the role of predictability in determining the effects of perceived control during an aversive reaction time task. Fifty-six subjects were allocated to one of four groups; predictable-control, predictable-no control, unpredictable-control, unpredictable-no control. In the predictable conditions, subjects could temporally predict the occurrence of an aversive noise. In the perceived control conditions, duration of the aversive tone was contingent on subject's performance. All subjects were matched in terms of the nature of the task and in the number and time of receipt of both the warning signal and noise. Heart rate reactivity and two performance parameters were measured, reaction time and performance increase. Both predictability and control-belief led to a reduction in heart rate reactivity, although they appeared to function independently and at different points in the sequence of events. That is, predictability or perceived control was sufficient to mitigate the effects of an aversive situation. Neither perception of control or predictability led to better task performance. These results are discussed in terms of behavioural uncertainty explanations.

  6. 40 CFR 63.997 - Performance test and compliance assessment requirements for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration at the outlet of a control device, use Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, or ASTM D6420-99... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control... existing control device, a flare compliance demonstration shall be performed using the methods specified...

  7. 40 CFR 63.997 - Performance test and compliance assessment requirements for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentration at the outlet of a control device, use Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, or ASTM D6420-99... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control... existing control device, a flare compliance demonstration shall be performed using the methods specified...

  8. The effects of voice and manual control mode on dual task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Zenyuh, J.; Culp, V.; Marshak, W.

    1986-01-01

    Two fundamental principles of human performance, compatibility and resource competition, are combined with two structural dichotomies in the human information processing system, manual versus voice output, and left versus right cerebral hemisphere, in order to predict the optimum combination of voice and manual control with either hand, for time-sharing performance of a dicrete and continuous task. Eight right handed male subjected performed a discrete first-order tracking task, time-shared with an auditorily presented Sternberg Memory Search Task. Each task could be controlled by voice, or by the left or right hand, in all possible combinations except for a dual voice mode. When performance was analyzed in terms of a dual-task decrement from single task control conditions, the following variables influenced time-sharing efficiency in diminishing order of magnitude, (1) the modality of control, (discrete manual control of tracking was superior to discrete voice control of tracking and the converse was true with the memory search task), (2) response competition, (performance was degraded when both tasks were responded manually), (3) hemispheric competition, (performance degraded whenever two tasks were controlled by the left hemisphere) (i.e., voice or right handed control). The results confirm the value of predictive models invoice control implementation.

  9. 75 FR 35092 - Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-NEW

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-NEW AGENCY: U.S... on a new information collection request (ICR) 3206-NEW, Performance Measurement Surveys. As required... high quality and diverse workforce. Performance measurement surveys are valuable tools to...

  10. Class Anxiety in Secondary Education: Exploring Structural Relations with Perceived Control, Engagement, Disaffection, and Performance.

    PubMed

    González, Antonio; Faílde Garrido, José María; Rodríguez Castro, Yolanda; Carrera Rodríguez, María Victoria

    2015-09-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between class-related anxiety with perceived control, teacher-reported behavioral engagement, behavioral disaffection, and academic performance. Participants were 355 compulsory secondary students (9th and 10th grades; Mean age = 15.2 years; SD = 1.8 years). Structural equation models revealed performance was predicted by perceived control, anxiety, disaffection, and engagement. Perceived control predicted anxiety, disaffection, and engagement. Anxiety predicted disaffection and engagement, and partially mediated the effects from control on disaffection (β = -.277, p < .005; CI = -.378, -.197) and engagement (β = .170, p < .002; CI = .103 .258). The negative association between anxiety and performance was mediated by engagement and disaffection (β = -.295, p < .002; CI = -.439, -.182). Anxiety, engagement, and disaffection mediated the effects of control on performance (β = .352, p < .003; CI = .279, .440). The implications of these results are discussed in the light of current theory and educational interventions.

  11. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  12. ATS-6 - Flight performance of the Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on ATS-6 was designed to demonstrate the thermal control capability of a thermal diode (one-way) heat pipe, a phase-change material for thermal storage, and a feedback-controlled heat pipe. Flight data for the different operational modes are compared to ground test data, and the performance of the components is evaluated on an individual basis and as an integrated temperature-control system.

  13. A Performance Management Initiative for Local Health Department Vector Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Justin; Kirshy, Micaela; Moran, John W.; Bialek, Ron; Lamers, Vanessa; Sarisky, John

    2016-01-01

    Local health department (LHD) vector control programs have experienced reductions in funding and capacity. Acknowledging this situation and its potential effect on the ability to respond to vector-borne diseases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Public Health Foundation partnered on a performance management initiative for LHD vector control programs. The initiative involved 14 programs that conducted a performance assessment using the Environmental Public Health Performance Standards. The programs, assisted by quality improvement (QI) experts, used the assessment results to prioritize improvement areas that were addressed with QI projects intended to increase effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of services such as responding to mosquito complaints and educating the public about vector-borne disease prevention. This article describes the initiative as a process LHD vector control programs may adapt to meet their performance management needs. This study also reviews aggregate performance assessment results and QI projects, which may reveal common aspects of LHD vector control program performance and priority improvement areas. LHD vector control programs interested in performance assessment and improvement may benefit from engaging in an approach similar to this performance management initiative. PMID:27429555

  14. Parkinson's disease disrupts both automatic and controlled processing of action verbs.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L; Binder, Jeffrey R; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H

    2013-10-01

    The problem of how word meaning is processed in the brain has been a topic of intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. While considerable correlational evidence exists for the involvement of sensory-motor systems in conceptual processing, it is still unclear whether they play a causal role. We investigated this issue by comparing the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with that of age-matched controls when processing action and abstract verbs. To examine the effects of task demands, we used tasks in which semantic demands were either implicit (lexical decision and priming) or explicit (semantic similarity judgment). In both tasks, PD patients' performance was selectively impaired for action verbs (relative to controls), indicating that the motor system plays a more central role in the processing of action verbs than in the processing of abstract verbs. These results argue for a causal role of sensory-motor systems in semantic processing.

  15. Parkinson's disease disrupts both automatic and controlled processing of action verbs.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L; Binder, Jeffrey R; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H

    2013-10-01

    The problem of how word meaning is processed in the brain has been a topic of intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. While considerable correlational evidence exists for the involvement of sensory-motor systems in conceptual processing, it is still unclear whether they play a causal role. We investigated this issue by comparing the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with that of age-matched controls when processing action and abstract verbs. To examine the effects of task demands, we used tasks in which semantic demands were either implicit (lexical decision and priming) or explicit (semantic similarity judgment). In both tasks, PD patients' performance was selectively impaired for action verbs (relative to controls), indicating that the motor system plays a more central role in the processing of action verbs than in the processing of abstract verbs. These results argue for a causal role of sensory-motor systems in semantic processing. PMID:22910144

  16. Performing under pressure: gaze control, decision making and shooting performance of elite and rookie police officers.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Joan N; Lewinski, William

    2012-02-01

    Gaze of elite (E) and rookie (R) officers were analyzed as they faced a potentially lethal encounter that required use of a handgun, or inhibition of the shot when a cell phone was drawn. The E shot more accurately than the R (E 74.60%; R 53.80%) and made fewer decisions errors in the cell condition when 18.50% of E and 61.50% of R fired at the assailant. E and R did not differ in duration of the draw/aim/fire phases, but the R's motor onsets were later, during the final second compared to the E's final 2.5 s. Across the final six fixations the E increased the percent of fixations on the assailant's weapon/cell to 71% and to 86% on hits, compared to a high of 34% for the R. Before firing, the R made a rapid saccade to their own weapon on 84% of trials leading to a failure to fixate the assailant on 50% of trials as they fired. Compared to the R, the E had a longer quiet eye duration on the assailant's weapon/cell prior to firing. The results provide new insights into officer weapon focus, firearms training and the role of optimal gaze control when under extreme pressure. PMID:21807433

  17. Characteristics of On-Road Driving Performance of Persons With Central Vision Loss Who Use Bioptic Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Joanne M.; McGwin, Gerald; Elgin, Jennifer; Searcey, Karen; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the on-road driving performance of visually impaired drivers using bioptic telescopes with age-matched controls. Methods. Participants included 23 persons (mean age = 33 ± 12 years) with visual acuity of 20/63 to 20/200 who were legally licensed to drive through a state bioptic driving program, and 23 visually normal age-matched controls (mean age = 33 ± 12 years). On-road driving was assessed in an instrumented dual-brake vehicle along 14.6 miles of city, suburban, and controlled-access highways. Two backseat evaluators independently rated driving performance using a standardized scoring system. Vehicle control was assessed through vehicle instrumentation and video recordings used to evaluate head movements, lane-keeping, pedestrian detection, and frequency of bioptic telescope use. Results. Ninety-six percent (22/23) of bioptic drivers and 100% (23/23) of controls were rated as safe to drive by the evaluators. There were no group differences for pedestrian detection, or ratings for scanning, speed, gap judgments, braking, indicator use, or obeying signs/signals. Bioptic drivers received worse ratings than controls for lane position and steering steadiness and had lower rates of correct sign and traffic signal recognition. Bioptic drivers made significantly more right head movements, drove more often over the right-hand lane marking, and exhibited more sudden braking than controls. Conclusions. Drivers with central vision loss who are licensed to drive through a bioptic driving program can display proficient on-road driving skills. This raises questions regarding the validity of denying such drivers a license without the opportunity to train with a bioptic telescope and undergo on-road evaluation. PMID:23640044

  18. Controller performance improvements for reentry through Earth's atmosphere for low L/D spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Eric Michael

    Development of space-based industry created on the International Space Station is limited by reentry through Earth's atmosphere. The Lyapunov method is applied to improve reentry controller performance through Earth's atmosphere. A Predictor Corrector controller (PCCPA) derived from the Apollo program reentry guidance is the baseline against which candidate controllers are compared. Controllers designed to guide the reentry vehicle to within 1nm of the final target while satisfying a 51.55 BTU/ft2/sec heat rate constraint and a 4 g load constraint are evaluated in a six degree of freedom simulation environment. Three Lyapunov controllers developed in the initial design phase are subjected to variations in vehicle L/D. Controller gains are iteratively determined to satisfy reentry requirements for nominal reentry. However, different controller gain sets have different levels of performance robustness. Only one controller, the Lyapunov Controller, Gain Set 3, satisfies reentry requirements over a larger range of L/D variations than the PCCPA. In the final design phase, three hybrid reentry controllers are developed by combining Lyapunov based guidance routines with PCCPA transition logic and are evaluated for variations in vehicle L/D, weight and initial flight path angle (gamma0). The Hybrid Predictor Corrector/Lyapunov Controller #1 demonstrates the greatest performance robustness and satisfies all reentry requirements over a larger range of L/D, weight, and gamma 0 variations than the PCCPA. The hybrid controller, #3, meets all reentry requirements for a larger range of L/D variations than the PCCPA. The hybrid controller, #2, fails to outperform the PCCPA. All seven reentry controllers are linearized at four operating points and linear robust control analysis techniques are employed to quantify controller performance. Two robustness parameters, eta, a guaranteed domain of stability, and Jw, a measure of system performance to the worst possible direction of the

  19. Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) phase 3 simplified integrated test trace contaminant control subsystem performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system testing has been conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center since 1986. The phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted from July 30, 1989, through August 11, 1989, tested an integrated air revitalization system. During this test, the trace contaminant control subsystem (TCCS) was directly integrated with the bleed stream from the carbon dioxide reduction subsystem. The TCCS performed as expected with minor anomalies. The test set the basis for further characterizing the TCCS performance as part of advance air revitalization system configurations.

  20. Experimental quadrotor flight performance using computationally efficient and recursively feasible linear model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffery, Mujtaba H.; Shead, Leo; Forshaw, Jason L.; Lappas, Vaios J.

    2013-12-01

    A new linear model predictive control (MPC) algorithm in a state-space framework is presented based on the fusion of two past MPC control laws: steady-state optimal MPC (SSOMPC) and Laguerre optimal MPC (LOMPC). The new controller, SSLOMPC, is demonstrated to have improved feasibility, tracking performance and computation time than its predecessors. This is verified in both simulation and practical experimentation on a quadrotor unmanned air vehicle in an indoor motion-capture testbed. The performance of the control law is experimentally compared with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) controllers in an unconstrained square manoeuvre. The use of soft control output and hard control input constraints is also examined in single and dual constrained manoeuvres.

  1. Flight operations and performance of Skylab life support and environmental control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, G. D.; Littles, J. W.; Patterson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The design and performance of the Skylab thermal and environmental control systems is considered. The Orbital Workshop had a combined active and passive thermal control system. The refrigeration system was designed to store food and biomedical samples and to cool drinking water. The atmosphere control system included active humidity control, molecular sieves and charcoal canisters to control carbon dioxide, odor, and contaminants, and the gas supply system. Mission support preparation, including instrumentation, ground data system, system troubleshooting, and training, is surveyed. Major in-flight anomalies occurred with the thermal control system when the meteoroid shield was lost during SL-1 ascent and when the Airlock Module coolant loop malfunctioned during SL-2 manned operations. The atmosphere control system performed without major anomaly throughout the manned missions.

  2. The effects of speech controls on performance in advanced helicopters in a double stimulation paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolussi, Michael R.; Vidulich, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The potential benefit of speech as a control modality has been investigated with mixed results. Earlier studies suggests that speech controls can reduce the potential of manual control overloads and improve time-sharing performance. However, these benefits were not without costs. Pilots reported higher workload levels associated with the use of speech controls. To further investigate these previous findings, an experiment was conducted in a simulation of an advanced single-pilot, scout/attack helicopter at NASA-Ames' ICAB (interchangeable cab) facility. Objective performance data suggested that speech control modality was effective in reducing interference of discrete, time-shared responses during continuous flight control activity. Subjective ratings, however, indicated that the speech control modality increased workload. Post-flight debriefing indicated that these results were mainly due to the increased effort to speak precisely to a less than perfect voice recognition system.

  3. Combating dephasing decoherence by periodically performing tracking control and projective measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming; Dai Hongyi; Xi Zairong; Xie Hongwei; Hu Dewen

    2007-10-15

    We propose a scheme to overcome phase damping decoherence by periodically performing open loop tracking control and projective measurement. Although it is impossible to stabilize a qubit subject to Markovian dynamics only by open loop coherent control, one can attain a 'softened' control goal with the help of periodical projective measurement. The 'softened' control objective in our scheme is to keep the state of the controlled qubit to stay near a reference pure state with a high probability for a sufficiently long time. Two suboptimal control problems are given in the sense of trace distance and fidelity, respectively, and they are eventually reduced to the design of a period T. In our scheme, one can choose the period T as long as possible if the 'softened' control goal is attained. This is in contrast to the observation that quantum Zeno effect takes place only if measurements are performed in a very frequent manner, i.e., the period T must be extremely small.

  4. On the use of controls for subsonic transport performance improvement: Overview and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn; Espana, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Increasing competition among airline manufacturers and operators has highlighted the issue of aircraft efficiency. Fewer aircraft orders have led to an all-out efficiency improvement effort among the manufacturers to maintain if not increase their share of the shrinking number of aircraft sales. Aircraft efficiency is important in airline profitability and is key if fuel prices increase from their current low. In a continuing effort to improve aircraft efficiency and develop an optimal performance technology base, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed and flight tested an adaptive performance seeking control system to optimize the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 aircraft. The demonstrated technology is equally applicable to transport aircraft although with less improvement. NASA Dryden, in transitioning this technology to transport aircraft, is specifically exploring the feasibility of applying adaptive optimal control techniques to performance optimization of redundant control effectors. A simulation evaluation of a preliminary control law optimizes wing-aileron camber for minimum net aircraft drag. Two submodes are evaluated: one to minimize fuel and the other to maximize velocity. This paper covers the status of performance optimization of the current fleet of subsonic transports. Available integrated controls technologies are reviewed to define approaches using active controls. A candidate control law for adaptive performance optimization is presented along with examples of algorithm operation.

  5. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time.

  6. Combined dynamic inversion and QFT flight control of an unstable high performance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Perry Walter

    Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) is a control system synthesis, technique that directly considers system uncertainties and disturbance magnitudes when formulating closed-loop control algorithms. Dynamic Inversion is a nonlinear control system design technique that relies on accurate mathematical models to compute control inputs producing arbitrary system responses. Both techniques have been applied to unstable high performance aircraft flight control, and produced effective aircraft controllers. Both techniques have certain drawbacks: Nonlinear QFT controllers tend to be unnecessarily conservative (the computed controllers have excessive bandwidth) because known system properties are treated as "unknown" disturbances during loop synthesis. Meanwhile Dynamic Inversion control is sensitive to differences between assumed mathematical models and actual system dynamic properties. Combining the two control techniques provides the benefit of both while suffering the drawbacks of neither, as demonstrated by Single Input, Single Output (SISO) control of a constant airspeed, no roll, no yaw nonlinear model of the F-16 aircraft, and by Multi-Input, Multi-Output (MIMO) control of a full six-degree-of-freedom version. Design performance of the combined controllers is verified by reduced actuator efforts and by reduced sensor noise to actuator input (U( s)/n(s)) transfer function magnitudes compared to standard QFT versions.

  7. Direct yaw moment control for distributed drive electric vehicle handling performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoping; Leng, Bo; Xiong, Lu; Feng, Yuan; Shi, Fenmiao

    2016-05-01

    For a distributed drive electric vehicle (DDEV) driven by four in-wheel motors, advanced vehicle dynamic control methods can be realized easily because motors can be controlled independently, quickly and precisely. And direct yaw-moment control (DYC) has been widely studied and applied to vehicle stability control. Good vehicle handling performance: quick yaw rate transient response, small overshoot, high steady yaw rate gain, etc, is required by drivers under normal conditions, which is less concerned, however. Based on the hierarchical control methodology, a novel control system using direct yaw moment control for improving handling performance of a distributed drive electric vehicle especially under normal driving conditions has been proposed. The upper-loop control system consists of two parts: a state feedback controller, which aims to realize the ideal transient response of yaw rate, with a vehicle sideslip angle observer; and a steering wheel angle feedforward controller designed to achieve a desired yaw rate steady gain. Under the restriction of the effect of poles and zeros in the closed-loop transfer function on the system response and the capacity of in-wheel motors, the integrated time and absolute error (ITAE) function is utilized as the cost function in the optimal control to calculate the ideal eigen frequency and damper coefficient of the system and obtain optimal feedback matrix and feedforward matrix. Simulations and experiments with a DDEV under multiple maneuvers are carried out and show the effectiveness of the proposed method: yaw rate rising time is reduced, steady yaw rate gain is increased, vehicle steering characteristic is close to neutral steer and drivers burdens are also reduced. The control system improves vehicle handling performance under normal conditions in both transient and steady response. State feedback control instead of model following control is introduced in the control system so that the sense of control intervention to

  8. Part-load performance of energy wheels: Part 1 -- Wheel speed control

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, C.J.; Shang, W.; Besant, R.W.

    2000-07-01

    Controlling the performance of HVAC systems and air-to-air energy exchangers, to prevent overheating and overhumidifying of the supply air during part-load operating conditions is discussed in this paper. Equations are developed to facilitate the calculation of the optimal energy exchanger performance and the optimal recirculation air flow rate during part-load operating conditions. If these optimal values are applied, it is possible to simultaneously save energy and improve indoor air quality. Numerical and experimental investigations are applied to investigate the potential of using wheel speed control to control the energy and moisture transfer rates in energy wheels. The results show that, during wheel speed control, a numerical model is necessary to predict the part-load performance because the performance is affected by the operating conditions. The effectiveness decreases as the wheel speed decreases for some operating conditions, while the effectiveness increases as the wheel speed decreases for other operating conditions.

  9. Design and Demonstration of Emergency Control Modes for Enhanced Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A design concept is presented for developing control modes that enhance aircraft engine performance during emergency flight scenarios. The benefits of increased engine performance to overall vehicle survivability during these situations may outweigh the accompanied elevated risk of engine failure. The objective involves building control logic that can consistently increase engine performance beyond designed maximum levels based on an allowable heightened probability of failure. This concept is applied to two previously developed control modes: an overthrust mode that increases maximum engine thrust output and a faster response mode that improves thrust response to dynamic throttle commands. This paper describes the redesign of these control modes and presents simulation results demonstrating both enhanced engine performance and robust maintenance of the desired elevated risk level.

  10. High-performance control system for a heavy-ion medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, H.D.; Magyary, S.B.; Sah, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    A high performance control system is being designed as part of a heavy ion medical accelerator. The accelerator will be a synchrotron dedicated to clinical and other biomedical uses of heavy ions, and it will deliver fully stripped ions at energies up to 800 MeV/nucleon. A key element in the design of an accelerator which will operate in a hospital environment is to provide a high performance control system. This control system will provide accelerator modeling to facilitate changes in operating mode, provide automatic beam tuning to simplify accelerator operations, and provide diagnostics to enhance reliability. The control system being designed utilizes many microcomputers operating in parallel to collect and transmit data; complex numerical computations are performed by a powerful minicomputer. In order to provide the maximum operational flexibility, the Medical Accelerator control system will be capable of dealing with pulse-to-pulse changes in beam energy and ion species.

  11. Recurrent fuzzy neural network backstepping control for the prescribed output tracking performance of nonlinear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jang-Myung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a backstepping control system that uses a tracking error constraint and recurrent fuzzy neural networks (RFNNs) to achieve a prescribed tracking performance for a strict-feedback nonlinear dynamic system. A new constraint variable was defined to generate the virtual control that forces the tracking error to fall within prescribed boundaries. An adaptive RFNN was also used to obtain the required improvement on the approximation performances in order to avoid calculating the explosive number of terms generated by the recursive steps of traditional backstepping control. The boundedness and convergence of the closed-loop system was confirmed based on the Lyapunov stability theory. The prescribed performance of the proposed control scheme was validated by using it to control the prescribed error of a nonlinear system and a robot manipulator.

  12. Investigation of neural-net based control strategies for improved power system dynamic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sobajic, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The ability to accurately predict the behavior of a dynamic system is of essential importance in monitoring and control of complex processes. In this regard recent advances in neural-net base system identification represent a significant step toward development and design of a new generation of control tools for increased system performance and reliability. The enabling functionality is the one of accurate representation of a model of a nonlinear and nonstationary dynamic system. This functionality provides valuable new opportunities including: (1) The ability to predict future system behavior on the basis of actual system observations, (2) On-line evaluation and display of system performance and design of early warning systems, and (3) Controller optimization for improved system performance. In this presentation, we discuss the issues involved in definition and design of learning control systems and their impact on power system control. Several numerical examples are provided for illustrative purpose.

  13. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report - Third Quarter - Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1998-11-01

    The INEEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used to measure performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as goals in themselves. These indicators should be used by management as tools to focus on priorities, attention, and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. This document provides a report and an analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the third quarter of Calendar Year 1998 (CY-98) for Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The LMITCO collective occupational radiation deep dose is 47.0 person-rem year to date, compared to a year to date goal of 65.8 person-rem.

  14. The Impact of Trajectory Prediction Uncertainty on Air Traffic Controller Performance and Acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Joey S.; Bienert, Nancy; Gomez, Ashley; Hunt, Sarah; Kraut, Joshua; Martin, Lynne; Morey, Susan; Green, Steven M.; Prevot, Thomas; Wu, Minghong G.

    2013-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop air traffic control simulation investigated the impact of uncertainties in trajectory predictions on NextGen Trajectory-Based Operations concepts, seeking to understand when the automation would become unacceptable to controllers or when performance targets could no longer be met. Retired air traffic controllers staffed two en route transition sectors, delivering arrival traffic to the northwest corner-post of Atlanta approach control under time-based metering operations. Using trajectory-based decision-support tools, the participants worked the traffic under varying levels of wind forecast error and aircraft performance model error, impacting the ground automations ability to make accurate predictions. Results suggest that the controllers were able to maintain high levels of performance, despite even the highest levels of trajectory prediction errors.

  15. Backup control airstart performance on a digital electronic engine control-equipped F100-engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The air start capability of a backup control (BUC) was tested for a digital electronic engine control (DEEC) equipped F100 engine, which was installed in an F-15 aircraft. Two air start schedules were tested. Using the group 1 start schedule, based on a 40 sec timer, an air speed of 300 knots was required to ensure successful 40 and 25% BUC mode spooldown airstarts. If core rotor speed (N2) was less than 40% a stall would occur when the start bleed closed, 40 sec after initiation of the air start. All jet fuel starter (JFS) assisted air starts were successful with the group 1 start schedule. For the group 2 schedule, the time between pressurization and start bleed closure ranged between 50 sec and 72 sec. Idle rps was lower than the desired 65% for air starts at higher altitudes and lower air speeds.

  16. The effects of cognitive and behavioral control on post-stress performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. C.; Davis, M. H.; Stephan, W. G.; Bernstein, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was designed to investigate the effects of behavioral and cognitive control on post-stress performance. Half of the subjects exposed to loud unpredictable noise bursts were given 'behavioral' control (a button which would terminate the noise), while the other half had no behavioral control. In addition, subjects were provided with one of three levels of feedback (success, failure, or no feedback) regarding their performance during the noise. It was expected that information about performance would provide subjects with an increased sense of 'cognitive' control which would affect their appraisal of stressful events and their later performance. The results indicated that subjects given feedback performed better on subsequent tasks than those given no feedback. Perceived behavioral control had little effect on performance. The causal attributions made by subjects were used to interpret these effects. These findings were viewed as supportive of Averill's (1973) notion that various types of control are related to stress in a complex fashion. The data may also support the reformulation by Abramson et al. (1978) of learned helplessness theory.

  17. Application of digital servo control on high-performance VCM in HDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Gang; Lin, Ming-Jer

    1992-10-01

    An application of digital servo control on a high-performance voice coil motor positioning system in hard disk drive is discussed. Modern digital control theory is used in servo algorithm design, and the servo algorithm is implemented by a high-speed microprocessor, OES 22040 model. The experimental results show the excellent properties in time domain and frequency domain.

  18. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  19. Integrated command, control, communication and computation system design study. Summary of tasks performed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A summary of tasks performed on an integrated command, control, communication, and computation system design study is given. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System command and control system study, an automated real-time operations study, and image processing work are discussed.

  20. PERFORMANCE AND COST OF MERCURY AND MULTIPOLLUTANT EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents estimates of the performance and cost of both powdered activated carbon (PAC) and multipollutant control technologies that may be useful in controlling mercury emissions. Based on currently available data, cost estimates for PAC injection range are 0.03-3.096 ...

  1. 31 CFR 545.407 - Services performed in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. 545.407 Section 545.407 Money and Finance: Treasury... TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN) SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 545.407 Services performed in the territory of Afghanistan controlled by the Taliban. The prohibitions on transactions involving...

  2. An Effect of Knowledge of Results on Performance with Goal Setting Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark S.; Freedman, Steven

    Locke has concluded that motivational knowledge of results (KR) has no effect on performance if goal is controlled. Previous studies, however, always afforded to No KR groups some KR. In the present study a 2x2 factorial design (KR-No KR; low-high goal) was used. Stringent controls were instituted to eliminate all KR, in the No KR conditions. The…

  3. Effects of Attentional Focus and Age on Suprapostural Task Performance and Postural Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNevin, Nancy; Weir, Patricia; Quinn, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Suprapostural task performance (manual tracking) and postural control (sway and frequency) were examined as a function of attentional focus, age, and tracking difficulty. Given the performance benefits often found under external focus conditions, it was hypothesized that external focus instructions would promote superior tracking and…

  4. 75 FR 65039 - Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-NEW

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2010 at 75 FR 35092 allowing for a 60... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-NEW AGENCY: U.S... on a new information collection request (ICR) 3206-NEW, Performance Measurement Surveys. As...

  5. 78 FR 78416 - Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0253

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Performance Measurement Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0253 AGENCY: U.S... on the information collection request (ICR) 3206-0253, Performance Measurement Surveys. As required... measurement surveys are valuable tools to gather information from our customers so we can design and...

  6. Performance Evaluation of Reliable Multicast Protocol for Checkout and Launch Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Wei Wennie; Porter, John

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to study reliability and performance of Real Time Critical Network (RTCN) for checkout and launch control systems (CLCS). The major tasks include reliability and performance evaluation of Reliable Multicast (RM) package and fault tolerance analysis and design of dual redundant network architecture.

  7. The Use of Performance Control Charts in Business Schools: A Tool for Assessing Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervetti, Michael J.; Royne, Marla B.; Shaffer, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose the use of performance control charts as a useful tool for tracking student assessments that rely upon faculty administered exams and projects as well as assessing teacher performance. This quantitative, formative evaluation process can be integrated into the classroom during an actual semester and utilized as a means to…

  8. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  9. CF6 Jet Engine Performance Improvement: High Pressure Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, S. E.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An active clearance control system was developed which reduces fuel consumption and performance degradation. This system utilizes compressor discharge air during takeoff and fan discharge air during cruise to impinge on the shroud structure to improve the thermal response. The system was evaluated in component and engine tests. The test results demonstrated a performance improvement of 0.7 percent in cruise SFC.

  10. Can executive control be influenced by performance feedback? Two experimental studies with younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Drueke, Barbara; Boecker, Maren; Mainz, Verena; Gauggel, Siegfried; Mungard, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Executive control describes a wide range of cognitive processes which are critical for the goal-directed regulation of stimulus processing and action regulation. Previous studies have shown that executive control performance declines with age but yet, it is still not clear whether different internal and external factors—as performance feedback and age—influence these cognitive processes and how they might interact with each other. Therefore, we investigated feedback effects in the flanker task in young as well as in older adults in two experiments. Performance feedback significantly improved executive performance in younger adults at the expense of errors. In older adults, feedback also led to higher error rates, but had no significant effect on executive performance which might be due to stronger interference. Results indicate that executive functions can be positively influenced by performance feedback in younger adults, but not necessarily in older adults. PMID:22529793

  11. ATS-6 engineering performance report. Volume 2: Orbit and attitude controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, R. O. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Attitude control is reviewed, encompassing the attitude control subsystem, spacecraft attitude precision pointing and slewing adaptive control experiment, and RF interferometer experiment. The spacecraft propulsion system (SPS) is discussed, including subsystem, SPS design description and validation, orbital operations and performance, in-orbit anomalies and contingency operations, and the cesium bombardment ion engine experiment. Thruster failure due to plugging of the propellant feed passages, a major cause for mission termination, are considered among the critical generic failures on the satellite.

  12. Dynamic neural networks based on-line identification and control of high performance motor drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubaai, Ahmed; Kotaru, Raj

    1995-01-01

    In the automated and high-tech industries of the future, there wil be a need for high performance motor drives both in the low-power range and in the high-power range. To meet very straight demands of tracking and regulation in the two quadrants of operation, advanced control technologies are of a considerable interest and need to be developed. In response a dynamics learning control architecture is developed with simultaneous on-line identification and control. the feature of the proposed approach, to efficiently combine the dual task of system identification (learning) and adaptive control of nonlinear motor drives into a single operation is presented. This approach, therefore, not only adapts to uncertainties of the dynamic parameters of the motor drives but also learns about their inherent nonlinearities. In fact, most of the neural networks based adaptive control approaches in use have an identification phase entirely separate from the control phase. Because these approaches separate the identification and control modes, it is not possible to cope with dynamic changes in a controlled process. Extensive simulation studies have been conducted and good performance was observed. The robustness characteristics of neuro-controllers to perform efficiently in a noisy environment is also demonstrated. With this initial success, the principal investigator believes that the proposed approach with the suggested neural structure can be used successfully for the control of high performance motor drives. Two identification and control topologies based on the model reference adaptive control technique are used in this present analysis. No prior knowledge of load dynamics is assumed in either topology while the second topology also assumes no knowledge of the motor parameters.

  13. Performance Analysis of a Three-Channel Control Architecture for Bilateral Teleoperation with Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Ryogo; Iiyama, Noriko; Natori, Kenji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Furukawa, Hirotaka

    Bilateral control is one of the control methods of teleoperation systems. Human operators can feel reaction force from remote environment by means of this control scheme. This paper presents a novel control architecture for bilateral teleoperation with/without time delay. The proposed bilateral control system has three communication channels between master and slave robots. In concrete terms, this system has two transmission channels of position and force information from the master side to the slave side and one transmission channel of force information from the slave side to the master side. The master controller of the proposed three-channel teleoperation system does not include a position controller, i.e. only force control is implemented in the master side, in order to improve operationality in the master side. The three-channel controller with time delay as well as without time delay gives better performance (higher transparency) than other conventional controllers such as four-channel controllers and so on. In the proposed controller, models of a slave robot and communication time delay are not required differently from conventional methods, and robust acceleration control is achieved by using the disturbance observer (DOB). Hybrid matrices are utilized to analyze four-channel and three-channel control systems. Transmission characteristics of force and position information between master and slave robots are clarified in the analysis. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimental results.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Control Coefficients on the Performance of CNTFET Under Different Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Safayat-Al; Kalam, Nasheen; Abdullah, Sharmin

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the performance of both gate and drain control coefficients to analyze the behavior of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) under ballistic conditions and based on the change of different parameter value, such as oxide thickness of structure and temperature variation. A thorough study of both gate and drain control coefficient effects on the performance of CNTFETs has been conducted under different temperature and oxide layers and the output of the device has been analyzed through different parameters. Higher values of control coefficient help to attain larger transconductance by the increasing temperatures. For a fixed value of control coefficient, 4nm thickness of oxide has a transconductance of ˜ 4.5 × 10-5 S/m. Smaller oxide layer thickness has higher slope of increment in transconductance value. ON-state current to leakage current ratio shows a steady state response toward increment of gate control coefficient. Also, increment of oxide thickness has an adverse effect on current ratio, while a linear decay of current ratio is observed with the increased value of drain controlled one. Drain-induced battery lowering (DIBL) effect decreases with the value of gate control one and increases with the drain control coefficient. In this way, the optimum value for both the control coefficients has to be considered in order to perform well.

  15. No effects of ingesting or rinsing sucrose on depleted self-control performance.

    PubMed

    Boyle, N B; Lawton, C L; Allen, R; Croden, F; Smith, K; Dye, L

    2016-02-01

    Self-control tasks appear to deplete a limited resource resulting in reduced subsequent self-control performance; a state of ego depletion. Evidence of reduced peripheral glucose by exertion of self-control, and attenuation of ego depletion by carbohydrate metabolism underpins the proposition that this macronutrient provides the energetic source of self-control. However, the demonstration of positive, non-metabolic effects on ego depletion when merely sensing carbohydrates orally contradicts this hypothesis. Recent studies have also failed to support both metabolic and non-metabolic accounts. The effects of ingesting or rinsing a carbohydrate (sucrose) and an artificially sweetened (sucralose) solution on capillary blood and interstitial glucose, and depleted self-control performance were examined in older adults. Forty, healthy, adults (50-65years) ingested and rinsed sucrose and sucralose solutions in a 2 (method)×2 (source), fully counterbalanced, repeated measures, crossover design. Capillary blood and interstitial glucose responses were assayed. Depleted self-control performance (induced by the Bakan visual processing task) on an attention switch task was assessed under each study condition. Ego depletion had no consistent effects on peripheral glucose levels and no significant effects of ingesting or rinsing sucrose on self-control were observed. The act of rinsing the solutions, independent of energetic content, resulted in a small, non-significant enhancement of performance on the attention switch task relative to ingesting the same solutions (RT: p=.05; accuracy: p=.09). In conclusion, a metabolic account of self-control was not supported. Whilst a positive effect of rinsing on depleted self-control performance was demonstrated, this was independent of energetic content. Findings suggest glucose is an unlikely physiological analogue for self-control resources.

  16. Performance Optimization of Force Feedback Control System in Virtual Vascular Intervention Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  17. Performances of PID and Different Fuzzy Methods for Controlling a Ball on Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Mart, Tamre; Moezzi, Reza; Oliver, Mets; Martin, Jurise; Ahti, Polder; Leo, Teder; Mart, Juurma

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops and analyses the performances evaluation of different control strategies applied for a nonlinear motion of a ball on a beam system. Comparison results provide in-depth comprehension on the stable ability of different controllers for this real mechanical application. The three different controllers are a conventional PID method, a Mamdani-type fuzzy rule method and a Sugeno-type fuzzy rule method. In this study, the PID shows the fastest sinuous reference tracking while the Mamdani-type fuzzy method proves the highest stability performance for tracking square wave motions.

  18. A comparison of one- and two-person crew performance in a supervisory control task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. Allen; Jagacinski, Richard J.; Plamondon, Brian D.; Lytton, Lynn E.; Kirlik, Alex C.

    1987-01-01

    One- and two-person crews performed a simulated supervisory control task in which they had to directly control a scout helicopter and indirectly control four friendly helicopters in a hostile environment. One-person crews relied on an autopilot more than two-person crews in order to deal with multiple task demands. However, two-person crews were superior in terms of overall performance, and on particular subtasks such as searching for cargo and enemy craft and destroying enemy craft after they were located.

  19. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  20. Antenna Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) Controllers: Properties, Limits of Performance, and Tuning Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2004-01-01

    Wind gusts are the main disturbances that depreciate tracking precision of microwave antennas and radiotelescopes. The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers - as compared with the proportional-and-integral (PI) controllers significantly improve the tracking precision in wind disturbances. However, their properties have not been satisfactorily understood; consequently, their tuning is a trial-and-error process. A control engineer has two tools to tune an LQG controller: the choice of coordinate system of the controller model and the selection of weights of the LQG performance index. This article analyzes properties of an open- and closed-loop antenna. It shows that the proper choice of coordinates of the open-loop model simplifies the shaping of the closed-loop performance. The closed-loop properties are influenced by the LQG weights. The article shows the impact of the weights on the antenna closed-loop bandwidth, disturbance rejection properties, and antenna acceleration. The bandwidth and the disturbance rejection characterize the antenna performance, while the acceleration represents the performance limit set by the antenna hardware (motors). The article presents the controller tuning procedure, based on the coordinate selection and the weight properties. The procedure rationally shapes the closed-loop performance, as an alternative to the trial-and-error approach.

  1. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mustapa, Amirah; Mohd Mustafah, Nadia; Jamil, Nursuriati

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD), EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were “postural control,” “balance,” “gait performance,” “diabetes mellitus,” and “diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults. PMID:27525281

  2. Postural Control and Gait Performance in the Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mustapa, Amirah; Justine, Maria; Mohd Mustafah, Nadia; Jamil, Nursuriati; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to review the published studies on the characteristics of impairments in the postural control and gait performance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods. A review was performed by obtaining publication of all papers reporting on the postural control and gait performance in DPN from Google Scholar, Ovid, SAGE, Springerlink, Science Direct (SD), EBSCO Discovery Service, and Web of Science databases. The keywords used for searching were "postural control," "balance," "gait performance," "diabetes mellitus," and "diabetic peripheral neuropathy." Results. Total of 4,337 studies were hit in the search. 1,524 studies were screened on their titles and citations. Then, 79 studies were screened on their abstract. Only 38 studies were eligible to be selected: 17 studies on postural control and 21 studies on the gait performance. Most previous researches were found to have strong evidence of postural control impairments and noticeable gait deficits in DPN. Deterioration of somatosensory, visual, and vestibular systems with the pathologic condition of diabetes on cognitive impairment causes further instability of postural and gait performance in DPN. Conclusions. Postural instability and gait imbalance in DPN may contribute to high risk of fall incidence, especially in the geriatric population. Thus, further works are crucial to highlight this fact in the hospital based and community adults. PMID:27525281

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report: Third quarter -- Calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.; Aitken, S.B.

    1996-11-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, in accordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose equivalent to a worker; number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; number of radioactive material intakes resulting in a dose assessment of 10 mrem or more; area of contamination, high contamination, and airborne radioactivity areas, in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills.

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report. Third quarter, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, R.

    1995-12-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, in accordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: collective dose in person-rem; average work dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose to a worker; the number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; the number of radioactive material intakes resulting in a dose assessment of 10 mrem or more; the area of contamination, high contamination, and airborne radioactivity areas in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills.

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report: Second quarter -- Calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.; Aitken, S.B.

    1996-09-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, in accordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose equivalent to a worker; number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; number of radioactive material intakes resulting in a dose assessment of 10 mrem or more; area of contamination, high contamination, and airborne radioactivity areas, in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills.

  6. Efficiency under record performance demands: exertion control--an individual difference variable?

    PubMed

    Heckhausen, H; Strang, H

    1988-09-01

    Semiprofessional players ran basketball circuits under either normal or record performance demands. Lactate concentration and heart rate were measured as indexes of exertion. Number of dribbling errors, attempted shots, hits, and hit rate served as measures of performance and efficiency. Several individual difference measures were taken in order to identify those athletes who were capable of moderating the extent of exertion and of preserving their performance from impairment. The indexes of exertion rose sharply from normal to record trials. Correspondingly, the numbers of dribbling errors and of shots increased while the hit rate declined. However, there were considerable individual differences in restraining exertion and preserving efficiency--both indexes of exertion control. Neither achievement motive scores nor questionnaire items that ask for self-knowledge about exertion control could account for these differences. However, individuals capable of exertion control could be discriminated by an action-control scale that asks about postdecisional implementation of action steps (Kuhl, 1985).

  7. Handling performance control for hybrid 8-wheel-drive vehicle and simulation verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jun; Hu, Jibin

    2016-08-01

    In order to improve handling performance of a hybrid 8-Wheel-Drive vehicle, the handling performance control strategy was proposed. For armoured vehicle, besides handling stability in high speed, the minimum steer radius in low speed is also a key tactical and technical index. Based on that, the proposed handling performance control strategy includes 'Handling Stability' and 'Radius Minimization' control modes. In 'Handling Stability' control mode, 'Neutralsteer Radio' is defined to adjust the steering characteristics to satisfy different demand in different speed range. In 'Radius Minimization' control mode, the independent motors are controlled to provide an additional yaw moment to decrease the minimum steer radius. In order to verify the strategy, a simulation platform was built including engine and continuously variable transmission systems, generator and battery systems, independent motors and controllers systems, vehicle dynamic and tyre mechanical systems. The simulation results show that the handling performance of the vehicle can be enhanced significantly, and the minimum steer radius can be decreased by 20% which is significant improvement compared to the common level of main battle armoured vehicle around the world.

  8. The study of passive flow control device performance at low inlet subcooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, S. G.; Chen, I. Y.; Chang, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Passive flow control devices (PFCDs) are normally used for flow measurement and flow regulation in many liquid flow systems. The typical PFCDs are venturis, orifices, nozzles, and capillary tubes. The PFCDs have several advantages over active flow control valves in thermal-fluid systems. They require no electrical power, data, command signal for operation and are not subject to wear or breakage, as well as the need of feedback control. When liquid flow venturi cavitates, it has the ability to passively control the flow in thermal-fluid systems at the choked flow regime. However, when the cavitating venturi (CV) operates at low value of inlet subcooling to conserve electrical power, an all-liquid overflow phenomenon can occur. If cavitation cannot be guaranteed in CV, then the constant flow rate performance of CV could not be obtained. Then, the CV may not be the best choice for the thermal-fluid control systems. For this reason, the main objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of possible PFCDs at low inlet subcooling. Experiments were performed for the alternate PFCDs of orifice, nozzle, and capillary tube at low levels of inlet subcooling in order to explore the physical phenomena of the PFCD relevant to their operation parameters. The test results of PFCDs are compared with CV's performance, and recommendations are made for the best type of passive flow control device at low inlet subcooling for the industrial and aerospace thermal-fluid control system applications.

  9. Reactor instrumentation and control design and performance simulation for SP-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. A.; Alley, A. D.; Halfen, F. J.; Brynsvold, G. V.

    1987-01-01

    The SP-100 flight system will be launched with all primary and secondary lithium in the solid state. Once in orbit, the reactor will be brought critical and maintained at a low power level while the lithium is thawed out. Once the system is thawed out, the reactor power will be controlled to provide the energy source required by the power conversion system to meet the payload electrical power requirements. The Reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem which includes the reactor control drives, instrumentation and the digital controller provides for the control of the nuclear subsystem to perform these operating maneuvers as well as providing for automatic shutdown and restart under certain off-normal conditions. The design and performance of this system are described.

  10. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) Network Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the network control function for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) very small aperture terminal (VSAT) full mesh network. This includes control of all operational activities such as acquisition, synchronization, timing and rain fade compensation as well as control of all communications activities such as on-demand integrated services (voice, video, and date) connects and disconnects Operations control is provided by an in-band orderwire carried in the baseboard processor (BBP) control burst, the orderwire burst, the reference burst, and the uplink traffic burst. Communication services are provided by demand assigned multiple access (DAMA) protocols. The ACTS implementation of DAMA protocols ensures both on-demand and integrated voice, video and data services. Communications services control is also provided by the in-band orderwire but uses only the reference burst and the uplink traffic burst. The performance of the ACTS network control functions have been successfully tested during on-orbit checkout and in various VSAT networks in day to day operations. This paper discusses the network operations and services control performance.

  11. Adaptive control schemes for improving dynamic performance of efficiency-optimized induction motor drives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navneet; Raj Chelliah, Thanga; Srivastava, S P

    2015-07-01

    Model Based Control (MBC) is one of the energy optimal controllers used in vector-controlled Induction Motor (IM) for controlling the excitation of motor in accordance with torque and speed. MBC offers energy conservation especially at part-load operation, but it creates ripples in torque and speed during load transition, leading to poor dynamic performance of the drive. This study investigates the opportunity for improving dynamic performance of a three-phase IM operating with MBC and proposes three control schemes: (i) MBC with a low pass filter (ii) torque producing current (iqs) injection in the output of speed controller (iii) Variable Structure Speed Controller (VSSC). The pre and post operation of MBC during load transition is also analyzed. The dynamic performance of a 1-hp, three-phase squirrel-cage IM with mine-hoist load diagram is tested. Test results are provided for the conventional field-oriented (constant flux) control and MBC (adjustable excitation) with proposed schemes. The effectiveness of proposed schemes is also illustrated for parametric variations. The test results and subsequent analysis confer that the motor dynamics improves significantly with all three proposed schemes in terms of overshoot/undershoot peak amplitude of torque and DC link power in addition to energy saving during load transitions. PMID:25820090

  12. Design of a new high-performance pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    A new form of high-performance, disturbance-adaptive pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is proposed. This new controller is all linear (constant gains) and can maintain accurate 'pointing' of the HST in the face of persistent randomly triggered uncertain, unmeasurable 'flapping' motions of the large attached solar array panels. Similar disturbances associated with antennas and other flexible appendages can also be accommodated. The effectiveness and practicality of the proposed new controller is demonstrated by a detailed design and simulation testing of one such controller for a planar-motion, fully nonlinear model of HST. The simulation results show a high degree of disturbance isolation and pointing stability.

  13. Real-Time Adaptive Control Allocation Applied to a High Performance Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Bundick, W. Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development and application of one approach to the control of aircraft with large numbers of control effectors. This approach, referred to as real-time adaptive control allocation, combines a nonlinear method for control allocation with actuator failure detection and isolation. The control allocator maps moment (or angular acceleration) commands into physical control effector commands as functions of individual control effectiveness and availability. The actuator failure detection and isolation algorithm is a model-based approach that uses models of the actuators to predict actuator behavior and an adaptive decision threshold to achieve acceptable false alarm/missed detection rates. This integrated approach provides control reconfiguration when an aircraft is subjected to actuator failure, thereby improving maneuverability and survivability of the degraded aircraft. This method is demonstrated on a next generation military aircraft Lockheed-Martin Innovative Control Effector) simulation that has been modified to include a novel nonlinear fluid flow control control effector based on passive porosity. Desktop and real-time piloted simulation results demonstrate the performance of this integrated adaptive control allocation approach.

  14. Level of automation effects on performance, situation awareness and workload in a dynamic control task.

    PubMed

    Endsley, M R; Kaber, D B

    1999-03-01

    Various levels of automation (LOA) designating the degree of human operator and computer control were explored within the context of a dynamic control task as a means of improving overall human/machine performance. Automated systems have traditionally been explored as binary function allocations; either the human or the machine is assigned to a given task. More recently, intermediary levels of automation have been discussed as a means of maintaining operator involvement in system performance, leading to improvements in situation awareness and reductions in out-of-the-loop performance problems. A LOA taxonomy applicable to a wide range of psychomotor and cognitive tasks is presented here. The taxonomy comprises various schemes of generic control system function allocations. The functions allocated to a human operator and/or computer included monitoring displays, generating processing options, selecting an 'optimal' option and implementing that option. The impact of the LOA taxonomy was assessed within a dynamic and complex cognitive control task by measuring its effect on human/system performance, situation awareness and workload. Thirty subjects performed simulation trials involving various levels of automation. Several automation failures occurred and out-of-the-loop performance decrements were assessed. Results suggest that, in terms of performance, human operators benefit most from automation of the implementation portion of the task, but only under normal operating conditions; in contrast, removal of the operator from task implementation is detrimental to performance recovery if the automated system fails. Joint human/system option generation significantly degraded performance in comparison to human or automated option generation alone. Lower operator workload and higher situation awareness were observed under automation of the decision making portion of the task (i.e. selection of options), although human/system performance was only slightly improved. The

  15. Robust Damage-Mitigating Control of Aircraft for High Performance and Structural Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, Jeffrey; Ray, Asok; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the concept and a design methodology for robust damage-mitigating control (DMC) of aircraft. The goal of DMC is to simultaneously achieve high performance and structural durability. The controller design procedure involves consideration of damage at critical points of the structure, as well as the performance requirements of the aircraft. An aeroelastic model of the wings has been formulated and is incorporated into a nonlinear rigid-body model of aircraft flight-dynamics. Robust damage-mitigating controllers are then designed using the H(infinity)-based structured singular value (mu) synthesis method based on a linearized model of the aircraft. In addition to penalizing the error between the ideal performance and the actual performance of the aircraft, frequency-dependent weights are placed on the strain amplitude at the root of each wing. Using each controller in turn, the control system is put through an identical sequence of maneuvers, and the resulting (varying amplitude cyclic) stress profiles are analyzed using a fatigue crack growth model that incorporates the effects of stress overload. Comparisons are made to determine the impact of different weights on the resulting fatigue crack damage in the wings. The results of simulation experiments show significant savings in fatigue life of the wings while retaining the dynamic performance of the aircraft.

  16. Damage-mitigating control of aircraft for high performance and life extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplin, Jeffrey

    1998-12-01

    A methodology is proposed for the synthesis of a Damage-Mitigating Control System for a high-performance fighter aircraft. The design of such a controller involves consideration of damage to critical points of the structure, as well as the performance requirements of the aircraft. This research is interdisciplinary, and brings existing knowledge in the fields of unsteady aerodynamics, structural dynamics, fracture mechanics, and control theory together to formulate a new approach towards aircraft flight controller design. A flexible wing model is formulated using the Finite Element Method, and the important mode shapes and natural frequencies are identified. The Doublet Lattice Method is employed to develop an unsteady flow model for computation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads acting on the wing due to rigid-body maneuvers and structural deformation. These two models are subsequently incorporated into a pre-existing nonlinear rigid-body aircraft flight-dynamic model. A family of robust Damage-Mitigating Controllers is designed using the Hinfinity-optimization and mu-synthesis method. In addition to weighting the error between the ideal performance and the actual performance of the aircraft, weights are also placed on the strain amplitude at the root of each wing. The results show significant savings in fatigue life of the wings while retaining the dynamic performance of the aircraft.

  17. Damage-Mitigating Control of Space Propulsion Systems for High Performance and Extended Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Wu, Min-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    A major goal in the control of complex mechanical system such as spacecraft rocket engine's advanced aircraft, and power plants is to achieve high performance with increased reliability, component durability, and maintainability. The current practice of decision and control systems synthesis focuses on improving performance and diagnostic capabilities under constraints that often do not adequately represent the materials degradation. In view of the high performance requirements of the system and availability of improved materials, the lack of appropriate knowledge about the properties of these materials will lead to either less than achievable performance due to overly conservative design, or over-straining of the structure leading to unexpected failures and drastic reduction of the service life. The key idea in this report is that a significant improvement in service life could be achieved by a small reduction in the system dynamic performance. The major task is to characterize the damage generation process, and then utilize this information in a mathematical form to synthesize a control law that would meet the system requirements and simultaneously satisfy the constraints that are imposed by the material and structural properties of the critical components. The concept of damage mitigation is introduced for control of mechanical systems to achieve high performance with a prolonged life span. A model of fatigue damage dynamics is formulated in the continuous-time setting, instead of a cycle-based representation, for direct application to control systems synthesis. An optimal control policy is then formulated via nonlinear programming under specified constraints of the damage rate and accumulated damage. The results of simulation experiments for the transient upthrust of a bipropellant rocket engine are presented to demonstrate efficacy of the damage-mitigating control concept.

  18. Power and Performance Management in Nonlinear Virtualized Computing Systems via Predictive Control

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chengjian; Mu, Yifen

    2015-01-01

    The problem of power and performance management captures growing research interest in both academic and industrial field. Virtulization, as an advanced technology to conserve energy, has become basic architecture for most data centers. Accordingly, more sophisticated and finer control are desired in virtualized computing systems, where multiple types of control actions exist as well as time delay effect, which make it complicated to formulate and solve the problem. Furthermore, because of improvement on chips and reduction of idle power, power consumption in modern machines shows significant nonlinearity, making linear power models(which is commonly adopted in previous work) no longer suitable. To deal with this, we build a discrete system state model, in which all control actions and time delay effect are included by state transition and performance and power can be defined on each state. Then, we design the predictive controller, via which the quadratic cost function integrating performance and power can be dynamically optimized. Experiment results show the effectiveness of the controller. By choosing a moderate weight, a good balance can be achieved between performance and power: 99.76% requirements can be dealt with and power consumption can be saved by 33% comparing to the case with open loop controller. PMID:26225769

  19. The influence of oculomotor tasks on postural control in dyslexic children

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Mélithe, Damien; Ajrezo, Layla; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Gérard, Christophe-Loic

    2014-01-01

    Dual task is known to affect postural stability in children. We explored the effect of visual tasks on postural control in thirty dyslexic children. A selected group of thirty chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children (mean age: 9.92 ± 0.35 years) and a group of thirty reading age-matched non-dyslexic children (mean reading age: 7.90 ± 0.25 years) were chosen for comparison. All children underwent ophthalmologic and optometric evaluation. Eye movements were recorded by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2) and postural sway was recorded simultaneously by a force platform (TechnoConept®). All children performed fixations, pursuits, pro- and anti-saccades tasks. Dyslexic children showed significantly poor near fusional vergence ranges (convergence and divergence) with respect to the non-dyslexic children groups. During the postural task, quality of fixation and anti-saccade performance in dyslexic children were significantly worse compared to the two non-dyslexic children groups. In contrast, the number of catch-up saccades during pursuits and the latency of pro- and anti-saccades were similar in the three groups of children examined. Concerning postural quality, dyslexic children were more unstable than chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children group. For all three groups of children tested we also observed that executing saccades (pro- and anti-saccades) reduced postural values significantly in comparison with fixation and pursuit tasks. The impairment in convergence and divergence fusional capabilities could be due to an immaturity in cortical structures controlling the vergence system. The poor oculomotor performance reported in dyslexic children suggested a deficit in allocating visual attention and their postural instability observed is in line with the cerebellar impairment previously reported in dyslexic children. Finally, pro- or anti-saccades reduce postural values compared to fixation and pursuit tasks in all groups of children tested

  20. The influence of oculomotor tasks on postural control in dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Mélithe, Damien; Ajrezo, Layla; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Gérard, Christophe-Loic

    2014-01-01

    Dual task is known to affect postural stability in children. We explored the effect of visual tasks on postural control in thirty dyslexic children. A selected group of thirty chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children (mean age: 9.92 ± 0.35 years) and a group of thirty reading age-matched non-dyslexic children (mean reading age: 7.90 ± 0.25 years) were chosen for comparison. All children underwent ophthalmologic and optometric evaluation. Eye movements were recorded by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2) and postural sway was recorded simultaneously by a force platform (TechnoConept®). All children performed fixations, pursuits, pro- and anti-saccades tasks. Dyslexic children showed significantly poor near fusional vergence ranges (convergence and divergence) with respect to the non-dyslexic children groups. During the postural task, quality of fixation and anti-saccade performance in dyslexic children were significantly worse compared to the two non-dyslexic children groups. In contrast, the number of catch-up saccades during pursuits and the latency of pro- and anti-saccades were similar in the three groups of children examined. Concerning postural quality, dyslexic children were more unstable than chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children group. For all three groups of children tested we also observed that executing saccades (pro- and anti-saccades) reduced postural values significantly in comparison with fixation and pursuit tasks. The impairment in convergence and divergence fusional capabilities could be due to an immaturity in cortical structures controlling the vergence system. The poor oculomotor performance reported in dyslexic children suggested a deficit in allocating visual attention and their postural instability observed is in line with the cerebellar impairment previously reported in dyslexic children. Finally, pro- or anti-saccades reduce postural values compared to fixation and pursuit tasks in all groups of children tested

  1. An Electronic Workshop on the Performance Seeking Control and Propulsion Controlled Aircraft Results of the F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control Flight Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    Flight research for the F-15 HIDEC (Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control) program was completed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in the fall of 1993. The flight research conducted during the last two years of the HIDEC program included two principal experiments: (1) performance seeking control (PSC), an adaptive, real-time, on-board optimization of engine, inlet, and horizontal tail position on the F-15; and (2) propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA), an augmented flight control system developed for landings as well as up-and-away flight that used only engine thrust (flight controls locked) for flight control. In September 1994, the background details and results of the PSC and PCA experiments were presented in an electronic workshop, accessible through the Dryden World Wide Web (http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/dryden.html) and as a compact disk.

  2. Self-Control Strength Depletion Reduces Self-Efficacy and Impairs Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jeffrey D; Bray, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of task self-efficacy as a psychological factor involved in the relationship between self-control depletion and physical endurance. Participants (N = 37) completed two isometric handgrip endurance trials, separated by a Stroop task, which was either congruent (control) or incongruent (causing depletion). Task self-efficacy for the second endurance trial was measured following the Stroop task. Participants in the depletion condition reported lower task self-efficacy and showed a greater reduction in performance on the second endurance trial when compared with controls. Task self-efficacy also mediated the relationship between self-control depletion and endurance performance. The results of this study provide evidence that task self-efficacy is negatively affected following self-control depletion. We recommend that task self-efficacy be further investigated as a psychological factor accounting for the negative change in self-control performance of physical endurance and sport tasks following self-control strength depletion.

  3. Meditation, mindfulness and executive control: the importance of emotional acceptance and brain-based performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Teper, Rimma; Inzlicht, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have documented the positive effects of mindfulness meditation on executive control. What has been lacking, however, is an understanding of the mechanism underlying this effect. Some theorists have described mindfulness as embodying two facets-present moment awareness and emotional acceptance. Here, we examine how the effect of meditation practice on executive control manifests in the brain, suggesting that emotional acceptance and performance monitoring play important roles. We investigated the effect of meditation practice on executive control and measured the neural correlates of performance monitoring, specifically, the error-related negativity (ERN), a neurophysiological response that occurs within 100 ms of error commission. Meditators and controls completed a Stroop task, during which we recorded ERN amplitudes with electroencephalography. Meditators showed greater executive control (i.e. fewer errors), a higher ERN and more emotional acceptance than controls. Finally, mediation pathway models further revealed that meditation practice relates to greater executive control and that this effect can be accounted for by heightened emotional acceptance, and to a lesser extent, increased brain-based performance monitoring.

  4. Performance analysis of a semiactive suspension system with particle swarm optimization and fuzzy logic control.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W; Khan, Afzal; Khan, Muhammad Tahir

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control.

  5. Performance Analysis of a Semiactive Suspension System with Particle Swarm Optimization and Fuzzy Logic Control

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control. PMID:24574868

  6. Application and Evaluation of Control Modes for Risk-Based Engine Performance Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The engine control system for civil transport aircraft imposes operational limits on the propulsion system to ensure compliance with safety standards. However, during certain emergency situations, aircraft survivability may benefit from engine performance beyond its normal limits despite the increased risk of failure. Accordingly, control modes were developed to improve the maximum thrust output and responsiveness of a generic high-bypass turbofan engine. The algorithms were designed such that the enhanced performance would always constitute an elevation in failure risk to a consistent predefined likelihood. This paper presents an application of these risk-based control modes to a combined engine/aircraft model. Through computer and piloted simulation tests, the aim is to present a notional implementation of these modes, evaluate their effects on a generic airframe, and demonstrate their usefulness during emergency flight situations. Results show that minimal control effort is required to compensate for the changes in flight dynamics due to control mode activation. The benefits gained from enhanced engine performance for various runway incursion scenarios are investigated. Finally, the control modes are shown to protect against potential instabilities during propulsion-only flight where all aircraft control surfaces are inoperable.

  7. Application and Evaluation of Control Modes for Risk-Based Engine Performance Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl (Compiler); Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The engine control system for civil transport aircraft imposes operational limits on the propulsion system to ensure compliance with safety standards. However, during certain emergency situations, aircraft survivability may benefit from engine performance beyond its normal limits despite the increased risk of failure. Accordingly, control modes were developed to improve the maximum thrust output and responsiveness of a generic high-bypass turbofan engine. The algorithms were designed such that the enhanced performance would always constitute an elevation in failure risk to a consistent predefined likelihood. This paper presents an application of these risk-based control modes to a combined engine/aircraft model. Through computer and piloted simulation tests, the aim is to present a notional implementation of these modes, evaluate their effects on a generic airframe, and demonstrate their usefulness during emergency flight situations. Results show that minimal control effort is required to compensate for the changes in flight dynamics due to control mode activation. The benefits gained from enhanced engine performance for various runway incursion scenarios are investigated. Finally, the control modes are shown to protect against potential instabilities during propulsion-only flight where all aircraft control surfaces are inoperable.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Reduced-Gyro Control Law Design, Implementation, and On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, Brian R.; Ramsey, Patrick R.; Wirzburger, John H.; Smith, Daniel C.; VanArsadall, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Following gyro failures in April 2001 and April 2003, HST Pointing Control System engineers designed reduced-gyro control laws to extend the spacecraft science mission. The Two-Gyro Science (TGS) and One-Gyro Science (OGS) control laws were designed and implemented using magnetometers, star trackers, and Fine Guidance Sensors in succession to control vehicle rate about the missing gyro axes. Both TGS and OGS have demonstrated on-orbit pointing stability of 7 milli-arcseconds or less, which depends upon the guide star magnitude used by the Fine Guidance Sensor. This paper describes the design, implementation, and on-orbit performance of the TGS and OGS control law fine-pointing modes using Fixed Head Star Trackers and Fine Guidance Sensors, after successfully achieving coarse-pointing control using magnetometers.

  9. Effect of bonding on the performance of a piezoactuator-based active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is studied. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to select the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The presented method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators and the bonding layers have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the MIMSC method and to demonstrate the effect of the physical and geometrical properties of the bonding layer on the dynamic performance of the actively controlled beams. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  10. A Real-time Reinforcement Learning Control System with H∞ Tracking Performance Compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Shogo; Obayashi, Masanao; Kuremoto, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kunikazu

    Robust control theory generally guarantees robustness and stability of the closed-loop system. It however requires a mathematical model of the system to design the control system. It therefore can't often deal with nonlinear systems due to difficulty of modeling of the system. On the other hand, reinforcement learning methods can deal with nonlinear systems without any mathematical model. It however usually doesn't guarantee the stability of the system control. In this paper, we propose a “Real-time Reinforcement Learning Control System (RRLCS)” through combining reinforcement learning to treat unknown nonlinear systems and robust control theory to guarantee the robustness and stability of the system. Moreover, we analyze the stability of the proposed system using H∞ tracking performance and Lyapunov function. Finally, through the computer simulation for controlling an inverted pendulum system, we show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Improvements To Progressive Wave Tube Performance Through Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents recent improvements to the acoustic and thermal control systems of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), a progressive wave tube test facility at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. A brief summary of past acoustic performance is given first to serve as a basis for comparison with the new performance data using a multiple-input, closed-loop, narrow-band controller. Performance data in the form of test section acoustic power spectral densities and coherence are presented in three of six facility configurations for a variety of input spectra. Tested spectra include uniform, two cases of pink noise, three cases of narrow-band random, a simulated launch payload bay environment for an expendable launch vehicle, and a simulated external acoustic load for the aft section of a reusable launch vehicle. In addition, a new closed-loop temperature controller and thermocouple data acquisition system are described.

  12. Preliminary evidence of salivary cortisol predicting performance in a controlled setting.

    PubMed

    Lautenbach, Franziska; Laborde, Sylvain; Achtzehn, Silvia; Raab, Markus

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the influence of salivary cortisol on tennis serve performance in a controlled setting and to investigate if cortisol predicts unique variance in performance beyond a subjective anxiety measure (i.e., Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 [CSAI-2]). Twenty-three tennis players performed two series of second tennis serves separated by an anxiety induction (i.e., arithmetic task). Cortisol was assessed six times during the experiment. Results show that cortisol response and a drop in serving performance are positively correlated (r=.68, p<.001). Cortisol also explains unique variance in performance (i.e., 19%) beyond CSAI-2 measures. Thus, considering cortisol measurements seems warranted in future research aimed at understanding performance.

  13. Performance and control study of a low-pressure-ratio turbojet engine for a drone aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seldner, K.; Geyser, L. C.; Gold, H.; Walker, D.; Burgner, G.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analog and digital computer studies of a low-pressure-ratio turbojet engine system for use in a drone vehicle are presented. The turbojet engine consists of a four-stage axial compressor, single-stage turbine, and a fixed area exhaust nozzle. Three simplified fuel schedules and a generalized parameter fuel control for the engine system are presented and evaluated. The evaluation is based on the performance of each schedule or control during engine acceleration from a windmill start at Mach 0.8 and 6100 meters to 100 percent corrected speed. It was found that, because of the higher acceleration margin permitted by the control, the generalized parameter control exhibited the best dynamic performance.

  14. A simplified adaptive neural network prescribed performance controller for uncertain MIMO feedback linearizable systems.

    PubMed

    Theodorakopoulos, Achilles; Rovithakis, George A

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the problem of deriving a continuous, state-feedback controller for a class of multiinput multioutput feedback linearizable systems is considered with special emphasis on controller simplification and reduction of the overall design complexity with respect to the current state of the art. The proposed scheme achieves prescribed bounds on the transient and steady-state performance of the output tracking errors despite the uncertainty in system nonlinearities. Contrary to the current state of the art, however, only a single neural network is utilized to approximate a scalar function that partly incorporates the system nonlinearities. Furthermore, the loss of model controllability problem, typically introduced owing to approximation model singularities, is avoided without attaching additional complexity to the control or adaptive law. Simulations are performed to verify and clarify the theoretical findings.

  15. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system of an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and in integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  16. Enhancement in Steady State and Dynamic Performance of Direct Torque Control Induction Motor Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Jain, Shailendra; Dwivedi, Sanjeet

    2013-09-01

    An enhancement in dynamic performance of a traditional DTC drive can be achieved by a robust speed control algorithm while the steady state performance depends upon the switching strategy selected for minimization of torque ripples and an efficient flux control loop. In this paper a new torque ripple reduction technique with a modified look up table incorporating a larger number of synthesized non zero active voltage vectors is utilized to overcome the limitations of the conventionally controlled DTC drive. A fuzzy logic based speed controller and a low pass filter with tunable cutoff frequency for flux estimation is proposed in this paper. The proposed study is investigated through simulation and experimentally validated on a test drive.

  17. Collective action control by goals and plans: applying a self-regulation perspective to group performance.

    PubMed

    Wieber, Frank; Thürmer, J Lukas; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    In celebration of the 125th anniversary of The American Journal of Psychology, this article discusses a seminal publication by Marjorie Shaw (1932) on small group performance in the rational solution of complex problems. We then propose an approach for the effective regulation of group goal striving based on the collective action control perspective. From this perspective, group performance might be hindered by a collective intention-behavior gap: Groups fail to act on their intentions despite being strongly committed to the collective goal, knowing what the necessary actions are, and being capable of performing them. To reduce this gap, we suggest specific if-then plans (implementation intentions) in which groups specify when, where, and how to act toward their collective goal as an easily applicable self-regulation strategy to automate collective action control. Studies in which implementation intentions improved group performance in hidden profile, escalation of commitment, and cooperation task paradigms are reported and discussed.

  18. Performance validation of the ANSER control laws for the F-18 HARV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The ANSER control laws were implemented in Ada by NASA Dryden for flight test on the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The Ada implementation was tested in the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation, and results were compared to those obtained with the NASA Langley batch Fortran implementation of the control laws which are considered the 'truth model.' This report documents the performance validation test results between these implementations. This report contains the ANSER performance validation test plan, HIL versus batch time-history comparisons, simulation scripts used to generate checkcases, and detailed analysis of discrepancies discovered during testing.

  19. A modified method of vibration surveillance by using the optimal control at energy performance index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliński, Krzysztof J.; Galewski, Marek A.

    2015-06-01

    A method of vibration surveillance by using the optimal control at energy performance index has been creatively modified. The suggested original modification depends on consideration of direct relationship between the measured acceleration signal and the optimal control command. The paper presents the results of experiments and Hardware-in-the-loop simulations of a new active vibration reduction algorithm based on the energy performance index idea modified in such a way, that it directly utilises the acceleration feedback signal. Promising prospects towards real application of the modified method in case of the high speed milling are predicted as well.

  20. Performance validation of the ANSER Control Laws for the F-18 HARV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The ANSER control laws were implemented in Ada by NASA Dryden for flight test on the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The Ada implementation was tested in the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation, and results were compared to those obtained with the NASA Langley batch Fortran implementation of the control laws which are considered the 'truth model'. This report documents the performance validation test results between these implementations. This report contains the ANSER performance validation test plan, HIL versus batch time-history comparisons, simulation scripts used to generate checkcases, and detailed analysis of discrepancies discovered during testing.

  1. Evolution of the hormonal control of animal performance: insights from the seaward migration of salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    The endocrine system is the key mediator of environmental and developmental (internal) information, and is likely to be involved in altering the performance of animals when selection has favored phenotypic plasticity. The endocrine control of performance should be especially pronounced in animals that undergo a developmental shift in niche, such as occurs in migratory species. By way of example, I review the developmental and environmental control of the preparatory changes for seawater entry of juvenile salmon (known as smolting) and its hormonal regulation. There is a size threshold for smolt development in juvenile Atlantic salmon that results in greater sensitivity of the growth hormone and cortisol axes to changes in daylength. These hormones, in turn, have broad effects on survival, ion homeostasis, growth and swimming performance during entry into seawater. Migratory niche shifts and metamorphic events are extreme examples of the role of hormones in animal performance and represent one end of a continuum. A framework for predicting when hormones will be involved in performance of animals is presented. Endocrine involvement in performance will be more substantial when (1) selection differentials on traits underlying performance are high and temporally discontinuous over an animal's lifetime, (2) the energetic and fitness costs of maintaining performance plasticity are less than those of constant performance, (3) cues for altering performance are reliable indicators of critical environmental conditions, require neurosensory input, and minimize effects of lag, and (4) the need for coordination of organs, tissues and cells to achieve increased performance is greater. By examining these impacts of selection, endocrinologists have an opportunity to contribute to the understanding of performance, phenotypic plasticity, and the evolution of life-history traits.

  2. Optimisation of active suspension control inputs for improved vehicle handling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čorić, Mirko; Deur, Joško; Kasać, Josip; Tseng, H. Eric; Hrovat, Davor

    2016-11-01

    Active suspension is commonly considered under the framework of vertical vehicle dynamics control aimed at improvements in ride comfort. This paper uses a collocation-type control variable optimisation tool to investigate to which extent the fully active suspension (FAS) application can be broaden to the task of vehicle handling/cornering control. The optimisation approach is firstly applied to solely FAS actuator configurations and three types of double lane-change manoeuvres. The obtained optimisation results are used to gain insights into different control mechanisms that are used by FAS to improve the handling performance in terms of path following error reduction. For the same manoeuvres the FAS performance is compared with the performance of different active steering and active differential actuators. The optimisation study is finally extended to combined FAS and active front- and/or rear-steering configurations to investigate if they can use their complementary control authorities (over the vertical and lateral vehicle dynamics, respectively) to further improve the handling performance.

  3. Current Methods for Modeling and Simulating Icing Effects on Aircraft Performance, Stability and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralvasky, Thomas P.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Lee, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Icing alters the shape and surface characteristics of aircraft components, which results in altered aerodynamic forces and moments caused by air flow over those iced components. The typical effects of icing are increased drag, reduced stall angle of attack, and reduced maximum lift. In addition to the performance changes, icing can also affect control surface effectiveness, hinge moments, and damping. These effects result in altered aircraft stability and control and flying qualities. Over the past 80 years, methods have been developed to understand how icing affects performance, stability and control. Emphasis has been on wind tunnel testing of two-dimensional subscale airfoils with various ice shapes to understand their effect on the flow field and ultimately the aerodynamics. This research has led to wind tunnel testing of subscale complete aircraft models to identify the integrated effects of icing on the aircraft system in terms of performance, stability, and control. Data sets of this nature enable pilot in the loop simulations to be performed for pilot training, or engineering evaluation of system failure impacts or control system design.

  4. Current Methods Modeling and Simulating Icing Effects on Aircraft Performance, Stability, Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Lee, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Icing alters the shape and surface characteristics of aircraft components, which results in altered aerodynamic forces and moments caused by air flow over those iced components. The typical effects of icing are increased drag, reduced stall angle of attack, and reduced maximum lift. In addition to the performance changes, icing can also affect control surface effectiveness, hinge moments, and damping. These effects result in altered aircraft stability and control and flying qualities. Over the past 80 years, methods have been developed to understand how icing affects performance, stability, and control. Emphasis has been on wind-tunnel testing of two-dimensional subscale airfoils with various ice shapes to understand their effect on the flowfield and ultimately the aerodynamics. This research has led to wind-tunnel testing of subscale complete aircraft models to identify the integrated effects of icing on the aircraft system in terms of performance, stability, and control. Data sets of this nature enable pilot-in-the-loop simulations to be performed for pilot training or engineering evaluation of system failure impacts or control system design.

  5. Performance and stability of telemanipulators using bilateral impedance control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher Lane

    1991-01-01

    A new method of control for telemanipulators called bilateral impedance control is investigated. This new method differs from previous approaches in that interaction forces are used as the communication signals between the master and slave robots. The new control architecture has several advantages: (1) It allows the master robot and the slave robot to be stabilized independently without becoming involved in the overall system dynamics; (2) It permits the system designers to arbitrarily specify desired performance characteristics such as the force and position ratios between the master and slave; (3) The impedance at both ends of the telerobotic system can be modulated to suit the requirements of the task. The main goals of the research are to characterize the performance and stability of the new control architecture. The dynamics of the telerobotic system are described by a bond graph model that illustrates how energy is transformed, stored, and dissipated. Performance can be completely described by a set of three independent parameters. These parameters are fundamentally related to the structure of the H matrix that regulates the communication of force signals within the system. Stability is analyzed with two mathematical techniques: the Small Gain Theorem and the Multivariable Nyquist Criterion. The theoretical predictions for performance and stability are experimentally verified by implementing the new control architecture on a multidegree of freedom telemanipulator.

  6. Expert Meeting: Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2013-07-01

    The topic of this Building America expert meeting was 'Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes,' which was held on October 16, 2012, in Westford, MA, and brought together experts in the field of residential humidity control to address modeling issues for dehumidification. The presentations and discussions centered on computer simulation and field experience with these systems, with the goal of developing foundational information to support the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic.

  7. Generalized variables for controlling Government Transfer Services with respect to performance measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. D.

    1981-01-01

    The term Government Transfer Services is used in reference to any of the organized streams of public resources that flow into private economic activity. This includes such activities as offshore leasing, Social Security, and NASA technology transfer services. This paper describes a performance measure, empirical results, a theory, and a control model for such services. These are illustrated by a specific example (NASA). An agenda for developing this service control method is also presented.

  8. Analysis of dashpot performance for rotating control drums of a lithium cooled fast reactor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzler, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    A dashpot was incorporated in the design of the drive train of the rotating control drum to prevent shock damage to the control drum and drive train at the termination of a scram action. A rotating vane dashpot using reactor coolant lithium as a damping fluid appears to be the best candidate of the various damping devices explored. A performance analysis, results and discussion of vane type dashpots are presented.

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control performance indicator report: First quarter, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.

    1995-07-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, inaccordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The ALARA Committees establish ALARA goals for the INEL based on forecasts and goals provided by each facility organizational manager or supervisor.Performance goals are realistic and measurable. Stringent goals are set at least annually to reflect expected workloads and improvement of radiological performance. Goals higher than previous goals may occasionally be set due to changes in work scope or mission. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: Collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose to a worker;the number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; the number of radioactive material intakes; the area of Contamination, High Contamination, and Airborne Radioactivity Areas in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills.

  10. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.; Melin, A.; Burress, T.; Fugate, D.; Holcomb, D.; Wilgen, J.; Miller, J.; Wilson, D.; Silva, P.; Whitlow, L.; Peretz, F.

    2012-09-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) components and systems. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration platform. I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the system; treating I&C as an integral part of the system design is innovative and will allow significant improvement in capabilities and performance. As systems become more complex and greater performance is required, traditional I&C design techniques become inadequate and more advanced I&C needs to be applied. New I&C techniques enable optimal and reliable performance and tolerance of noise and uncertainties in the system rather than merely monitoring quasistable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in NPP components after the design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. By incorporating I&C at the beginning of the design phase, the control system can provide superior performance and reliability and enable designs that are otherwise impossible. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the platform to demonstrate the performance and reliability improvements enabled by advanced embedded I&C.

  11. The influence of vehicle aerodynamic and control response characteristics on driver-vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandridis, A. A.; Repa, B. S.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of changes in understeer, control sensitivity, and location of the lateral aerodynamic center of pressure (c.p.) of a typical passenger car on the driver's opinion and on the performance of the driver-vehicle system were studied in a moving-base driving simulator. Twelve subjects with no prior experience on the simulator and no special driving skills performed regulation tasks in the presence of both random and step wind gusts.

  12. The CF6 Jet Engine Performance Improvement - Low Pressure Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B. D.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A low pressure turbine (LPT) active clearance control (ACC) cooling system was developed to reduce the fuel consumption of current CF6-50 turbofan engines for wide bodied commercial aircraft. The program performance improvement goal of 0.3% delta sfc was determined to be achievable with an improved impingement cooling system. The technology enables the design of an optimized manifold and piping system which is capable of a performance gain of 0.45% delta sfc.

  13. Online intelligent controllers for an enzyme recovery plant: design methodology and performance.

    PubMed

    Leite, M S; Fujiki, T L; Silva, F V; Fileti, A M F

    2010-12-27

    This paper focuses on the development of intelligent controllers for use in a process of enzyme recovery from pineapple rind. The proteolytic enzyme bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) is precipitated with alcohol at low temperature in a fed-batch jacketed tank. Temperature control is crucial to avoid irreversible protein denaturation. Fuzzy or neural controllers offer a way of implementing solutions that cover dynamic and nonlinear processes. The design methodology and a comparative study on the performance of fuzzy-PI, neurofuzzy, and neural network intelligent controllers are presented. To tune the fuzzy PI Mamdani controller, various universes of discourse, rule bases, and membership function support sets were tested. A neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS), based on Takagi-Sugeno rules, and a model predictive controller, based on neural modeling, were developed and tested as well. Using a Fieldbus network architecture, a coolant variable speed pump was driven by the controllers. The experimental results show the effectiveness of fuzzy controllers in comparison to the neural predictive control. The fuzzy PI controller exhibited a reduced error parameter (ITAE), lower power consumption, and better recovery of enzyme activity.

  14. Online intelligent controllers for an enzyme recovery plant: design methodology and performance.

    PubMed

    Leite, M S; Fujiki, T L; Silva, F V; Fileti, A M F

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of intelligent controllers for use in a process of enzyme recovery from pineapple rind. The proteolytic enzyme bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) is precipitated with alcohol at low temperature in a fed-batch jacketed tank. Temperature control is crucial to avoid irreversible protein denaturation. Fuzzy or neural controllers offer a way of implementing solutions that cover dynamic and nonlinear processes. The design methodology and a comparative study on the performance of fuzzy-PI, neurofuzzy, and neural network intelligent controllers are presented. To tune the fuzzy PI Mamdani controller, various universes of discourse, rule bases, and membership function support sets were tested. A neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS), based on Takagi-Sugeno rules, and a model predictive controller, based on neural modeling, were developed and tested as well. Using a Fieldbus network architecture, a coolant variable speed pump was driven by the controllers. The experimental results show the effectiveness of fuzzy controllers in comparison to the neural predictive control. The fuzzy PI controller exhibited a reduced error parameter (ITAE), lower power consumption, and better recovery of enzyme activity. PMID:21234106

  15. Online Intelligent Controllers for an Enzyme Recovery Plant: Design Methodology and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M. S.; Fujiki, T. L.; Silva, F. V.; Fileti, A. M. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of intelligent controllers for use in a process of enzyme recovery from pineapple rind. The proteolytic enzyme bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) is precipitated with alcohol at low temperature in a fed-batch jacketed tank. Temperature control is crucial to avoid irreversible protein denaturation. Fuzzy or neural controllers offer a way of implementing solutions that cover dynamic and nonlinear processes. The design methodology and a comparative study on the performance of fuzzy-PI, neurofuzzy, and neural network intelligent controllers are presented. To tune the fuzzy PI Mamdani controller, various universes of discourse, rule bases, and membership function support sets were tested. A neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS), based on Takagi-Sugeno rules, and a model predictive controller, based on neural modeling, were developed and tested as well. Using a Fieldbus network architecture, a coolant variable speed pump was driven by the controllers. The experimental results show the effectiveness of fuzzy controllers in comparison to the neural predictive control. The fuzzy PI controller exhibited a reduced error parameter (ITAE), lower power consumption, and better recovery of enzyme activity. PMID:21234106

  16. The performance and efficiency of four motor/controller/battery systems for the simpler electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipps, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    A test and analysis program performed on four complete propulsion systems for an urban electric vehicle (EV) is described and results given. A dc series motor and a permanent magnet (PM) motor were tested, each powered by an EV battery pack and controlled by (1) a series/parallel voltage-switching (V-switch) system; and (2) a system using a pulse width modulation, 400 Hz transistorized chopper. Dynamometer tests were first performed, followed by eV performance predictions and data correlating road tests. During dynamometer tests using chopper control; current, voltage, and power were measured on both the battery and motor sides of the chopper, using three types of instrumentation. Conventional dc instruments provided adequate accuracy for eV power and energy measurements, when used on the battery side of the controller. When using the chopper controller, the addition of a small choke inductor improved system efficiency in the lower duty cycle range (some 8% increase at 50% duty cycle) with both types of motors. Overall system efficiency rankings during road tests were: (1) series motor with V-switch; (2) PM motor with V-switch; (3) series motor with chopper; and (4) PM motor with chopper. Chopper control of the eV was smoother and required less driver skill than V-switch control.

  17. The performance and efficiency of four motor/controller/battery systems for the simpler electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipps, P. R.

    1980-05-01

    A test and analysis program performed on four complete propulsion systems for an urban electric vehicle (EV) is described and results given. A dc series motor and a permanent magnet (PM) motor were tested, each powered by an EV battery pack and controlled by (1) a series/parallel voltage-switching (V-switch) system; and (2) a system using a pulse width modulation, 400 Hz transistorized chopper. Dynamometer tests were first performed, followed by eV performance predictions and data correlating road tests. During dynamometer tests using chopper control; current, voltage, and power were measured on both the battery and motor sides of the chopper, using three types of instrumentation. Conventional dc instruments provided adequate accuracy for eV power and energy measurements, when used on the battery side of the controller. When using the chopper controller, the addition of a small choke inductor improved system efficiency in the lower duty cycle range (some 8% increase at 50% duty cycle) with both types of motors. Overall system efficiency rankings during road tests were: (1) series motor with V-switch; (2) PM motor with V-switch; (3) series motor with chopper; and (4) PM motor with chopper. Chopper control of the eV was smoother and required less driver skill than V-switch control.

  18. Intelligent adaptive nonlinear flight control for a high performance aircraft with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Savran, Aydogan; Tasaltin, Ramazan; Becerikli, Yasar

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a neural network (NN) based adaptive flight control system for a high performance aircraft. The main contribution of this work is that the proposed control system is able to compensate the system uncertainties, adapt to the changes in flight conditions, and accommodate the system failures. The underlying study can be considered in two phases. The objective of the first phase is to model the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear F-16 model using NNs. Therefore a NN-based adaptive identification model is developed for three angular rates of the aircraft. An on-line training procedure is developed to adapt the changes in the system dynamics and improve the identification accuracy. In this procedure, a first-in first-out stack is used to store a certain history of the input-output data. The training is performed over the whole data in the stack at every stage. To speed up the convergence rate and enhance the accuracy for achieving the on-line learning, the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method with a trust region approach is adapted to train the NNs. The objective of the second phase is to develop intelligent flight controllers. A NN-based adaptive PID control scheme that is composed of an emulator NN, an estimator NN, and a discrete time PID controller is developed. The emulator NN is used to calculate the system Jacobian required to train the estimator NN. The estimator NN, which is trained on-line by propagating the output error through the emulator, is used to adjust the PID gains. The NN-based adaptive PID control system is applied to control three angular rates of the nonlinear F-16 model. The body-axis pitch, roll, and yaw rates are fed back via the PID controllers to the elevator, aileron, and rudder actuators, respectively. The resulting control system has learning, adaptation, and fault-tolerant abilities. It avoids the storage and interpolation requirements for the too many controller parameters of a typical flight control

  19. Wireless Communication for Controlling Microgrids: Co-simulation and Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Rukun; Xu, Yan; Li, Huijuan; Li, Husheng

    2013-01-01

    A microgrid with wireless communication links for microgrid control has been designed and developed. The complete simulation model has been developed in MatLab SimuLink with seamless integration of the power subsystem and the communication subsystem. Unlike the conventional co-simulators that usually glue two existing simulators together by creating an interface, which has a steep learning curve, the proposed simulator is a compact single-unit model. Detailed modeling of the power subsystem and communication system is presented as well as the microgrid control architecture and strategies. The impact of different communication system performances on microgrid control has been studied and evaluated in the proposed simulator.

  20. Intelligent adaptive nonlinear flight control for a high performance aircraft with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Savran, Aydogan; Tasaltin, Ramazan; Becerikli, Yasar

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a neural network (NN) based adaptive flight control system for a high performance aircraft. The main contribution of this work is that the proposed control system is able to compensate the system uncertainties, adapt to the changes in flight conditions, and accommodate the system failures. The underlying study can be considered in two phases. The objective of the first phase is to model the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear F-16 model using NNs. Therefore a NN-based adaptive identification model is developed for three angular rates of the aircraft. An on-line training procedure is developed to adapt the changes in the system dynamics and improve the identification accuracy. In this procedure, a first-in first-out stack is used to store a certain history of the input-output data. The training is performed over the whole data in the stack at every stage. To speed up the convergence rate and enhance the accuracy for achieving the on-line learning, the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method with a trust region approach is adapted to train the NNs. The objective of the second phase is to develop intelligent flight controllers. A NN-based adaptive PID control scheme that is composed of an emulator NN, an estimator NN, and a discrete time PID controller is developed. The emulator NN is used to calculate the system Jacobian required to train the estimator NN. The estimator NN, which is trained on-line by propagating the output error through the emulator, is used to adjust the PID gains. The NN-based adaptive PID control system is applied to control three angular rates of the nonlinear F-16 model. The body-axis pitch, roll, and yaw rates are fed back via the PID controllers to the elevator, aileron, and rudder actuators, respectively. The resulting control system has learning, adaptation, and fault-tolerant abilities. It avoids the storage and interpolation requirements for the too many controller parameters of a typical flight control

  1. Large-scale performance and design for construction activity erosion control best management practices.

    PubMed

    Faucette, L B; Scholl, B; Beighley, R E; Governo, J

    2009-01-01

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II requires construction activities to have erosion and sediment control best management practices (BMPs) designed and installed for site storm water management. Although BMPs are specified on storm water pollution prevention plans (SWPPPs) as part of the construction general permit (GP), there is little evidence in the research literature as to how BMPs perform or should be designed. The objectives of this study were to: (i) comparatively evaluate the performance of common construction activity erosion control BMPs under a standardized test method, (ii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blanket thickness, (iii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blankets (CECBs) on a variety of slope angles, and (iv) determine Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) cover management factors (C factors) for these BMPs to assist site designers and engineers. Twenty-three erosion control BMPs were evaluated using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-6459, standard test method for determination of ECB performance in protecting hill slopes from rainfall induced erosion, on 4:1 (H:V), 3:1, and 2:1 slopes. Soil loss reduction for treatments exposed to 5 cm of rainfall on a 2:1 slope ranged from-7 to 99%. For rainfall exposure of 10 cm, treatment soil loss reduction ranged from 8 to 99%. The 2.5 and 5 cm CECBs significantly reduced erosion on slopes up to 2:1, while CECBs < 2.5 cm are not recommended on slopes >or= 4:1 when rainfall totals reach 5 cm. Based on the soil loss results, USLE C factors ranged from 0.01 to 0.9. These performance and design criteria should aid site planners and designers in decision-making processes. PMID:19398523

  2. Large-scale performance and design for construction activity erosion control best management practices.

    PubMed

    Faucette, L B; Scholl, B; Beighley, R E; Governo, J

    2009-01-01

    The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II requires construction activities to have erosion and sediment control best management practices (BMPs) designed and installed for site storm water management. Although BMPs are specified on storm water pollution prevention plans (SWPPPs) as part of the construction general permit (GP), there is little evidence in the research literature as to how BMPs perform or should be designed. The objectives of this study were to: (i) comparatively evaluate the performance of common construction activity erosion control BMPs under a standardized test method, (ii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blanket thickness, (iii) evaluate the performance of compost erosion control blankets (CECBs) on a variety of slope angles, and (iv) determine Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) cover management factors (C factors) for these BMPs to assist site designers and engineers. Twenty-three erosion control BMPs were evaluated using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-6459, standard test method for determination of ECB performance in protecting hill slopes from rainfall induced erosion, on 4:1 (H:V), 3:1, and 2:1 slopes. Soil loss reduction for treatments exposed to 5 cm of rainfall on a 2:1 slope ranged from-7 to 99%. For rainfall exposure of 10 cm, treatment soil loss reduction ranged from 8 to 99%. The 2.5 and 5 cm CECBs significantly reduced erosion on slopes up to 2:1, while CECBs < 2.5 cm are not recommended on slopes >or= 4:1 when rainfall totals reach 5 cm. Based on the soil loss results, USLE C factors ranged from 0.01 to 0.9. These performance and design criteria should aid site planners and designers in decision-making processes.

  3. The Large Binocular Telescope primary mirror support control system description and current performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Kern, Jonathan; Hill, John M.; Davison, Warren B.; Cuerden, Brian; Brynnel, Joar G.; Biddick, Chris; Duffek, Kenneth

    2008-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is built around two lightweight borosilicate honeycomb mirrors which, at 8.4 meters in diameter, are the largest operational examples of this technology. Since the mirrors are relatively stiff, the LBT mirror support system relies on passive position control and active force control. Passive position control is performed by six extendable hardpoints organized as a truncated hexapod, which may be positioned as required by the active optics control loop. The hardpoints rely on their axial stiffness to maintain the mirror position against residual external disturbances. The active force control system minimizes the force exerted by the hardpoints on the glass. Additionally, the axial component of the nominally uniform active support forces can be perturbed to distort the mirror as required by the active optics control loop. Because of the relatively large CTE of borosilicate glass, the differential temperature of the mirror is critical. Thus, the force control system must support a 16 metric ton mirror using less than 100 Watts of electrical power. The authors present a description of the primary mirror support system as implemented at the LBT. Initial stability problems made the mirrors nearly unusable in freezing temperatures. The authors explain the reason for this instability and describe the solutions implemented. Data demonstrating the current performance of the primary mirror support system are also presented.

  4. High-Performance Integrated Control of water quality and quantity in urban water reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galelli, S.; Castelletti, A.; Goedbloed, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper contributes a novel High-Performance Integrated Control framework to support the real-time operation of urban water supply storages affected by water quality problems. We use a 3-D, high-fidelity simulation model to predict the main water quality dynamics and inform a real-time controller based on Model Predictive Control. The integration of the simulation model into the control scheme is performed by a model reduction process that identifies a low-order, dynamic emulator running 4 orders of magnitude faster. The model reduction, which relies on a semiautomatic procedural approach integrating time series clustering and variable selection algorithms, generates a compact and physically meaningful emulator that can be coupled with the controller. The framework is used to design the hourly operation of Marina Reservoir, a 3.2 Mm3 storm-water-fed reservoir located in the center of Singapore, operated for drinking water supply and flood control. Because of its recent formation from a former estuary, the reservoir suffers from high salinity levels, whose behavior is modeled with Delft3D-FLOW. Results show that our control framework reduces the minimum salinity levels by nearly 40% and cuts the average annual deficit of drinking water supply by about 2 times the active storage of the reservoir (about 4% of the total annual demand).

  5. Academic task persistence of normally achieving ADHD and control boys: performance, self-evaluations, and attributions.

    PubMed

    Hoza, B; Pelham, W E; Waschbusch, D A; Kipp, H; Owens, J S

    2001-04-01

    The authors examined academic task persistence, pretask expectancies, self-evaluations, and attributions of boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared with control boys. Participants were 83 ADHD boys and 66 control boys, all normally achieving. Prior to the task, performance expectancies were assessed. After a success-failure manipulation with find-a-word puzzles, performance on subsequent trials, self-evaluations, and attributions were evaluated. Compared with controls, ADHD boys solved fewer test puzzles, quit working more often, and found fewer words on a generalization task. Consistent with these behavioral findings, research assistants rated ADHD boys as less effortful and less cooperative than control boys. Although ADHD boys did not differ significantly from controls in their posttask self-evaluations, they did differ significantly from controls in some aspects of their attributions. Attributional data indicated that ADHD boys endorsed luck as a reason for success more strongly and lack of effort as a reason for failure less strongly than controls. PMID:11393604

  6. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport. PMID:26583139

  7. ACTIVE FILTER HARDWARE DESIGN & PERFORMANCE FOR THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SELLERS,D; FERRON,J.R; WALKER,M.L; BROESCH,J.D

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The digital plasma control system (PCS), currently in operation on the DIII-D tokamak, requires inputs from a large number of sensors. Due to the nature of the digitizers and the relative noisy environment from which these signals are derived, each of the 32 signals must be conditioned via an active filter. Two different types of filters, Chebyshev and Bessel with fixed frequencies: 100 Hz Bessel was used for filtering the motional Stark effect diagnostic data. 800 Hz Bessel was designed to filter plasma control data and 1200 Hz Chebyshev is used with closed loop control of choppers. The performance of the plasma control system is greatly influenced by how well the actual filter responses match the software model used in the control system algorithms. This paper addresses the various issues facing the designer in matching the electrical design with the theoretical.

  8. Performance improvements of a highly integrated digital electronic control system for an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Andries, M. G.; Kelly, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program is structured to conduct flight research into the benefits of integrating an aircraft flight control system with the engine control system. A brief description of the HIDEC system installed on an F-15 aircraft is provided. The adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode is described in detail, together with simulation results and analyses that show the significant excess thrust improvements achievable with the ADECS mode. It was found that this increased thrust capability is accompanied by reduced fan stall margin and can be realized during flight conditions where engine face distortion is low. The results of analyses and simulations also show that engine thrust response is improved and that fuel consumption can be reduced. Although the performance benefits that accrue because of airframe and engine control integration are being demonstrated on an F-15 aircraft, the principles are applicable to advanced aircraft such as the advanced tactical fighter and advanced tactical aircraft.

  9. A Retro-Fit Control Architecture to Maintain Engine Performance With Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane; Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    An outer loop retrofit engine control architecture is presented which modifies fan speed command to obtain a desired thrust based on throttle position. This maintains the throttle-to-thrust relationship in the presence of engine degradation, which has the effect of changing the engine s thrust output for a given fan speed. Such an approach can minimize thrust asymmetry in multi-engine aircraft, and reduce pilot workload. The outer loop control is demonstrated under various levels of engine deterioration using a standard deterioration profile as well as an atypical profile. It is evaluated across various transients covering a wide operating range. The modified fan speed command still utilizes the standard engine control logic so all original life and operability limits remain in place. In all cases it is shown that with the outer loop thrust control in place, the deteriorated engine is able to match the thrust performance of a new engine up to the limits the controller will allow.

  10. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  11. Motion Perception and Manual Control Performance During Passive Tilt and Translation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study is examining changes in motion perception following Space Shuttle flights and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data has been collected on 5 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s) combined with body translation (12-22 cm, peak-to-peak) is utilized to elicit roll-tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). A forward-backward moving sled (24-390 cm, peak-to-peak) with or without chair tilting in pitch is utilized to elicit pitch tilt perception (equivalent to 20 deg, peak-to-peak). These combinations are elicited at 0.15, 0.3, and 0.6 Hz for evaluating the effect of motion frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity. In both devices, a closed-loop nulling task is also performed during pseudorandom motion with and without vibrotactile feedback of tilt. All tests are performed in complete darkness. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for translation motion perception to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. The results of this study indicate that post-flight recovery of motion perception and manual control performance is complete within 8 days following short-duration space missions. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt improves manual control performance both before and after flight.

  12. Optimal tracking performance of MIMO control systems with communication constraints and a code scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xi-Sheng; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xian-He; Yuan, Fu-Shun

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the issue of the optimal tracking performance for multiple-input multiple-output linear time-invariant continuous-time systems with power constrained. An H2 criterion of the error signal and the signal of the input channel are used as a measure for the tracking performance. A code scheme is introduced as a means of integrating controller and channel design to obtain the optimal tracking performance. It is shown that the optimal tracking performance index consists of two parts, one depends on the non-minimum phase zeros and zero direction of the given plant, as well as the reference input signal, while the other depends on the unstable poles and pole direction of the given plant, as well as on the bandwidth and additive white noise of a communication channel. It is also shown that when the communication does not exist, the optimal tracking performance reduces to the existing normal tracking performance of the control system. The results show how the optimal tracking performance is limited by the bandwidth and additive white noise of the communication channel. A typical example is given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  13. Programming generality into a performance feedback writing intervention: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hier, Bridget O; Eckert, Tanya L

    2016-06-01

    Substantial numbers of students in the United States are performing below grade-level expectations in core academic areas, and these deficits are most pronounced in the area of writing. Although performance feedback procedures have been shown to produce promising short-term improvements in elementary-aged students' writing skills, evidence of maintenance and generalization of these intervention effects is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate, generalized, and sustained effects of incorporating multiple exemplar training into the performance feedback procedures of a writing intervention using a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Results indicated that although the addition of multiple exemplar training did not improve students' writing performance on measures of stimulus and response generalization, it did result in greater maintenance of intervention effects in comparison to students who received performance feedback without generality programming and students who engaged in weekly writing practice alone.

  14. PERFORMANCE AND COST OF MERCURY EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents estimates of the performance and cost of powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection-based mercury control technologies and projections of costs for future applications. (NOTE: Under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the U.S. EPA has to determine whether mer...

  15. OPTIMAL CONFIGURATION OF A COMMAND AND CONTROL NETWORK: BALANCING PERFORMANCE AND RECONFIGURATION CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    L. DOWELL

    1999-07-01

    The optimization of the configuration of communications and control networks is important for assuring the reliability and performance of the networks. This paper presents techniques for determining the optimal configuration for such a network in the presence of communication and connectivity constraints.

  16. OPTIMAL CONFIGURATION OF A COMMAND AND CONTROL NETWORK: BALANCING PERFORMANCE AND RECONFIGURATION CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    L. DOWELL

    1999-08-01

    The optimization of the configuration of communications and control networks is important for assuring the reliability and performance of the networks. This paper presents techniques for determining the optimal configuration for such a network in the presence of communication and connectivity constraints. reconfiguration to restore connectivity to a data-fusion network following the failure of a network component.

  17. Relationships among Reading Performance, Locus of Control and Achievement for Marginal Admission Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Roger S.; Drexler, John A., Jr.

    The first phase of the study was a 2 x 2 factorial design, with locus of control and instructional method (lecture and demonstration) as independent variables and honor point average (HPA) as the dependent variable. The second phase used correlational techniques to test the extent to which reading performance and traditional predictors of…

  18. Effect of Language Proficiency and Executive Control on Verbal Fluency Performance in Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Lin; Luk, Gigi; Bialystok, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    We use a time-course analysis to examine the roles of vocabulary size and executive control in bilinguals' verbal fluency performance. Two groups of bilinguals and a group of monolingual adults were tested in English with verbal fluency subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System. The two bilingual groups were equivalent in their…

  19. Proficiency and Linguistic Complexity Influence Speech Motor Control and Performance in Spanish Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Blumenfeld, Henrike K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Second-language (L2) production requires greater cognitive resources to inhibit the native language and to retrieve less robust lexical representations. The current investigation identifies how proficiency and linguistic complexity, specifically syntactic and lexical factors, influence speech motor control and performance. Method: Speech…

  20. Correlates of Student Performance in Environmental Control Systems Courses at an Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudhury, Ifte

    2001-01-01

    A study of 223 environmental control systems students in summer 1997 and 1998, fall 1997, and spring 1998 indicated that student performance was not correlated with class size. The most statistically significant predictor was academic ability measured by overall grade point average. Gender and academic classification were inversely related to…

  1. Effortful Control in "Hot" and "Cool" Tasks Differentially Predicts Children's Behavior Problems and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sanghag; Nordling, Jamie Koenig; Yoon, Jeung Eun; Boldt, Lea J.; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Effortful control (EC), the capacity to deliberately suppress a dominant response and perform a subdominant response, rapidly developing in toddler and preschool age, has been shown to be a robust predictor of children's adjustment. Not settled, however, is whether a view of EC as a heterogeneous rather than unidimensional construct may offer…

  2. Context-Sensitive Adjustment of Cognitive Control in Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Rico; Gottschalk, Caroline; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-01-01

    Performing 2 highly similar tasks at the same time requires an adaptive regulation of cognitive control to shield prioritized primary task processing from between-task (cross-talk) interference caused by secondary task processing. In the present study, the authors investigated how implicitly and explicitly delivered information promotes the…

  3. A New Method for the Statistical Control of Rating Error in Performance Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannister, Brendan D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    To control for response bias in student ratings of college teachers, an index of rater error was used that was theoretically independent of actual performance. Partialing out the effects of this extraneous response bias enhanced validity, but partialing out overall effectiveness resulted in reduced convergent and discriminant validities.…

  4. PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCE AND COST ESTIMATES OF MERCURY EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper discusses preliminary performance and cost estimates of mercury emission control options for electric utility boilers. Under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, EPA had to determine whether mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants should be regulated. To a...

  5. Establishing Contextual Control over Symmetry and Asymmetry Performances in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Jennifer; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    Experiments 1, 2, and 3 investigated generalized contextually controlled symmetry and asymmetry in typically developing children and children with autism. In Experiment 1, eight typically developing children demonstrated the target performances without intervention. In Experiment 2, multiple-exemplar training and the use of familiar stimuli…

  6. The Ability of Psychological Flexibility and Job Control to Predict Learning, Job Performance, and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Frank W.; Flaxman, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    This longitudinal study tested the degree to which an individual characteristic, psychological flexibility, and a work organization variable, job control, predicted ability to learn new skills at work, job performance, and mental health, amongst call center workers in the United Kingdom (N = 448). As hypothesized, results indicated that job…

  7. Effects of Self-Control and Thinking Tools Training on Academic Performance of Undergraduate Venezuelan Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaber, Guillermo

    This study examined the relative effectiveness of two variations of an elective course on self-control and study behavior in modifying academic performance of freshmen undergraduate students enrolled in the independent studies program of the Universidad Simon Bolivar, in Venezuela. Of the 29 freshmen students selected to participate in this study,…

  8. Guidance, navigation, and control systems performance analysis: Apollo 13 mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The conclusions of the analyses of the inflight performance of the Apollo 13 spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control equipment are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) the command module systems, (2) the lunar module inertial measurement unit, (3) the lunar module digital autopilot, (4) the lunar module abort guidance system, (5) lunar module optical alignment checks, and (6) spacecraft component separation procedures.

  9. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  10. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  11. Attention and response control in ADHD. Evaluation through integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Inmaculada; Delgado-Pardo, Gracia; Roldán-Blasco, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses attention and response control through visual and auditory stimuli in a primary care pediatric sample. The sample consisted of 191 participants aged between 7 and 13 years old. It was divided into 2 groups: (a) 90 children with ADHD, according to diagnostic (DSM-IV-TR) (APA, 2002) and clinical (ADHD Rating Scale-IV) (DuPaul, Power, Anastopoulos, & Reid, 1998) criteria, and (b) 101 children without a history of ADHD. The aims were: (a) to determine and compare the performance of both groups in attention and response control, (b) to identify attention and response control deficits in the ADHD group. Assessments were carried out using the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA/CPT, Sandford & Turner, 2002). Results showed that the ADHD group had visual and auditory attention deficits, F(3, 170) = 14.38; p < .01, deficits in fine motor regulation (Welch´s t-test = 44.768; p < .001) and sensory/motor activity (Welch'st-test = 95.683, p < .001; Welch's t-test = 79.537, p < .001). Both groups exhibited a similar performance in response control, F(3, 170) = .93, p = .43.Children with ADHD showed inattention, mental processing speed deficits, and loss of concentration with visual stimuli. Both groups yielded a better performance in attention with auditory stimuli.

  12. Perceived Control of Anxiety and Its Relationship to Self-Confidence and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanton, Sheldon; Connaughton, Declan

    2002-01-01

    Investigated elite and subelite swimmers' retrospective perceptions and causal beliefs about the link between anxiety symptoms and performance and the underlying mechanisms involved. Interview data indicated that perceived control was the moderating factor in the directional interpretation of anxiety and not the experience of anxiety symptoms…

  13. UPDATING PERFORMANCE AND COST OF NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INTEGRATED PLANNING MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA uses the Integrated Planning Model (IPM) to evaluate the cost and emission impacts of proposed policies. Studies were undertaken recently to update the performance and cost factors contained in this model for various NOx control technologies. The studies showed a sig...

  14. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: improvements in performance, thermal comfort, and electricity use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Sartor, Karina

    2016-08-01

    The use of smarter temperature control technologies in heating systems can optimize the use of electric power and performance of piglets. Two control technologies of a resistive heating system were assessed in a pig nursery: a PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) controller and a thermostat. The systems were evaluated regarding thermal environment, piglet performance, and use of electric power for 99 days. The heating system with PID controller improved the thermal environment conditions and was significantly ( P < 0.001) more efficient in terms of electricity use to produce 1 kg of body weight (2.88 kWh kg-1), specific cost (0.75 R kg-1), weight gain (7.3 kg), daily weight gain (0.21 kg day-1), and feed conversion (1.71) than the system with thermostat (3.98 kWh kg-1; 1.03 R kg-1; 5.2 kg; 0.15 kg day-1, and 2.62, respectively). The results indicate that the PID-controlled heating system is more efficient in electricity use and provides better conditions for thermal comfort and animal performance than heating with thermostat.

  15. Nonlinear stability and control study of highly maneuverable high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    This project is intended to research and develop new nonlinear methodologies for the control and stability analysis of high-performance, high angle-of-attack aircraft such as HARV (F18). Past research (reported in our Phase 1, 2, and 3 progress reports) is summarized and more details of final Phase 3 research is provided. While research emphasis is on nonlinear control, other tasks such as associated model development, system identification, stability analysis, and simulation are performed in some detail as well. An overview of various models that were investigated for different purposes such as an approximate model reference for control adaptation, as well as another model for accurate rigid-body longitudinal motion is provided. Only a very cursory analysis was made relative to type 8 (flexible body dynamics). Standard nonlinear longitudinal airframe dynamics (type 7) with the available modified F18 stability derivatives, thrust vectoring, actuator dynamics, and control constraints are utilized for simulated flight evaluation of derived controller performance in all cases studied.

  16. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: improvements in performance, thermal comfort, and electricity use.

    PubMed

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Sartor, Karina

    2016-08-01

    The use of smarter temperature control technologies in heating systems can optimize the use of electric power and performance of piglets. Two control technologies of a resistive heating system were assessed in a pig nursery: a PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) controller and a thermostat. The systems were evaluated regarding thermal environment, piglet performance, and use of electric power for 99 days. The heating system with PID controller improved the thermal environment conditions and was significantly (P < 0.001) more efficient in terms of electricity use to produce 1 kg of body weight (2.88 kWh kg(-1)), specific cost (0.75 R$ kg(-1)), weight gain (7.3 kg), daily weight gain (0.21 kg day(-1)), and feed conversion (1.71) than the system with thermostat (3.98 kWh kg(-1); 1.03 R$ kg(-1); 5.2 kg; 0.15 kg day(-1), and 2.62, respectively). The results indicate that the PID-controlled heating system is more efficient in electricity use and provides better conditions for thermal comfort and animal performance than heating with thermostat.

  17. When tight blood pressure control is not for everyone: a model for performance measurement in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael A.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Many patients with hypertension have legitimate reasons to forego standard blood pressure targets yet are nonetheless included in performance measurement systems. An approach to performance measurement that incorporates clinical reasoning was developed to determine which patients to include in a performance measure for blood pressure control. Design A 10-member multispecialty advisory panel refined a taxonomy of situations in which the balance of benefits and harms of anti-hypertensive treatment do not clearly favor tight blood pressure control (blood pressure < 140/90). Results The panel identified several broad categories of reasons that could reasonably exempt a patient from performance measurement for blood pressure control. These included (1) patients who have suffered adverse effects from multiple classes of antihypertensive medications;(2) patients already taking ≥ 4 antihypertensive medications; (3) patients with terminal disease, moderate to severe dementia, or other conditions that overwhelmingly dominate the patient’s clinical status; and (4) other patient factors, including comfort care orientation and poor medication adherence despite attempts to remedy adherence difficulties. Several general principles also emerged. Performance measurement should focus on patients for whom the benefits of treatment clearly outweigh the harms and incorporate a longitudinal approach whereby clinicians are given a reasonable period of time to intervene on their patients with high blood pressure. In addition, the criteria for exempting a patient from performance measurement should be more strict in patients at higher risk of adverse health outcomes from hypertension, and more lenient for patients at lower risk. Conclusions Incorporating “real world” clinical principles and judgment into performance measurement systems may improve targeting of care and, by accounting for patient case-mix, allow for better comparison of performance between institutions

  18. Control performance and biomembrane disturbance of carbon nanotube artificial water channels by nitrogen-doping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuling; Li, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Jinliang; Du, Huailiang; Zhao, Lina; Zhao, Yuliang

    2010-10-26

    To establish ways to control the performance of artificial water channels is a big challenge. With molecular dynamics studies, we found that water flow inside the water channels of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be controlled by reducing or intensifying interaction energy between water molecules and the wall of the CNTs channel. A way of example toward this significant goal was demonstrated by the doping of nitrogen into the wall of CNTs. Different ratios of nitrogen doping result in different controllable water performance which is dominated mainly through a gradient of van der Waals forces created by the heteroatom doping in the wall of CNTs. Further results revealed that the nitrogen-doped CNT channels show less influence on the integrality of biomembrane than the pristine one, while the nitrogen-doped double-walled carbon nanotube exhibits fewer disturbances to the cellular membrane integrality than the nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube when interacting with biomembranes.

  19. Stabilization and control of the International Ultraviolet Explorer including a summary of flight performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the International Ultraviolet Explorer Mission sequence, spacecraft equipment, and control laws. Flight data from the precision control modes are presented, to illustrate the performance achieved; the subarc second pointing at sources for 60 min periods is accomplished routinely. Two modes of precision control are available: one is of a bright guide star which is in the vicinity of the target source, so that the guidance mode includes a star tracker for position information and a gyro system for rate damping. When a guide star is not available, precision hold is accomplished solely on a well trimmed gyro reference with low frequency updates from a dim source. The three axis maneuvers, the maneuver angle, and the gyro data used are discussed, concluding that these data used in conjunction with star tracker data provide a good source of information for orbital performance evaluation.

  20. Compact high-performance MWIR camera with exposure control and 12-bit video processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Thomas S.; Loesser, Kenneth A.; Perna, Steve N.; McCarthy, D. R.; Pantuso, Francis P.

    1998-07-01

    The design and performance of a compact infrared camera system is presented. The 3 - 5 micron MWIR imaging system consists of a Stirling-cooled 640 X 480 staring PtSi infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) with a compact, high-performance 12-bit digital image processor. The low-noise CMOS IRFPA is X-Y addressable, utilizes on-chip-scanning registers and has electronic exposure control. The digital image processor uses 16-frame averaged, 2-point non-uniformity compensation and defective pixel substitution circuitry. There are separate 12- bit digital and analog I/O ports for display control and video output. The versatile camera system can be configured in NTSC, CCIR, and progressive scan readout formats and the exposure control settings are digitally programmable.

  1. The 2kW Mini-BRU Electrical Controls Concept and Transient Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    The proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter, JIMO, mission selected a Brayton power conversion system as its electrical power generator. Although the JIMO mission power conversion system was expected to produce in the order of 100 kW, an available 2 kW Brayton system was used to develop control system strategies for the JIMO mission. This report describes the shunt loading voltage/speed regulation control concept developed for the 2 kW system, and the transient performance of controls. The 2 kW alternator is a permanent magnet alternator as proposed for the JIMO mission, and operates at a similar speed and internal impedance, allowing it to be used as an accurate model for performance of the larger system. The JIMO mission was cancelled in September 2005.

  2. Performance Benefits for a Turboshaft Engine Using Nonlinear Engine Control Technology Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    The potential benefits of nonlinear engine control technology applied to a General Electric T700 helicopter engine were investigated. This technology is being developed by the U.S. Navy SPAWAR Systems Center for a variety of applications. When used as a means of active stability control, nonlinear engine control technology uses sensors and small amounts of injected air to allow compressors to operate with reduced stall margin, which can improve engine pressure ratio. The focus of this study was to determine the best achievable reduction in fuel consumption for the T700 turboshaft engine. A customer deck (computer code) was provided by General Electric to calculate the T700 engine performance, and the NASA Glenn Research Center used this code to perform the analysis. The results showed a 2- to 5-percent reduction in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) at the three Sikorsky H-60 helicopter operating points of cruise, loiter, and hover.

  3. Modeling and control of actuators for high performance structural dynamic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Dyke, S. J.

    2014-05-01

    Most research in the structural engineering field uses either a simplified data-based model or a physics-based model to describe the dynamic behavior of servo-hydraulic actuators. In either way, the nominal model is typically used for modeling, analysis and control design. However, little effort has been directed to model uncertainties that are inherently associated with any physical system. A robust modeling approach is proposed in this study that can characterize both parametric and non-parametric uncertainties. The combination of this uncertainty with the nominal model provides a powerful tool to analyze the system performance and stability properties. Several control techniques are evaluated experimentally, and an H∞ robust control design is demonstrated to achieve the best performance as well as good robustness.

  4. Semiactive vibration control of nonlinear structures through adaptive backstepping techniques with H ∞ performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapateiro, Mauricio; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Luo, Ningsu

    2011-05-01

    This article presents a new approach to the vibration mitigation problem in structures subject to seismic motions. These kinds of structures are characterised by the uncertainties of the parameters that describe their dynamics, such as stiffness and damping coefficients. Moreover, the dampers used to mitigate the vibrations caused by earthquakes are usually nonlinear devices with frictional or hysteretic dynamics. We propose an adaptive backstepping controller to account for the uncertainties and the nonlinearities. The controller is formulated in such a way that it satisfies an H ∞ performance. It is designed for a 10-storey building whose base is isolated with a frictional damper (passive device) and a magnetorheological damper (semiactive device). Controller performance is analysed through numerical simulations.

  5. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  6. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40,000) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  7. Performance of Swashplateless Ultralight Helicopter Rotor with Trailing-edge Flaps for Primary Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Jin-Wei; Chopra, Inderjit

    2003-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the rotor performance, trailing-edge deflections and actuation requirement of a helicopter rotor with trailing-edge flap system for primary flight control. The swashplateless design is implemented by modifying a two-bladed teetering rotor of an production ultralight helicopter through the use of plain flaps on the blades, and by replacing the pitch link to fixed system control system assembly with a root spring. A comprehensive rotorcraft analysis based on UMARC is carried out to obtain the results for both the swashplateless and a conventional baseline rotor configuration. The predictions show swashplateless configuration achieve superior performance than the conventional rotor attributed from reduction of parasite drag by eliminating swashplate mechanic system. It is indicated that optimal selection of blade pitch index angle, flap location, length, and chord ratio reduces flap deflections and actuation requirements, however, has virtually no effect on rotor performance.

  8. Performance enhanced design of chaos controller for the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system via adaptive dynamic surface control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Hou, Zhiwei; Zhang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses chaos suppression of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system with output constraint and fully unknown parameters via adaptive dynamic surface control. To have a certain understanding of chaotic nature of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system and subsequently design its controller, the useful tools like the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are employed. By using tangent barrier Lyapunov function, a dynamic surface control scheme with neural network and tracking differentiator is developed to transform chaos oscillation into regular motion and the output constraint rule is not broken in whole process. Plugging second-order tracking differentiator into chaos controller tackles the "explosion of complexity" of backstepping and improves the accuracy in contrast with the first-order filter. Meanwhile, Chebyshev neural network with adaptive law whose input only depends on a subset of Chebyshev polynomials is derived to learn the behavior of unknown dynamics. The boundedness of all signals of the closed-loop system is verified in stability analysis. Finally, the results of numerical simulations illustrate effectiveness and exhibit the superior performance of the proposed scheme by comparing with the existing ADSC method.

  9. Development of the integrated environmental control model: Performance model for the NOXSO process. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalagnanam, J.R.; Rubin, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The most recent version of the IECM, implemented on a MacIntosh II computer, was delivered to DOE/PETC at the end of the last contract in May 1991. The current contract will continue the model development effort to provide DOE/PETC with improved model capabilities, including new software developments to facilitate model use and new technical capabilities for analysis of environmental control technologies. Integrated environmental control systems involving pre-combustion, combustion, and post-combustion control methods will be considered. Phase I involves developing the existing modules of the IECM. Phase II deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the use of the updated models. The present report summarizes recent progress on the Phase I effort during the period January 1 - March 31, 1995. A preliminary summary is given of the new performance model developed for the NOXSO process. The performance model is developed from first principles and parametrized based on experimental data from pilot plants.

  10. Effect of Performance Speed on Trunk Movement Control During the Curl-Up Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Barbado, David; Elvira, Jose Luis L.; Moreno, Francisco J.; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk exercise speed has significant effects on neuro-mechanical demands; however, the influence of a variety of exercise speeds on motor control of the trunk displacement remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of performance speed on trunk motion control during the curl-up exercise by analyzing the kinematic variance about the sagittal trajectory. Seventeen subjects volunteered to perform curl-ups at different cadences controlled by a metronome. Standard deviation (SD) and range (RG) of shoulder girdle medial-lateral displacement (SGML) and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of SGML were calculated to examine linear variability and long range autocorrelation of medial-lateral upper trunk displacements, respectively. In addition, SD, RG and DFA of centre of pressure medial-lateral displacement (COPML) were performed to analyze the behavior of the motor system while controlling trunk displacement. Although SD and RG of COPML increased as speed increased, the curl-up cadence did not have significant effects on SD and RG of SGML. These results suggest that although high speed curl-ups challenged participants’ ability to carry out medial-lateral adjustments, an increase of performance speed did not modify the linear variability about the sagittal trajectory. Regarding DFA, the scaling exponent α of SGML and COPML was higher for the fastest movements, mainly in long term fluctuations. Therefore, to maintain the target trajectory, participants used different strategies depending on performance speed. This is to say, there were less trajectory changes when participants performed the fastest exercises. PMID:26240646

  11. Performance of Optimized Actuator and Sensor Arrays in an Active Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Padula, S. L.; Lyle, K. H.; Cline, J. H.; Cabell, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in NASA Langley's Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory to determine the effectiveness of optimized actuator/sensor architectures and controller algorithms for active control of harmonic interior noise. Tests were conducted in a large scale fuselage model - a composite cylinder which simulates a commuter class aircraft fuselage with three sections of trim panel and a floor. Using an optimization technique based on the component transfer functions, combinations of 4 out of 8 piezoceramic actuators and 8 out of 462 microphone locations were evaluated against predicted performance. A combinatorial optimization technique called tabu search was employed to select the optimum transducer arrays. Three test frequencies represent the cases of a strong acoustic and strong structural response, a weak acoustic and strong structural response and a strong acoustic and weak structural response. Noise reduction was obtained using a Time Averaged/Gradient Descent (TAGD) controller. Results indicate that the optimization technique successfully predicted best and worst case performance. An enhancement of the TAGD control algorithm was also evaluated. The principal components of the actuator/sensor transfer functions were used in the PC-TAGD controller. The principal components are shown to be independent of each other while providing control as effective as the standard TAGD.

  12. High performance, accelerometer-based control of the Mini-MAST structure at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line of sight pointing accuracy and constraints on rms surface roughness. In order for these concepts to become operational, it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be shown to be practical in ground based experiments. The results of an experiment shows the successful application of the Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection control design methodology to active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Mini-Mast structure at NASA-Langley and has features dynamically traceable to future space systems. To maximize traceability to real flight systems, the controllers were designed and implemented using sensors (four accelerometers and one rate gyro) that are actually mounted to the structure. Ground mounted displacement sensors that could greatly ease the control design task were available but were used only for performance evaluation. The use of the accelerometers increased the potential of destabilizing the system due to spillover effects and motivated the use of precompensation strategy to achieve sufficient compensator roll-off.

  13. Control performances of a piezoactuator direct drive valve system at high temperatures with thermal insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yung-Min; Han, Chulhee; Kim, Wan Ho; Seong, Ho Yong; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-09-01

    This technical note presents control performances of a piezoactuator direct drive valve (PDDV) operated at high temperature environment. After briefly discussing operating principle and mechanical dimensions of the proposed PDDV, an appropriate size of the PDDV is manufactured. As a first step, the temperature effect on the valve performance is experimentally investigated by measuring the spool displacement at various temperatures. Subsequently, the PDDV is thermally insulated using aerogel and installed in a large-size heat chamber in which the pneumatic-hydraulic cylinders and sensors are equipped. A proportional-integral-derivative feedback controller is then designed and implemented to control the spool displacement of the valve system. In this work, the spool displacement is chosen as a control variable since it is directly related to the flow rate of the valve system. Three different sinusoidal displacements with different frequencies of 1, 10 and 50 Hz are used as reference spool displacement and tracking controls are undertaken up to 150 °C. It is shown that the proposed PDDV with the thermal insulation can provide favorable control responses without significant tracking errors at high temperatures.

  14. High performance, accelerometer-based control of the Mini-MAST structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line of sight pointing accuracy and constraints on rms surface roughness. In order for these concepts to become operational, it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be shown to be practical in ground based experiments. The results of an experiment shows the successful application of the Maximum Entropy/Optical Projection control design methodology to active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Mini-Mast structure at NASA-Langley and has features dynamically traceable to future space systems. To maximize traceability to real flight systems, the controllers were designed and implemented using sensors (four accelerometers and one rate gyro) that are actually mounted to the structure. Ground mounted displacement sensors that could greatly ease the control design task were available but were used only for performance evaluation. The use of the accelerometers increased the potential of destabilizing the system due to spillover effects and motivated the use of precompensation strategy to achieve sufficient compensator roll-off.

  15. Audio-visual feedback improves the BCI performance in the navigational control of a humanoid robot

    PubMed Central

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Gergondet, Pierre; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Aglioti, Salvatore M.

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in brain computer interfaces (BCI) technology allows people to actively interact in the world through surrogates. Controlling real humanoid robots using BCI as intuitively as we control our body represents a challenge for current research in robotics and neuroscience. In order to successfully interact with the environment the brain integrates multiple sensory cues to form a coherent representation of the world. Cognitive neuroscience studies demonstrate that multisensory integration may imply a gain with respect to a single modality and ultimately improve the overall sensorimotor performance. For example, reactivity to simultaneous visual and auditory stimuli may be higher than to the sum of the same stimuli delivered in isolation or in temporal sequence. Yet, knowledge about whether audio-visual integration may improve the control of a surrogate is meager. To explore this issue, we provided human footstep sounds as audio feedback to BCI users while controlling a humanoid robot. Participants were asked to steer their robot surrogate and perform a pick-and-place task through BCI-SSVEPs. We found that audio-visual synchrony between footsteps sound and actual humanoid's walk reduces the time required for steering the robot. Thus, auditory feedback congruent with the humanoid actions may improve motor decisions of the BCI's user and help in the feeling of control over it. Our results shed light on the possibility to increase robot's control through the combination of multisensory feedback to a BCI user. PMID:24987350

  16. Human Performance in a Realistic Instrument-Control Task during Short-Term Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Fabian; Kalicinski, Michael; Dalecki, Marc; Bock, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented the detrimental effects of microgravity on human sensorimotor skills. While that work dealt with simple, laboratory-type skills, we now evaluate the effects of microgravity on a complex, realistic instrument-control skill. Twelve participants controlled a simulated power plant during the short-term microgravity intervals of parabolic flight as well as during level flight. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from the power plant. We quantified control efficiency as the participants' net earnings (revenue minus expenses), motor performance as hand kinematics and dynamics, and stress as cortisol level, self-assessed mood and self-assessed workload. We found that compared to normal gravity, control efficiency substantially decreased in microgravity, hand velocity slowed down, and cortisol level and perceived physical strain increased, but other stress and motor scores didn't change. Furthermore, control efficiency was not correlated with motor and stress scores. From this we conclude that realistic instrument control was degraded in short-term microgravity. This degradation can't be explained by the motor and/or stress indicators under study, and microgravity affected motor performance differently in our complex, realistic skill than in the simple, laboratory-type skills of earlier studies. PMID:26083473

  17. Human Performance in a Realistic Instrument-Control Task during Short-Term Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Fabian; Kalicinski, Michael; Dalecki, Marc; Bock, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented the detrimental effects of microgravity on human sensorimotor skills. While that work dealt with simple, laboratory-type skills, we now evaluate the effects of microgravity on a complex, realistic instrument-control skill. Twelve participants controlled a simulated power plant during the short-term microgravity intervals of parabolic flight as well as during level flight. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from the power plant. We quantified control efficiency as the participants’ net earnings (revenue minus expenses), motor performance as hand kinematics and dynamics, and stress as cortisol level, self-assessed mood and self-assessed workload. We found that compared to normal gravity, control efficiency substantially decreased in microgravity, hand velocity slowed down, and cortisol level and perceived physical strain increased, but other stress and motor scores didn’t change. Furthermore, control efficiency was not correlated with motor and stress scores. From this we conclude that realistic instrument control was degraded in short-term microgravity. This degradation can’t be explained by the motor and/or stress indicators under study, and microgravity affected motor performance differently in our complex, realistic skill than in the simple, laboratory-type skills of earlier studies. PMID:26083473

  18. Human Performance in a Realistic Instrument-Control Task during Short-Term Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Fabian; Kalicinski, Michael; Dalecki, Marc; Bock, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented the detrimental effects of microgravity on human sensorimotor skills. While that work dealt with simple, laboratory-type skills, we now evaluate the effects of microgravity on a complex, realistic instrument-control skill. Twelve participants controlled a simulated power plant during the short-term microgravity intervals of parabolic flight as well as during level flight. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from the power plant. We quantified control efficiency as the participants' net earnings (revenue minus expenses), motor performance as hand kinematics and dynamics, and stress as cortisol level, self-assessed mood and self-assessed workload. We found that compared to normal gravity, control efficiency substantially decreased in microgravity, hand velocity slowed down, and cortisol level and perceived physical strain increased, but other stress and motor scores didn't change. Furthermore, control efficiency was not correlated with motor and stress scores. From this we conclude that realistic instrument control was degraded in short-term microgravity. This degradation can't be explained by the motor and/or stress indicators under study, and microgravity affected motor performance differently in our complex, realistic skill than in the simple, laboratory-type skills of earlier studies.

  19. Software structure and its performance on FOCAS instrument control, a MOS design, and an analyzing package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Kosugi, George; Takata, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Aoki, Kentaro; Asai, Ryo; Ohyama, Youichi; Kawabata, Koji; Inata, Motoko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Taguchi, Hiroko; Ebizuka, Noboru; Yadoumaru, Yasushi; Ozawa, Tomohiko; Iye, Masanori

    2000-06-01

    Faint Object Camera And Spectrograph (FOCAS) is completed and now waiting for a commissioning run on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea. We have developed a software system that includes the control of FOCAS instruments, Multiple Object Slits (MOS) design, and an analyzing package especially for evaluating performances of FOCAS. The control software system consists of several processes: a network interface process, user interface process, a central control engine process, a command dispatcher process, local control units, and a data acquisition system. These processes are mutually controlled by passing messages of commands and their status each other. The control system is also connected to Subaru Observation Software System to achieve high efficiency and reliability of observations. We have two off-line systems: a MOS design program, MDP, and an analyzing package. The MDP is a utility software to select spectroscopy targets in the field of view of FOCAS easily through its GUI and to design MOS plates efficiently. The designed MOS parameters are sent to a laser cutter to make a desirable MOS plate. A special package enables prompt performance check and evaluation of the FOCAS itself during a commissioning period. We describe the overall structure of FOCAS software with some GUI samples.

  20. A Modified Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) High Gain Antenna (HGA) Controller Based on Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Neerav

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched on June 18, 2009 and is currently in a 50 km mean altitude polar orbit around the Moon. LRO was designed and built by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The spacecraft is three-axis stabilized via the attitude control system (ACS), which is composed of various control modes using different sets of sensors and actuators. In addition to pointing the spacecraft, the ACS is responsible for pointing LRO s two appendages, the Solar Array (SA) and the High Gain Antenna (HGA). This study reviews LRO s HGA control system. Starting with an overview of the HGA system, the paper delves into the single input single output (SISO) linear analysis followed by the controller design. Based on flight results, an alternate control scheme is devised to address inherent features in the flight control system. The modified control scheme couples the HGA loop with the spacecraft pointing control loop, and through analysis is shown to be stable and improve transient performance. Although proposed, the LRO project decided against implementing this modification.

  1. An experimental study of concurrent methods for adaptively controlling vertical tail buffet in high performance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Patrick J.

    High performance twin-tail aircraft, like the F-15 and F/A-18, encounter a condition known as tail buffet. At high angles of attack, vortices are generated at the wing fuselage interface (shoulder) or other leading edge extensions. These vortices are directed toward the twin vertical tails. When the flow interacts with the vertical tail it creates pressure variations that can oscillate the vertical tail assembly. This results in fatigue cracks in the vertical tail assembly that can decrease the fatigue life and increase maintenance costs. Recently, an offset piezoceramic stack actuator was used on an F-15 wind tunnel model to control buffet induced vibrations at high angles of attack. The controller was based on the acceleration feedback control methods, In this thesis a procedure for designing the offset piezoceramic stack actuators is developed. This design procedure includes determining the quantity and type of piezoceramic stacks used in these actuators. The changes of stresses, in the vertical tail caused by these actuators during an active control, are investigated. In many cases, linear controllers are very effective in reducing vibrations. However, during flight, the natural frequencies of the vertical tail structural system changes as the airspeed increases. This in turn, reduces the effectiveness of a linear controller. Other causes such as the unmodeled dynamics and nonlinear effects due to debonds also reduce the effectiveness of linear controllers. In this thesis, an adaptive neural network is used to augment the linear controller to correct these effects.

  2. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Performance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Su, Chwen-Yng; Su, Jui-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the executive functions measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) between children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and age-matched normal controls. A second purpose was to examine the relations between executive functions and school functions in DCD children.…

  3. Performance Testing of a Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Curtis, R. E.; Alexandre, K. L.; Ruggiero, L. L.; Shtessel, N.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the International Space Station (ISS) Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS) development, a performance test has been conducted to provide reference data for flight verification analyses. This test, which used the U.S. Habitation Module (U.S. Hab) TCCS as the test article, was designed to add to the existing database on TCCS performance. Included in this database are results obtained during ISS development testing; testing of functionally similar TCCS prototype units; and bench scale testing of activated charcoal, oxidation catalyst, and granular lithium hydroxide (LiOH). The present database has served as the basis for the development and validation of a computerized TCCS process simulation model. This model serves as the primary means for verifying the ISS TCCS performance. In order to mitigate risk associated with this verification approach, the U.S. Hab TCCS performance test provides an additional set of data which serve to anchor both the process model and previously-obtained development test data to flight hardware performance. The following discussion provides relevant background followed by a summary of the test hardware, objectives, requirements, and facilities. Facility and test article performance during the test is summarized, test results are presented, and the TCCS's performance relative to past test experience is discussed. Performance predictions made with the TCCS process model are compared with the U.S. Hab TCCS test results to demonstrate its validation.

  4. Performance and costs of municipal waste combustor NO{sub x} control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    NO{sub x} control technologies that have been applied to MWCs include combustion controls, natural gas injection (NGI), selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This paper reviews the key design and operating parameters, commercial status, demonstrated performance, and cost effectiveness of these technologies. In the US, combustion controls and SNCR are being applied to new MWCs. In Europe and Japan, these controls as well as SCR have been installed. The use of NGI has been limited to testing programs. Of these technologies, the most cost effective (based on tipping fee impacts and $/ton of reduced NO{sub x} emissions) is SNCR. SCR costs are {approximately} 3 times higher than for SNCR. NGI costs can be comparable to SNCR costs, but are very sensitive to site-specific economic considerations.

  5. Empowerment, span of control, and safety performance in work teams after workforce reduction.

    PubMed

    Hechanova-Alampay, R; Beehr, T A

    2001-10-01

    Relationships of empowerment and span of control with 2 safety measures (unsafe behaviors and accidents) were investigated among 24 workgroups comprising 531 employees of a large chemical company in 3 U.S. states. The company recently implemented a reengineering process. Data were from an anonymous survey (unsafe behaviors), company records (accidents, span of control), and trained expert raters (empowerment). Span of control (positively) and level of empowerment (negatively) correlated with both measures of poor safety performance, but only empowerment predicted unique variance in safety criteria. Together, these structural measures predicted one third of the variance in safety measures. Structural variables such as span of control and team empowerment have been largely overlooked in past safety research but can be important.

  6. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length. PMID:25234987

  7. Stability and performance analysis of a jump linear control system subject to digital upsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Hui; Ma, Zhen-Yang

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the methodology analysis for the stability and the corresponding tracking performance of a closed-loop digital jump linear control system with a stochastic switching signal. The method is applied to a flight control system. A distributed recoverable platform is implemented on the flight control system and subject to independent digital upsets. The upset processes are used to stimulate electromagnetic environments. Specifically, the paper presents the scenarios that the upset process is directly injected into the distributed flight control system, which is modeled by independent Markov upset processes and independent and identically distributed (IID) processes. A theoretical performance analysis and simulation modelling are both presented in detail for a more complete independent digital upset injection. The specific examples are proposed to verify the methodology of tracking performance analysis. The general analyses for different configurations are also proposed. Comparisons among different configurations are conducted to demonstrate the availability and the characteristics of the design. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61403395), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant No. 13JCYBJC39000), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China, the Tianjin Key Laboratory of Civil Aircraft Airworthiness and Maintenance in Civil Aviation of China (Grant No. 104003020106), and the Fund for Scholars of Civil Aviation University of China (Grant No. 2012QD21x).

  8. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length.

  9. Touch Screen Performance by Individuals With and Without Motor Control Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Karen B.; Savage, Anne B.; Chourasia, Amrish O.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Sesto, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Touch technology is becoming more prevalent as functionality improves and cost decreases. Therefore, it is important that this technology is accessible to users with diverse abilities. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of button and gap size on performance by individuals with varied motor abilities. Participants with (n=38) and without (n=15) a motor control disability completed a digit entry task. Button size ranged from 10 to 30 mm and gap size was either 1 or 3 mm. Results indicated that as button size increased, there was a decrease in misses, errors, and time to complete tasks. Performance for the non-disabled group plateaued at button size 20mm, with minimal, if any gains observed with larger button sizes. In comparison, the disabled group’s performance continued to improve as button size increased. Gap size did not affect user performance. These results may help to improve accessibility of touch technology. PMID:23021630

  10. Investigation of Control Inceptor Dynamics and Effect on Human Subject Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanco, Anthony A.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Grube, Richard C.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2013-01-01

    The control inceptor used in a vehicle simulation is an important part of adequately representing the dynamics of the vehicle. The inceptor characteristics are typically based on a second order spring mass damper system with damping, force gradient, breakout force, and natural frequency parameters. Changing these parameters can have a great effect on pilot control of the vehicle. A quasi transfer of training experiment was performed employing a high fidelity and a low fidelity control inceptor. A disturbance compensatory task was employed which involved a simple horizon line disturbed in roll by a sum of sinusoids presented in an out-the-window display. Vehicle dynamics were modeled as 1/s and 1/s2. The task was to maintain level flight. Twenty subjects were divided between the high and the low fidelity training groups. Each group was trained to a performance asymptote, and then transferred to the high fidelity simulation. RMS tracking error, a PSD analysis, and a workload analysis were performed to quantify the transfer of training effect. Quantitative results of the experiments show that there is no significant difference between the high and low fidelity training groups for 1/s plant dynamics. For 1/s2 plant dynamics there is a greater difference in tracking performance and PSD; and the subjects are less correlated with the input disturbance function

  11. The measurement of aircraft performance and stability and control after flight through natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranaudo, R. J.; Mikkelsen, K. L.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ide, R. F.; Reehorst, A. L.; Jordan, J. L.; Schinstock, W. C.; Platz, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of airframe icing on the performance and stability and control of a twin-engine commuter-class aircraft were measured by the NASA Lewis Research Center. This work consisted of clear air tests with artificial ice shapes attached to the horizontal tail, and natural icing flight tests in measured icing clouds. The clear air tests employed static longitudinal flight test methods to determine degradation in stability margins for four simulated ice shapes. The natural icing flight tests employed a data acquisition system, which was provided under contract to NASA by Kohlman Systems Research Incorporated. This system used a performance modeling method and modified maximum likelihood estimation (MMLE) technique to determine aircraft performance degradation and stability and control. Flight test results with artificial ice shapes showed that longitudinal, stick-fixed, static margins are reduced on the order of 5 percent with flaps up. Natural icing tests with the KSR system corroborated these results and showed degradation in the elevator control derivatives on the order of 8 to 16 percent depending on wing flap configuration. Performance analyses showed the individual contributions of major airframe components to the overall degration in lift and drag.

  12. The measurement of aircraft performance and stability and control after flight through natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranaudo, R. J.; Mikkelsen, K. L.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ide, R. F.; Reehorst, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of airframe icing on the performance and stability and control of a twin-engine commuter-class aircraft were measured by the NASA Lewis Research Center. This work consisted of clear air tests with artificial ice shapes attached to the horizontal tail, and natural icing flight tests in measured icing clouds. The clear air tests employed static longitudinal flight test methods to determine degradation in stability margins for four simulated ice shapes. The natural icing flight tests employed a data acquisition system, which was provided under contract to NASA by Kohlman Systems Research Incorporated. This system used a performance modeling method and modified maximum likelihood estimation (MMLE) technique to determine aircraft performance degradation and stability and control. Flight test results with artificial ice shapes showed that longitudinal, stick-fixed, static margins are reduced on the order of 5 percent with flaps up. Natural icing tests with the KSR system corroborated these results and showed degradation in the elevator control derivatives on the order of 8 to 16 percent depending on wing flap configuration. Performance analyses showed the individual contributions of major airframe components to the overall degradation in lift and drag.

  13. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a performance seeking control algorithm on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1992-01-01

    The subsonic flight test evaluation phase of the NASA F-15 (powered by F 100 engines) performance seeking control program was completed for single-engine operation at part- and military-power settings. The subsonic performance seeking control algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the propulsion system for three modes of operation. The minimum fuel flow mode minimizes fuel consumption. The minimum thrust mode maximizes thrust at military power. Decreases in thrust-specific fuel consumption of 1 to 2 percent were measured in the minimum fuel flow mode; these fuel savings are significant, especially for supersonic cruise aircraft. Decreases of up to approximately 100 degree R in fan turbine inlet temperature were measured in the minimum temperature mode. Temperature reductions of this magnitude would more than double turbine life if inlet temperature was the only life factor. Measured thrust increases of up to approximately 15 percent in the maximum thrust mode cause substantial increases in aircraft acceleration. The system dynamics of the closed-loop algorithm operation were good. The subsonic flight phase has validated the performance seeking control technology, which can significantly benefit the next generation of fighter and transport aircraft.

  14. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a performance seeking control algorithm on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1992-01-01

    The subsonic flight test evaluation phase of the NASA4 F-15 (powered by F100 engines) performance-seeking control program was completed for single-engine operation at part- and military-power settings. The subsonic performance-seeking control algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the propulsion system for three modes of operation: the minimum-fuel-flow mode, the minimum-temperature mode, and the maximum-thrust mode. Decreases in thrust-specific fuel consumption of 1 to 2 percent were measured in the minimum-fuel-flow mode; these fuel savings are significant especially for supersonic cruise aircraft. Decreases of up to approximately 100 R in fan turbine inlet temperature were measured in the minimum-temperature mode. Temperature reductions of this magnitude would more than double turbine life if inlet temperature was the only life factor. Measured thrust increases of up to approximately 15 percent in the maximum-thrust mode cause substantial increases in aircraft acceleration. The subsonic flight phase has validated the performance-seeking control technology which can significantly benefit the next generation of fighter and transport aircraft.

  15. Control effects of steer-by-wire system for motorcycles on lane-keeping performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marumo, Yoshitaka; Katagiri, Nozomi

    2011-08-01

    This study discusses the control effects of the steer-by-wire (SBW) system for motorcycles on the lane-keeping performance by examining computer simulation with a rider-vehicle system which consists of a simplified vehicle model, a rider control model and the controller of the SBW system. The SBW system, which compensates the rolling angle deviation between the desired rolling angle intended by the rider and the actual rolling angle, improves the lane-keeping performance of the rider-vehicle system under the steering torque disturbance. The SBW system is, on the other hand, not effective in the lane-keeping performance under the lateral force disturbance. In addition, the lane-keeping assistance (LKA) system is applied to the SBW system and the cooperativeness of the SBW and the LKA systems is examined. The LKA system improves the lane-keeping performance of the SBW system under not only the steering torque disturbance but also the lateral force disturbance.

  16. Out of control: Diminished prefrontal activity coincides with impaired motor performance due to choking under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taraz G.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    There are three non-exclusive theoretical explanations for the paradoxical collapse of performance due to large financial incentives. It has been proposed that “choking under pressure” is either due to distraction, interference via an increase in top-down control and performance monitoring, or excessive levels of arousal in the face of large losses. Given the known neural architecture involved in executive control and reward, we used fMRI of human participants during incentivized motor performance to provide evidence to support and/or reconcile these competing models in a visuomotor task. We show that the execution of a pre-trained motor task during neuroimaging is impaired by high rewards. BOLD activity occurring prior to movement onset is increased in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and functional connectivity between this region and motor cortex is likewise increased just prior to choking. However, the extent of this increase in functional connectivity is inversely related to a participant's propensity to choke, suggesting that a failure in exerting top-down influence on motor control underlies choking under pressure due to large incentives. These results are consistent with a distraction account of choking and suggest that frontal influences on motor activity are necessary to protect performance from vulnerability under pressure. PMID:25449744

  17. Improved cognition after control of risk factors for multi-infarct dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Judd, B.W.; Tawaklna, T.; Rogers, R.L.; Mortel, K.F.

    1986-10-24

    A cohort of 52 patients (30 men and 22 women) with multi-infarct dementia (MID) has been followed up prospectively for a mean interval of 22.2 months. Clinical course has been documented by serial history taking and interviews and neurological, medical, and psychological examinations, and correlated with measurements of cerebral blood flow. The clinical course and cognitive performance have been compared with those of age-matched normal volunteers and patients with Alzheimer's disease. Patients with MID were subdivided into hypertensive and normotensive groups, and also into those displaying stabilized or improved cognition and those whose condition deteriorated. Among hypertensive patients with MID, improved cognition and clinical course correlated with control of systolic blood pressure within upper limits of normalf (135 to 150 mm Hg), but if systolic blood pressure was reduced below this level, patients with MID deteriorated. Among normotensive patients with MID, improved cognition was associated with cessation of smoking cigarettes.

  18. Robust active combustion control for the optimization of environmental performance and energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demayo, Trevor Nat

    Criteria pollutant regulations, climate change concerns, and energy conservation efforts are placing strict constraints in the design and operation of advanced, stationary combustion systems. To ensure minimal pollutant emissions and maximal efficiency at every instant of operation while preventing reaction blowout, combustion systems need to react and adapt in real-time to external changes. This study describes the development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multivariable feedback control system, designed to maximize the performance of natural gas-fired combustion systems. A feedback sensor array was developed to monitor reaction stability and measure combustion performance as a function of NOx, CO, and O, emissions. Acoustic and UV chemiluminescent emissions were investigated for use as stability indicators. Modulated signals of CH* and CO2* chemiluminescence were found to correlate well with the onset of lean blowout. A variety of emissions sensors were tested and evaluated, including conventional CEMS', micro-fuel cells, a zirconia NOx transducer, and a rapid response predictive NOx sensor based on UV flame chemiluminescence. A dual time-scale controller was designed to actively optimize operating conditions by maximizing a multivariable performance function J using a linear direction set search algorithm. The controller evaluated J under slow, quasi steady-state conditions, while dynamically monitoring the reaction zone at high speed for pre-blowout instabilities or boundary condition violations. To establish the input control parameters, two burner systems were selected: a 30 kW air-swirl, generic research burner, and a 120 kW scaled, fuel-staged, industrial boiler burner. The parameters, chosen to most affect burner performance, consisted of air swirl intensity and excess air for the generic burner, and fuel-staging and excess air for the boiler burner. A set of optimization parameters was also established to ensure efficient and deterministic

  19. Active load control during rolling maneuvers. [performed in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.

    1994-01-01

    A rolling maneuver load alleviation (RMLA) system has been demonstrated on the active flexible wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The objective was to develop a systematic approach for designing active control laws to alleviate wing loads during rolling maneuvers. Two RMLA control laws were developed that utilized outboard control-surface pairs (leading and trailing edge) to counteract the loads and that used inboard trailing-edge control-surface pairs to maintain roll performance. Rolling maneuver load tests were performed in the TDT at several dynamic pressures that included two below and one 11 percent above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The RMLA system was operated simultaneously with an active flutter suppression system above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. At all dynamic pressures for which baseline results were obtained, torsion-moment loads were reduced for both RMLA control laws. Results for bending-moment load reductions were mixed; however, design equations developed in this study provided conservative estimates of load reduction in all cases.

  20. An expert system to perform on-line controller restructuring for abrupt model changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    1990-01-01

    Work in progress on an expert system used to reconfigure and tune airframe/engine control systems on-line in real time in response to battle damage or structural failures is presented. The closed loop system is monitored constantly for changes in structure and performance, the detection of which prompts the expert system to choose and apply a particular control restructuring algorithm based on the type and severity of the damage. Each algorithm is designed to handle specific types of failures and each is applicable only in certain situations. The expert system uses information about the system model to identify the failure and to select the technique best suited to compensate for it. A depth-first search is used to find a solution. Once a new controller is designed and implemented it must be tuned to recover the original closed-loop handling qualities and responsiveness from the degraded system. Ideally, the pilot should not be able to tell the difference between the original and redesigned systems. The key is that the system must have inherent redundancy so that degraded or missing capabilities can be restored by creative use of alternate functionalities. With enough redundancy in the control system, minor battle damage affecting individual control surfaces or actuators, compressor efficiency, etc., can be compensated for such that the closed-loop performance in not noticeably altered. The work is applied to a Black Hawk/T700 system.

  1. A robust and high-performance queue management controller for large round trip time networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevisan, Ladan; Salmasi, Farzad R.

    2016-05-01

    Congestion management for transmission control protocol is of utmost importance to prevent packet loss within a network. This necessitates strategies for active queue management. The most applied active queue management strategies have their inherent disadvantages which lead to suboptimal performance and even instability in the case of large round trip time and/or external disturbance. This paper presents an internal model control robust queue management scheme with two degrees of freedom in order to restrict the undesired effects of large and small round trip time and parameter variations in the queue management. Conventional approaches such as proportional integral and random early detection procedures lead to unstable behaviour due to large delay. Moreover, internal model control-Smith scheme suffers from large oscillations due to the large round trip time. On the other hand, other schemes such as internal model control-proportional integral and derivative show excessive sluggish performance for small round trip time values. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce a system entailing two individual controllers for queue management and disturbance rejection, simultaneously. Simulation results based on Matlab/Simulink and also Network Simulator 2 (NS2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure and verify the analytical approach.

  2. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L.Y.; Cusson, B.K.

    2003-08-26

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7 deg. tilt implants have progressed to 0 deg. implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0 deg. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5 deg. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  3. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L. Y.; Cusson, B. K.

    2003-08-01

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7° tilt implants have progressed to 0° implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0°. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5°. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave™, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  4. Design of Performance Driven Self-Tuning PID Control Systems and It's Application for DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yoshihiro; Ikemoto, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toru

    This paper proposes an adaptive PID controller which is driven by current control performance. The calculations of the PID parameters are based on the generalized minimum variance control(GMVC) algorithm. The current control performance is obtained in an online manner over a user-specified time-window with some overlap. The retuning of PID parameters are only carried out when controller performance deteriorates below a user-specified threshold. Experimental evaluations on the voltage control of the DC-DC converter demonstrates the practicality and utility of this idea.

  5. Mitigation of chromatography adsorbent lot performance variability through control of buffer solution design space.

    PubMed

    Aono, Hiromasa; Iliescu, Ionela; Cecchini, Doug; Wood, Susanne; McCue, Justin T

    2013-11-29

    The separation of undesired product-related impurities often poses a challenge in the purification of protein therapeutic species. Product-related impurity species, which may consist of undesirable isoforms, aggregated, or misfolded variants of the desired monomeric form of the product, can be challenging to remove using preparatory scale chromatographic techniques. When using anion exchange chromatography to remove undesirable product-related impurities, the separation can be highly sensitive to relatively small changes in the chromatography operating conditions, including changes to buffer solution pH, buffer solution conductivity protein loading, and operating temperature. When performing difficult separations, slight changes to the chemical and physical properties of the anion exchange adsorbent lot may also impact the separation profile. Such lot-to-lot variability may not be readily measurable by the adsorbent manufacturer, since variability can be highly dependent on a specific protein separation. Consequently, manufacturers of chromatographic adsorbents may not be able to control adsorbent lot to lot variability tightly enough to prevent differences from occurring when performing difficult product-related separations at the preparatory scale. In such cases, it is desirable to design a chromatography step with a control strategy which accounts for adsorbent lot to lot variability in the separation performance. In order to avoid the undesired changes to process consistency and product quality, a proper adjustment of the column operating conditions can be implemented, based on the performance of each adsorbent lot or lot mixture. In this work, we describe how the adjustment of the column buffer solution composition can be used as a design space based-control strategy used to ensure consistent process performance and product quality are achieved for an anion exchange chromatography step susceptible to adsorbent lot to lot performance variability. In addition, a

  6. The disruptive effects of pain on complex cognitive performance and executive control.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Edmund; Moore, David J; Duggan, Geoffrey B; Payne, Stephen J; Eccleston, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Pain interferes and disrupts attention. What is less clear is how pain affects performance on complex tasks, and the strategies used to ensure optimal outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of pain on higher-order executive control processes involved in managing complex tasks. Sixty-two adult volunteers (40 female) completed two computer-based tasks: a breakfast making task and a word generation puzzle. Both were complex, involving executive control functions, including goal-directed planning and switching. Half of those recruited performed the tasks under conditions of thermal heat pain, and half with no accompanying pain. Whilst pain did not affect central performance on either task, it did have indirect effects. For the breakfast task, pain resulted in a decreased ability to multitask, with performance decrements found on the secondary task. However, no effects of pain were found on the processes thought to underpin this task. For the word generation puzzle, pain did not affect task performance, but did alter subjective accounts of the processes used to complete the task; pain affected the perceived allocation of time to the task, as well as switching perceptions. Sex differences were also found. When studying higher-order cognitive processes, pain-related interference effects are varied, and may result in subtle or indirect changes in cognition. PMID:24386168

  7. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report -- Fourth Quarter, Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1999-02-01

    This document provides a report of an analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the fourth quarter of Calendar Year (CY-98) and is the annual report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 63.034 person-rem year to date, compared to a goal of 83.1 person-rem. During the fourth quarter, all areas experienced deletions of work resulting from the Maintenance Stand Down. This reduction in work is a primary factor in the difference in the year end dose and the ALARA goal. The work will be completed during CY-99. Beginning in CY-98, a numeric Radiological Performance Index (RPI) is being used to compare radiological performance. The RPI takes into consideration frequency and severity of events such as skin contaminations, clothing contaminations, spills, exposures to radiation exceeding limits, and positive internal dose. The RPI measures the cost of these events in cents per hour of radiological work performed. To make the RPI meaningful, tables have been prepared to show the facility that contributes to the values used. The data are compared on a quarterly basis to the prior year to show measurable performance.

  8. Using a shock control bump to improve the performance of an axial compressor blade section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Khatibirad, S.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we use numerical analysis to study the effects of a shock control bump (SCB) on the performance of a transonic axial compressor blade section and to optimize its shape and location to improve the compressor performance. A section of the NASA rotor 67 blade is used for this study. Two Bézier curves, each consisting of seven control points, are used to model the suction and pressure surfaces of the blade section. The SCB is modeled with the Hicks-Henne function and, using five design parameters, is added to the suction side. The total pressure loss through a cascade of blade sections is selected as the cost function. A continuous adjoint optimization method is used along with a RANS solver to find a new blade section shape. A grid independence study is performed, and all optimization and flow solver algorithms are validated. Two single-point optimizations are performed in the design condition and in an off-design condition. It is shown that both optimized shapes have overall better performance for both on-design and off-design conditions. An analysis is given regarding how the SCB has changed the wave structure between blade sections resulting in a more favorable flow pattern.

  9. The Effect of Modified Control Limits on the Performance of a Generic Commercial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; May, Ryan D.; Gou, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of modifying the control limits of an aircraft engine to obtain additional performance. In an emergency situation, the ability to operate an engine above its normal operating limits and thereby gain additional performance may aid in the recovery of a distressed aircraft. However, the modification of an engine s limits is complex due to the risk of an engine failure. This paper focuses on the tradeoff between enhanced performance and risk of either incurring a mechanical engine failure or compromising engine operability. The ultimate goal is to increase the engine performance, without a large increase in risk of an engine failure, in order to increase the probability of recovering the distressed aircraft. The control limit modifications proposed are to extend the rotor speeds, temperatures, and pressures to allow more thrust to be produced by the engine, or to increase the rotor accelerations and allow the engine to follow a fast transient. These modifications do result in increased performance; however this study indicates that these modifications also lead to an increased risk of engine failure.

  10. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bratrud, L.; Castro, A.; Costa, F.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kiss, T.; Langøy, R.; Lien, J.; Lippmann, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Rehman, A. Ur; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Stuart, M.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Yang, S.; Österman, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level irradiation test results as well as the first commissioning results of the RCU2. Furthermore, it will be concluded with a discussion of the planned updates in firmware.

  11. Controlling the Interface Areas of Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Heterojunction Nanowires for High-Performance Diodes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Gao, Juan; Li, Jiaofu; Chen, Yanhuan; Jia, Zhiyu; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Huibiao; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Yuliang; Li, Dan

    2016-08-24

    A new method of in situ electrically induced self-assembly technology combined with electrochemical deposition has been developed for the controllable preparation of organic/inorganic core/shell semiconductor heterojunction nanowire arrays. The size of the interface of the heterojunction nanowire can be tuned by the growing parameter. The heterojunction nanowires of graphdiyne/CuS with core/shell structure showed the strong dependence of rectification ratio and perfect diode performance on the size of the interface. It will be a new way for controlling the structures and properties of one-dimensional heterojunction nanomaterials. PMID:27472226

  12. An investigation of improved airbag performance by vent control and gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Calvin; Rosato, Nick; Lai, Francis

    Airbags are currently being investigated as an impact energy absorber for U.S. Army airdrop. Simple airbags with constant vent areas have been found to be unsatisfactory in yielding high G forces. In this paper, a method of controlling the vent area and a method of injecting gas into the airbag during its compression stroke to improve airbag performance are presented. Theoretical analysis of complex airbags using these two methods show that they provide lower G forces than simple airbags. Vertical drop tests of a vent-control airbag confirm this result. Gas-injection airbags are currently being tested.

  13. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-12-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment. PMID:16512212

  14. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-09-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment. PMID:20549445

  15. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-09-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment.

  16. Innovative use of controlled availability fertilizers with high performance for intensive agriculture and environmental conservation.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Sadao

    2005-12-01

    A variety of slow release fertilizers, controlled release (availability) fertilizers (CAFs), and stability fertilizers have been developed in response to the serious drawbacks of the conventional fertilizers since the early 1960's. Of these fertilizers, CAFs which are coated with resin are consumed in the largest quantity in the world. Selecting CAFs with higher performance, the author will discuss about: 1) Innovation of agro-technologies for various field crops including new concepts of fertilizer application, 2) high yielding of field crops, 3) enhancing quality and safety of farm products, and 4) controlling the adverse effect of intensive agriculture on the environment.

  17. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  18. On-orbit performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system.

    PubMed

    Basedow, R; Ftaclas, C; Crout, R; Nonnenmacher, A

    1993-04-01

    On-orbit data are used to examine the performance of the Hubble Space Telescope optical control system. The precision, relative accuracy, and absolute accuracy of the off-axis Wavefront-Sensor measurements are evaluated and compared with design requirements. The internal stability of the sensors is better than 0.006 microm rms over five years, including launch. Random errors are estimated to be within 0.01 microm rms. Systematic errors are present in the estimates of focus, spherical, and coma aberrations, but none has been identified for astigmatism. Primary-mirror spherical aberration is believed to be the probable cause of all subspecification performances.

  19. Damage-mitigating control of a reusable rocket engine for high performance and extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Dai, Xiaowen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of damage mitigating control in reusable rocket engines is to achieve high performance with increased durability of mechanical structures such that functional lives of the critical components are increased. The major benefit is an increase in structural durability with no significant loss of performance. This report investigates the feasibility of damage mitigating control of reusable rocket engines. Phenomenological models of creep and thermo-mechanical fatigue damage have been formulated in the state-variable setting such that these models can be combined with the plant model of a reusable rocket engine, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), for synthesizing an optimal control policy. Specifically, a creep damage model of the main thrust chamber wall is analytically derived based on the theories of sandwich beam and viscoplasticity. This model characterizes progressive bulging-out and incremental thinning of the coolant channel ligament leading to its eventual failure by tensile rupture. The objective is to generate a closed form solution of the wall thin-out phenomenon in real time where the ligament geometry is continuously updated to account for the resulting deformation. The results are in agreement with those obtained from the finite element analyses and experimental observation for both Oxygen Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper and a copper-zerconium-silver alloy called NARloy-Z. Due to its computational efficiency, this damage model is suitable for on-line applications of life prediction and damage mitigating control, and also permits parametric studies for off-line synthesis of damage mitigating control systems. The results are presented to demonstrate the potential of life extension of reusable rocket engines via damage mitigating control. The control system has also been simulated on a testbed to observe how the damage at different critical points can be traded off without any significant loss of engine performance. The research work

  20. Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) team in the SL POCC) during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  1. Cost and schedule control systems criteria for contract performance measurement: contractor reporting/data analysis guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The DOE Cost and Schedule Control Systems Criteria (CSCSC) require that a contractor's management control systems include methods and procedures designed to ensure that they will accomplish, in addition to other requirements, a summarization of data elements to the level of reporting to DOE specified in the contract under separate clause. Reports provided to DOE must relate contract cost, schedule, and technical accomplishment to a baseline plan, within the framework of both the contract Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and the contractor's organizational structure. This Guide describes the reports available from contractors, with emphasis on the Cost Performance Report (CPR), and provides a framework for using the reported data as a basis for decision making. This Guide was developed to assist DOE Project Managers in assessing contractor performance through proper use of the CPR and supporting reports.

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report. Fourth quarter -- Calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, F.L.

    1997-02-01

    Indicators are used to measure performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as goals in themselves. These indicators should be used by management as tools to focus priorities, attention, and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: collective dose in person-rem; average work dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose equivalent to a worker; number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; number of radioactive material intakes resulting in a dose assessment of 10 mrem or more; area of contamination, high contamination, and airborne radioactivity areas, in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills. These indicators also provide tracking and trending for the previous three years.

  3. A Multiple Agent Model of Human Performance in Automated Air Traffic Control and Flight Management Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin; Pisanich, Gregory; Condon, Gregory W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A predictive model of human operator performance (flight crew and air traffic control (ATC)) has been developed and applied in order to evaluate the impact of automation developments in flight management and air traffic control. The model is used to predict the performance of a two person flight crew and the ATC operators generating and responding to clearances aided by the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS). The purpose of the modeling is to support evaluation and design of automated aids for flight management and airspace management and to predict required changes in procedure both air and ground in response to advancing automation in both domains. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. New Technique of High-Performance Torque Control Developed for Induction Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Two forms of high-performance torque control for motor drives have been described in the literature: field orientation control and direct torque control. Field orientation control has been the method of choice for previous NASA electromechanical actuator research efforts with induction motors. Direct torque control has the potential to offer some advantages over field orientation, including ease of implementation and faster response. However, the most common form of direct torque control is not suitable for the highspeed, low-stator-flux linkage induction machines designed for electromechanical actuators with the presently available sample rates of digital control systems (higher sample rates are required). In addition, this form of direct torque control is not suitable for the addition of a high-frequency carrier signal necessary for the "self-sensing" (sensorless) position estimation technique. This technique enables low- and zero-speed position sensorless operation of the machine. Sensorless operation is desirable to reduce the number of necessary feedback signals and transducers, thus improving the reliability and reducing the mass and volume of the system. This research was directed at developing an alternative form of direct torque control known as a "deadbeat," or inverse model, solution. This form uses pulse-width modulation of the voltage applied to the machine, thus reducing the necessary sample and switching frequency for the high-speed NASA motor. In addition, the structure of the deadbeat form allows the addition of the high-frequency carrier signal so that low- and zero-speed sensorless operation is possible. The new deadbeat solution is based on using the stator and rotor flux as state variables. This choice of state variables leads to a simple graphical representation of the solution as the intersection of a constant torque line with a constant stator flux circle. Previous solutions have been expressed only in complex mathematical terms without a

  5. Performance indicators for initial regional medical response to major incidents: a possible quality control tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Timely decisions concerning mobilization and allocation of resources and distribution of casualties are crucial in medical management of major incidents. The aim of this study was to evaluate documented initial regional medical responses to major incidents by applying a set of 11 measurable performance indicators for regional medical command and control and test the feasibility of the indicators. Methods Retrospective data were collected from documentation from regional medical command and control at major incidents that occurred in two Swedish County Councils. Each incident was assigned to one of nine different categories and 11 measurable performance indicators for initial regional medical command and control were systematically applied. Two-way analysis of variance with one observation per cell was used for statistical analysis and the post hoc Tukey test was used for pairwise comparisons. Results The set of indicators for regional medical command and control could be applied in 102 of the130 major incidents (78%), but 36 incidents had to be excluded due to incomplete documentation. The indicators were not applicable as a set for 28 incidents (21.5%) due to different characteristics and time frames. Based on the indicators studied in 66 major incidents, the results demonstrate that the regional medical management performed according to the standard in the early phases (1–10 min after alert), but there were weaknesses in the secondary phase (10–30 min after alert). The significantly lowest scores were found for Indicator 8 (formulate general guidelines for response) and Indicator 10 (decide whether or not resources in own organization are adequate). Conclusions Measurable performance indicators for regional medical command and control can be applied to incidents that directly or indirectly involve casualties provided there is sufficient documentation available. Measurable performance indicators can enhance follow- up and be used as a structured

  6. General collaboration offer of Johnson Controls regarding the performance of air conditioning automatic control systems and other buildings` automatic control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gniazdowski, J.

    1995-12-31

    JOHNSON CONTROLS manufactures measuring and control equipment (800 types) and is as well a {open_quotes}turn-key{close_quotes} supplier of complete automatic controls systems for heating, air conditioning, ventilation and refrigerating engineering branches. The Company also supplies Buildings` Computer-Based Supervision and Monitoring Systems that may be applied in both small and large structures. Since 1990 the company has been performing full-range trade and contracting activities on the Polish market. We have our own well-trained technical staff and we collaborate with a series of designing and contracting enterprises that enable us to have our projects carried out all over Poland. The prices of our supplies and services correspond with the level of the Polish market.

  7. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  8. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  9. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-06-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  10. Performance Monitoring and Assessment of Neuro-Adaptive Controllers for Aerospace Applications Using a Bayesian Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Jacklin, Stephen; Schumann, Johann; Guenther, Kurt; Richard, Michael; Soares, Fola

    2005-01-01

    Modem aircraft, UAVs, and robotic spacecraft pose substantial requirements on controllers in the light of ever increasing demands for reusability, affordability, and reliability. The individual systems (which are often nonlinear) must be controlled safely and reliably in environments where it is virtually impossible to analyze-ahead of time- all the important and possible scenarios and environmental factors. For example, system components (e.g., gyros, bearings of reaction wheels, valves) may deteriorate or break during autonomous UAV operation or long-lasting space missions, leading to a sudden, drastic change in vehicle performance. Manual repair or replacement is not an option in such cases. Instead, the system must be able to cope with equipment failure and deterioration. Controllability of the system must be retained as good as possible or re-established as fast as possible with a minimum of deactivation or shutdown of the system being controlled. In such situations the control engineer has to employ adaptive control systems that automatically sense and correct themselves whenever drastic disturbances and/or severe changes in the plant or environment occur.

  11. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-08-13

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer 'K' for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 10(5), and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer 'K'.

  12. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-08-13

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer 'K' for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 10(5), and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer 'K'. PMID:25024414

  13. Performance of an adaptive MIMO controller for a multiple-element ultrasound hyperthermia system.

    PubMed

    Hartov, A; Colacchio, T A; Strohbehn, J W; Ryan, T P; Hoopes, P J

    1993-01-01

    A prototype adaptive automatic control algorithm was implemented to regulate temperatures measured at several points in a tumour by adjusting the power applied to several ultrasound transducers. The goal was to control the temperatures under the elements of a mosaic applicator individually without any priori knowledge of which probes are under which elements. The control algorithm was devised for clinical applications where the position of each probe with respect to the heat sources is difficult to determine precisely. Instead, the program 'learns' the relationship between the inputs (power levels) and the outputs (temperatures) automatically. Based on the observed transfer function relating the power at m sources to the temperatures n probes, where n and m are not necessarily the same, a new method was used to implement a feedback controller. This method simplifies the design of the controller for a multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) system, while taking into account the coupling that may exist between the various elements of the system. As a result of using an adaptive scheme, the regulator continuously tracks changes in the system, such as blood flow variations or patient motion, by modifying its control parameters. The algorithm performance has been tested in simulations as well as experiments in dog thigh and a perfused kidney model. PMID:8366306

  14. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer ‘K’ for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 105, and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer ‘K’. PMID:25024414

  15. Propulsion system performance resulting from an Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Garg, Sanjay

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion system specific results are presented from the application of the Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control (IMPAC) design approach to Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control design for a STOVL aircraft in transition flight. The IMPAC method is briefly discussed and the propulsion system specifications for the integrated control design are examined. The structure of a linear engine controller that results from partitioning a linear centralized controller is discussed. The details of a nonlinear propulsion control system are presented, including a scheme to protect the engine operational limits: the fan surge margin and the acceleration/deceleration schedule which limits the fuel flow. Also, a simple but effective multivariable integrator windup protection scheme is investigated. Nonlinear closed-loop simulation results are presented for two typical pilot commands for transition flight: acceleration while maintaining flight path angle and a change in flight path angle while maintaining airspeed. The simulation nonlinearities include the airframe/engine coupling, the actuator and sensor dynamics and limits, the protection scheme for the engine operational limits, and the integrator windup protection. Satisfactory performance of the total airframe plus engine system for transition flight, as defined by the specifications, is maintained during the limit operation of the closed-loop engine subsystem.

  16. Propulsion system performance resulting from an integrated flight/propulsion control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Garg, Sanjay

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion-system-specific results are presented from the application of the integrated methodology for propulsion and airframe control (IMPAC) design approach to integrated flight/propulsion control design for a 'short takeoff and vertical landing' (STOVL) aircraft in transition flight. The IMPAC method is briefly discussed and the propulsion system specifications for the integrated control design are examined. The structure of a linear engine controller that results from partitioning a linear centralized controller is discussed. The details of a nonlinear propulsion control system are presented, including a scheme to protect the engine operational limits: the fan surge margin and the acceleration/deceleration schedule that limits the fuel flow. Also, a simple but effective multivariable integrator windup protection scheme is examined. Nonlinear closed-loop simulation results are presented for two typical pilot commands for transition flight: acceleration while maintaining flightpath angle and a change in flightpath angle while maintaining airspeed. The simulation nonlinearities include the airframe/engine coupling, the actuator and sensor dynamics and limits, the protection scheme for the engine operational limits, and the integrator windup protection. Satisfactory performance of the total airframe plus engine system for transition flight, as defined by the specifications, was maintained during the limit operation of the closed-loop engine subsystem.

  17. Orion Guidance and Control Ascent Abort Algorithm Design and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proud, Ryan W.; Bendle, John R.; Tedesco, Mark B.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    During the ascent flight phase of NASA s Constellation Program, the Ares launch vehicle propels the Orion crew vehicle to an agreed to insertion target. If a failure occurs at any point in time during ascent then a system must be in place to abort the mission and return the crew to a safe landing with a high probability of success. To achieve continuous abort coverage one of two sets of effectors is used. Either the Launch Abort System (LAS), consisting of the Attitude Control Motor (ACM) and the Abort Motor (AM), or the Service Module (SM), consisting of SM Orion Main Engine (OME), Auxiliary (Aux) Jets, and Reaction Control System (RCS) jets, is used. The LAS effectors are used for aborts from liftoff through the first 30 seconds of second stage flight. The SM effectors are used from that point through Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). There are two distinct sets of Guidance and Control (G&C) algorithms that are designed to maximize the performance of these abort effectors. This paper will outline the necessary inputs to the G&C subsystem, the preliminary design of the G&C algorithms, the ability of the algorithms to predict what abort modes are achievable, and the resulting success of the abort system. Abort success will be measured against the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) abort performance metrics and overall performance will be reported. Finally, potential improvements to the G&C design will be discussed.

  18. Maximum performance synergy: A new approach to recording studio control room design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Jeff D.

    2003-10-01

    Popular recording studio control room designs include LEDE(tm), RFZ(tm), and nonenvironment rooms. The common goal of all of these is to create an accurate acoustical environment that does not distort or otherwise color audio reproduction. Also common to these designs is the frequent need to have multiple ancillary recording rooms, often adjacent to the main control room, where group members perform. This approach, where group members are physically separated from one another, can lead to lack of ensemble in the finished recordings. New twists on old acoustical treatment techniques have been implemented at a studio in Nashville, Tennessee, which minimize the need for multiple ancillary recording rooms, thus creating an environment where talent, producer and recording professionals can all occupy the same space for maximum performance synergy. Semi-separated performance areas are designed around a central, critical listening area. The techniques and equipment required to achieve this separation are reviewed, as are advantages and disadvantages to this new control room design approach.

  19. [Performance of Grass Swales for Controlling Pollution of Roadway Runoff in Field Experiments].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun-jie; Shen, Qing-ran; Li, Tian

    2015-06-01

    Two different styles of grass swales were built in new Binhu region of Hefei city to monitor the flux and quality of the influent and effluent water under actual precipitation conditions, in order to evaluate the performance of water quality purification and pollution load control for roadway runoff. The results showed that both of the grass swales could effectively remove the pollutants such as TSS, COD, Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn in roadway runoff; the median EMC removal efficiencies of TSS and COD were 67.1%, 46.7% respectively,for facility I, and the median EMC removal efficiencies of TSS and COD were 78.6%, 58.6% respectively, for facility II; the concentrations of Pb, Cu, Zn in the effluent of facility II could meet the requirements of the surface water quality class V; release of nitrogen and phosphorus occurred in both facilities I and I[ in several rainfall events, mainly in heavy storms; the removal efficiencies of TP in the two grass swales were improved with the increase of influent concentration; the mean removal efficiencies of TP in facilities I and II were 14.7% and 45.4%, respectively; the load control performance of facility II for pollutants such as TSS, COD, TP, TN, NH4+ -N and NO3- -N was better than that of facility I; in the district with poor soil permeability and low ground slope, application of dry swale could achieve better performance in water quality control and pollution load reduction of roadway runoff.

  20. Age effects on transfer index performance and executive control in baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Bonté, Elodie; Kemp, Caralyn; Fagot, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Reversal performance in the transfer index (TI) task is known to improve from prosimians to apes, suggesting that this task is a marker of cognitive evolution within the primate taxa (Rumbaugh, 1970). However, the cognitive processes recruited by this task remain unclear. In the present study, 19 socially-housed baboons (Papio papio) from 1.6 to 14.3 years of age were tested on a computerized version of the TI task, using an automated self-testing procedure. Age was a significant factor in the level of success, with the younger baboons outperforming the adults. The younger baboons learned the pre-reversal discrimination faster and improved their post-reversal performance more rapidly than adult baboons. As 17 of these baboons had already been tested in previous studies on inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility tasks, comparison across tasks provide indicators of the underlying cognitive processes. Age variations in performance were similar between the TI task and in an adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) measuring cognitive flexibility (Bonté et al., 2011). This contrasts previous results from a task requiring motor inhibitory control (Fagot et al., 2011). Therefore, these findings suggest that cognitive flexibility was a central component of the cognitive system that evolved within non-human primates. They also implicate a decline in executive control with age that begins during early adulthood in this baboon species. PMID:24624114

  1. Age effects on transfer index performance and executive control in baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Bonté, Elodie; Kemp, Caralyn; Fagot, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Reversal performance in the transfer index (TI) task is known to improve from prosimians to apes, suggesting that this task is a marker of cognitive evolution within the primate taxa (Rumbaugh, 1970). However, the cognitive processes recruited by this task remain unclear. In the present study, 19 socially-housed baboons (Papio papio) from 1.6 to 14.3 years of age were tested on a computerized version of the TI task, using an automated self-testing procedure. Age was a significant factor in the level of success, with the younger baboons outperforming the adults. The younger baboons learned the pre-reversal discrimination faster and improved their post-reversal performance more rapidly than adult baboons. As 17 of these baboons had already been tested in previous studies on inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility tasks, comparison across tasks provide indicators of the underlying cognitive processes. Age variations in performance were similar between the TI task and in an adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) measuring cognitive flexibility (Bonté et al., 2011). This contrasts previous results from a task requiring motor inhibitory control (Fagot et al., 2011). Therefore, these findings suggest that cognitive flexibility was a central component of the cognitive system that evolved within non-human primates. They also implicate a decline in executive control with age that begins during early adulthood in this baboon species.

  2. Effects of Automation Types on Air Traffic Controller Situation Awareness and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sethumadhavan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Planning and Development Office has proposed the introduction of automated systems to help air traffic controllers handle the increasing volume of air traffic in the next two decades (JPDO, 2007). Because fully automated systems leave operators out of the decision-making loop (e.g., Billings, 1991), it is important to determine the right level and type of automation that will keep air traffic controllers in the loop. This study examined the differences in the situation awareness (SA) and collision detection performance of individuals when they worked with information acquisition, information analysis, decision and action selection and action implementation automation to control air traffic (Parasuraman, Sheridan, & Wickens, 2000). When the automation was unreliable, the time taken to detect an upcoming collision was significantly longer for all the automation types compared with the information acquisition automation. This poor performance following automation failure was mediated by SA, with lower SA yielding poor performance. Thus, the costs associated with automation failure are greater when automation is applied to higher order stages of information processing. Results have practical implications for automation design and development of SA training programs.

  3. Modelling and temporal performances evaluation of networked control systems using (max, +) algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammour, R.; Amari, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of temporal performances evaluation of producer/consumer networked control systems. The aim is to develop a formal method for evaluating the response time of this type of control systems. Our approach consists on modelling, using Petri nets classes, the behaviour of the whole architecture including the switches that support multicast communications used by this protocol. (max, +) algebra formalism is then exploited to obtain analytical formulas of the response time and the maximal and minimal bounds. The main novelty is that our approach takes into account all delays experienced at the different stages of networked automation systems. Finally, we show how to apply the obtained results through an example of networked control system.

  4. The effects of control order, feedback, practice, and input device on tracking performance and perceived workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, P. A.; Robinson, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The present experiment examined the influence of several task-related factors on tracking performance and concomitant workload. The manipulated factors included tracking order, the presence or absence of knowledge of performance, and the control device. Summed root mean square error (rmse) and perceived workload were measured at the termination of each trial. Perceived workload was measured using the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and the Subjective Workload Assessment Technique (SWAT). Results indicated a large and expected effect for track order on both performance and the perception of load. In general, trackball input was more accurate and judged for lower load than input using a mouse. The presence or absence of knowledge of performance had little effect on either performance or workload. There were a number of interactions between factors shown in performance that were mirrored by perceived workload scores. Results from each workload scale were equivalent in terms of sensitivity to task manipulations. The pattern of results affirm the utility of these workload measures in assessing the imposed load of multiple task-related variables.

  5. No Evidence That Gratitude Enhances Neural Performance Monitoring or Conflict-Driven Control.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Blair; He, Frank F H; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that gratitude can benefit self-regulation by reducing impulsivity during economic decision making. We tested if comparable benefits of gratitude are observed for neural performance monitoring and conflict-driven self-control. In a pre-post design, 61 participants were randomly assigned to either a gratitude or happiness condition, and then performed a pre-induction flanker task. Subsequently, participants recalled an autobiographical event where they had felt grateful or happy, followed by a post-induction flanker task. Despite closely following existing protocols, participants in the gratitude condition did not report elevated gratefulness compared to the happy group. In regard to self-control, we found no association between gratitude--operationalized by experimental condition or as a continuous predictor--and any control metric, including flanker interference, post-error adjustments, or neural monitoring (the error-related negativity, ERN). Thus, while gratitude might increase economic patience, such benefits may not generalize to conflict-driven control processes.

  6. No Evidence That Gratitude Enhances Neural Performance Monitoring or Conflict-Driven Control

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Blair; He, Frank F. H.; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that gratitude can benefit self-regulation by reducing impulsivity during economic decision making. We tested if comparable benefits of gratitude are observed for neural performance monitoring and conflict-driven self-control. In a pre-post design, 61 participants were randomly assigned to either a gratitude or happiness condition, and then performed a pre-induction flanker task. Subsequently, participants recalled an autobiographical event where they had felt grateful or happy, followed by a post-induction flanker task. Despite closely following existing protocols, participants in the gratitude condition did not report elevated gratefulness compared to the happy group. In regard to self-control, we found no association between gratitude—operationalized by experimental condition or as a continuous predictor—and any control metric, including flanker interference, post-error adjustments, or neural monitoring (the error-related negativity, ERN). Thus, while gratitude might increase economic patience, such benefits may not generalize to conflict-driven control processes. PMID:26633830

  7. Optimal performance of periodically driven, stochastic heat engines under limited control.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-04-01

    We consider the performance of periodically driven stochastic heat engines in the linear response regime. Reaching the theoretical bounds for efficiency and efficiency at maximum power typically requires full control over the design and the driving of the system. We develop a framework which allows us to quantify the role that limited control over the system has on the performance. Specifically, we show that optimizing the driving entering the work extraction for a given temperature protocol leads to a universal, one-parameter dependence for both maximum efficiency and maximum power as a function of efficiency. In particular, we show that reaching Carnot efficiency (and, hence, Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency at maximum power) requires to have control over the amplitude of the full Hamiltonian of the system. Since the kinetic energy cannot be controlled by an external parameter, heat engines based on underdamped dynamics can typically not reach Carnot efficiency. We illustrate our general theory with a paradigmatic case study of a heat engine consisting of an underdamped charged particle in a modulated two-dimensional harmonic trap in the presence of a magnetic field.

  8. Optimal performance of periodically driven, stochastic heat engines under limited control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michael; Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-04-01

    We consider the performance of periodically driven stochastic heat engines in the linear response regime. Reaching the theoretical bounds for efficiency and efficiency at maximum power typically requires full control over the design and the driving of the system. We develop a framework which allows us to quantify the role that limited control over the system has on the performance. Specifically, we show that optimizing the driving entering the work extraction for a given temperature protocol leads to a universal, one-parameter dependence for both maximum efficiency and maximum power as a function of efficiency. In particular, we show that reaching Carnot efficiency (and, hence, Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency at maximum power) requires to have control over the amplitude of the full Hamiltonian of the system. Since the kinetic energy cannot be controlled by an external parameter, heat engines based on underdamped dynamics can typically not reach Carnot efficiency. We illustrate our general theory with a paradigmatic case study of a heat engine consisting of an underdamped charged particle in a modulated two-dimensional harmonic trap in the presence of a magnetic field.

  9. Performance improvement of PI controllers through dynamic set-point weighting.

    PubMed

    Mudi, Rajani K; Dey, Chanchal

    2011-04-01

    Responses of high-order systems under Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI controllers (ZNPIs) are characterized by excessive oscillation with a large overshoot. Although, a fixed set-point weighting based PI controller (FSWPI) may decrease the overshoot considerably, it fails to reduce the oscillation in the set-point response. Moreover, both FSWPI and ZNPI exhibit equally poor load regulation. Keeping in mind an overall improved performance, we propose an online dynamic set-point weighting technique for ZNPIs. The dynamic set-point weighting factor (β(d)) is heuristically derived from the instantaneous process trend. Performance of the proposed dynamic set-point weighting based PI controller (DSWPI) for various second- and third-order processes including a pH process shows a significant improvement during both the set-point and load disturbance responses over other methods. Stability and robustness of the proposed DSWPI are addressed. Effectiveness of the DSWPI is demonstrated through the real-time implementation on a practical DC position control system.

  10. The application of control limits analysis to the myometric assessment of motor performance in neuropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Lough, J C; Rafferty, D; McColl, J H; Bell, F; Willison, H J

    2000-07-01

    Measurement of muscle strength by myometry is used to monitor the natural course and treatment response of motor system diseases, both in individual patients and clinical trials. However, the practical usefulness of myometric data is reliant upon a statistical method for analysing serial strength measurements which distinguishes disease-related changes from random fluctuations in patient performance and operator/device dependent measurement errors. In this study we have applied control limits analysis to this problem. Using hand-held dynamometry, sets of baseline strength measurements were collected on two separate occasions during a period of clinical stability from up to four muscle groups in 22 patients with peripheral neuropathies. From these sets of data, 76 control limits were calculated and then used to describe the inter-measurement variation in muscle strength in individual muscles. The range of control limits was wide, varying from <10% of baseline (in 36% of muscles tested) to >50% (in 4% of muscles tested), with 88% of muscles falling within 30% of baseline. Follow-up data were also collected from all patients, including those undergoing treatment. Control limits analysis is a powerful and simple method for assessing the significance of motor performance changes in individual muscles in patients undergoing serial monitoring and can be easily applied to both single patients and clinical trials.

  11. Perpetual factors involved in performance of air traffic controllers using a microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershzohn, G.

    1978-01-01

    The task involved the control of two simulated aircraft targets per trial, in a 37.0 -km radius terminal area, by means of conventional radar vectoring and/or speed control. The goal was to insure that the two targets crossed the Missed Approach Point (MAP) at the runway threshold exactly 60 sec apart. The effects on controller performance of the MLS configuration under wind and no-wind conditions were examined. The data for mean separation time between targets at the MAP and the range about that mean were analyzed by appropriate analyses of variance. Significant effects were found for mean separation times as a result of the configuration of the MLS and for interaction between the configuration and wind conditions. The analysis of variance for range indicated significantly poorer performance under the wind condition. These findings are believed to be a result of certain perceptual factors involved in radar air traffic control (ATC) using the MLS with separation of targets in time.

  12. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Perform Designated Occupational Activities according to Simple Instructions with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology, turning the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller into a high performance three-dimensional object orientation detector. This study extended Wii Remote Controller functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated simple…

  13. Control of Auditory Attention in Children With Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Children with specific language impairment (SLI) appear to demonstrate deficits in attention and its control. Selective attention involves the cognitive control of attention directed toward a relevant stimulus and simultaneous inhibition of attention toward irrelevant stimuli. The current study examined attention control during a cross-modal word recognition task. Method Twenty participants with SLI (ages 9–12 years) and 20 age-matched peers with typical language development (TLD) listened to words through headphones and were instructed to attend to the words in 1 ear while ignoring the words in the other ear. They were simultaneously presented with pictures and asked to make a lexical decision about whether the pictures and auditory words were the same or different. Accuracy and reaction time were measured in 5 conditions, in which the stimulus in the unattended channel was manipulated. Results The groups performed with similar accuracy. Compared with their peers with TLD, children with SLI had slower reaction times overall and different within-group patterns of performance by condition. Conclusions Children with TLD showed efficient inhibitory control in conditions that required active suppression of competing stimuli. Participants with SLI had difficulty exerting control over their auditory attention in all conditions, with particular difficulty inhibiting distractors of all types. PMID:26262428

  14. Design of high performance multivariable control systems for supermaneuverable aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valavani, Lena

    1995-01-01

    The main motivation for the work under the present grant was to use nonlinear feedback linearization methods to further enhance performance capabilities of the aircraft, and robustify its response throughout its operating envelope. The idea was to use these methods in lieu of standard Taylor series linearization, in order to obtain a well behaved linearized plant, in its entire operational regime. Thus, feedback linearization was going to constitute an 'inner loop', which would then define a 'design plant model' to be compensated for robustness and guaranteed performance in an 'outer loop' application of modern linear control methods. The motivation for this was twofold; first, earlier work had shown that by appropriately conditioning the plant through conventional, simple feedback in an 'inner loop', the resulting overall compensated plant design enjoyed considerable enhancement of performance robustness in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Second, the nonlinear techniques did not have any proven robustness properties in the presence of unstructured uncertainty; a definition of robustness (and performance) is very difficult to achieve outside the frequency domain; to date, none is available for the purposes of control system design. Thus, by proper design of the outer loop, such properties could still be 'injected' in the overall system.

  15. Effect of overreaching on cognitive performance and related cardiac autonomic control.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, O; Lussier, M; Fraser, S; Bherer, L; Audiffren, M; Bosquet, L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effect of a 2-week overload period immediately followed by a 1-week taper period on different cognitive processes including executive and nonexecutive functions, and related heart rate variability. Eleven male endurance athletes increased their usual training volume by 100% for 2 weeks, and decreased it by 50% for 1 week. A maximal graded test, a constant speed test at 85% of peak treadmill speed, and a Stroop task with the measurement of heart rate variability were performed at each period. All participants were considered as overreached. We found a moderate increase in the overall reaction time to the three conditions of the Stroop task after the overload period (816 ± 83 vs 892 ± 117 ms, P = 0.03) followed by a return to baseline after the taper period (820 ± 119 ms, P = 0.013). We found no association between cognitive performance and cardiac parasympathetic control at baseline, and no association between changes in these measures. Our findings clearly underscore the relevance of cognitive performance in the monitoring of overreaching in endurance athletes. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find any relationship between executive performance and cardiac parasympathetic control. PMID:22537000

  16. The Influence of Relative Humidity on Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Flow Control Actuator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, M.; Thomas, F. O.; Corke, T. C.; Patel, M.

    2012-11-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators possess numerous advantages for flow control applications and have been the focus of several previous studies. Most work has been performed in relatively pristine laboratory settings. In actual flow control applications, however, it is essential to assess the impact of various environmental influences on actuator performance. As a first effort toward assessing a broad range of environmental effects on DBD actuator performance, the influence of relative humidity (RH) is considered. Actuator performance is quantified by force balance measurements of reactive thrust while RH is systematically varied via an ultrasonic humidifier. The DBD plasma actuator assembly, force balance, and ultrasonic humidifier are all contained inside a large, closed test chamber instrumented with RH and temperature sensors in order to accurately estimate the average RH at the actuator. Measurements of DBD actuator thrust as a function of RH for several different applied voltage regimes and dielectric materials and thicknesses are presented. Based on these results, several important design recommendations are made. This work was supported by Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II Contract No. N00014-11-C-0267 issued by the U.S. Department of the Navy.

  17. Implementation of Statistical Process Control: Evaluating the Mechanical Performance of a Candidate Silicone Elastomer Docking Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been developing a novel docking system to meet the requirements of future exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and beyond. A dynamic gas pressure seal is located at the main interface between the active and passive mating components of the new docking system. This seal is designed to operate in the harsh space environment, but is also to perform within strict loading requirements while maintaining an acceptable level of leak rate. In this study, a candidate silicone elastomer seal was designed, and multiple subscale test articles were manufactured for evaluation purposes. The force required to fully compress each test article at room temperature was quantified and found to be below the maximum allowable load for the docking system. However, a significant amount of scatter was observed in the test results. Due to the stochastic nature of the mechanical performance of this candidate docking seal, a statistical process control technique was implemented to isolate unusual compression behavior from typical mechanical performance. The results of this statistical analysis indicated a lack of process control, suggesting a variation in the manufacturing phase of the process. Further investigation revealed that changes in the manufacturing molding process had occurred which may have influenced the mechanical performance of the seal. This knowledge improves the chance of this and future space seals to satisfy or exceed design specifications.

  18. Age-related changes in executive control and their relationships with activity performance in handwriting.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Sara; Engel-Yeger, Batya; Fogel, Yael

    2013-04-01

    Deterioration in the frontal and prefrontal cortex associated with executive functions (EF) occurs with age and may be associated with changes in daily performance. The aim of the present study was to describe changes occurring with age in Executive Functions (EF) and handwriting activity, as well as to analyze relationships between age, EF and handwriting performance. The study population included 80 healthy participants (aged 31 to 76+) living in the community. After answering five questions about their writing habits, the participants completed the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). In addition, they performed a handwriting task on a digitizer included in the Computerized Penmanship Evaluation Tool (ComPET), which provides kinematic measures of the handwriting process. Significant differences were found between the four age groups for both EF and temporal and spatial handwriting measures. A series of regressions indicated that age predicted 35% of the variance of the BADS profile score (EF control) and 32% of the variance of in-air time while writing. The results of this study indicated age effect on both EF control and handwriting performance. Possible implications for further research and clinical evaluation and intervention are discussed. PMID:23558056

  19. Perceived control in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) - Enhanced video-task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine whether perceived control effects found in humans extend to rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) tested in a video-task format, using a computer-generated menu program, SELECT. Choosing one of the options in SELECT resulted in presentation of five trials of a corresponding task and subsequent return to the menu. In Experiments 1-3, the animals exhibited stable, meaningful response patterns in this task (i.e., they made choices). In Experiment 4, performance on tasks that were selected by the animals significantly exceeded performance on identical tasks when assigned by the experimenter under comparable conditions (e.g., time of day, order, variety). The reliable and significant advantage for performance on selected tasks, typically found in humans, suggests that rhesus monkeys were able to perceive the availability of choices.

  20. Academic performance and social competence of adolescents: predictions based on effortful control and empathy.

    PubMed

    Zorza, Juan P; Marino, Julián; de Lemus, Soledad; Acosta Mesas, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the predictive power of effortful control (EC) on empathy, academic performance, and social competence in adolescents. We obtained self-report measures of EC and dispositional empathy in 359 students (197 girls and 162 boys) aged between 12 and 14 years. Each student provided information about the prosocial behavior of the rest of his/her classmates and completed a sociogram. At the end of the school year, we calculated the mean grade of each student and the teacher responsible for each class completed a questionnaire on the academic skills of his/her students. The study confirmed the existence of a structural equation model (SEM) in which EC directly predicted academic performance and social competence. Additionally, empathic concern partially mediated the effect of EC on social competence. Finally, social competence significantly predicted academic performance. The article discusses the practical applications of the model proposed.