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Sample records for age-matched normal subjects

  1. Postural finger tremor exhibited by Parkinson patients and age-matched subjects.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Hutton, J T

    1995-09-01

    Physiological correlates of postural tremor of the finger seen in Parkinson's disease patients are different from those seen in age-matched control subjects. A significant correlation between the spectral peak of acceleration and the spectral peak of rectified electromyographic activity from the muscle responsible for finger extension was found in Parkinson's disease patients. This correlation was not seen in age-matched control subjects. Any neural drive imposed on the motoneuron pool from supraspinal levels would enhance the electromyographic activity. Likewise, any feedback effects via spinal stretch reflexes or supraspinal stretch responses would be mediated through the motoneuron pool and electromyographic activity. The results of this research support the theory that Parkinson tremor is a centrally driven rhythm that may be influenced by feedback effects, whereas physiological tremor is due to a complex interaction of central, feedback, and mechanical effects.

  2. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  3. [Dynamic posturography in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Salami, A; Guglielmetti, G; Bindi, G F; Dellepiane, M

    1990-01-01

    The relative lack of data on the dynamic posturography led us to start a study in order to give our contributions to the standardization of M1, M2, M3, response parameters in normal subjects. Our research was carried out on 35 normal subjects aged 21 to 50. All of them were standing in Romberg's position on a Tönnies model board in a normally lit and ventilated room. We performed two tests: the first one open-eyed staring at no point, the second, 5 minutes later, closed-eyed. The EMG signals were obtained by surface electrodes on triceps sural and front tibial muscles. The EMG recording was determined by a "tilt" movement of the board at a steady speed of 50 per sec. and 4 wide. We use a XT 286 IBM computer with "T POST" software for checking and testing the data. Our results showed a significant variation in the value of the duration parameter in open-eyed and closed-eyed tests. Latency and area values were inferior to those obtained by other authors, except for Diener and Dichgans (3) whose results differ in latency value only.

  4. Pressure test in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Izukura, H

    1994-01-01

    The application of pressure to the middle ear changes the normal inner ear pressure in animal experiments. In this study we tested the effect of exposure to under- or overpressure on hearing in a total of 78 normal ears (40 subjects) in a soundproof pressure chamber. [After exposure to underpressure, a 10 dB or more gain in 3 ears and loss in 2 ears for at least one of the test frequencies was observed in 38 ears. After exposure to overpressure, a 10 dB or more gain in 5 ears and loss in 1 ear for at least one of the test frequencies was observed in 40 ears.] The characteristics of transferred inner ear pressure during a series of exposures to underpressure seemed to be similar to those during exposures to overpressure.

  5. Working Memory Processing In Normal Subjects and Subjects with Dyslexia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, S. M.; Lajiness-O'Neill, R.; Weiland, B. J.; Mason, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to determine the neuroanatomical location of working memory (WM) processes. Differences between subjects with dyslexia (SD; n=5) and normal readers (NR; n=5) were studied during two WM tasks. A spatial WM task (SMW) consisted of blocks visually presented in one of 12 positions for 2 s each. Subjects were to determine if the current position matched the position presented 2 slides earlier (N-Back Test). The verbal task (VMW) consisted of presentation of a single letter. The location of cortical activity during SWM in NR (determined with MR-FOCUSS analysis) was in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and right angular gyrus (AG). Similar activation was seen in SD with a slight delay of approximately 20 ms. During VWM activity was seen in LEFT STG and LEFT AG in NR. In contrast for SD, activation was in the RIGHT STG and RIGHT AG. This study demonstrates the possibility to differentiate WM processing in subjects with and without learning disorders.

  6. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  7. Contact heat evoked potentials in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-An; Hung, Steven Wu; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Lim, Siew-Na; Tsai, Yu-Tai; Hsiao, Cheng-Lun; Hsieh, Hsiang-Yao; Wu, Tony

    2006-09-01

    Laser-evoked potentials are widely used to investigate nociceptive pathways. The newly developed contact heat stimulator for evoking brain response has the advantages of obtaining reliable scalp potentials and absence of cutaneous lesions. This study aimed to identify the most appropriate stimulation site with consistent cortical responses, and to correlate several parameters of the contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) with age, gender, and body height in normal subjects. CHEPs were recorded at Cz with a contact heat stimulator (Medoc, Israel) in 35 normal controls. The subjects were asked to keep eyes open and remain alert. The baseline temperature was 32 degrees C, and stimulation peak heat intensity of 51 degrees C was applied to five body sites: bilateral forearm, right dorsum hand, right peroneal area, and right dorsum foot. Reproducible CHEPs were recorded more frequently when stimulated at volar forearm (62.5%) than at the lower limbs (around 40%). The first negative peak latency (N1) was 370.1 +/- 20.3 ms, first positive peak latency (P1) was 502.4 +/- 33.0 ms, and peak to peak amplitude was 10.2 +/- 4.9 microV with stimulation of the forearm. Perceived pain intensity was not correlated with the presence or amplitude of CHEPs. No gender or inter-side differences were observed for N1 latency and N1-P1 amplitude. Also, no correlation was noted between N1 and age or body height. These results support future clinical access of CHEPs as a diagnostic tool.

  8. Nimodipine disposition and haemodynamic effects in patients with cirrhosis and age-matched controls.

    PubMed Central

    Gengo, F M; Fagan, S C; Krol, G; Bernhard, H

    1987-01-01

    Six biopsy proven cirrhotics and five age-matched controls (mean 55.3 vs 52.4 years) were randomly given single 60 mg p.o. and 30 mg s.l. doses of nimodipine. Serum concentrations and blood pressure were measured regularly over the subsequent 24 h period. The clearance of nimodipine was reduced in the patients with cirrhosis. Apparent oral clearance of nimodipine in the cirrhotic group was significantly lower than that observed in the normal group (187 +/- 163 l h-1 vs 469.6 +/- 198.4 l h-1, P less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the normal subjects. There were, however, significant reductions in MAP following oral nimodipine in the cirrhotics. These reductions were significantly related to nimodipine concentrations in individual patients (P less than 0.05). PMID:3814462

  9. Macular dazzling test on normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ulla, F; Louro, O; Mosquera, M

    1986-01-01

    The macular dazzling test was performed on 240 healthy eyes, classified into six groups according to the ages of the subjects. The test was used to assess both long distance and short distance vision with a simultaneous study of the influence of mydriasis and miosis. The MDT is a test easy to perform, requires a minimum of co-operation by the subject, and gives repeatable results. The MDT values increase significantly as the age of the subject increases. The sex of the subject has no influence on it, and there are no significant differences between a subject's right and left eyes. Mydriasis does not affect the MDT, but miosis reduces the recovery period. All the values are statistically greater for long distance vision than for short distance vision. PMID:3954979

  10. Tibialis anterior response to sudden ankle displacements in normal and Parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Kearney, R E; Jones, G M

    1979-09-14

    It is well known that in Parkinsonian subjects with akinesia, reaction times are increased but reflex latencies remain normal. We have attempted to use this knowledge to distinguish between 'reflex' and 'voluntary' components of the electromyographic (EMG) response to ankle displacement. The EMG and torque responses of tibialis anterior (TA) to randomly applied servo-controlled plantar-flexing displacements of the ankle with and without the subject's intentional opposition were examined in 9 Parkinsonian and 9 age-matched normal humans. To obtain a measure of akinesia, the response latency to a visual stimulus was subsequently measured in the same subjects. Three principal findings emerged. (1) The intermediate latency EMG component (PSR) of the response evoked by ankle displacement with the subject instructed to relax was more regularly evoked and of lower threshold in Parkinsonians than in normals. This finding corresponds to the enlarged M2 component in upper limb muscles. However, the facilitation of PSR was not found to be associated with an increase in torque. In fact, the patients did not exhibit more stiffness than normals under our experimental conditions. (2) Mean latency estimate of the PSR was indistinguishable between Parkinsonians and normals. This finding puts the PSR in the nature of a reflex. Indeed, in accordance with reflex behaviour which is proportional to input characteristics, its area increased linearly with increase in the magnitude of displacement velocity. (3) In contrast, the 'late' EMG response (FSR) evoked by opposing sudden ankle displacement exhibited a significantly longer latency in 6 out of 8 Parkinsonians than normals. In the same patients, the EMG response latency to a visual signal was similarly increased. The delay of FSR in akinesia patients thus argued against its being a stereotyped reflex. The result is discussed with reference to the recent finding that preprogrammed responses are delayed in Parkinsonians.

  11. Effects of age of serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in cocaine abusers and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J.

    1995-05-01

    We measured the effect of age on serotonin 5-HT2 receptor availability and compared it with the effects on dopamine D2 receptors on 19 chronic cocaine abusers (35.2{plus_minus}9.8 years, range 18-54 years old) and 19 age matched normal controls using positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 N-methylspiperone (NMS). 5-HT2 Receptor availability was measure din frontal (FR), occipital (OC), cingulate (CI) and orbitofrontal (OF) cortices using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest to that in the cerebelium (CB) which is a function of Bmax/Kd. D2 receptor availability in the basal ganglia was measured using the {open_quotes}ratio index{close_quotes} (slope of striatum/CB versus time over 180 min of the scan) which is a function of Bmax. 5-HT2 Receptor availability differed among regions and were as follows: CI>OF>OC>FC.5-HT2 Receptor availability decreased significantly with age. This effect was more accentuated for 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR than in OC(df=1, p<0.025). Striatal dopamine D2 receptors were also found to decrease significantly with age (r=0.63, p<0.007). In a given subject, D2 receptor availability was significantly correlated with 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR (r=0.51, p<0.035) but not in OC. The values for 5-HT2 receptor availability were not different in normal subjects and cocaine abusers. These results document a decline in 5-HT2 and D2 receptors with age and document an association between frontal 5-HT2 and striatal D2 receptor availability. These results did not show any changes in 5-HT2 receptor availability in cocaine abusers as compared to control subjects.

  12. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Moser, K.M.; Hartman, M.T.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A vital factor conditioning the usage of the pulmonary perfusion (Q) scan in the evaluation of patients suspected of pulmonary embolism is the prevalence of abnormal Q scans in subjects free of cardiopulmonary disease. Because this prevalence has not been well defined, we performed Q scans in 80 nonsmoking subjects 18 to 29 yr of age having no known active cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject underwent a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and PA chest roentgenogram, followed by a 6-view Q scan. Two subjects in whom a Q defect was suspected underwent a /sup 133/Xe equilibrium-washout ventilation (V) scan. All Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by 2 experienced readers. Seventy-nine of the 80 Q scans were read as normal. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect. One of the 80 subjects, who had a mild pectus excavatum, had a left upper lobe subsegmental defect, which was not seen on the V scan. Based on the statistical analysis of these data, no more than 3.68% of normal nonsmoking persons in this age group may have a lobar or segmental Q scan defect and no more than 6.77% may have a subsegmental defect (with 95% confidence). Therefore, our study indicated that Q scan defects, particularly lobar or segmental, are rarely present among normal nonsmokers in this age group.

  13. Babbling Development of Hearing-Impaired and Normally Hearing Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoel-Gammon, Carol; Otomo, Kiyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Phonetic transcriptions of babbling samples from 11 normally hearing subjects, age 4-18 months, were compared with samples for 11 hearing-impaired students, age 4-28 months. Findings suggested both qualitative and quantitative differences in the babbling of the two groups. (Author/CL)

  14. Growth hormone secretory dynamics in subjects with normal stature.

    PubMed

    Costin, G; Kaufman, F R; Brasel, J A

    1989-10-01

    To evaluate the dynamics of growth hormone (GH) secretion in subjects with normal stature and to determine whether a correlation exists between height and the quantity of GH secreted, we determined the 24-hour GH concentration by measuring GH levels every 30 minutes in 27 boys and 19 girls of normal height, 7 to 18 years of age, of whom 24 were prepubertal and 22 in various stages of puberty. Spontaneous GH secretion had wide variations, with values ranging from less than 1.0 to 67.0 micrograms/L. In prepubertal children the highest GH levels were usually noted during sleep; in pubertal subjects the highest values were distributed almost equally between sleep and wake hours. In all subjects, GH secretion appeared to decrease before meals, followed by an increase after meals. Most indexes of GH secretion and insulin-like growth factor I levels were significantly greater in pubertal than in prepubertal subjects (p less than 0.002), and in both groups the GH concentration was significantly greater during sleep (p less than 0.005). In all groups the 24-hour GH concentration correlated significantly with the area under the GH curve, 24-hour GH pulse amplitude, and GH concentration and peak GH level during sleep and wake hours (P less than 0.0001); 24-hour GH concentrations correlated with insulin-like growth factor I levels only when the entire group of 46 subjects was considered (p less than 0.01). There were no significant correlations between 24-hour GH concentration and the subjects' age, bone age, height (SD score), weight (SD score), or body mass index. We conclude that in subjects with normal stature, mean 24-hour GH concentrations vary considerably and in the low range overlap with values reported in hypopituitarism.

  15. Electrophysiology of the palmomental reflex in normal and parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Caccia, M R; Galimberti, V; Valla, P; Osio, M; Dezuanni, E; Mangoni, A

    1996-01-01

    The palmomental reflex (PMR), obtained by mechanical stimulation of the skin of the thenar and hypothenar eminences of the hand and recording the surface EMG response from the chin muscles homolateral and contralateral to the side of stimulation, was studied in normal subjects and in a group of akinetic parkinsonians, both de novo and treated. PMR was present in most subjects of both groups. No differences regarding the incidence of the PMR homolateral to stimulation of the thenar eminence was found between controls and patients, and it was non-habituating in both groups. When the hypothenar eminence was stimulated, the PMR was present in about half of the subjects of both groups. PMR was present contralaterally in both normal and patients, whereas bilateral PMR prevailed in parkinsonians. Latency and duration of the reflex were significantly shorter in parkinsonians than in controls. The data are discussed in the light of the pathophysiology of the PMR putative pathways in normal subjects and in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Circulating Levels of Irisin in Hypopituitary and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Bello, Lara; Pértega-Diaz, Sonia; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Outeiriño-Blanco, Elena; Eiras-Leal, Raquel; Varela-Rodriguez, Bárbara; Juiz-Valiña, Paula; Pérez-Fontán, Miguel; Cordido, María; Cordido, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Context The recently identified myokine irisin conveys some of the benefits of exercise. Hypopituitarism with adult growth hormone deficiency (HP) is a situation characterized by decreased GH secretion and an altered body composition. Objective Our aim was to study the skeletal muscle hormone irisin in HP, and compare the results with a similar group of normal subjects. Participants and Methods Seventeen HP patients and fifty-one normal subjects of similar age and sex were studied. The diagnosis of GH deficiency was confirmed by the presence of pituitary disease and a peak GH secretion below 3 μg/L after an insulin tolerance test. The patients were adequately treated for all pituitary hormone deficits, except for GH. Fasting serum irisin was measured with an enzyme immunoassay, and HOMA-IR, QUICKI and HOMA-β were calculated. Results Fasting irisin levels (ng/ml) were similar in normal [208.42 (168.44–249.23)] and HP patients [195.13 (178.44–241.44)]. In the control group there were moderate significant positive correlations between irisin and BMI, waist circumference, leptin, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, triglycerides, and cholesterol. In the control group there were moderate significant negative correlations between irisin and IGF-I and QUICKI. In the hypopituitary group there were moderate significant positive correlations between irisin and body fat and HOMA-β. Conclusions We found similar irisin levels in GH deficiency hypopituitary patients when compared with normal subjects. The correlation between irisin and adiposity related factors suggests that that in the case of this clinical model, irisin is regulated by adiposity and not by GH. PMID:27472279

  17. The flow volume curve: normal standards in young subjects.

    PubMed

    Giosuè, S; Schmid, G; Sinelli, G; Pergola, M; Pergola, V; Ciavarella, M

    1979-01-01

    During epidemiological survey, satisfactory flow-volume data were obtained from 438 young Italian Boy-Scouts. Data from 302 non-smoking subjects (170 males and 132 females, ranging in age from 10 to 20 years) free of symptoms or history of cardiorespiratory disease were used in determining "normal" prediction equations and nomograms for peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal expiratory flow at 75 percent (V 75%), 50 percent (V 50%), 25 percent (V 25%) of the forced vital capacity. The flow-volume curve showed for the same height and age evident intersubject variability. The prediction equations and nomograms give mean values but no information on scatter.

  18. Effect of atmospheric pressure on hearing in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Ozawa, H; Kodama, A; Izukura, H; Inoue, S; Uchida, K

    1994-01-01

    Hearing is assumed to be altered during or immediately after a change in atmospheric pressure, although this has not been tested experimentally. We used a soundproof pressure chamber to examine the effect of alterations in atmospheric pressure on hearing in 26 normal healthy subjects. The subjects were placed in the soundproof pressure chamber in a supine position and instructed to actively equilibrate middle ear pressure or to abstain from doing so. When the pressure was changed to +/- 500 mmH2O at 33 mmH2O/s the results were as follows: When subjects did not equilibrate middle ear pressure, air conduction at low frequency tones increased more than bone conduction. The degree of deterioration in hearing was greater when the chamber pressure was increased (descent) than where pressure was decreased (ascent). When the subjects equilibrated middle ear pressure, little change in the levels of air or bone conduction was observed. Most of the deterioration in bone conduction was considered to reflect functional loss due to increased stiffness and damping of the sound transmission mechanism.

  19. FMS mutations in myelodysplastic, leukemic, and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Ridge, S.A.; Worwood, M.; Jacobs, A.; Padua, R.A. ); Oscier, D. )

    1990-02-01

    The FMS gene encodes the functional cell surface receptor for colony-stimulating factor 1, the macrophage-and monocyte-specific growth factor. Codons 969 and 301 have been identified as potentially involved in promoting the transforming activity of FMS. Mutations at codon 301 are believed to lead to neoplastic transformation by ligand independence and constitutive tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor. The tyrosine residue at codon 969 has been shown to be involved in a negative regulatory activity, which is disrupted by amino acid substitutions. This study reports on the frequency of point mutations at these codons, in vivo, in human myeloid malignancies and in normal subjects. We studied 110 patients (67 with myelodysplasia (MDS) and 48 with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML)), 5 patients being studied at the MDS and the later AML stage of the disease. There was a total incidence of 12.7% (14/110) with mutations in codon 969 and 1.8% (2/110) with mutations in codon 301. Two patients had mutations in the AML stage of the disease but not in the preceding MDS and one had a mutation in the MDS stage but not upon transformation of AML. This is consistent with the somatic origin of these mutations. FMS mutations were most prevalent (20%) in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and AML type M4 (23%), both of which are characterized by monocytic differentiation. One of 51 normal subjects had a constitutional codon 969 mutation, which may represent a marker for predisposition to myeloid malignancy.

  20. Perception of imposed leg length inequality in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Seamus; Kernohan, George; Fitzpatrick, Claire; Hill, Janet; Beverland, David

    2010-01-01

    Lower limb length differences of up to 10mm exist in 60% - 95% of the population.There are usually no symptoms or functional effects. Following Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA), satisfactory clinical results can be spoiled by dissatisfaction due to a change in leg length. Although the change in leg length may be modest in comparison to the normal variation, the patient may perceive this as a leg length discrepancy. To study the average threshold for perception, artificial leg length discrepancies of 5 mm to 25 mm were created in 30 young healthy adults using calibrated wooden blocks. Responses were recorded and analysed using a chi-squared test for independence and an independent measures t-test. Awareness of leg length discrepancy was related to the magnitude of the discrepancy (X2 (15)= 156.6, p<0.05 on the right side, and X2 (15)= 178.725 p<0.05 on the left side). It was shown that no subject reported a 5mm increase in leg length to be uncomfortable while all subjects were aware of leg length discrepancies of 20 mm and 25 mm. When there was a discrepancy of 10 mm in either lower limb, 29 out of 30 subjects (96.7%) thought there was a difference in leg length. Consequently it is suggested that during total hip arthroplasty the surgeon should aim for a leg length discrepancy of less than 10 mm.

  1. Motor initiation versus execution in normal and Parkinson's disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, E B; Gorman, D S; Nuessen, J

    1991-09-01

    We studied motor initiation and execution using wrist extension movements to changing target locations in eight normal subjects and nine Parkinson's disease (PD) patients before and after medications. Late changes resulted in double trajectories, indicating commitment to the initial target acquisition program followed by a correcting movement. There was compensation for earlier changes, even after onset of agonist muscle activity, resulting in a single trajectory, implying that the original trajectory had not yet been specified. However, movements were slowed in PD patients implying an abnormality in the content of the target acquisition program but not in the timing of its specification. In PD patients, the timing of the second movement onset correlated best with the timing of target location change and did not depend on initial movement completion. Thus, PD patients were able to program the second movement while the first movement was under way.

  2. Hydralazine tachycardia and sympathetic cardiovascular reactivity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Tena, I

    1980-11-01

    The correlation between hydralazine-induced tachycardia and overall cardiovascular reactivity to sympathetic stimulation was explored in 50 normal subjects. Blood pressure and heart rate changes after standing, immersion of a hand in cold water, the Valsalva maneuver, and moderate exercise were compared with pressure and rate responses to 20 mg oral hydralazine. The drug did not modify blood pressure but increased heart rate, mainly in the standing position. Because plotting the magnitude of this response suggested a two-population distribution, subjects were divided into hyporeactor and hyperreactor groups. Reactivity did not appear to be related to acetylator phenotype. The magnitude of the cardiac response correlated with heart rate responses to standing and to the Valsalva maneuver; when analyzed separately from hyporeactors, correlation was greater among hyperreactors. Because the orthostatic and Valsalva responses are reflex in nature, these results suggest that hydralazine tachycardia is also reflexly induced, that its magnitude depends on individual baroreceptor sensitivity, which is distributed nonnormally, and that it can be predicted by suitable tests of sympathetic responsiveness.

  3. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  4. The relationship between uric acid and potassium in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, A C; Boddy, K; King, P C; Brennan, J; Anderson, J A; Buchanan, W W

    1978-01-01

    The serum uric acid concentration in normal healthy subjects has been studied in relation to sex, height, weight, lean body mass measured from total body potassium and predicted from the Hume-Weyers formula (1971), total body potassium, plasma potassium and urea, and packed cell volume. The strongest correlation was found with sex, but height, weight, total body potassium, lean body mass (measured and predicted) also correlated significantly with serum uric acid concentration. However, when the sex variable was removed, the other factors lost their significant correlation. Finally, total red blood cell and plasma volumes were predicted (Hume and Goldberg, 1964) and from these an estimate of total plasma uric acid, total plasma potassium, and total red blood cell potassium obtained. Measured total body potassium was found to correlate well with total plasma potassium and total red blood cell potassium independent of sex. Total plasma uric acid correlated well with measured total body potassium when both sexes were considered and when separated into male and female groups the males retained a significant correlation as did the female group. PMID:686865

  5. Modeling Longitudinal Data Containing Non-Normal Within Subject Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan; Glenn, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) human research program is to advance safe human spaceflight. This involves conducting experiments, collecting data, and analyzing data. The data are longitudinal and result from a relatively few number of subjects; typically 10 – 20. A longitudinal study refers to an investigation where participant outcomes and possibly treatments are collected at multiple follow-up times. Standard statistical designs such as mean regression with random effects and mixed–effects regression are inadequate for such data because the population is typically not approximately normally distributed. Hence, more advanced data analysis methods are necessary. This research focuses on four such methods for longitudinal data analysis: the recently proposed linear quantile mixed models (lqmm) by Geraci and Bottai (2013), quantile regression, multilevel mixed–effects linear regression, and robust regression. This research also provides computational algorithms for longitudinal data that scientists can directly use for human spaceflight and other longitudinal data applications, then presents statistical evidence that verifies which method is best for specific situations. This advances the study of longitudinal data in a broad range of applications including applications in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

  6. Signs of temporomandibular disorders in girls receiving orthodontic treatment. A prospective and longitudinal comparison with untreated Class II malocclusions and normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Henrikson, T; Nilner, M; Kurol, J

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to prospectively and longitudinally study signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and occlusal changes in girls with Class II malocclusion receiving orthodontic treatment and to compare them with subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions and with normal occlusion subjects. Three groups of age-matched adolescent girls were examined for clinical signs of TMD and re-examined 2 years later. Sixty-five Class II subjects received orthodontic fixed straight-wire appliance treatment (Orthodontic group), 58 subjects were orthodontically untreated (Class II group), and 60 subjects had a normal occlusion (Normal group). In the Orthodontic group, the prevalence of muscular signs of TMD was significantly less common post-treatment. The Class II and the Normal groups showed minor changes during the 2-year period. Temporomandibular joint clicking increased in all three groups over the 2 years, but was less common in the Normal group. The Normal group also had a lower overall prevalence of signs of TMD than the Orthodontic and the Class II groups at both registrations. Functional occlusal interferences decreased in the Orthodontic group, but remained the same in the other groups over the 2 years. In conclusion, orthodontic treatment did not increase the risk for or worsen pretreatment signs of TMD. On the contrary, subjects with Class II malocclusions and signs of TMD of muscular origin seemed to benefit functionally from orthodontic treatment in a 2-year perspective. The Normal group had a lower prevalence of signs of TMD than the Orthodontic and the untreated Class II groups.

  7. Moxalactam and cefazolin: comparative pharmacokinetics in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, W M; Spyker, D A; Donowitz, G R; Bolton, W K; Sande, M A

    1981-01-01

    Moxalactam, a new beta-lactam antibiotic with a wide in vitro spectrum of activity, was compared with cefazolin after intravenous and intramuscular administration of 1.0 g in a double-blind crossover design in 21 adult male subjects with normal renal function. Serum samples were obtained at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h, and urine was collected at 0 to 2, 2 to 4, 4 to 6, 6 to 8, and 8 to 12 h after dosing. Intravenous kinetics were described by a linear two-compartment model. For moxalactam, the drug clearance and volume of distribution were larger (115.2 versus 75.9 ml/min per 70 kg, P = 0.001, and 0.44 versus 0.19 liter/kg, P less than 0.001, respectively), and the t1/2beta was longer (3.47 versus 2.18 h, P = 0.01), with correspondingly smaller area under the curve (151 versus 236 h x mg/ml, P = 0.003) and lower serum concentration at 30 min (62 versus 106 micrograms/ml, P = 0.003) than cefazolin. Intramuscular kinetics were similar and were well described by a single-compartment model. Urinary recovery was essentially identical for both drugs: 55 to 75% in 8 h. Consistent departures from the two-compartment model for moxalactam (not noted for cefazolin) suggested enterohepatic recirculation of moxalactam. Both drugs were well tolerated, and no adverse reactions were noted. PMID:6454387

  8. ABCB1 genotypes and haplotypes in patients with dementia and age-matched non-demented control patients

    PubMed Central

    Frankfort, Suzanne V; Doodeman, Valerie D; Bakker, Remco; Tulner, Linda R; van Campen, Jos PCM; Smits, Paul HM; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid β is an in vitro substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux pump at the blood brain barrier (BBB). The Multi Drug Resistance (ABCB1) gene, encoding for P-gp, is highly polymorphic and this may result in a changed function of P-gp and may possibly interfere with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This study investigates to what extent ABCB1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs; C1236T in exon 12, G2677T/A in exon 21 and C3435T in exon 26) and inferred haplotypes exist in an elderly population and if these SNPs and haplotypes differ between patients with dementia and age-matched non-demented control patients. ABCB1 genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies were neither significantly different between patients with dementia and age-matched controls, nor between subgroups of different types of dementia nor age-matched controls. This study shows ABCB1 genotype frequencies to be comparable with described younger populations. To our knowledge this is the first study on ABCB1 genotypes in dementia. ABCB1 genotypes are presently not useful as a biomarker for dementia, as they were not significantly different between demented patients and age-matched control subjects. PMID:16999857

  9. Comparison of the nerve fiber layer of type 2 diabetic patients without glaucoma with normal subjects of the same age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Takis, Alexandros; Alonistiotis, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Nikolaos; Papaconstantinou, Dimitris; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Background The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 was compared to normal subjects of similar age and sex, having first excluded any risk factors for glaucoma. The correlation between the RNFL thickness and the severity of diabetic retinopathy was investigated at its primary stages and with other ocular and diabetic parameters. Methods A prospective, case series study was carried out. Twenty-seven diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, 24 diabetic patients with mild retinopathy, and 25 normal, age-matched subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and imaging with scanning laser polarimetry for the evaluation of the RNFL. Multivariate analysis was applied in order to investigate the correlation between RNFL and diabetic parameters, such as age, duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin; and ocular parameters, such as cup to disc ratio, levels of normal intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness. Results The mean inferior average of RNFL and the temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal standard deviation were statistically significantly lower in both diabetic groups, and the nerve fiber index was higher (P=0.04) compared to the normal group. There was no statistically significant difference between the diabetic groups. The factor analysis showed no significant correlation between the RNFL and the previously mentioned diabetic and ocular parameters. Conclusion The existence of diabetes should be seriously considered in evaluating the results of scanning laser polarimetry. Multivariate analysis for RNFL was used for the first time. PMID:24596452

  10. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  11. Frequency dependency of temporal contrast adaptation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Bettina; Rössler, Christopher W; Jünemann, Anselm G M; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2011-06-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of temporal frequency of temporal contrast adaptation on contrast sensitivity in healthy subjects. Temporal contrast sensitivities (TCS) were measured monocularly in seven healthy subjects with a modified ERG full-field bowl stimulator at eight different test temporal frequencies (9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51 Hz) using a two-alternative-forced-choice strategy. Before each presentation of the test stimulus, a 100% contrast adapting flicker stimulus was presented (frequencies: 9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51, 100 Hz). At each adapting frequency, a complete set of TCSs was measured. All temporal contrast sensitivities decreased with increasing temporal frequencies. Adaptation led to a general temporal contrast sensitivity decrease. Largest adaptation effects were seen at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. Reduction of contrast sensitivity was significantly larger at 25 Hz adaptation than at 9 Hz adaptation (t-test of paired samples, Bonferroni corrected). The results of this study showed a general TCS decrease with the largest effect at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. This finding indicates that the contrast adaptation probably occurred in the magnocellular-pathway. In future clinical studies adaptation effects could be investigated in patients with reduced temporal contrast sensitivity.

  12. Characterization of Swallowing Sound: Preliminary Investigation of Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Baba, Takuro; Fujimoto, Keiko; Goto, Takaharu; Nagao, Kan; Harada, Masafumi; Honda, Eiichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize the swallowing sound and identify the process of sound generation during swallowing in young healthy adults. Methods Thirty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled and allocated into three experimental groups. In experiment 1, a microphone was attached to one of eight cervical sites in 20 subjects, participants swallowed 5 ml water, and the sound waveform was recorded. In experiment 2, 10 subjects swallowed either 0, 5, 10, or 15 ml water during audio recording. In addition, participants consumed the 5 ml bolus in two different cervical postures. In experiment 3, the sound waveform and videofluoroscopy were simultaneously recorded while the three participants consumed 5 ml iopamidol solution. The duration and peak intensity ratio of the waveform were analyzed in all experimental groups. Results The acoustic analysis of the waveforms and videofluoroscopy suggested that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods, each associated with a stage of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising posterior tongue and hyoid bone movement; the pharyngeal phase comprising larynx movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and passage of the bolus through the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the return of the hyoid bone and larynx to their resting positions, and reopening of the epiglottis. Conclusion Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds and videofluoroscopy suggests that the swallowing sound could be divided into three periods associated with each process of the swallowing movement: the oral phase comprising the posterior movement of the tongue and hyoid bone; the pharyngeal phase comprising the laryngeal movement, hyoid bone elevation, epiglottis closure, and the bolus passage to the esophagus orifice; and the repositioning phase comprising the repositioning of the hyoid bone and larynx, and reopening of the epiglottis. PMID:27959902

  13. Absorption and disposition kinetics of amoxicillin in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Arancibia, A; Guttmann, J; González, G; González, C

    1980-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of amoxicillin were studied in healthy fasted subjects afqer both oral and intravenous administration of a single 500-mg dose. Serum levels and urinary excretion rates were determined at various time intervals by a microbiological method. The conventional two-compartment model with elimination occurring from the central compartment was used to analyze the data. Mean values were 3.40 h-1 for alpha and 0.68 h-1 for beta. Distribution constants kappa 12 and kappa 21 were 0.92 h-1 and 1.99 h-1, respectively. The rate constant for elimination from the central compartment, kappa 10, was 1.16 h-1. The volume of distribution was 20.2 liters (0.30 liter/kg), and the serum clearance was 13.3 liters/h. The absorption rate constant, kappa a, in the oral study, calculated by the Loo-Riegelman method, was 1.02 h-1, and the absorption half-life was 0.72 h. Absolute bioavailability after the oral dose was determined by comparing both the areas under the curve (AUC) and fractions of the antibiotic excreted unchanged in the urine. The AUC after oral administration was 77.4% of the intravenous AUC. On the other hand, recovery from the urine was 43.4% after the oral dose and 57.4% after the intravenous dose, indicating 76.5% bioavailability. PMID:7387142

  14. Single-Dose Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Rifapentine in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Conte, John E.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; McQuitty, Mari; Kipps, Juliana; Lin, Emil T.; Zurlinden, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    The intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of rifapentine were studied in 30 volunteers who received a single, oral dose of rifapentine (600 mg). Subgroups of five subjects each underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at timed intervals following drug administration. Drug concentrations, including the concentration of the primary metabolite 25-desacetyl rifapentine, were determined in plasma, BAL fluid, and alveolar cells (AC) by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were calculated by the urea diffusion method. The concentration-time data were fit to two-compartment (plasma) or one-compartment (AC and ELF) models. The peak concentrations in plasma, ELF, and AC, 26.2, 3.7, and 5.3 μg/ml, respectively, occurred at 5, 5, and 7 h after drug administration, respectively. The half-lives and areas under the curve for plasma, ELF, and AC were 18.3 h and 520 μg · h/ml, 20.8 h and 111 μg · h/ml, and 13.0 h and 133 μg · h/ml, respectively. Although the intrapulmonary rifapentine concentrations were less than the plasma rifapentine concentrations at all time periods, they remained above the proposed breakpoint for M. tuberculosis (0.5 μg/ml) for the 48-h observation period. These data provide a pharmacokinetic rationale for extended-interval dosing. The optimum dosing regimen for rifapentine will have to be determined by controlled clinical trials. PMID:10722501

  15. Pharmacological enhancement of memory or cognition in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Gary; Cox, Conor D.; Gall, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of expanding memory or cognitive capabilities above the levels in high functioning individuals is a topic of intense discussion among scientists and in society at large. The majority of animal studies use behavioral endpoint measures; this has produced valuable information but limited predictability for human outcomes. Accordingly, several groups are pursuing a complementary strategy with treatments targeting synaptic events associated with memory encoding or forebrain network operations. Transcription and translation figure prominently in substrate work directed at enhancement. Notably, the question of why new proteins would be needed for a now-forming memory given that learning-driven synthesis presumably occurred throughout the immediate past has been largely ignored. Despite this conceptual problem, and some controversy, recent studies have reinvigorated the idea that selective gene manipulation is a plausible route to enhancement. Efforts to improve memory by facilitating synaptic encoding of information have also progressed, in part due of breakthroughs on mechanisms that stabilize learning-related, long-term potentiation (LTP). These advances point to a reductionistic hypothesis for a diversity of experimental results on enhancement, and identify under-explored possibilities. Cognitive enhancement remains an elusive goal, in part due to the difficulty of defining the target. The popular view of cognition as a collection of definable computations seems to miss the fluid, integrative process experienced by high functioning individuals. The neurobiological approach obviates these psychological issues to directly test the consequences of improving throughput in networks underlying higher order behaviors. The few relevant studies testing drugs that selectively promote excitatory transmission indicate that it is possible to expand cortical networks engaged by complex tasks and that this is accompanied by capabilities not found in normal animals

  16. Pulmonary performance of elderly normal subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exposed to 0. 3 ppm nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Utell, M.J.; Bauer, M.A.; Smeglin, A.M.; Frampton, M.W.; Cox, C.; Speers, D.M.; Gibb, F.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Symptoms and changes in pulmonary function of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and elderly normal subjects, induced by a 4-h exposure to 0.3 ppm NO2, were investigated using a double-blind, crossover design with purified air. The 5-day experimental protocol required approximately 2 wk with at least a 5-day separation between randomized 4-h exposures to either NO2 or air which included several periods of exercise. Over a 2-yr period, COPD subjects, all with a history of smoking, consisting of 13 men and 7 women (mean age of 60.0 yr) and 20 elderly normal subjects of comparable age and sex were evaluated. During intermittent light exercise, COPD subjects demonstrated progressive decrements in FVC and FEV1 compared with baseline with 0.3 ppm NO2, but not with air. Differences in percent changes from baseline data (air-NO2) showed an equivocal reduction in FVC by repeated measures of analysis of variance and cross-over t tests (p less than 0.10). Subgroup analyses suggested that responsiveness to NO2 decreased with severity of COPD; in elderly normal subjects, NO2-induced reduction in FEV1 was greater among smokers than never-smokers. A comparison of COPD and elderly normal subjects also revealed distinctions in NO2-induced responsiveness.

  17. Experimental induction of the "sensed presence" in normal subjects and an exceptional subject.

    PubMed

    Cook, C M; Persinger, M A

    1997-10-01

    9 of the 15 volunteers who were exposed to successive 3-min. durations of bursts of different types of weak (1 microT) complex magnetic fields or sham-fields reported the sense of a presence as indicated by a button press at the time of the experience. Reports of subjective experiences indicated that attempts to "focus" cognitively upon the location of the presence altered its location or induced its "movement." An exceptional subject who had a history of experiencing within his upper left peripheral visual field "flashing images" concerning the health and history of people [when handling their photographs] was also exposed to the burst sequences. Numbers of button presses associated with the experiences of a mystical presence, to whom the subject attributed his capacity, increased when the complex magnetic fields were applied without the subject's knowledge. The results support the hypothesis that the sense of a presence, which may be the common phenomenological base from which experiences of gods, spirits, angels, and other entities are derived, is a right hemispheric homologue of the left hemispheric sense of self.

  18. Effect of inhaled H1 and H2 receptor antagonist in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N C; Kerr, J W

    1980-01-01

    The effects on airflow resistance of an inhaled H1 receptor antagonist, clemastine, and an H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, have been investigated in normal and asthmatic subjects. No significant changes in specific conductance (sGaw) were seen in six normal subjects. In eight asthmatic subjects a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) occurred at 60 min (< 0.02), and 120 (< 0.05) after the inhalation of clemastine, whereas inhaled cimetidine had no effect on airflow resistance. Clemastine and cimetidine were tested on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal and eight asthmatic subjects. Clemastine significantly reduced the fall in sGaw in normal subjects and the fall in FEV1 in asthmatic subjects, whereas cimetidine had no protective effect. Clemastine and ipratropium bromide were tested on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal subjects. Ipratropium bromide, but not clemastine, significantly reduced the fall in sGaw after methacholine. These results suggest that in normal and asthmatic subjects histamine-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated predominantly via H1 rather than H2 receptors in the airways. PMID:6449094

  19. Blood glucose may condition factor VII levels in diabetic and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1988-12-01

    Increased factor VII levels have been reported in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects. A direct correlation between fasting plasma glucose and factor VII level was found to exist in both diabetic and normal subjects. Induced-hyperglycaemia was able to increase factor VII levels in both diabetic patients and normal control subjects while, when euglycaemia was achieved in diabetic patients, factor VII values returned to normal range. This study shows that the level of factor VII may be directly conditioned by circulating blood glucose and, therefore, stresses the role of hyperglycaemia in conditioning coagulation abnormalities in diabetes mellitus.

  20. Cardiovascular autonomic regulation in subjects with normal blood pressure, high-normal blood pressure and recent-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Prakash, E Sankaranarayanan; Madanmohan; Sethuraman, K Raman; Narayan, Sunil K

    2005-01-01

    1. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in recent-onset hypertension and that pressor responses to standard autonomic reflex tests are not any different in hypertensives compared with normotensives. We also hypothesized that subjects with high-normal blood pressure (BP) would be distinguishable from normotensives on the basis of short-term HRV indices. 2. Three groups of subjects, each consisting of 15 men and 10 women, were examined. The first group consisted of subjects with recent-onset hypertension who were not taking antihypertensive medication (mean (+/-SD) age 50 +/- 12 years; BP >/= 140/90 mmHg), the second group consisted of subjects with high-normal BP (mean age 46 +/- 13 years; BP 130-139/85-89 mmHg) and the third group consisted of subjects with normal BP (mean age 48 +/- 12 years; BP < 120/80 mmHg). The aim was to characterize the autonomic state in each group. 3. Blood pressure, heart rate (HR), indices of short-term HRV during supine rest and quiet standing, HR variation during timed deep breathing (HRVdb) and pressor responses to the cold pressor test and sustained isometric handgrip were compared between the groups. 4. Although the three groups were comparable (P > 0.1) in terms of mean HR and low-frequency (LF) power expressed in normalized units at rest and during quiet standing, the standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN) during supine rest, LF and high-frequency spectral powers during supine rest and HRVdb were lowest in hypertensives (P subjects with high-normal BP (P

  1. Cardiovascular function is better in veteran football players than age-matched untrained elderly healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J F; Andersen, T R; Andersen, L J; Randers, M B; Hornstrup, T; Hansen, P R; Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether lifelong football training may improve cardiovascular function, physical fitness, and body composition. Our subjects were 17 male veteran football players (VPG; 68.1 ± 2.1 years) and 26 healthy age-matched untrained men who served as a control group (CG; 68.2 ± 3.2 years). Examinations included measurements of cardiac function, microvascular endothelial function [reactive hyperemic index (RHI)], maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), and body composition. In VPG, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume was 20% larger (P < 0.01) and LV ejection fraction was higher (P < 0.001). Tissue Doppler imaging revealed an augmented LV longitudinal displacement, i.e., LV shortening of 21% (P < 0.001) and longitudinal 2D strain was 12% higher (P < 0.05), in VPG. In VPG, resting heart rate was lower (6 bpm, P < 0.05), and VO2max was higher (18%, P < 0.05). In addition, RHI was 21% higher (P < 0.05) in VPG. VPG also had lower body mass index (P < 0.05), body fat percentage, total body fat mass, android fat percentage, and gynoid fat percentage (all P < 0.01). Lifelong participation in football training is associated with better LV systolic function, physical fitness, microvascular function, and a healthier body composition. Overall, VPG have better cardiovascular function compared with CG, which may reduce their cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  2. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ANXIETY IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS AND NORMAL SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Dasgupta, S.; Laha, H.

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY Physiological (Skin conductance) and Psychological (State-trait anxiety) measures of anxiety were employed to assess the level of anxiety in 10 anxious neurotics, 10 schizophrenics and 10 normal subjects. Both the Physiological and Psychological measures were sensitive in detecting the level of anxiety in normals and patients. But interrelationships between these two measures were very poor. PMID:21965905

  3. SSRI Effects on Psychomotor Performance: Assessment of Citalopram and Escitalopram on Normal Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE SSRI Effects on Pyschomotor Performance: Assessment of Citalopram and Escitalopram on Normal Subjects MICHEL A. PAUL, GARY W... escitalopram 011 nomral subjects. Aviat Space Environ Med 2007; 78:693-7. Introduction: Standard aeromedical doctrine dictates that aircrew...noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake inhibi- tor). This study was undertaken to determine whether or not cita lopram or escitalopram affect psychomotor

  4. Ferritin in the Serum of Normal Subjects and Patients with Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, A.; Miller, F.; Worwood, M.; Beamish, M. R.; Wardrop, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The concentration of ferritin in serum gives a quantitative measure of the amount of storage iron in normal subjects and those with iron deficiency or overload. The mean level in normal men is 69 ng/ml, compared with 35 ng/ml in normal women. A concentration below 10 ng/ml is associated with a low transferrin saturation and iron-deficient erythropoiesis. PMID:5082548

  5. Investigating an approach to identifying the biomechanical differences between intercostal cartilage in subjects with pectus excavatum and normals in vivo: preliminary assessment of normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechowicz, Krzysztof; McKenzie, Frederic; Yan, Zhenzhen; Bawab, Sebastian; Ringleb, Stacie

    2009-02-01

    The cause of pectus excavatum (PE) is unknown and little research has been done to assess the material properties of the PE costal cartilage. One source reported, after studying ex vivo various properties of the costal cartilage in cases of PE that the biomechanical stability of PE cartilage is decreased when compared to that of normals. Building on this idea, it would be beneficial to measure the biomechanical properties of the costal cartilages in vivo to further determine the differences between PE subjects and normals. An approach to doing this would be to use a modified FARO arm, which can read applied loads and resulting deflections. These values can be used to establish a finite element model of the chest area of a person with PE. So far, a validated technique for the registration between a CT based 3D model of the ribcage and a skin surface scan in case of PE has been addressed. On the basis of the data gathered from 10 subjects with normal chests using a robot arm, stylus and 3D laser scanner, we tried to evaluate the influence of inter-measurement respiration of a subject on results accuracy and the possibility of using the stylus for deflection measurement. In addition, we established the best strategy for taking measurements.

  6. The effect of simulated hamstring shortening on gait in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, C L; Hillman, S J; Richardson, A M; Hazlewood, M E; Robb, J E

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of simulated hamstring shortening on gait in normal subjects. Six normal subjects wore an adjustable brace to simulate three different hamstring lengths. Evaluation of the physiological cost index (PCI) and gait analysis revealed that simulated hamstring shortening produced adverse affects in the gait of normal subjects. Significant effects were only observed when the popliteal angle exceeded 85 degrees (p<0.001) and included increased effort of walking (PCI), decreased speed, stride and step length; decreased hip flexion and increased knee flexion in stance, increased posterior pelvic tilt, decreased pelvic obliquity and rotation and premature ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion in stance. These results emphasise the need to consider the effects of changing the length of the hamstrings on joints other than the hip and knee when assessing patients for hamstring lengthening.

  7. What processing is impaired in apperceptive agnosia? Evidence from normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vecera, S P; Gilds, K S

    1998-09-01

    Visual agnosia is a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by a failure of object identification. Apperceptive agnosia, an object identification deficit caused by damage to early perceptual processes, has been explained by appealing to both damaged early sensory processes and to damaged preattentive grouping processes. Which of these two explanations best accounts for the behavior of these patients? We present results from two experiments designed to distinguish rival theoretical accounts of apperceptive agnosia. In our studies, we attempted to simulate apperceptive agnosia in neurologically intact subjects. Sensory-deficit accounts of the syndrome predict that degrading visual processing would make normal subjects perform like patients; grouping-deficit accounts predict that removing perceptual organization cues from visual displays would make normal subjects perform like patients. We were able to simulate the behavior of an apperceptive agnosic patient by removing perceptual organization cues, consistent with a grouping-deficit account of this syndrome. The implications for understanding both apperceptive agnosia and normal visual functioning are discussed.

  8. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

  9. Relation between rectal sensation and anal function in normal subjects and patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, W M; Read, N W; Miner, P B

    1990-01-01

    The relation between sensory perception of rapid balloon distension of the rectum and the motor responses of the rectum and external and internal anal sphincters in 27 normal subjects and 16 patients with faecal incontinence who had impaired rectal sensation but normal sphincter pressures was studied. In both patients and normal subjects, the onset and duration of rectal sensation correlated closely with the external anal sphincter electrical activity (r = 0.8, p less than 0.0001) and with rectal contraction (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not with internal sphincter relaxation. All normal subjects perceived a rectal sensation within one second of rapid inflation of a rectal balloon with volumes of 20 ml or less air. Six patients did not perceive any rectal sensation until 60 ml had been introduced, while in the remaining nine patients the sensation was delayed by at least two seconds. Internal sphincter relaxation occurred before the sensation was perceived in three of 27 normal subjects and 11 of 16 patients (p less than 0.001), and could be associated with anal leakage, which stopped as soon as sensation was perceived. The lowest rectal volumes required to induce anal relaxation, to cause sustained relaxation, or to elicit sensations of a desire to defecate or pain were similar in patients and normal subjects. In conclusion, these results show the close association between rectal sensation and external anal sphincter contraction, and show that faecal incontinence may occur as a result of delayed or absent external anal sphincter contraction when the internal anal sphincter is relaxed. PMID:2210452

  10. Normalizing the Educated Subject: A Foucaultian Analysis of High-Stakes Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I use concepts from Michel Foucault to analyze the ways in which the high-stakes accountability movement has appropriated the technology of the examination to redefine the educated subject as a normalized case. Partly this has become possible because of the role that educational research has played in laying out the conditions for…

  11. Gallbladder dynamics induced by a fatty meal in normal subjects and patients with gallstones: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Bobba, V R; Krishnamurthy, G T; Kingston, E; Turner, F E; Brown, P H; Langrell, K

    1984-01-01

    A study was undertaken to establish the pattern of gallbladder emptying in normal subjects and in patients with gallstones, using a fatty meal as stimulus to release endogenous cholecystokinin. The time from meal ingestion to beginning of gallbladder emptying (latent period), the total duration of emptying (ejection period), degree of emptying (ejection fraction), and the rate of emptying (ejection fraction/ejection period) were measured noninvasively by a nongeometric scintigraphic technique. The mean latent period and ejection rate were similar in normal subjects and patients with gallstones, but the mean ejection period and ejection fraction were significantly reduced in the patients. This study suggests that for an identical stimulus, the gallbladder in cholelithiasis begins to empty at the normal time but empties for a shorter duration; the result is a reduction of ejection fraction but not of ejection rate.

  12. α-Synuclein in the colon and premotor markers of Parkinson disease in neurologically normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, In-Seok; Park, Hyung-Eun; Kim, Su-Young; Yun, Jung A; Jung, Chan Kwon; Sung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jin-Kwon; Kang, Won-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Extranigral non-motor signs precede the first motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease by many years in some patients. The presence of α-synuclein deposition within colon tissues in patients with Parkinson's disease can aid in identifying early neuropathological changes prior to disease onset. In the present study, we evaluated the roles of non-motor symptoms and signs and imaging biomarkers of nigral neuronal changes and α-synuclein accumulation in the colon. Twelve subjects undergoing colectomy for primary colon cancer were recruited for this study. Immunohistochemical staining for α-synuclein in normal and phosphorylated forms was performed in normally appearing colonic tissue. We evaluated 16 candidate premotor risk factors in this study cohort. Among them, ten subjects showed positive immunostaining with normal- and phosphorylated-α-synuclein. An accumulation of premotor markers in each subject was accompanied with positive normal- and phosphorylated-α-synuclein immunostaining, ranging from 2 to 7 markers per subject, whereas the absence of Lewy bodies in the colon was associated with relative low numbers of premotor signs. A principal component analysis and a cluster analysis of these premotor markers suggest that urinary symptoms were commonly clustered with deposition of peripheral phosphorylated-α-synuclein. Among other premotor marker, color vision abnormalities were related to non-smoking. This mathematical approach confirmed the clustering of premotor markers in preclinical stage of Parkinson's disease. This is the first report showing that α-synuclein in the colon and other premotor markers are related to each other in neurologically normal subjects.

  13. Low normal CSF Aβ42 levels predict clinical progression in non-demented subjects.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Bertens, Daniela; Slot, Rosalinde E; Gouw, Alida A; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2017-03-20

    We studied whether continuous lower normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid β 1-42 (≥640 pg/ml) levels related with rate of clinical progression in a sample of 393 non-demented memory clinic patients. Lower normal levels were associated with faster clinical progression and this depended on baseline cognitive status (subjective cognitive decline: HR = 0.59, p <.05; mild cognitive impairment: HR=0.12, p <.001), indicating that normal CSF amyloid levels do not exclude incident Alzheimer's disease. These findings suggest that research on preclinical markers for Alzheimer's disease should take the continuum of CSF amyloid β 1-42 levels within the normal range into account. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Side-to-side differences of three-dimensional knee kinematics during walking by normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Takumi; Ohkoshi, Yasumitsu; Maeda, Tatsunori; Kawakami, Kensaku; Suzuki, Shoji; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the normal range of the side-to-side difference in three dimensional knee kinematics measured by the point cluster technique (PCT). [Subjects] The subjects were twenty-one healthy normal volunteers without knee pain or an episode of injury to the legs. [Methods] The subjects were tested bilaterally at a self-selected normal walking speed and six degrees of freedom knee kinematics were measured using the PCT, and the 95% confidence intervals of the average side-to-side differences in flexion-extension (FE), adduction-abduction (AA), internal-external (IE) rotation, and anterior-posterior (AP), medial-lateral (ML), superior-inferior (SI) translation in each stage of the gait cycle were determined. [Results] The average side-to-side differences and their 95% confidence intervals in rotation/translation in each stage of the gait cycle were determined. The side-to-side differences in AA rotation and AP translation of the tibia were significantly larger in the swing phase than in the stance phase. [Conclusion] The side-to-side differences in AA rotation and AP translation were highly dependent on the stage of the gait cycle. Therefore, the normal ranges of the side-to-side differences in knee kinematics in each stage of the gait cycle, in particular AA rotation and AP translation of the tibia, is useful information for evaluating knee kinematics during walking. PMID:26180325

  15. Studies on pyrazinoylguanidine. 7. Effects of single oral doses in normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Vesell, E S; Beyer, K H

    1999-03-01

    In a three-phase study, single oral doses of placebo, followed in 1 week by pyrazinoylguanidine (PZG; 900 mg), followed in 3 weeks by pyrazinoic acid (PZA; 300 mg) were given to 8 normal male subjects. Blood analyses performed 0, 2 and 4 h after administration of placebo or drug revealed that compared to mean 0 h values, PZG and also PZA, but not placebo, decreased mean values for serum glucose, insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides and free fatty acids. In all groups, serum potassium, urea, fibrinogen, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein were unchanged. PZA, but not PZG, increased serum uric acid. PZG significantly reduced very-low-density lipoprotein whereas PZA only tended to do so. PZG was well tolerated and without any side effect, but in 7 of the 8 normal volunteers, PZA produced a variable vasomotor response over the blush area of the face and neck lasting from 30 min in 3 subjects to 4 h in 1 subject. Collectively, these results suggest generally similar metabolic responses of normal subjects to PZG and PZA after only a single oral dose of each. Previously, it was unrecognized that acute administration of PZG and PZA could produce such rapid metabolic changes.

  16. Utility of Normal Findings on Electrocardiogram and Echocardiogram in Subjects ≥65 Years.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sanjay; O'Neal, Wesley T; Broughton, Stephen T; Shah, Amit J; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2017-03-15

    The lack of abnormalities found on noninvasive cardiac testing possibly improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk stratification efforts and conveys reduced risk despite the presence of traditional risk factors. This analysis included 3,805 (95% white and 61% women) participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) without baseline CVD. The combination of a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiogram was assessed for the development of CVD. A normal ECG was defined as the absence of major or minor Minnesota code abnormalities. A normal echocardiogram was defined as the absence of contractile dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities, or abnormal left ventricular mass. Cox regression was used to compute the 10-year risk of developing coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure events. There were 1,555 participants (41%) with normal findings on both measures. After accounting for traditional CVD risk factors, a protective benefit was observed for all outcomes among participants who had normal ECG and echocardiographic findings (coronary heart disease: hazard ratio [HR] 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46, 0.69; stroke: HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43, 0.76; heart failure: HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.29, 0.41). The addition of this normal profile resulted in significant net reclassification improvement of the Framingham risk score for heart failure (net reclassification improvement 4.3%, 95% CI 1.0, 8.0). In conclusion, normal findings on routine noninvasive cardiac assessment identify subjects in whom CVD risk is low.

  17. Changes in oxygen saturation and heart frequency during sleep in young normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, F; Peset, R

    1984-01-01

    Changes in oxygen saturation and heart frequency were measured during sleep in a group of 21 normal subjects (9 women and 12 men) aged 19-25. At the time of the investigation all were non-smokers, they had no respiratory complaints, and indices of lung function (lung volumes, volume-pressure diagram, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide) were within normal limits. In contrast to published data, there were no major changes in oxygen saturation and no differences between men and women. PMID:6474401

  18. Shock wave over hand muscles: a neurophysiological study on peripheral conduction nerves in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Manganotti, Paolo; Amelio, Ernesto; Guerra, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and purpose: shock waves are defined as a sequence of single sonic pulses largely used in the treatment of bone and tendon diseases and recently on muscular hypertonia in stroke patients. Our purpose is to investigate the short and long term effect of extra-corporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the peripheral nerve conduction and central conductions from the treated muscles in normal human subjects in order to define safety criteria. Methods: we studied 10 patients normal subjects. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and F response from right ipothenar eminence (abductor digiti minimi) of the hand was recorded. Furthermore MEP latency and amplitude and central conduction from the same muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation was evaluated. In all subjects each neurophysiological measures were monitored before, immediately after, 15 minutes and after 30 minutes from the active ESWT treatment (1600 shots with an energy applied of 0.030 mj/mm2). Results: no significant short or long term changes were noted in sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction in all the subjects evaluated after ESWT. Conclusions: the ESWT has no effect on sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction. The ESWT using low level of energy represent a safety method for treating the muscles in human subjects without involvement of motor or sensory nervous trunks. Different mechanisms of action of ESWT are discussed. PMID:23738282

  19. [Box and block test of manual dexterity in normal subjects and in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendes, M F; Tilbery, C P; Balsimelli, S; Moreira, M A; Cruz, A M

    2001-12-01

    Recently new disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) were introduced which can change the natural course of the disease. In clinical trials with these new agents the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is often used as a primary outcome instrument to measure neurological impairment and disability. A number of limitations have been identified when using the EDSS, some of wich are because the EDSS is an ordinal scale that is heavily biased to locomotor function. In this study we applied the box and block test of manual dexterity in normal subjects and relapsing-remitting MS patients. The results were that 64.8% of the female and 80.7% of the male patients had significant changes on this task compared with normal subjects, and as this test is easily applied and is sensitive in detecting upper extremity functional ability, we recommend its use in clinical trials to evaluate new drugs in MS patients.

  20. Multifocal pupillary light response fields in normal subjects and patients with visual field defects.

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Kondo, M; Sato, M; Kondo, N; Miyake, Y

    2001-04-01

    The optimal conditions for recording focal pupillary light responses with a multifocal stimulation technique were determined, and the technique was applied to normal subjects and patients with visual field defects. Thirty-seven hexagonal stimuli were presented on a TV monitor with a visual field of 40 degrees diameter under a constant background illumination. Using a slow (4.7 Hz) m-sequence, reliable focal responses were obtained in both normal subjects and patients. The pupillary field and visual field were well correlated in patients with retinal diseases, but the correlation was not strong in patients with optic-nerve diseases. Pupillary light responses were reduced in the blind hemifield in patients with post-geniculate lesions. These results indicate that the multifocal stimulation technique can be used clinically to obtain a pupillary field for objective visual field testing.

  1. High density electromyography data of normally limbed and transradial amputee subjects for multifunction prosthetic control.

    PubMed

    Daley, Heather; Englehart, Kevin; Hargrove, Levi; Kuruganti, Usha

    2012-06-01

    Pattern recognition based control of powered upper limb myoelectric prostheses offers a means of extracting more information from the available muscles than conventional methods. By identifying repeatable patterns of muscle activity across multiple muscle sites rather than relying on independent EMG signals it is possible to provide more natural, reliable control of myoelectric prostheses. The purposes of this study were to (1) determine if participants can perform distinctive muscle activation patterns associated with multiple wrist and hand movements reliably and (2) to show that high density EMG can be applied individually to determine the electrode location of a clinically acceptable number of electrodes (maximally eight) to classify multiple wrist and hand movements reliably in transradial amputees. Eight normally limbed subjects (five female, three male) and four transradial amputee subjects (two traumatic and congenital) subjects participated in this study, which examined the classification accuracies of a pattern recognition control system. It was found that tasks could be classified with high accuracy (85-98%) with normally limbed subjects (10-13 tasks) and with amputees (4-6) tasks. In healthy subjects, reducing the number of electrodes to eight did not affect accuracy significantly when those electrodes were optimally placed, but did reduce accuracy significantly when those electrodes were distributed evenly. In the amputee subjects, reducing the number of electrodes up to 4 did not affect classification accuracy or the number of tasks with high accuracy, independent of whether those remaining electrodes were evenly distributed or optimally placed. The findings in healthy subjects suggest that high density EMG testing is a useful tool to identify optimal electrode sites for pattern recognition control, but its use in amputees still has to be proven. Instead of just identifying the electrode sites where EMG activity is strong, clinicians will be able to

  2. Psychoacoustic Characteristics of Tinnitus versus Temporal Resolution in Subjects with Normal Hearing Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Ola Abdallah; Hassaan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cochlear or neural mechanisms of tinnitus generation may affect auditory temporal resolution in tinnitus patients even with normal audiometry. Thus, studying the correlation between tinnitus characteristics and auditory temporal resolution in subjects with tinnitus may help in proper modification of tinnitus management strategy. Objective This study aims to examine the relationship between the psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus and the auditory temporal resolution in subjects with normal audiometry. Methods Two normal hearing groups with ages ranging from 20 to 45 years were involved: control group of 15 adults (30 ears) without tinnitus and study group of 15 adults (24 ears) with tinnitus. Subjective scaling of annoyance and sleep disturbance caused by tinnitus, basic audiological evaluation, tinnitus psychoacoustic measures and Gaps in Noise test were performed. Data from both groups were compared using independent sample t-test. Psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus and Gaps in Noise test parameters of the tinnitus group were correlated with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Significantly higher hearing threshold, higher approximate threshold and lower correct Gaps in Noise scores were observed in tinnitus ears. There was no significant correlation between psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus and Gaps in Noise test parameters of the tinnitus group. Conclusion Auditory temporal resolution impairment was found in tinnitus patients, which could be attributed to cochlear impairment or altered neural firing within the auditory pathway. It is recommended to include temporal resolution testing in the tinnitus evaluation battery to provide a proper management planning. PMID:28382121

  3. Temperature and humidity modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Amirav, I; Plit, M

    1989-11-01

    The airway response to inhaled histamine is known to be influenced by various stimuli (e.g., infection, ozone). Temperature (T) has been shown to affect it in vitro. We studied whether T and humidity (H) modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects. Twelve normal subjects 21 to 46 yr of age (mean age, 29 yr) performed two similar histamine inhalation tests, the only difference being the conditions of the inspired air. One test was done while breathing cold dry air (mean T +/- SEM, -17.3 +/- 1.8 degrees C; relative H, 0%), and the other while breathing warm humid air (mean T +/- SEM, 33.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C; relative H, 100%). Whereas the geometric mean histamine concentration required to produce a 15% fall in FEV1 in the warm humid tests was 22.7 mg/ml, it was 11.9 mg/ml in the cold dry test (p less than 0.01). It is concluded that the T and H of inspired air modify the airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

  4. Observations on the mechanisms of glucosuria during glucose loads in normal and nondiabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    McPhaul, John J.; Simonaitis, John J.

    1968-01-01

    The study of 14 normal young men by glucose titration procedures has defined the magnitude of splay in this population, differing from previously reported data in its unexpected deviation from the line of theoretic unity high on the titration curve. Compared to these normal subjects, a group of glucosuric men could be divided into two subclasses, those with normal maximal rate of glucose reabsorption (TmG) and those with subnormal TmG, both with comparably abnormal splay. Most consistent glucosurics fall into the latter group. Nephritic patients studied were not such a homogeneous group in terms of age and sex, but did manifest an abnormal splay during their titration curves in most cases. They also demonstrated a greater than normal reabsorptive rate of glucose per unit measured glomerular filtration rate. It is concluded that renal glucosuria must be defined not only in terms of the concept of TmG but also by deviation of the glucose titration curve expressing an unusual degree of splay. The latter is presumed, as has been suggested by others, to be a characteristic of nonhomogeneity of glucose handling units in the kidney. This seems subject to exaggeration in the adaptations which accompany chronic renal disease. PMID:5641612

  5. The LONFLIT4-VENORUTON study: a randomized trial prophylaxis of flight-edema in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Geroulakos, George; Acerbi, Giovanni; Candiani, Carlo; Griffin, Maura; Bavera, Peter; Dugall, Mark; Brandolini, Rossella; Di Renzo, Andrea; Ricci, Andrea; Ippolito, Edmondo; Winford, Michelle; Golden, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of Venoruton on the development of flight edema in normal subjects travelling in economy in long-haul flights (8-9 hours). Edema is a relevant aspect of long-haul flights affecting both venous patients and normal subjects. Edema and flight microangiopathy were studied in a group of 164 subjects randomized (after informed consent) into two groups to evaluate prophylaxis in 8- to 9-hour flights. The treatment group received Venoruton (hydroxyethyl rutosides) 1 g twice daily for 3 days (2 days before the flight and the day of the flight). The control group received comparable placebo. Edema was evaluated with a composite edema score based on the edema tester, on the measurements of ankle circumference, volume measurements, subjective swelling, and on a discomfort score. Items 1, 4, and 5 are based on an analogue scale line (1 to 10) directly defined by the subjects before and after the flights. Of the included subjects, 151 completed the study. Dropouts were due to poor compliance, travelling, or connection problems. Age and gender distribution were comparable in the two groups as were risk factor distributions. The level of edema at inclusion was comparable in the two groups of subjects. After the flight there was an average score of 6.7 (SD 1.7) in the control group, while in the Venoruton group the score was on average 3 (SD 1.1) (p < 0.05). In the control group 77% of the subjects had an evident increase in ankle circumference and volume, which was clearly visible at inspection and associated with discomfort. In the Venoruton group, edema was clearly present only in 8% of subjects (associated with discomfort rated between 3 and 6 on the analogue scale line) and it was mild, not associated with symptoms. Therefore the control of flight edema with Venoruton was clear both considering parametric data (circumference and volume) and non-parametric (analogue scale lines) measurements. The combined evaluation of the edema score

  6. Stimulus and site specific induction of hiccups in the oesophagus of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fass, R; Higa, L; Kodner, A; Mayer, E

    1997-01-01

    Background—Hiccups that are induced by a large meal have been suggested to result from gastric overdistension. The role of the oesophagus in precipitating hiccups has never been defined. 
Aims—To determine the involvement of oesophageal mechanoreceptors in the hiccup reflex. 
Methods—Ten normal healthy subjects were prospectively evaluated at a university affiliated hospital. Controlled inflation of a polyethylene bag in the proximal and distal oesophagus was carried out using slow ramp and rapid phasic distensions, by an electronic distension device. 
Results—Hiccups were induced in four subjects only during rapid phasic distensions and only in the proximal oesophagus. The mean (SEM) minimal volume threshold for the hiccup reflex was 32.5 (4.8) ml, which was above the perception threshold. Hiccups appeared during inflation and resolved after deflation. 
Conclusions—Sudden rapid stretch of the mechanoreceptors in the proximal oesophagus can trigger the hiccup reflex in normal subjects. Only rapid distensions above a determined volume threshold will predictably induce hiccups in a given subject. This mechanism may play a role in the physiological induction of hiccups. 

 Keywords: hiccups; oesophageal mechanoreceptors; electronic distension device; phasic distension; ramp distension; perception thresholds PMID:9414962

  7. Lung sound intensity in patients with emphysema and in normal subjects at standardised airflows.

    PubMed Central

    Schreur, H J; Sterk, P J; Vanderschoot, J; van Klink, H C; van Vollenhoven, E; Dijkman, J H

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A common auscultatory finding in pulmonary emphysema is a reduction of lung sounds. This might be due to a reduction in the generation of sounds due to the accompanying airflow limitation or to poor transmission of sounds due to destruction of parenchyma. Lung sound intensity was investigated in normal and emphysematous subjects in relation to airflow. METHODS: Eight normal men (45-63 years, FEV1 79-126% predicted) and nine men with severe emphysema (50-70 years, FEV1 14-63% predicted) participated in the study. Emphysema was diagnosed according to pulmonary history, results of lung function tests, and radiographic criteria. All subjects underwent phonopneumography during standardised breathing manoeuvres between 0.5 and 2 1 below total lung capacity with inspiratory and expiratory target airflows of 2 and 1 l/s respectively during 50 seconds. The synchronous measurements included airflow at the mouth and lung volume changes, and lung sounds at four locations on the right chest wall. For each microphone airflow dependent power spectra were computed by using fast Fourier transformation. Lung sound intensity was expressed as log power (in dB) at 200 Hz at inspiratory flow rates of 1 and 2 l/s and at an expiratory flow rate of 1 l/s. RESULTS: Lung sound intensity was well repeatable on two separate days, the intraclass correlation coefficient ranging from 0.77 to 0.94 between the four microphones. The intensity was strongly influenced by microphone location and airflow. There was, however, no significant difference in lung sound intensity at any flow rate between the normal and the emphysema group. CONCLUSION: Airflow standardised lung sound intensity does not differ between normal and emphysematous subjects. This suggests that the auscultatory finding of diminished breath sounds during the regular physical examination in patients with emphysema is due predominantly to airflow limitation. Images PMID:1440459

  8. High fluid intake increases urine free cortisol excretion in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Mericq, M V; Cutler, G B

    1998-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased fluid intake increases the urine free cortisol, we prescribed 5 liters of fluid intake per day or a normal fluid intake according to a randomized cross-over design in six normal volunteers. Each period lasted 5 days, with a 2-day washout period of normal fluid intake between the two periods. Urine free cortisol, 17-hydroxycorticosteroids, and creatinine were measured daily during each study period, and the average value over each 5-day period was calculated for each subject. High fluid intake caused a significant increase in the mean urine free cortisol [126 +/- 33 (SD) vs. 77 +/- 18 micrograms/day, P < 0.005]. The frequency of urine free cortisol results that exceeded the upper normal limit of 95 micrograms/day was also much higher during high fluid intake (23/30 vs. 6/30, P < 0.005). By contrast, urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (high fluid vs. normal fluid: 5.3 +/- 1.5 vs. 5.0 +/- 1.7 mg/day, respectively, P = not significant) and urine creatinine (1.51 +/- 0.48 vs. 1.45 +/- 0.37 g/day, P = not significant) did not differ between the two study periods. We conclude that high fluid intake (5 liters/day) increases free cortisol excretion without an increase in urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroids. Thus, mild to moderate increases in urine cortisol excretion may not indicate hypercortisolism in individuals who have a high fluid intake and urine volume.

  9. Normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during Thoracic Slump Test (ST) in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ketaki C; Eapen, Charu; Kumar, Senthil P

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during the movement components of Thoracic Slump Test (Thoracic ST) in asymptomatic subjects. Sixty asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Thoracic ST was performed in two sequences, proximal initiation, which was proximal to distal and distal initiation, which was distal to proximal. Subjects were randomized into four groups depending on the order of sequences and sides. Outcome measures of sensory responses (intensity, type, and location) and ROM responses were recorded after each sequence. Friedman's test was done to compare between sensory responses of the subjects. Between-component comparison for prevalence of sensory responses within each sequence was done using Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxonsigned ranks test was used for between-component comparisons of intensity of symptoms within each sequence of testing. Independent t test was used to assess the ROM responses. Results show the prevalence of sensory responses, its nature, area and intensity. These sensory and ROM responses may be considered as normal response of Thoracic ST. The intensity of the symptoms of proximal initiation sequence (1.09±1.35 cm) was significant (P<0.05) when compared to distal initiation sequence (0.08±1.26 cm). The change in the ROM was significant (P<0.05) for distal initiation (7.55±4.51 degrees) when compared to proximal initiation (4.96±3.76 degrees). These normal responses may be used as a reference when using the Thoracic ST as an assessment technique.

  10. Association of Waist Circumference and Body Fat Weight with Insulin Resistance in Male Subjects with Normal Body Mass Index and Normal Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryoma; Yano, Yutaka; Yasuma, Taro; Onishi, Yuki; Suzuki, Toshinari; Maruyama-Furuta, Noriko; Gabazza, Esteban C; Sumida, Yasuhiro; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the relationship of the waist circumference (WC) and body fat weight (BF) with insulin resistance in subjects with normal body mass index (BMI) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during a routine medical check-up. Methods We categorized 167 male subjects in three groups as follows: a group with normal BMI but high WC (normal-BMI/high-WC group; 22≤BMI<25 kg/m(2), waist ≥85 cm; n=31), a group with normal BMI and normal WC (normal-BMI/normal-WC group, waist <85 cm; n=68), and a group with low normal BMI and normal WC (low normal-BMI/normal-WC group; 18.5≤BMI<22 kg/m(2) and waist<85 cm; n=68). We measured the plasma glucose and serum insulin levels before glucose loading and after 30 and 120 minutes and calculated several indexes of insulin secretion and sensitivity. Results Subjects from the normal-BMI/high-WC group showed significantly decreased Matsuda index and increased homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) compared with normal-BMI/normal-WC group. Univariate regression analyses showed significant correlation of HOMA-IR with WC (r=0.39) and BF (r=0.37). Matsuda index was significantly correlated with WC (r=-0.39) and BF (r=-0.47). The multiple regression analysis showed that the BF is significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (p<0.05) and Masuda index (p<0.005) among the clinical variables and with HOMA-IR (p<0.05) and Masuda index (p<0.0001) among the anthropometric variables but not with WC in either analysis. Conclusion Decreased Matsuda index and increased HOMA-IR were observed in subjects from the normal-BMI/high-WC group. Multivariate analysis showed that BF is associated with decreased Matsuda index and increased HOMA-IR and that WC is not associated with either factors.

  11. Frequency of Sinus Disease in Normal Subjects and Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, H.S.; Stewart, M.G.; Brissett, A.E.; Olson, K.L.; Takashima, M.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine if patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) have a higher frequency of rhinosinusitis than people with normal vestibular function. Methods The subjects were 52 patients with BPPV and 46 normal people. Every subject had a sinus CT scan, a blood draw for IgE and a rhinologic examination by an otolaryngologist. Results The frequency of rhinosinusitis based on physician diagnosis was 49% and based on CT scan findings 59%. This difference approached significance (p = 0.08). The observed frequency of rhinosinusitis was higher than predicted by survey data about the southern US region. The data trended toward higher prevalence of rhinosinusitis (by physician diagnosis) in the BPPV patients versus controls (58 vs. 39%, p = 0.06). Conclusion BPPV patients have a higher frequency of sinus disease compared to people with normal vestibular systems, perhaps due to age differences, but physiologic factors may also be involved. The higher frequency of rhinosinusitis in this geographical area than reported rates based on survey data raises concerns about the usefulness of questionnaire data for estimating population prevalence. PMID:20424495

  12. Classifying depression patients and normal subjects using machine learning techniques and nonlinear features from EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Hosseinifard, Behshad; Moradi, Mohammad Hassan; Rostami, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosing depression in the early curable stages is very important and may even save the life of a patient. In this paper, we study nonlinear analysis of EEG signal for discriminating depression patients and normal controls. Forty-five unmedicated depressed patients and 45 normal subjects were participated in this study. Power of four EEG bands and four nonlinear features including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), higuchi fractal, correlation dimension and lyapunov exponent were extracted from EEG signal. For discriminating the two groups, k-nearest neighbor, linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression as the classifiers are then used. Highest classification accuracy of 83.3% is obtained by correlation dimension and LR classifier among other nonlinear features. For further improvement, all nonlinear features are combined and applied to classifiers. A classification accuracy of 90% is achieved by all nonlinear features and LR classifier. In all experiments, genetic algorithm is employed to select the most important features. The proposed technique is compared and contrasted with the other reported methods and it is demonstrated that by combining nonlinear features, the performance is enhanced. This study shows that nonlinear analysis of EEG can be a useful method for discriminating depressed patients and normal subjects. It is suggested that this analysis may be a complementary tool to help psychiatrists for diagnosing depressed patients.

  13. Effect of inspiratory flow rate on bronchomotor tone in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Hida, W; Arai, M; Shindoh, C; Liu, Y N; Sasaki, H; Takishima, T

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the inspiratory flow rate during deep inspiration on the regulation of bronchomotor tone was studied in nine normal and 22 asthmatic subjects. Changes in bronchial tone were assessed by respiratory resistance measured by an oscillation method. In normal subjects with bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine a rapid deep inspiration reduced respiratory resistance more than a slow deep inspiration. Asthmatic subjects with spontaneous airway narrowing showed an increase in respiratory resistance after deep inspiration that was greater after rapid than after slow deep inspiration. On the other hand, in asthmatics with methacholine induced bronchoconstriction, bronchodilatation occurred after deep inspiration and this was also greater after rapid than after slow deep inspiration. Lignocaine inhalation attenuated both bronchoconstriction and bronchodilatation induced by both slow and rapid deep inspiration. These results suggest that the effects of deep inspiration are mediated at least in part via receptors in the airways. It is suggested that in asthmatic patients with spontaneous bronchoconstriction irritant receptor activity will be increased in proportion to the speed of inspiration. After methacholine induced bronchoconstriction stretch receptor activity is likely to behave in a similar fashion, leading to an opposite effect. PMID:6367130

  14. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of cefotetan in normal subjects and patients with impaired renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, M; Hirano, S; Tokunaga, S; Motoi, I; Shoda, R; Ikeda, A; Sugata, T; Sawaki, M; Shimamura, M; Okasho, A; Kuroda, K

    1983-01-01

    The elimination kinetics of cefotetan (YM09330), a new parenteral semisynthetic cephamycin derivative, were studied in eight healthy volunteers and 41 patients with renal insufficiency after the administration of a single 500-mg dose intravenously. Concentrations of cefotetan in serum and urine were determined by both bioassay and high-pressure liquid chromatography. The pharmacokinetic parameters for cefotetan were calculated on the basis of a two-compartment open model. Serum concentrations of cefotetan immediately after administration were approximately 180 micrograms/ml in all subjects regardless of function; however, serum concentrations during the beta-phase increased directly with the degree of renal impairment. The mean serum half-life during the beta-phase was 3.0 h in normal subjects as compared with 13.1 h in hemodialysis patients. There was a linear correlation (P less than 0.0001) between the elimination rate constant of cefotetan and creatinine clearance. The mean cumulative urinary recovery of cefotetan in the 24-h urine was 83.3% of the administered dose in normal subjects and decreased with reduced renal function. PMID:6572490

  16. CD36 haplotypes are associated with lipid profile in normal-weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is a common metabolic disorder that may result from abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles. Disorders of lipoprotein concentrations and elevated concentration of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) are risk factors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). CD36 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and polymorphisms in the CD36 gene are related to cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between genotypes and haplotypes of five polymorphisms in the CD36 gene with lipid levels in young normal-weight subjects. Methods A total of 232 unrelated subjects with normal-weight of 18 to 25 years old (157 women and 75 men) were randomly selected. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Genotyping of the polymorphisms -33137A/G (rs1984112), -31118G/A (rs1761667), -22674 T/C (rs2151916), 27645 Ins/Del (rs3840546) and 30294G/C (rs1049673) in the CD36 receptor gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism, linkage disequilibrium analysis among the five polymorphisms and an analysis of haplotype were estimated. Results HDL-C levels was lower in men than in women (P = 0.03). However, the median oxLDL levels in men was higher than in women (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C and glucose (P > 0.05). HDL-C levels were lower in the subjects with TC genotype of polymorphism -22674 T/C (P = 0.04), but the carriers of TT genotype had lower oxLDL levels (P = 0.01). LDL-C levels were higher in young carriers of CC genotype for 30294G/C polymorphism than non-carriers (P = 0.03). The subjects carrying the AATDC haplotype had 3.2 times presumably higher risk of LDL-C > 100 mg/dL than the carrying the AGTIG haplotype (P = 0.02), whereas the subjects carrying the AATIC haplotype had 2.0 times presumably

  17. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and ''y'' intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3. Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (31.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM (90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml) returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA.

  18. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 micro Ci/microgram and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and y intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3 Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (32.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM (90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml) returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA.

  19. Thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) metabolism in normal subjects from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, B A; Rosenthal, D

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic studies of T4 and T3 metabolism were performed on 5 healthy volunteers from Rio de Janeiro to obtain normal values for thyroid hormone metabolism. 125I-T4 and 131I-T3 were administered in bolus and blood samples taken during 7 days. Circulating tracers were isolated by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. The kinetic parameters of T4 and T3 metabolism were calculated by noncompartmental methods. Metabolic clearance rates were 1.04 l/day for T4 and 20.7 l/day for T3. The daily production rate was estimated at 94 micrograms/day for T4 and 23 micrograms/day for T3 and their exchangeable pools at 914 micrograms and 25.5 micrograms, respectively. These values are well within the range of those reported by North American or European authors for normal subjects.

  20. Brain parenchymal density measurements by CT in demented subjects and normal controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, M.; Danziger, W.L.; Chi, D.; Hughes, C.P.; Coben, L.A.

    1983-06-01

    Parachymal density measurements of 14 regions of gray and white matter from each cerebral hemisphere were made from CT scans of 25 subjects who had varying degrees of dementia as measured by a global Clinical Dementia Rating, and also from CT scans of 33 normal control subjects. There were few significant differences between the two groups in the mean density value for each of the regions examined, although several individual psychometric tests did correlate with density changes. Moreover, for six regions in the cerebral cortex, and for one region in the thalamus of each hemisphere, we found no significant correlation between the gray-white matter density difference and dementia. There was, however, a loss of the discriminability between the gray and white matter with an increase in the size of the ventricles. These findings may be attributed to the loss of white matter volume.

  1. Breathing rates and heart rate spectrograms regarding body position in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Avbelj, Viktor; Kalisnik, Jurij-Matija; Trobec, Roman; Gersak, Borut

    2003-05-01

    The right lateral body position has been proposed as an effective vagal enhancer. However, the possibility of breathing affecting heart rate power spectra in different body positions has not been assessed. The level of vagal modulation in various body positions in normal subjects was estimated by calculating heart rate power spectra. The results suggest that the levels of vagal modulation do not necessarily reflect a change due to assuming different body position, but might be the consequence of changed breathing patterns. Before adopting the right lateral body position as vagal enhancing, the contribution of varying breathing pattern should be eliminated.

  2. [Study of diaphragmatic muscle function during abdominal weight in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Sergio G; Pessolano, Fernando A; Suárez, Adrián A; De Vito, Eduardo L

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the abdominal weight with the intention of producing training of the diaphragm, have not been sufficiently evaluated. We studied the function of the diaphragm during the abdominal weight training and during associated changes in the respiratory pattern. Six normal volunteers were studied. Flow at the mouth at functional residual capacity (FRC) was obtained as well as gastric pressure (Pga), esophageal pressure (Pes), thoracic and abdominal movements, maximal inspiratory pressure and mean and maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi and Pdi max). Pdi/Pdimax and the diaphragm tension-time index (TTdi) were calculated. Studied steps: normal pattern (NP), abdominal pattern (AP) and weight of 1, 2, 4 and 6 kg with NP and AP as well. We found 1) The AP was facilitated by the abdominal weight, 2) Only with 6 kg (NP and AP) the Pga at FRC increased significantly (p 0.001), 3) the Pdi followed the variations of the Pga and increased with all the AP (p < 0.001), 4) The index TTdi load reached a value of 0.05 ± 0.02 (p < 0.001). The charges did not increase this rate more than did the AP alone. Our findings suggest abdominal weight increases propioception related to the respiratory movements and descent of the diaphragm. The loads on the abdomen produce minor changes in mechanics of the diaphragm (1/3 of the load required to develop fatigue in normal subjects). Al least in normal subjects these changes appear to be insufficient to produce respiratory muscle training.

  3. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  4. The Relationship of the Clinical Disc Margin and Bruch's Membrane Opening in Normal and Glaucoma Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Navid; Miraftabi, Arezoo; Henry, Sharon; Chung, Norman; Nowroozizadeh, Sarah; Caprioli, Joseph; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypotheses that the mismatch between the clinical disc margin (CDM) and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) is a function of BMO area (BMOA) and is affected by the presence of glaucoma. Methods A total of 45 normal eyes (45 subjects) and 53 glaucomatous eyes (53 patients) were enrolled and underwent radial optic nerve head (ONH) imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The inner tip of the Bruch's membrane (BM) and the clinical disc margin were marked on radial scans and optic disc photographs, and were coregistered with custom software. The main outcome measure was the difference between the clinical disc area (CDA) and BMOA, or CDA−BMOA mismatch, as a function of BMOA and diagnosis. Multivariate regression analyses were used to explore the influence of glaucoma and BMOA on the mismatch. Results Global CDA was larger than BMOA in both groups but the difference was statistically significant only in the normal group (1.98 ± 0.37 vs. 1.85 ± 0.45 mm2, P = 0.02 in the normal group; 1.96 ± 0.38 vs. 1.89 ± 0.56 mm2, P = 0.08 in the glaucoma group). The sectoral CDA−BMOA mismatch was smaller in superotemporal (P = 0.04) and superonasal (P = 0.05) sectors in the glaucoma group. The normalized CDA−BMOA difference decreased with increasing BMOA in both groups (P < 0.001). Presence or severity of glaucoma did not affect the CDA−BMOA difference (P > 0.14). Conclusions Clinical disc area was larger than BMOA in normal and glaucoma eyes but reached statistical significance only in the former group. The CDA−BMOA mismatch diminished with increasing BMOA but was not affected by presence of glaucoma. These findings have important clinical implications regarding clinical evaluation of the ONH. PMID:27031840

  5. Recovery of PdiTwitch following the induction of diaphragm fatigue in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Travaline, J M; Sudarshan, S; Criner, G J

    1997-11-01

    Low frequency diaphragm fatigue (LFF) may play a major role in the pathogenesis of ventilatory failure; however, recovery from LFF is not well studied. We measured transdiaphragmatic twitch pressure (PdiT) at FRC (using a reduction of PdiT as an index of LFF) and maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdimax) before and after the induction of diaphragm fatigue in seven normal subjects, age 31 +/- 3 yr (mean +/- SD). Fatigue was induced by breathing through an inspiratory resistive load. PdiT produced by bilateral transcutaneous supramaximal electrophrenic stimulation was measured at baseline, 15, 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4 h, and then 1 to 3 times between hour 20-25 post-fatigue. Pdimax estimated by twitch occlusion was measured at baseline, 30 min, 2-3, and 20-25 h post-fatigue. Pre-fatigue values (mean +/- SE) were: PdiT 23.6 +/- 2.5 cm H2O. The mean +/- SD time to fatigue was 25.3 +/- 12.3 min. Post-fatigue PdiT was reduced to 50%, and by 3 h was 72% of the initial value; 100% by 25 h. Pdimax was reduced to 75% post-fatigue, but recovered to 87% by 3 h, and 100% by 25 h. We concluded that recovery of PdiT and Pdimax in normal subjects starts to occur within the first few hours following diaphragm fatigue, and is complete by 25 h.

  6. Colour vision in normal subjects tested by the colour arrangement test 'Roth 28-hue desaturated'.

    PubMed

    Erb, C; Adler, M; Stübiger, N; Wohlrab, M; Zrenner, E; Thiel, H J

    1998-11-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain normal values for the colour-arrangement test, Roth 28-hue desaturated. In 146 healthy non-smokers colour vision was tested monocularly. The subjects were divided into four age groups: 0-19, 20-39, 40-59, and 60-79 years. The overall error score for all groups was 54 +/- 24 (median +/- mean absolute deviation). The values for the 20-39 year group were significantly lower than those for the other groups (Kruskal-Wallis: P < 0.0001 with subsequent multiple Mann-Whitney test). An increasing predominance of errors along the blue-yellow-axis was observed with increasing age. The error scores of normal subjects tested by the Roth 28-hue desaturated were comparable with those on the well-known Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue (FM-100). Because the Roth 28-hue desaturated is shorter and simpler to administer, it is an alternative to the FM-100 in situations that need to assess colour discrimination and error axis quantitatively and quickly.

  7. Association of Mild Kidney Dysfunction with Silent Brain Lesions in Neurologically Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Genya; Bokura, Hirokazu; Mitaki, Shingo; Onoda, Keiichi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been closely associated with stroke. Although a large number of studies reported the relationship between CKD and different types of asymptomatic brain lesions, few comprehensive analyses have been performed for all types of silent brain lesions. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study involving 1,937 neurologically normal subjects (mean age 59.4 years). Mild CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 30 and 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or positive proteinuria. Results The prevalence of mild CKD was 8.7%. Univariate analysis revealed an association between CKD and all silent brain lesions, including silent brain infarction, periventricular hyperintensity, subcortical white matter lesion, and microbleeds, in addition to hypertension and diabetes mellitus after adjusting for age and sex. In binary logistic regression analysis, the presence of CKD was a significant risk factor for all types of silent brain lesions, independent of other risk factors. Conclusions These results suggest that mild CKD is independently associated with all types of silent brain lesions, even in neurologically normal subjects. PMID:25873927

  8. Salivary composition in obese vs normal-weight subjects: towards a role in postprandial lipid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Vors, C; Drai, J; Gabert, L; Pineau, G; Laville, M; Vidal, H; Guichard, E; Michalski, M-C; Feron, G

    2015-09-01

    In the pathophysiological context of obesity, oral exposure to dietary fat can modulate lipid digestion and absorption, but underlying in-mouth mechanisms have not been clearly identified. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that salivary components related to dietary fat sensitivity would differ according to body mass index (BMI) and postprandial lipid metabolism in young men. Saliva was collected from nine normal-weight (BMI=22.3±0.5 kg m(-2)) and nine non-morbid obese (BMI=31.7±0.3 kg m(-2)) men before an 8-h postprandial metabolic exploration test involving the consumption of a 40-g fat meal, in which obese subjects revealed a delayed postprandial lipid metabolism. Nine salivary characteristics (flow, protein content, lipolysis, amylase, proteolysis, total antioxidant status, lysozyme, lipocalin 1 and carbonic anhydrase-VI) were investigated. We show that, under fasting conditions, salivary lipolysis was lower in obese vs normal-weight subjects, whereas proteolysis and carbonic anhydrase VI were higher. We reveal through multivariate and Mann-Whitney analysis that differences in fasting salivary lipolysis and proteolysis between both groups are related to differences in postprandial lipid metabolism including exogenous fatty-acid absorption and β-oxidation. These results suggest a potential role of salivary composition on postprandial lipid metabolism and bring novel causal hypotheses on the links between salivary composition, sensitivity to dietary fat oral income and postprandial lipid metabolism according to BMI.

  9. The effect of Stokes shift in the discrimination of urine of cervical cancer from normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Stokes shift spectroscopy has been considered as a potential tool in characterization of multiple components present in tissues and biofluids. Since, the intensity and resolution of the fluorophores depends on the Stokes shift, different opinion has been reflected by the researchers in fixing the Stokes shift. Also, not many studies have been reported on the characterization of biofluids and especially on the diagnosis of cancer. Urine is considered as an important diagnostic biofluid as it is rich in many metabolites where many of them are native fluorophores. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the urine of normal subjects and patients with cervical cancer as function of different Stokes shift. It is observed that Neopterin and Riboflavin are the main fluorophores contribute to the variation between normal and cervical cancer subjects. Ratio variables based linear discriminant analysis shows that the Stokes shift of 40 nm and 60 nm may be considered for better characterization with better signal to noise ratio when compared to others.

  10. Gastro-oesophageal function in normal subjects after oral administration of ranitidine.

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, L; Madsen, T; Boesby, S

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate gastro-oesophageal function in normal subjects after oral administration of 150 mg ranitidine as a single dose. The study was designed as a double blind crossover investigation. Ten healthy men, aged 26-49 years (median 29 years) joined the study. A series of oesophageal function tests were performed, starting 90 minutes after oral intake of ranitidine or placebo. Gastro-oesophageal sphincter pressure was measured using a perfused catheter system and a continuous pull-through technique. No changes in sphincter pressure could be demonstrated. Peristaltic amplitude in the body of the oesophagus as well as the duration and velocity of the peristalsis were measured after wet swallows (bolus 5 ml of water). We found no changes in these variables. Intragastric pH was measured and was higher after ranitidine than after placebo (p less than 0.005). Plasma ranitidine concentration did not correlate with intragastric pH. No effect of ranitidine could be demonstrated on the results of a standard acid clearing test. It is concluded that ranitidine, given orally in sufficient doses to suppress gastric acid secretion, does not influence gastro-oesophageal sphincter pressure or peristaltic activity in the oesophagus of normal subjects. PMID:6133814

  11. Estimation of cortical magnification from positional error in normally sighted and amblyopic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zahra; Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Besle, Julien; Webb, Ben S.; Barrett, Brendan T.; McGraw, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for deriving the linear cortical magnification factor from positional error across the visual field. We compared magnification obtained from this method between normally sighted individuals and amblyopic individuals, who receive atypical visual input during development. The cortical magnification factor was derived for each subject from positional error at 32 locations in the visual field, using an established model of conformal mapping between retinal and cortical coordinates. Magnification of the normally sighted group matched estimates from previous physiological and neuroimaging studies in humans, confirming the validity of the approach. The estimate of magnification for the amblyopic group was significantly lower than the normal group: by 4.4 mm deg−1 at 1° eccentricity, assuming a constant scaling factor for both groups. These estimates, if correct, suggest a role for early visual experience in establishing retinotopic mapping in cortex. We discuss the implications of altered cortical magnification for cortical size, and consider other neural changes that may account for the amblyopic results. PMID:25761341

  12. In vivo ultrasound assessment of respiratory function of abdominal muscles in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Misuri, G; Colagrande, S; Gorini, M; Iandelli, I; Mancini, M; Duranti, R; Scano, G

    1997-12-01

    Ultrasonography has recently been proposed for assessing changes in thickness and motion of the diaphragm during contraction in humans. Data on ultrasound assessment of abdominal muscles in humans are scarce. We therefore investigated the changes in thickness and the relevant mechanical effects of abdominal muscles using this technique during respiratory manoeuvres in normal subjects. We evaluated the thickness of the abdominal muscle layers in six normal male subjects (aged 26-36 yrs) using a 7.5 MHz B-mode ultrasound transducer. Gastric (Pg) and mouth pressures, muscle thickness of external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), transversus abdominis (TA) and rectus abdominis (RA) were assessed at functional residual capacity (FRC), residual volume (RV), total lung capacity (TLC), during progressive (PEEs) and maximal expiratory efforts (MEEs) against a closed airway and during homolateral (HTR) and contralateral (CTR) trunk rotation. Abdominal muscle thickness was found to be reproducible (coefficient of variation and two-way analysis of variance). Compared to FRC, the thickness of IO, TA and RA significantly increased at RV and during MEEs, whereas EO remained unchanged; at TLC, the thickness of IO and TA significantly decreased. During PEEs, a significant relationship between increase in Pg and TA thickness was observed in all subjects, the thickness of the other abdominal muscles being inconsistently related to Pg. Finally, a significant increase in the thickness of IO and EO was found during HTR and CTR, respectively. We conclude that during maximal expiratory manoeuvres, transversus abdominis, internal oblique and rectus abdominis thickened similarly. Transversus abdominis seems to be the major contributor in generating abdominal expiratory pressure during progressive expiratory efforts. External oblique seems to be preferentially involved during trunk rotation. These results suggest the possible value of studying the abdominal muscles by ultrasonography in

  13. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  14. Effects of suppressing neutral and obsession-like thoughts in normal subjects: beyond frequency.

    PubMed

    Belloch, Amparo; Morillo, Carmen; Giménez, Amparo

    2004-07-01

    Recent cognitive-behavioral theories on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) show that deliberate attempts to suppress intrusive and undesirable thoughts lie at the genesis of clinical obsessions. In this paper the results of an experimental study on the suppression of neutral and obsession-like thoughts in normal subjects are presented. Eighty-seven university students performed in three experimental periods: (1) base-line monitoring, (2) experimental instruction, and (3) monitoring. For each of these periods, the frequency of the occurrence of a "white bear" thought or a personally relevant intrusive thought was registered. Half of the subjects received instructions to suppress the target-thought in period 2, and the other half were instructed to only monitor the target-thought in each of the experimental periods. Several measures were also obtained before and after the experiment: annoyance caused by the intrusion, suppression effort, subjective success, and evaluative appraisals of the target-thought. The results showed neither immediate nor delayed frequency increases of the target thought. However, evidence was found that deliberate thought suppression efforts, regardless of their content, had greater negative consequences than did non suppression. These results are discussed in relation to the recent cognitive proposals about OCD.

  15. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17,015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample.

  16. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P < 0.05). Three of the proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  17. Effect of indomethacin on the metabolic and hormonal response to a standardized breakfast in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, A S; Guerten, D; Scheen, A; Delporte, J P; Lefebvre, P J; Jaminet, F

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of a single oral administration of indomethacin on blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin and glucagon concentrations in young healthy subjects. Two groups of 6 subjects were studied, the first received a standardized 500 kcal mixed meal without any previous drug administration (controls) whereas the second group received 50 mg indomethacin 2 h before ingesting an identical meal. Plasma indomethacin concentration reached its maximum (2.36 +/- 0.36 micro g/ml) 15 min after administration and declined to 0.45 +/- 0.04 micro g/ml after 2 h. Indomethacin ingestion was followed by a significant increase in blood glucose and plasma FFA reaching their maximum value at 45 min and returning to basal levels at 120 min. No simultaneous changes in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin or glucagon levels were detected during this period. The meal was followed by a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin as well as by a decrease in plasma FFA concentration. No significant differences were detected between the controls and the subjects receiving indomethacin. In controls, the meal was followed by a rise in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen and a modest although significant increase in glucagon levels. In indomethacin-treated subjects, the increment of alpha-amino-nitrogen was less marked and the increase in plasma glucagon was not observed. Thus, indomethacin by itself can exert several metabolic effects; however, it does not deteriorate the blood glucose or insulin profile after a regular meal. The present work is the first to demonstrate that an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis inhibits the plasma glucagon rise occurring after a physiological stimulus such as a normal meal. On the basis of previous in vitro experiments, we suggest that this effect results from an inhibition of glucagon secretion by the PG synthesis inhibitor.

  18. Assessment of gastric emptying in normal subjects with sucralfate (Carafate) and Amphojel

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; McCallum, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum-containing antacids (e.g Amphojel) and aluminum-containing compounds such as sucralfate (Carafate) have been shown in animal and human studies to delay gastric emptying, and are one proposed mechanism of action for healing of duodenal ulcers. Therefore, the authors designed a study to study the effects of Carafate and Amphojel on gastric emptying. Ten normal volunteers of mean age 27 years with no previous history of upper gastrointestinal diseases were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of 30gm of cooked chicken liver injected with lmCi of 99m-Tc-S-C, mixed with 7.5 oz. of beef stew, and eaten with 4 oz. of water labeled with 100..mu..Ci of 111-In-DTPA. Immediately after ingestion of the meal, the subject was placed supine under a gamma camera. Gastric emptying (GE) was expressed as percent emptied. On separate days the subject was given either lgm of Carafate (190mg Al/gm) or placebo in a double blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. On the third day, each subject was given 30cc of Amphojel (105mg Al/5cc) followed 30 minutes later by the test meal. GE at 2 hours for the solid meal was 60%, 69%, and 54% and 79%, 86% and 68% at 3 hours for placebo, Carafate, and Amphojel respectively. A small but not significant difference in gastric emptying between Amphojel and placebo was seen from 2 to 3 hours. For the liquid meal approximately 90% emptying was present at 1 hour for all three studies. Further studies are needed to determine whether these medications administered in the standard doses given here may affect gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients.

  19. Dichotomous effect of caffeine, curcumin, and naringenin on genomic DNA of normal and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Somaiah, Ashok; Raghunathan, Divya; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    Nutraceutical compounds show antioxidant and prooxidant properties under stress conditions like cancer, diabetes, and other diseases. The objective of this study is to find the dichotomic behavior of caffeine, curcumin, and naringenin on DNA of diabetic and normal subjects in the presence and absence of copper, hydrogen peroxide, and complex of copper-hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide releases hydroxyl free radicals ((•)OH) on oxidation of Cu (I) to Cu (II) through Fenton-type reaction to cause DNA damage. In the results, agarose gel electrophoretic pattern speculates the prooxidant effect of caffeine and antioxidant effect of curcumin on DNA in the presence of copper and hydrogen peroxide. UV-Vis spectral analysis shows hyperchromism on addition of DNA to caffeine, hypochromism with curcumin, and subtle changes with naringenin. The chosen nutraceuticals act as inducers and quenchers of oxidative free radicals arising from diabetes.

  20. Right Heart 4DMRI Flow Visualization in Normal and Hypertensive subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Schroeder, Joyce

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in time-resolved 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) have allowed for the 3-dimensional characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV) and right atrium (RA). In this talk, an overview of a large, ongoing, multi-disciplinary investigation of 4D right heart hemodynamics in normal and pathologic patients is given, as well as lessons learned from 4DMRI cardiac research. Time-resolved visualization techniques for understanding and communicating complex right heart flow structures throughout the cardiac cycle are presented. Finally, a qualitative visual comparison of 3D flow structures in the vena cava, RA, and RV between healthy subjects and pulmonary hypertensive patients is presented.

  1. Reference Clinical Database for Fixation Stability Metrics in Normal Subjects Measured with the MAIA Microperimeter

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Marco U.; Saker, Saker; Wilde, Craig; Pellizzari, Carlo; Pallikaris, Aristophanes; Notaroberto, Neil; Rubinstein, Martin; Rui, Chiara; Limoli, Paolo; Smolek, Michael K.; Amoaku, Winfried M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish a normal reference database for fixation stability measured with the bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) in the Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) microperimeter. Methods Subjects were 358 healthy volunteers who had the MAIA examination. Fixation stability was assessed using two BCEA fixation indices (63% and 95% proportional values) and the percentage of fixation points within 1° and 2° from the fovea (P1 and P2). Statistical analysis was performed with linear regression and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. Results Average areas of 0.80 deg2 (min = 0.03, max = 3.90, SD = 0.68) for the index BCEA@63% and 2.40 deg2 (min = 0.20, max = 11.70, SD = 2.04) for the index BCEA@95% were found. The average values of P1 and P2 were 95% (min = 76, max = 100, SD = 5.31) and 99% (min = 91, max = 100, SD = 1.42), respectively. The Pearson's product moment test showed an almost perfect correlation index, r = 0.999, between BCEA@63% and BCEA@95%. Index P1 showed a very strong correlation with BCEA@63%, r = −0.924, as well as with BCEA@95%, r = −0.925. Index P2 demonstrated a slightly lower correlation with both BCEA@63% and BCEA@95%, r = −0.874 and −0.875, respectively. Conclusions The single parameter of the BCEA@95% may be taken as accurately reporting fixation stability and serves as a reference database of normal subjects with a cutoff area of 2.40 ± 2.04 deg2 in MAIA microperimeter. Translational Relevance Fixation stability can be measured with different indices. This study originates reference fixation values for the MAIA using a single fixation index. PMID:27867756

  2. Gaze position corrective eye movements in normal subjects and in patients with vestibular deficits.

    PubMed

    Peng, Grace C Y; Minor, Lloyd B; Zee, David S

    2005-04-01

    Eye movements in response to high-acceleration head rotations (thrusts) in the horizontal plane from patients with unilateral (UVD) or bilateral vestibular loss (BVD) were recorded. The rapid, gaze-position corrections (GPCs) that appeared when vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) slow phases were undercompensatory were characterized. For comparison, eye movements from normal subjects who were asked to generate saccades in the direction opposite head rotation (in the same direction as slow phases) were recorded. This normal-subject model produced responses with spatial and temporal characteristics similar to those from GPCs in patients as follows: When head rotations were generated actively, compared with passively, gaze-position errors and corresponding GPCs were smaller and occurred earlier. During passively generated head thrusts, GPCs still occurred when head rotations were made in total darkness, though their accuracy decreased as the requirement for maintaining gaze on a specific location in space was relaxed. Time of onset of GPCs was not rigidly tied to head kinematics (peak velocity or peak acceleration). Speeds of GPCs, however, were lower than speeds of similar-sized, head-fixed saccades. Finally, during passive and active head thrusts in patients, sustained, high-frequency (20 to 30 Hz) oscillations that appeared as tiny saccades were occasionally observed, one immediately following the other, resembling a compensatory slow-phase response. Taken together, the results suggest that one strategy for overcoming a VOR deficit is to enlist the saccadic system to produce an oculomotor response that is required to compensate for head rotation. This response may come in the form of high-velocity GPCs or smaller-amplitude oscillations.

  3. Fluticasone Induces Epithelial Injury and Alters Barrier Function in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    MacRedmond, Ruth E.; Singhera, Gurpreet K.; Wadsworth, Samuel J.; Attridge, Susan; Bahzad, Mohammed; Williams, Kristy; Coxson, Harvey O.; White, Steven R.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The airway epithelium has a number of roles pivotal to the pathogenesis of asthma, including provision of a physical and immune barrier to the inhaled environment. Dysregulated injury and repair responses in asthma result in loss of airway epithelial integrity. Inhaled corticosteroids are a corner stone of asthma treatment. While effective in controlling asthma symptoms, they fail to prevent airway remodeling. Direct cytopathic effects on the airway epithelium may contribute to this. Methods This study examined the effects of a 4-week treatment regimen of inhaled fluticasone 500 μg twice daily in healthy human subjects. Induced sputum was collected for cell counts and markers of inflammation. Barrier function was examined by diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid (DTPA) clearance measured by nuclear scintillation scan, and albumin concentration in induced sputum. Results Steroid exposure resulted in epithelial injury as measured by a significant increase in the number of airway epithelial cells in induced sputum. There was no change in airway inflammation by induced sputum inflammatory cell counts or cytokine levels. Epithelial shedding was associated with an increase in barrier function, as measured by both a decrease in DTPA clearance and decreased albumin in induced sputum. This likely reflects the normal repair response. Conclusion Inhaled corticosteroids cause injury to normal airway epithelium. These effects warrant further evaluation in asthma, where the dysregulated repair response may contribute to airway remodeling. PMID:25324978

  4. On the nature of heart rate variability in a breathing normal subject: a stochastic process analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Teodor; Petelczyc, Monika; Zebrowski, Jan J; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kabat, Marek; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Piotrowska, Anna Justyna; Szelenberger, Waldemar

    2009-06-01

    Human heart rate is moderated by the autonomous nervous system acting predominantly through the sinus node (the main cardiac physiological pacemaker). One of the dominant factors that determine the heart rate in physiological conditions is its coupling with the respiratory rhythm. Using the language of stochastic processes, we analyzed both rhythms simultaneously taking the data from polysomnographic recordings of two healthy individuals. Each rhythm was treated as a sum of a deterministic drift term and a diffusion term (Kramers-Moyal expansion). We found that normal heart rate variability may be considered as the result of a bidirectional coupling of two nonlinear oscillators: the heart itself and the respiratory system. On average, the diffusion (noise) component measured is comparable in magnitude to the oscillatory (deterministic) term for both signals investigated. The application of the Kramers-Moyal expansion may be useful for medical diagnostics providing information on the relation between respiration and heart rate variability. This interaction is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, including the baroreflex, and results in a commonly observed phenomenon--respiratory sinus arrhythmia which is typical for normal subjects and often impaired by pathology.

  5. Comparison of Brachial Artery Vasoreactivity in Elite Power Athletes and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Michael A.; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P.; Parish, Tracie R.

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. Purpose To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Methods Eight elite power athletes (age = 23±2 years) and ten controls (age = 22±1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Results Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39±1.51 vs. Controls: 3.73±0.71 mm, p<0.05), had greater vasodilatory (BAFMD%: Athletes: 8.21±1.78 vs. Controls: 5.69±1.56%) and constrictor (CPT %: Athletes: -2.95±1.07 vs. Controls: −1.20±0.48%) responses, compared to controls. Vascular operating range (VOR = Peak dilation+Peak Constriction) was also greater in athletes (VOR: Athletes: 0.55±0.15 vs. Controls: 0.25±0.18 mm, p<0.05). Athletes had superior handgrip strength (Athletes: 55.92±17.06 vs. Controls: 36.77±17.06 kg, p<0.05) but similar heart rate responses at peak (Athletes: 123±16 vs. Controls: 130±25 bpm, p>0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88±21 vs. Controls: 98±26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Conclusion Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an

  6. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Relates to Hypo-Sympathetic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, leaving astronauts hemodynamically compromised after landing. Because of this hypovolemia, crew members are able to withstand a postflight 10 minute upright tilt test only if they are able to mount a hyper-sympathetic response. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that about 30% of astronauts, primarily female, have postflight sympathetic responses to tilt that are equal to or less than their preflight responses and thus, they become presyncopal. Part of the mission of the cardiovascular lab at the Johnson Space Center is to identify susceptible crewmembers before flight so that individualized countermeasures can be prescribed. The goal of this study was to develop a ground based model of hypovolemia that could be used for this purpose We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, would reproduce the landing day rate of presyncope during upright tilt in normal volunteers. Further, we hypothesized that, during hypovolemia, subjects who had sympathetic responses that were equal to or less than their normovolemic responses would become presyncopal during upright tilt tests. We studied 20 subjects, 13 male and 7 female, on two separate occasions: during normovolemia and hypovolemia. We induced hypovolemia with intravenous furosemide 40 hours prior to the experiment day, followed by a 10MEq Na diet. On the normovolemia and hypovolemia test days, plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing arterial pressure, heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. A two factor, repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the differences between group (presyncopal vs. non-presyncopal) and day (normovolemia vs. hypovolemia) effects. There were no differences in baseline arterial pressure between normovolemia and hypovolemia or between presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups, but heart rates were higher with hypovolemia in both groups (presyncopal

  7. Repeatability of short-duration transient visual evoked potentials in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V.; Prata, Tiago S.; Derr, Peter; Patel, Jayson; Siegfried, John; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the within-session and inter-session repeatability of a new, short-duration transient visual evoked potential (SD-tVEP) device on normal individuals, we tested 30 normal subjects (20/20 visual acuity, normal 24-2 SITA Standard VF) with SD-tVEP. Ten of these subjects had their tests repeated within 1–2 months from the initial visit. Synchronized single-channel EEG was recorded using a modified Diopsys Enfant™ System (Diopsys, Inc., Pine Brook, New Jersey, USA). A checkerboard stimulus was modulated at two reversals per second. Two different contrasts of checkerboard reversal patterns were used: 85% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 66.25 cd/m2 and 10% Michelson contrast with a mean luminance of 112 cd/m2. Each test lasted 20 s. Both eyes, independently and together, were tested 10 times (5 times at each contrast level). The following information was identified from the filtered N75-P100-N135 complex: N75 amplitude, N75 latency, P100 amplitude, P100 latency, and Delta Amplitude (N75-P100). The median values for each eye’s five SD-tVEP parameters were calculated and grouped into two data sets based on contrast level. Mean age was 27.3 ± 5.2 years. For OD only, the median (95% confidence intervals) of Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitudes at 10% and 85% contrast were 4.6 uV (4.1–5.9) and 7.1 uV (5.15–9.31). The median P100 latencies were 115.2 ms (112.0–117.7) and 104.0 ms (99.9–106.0). There was little within-session variability for any of these parameters. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.64 and 0.98, and within subject coefficients of variation were 3–5% (P100 latency) and 15–30% (Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) amplitude). Bland–Altman plots showed good agreement between the first and fifth test sessions (85% contrast Delta Amplitude (N75-P100) delta amplitude, mean difference, 0.48 mV, 95% CI, −0.18–1.12; 85% contrast P100 latency delay, −0.82 ms, 95% CI, −3.12–1.46; 10% contrast

  8. Simultaneous evaluation of tear turnover and corneal epithelial permeability by fluorophotometry in normal subjects and patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS).

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J D

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To simultaneously determine the tear turn over rate (TT) and corneal epithelial permeability (Pdc) in normal subjects and patients with KCS by a single-drop fluorophotometric technique using disodium fluorescein (DSF) or carboxyfluorescein (CF). METHODS: DSF was instilled in one eye chosen at random and CF in the fellow eye of 13 normal subjects and in 13 patients with KCS. TT and Pdc were determined using a single-drop technique on a Fluorotron Master. RESULTS: In normals and KCS subjects, TT was found to be independent of age and sex and essentially identical for DSF and CF. TT was approximately 42% lower in KCS subjects than normals (Table). TT was independent of Schirmer's I and Pdc. [table: see text] Pdc values were similar for DSF and CF in normals and increased with age. In KCS subjects, Pdc was 3-4 times higher compared to normal subjects (p < 0.01) and was directly correlated with the severity of corneal punctate staining. Pdc was independent of TT. CONCLUSION: Patients with KCS are more susceptible to the therapeutic and toxic effects of topical medications and preservatives due to increased corneal epithelial permeability. With the decreased TT in KCS patients, there is also slower elimination of substances from the tear film. This, combined with the increase in epithelial permeability, puts the KCS eye doubly at risk for the toxic effects of topically applied substances. PMID:8719697

  9. Biomechanical properties of normal tendons, normal palmar aponeuroses, and tissues from patients with Dupuytren's disease subjected to elastase and chondroitinase treatment.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H; Reihsner, R; Hamilton, G; Mallinger, R; Menzel, E J

    1995-01-01

    Normal tendons, normal palmar aponeuroses and palmar aponeuroses from patients with Dupuytren's disease were subjected to elastase or chondroitinase treatment. Young's modulus was derived from the linear portion of stress-strain graph. It showed the lowest value for the apparently normal palmar aponeuroses and the highest value for tendon samples. Elastase treatment caused an increase of extensibility and a reduction of Young's modulus of normal palmar aponeuroses and tendons, but not of contracture bands. In normal tendons, normal palmar aponeuroses and apparently normal palmar aponeuroses residual strain and hysteresis loop increased significantly as a linear function of the amount of digested elastin. In contrast these biomechanical parameters were not affected significantly in contracture bands. In normal and apparently normal areas incubation with chondroitinase ABC resulted in a significant increase of residual strain and, as opposed to elastase, a decrease of normalized hysteresis loop. In contracture bands, however, these biomechanical parameters remained unchanged. RELEVANCE: The increasing evidence of a correlation between morphological changes of palmar elastin and ground substance with the progress of Dupuytren's disease emphasizes the need to determine the relative importance of these connective tissue components for the pathogenesis of Dupuytren's disease.

  10. Acute effects of external negative pressure ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C B; Harris, N D; Howard, P

    1991-01-01

    This study compares the acute physiological effects of external negative pressure ventilation (ENPV) in normal subjects and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The equipment consisted of an airtight jacket (Pneumosuit) and vacuum pump. Minute ventilation (Ve) was recorded using a light-emitting turbine transducer. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were calculated every 30 s. Measurements were made at rest and during ENPV with pressures of -20 cmH2O and -40 cmH2O. The ventilator rate was fixed at 16.min-1. In 10 normal subjects, Ve increased from 8.6 to 22.9 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) accompanied by an increase in VCO2 from 0.25 to 0.39 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). In 10 normocapnic COPD patients (arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) less than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 11.5 to 17.1 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) whilst in 10 hypercapnic patients (PaCO2 greater than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 9.7 to 12.4 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). A change in VCO2 was not detected in the COPD patients, and VO2 did not change in any group. Arterial blood samples were obtained in eight hypercapnic patients. Baseline mean physiological deadspace ventilation (VD) was calculated to be 4.9 l.min-1 (56% of Ve) whilst Ve was 8.8 l.min-1 in this subgroup. During ENPV, arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) increased from 6.8 to 8.2 kPa (p less than 0.01) whilst PaCO2 decreased from 6.8 to 5.8 kPa (p less than 0.01) suggesting that despite the large physiological deadspace, a significant increase in alveolar ventilation had occurred. In advanced COPD, thoracic compliance falls and limits the ventilatory response to ENPV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Studies of osmotic diarrhea induced in normal subjects by ingestion of polyethylene glycol and lactulose.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, H F; Santa Ana, C A; Schiller, L R; Fordtran, J S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of pure osmotic diarrhea and the osmotic diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption. Diarrhea was induced in normal volunteers by ingestion of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which is nonabsorbable, not metabolized by colonic bacteria, and carries no electrical charge. In PEG-induced diarrhea, (a) stool weight was directly correlated with the total mass of PEG ingested; (b) PEG contributed 40-60% of the osmolality of the fecal fluid, the remainder being contributed by other solutes either of dietary, endogenous, or bacterial origin; and (c) fecal sodium, potassium, and chloride were avidly conserved by the intestine, in spite of stool water losses exceeding 1,200 g/d. Diarrhea was also induced in normal subjects by ingestion of lactulose, a disaccharide that is not absorbed by the small intestine but is metabolized by colonic bacteria. In lactulose-induced diarrhea, (a) a maximum of approximate 80 g/d of lactulose was metabolized by colonic bacteria to noncarbohydrate moieties such as organic acids; (b) the organic acids were partially absorbed in the colon; (c) unabsorbed organic acids obligated the accumulation of inorganic cations (Na greater than Ca greater than K greater than Mg) in the diarrheal fluid; (d) diarrhea associated with low doses of lactulose was mainly due to unabsorbed organic acids and associated cations, whereas with larger doses of lactulose unmetabolized carbohydrates also played a major role; and (e) the net effect of bacterial metabolism of lactulose and partial absorption of organic acids on stool water output was done dependent. With low or moderate doses of lactulose, stool water losses were reduced by as much as 600 g/d (compared with equimolar osmotic loads of PEG); with large dose, the increment in osmotically active solutes within the lumen exceeded the increment of the ingested osmotic load, and the severity of diarrhea was augmented. PMID:2794043

  12. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  13. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  14. Changes in longitudinal craniofacial growth in subjects with normal occlusions using the Ricketts analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun-ju; Kwon, Hye-jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to define the Korean norm values for the Ricketts analysis. Methods In this longitudinal study, lateral cephalograms of 31 subjects with normal occlusion were taken biennially from ages 9-19 years. Cephalometric measurements were performed. Parameters for which the 10-year change did not exceed one standard deviation were defined as unchanged. The means and standard deviations for the measured parameters were determined for each age group. Results No significant changes in growth were observed in the molar relationship, incisor overjet, incisor overbite, mandibular incisor extrusion, interincisor angle, lower incisor tip (B1) to A point-Pogonion (A-PO) plane, upper incisor tip (A1) to A-PO plane, B1 inclination to A-PO, A1 inclination to A-PO, B1 inclination to Frankfurt plane (FH), convexity, lower facial height, facial axis, maxillary depth, maxillary height, palatal plane to FH, cranial deflection, ramus Xi position, or porion location. Continual changes over the 10 years of growth were observed in the maxillary first molar distal position to pterygoid true vertical plane, facial depth, mandibular plane to FH, anterior cranial length, mandibular arc, and corpus length. Conclusions Clinicians can apply the Korean norms at age 9 as determined in this study when using the Ricketts analysis. The patient's age at the beginning of treatment and their sex should be taken into consideration when drawing visual treatment objectives. PMID:24696824

  15. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  16. The Mechanisms of Compensatory Responses of the Respiratory System to Simulated Central Hypervolemia in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Donina, Zh A; Aleksandrov, V G; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The compensatory responses of the respiratory system to simulated central hypervolemia (CHV) were investigated in 14 normal subjects. The central hypervolemia was caused by a short-time passive head-down tilt (HDT, -30°, 30 min). The results show that CHV increased the mechanical respiratory load and the airway resistance, slowed the inspiratory flow, increased the duration of the inspiratory phase, reduced the respiratory rate, but not changed the minute ventilation. CHV induced a significant rise in inspiratory swings of alveolar pressure (184%), based on the inspiratory occlusion pressure measurement. These changes indicate a compensatory increase in the inspiratory muscle contraction force. A stable level of minute ventilation during CHV was an effect of increased EMG activity of parasternal muscles more than twice (P<0.01). A contribution of the diaphragm and scalene muscles to ventilation during spontaneous breathing in HDT was reduced. An increase of genioglossus contractile activity during HDT contributed to the stabilization of airway patency. These results suggest that a coordinated modulation of inspiratory muscles activity allows preserving a constant level of minute ventilation during a short-time intrathoracic blood volume expansion. The mechanisms of respiratory load compensation seem to be mediated by afferent information from the lung and respiratory muscle receptors and from the segmentary reflexes and intrinsic properties of the muscle fibers.

  17. Heritability of Craniofacial Structures in Normal Subjects and Patients with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Comyn, Francois-Louis; Keenan, Brendan T.; Cater, Jacqueline; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    should be able to identify genes associated with these intermediate craniofacial phenotypes. Citation: Chi L, Comyn FL, Keenan BT, Cater J, Maislin G, Pack AI, Schwab RJ. Heritability of craniofacial structures in normal subjects and patients with sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1689-1698. PMID:25197806

  18. Antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans recognized by patients with juvenile periodontitis and periodontally normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, T J; Moncla, B J; Darveau, R P; Page, R C

    1991-01-01

    Most juvenile periodontitis patients respond to infection by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by producing serum antibodies. Specific antigens inducing the humoral immune response have not been identified, nor has the role of the resulting antibodies in disease progression been determined. Adsorbed and unadsorbed sera from juvenile periodontitis patients and normal subjects were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots), using digested and undigested bacterial sonicates and French pressure cell fractions to determine the biochemical class, cross-reactivity, and cellular location of the antigens in different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Antigens detected by using high-titer sera included the following: (i) serotype-specific nonprotein material located on the cell surface, (ii) soluble-fraction proteins showing highly variable antibody binding, (iii) cross-reactive proteins, and (iv) a protein present in soluble and cell wall fractions and immunopositive for all sera tested. In addition, one apparently nonprotein component that was enriched in the cell wall fraction was observed. Sera with high immunoglobulin G titers to one, two, three, or none of the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes were observed. There was a high degree of variation from one patient to another in the humoral immune response to serotype-specific and cross-reactive antigens. As demonstrated by whole-cell adsorption experiments, the serotype-specific surface antigen accounted for approximately 72 to 90% of the total antibody-binding activity for sera with titers greater than 100-fold above background, while cross-reactive antigen accounted for less than 28%. Antibody binding the whole-cell sonicate for high-titer sera was inhibited 90% by lipopolysaccharide from the same serotype, strongly suggesting that lipopolysaccharide is the immunodominant antigen class. Images PMID:1705243

  19. Sustained self-regulation of energy intake. Loss of weight in overweight subjects. Maintenance of weight in normal-weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary restraint is largely unsuccessful for controlling obesity. As an alternative, subjects can easily be trained to reliably recognize sensations of initial hunger (IH) a set of physiological sensations which emerge spontaneously, not necessarily at planned mealtimes, and may be the afferent arm of a homeostatic system of food intake regulation. Previously we have reported that IH is associated with blood glucose concentration (BG) below 81.8 mg/dL (4.55 mmol/l), (low blood glucose, LBG), and that a pattern of meals in which IH is present pre-meal (IHMP) improved insulin sensitivity, HbA1c and other cardiovascular risk factors. Here we report the effect upon weight in overweight and normal weight subjects. Objective To investigate whether the IHMP is associated with sustained loss of weight in overweight subjects over a 5 month period. Methods Seventy four overweight subjects (OW: BMI > 25) and 107 normal weight (NW) subjects were randomly allocated to either trained (OW: N = 51; NW N = 79) or control (OW: N = 23; NW: N = 28) groups. All subjects were allocated post-randomization into either low or high mean pre-meal BG groups (LBG and HBG groups) using a demarcation point of 81.8 mg/dL. Results A significant longitudinal decrease was found in body weight (trained NW: -2.5 ± 4.6 kg; OW -6.7 ± 4.5 kg; controls: NW +3.5 ± 4.0 kg and OW -3.4 ± 4.0 kg; P = 0.006 and 0.029) and in energy intake, mean BG, standard deviation of diary BG (BG as recorded by subjects' 7-day diary), BMI, and arm and leg skin-fold thickness in (OW and NW) HBG subjects. OW LBG subjects significantly decreased body weight (trained: -4.0 ± 2.4 kg; controls: -0.4 ± 3.7 kg; P = 0.037). 26 NW LBG subjects showed no longitudinal difference after training as did 9 control subjects. Conclusion Over a 5 month period the IHMP resulted in significant loss of weight in OW subjects compared to controls practicing dietary restraint. NW subjects maintained weight overall, however NW HBG

  20. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O'Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite(®) system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns.

  1. Surface markers on human lymphocytes: studies of normal subjects and of patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Aiuti, F.; Lacava, V.; Garofalo, J. A.; D'Amelio, R.; D'Asero, C.

    1973-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of twenty normal controls and twelve patients with primary immunodeficiencies were examined for surface membrane Ig and receptors for C3 complement (B cell markers) and for spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (T cell markers). In patients with defects in T cell function no lymphocytes forming spontaneous rosettes were seen. In patients with B cell deficiency they were normal or increased. Lymphocytes with membrane immunoglobulins were normal in patients with T cell defect and absent in patients with severe agammaglobulinaemia. Lymphocytes with receptors for C3 complement were increased in patients with T defect and normal in patients with most other forms of immunodeficiency studied. PMID:4587827

  2. Recombinant DNA derived monomeric insulin analogue: comparison with soluble human insulin in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Vora, J. P.; Owens, D. R.; Dolben, J.; Atiea, J. A.; Dean, J. D.; Kang, S.; Burch, A.; Brange, J.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the rate of absorption from subcutaneous tissue and the resulting hypoglycaemic effect of iodine-125 labelled soluble human insulin and a monomeric insulin analogue derived by recombinant DNA technology. DESIGN--Single blind randomised comparison of equimolar doses of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue. SETTING--Study in normal people at a diabetes research unit and a university department of medical physics. SUBJECTS--Seven healthy male volunteers aged 20-39 not receiving any other drugs. INTERVENTIONS--After an overnight fast and a basal period of one hour two doses (0.05 and 0.1 U/kg) of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue were injected subcutaneously into the anterior abdominal wall on four separate days. END POINT--To find a fast acting insulin for meal related requirements in insulin dependent diabetics. MEASUREMENTS and main results--Residual radioactivity at the injection site was measured continuously for the first two hours after injection of the 125I labelled preparations and thereafter for five minutes simultaneously with blood sampling. Frequent venous blood samples were obtained over six hours for determination of plasma immunoreactive insulin, insulin analogue, glucose, and glucagon values. Time to 50% of initial radioactivity at the injection site for the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin was 61 v 135 minutes (p less than 0.05) with 0.05 U/kg and 67 v 145 minutes (p less than 0.001) with 0.1 U/kg. Concentrations in plasma increased faster after the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin, resulting in higher plasma concentrations between 10 and 150 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.05 U/kg and between 40 and 360 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.1 U/kg. The hypoglycaemic response to insulin analogue was a plasma glucose nadir at 60 minutes with both doses compared with 90 and 120 minutes with soluble insulin at 0.5 and 0.1 U

  3. Evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between verapamil and propranolol in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D L; Thomson, G D; Thompson, G G; Murray, G D; Brodie, M J; McInnes, G T

    1991-01-01

    observed after repeated doses. 7. These findings provide little evidence of a pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interaction between verapamil and propranolol in normal subjects. Most of the haemodynamic responses to these drugs in combination can be explained by additive drug effects but an interaction affecting AV conduction after repeated doses cannot be excluded. The minor pharmacokinetic interaction between the drugs is unlikely to be relevant to the pharmacodynamic changes. PMID:2054272

  4. Glycaemic index of different coconut (Cocos nucifera)-flour products in normal and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Trinidad P; Valdez, Divinagracia H; Loyola, Anacleta S; Mallillin, Aida C; Askali, Faridah C; Castillo, Joan C; Masa, Dina B

    2003-09-01

    The glycaemic index (GI) of commonly consumed bakery products supplemented with increasing levels of coconut (Cocos nucifera) flour was determined in ten normal and ten diabetic subjects. Using a randomized crossover design, the control and test foods were fed in random order on separate occasions after an overnight fast. Blood samples were collected through finger prick before and after feeding and were analysed for glucose levels using a clinical chemistry analyser. The significantly low-GI (<60) foods investigated were: macaroons (GI 45.7 (sem 3.0)) and carrot cake (GI 51.8 (sem 3.3)), with 200-250 g coconut flour/kg (P<0.05). The test foods with 150 g coconut flour/kg had GI ranging from 61.3 to 71.4. Among the test foods, pan de sal (GI 87.2 (sem 5.5)) and multigrain loaf (GI 85.2 (sem 6.8)) gave significantly higher GI with 50 and 100 g coconut flour/kg respectively (P<0.05). On the other hand, granola bar and cinnamon bread with 50 and 100 g coconut flour/kg respectively gave a GI ranging from 62.7 to 71.6 and did not differ significantly from the test foods with 150 g coconut flour/kg (P<0.05). A very strong negative correlation (r -0.85, n 11, P<0.005) was observed between the GI and dietary fibre content of the test foods supplemented with coconut flour. In conclusion, the GI of coconut flour-supplemented foods decreased with increasing levels of coconut flour and this may be due to its high dietary fibre content. The results of the present study may form a scientific basis for the development of coconut flour as a functional food. However, the fat content of coconut flour-supplemented food should always be considered to optimize the functionality of coconut fibre in the proper control and management of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Developmental Level and Psychopathology: Comparing Children with Developmental Delays to Chronological and Mental Age Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Barbara; Neece, Cameron L.; Baker, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with developmental delays (DD) are at heightened risk for developing clinically significant behavioral and emotional difficulties as compared to children with typical development (TD). However, nearly all studies comparing psychopathology in youth with DD employ TD control groups of the same chronological age (CA). It is unclear, then, whether the heightened symptomology found in age-matched children with DD is beyond what would be expected given their developmental level. The present study assessed rates of behavior problems and mental disorder in 35 children with DD at age 9 years. These were compared with rates from 35 children with TD matched for CA at age 9 and also earlier rates for these same children at age 6, when matched for mental age (MA). Children with DD had significantly more behavior problems in 7 of the 17 scales of the CBCL when compared to TD children matched for CA, and 6 of 17 scales when compared to the MA-matched group. Rates of meeting DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric disorder were significantly higher in the DD group than both the CA- and MA-matched TD groups for three and four, respectively, of the seven diagnoses examined. Descriptively, the mean ratings for all variables assessed were higher for the DD group than both TD comparison groups, with the exception of the Anxious/Depressed scale of the CBCL. These findings validate the heightened risk for clinically significant behavior problems and mental disorders in youth with DD above and beyond their developmental functioning. PMID:25498740

  6. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  7. Inhibition of L-dopa induced growth hormone release in normal and diabetic subjects by glucose administration.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Klimes, I; Jurcovicova, J; Kolesar, P; Repcekova-Jezova, D

    1977-12-01

    Administration of L-dopa 1 g induced an increase of plasma growth hormone (GH) levels in seven of ten healthy volunteers and in six of ten hyperglycemic insulin-dependent diabetic subjects; the maximal GH response was higher in normal subjects. Addition of 100 g glucose orally to the L-dopa completely abolished the GH response of both groups. The difference between the effect of endogenous hyperglycemia and the effect of a sudden increase of blood sugar after glucose administration on L-dopa induced GH release in diabetic subjects may be explain by the resetting of the hypothalamic control for pituitary GH release to higher levels of blood glucose.

  8. OSMOTIC PRESSURE STUDY OF PROTEIN FRACTIONS IN NORMAL AND IN NEPHROTIC SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Bourdillon, Jaques

    1939-01-01

    In serum of patients with nephrosis both albumin and globulin showed by osmotic pressure nearly double the molecular weights of normal albumin and globulin. In the urines of such patients, on the other hand, both proteins showed molecular weights lower even than in normal serum. The colloidal osmotic pressures were measured by the author's method at such dilutions that the van't Hoff law relating pressures to molecular concentrations could be directly applied. For the albumin and globulin of normal serum the molecular weights found were 72,000 and 164,000 respectively, in agreement with the weights obtained by other methods. PMID:19870879

  9. A comparative study of antipyrine and lignocaine disposition in normal subjects and in patients treated with enzyme-inducing drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Hedges, A; Makki, K A; Richens, A

    1980-01-01

    1 The disposition kinetics of lignocaine and antipyrine were compared in eight normal subjects and in eleven patients receiving chronic therapy with antiepileptic drugs. The urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (D-GA) was measured in 16 subjects. 2 In patients treated with antiepileptic drugs antipyrine clearance and D-GA excretion were significantly increased, whereas lignocaine biovailability was significantly reduced. 3 When all the subjects included in the study were considered, a significant positive correlation could be found between the apparent oral clearance of lignocaine (Dose/area under the blood concentration curve) and both antipyrine clearance (r = 0.73) and D-GA excretion (r = 0.74). 4 When normal subjects and epileptic patients were considered separately, a significant positive correlation could be confirmed between the apparent oral clearance of lignocaine and both antipyrine clearance (r = 0.71) and D-GA excretion (r = 0.76) in normal subjects, and between antipyrine clearance and D-GA excretion (r = 0.75) in epileptic patients. 5 These results suggest that the reduction of the oral availability of lignocaine in epileptic patients is secondary to induction of first-pass metabolism of the latter drug. PMID:7437261

  10. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  11. The cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to venous stasis is normal in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C M; Marshall, J M; Pugh, M

    1999-10-01

    In control subjects and in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, sudden sound or a mild cool stimulus evokes the pattern of alerting response that includes cutaneous vasoconstriction but vasodilatation in forearm muscle. In control subjects, response habituates on repetition of these stimuli both within experimental sessions and over successive days. However, in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, the cutaneous vasoconstriction and the muscle vasodilatation persist. We have now tested whether a similar disparity exists for the cutaneous vasoconstriction evoked by venous stasis, a response considered to be a veno-arteriolar reflex mediated by sympathetic fibers, but not requiring transmission through the spinal cord. In 10 subjects with primary Raynaud's disease and in 10 matched controls, a sphygmomanometer cuff on the left arm was inflated to 40 mm Hg for 2 minutes, five times on each of three experimental sessions on days 1, 3, and 5. Cutaneous red cell flux (RCF) was recorded from the pulp and dorsum of the left index finger by using a laser Doppler meter; digital vascular conductance (DCVC) was computed as RCF divided by arterial pressure. The first venous stasis, in session 1, evoked a decrease in pulp and dorsum DCVC in the control and primary Raynaud's subjects. There were no differences between the groups in the magnitudes or durations of these responses. Within session 1, the magnitude of the decrease in DCVC diminished on repetition of venous stasis in the dorsum in controls and in the pulp in primary Raynaud's subjects. We propose these effects reflected the similar reductions in baseline DCVC over time; there was no change in the duration of the responses. Repetition of venous stasis had similar effects in both groups of subjects within sessions 2 and 3. Further, judging from the mean of the responses evoked in each Session the decreases evoked in pulp and dorsum DCVC by venous stasis were fully consistent in magnitude and duration over the

  12. Serum protein profile study of normal and cervical cancer subjects by high performance liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kumar, Pratap; Mahato, Krishna K; Kartha, Vasudevan B; Santhosh, Chidangil

    2008-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography with high sensitivity laser-induced fluorescence detection is used to study the protein profiles of serum samples from healthy volunteers and cervical cancer subjects. The protein profiles are subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows that the large number of chromatograms of a given class of serum samples--say normal/malignant--can be expressed in terms of a small number of factors (principal components). Three parameters--scores of the factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis distance--are derived from PCA. The parameters are observed to have a narrow range for protein profiles of standard calibration sets formed from groups of clinically confirmed normal/malignant classes. Limit tests using match/no match of the parameters of any test sample with parameters derived for the standard calibration sets give very good discrimination between malignant and normal samples with high sensitivity (approximately 100%) aand specificity (approximately 94%).

  13. Quantitative assessment of macular thickness in normal subjects and patients with diabetic retinopathy by scanning retinal thickness analyser

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Y.; Emi, K.; Yamanishi, S.; Motokura, M.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the scanning retinal thickness analyser (RTA), a novel non-invasive imaging instrument, in diagnosing and quantitatively characterising diabetic macular oedema, and to investigate the relation between central macula thickness measured by RTA and other clinical examinations.
METHODS—Central macular thickness was measured using the RTA in 40 normal subjects and 60 patients with diabetic retinopathy. The reproducibility of the retinal thickness measurements was evaluated by calculating the mean of the inter- and intrasession variations. Central macular thickness was correlated with the results of visual acuity measurements, biomicroscopy, and fluorescein angiography.
RESULTS—Intra- and intersession reproducibility of the RTA in normal subjects was plus or minus 5.2% (16 µm) and plus or minus 6.1% (19 µm), respectively. The mean central macular thickness was 182 (SD 16) µm in normal subjects, 283 (116) µm in diabetic eyes without clinically significant macular oedema (CSMO), and 564 (168) µm in diabetic eyes with CSMO. Central macular thickness was significantly greater (p<0.001) in eyes with diabetic retinopathy than in normal subjects, even when macular thickening did not meet the standard for CSMO (p=0.019) measured by biomicroscopy. Although greater fluorescein leakage at the macula results in greater central macular thickness, only eyes with diffuse leakage had statistically significant macular thickening compared with normal subjects (p=0.022). Central macular thickness measured with the RTA was significantly correlated with the logarithmic converted visual acuity (r2= 0.76) in diabetic eyes.
CONCLUSION—Scanning RTA, which has good reproducibility, might be useful to quantitatively detect and monitor macular thickening in diabetic retinopathy. Central macular thickness was highly correlated with logarithmic converted visual acuity in diabetic macular oedema.

 Keywords: scanning retinal thickness analyser; macular

  14. Sex-related differences in peripheral glucose metabolism in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Paula, F J; Pimenta, W P; Saad, M J; Paccola, G M; Piccinato, C E; Foss, M C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic response of muscle tissue to glucose ingestion was studied in 10 normal men (M) and women (F) by using the forearm balance technique and indirect calorimetry simultaneously. During the 3 hours after a 75 g--oral glucose load, glucose uptake per unit muscle mass was significantly higher in women than in men, F = 187.3 +/- 26.9 vs M = 116.7 +/- 9.5 mg/100 g forearm muscle (P less than 0.05). A significant difference in muscle glucose fate was also observed since the amount of glucose utilized through a nonoxidative pathway was significantly higher in women, F = 84.5 +/- 2.6% (161.8 +/- 27.3 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs M = 75.3 +/- 2.2% (87.2 +/- 8.6 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05), whereas the amount of glucose oxidized in relation to glucose uptake was significantly higher in men, M = 24.7 +/- 2.2% (28.2 +/- 3.2 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs F = 15.5 +/- 2.6% (27.8 +/- 5.4 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05). No significant differences in insulin response to glucose ingestion were detected between groups. The women showed greater suppression of serum free fatty acids (FFA) levels in relation to basal levels than men. We conclude that: 1) after ingesting 75 g glucose, normal women showed greater glucose uptake per unit muscle mass than normal men, 2) for 3 hours after the ingestion of 75 g glucose, the predominant tendency toward utilizing glucose by a nonoxidative pathway is more marked in normal women than in normal men, and 3) the higher glucose uptake per unit muscle mass in the female group in the presence of an insulin response not significantly different from that of the male group suggests that muscle insulin sensitivity is greater in normal women.

  15. Identification of musical instruments by normal-hearing subjects listening through a cochlear-implant simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Rebecca D.; Eddington, Donald

    2002-05-01

    Signal processing in a cochlear implant (CI) is primarily designed to convey speech and environmental sounds, and can cause distortion of musical timbre. Systematic investigation of musical instrument identification through a CI has not yet revealed how timbre is affected by the implant's processing. In this experiment, the bandpass filtering, rectification, and low-pass filtering of an implant are simulated in MATLAB. Synthesized signals representing 12 common instruments, each performing a major scale, are processed by simulations using up to 8 analysis channels. The unprocessed recordings, together with the 8 simulation conditions for 12 instruments, are presented in random order to each of the subjects. The subject's task is to identify the instrument represented by each item. The subjects also subjectively score each item based on similarity and pleasantness. We anticipate performance using the simulation will be worse than the unprocessed condition because of the limited information delivered by the envelopes of the analysis channels. These results will be analyzed as a confusion matrix and provide a basis for contrasting the information used by subjects listening to the unprocessed and processed materials. Understanding these differences should aid in the development of new processing strategies to better represent music for cochlear implant users.

  16. [Effect of the rate of speech flow on speech intelligibility in normal and hearing-impaired subjects].

    PubMed

    Hosoi, H; Murata, K; Ohta, F; Imaizumi, S

    1992-04-01

    The relationship between the rate of speech flow and speech intelligibility was investigated in normal and hearing-impaired subjects. It is usually observed that a slowly and clearly delivered speech is easier for hearing-impaired patients to understand. The purpose of paper is to analyze this phenomenon clinically and to present useful data for developing new hearing aids. Four or 5 syllabic words lists were prepared for this experiment and speech stimuli were chosen from these lists. The subjects consisted of 15 normal subjects and 79 hearing-impaired patients (57 with inner ear hearing loss and 22 with retrocochlear hearing loss). Hearing tests were performed using a tape recorder with various speech control systems in a soundproof room. Speech samples were presented at three speaking rates, that is, a conversational speech rate, a rate one and a half times as fast as the conversational speech rate and a rate twice as fast as that rate. The results obtained in the normal subjects confirmed that the faster the speaking rate was, the more the word intelligibility was reduced. According to the results in the hearing-impaired subjects, both the correlation coefficient and regression parameter between the word intelligibility in this experiment and speech discrimination scores measured by 57S-monosyllabic lists were low at the conversational speaking rate, but the higher the speaking rate was, the closer the relation between the both factors was. It was estimated by analyzing the data of inner ear hearing loss and retrocochler hearing loss separately that the subjects with retrocochler hearing loss had more difficulty in speech-mediated communication than the subjects with inner ear hearing loss.

  17. Prevalence and covariates of subjective forgetfulness in a normal population in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Ponds, R W; Commissaris, K J; Jolles, J

    1997-01-01

    In this study we examined the prevalence and covariates of forgetfulness in a large sample of almost 2,000 subjects in the age range twenty-four to eighty-six years. Nearly 40 percent of the participants considered themselves to be forgetful. There was a systematic increase in the prevalence of forgetfulness with age, from 29 percent in the young age group to 52 percent in the oldest age group. Forgetfulness was not considered to be a serious problem in terms of perceived hindrance and worry by most subjects, independent of their age. Age, depression, and subjective health (especially complaints about vitality) acted as covariates of forgetfulness. Gender and education had no effect on the prevalence of forgetfulness. The younger adults ascribed their forgetfulness more to potentially reversible and manageable memory-extrinsic causes such as tension and emotional problems, whereas the older adults mentioned less manageable and more or less irreversible memory-intrinsic causes such as aging more often.

  18. Effect of visual stimulus using central and peripheral visual field on postural control of normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Du-Jin

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of visual stimulus using central and peripheral vision fields on postural control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 40 young adult volunteers (15 males, 25 females) who had been informed of the study purpose and procedure. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of differing visual stimulus. Each group was given visual intervention in a standing position for 3 minutes. Postural control was evaluated before and after visual intervention. [Results] The results of the functional reach test and body sway test showed significant differences among the four groups. [Conclusion] The two-way peripheral vision-field group showed significantly more body sway after visual intervention than the other three groups. This finding may suggest two-way peripheral vision field is a more effective visual stimulus for training postural control and balance.

  19. Beyond Normalization and Impairment: Theorizing Subjectivity in Learning Difficulties--Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Scott; Dyson, Simon; Hiles, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Normalization and social role valorization continue to play a central role in shaping debates and practice relating to learning difficulties. In the context of recent arguments this paper draws on the work of Foucault to deconstruct these theories. Foucault's work alerts us to a conceptual confusion at their heart which reproduces a common but…

  20. The influence of age on pressure perception of static and moving two-point discrimination in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Atsushi; Asai, Noriyoshi; Kanda, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of age on digital pressure perception as measured by two-point discrimination (2PD) testing. The subjects were 177 normal volunteers ranging in age from 20 to 79 years. Perceptible pressure of static and moving 2PD was measured on the index finger and little finger, using the Pressure-specifying Sensory Device. The threshold of pressure perception increased significantly with advancing age in both static and moving 2PD tests. There was a marked increase in subjects older than 60 years. Pressure perception was significantly higher for static 2PD than for moving 2PD in subjects 70-79 years of age. The threshold of pressure perception for static and moving 2PD gradually increased with advancing age, and was markedly elevated in subjects older than 60 years.

  1. Creativity in Manic-Depressives, Cyclothymes, Their Normal Relatives, and Control Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ruth L.; And Others

    Although previous studies support familial and individual relationships between creativity and affective illness, most have examined eminent creative individuals. This is the first study of creativity in subjects defined only by psychodiagnostic criteria. Creative accomplishment over the adult lifetime was assessed broadly using a new instrument,…

  2. Spino-pelvic-rhythm with forward trunk bending in normal subjects without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Sairyo, Koichi; Hada, Yasushi; Dezawa, Akira; Okubo, Yu; Kaneoka, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    A strong correlation between low back pain and tight hamstrings has been reported. However, the effect of tight hamstrings on spinal biomechanics remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate spino-pelvic-rhythm during forward bending of the trunk and to clarify the rhythm features with regard to hamstrings tightness. Eighteen healthy male adults with no history of low back pain volunteered to participate. First, we measured the finger-to-floor distance (FFD) in the upright position and set this parameter to 100 %. Using a spinal mouse, spinal alignment was measured in the following four positions: (1) upright posture—100 % FFD; (2) forward bending—50 % FFD; (3) forward bending—25 % FFD; and (4) forward bending—0 % FFD (fingers in contact with the floor). Changes of the angle of the thoracic and lumbar spine as well as the pelvis were calculated. As an indicator of tight hamstrings, we measured straight leg raising (SLR) angle. From positions 1–2 (phase I), the entire spino-pelvic angle moved in 104°. During this phase, the lumbar spine mainly moved. In the second phase (positions 2–3), it moved in 16°. Interestingly, all but 2 subjects showed a negative angle in the thoracic motion, meaning that the thoracic spine extended 4° during trunk flexion, thus exhibiting paradoxical motion. During this phase, lumbopelvic rhythm showed 2 patterns. In 7 subjects, pelvic motion was greater than lumbar motion, while the remaining subjects showed the opposite. In subjects without tight hamstrings, 83 % showed a pelvis-dominant pattern. Only 7 subjects were capable of position 4. During this phase, only slight motion was noted in the spine, and the majority of the motion occurred in the pelvis. Lumbar and pelvic motion correlated negatively in all phases. SLR angle and pelvic motion correlated strongly during phase III, indicating dominant pelvic movement in flexible subjects. The lumbo-pelvic-rhythm comprises 2 patterns—lumbar dominant and

  3. Spino-pelvic-rhythm with forward trunk bending in normal subjects without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Kiyotaka; Sairyo, Koichi; Hada, Yasushi; Dezawa, Akira; Okubo, Yu; Kaneoka, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    A strong correlation between low back pain and tight hamstrings has been reported. However, the effect of tight hamstrings on spinal biomechanics remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate spino-pelvic-rhythm during forward bending of the trunk and to clarify the rhythm features with regard to hamstrings tightness. Eighteen healthy male adults with no history of low back pain volunteered to participate. First, we measured the finger-to-floor distance (FFD) in the upright position and set this parameter to 100 %. Using a spinal mouse, spinal alignment was measured in the following four positions: (1) upright posture-100 % FFD; (2) forward bending-50 % FFD; (3) forward bending-25 % FFD; and (4) forward bending-0 % FFD (fingers in contact with the floor). Changes of the angle of the thoracic and lumbar spine as well as the pelvis were calculated. As an indicator of tight hamstrings, we measured straight leg raising (SLR) angle. From positions 1-2 (phase I), the entire spino-pelvic angle moved in 104°. During this phase, the lumbar spine mainly moved. In the second phase (positions 2-3), it moved in 16°. Interestingly, all but 2 subjects showed a negative angle in the thoracic motion, meaning that the thoracic spine extended 4° during trunk flexion, thus exhibiting paradoxical motion. During this phase, lumbopelvic rhythm showed 2 patterns. In 7 subjects, pelvic motion was greater than lumbar motion, while the remaining subjects showed the opposite. In subjects without tight hamstrings, 83 % showed a pelvis-dominant pattern. Only 7 subjects were capable of position 4. During this phase, only slight motion was noted in the spine, and the majority of the motion occurred in the pelvis. Lumbar and pelvic motion correlated negatively in all phases. SLR angle and pelvic motion correlated strongly during phase III, indicating dominant pelvic movement in flexible subjects. The lumbo-pelvic-rhythm comprises 2 patterns-lumbar dominant and pelvis

  4. Left ventricular volumes during exercise in normal subjects and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomai, F; Ciavolella, M; Crea, F; Gaspardone, A; Versaci, F; Giannitti, C; Scali, D; Chiariello, L; Gioffrè, P A

    1993-11-15

    During isotonic exercise, left ventricular (LV) suction and the Frank-Starling law of the heart may have important roles in the enhancement of early LV diastolic filling and in the increase of myocardial contractility, respectively. It remains controversial whether these mechanisms operate in normal subjects or patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Ten healthy subjects and 10 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent maximal upright bicycle exercise testing were studied. First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed at both rest and peak exercise using a multicrystal gamma camera. In normal subjects, LV end-systolic volume at peak exercise was smaller than during baseline (17 +/- 7 vs 30 +/- 15 ml/m2; p < 0.05), whereas rapid filling volume was greater (52 +/- 16 vs 38 +/- 8 ml/m2; p < 0.01). In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, both end-systolic (108 +/- 34 to 123 +/- 53 ml/m2; p = NS) and rapid filling (24 +/- 6 to 28 +/- 9 ml/m2; p = NS) volumes did not change from rest to peak exercise. A significant correlation was found between the changes in end-systolic volume at peak exercise and in peak rapid filling rate in normal subjects (r = 0.6; p < 0.05), but not in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (r = 0.3; p = NS). In normal subjects, end-diastolic volume at peak exercise was similar to that during baseline (78 +/- 14 and 85 +/- 15 ml/m2, respectively; p = NS), whereas in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, it was greater (164 +/- 50 vs 146 +/- 33 ml/m2; p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Reexamining the Validity and Reliability of the Clinical Version of the Iowa Gambling Task: Evidence from a Normal Subject Group

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Chen, Ying-Ying; Lee, We-Kang; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2013-01-01

    Over past decade, the Iowa gambling task (IGT) has been utilized to test various decision deficits induced by neurological damage or psychiatric disorders. The IGT has recently been standardized for identifying 13 different neuropsychological disorders. Neuropsychological patients choose bad decks frequently, and normal subjects prefer good expected value (EV) decks. However, the IGT has several validity and reliability problems. Some research groups have pointed out that the validity of IGT is influenced by the personality and emotional state of subjects. Additionally, several other studies have proposed that the “prominent deck B phenomenon” (PDB phenomenon) – that is, normal subjects preferring bad deck B – may be the most serious problem confronting IGT validity. Specifically, deck B offers a high frequency of gains but negative EV. In the standard IGT administration, choice behavior can be understood with reference to gain-loss frequency (GLF) rather than inferred future consequences (EV, the basic assumption of IGT). Furthermore, using two different criteria (basic assumption vs. professional norm) results in significantly different classification results. Therefore, we recruited 72 normal subjects to test the validity and reliability of IGT. Each subject performed three runs of the computer-based clinical IGT version. The PDB phenomenon has been observed to a significant degree in the first and second stages of the clinical IGT version. Obviously, validity, reliability, and the practice effect were unstable between two given stages. The present form of the clinical IGT version has only one stage, so its use should be reconsidered for examining normal decision makers; results from patient groups must also be interpreted with great care. GLF could be the main factor to be considered in establishing the constructional validity and reliability of the clinical IGT version. PMID:23755026

  6. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Related to Hypoadrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.; Waters, Wendy W.; Shi, Shang-Jin; Hayashi, Yuho; Perez, Sondra A.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, making astronauts hemodynamically compromised. After landing, astronauts separate into two groups. One group compensates for the hypovolemia with a hyper-sympathetic response during upright tilt testing and can complete a tilt test with few symptoms. The other group is unable to mount a hyper-sympathetic response and experiences orthostatic hypotension and presyncope during upright tilt tests. We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, also would cause subjects to separate into presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups according to their sympathetic responses during tilt. We studied 20 subjects, including 10 veteran astronauts, on three occasions. On Days 1 (normovolemia) and 3 (hypovolemia), plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Forty hours prior to Day 3, subjects were given intravenous furosemide, followed by 36 hours of a 10MEq Na diet. Statistical comparisons were made between normovolemia and hypovolemia responses. This protocol reproduced landing day tilt test outcomes with 100% fidelity in the astronauts. Similarly to patterns reported after flight, non-presyncopal subjects had greater norepinephrine responses to tilt during hypovolemia compared to normovolemia (580 plus or minus 79 vs. 298 plus or minus 37 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but presyncopal subjects had no increase (180 plus or minus 44 vs. 145 plus or minus 32 pg/ml, P=NS). This model can be used to predict astronauts who will become presyncopal on landing day, so that prospective, individualized countermeasures can be developed. Within patient populations, it can be used to study the interaction of volemic state and the sympathetic nervous system.

  7. High wavenumber Raman spectroscopy in the characterization of urinary metabolites of normal subjects, oral premalignant and malignant patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindha, Elumalai; Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2017-01-01

    Urine has emerged as one of the diagnostically potential bio fluids, as it has many metabolites. As the concentration and the physiochemical properties of the urinary metabolites may vary under pathological transformation, Raman spectroscopic characterization of urine has been exploited as a significant tool in identifying several diseased conditions, including cancers. In the present study, an attempt was made to study the high wavenumber (HWVN) Raman spectroscopic characterization of urine samples of normal subjects, oral premalignant and malignant patients. It is concluded that the urinary metabolites flavoproteins, tryptophan and phenylalanine are responsible for the observed spectral variations between the normal and abnormal groups. Principal component analysis-based linear discriminant analysis was carried out to verify the diagnostic potentiality of the present technique. The discriminant analysis performed across normal and oral premalignant subjects classifies 95.6% of the original and 94.9% of the cross-validated grouped cases correctly. In the second analysis performed across normal and oral malignant groups, the accuracy of the original and cross-validated grouped cases was 96.4% and 92.1% respectively. Similarly, the third analysis performed across three groups, normal, oral premalignant and malignant groups, classifies 93.3% and 91.2% of the original and cross-validated grouped cases correctly.

  8. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  9. Influence of BMI on health-related quality of life: comparison between an obese adult cohort and age-matched population norms.

    PubMed

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; Caterson, Ian D; Leibman, Steven; Smith, Garett S; Sambrook, Phillip N; Fransen, Marlene; March, Lyn M

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine health-related quality of life and fatigue measures in obese subjects and to compare scores with age- and gender-matched population norms. A total of 163 obese subjects were recruited from laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding or exercise and diet weight loss programs between March 2006 and December 2007. All subjects completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL), and Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) questionnaires. One-sample t-tests were used to compare transformed scores with age- and gender-matched population norms and controls. Obese subjects have significantly lower SF-36 physical and emotional component scores, significantly lower AQoL utility scores and significantly higher fatigue scores compared to age-matched population norms. Within the study cohort, the SF-36 physical functioning, role physical and bodily pain scores, and AQoL utility index were even lower in subjects with clinical knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, obese individuals without OA still had significantly lower scores compared to population norms. Obesity is associated with impaired health-related quality of life and disability as measured by the SF-36, AQoL, and fatigue score (MAF) compared to matched population norms.

  10. Baseline MNREAD Measures for Normally Sighted Subjects From Childhood to Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Calabrèse, Aurélie; Cheong, Allen M. Y.; Cheung, Sing-Hang; He, Yingchen; Kwon, MiYoung; Mansfield, J. Stephen; Subramanian, Ahalya; Yu, Deyue; Legge, Gordon E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The continuous-text reading-acuity test MNREAD is designed to measure the reading performance of people with normal and low vision. This test is used to estimate maximum reading speed (MRS), critical print size (CPS), reading acuity (RA), and the reading accessibility index (ACC). Here we report the age dependence of these measures for normally sighted individuals, providing baseline data for MNREAD testing. Methods We analyzed MNREAD data from 645 normally sighted participants ranging in age from 8 to 81 years. The data were collected in several studies conducted by different testers and at different sites in our research program, enabling evaluation of robustness of the test. Results Maximum reading speed and reading accessibility index showed a trilinear dependence on age: first increasing from 8 to 16 years (MRS: 140–200 words per minute [wpm]; ACC: 0.7–1.0); then stabilizing in the range of 16 to 40 years (MRS: 200 ± 25 wpm; ACC: 1.0 ± 0.14); and decreasing to 175 wpm and 0.88 by 81 years. Critical print size was constant from 8 to 23 years (0.08 logMAR), increased slowly until 68 years (0.21 logMAR), and then more rapidly until 81 years (0.34 logMAR). logMAR reading acuity improved from −0.1 at 8 years to −0.18 at 16 years, then gradually worsened to −0.05 at 81 years. Conclusions We found a weak dependence of the MNREAD parameters on age in normal vision. In broad terms, MNREAD performance exhibits differences between three age groups: children 8 to 16 years, young adults 16 to 40 years, and middle-aged to older adults >40 years. PMID:27442222

  11. Action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on ventilatory control in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Maranetra, N; Pain, M C

    1976-03-20

    The action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on the ventilatory response to inhaled carbon dioxide has been assessed in 10 normal volunteers. In doses of 50 mg and 100 mg given intravenously, tilidine hydrochloride induced less respiratory depression than 10 mg of morphine given intravenously. Side effects were not different or troublesome with either drug. Depending on its relative pain-relieving property, tilidine hydrochloride may have advantages over morphine as an analgesic.

  12. 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of hepatic glucose metabolism in normal subjects and subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Cline, G W; Rothman, D L; Magnusson, I; Katz, L D; Shulman, G I

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effect of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) on rates and pathways of hepatic glycogen synthesis, as well as flux through hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase, we used 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the peak intensity of the C1 resonance of the glucosyl units of hepatic glycogen, in combination with acetaminophen to sample the hepatic UDP-glucose pool and phenylacetate to sample the hepatic glutamine pool, during a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp using [1-13C]-glucose. Five subjects with poorly controlled IDDM and six age-weight-matched control subjects were clamped at a mean plasma glucose concentration of approximately 9 mM and mean plasma insulin concentrations approximately 400 pM for 5 h. Rates of hepatic glycogen synthesis were similar in both groups (approximately 0.43 +/- 0.09 mumol/ml liver min). However, flux through the indirect pathway of glycogen synthesis (3 carbon units-->-->glycogen) was increased by approximately 50% (P < 0.05), whereas the relative contribution of pyruvate oxidation to TCA cycle flux was decreased by approximately 30% (P < 0.05) in the IDDM subjects compared to the control subjects. These studies demonstrate that patients with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus have augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and relative decreased rates of hepatic pyruvate oxidation. These abnormalities are not immediately reversed by normalizing intraportal concentrations of glucose, insulin, and glucagon and may contribute to postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:7989593

  13. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  14. A binocular contribution to the production of optokinetic nystagmus in normal and stereoblind subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. M.; Held, R.; Bauer, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Viewing a large patterned field moving in one direction produces a regular pattern of eye movements known as optokinetic nystagmus (OKN). Fox et al. (1978) showed that the mechanism producing OKN can utilize purely binocular or 'cyclopean' input. Experiments reported confirm that finding and extend it to demonstrate that the binocularity of this mechanism is not disrupted in subjects who lack stereopsis. This result indicates that there exists more than one binocular process in the visual system.

  15. Influence of the heart rate on mean circumferential shortening velocity: echocardiographic study of 183 normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, R; Martinotti, R; Monzani, V; Sardella, F; Pierini, A; Pastori, M; Randazzo, A

    1986-01-01

    Echocardiography was used to explore the influence of independent variables (age, body surface area and heart rate) on the mean circumferential shortening velocity (MVCF) in 183 healthy subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis shows that heart rate is the only variable of the three just mentioned that influences MVCF. A regression equation is evolved and proposed as an index of MVCF correction for varying heart rates.

  16. Expiratory muscle training and sensation of respiratory effort during exercise in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S.; Sato, M.; Okubo, T.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The sensation of respiratory effort may increase as expiratory muscles become fatigued during expiratory loading. A study was performed to determine whether expiratory muscle training (EMT) affects the sensation of respiratory effort during exercise in healthy subjects. METHODS--Six subjects performed EMT for 15 minutes twice daily for four weeks using a pressure threshold device; another six subjects served as a control group. The expiratory threshold was set at 30% of the individual's maximum expiratory mouth pressure (PEmax). The sensation of respiratory effort was evaluated during a progressive exercise test using the Borg scale. RESULTS--After EMT PEmax increased by 25% in the training group. The Borg score increased as exercise grade increased before and after EMT, but scores for each grade were lower after EMT. Minute ventilation during exercise decreased after EMT, as did the breathing frequency during exercise, while the expiratory time increased. Although there was no difference in the relationship between Borg score and minute ventilation before or after EMT, the curve shifted to a lower Borg score after EMT. There were no changes in PEmax, Borg score, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern after the four week study period in the control group. CONCLUSION--These findings suggest that EMT increases expiratory muscle strength and reduces the sensation of respiratory effort during exercise, presumably by reducing minute ventilation. PMID:7785008

  17. Effect of tone-based sound stimulation on balance performance of normal subjects: preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Pagnacco, Guido; Klotzek, Adam S; Carrick, Frederick R; Wright, Cameron H G; Oggero, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Sound is known to affect the human brain, hence sound or music therapy is sometimes used to improve a subject's physicaland mental health. In this study, the effects sound stimulation has on balance were investigated by means of computerizeddynamic posturography tests performed with eyes closed on an unstable surface using a CAPS® system, exceeding theInternational Society for Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR) recommended metrological performance standards. Subjectswere tested without listening to any music (baseline), listening to “pure music”, and listening to the same music with differenttones embedded into it (one for each key). We found that different subjects react differently to different tones. Music alonedid not have a statistically significant effect on balance compared to the baseline, but the “best” tone significantly improvedbalance compared to the baseline or the “pure music” conditions. Furthermore, the “worst” tone reduced the balancecompared to “pure music”, but the reduction was not statistically significant relative to the baseline. The results thereforeindicate that, at least relative to balance performance, the tone-based sound stimulation we investigated is effective andinherently safe, but that tone selection depends on the individual subject.

  18. The Thai version of the German Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT): description of the test and performance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Pracharitpukdee, N; Phanthumchinda, K; Huber, W; Willmes, K

    1998-06-01

    The Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT), originally developed as a test for aphasia language disorders in Germany, consists of six spontaneous speech rating scales and five subtests: Token Test, Repetition, Written Language, Confronting Naming and Comprehension. The study aimed to describe the linguistic properties of the AAT Thai version and to investigate the test performances of the normal subjects. In this study some problems of linguistic changes in the construction of the Thai version were discussed. The results revealed that the normal subjects' performances on the test were independent of age, sex and education level. Therefore, the Thai version of AAT is applicable to the differential diagnosis of the communicative abilities of Thai aphasic patients.

  19. Analysis of visual appearance of retinal nerve fibers in high resolution fundus images: a study on normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Radim; Tornow, Ralf P; Laemmer, Robert; Odstrcilik, Jan; Mayer, Markus A; Gazarek, Jiri; Jan, Jiri; Kubena, Tomas; Cernosek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The retinal ganglion axons are an important part of the visual system, which can be directly observed by fundus camera. The layer they form together inside the retina is the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This paper describes results of a texture RNFL analysis in color fundus photographs and compares these results with quantitative measurement of RNFL thickness obtained from optical coherence tomography on normal subjects. It is shown that local mean value, standard deviation, and Shannon entropy extracted from the green and blue channel of fundus images are correlated with corresponding RNFL thickness. The linear correlation coefficients achieved values 0.694, 0.547, and 0.512 for respective features measured on 439 retinal positions in the peripapillary area from 23 eyes of 15 different normal subjects.

  20. Analysis of Visual Appearance of Retinal Nerve Fibers in High Resolution Fundus Images: A Study on Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tornow, Ralf P.; Odstrcilik, Jan; Mayer, Markus A.; Gazarek, Jiri; Jan, Jiri; Kubena, Tomas; Cernosek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The retinal ganglion axons are an important part of the visual system, which can be directly observed by fundus camera. The layer they form together inside the retina is the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This paper describes results of a texture RNFL analysis in color fundus photographs and compares these results with quantitative measurement of RNFL thickness obtained from optical coherence tomography on normal subjects. It is shown that local mean value, standard deviation, and Shannon entropy extracted from the green and blue channel of fundus images are correlated with corresponding RNFL thickness. The linear correlation coefficients achieved values 0.694, 0.547, and 0.512 for respective features measured on 439 retinal positions in the peripapillary area from 23 eyes of 15 different normal subjects. PMID:24454526

  1. Investigation of cytokines, oxidative stress, metabolic, and inflammatory biomarkers after orange juice consumption by normal and overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Grace K. Z. S.; Cesar, Thais B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal adiposity has been linked to metabolic abnormalities, including dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, and low-grade inflammation. Objective To test the hypothesis that consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) would improve metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory biomarkers and cytokine levels in normal and overweight subjects with increased waist circumference. Design Subjects were divided into two groups in accordance with their body mass index: normal and overweight. Both groups of individuals consumed 750 mL of OJ daily for 8 weeks. Body composition (weight, height, percentage of fat mass, and waist circumference); metabolic biomarkers (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and glycated hemoglobin); oxidative biomarkers (malondialdehyde and DPPH•); inflammatory biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]); cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ); and diet were evaluated before and after consumption of OJ for 8 weeks. Results The major findings of this study were: 1) no alteration in body composition in either group; 2) improvement of the lipid profile, evidenced by a reduction in total cholesterol and LDL-C; 3) a potential stimulation of the immune response due to increase in IL-12; 4) anti-inflammatory effect as a result of a marked reduction in hsCRP; and 5) antioxidant action by the enhancement of total antioxidant capacity and the reduction of lipid peroxidation, in both normal and overweight subjects. Conclusions OJ consumption has a positive effect on important biomarkers of health status in normal and overweight subjects, thereby supporting evidence that OJ acts as functional food and could be consumed as part of a healthy diet to prevent metabolic and chronic diseases. PMID:26490535

  2. Lung deposition patterns of directly labelled salbutamol in normal subjects and in patients with reversible airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, R; Biddiscombe, M F; Mak, V H; Short, M D; Spiro, S G

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Earlier studies of aerosol deposition in the lungs have relied on indirect labelling of Teflon spheres of a similar size distribution to the drug in question and have assumed similar aerodynamic properties. Using a modification of a new technique for directly labelling salbutamol, the deposition of salbutamol within the lungs of normal subjects and patients with asthma has been studied with the use of a metered dose inhaler (MDI) alone, an MDI with a spacer device, and a dry powder inhaler (DPI). METHOD--Salbutamol was directly labelled with technetium-99m and placed in an MDI or DPI. Ten normal subjects and 19 patients with asthma inhaled 200 micrograms of salbutamol by means of the MDI alone, the MDI with a spacer device attached, and by DPI on separate days. Deposition was assessed by a dual headed gamma camera after inhalation of the drug. RESULTS--The total mean (SD) percentage deposition of the drug in the normal subjects was 21.6% (8.9%) with the MDI alone, 20.9% (7.8%) with the MDI with spacer, and 12.4% (3.5%) with the DPI. For the patients, the mean percentage deposition was 18.2% (7.8%) with the MDI alone, 19.0% (8.9%) with the MDI and spacer, and 11.4% (5.0%) with the DPI. Bronchodilatation achieved by the patients was similar with all three techniques. Mean peripheral lung deposition was significantly greater with a spacer device than when the MDI was used alone in both normal subjects (49.4% (6.1%) v 44.1% (9.9%)) and patients (38.6% (11.1%) v 30.4% (9.4%)). CONCLUSIONS--The deposition of directly labelled salbutamol from an MDI is greater than previously estimated by indirect labelling techniques. The deposition of labelled salbutamol from a DPI, however, is little different from that measured by indirect techniques. PMID:8322237

  3. Correlation between Bethatrophin and 25(OH)D Concentrations in a Group of Subjects With Normal and Impaired Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Turkon, H; Yalcın, H; Toprak, B; Demirpençe, M; Yaşar, H Y; Colak, A

    2016-02-24

    Aim: Inducing beta cell replication is a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Recently betatrophin was suggested as a novel stimulator of beta cell proliferation in mice but its role in humans remains to be established. We aimed to investigate betatrophin concentration and its association with metabolic parameters in a group of individuals with normal glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus who had not been previously treated. Methods: A total of 72 subjects were recruited for this cross sectional study: 23 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 22 subjects with prediabetes, and 27 subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM). Circulating betatrophin concentration, 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, fasting insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, 25hydroxy vitamin D and HOMA IR were measured. Results: The difference in betatrophin values did not reach statistical significance between the 3 groups [NGT:206 (176-297)pg/mL, Prediabetes:232 (181-254)pg/mL, DM:245 (205-526)pg/mL, p=0.078]. Betatrophin was negatively significantly correlated with BMI and positively significantly correlated with 25(OH)vitD (p=0.043 and p=0.001 respectively). Multivariate linear regression showed that 25(OH) vitD (β=0.440 p=0.001) and fasting glucose (β=0.003 p=0.038) were variables associated with betatrophin concentration (R2=0.251). Conclusions: In a group of subjects ranging from those with normal glucose tolerance to newly diagnosed diabetes, we found that 25(OH)D and fasting glucose were factors associated with serum betatrophin concentration.

  4. Coupled vibrations of rectangular buildings subjected to normally-incident random wind loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Foutch, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for analyzing the three-directional coupled dynamic response of wind-excited buildings is presented. The method is based on a random vibration concept and is parallel to those currently used for analyzing alongwind response. Only the buildings with rectangular cross-section and normally-incident wind are considered. The alongwind pressures and their correlations are represented by the well-known expressions that are available in the literature. The acrosswind forces are assumed to be mainly due to vortex shedding. The torque acting on the building is taken as the sum of the torque due to random alongwind forces plus the torque due to asymmetric acrosswind forces. The study shows the following: (1) amplitude of acrosswind vibrations can be several times greater than that of alongwind vibrations; (2) torsional vibrations are significant if the building has large frontal width, and/or it is asymmetric, and/or its torsional natural frequency is low; (3) even a perfectly symmetric structure with normally incident wind can experience significant torsional vibrations due to the randomness of wind pressures. ?? 1987.

  5. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Xavier; Muscente-Paque, Delphine; Chappuis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE) standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL), glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG) responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001). Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals. PMID:27707453

  6. What Limits Cardiac Performance during Exercise in Normal Subjects and in Healthy Fontan Patients?

    PubMed Central

    La Gerche, André; Gewillig, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is an important determinant of health but is significantly reduced in the patient with a univentricular circulation. Normal exercise physiology mandates an increase in pulmonary artery pressures which places an increased work demand on the right ventricle (RV). In a biventricular circulation with pathological increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and/or reductions in RV function, exercise-induced augmentation of cardiac output is limited. Left ventricular preload reserve is dependent upon flow through the pulmonary circulation and this requires adequate RV performance. In the Fontan patient, the reasons for exercise intolerance are complex. In those patients with myocardial dysfunction or other pathologies of the circulatory components, it is likely that these abnormalities serve as a limitation to cardiac performance during exercise. However, in the healthy Fontan patient, it may be the absence of a sub-pulmonary pump which limits normal increases in pulmonary pressures, trans-pulmonary flow requirements and cardiac output. If so, performance will be exquisitely dependent on pulmonary vascular resistance. This provides a potential explanation as to why pulmonary vasodilators may improve exercise tolerance. As has recently been demonstrated, these agents may offer an important new treatment strategy which directly addresses the physiological limitations in the Fontan patient. PMID:20871839

  7. Frequency-domain photon migration measurements of normal and malignant tissue optical properties in a human subject

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkin, J.B.; Coquoz, O.; Anderson, E.R.; Brenner, M.; Tromberg, B.J. |

    1997-01-01

    A 1-GHz multifrequency, multiwavelength frequency-domain photon migration instrument is used to measure quantitatively the optical absorption ({mu}{sub a}) and effective optical scattering ({mu}{sub s}{sup {prime}}) of normal and malignant tissues in a human subject. Large ellipsoidal ({approximately}10-cm major axis, {approximately}6-cm minor axes) subcutaneous malignant lesions were compared with adjacent normal sites in the abdomen and back. Absorption coefficients recorded at 674, 811, 849, and 956 nm were used to calculate tissue hemoglobin concentration (oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total), water concentration, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood volume fraction {ital in vivo}. Our results show that the normal and the malignant tissues measured in the patient have clearly resolvable optical and physiological property differences that may be broadly useful in identifying and characterizing tumors.{copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  8. Subjective forgetfulness in a normal Dutch population: possibilities for health education and other interventions.

    PubMed

    Commissaris, C J; Ponds, R W; Jolles, J

    1998-05-01

    Many, especially elderly people, are worried about their diminishing memory. In order to be able to improve health education activities about forgetfulness and aging processes, nearly 2000 healthy Dutch people, aged 25-85 years, participated in a postal survey into the determinants of subjective forgetfulness. As expected, there was a systematic increase in the prevalence of forgetfulness with age. The relatively high prevalence of forgetfulness in the young (29%) and middle-aged groups (34%) was unexpected. Besides age, the occurrence of dementia in a close relative appeared to be a strong predictor of people's subjective forgetfulness. Furthermore, people who felt more in control of their memory functioning reported less forgetfulness. Younger people ascribed their forgetfulness mostly to external causes (stress, concentration) and older people to internal causes (age, retardation). Eleven percent of all forgetful people were interested in an intervention for their memory complaints. In this group, education (37%), memory training (29%), and medication (12%) were the preferred interventions. No differences were found between older and younger respondents.

  9. Relative activity of cerebral subcortical gray matter in varying states of attention and awareness in normal subjects and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Levy, J.; Wagner, N.; Spire, J.P.; Jacobsen, J.; Meltzer, H.; Metz, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    An important aspect of the study of brain function involves measurement of the relationships; between activities in the subcortical gray matter of the caudate and of the thalamus; and between these structures and functional cortical areas. The authors have studied these relationships in 22 subjects under different conditions of activation, sleep and sensory deprivation using a PET VI system and F-18-2DG to determine regional cerebral metabolism. Subject activating conditions were maintained throughout the period of equilibration of F-18-2DG and E.E.G.'s were monitored. Multiple tomographic slices of 1-2 million counts were obtained simultaneously with slice separation of 14mm and each plane parallel to the cantho-meatal line. In activated and non-activated awake conditions for normal subjects, left and right thalmus-to-caudate ratios were similar and greater than unity. This relationship was maintained in non-REM sleep, but was reversed and divergent in REM sleep and sensory deprivation; this was also evident in 3/4 narcoleptics awake and asleep in non-REM and REM and 2/3 schizophrenics and affective disorder, subjects. This approach appears to have potential for characterizating normal and disordered regional cerebral function.

  10. Initial rightward orienting bias in clinical tasks: normal subjects and right hemispheric stroke patients with and without neglect.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Maarit J; Lindell, Arja B; Brunila, Teea; Tenovuo, Olli; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2002-06-01

    In order to develop the diagnosis of hemi-inattention in patients with right hemispheric cerebrovascular accident (RCVA), the initial starting point of cancellation performance was studied in seven commonly used visual cancellation tasks, an Object Finding task, and a blindfold Tactuo-motor search task. The subject groups consisted of 34 patients with RCVA and 31 healthy subjects. Patients were divided into groups of contralateral neglect and no neglect. One additional case of ipsilesional neglect and one of nonlateralised attentional disorder in relation to early orienting bias, are reported. Patients with contralateral neglect showed a strong tendency to start their cancellation performance on the right. Also, half of the nonneglect patient group demonstrated right bias in initiating their cancellation performance, suggesting the presence of a subclinical hemi-inattention group. Contrary to expectations, also a small proportion of normal subjects were right-biased. Task dependent differences in the assessment of early rightward orienting bias were found.

  11. Clearance and synthesis rates of beta 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis and in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Floege, J.; Bartsch, A.; Schulze, M.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M.; Smeby, L.C. )

    1991-08-01

    Retention of {beta} 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis is associated with a {beta} 2-microglobulin-derived amyloidosis. Removal of {beta} 2-microglobulin by renal replacement therapy has been proposed for the prevention of this amyloidosis. Currently, however, data on the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in patients undergoing hemodialysis are scarce, and consequently it remains speculative how much removal would be necessary to counterbalance synthesis. The plasma kinetics of iodine 131-labeled {beta} 2-microglobulin were therefore examined in 11 patients with anuria who were undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Five healthy persons served as controls. Kinetic modeling of the plasma curves showed that the data fitted a two-pool model (r2 greater than 0.96) consisting of a rapid 2 to 4 hour distribution phase followed by a less steep curve, described by the plasma (metabolic) clearance (Clp). Synthetic rates were calculated from Clp and the {beta} 2-microglobulin steady state plasma concentration (plus {beta} 2-microglobulin removal during hemodialysis in the case of high flux hemodialysis). The results showed a significantly higher Clp in normal controls as compared with patients undergoing hemodialysis (65.5 {plus minus} 12.8 ml/min (mean {plus minus} SD) versus 3.4 {plus minus} 0.7 ml/min). In contrast, the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in the patient group (3.10 {plus minus} 0.79 mg/kg/day) was not significantly different from that of normal controls (2.40 {plus minus} 0.67 mg/kg/day), which was due to markedly elevated {beta} 2-microglobulin plasma concentrations in the patients (37.6 {plus minus} 14.1 mg/L vs 1.92 {plus minus} 0.27 mg/L). These findings suggest that the presence of end-stage renal disease does not have a significant impact on the beta 2-microglobulin generation rate.

  12. The effects of diet and physical activity on plasma homovanillic acid in normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S; Mohs, R C; Davis, K L

    1983-03-01

    This study examines the effect of diet and moderate physical activity on plasma levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) in healthy young males. At weekly intervals, subjects were fed four isocaloric meals: polycose (pure carbohydrate), sustecal, low monoamine, and high monoamine. Moderate physical activity consisted of 30 minutes of exercise on a bicycle ergometer. The effect of diet on plasma HVA (pHVA) was highly significant. Compared to the polycose meal, the high monoamine meal significantly increased pHVA. Moderate physical activity also significantly increased pHVA. Future clinical studies using pHVA in man as an index of brain dopamine function should control for the effects of both diet and physical activity.

  13. Variations of brain activities of acupuncture to TE5 of left hand in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Chien-Yue; Ke, Ming-Da; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Sun, Yuan-Ting; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the evident effects of acupoint stimulation, using EEG (electroencephalogram) measurements. With acupuncture stimulation and the EEG measurement on the same meridian, EEG is able to accurately detect the effects of acupunctural point stimulation on brain waves. In this study, 24 subjects without heart or neural diseases were randomly separated into two groups of 12, named test and control groups. Similar procedures are performed; the subjects lay on a bed with eyes closed for ten minutes as the baseline. The test group received acupuncture at their Waiguan points (TE5) on their left hands for 20 minutes, while the control group did not. EEGs are recorded during pre-acupuncture, acupuncture stimulation and post-acupuncture stimulation periods. The EEG electrodes are at the T3, T4, O1 and O2 locations. Continuous wavelet transformation analysis is adopted; therefore, EEGs are divided into the following bands: δ (0.5-4HZ), θ (4-8HZ), α (8-13HZ) and β (13-30HZ). During acupuncture stimulation, the θ energy is increased and had statistical differences at all electrode points, T3, T4, O1 and O2. Upon removing the needle, the energy at the T3 and T4 points slowly declined and revealed obvious statistical differences. During acupuncture, only α energy has been noted to have statistical difference and it was increased at the T3 point. However, the energy was decreased and had no statistical difference after five minutes. Acupuncture is proven to be able to affect brain waves, as the stimulation might have changed the tissues between the cranium and scalp; therefore, the brain waves are detected more easily.

  14. Insulin-resistant subjects have normal angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training in skeletal muscle, but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian S; Mula, Jyothi; Long, Douglas E; Zhu, Beibei; Fry, Christopher S; Westgate, Philip M; Lee, Jonah D; Bennett, Tamara; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Reduced vessel density in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is associated with obesity and may result in decreased perfusion, decreased oxygen consumption, and insulin resistance. In the presence of VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) and Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) are central determinants of angiogenesis, with greater Angpt2:Angpt1 ratios promoting angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, exercise training stimulates angiogenesis and modulates transcription of VEGFA, Angpt1, and Angpt2. However, it remains unknown whether exercise training stimulates vessel growth in human adipose tissue, and it remains unknown whether adipose angiogenesis is mediated by angiopoietin signaling. We sought to determine whether insulin-resistant subjects would display an impaired angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training. Insulin-sensitive (IS, N = 12) and insulin-resistant (IR, N = 14) subjects had subcutaneous adipose and muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies before and after 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training. In both tissues, we measured vessels and expression of pro-angiogenic genes. Exercise training did not increase insulin sensitivity in IR Subjects. In skeletal muscle, training resulted in increased vessels/muscle fiber and increased Angpt2:Angpt1 ratio in both IR and IS subjects. However, in adipose, exercise training only induced angiogenesis in IS subjects, likely due to chronic suppression of VEGFA expression in IR subjects. These results indicate that skeletal muscle of IR subjects exhibits a normal angiogenic response to exercise training. However, the same training regimen is insufficient to induce angiogenesis in adipose tissue of IR subjects, which may help to explain why we did not observe improved insulin sensitivity following aerobic training.

  15. White matter diffusivity predicts memory in patients with subjective and mild cognitive impairment and normal CSF total tau levels.

    PubMed

    Grambaite, Ramune; Stenset, Vidar; Reinvang, Ivar; Walhovd, Kristine B; Fjell, Anders M; Fladby, Tormod

    2010-01-01

    Subjective and mild cognitive impairment (SCI and MCI) are etiologically heterogeneous conditions. This poses problems for assessment of pathophysiological mechanisms and risk of conversion to dementia. Neuropsychological, imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings serve to distinguish Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other etiological subgroups. Tau-molecules stabilize axonal microtubuli; high CSF total tau (T-tau) reflects ongoing axonal damage consistent with AD. Here, we stratify patients by CSF T-tau pathology to determine if memory network diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) predicts memory performance in the absence of elevated T-tau. We analyzed neuropsychological test results, hippocampus volume (HcV) and white matter diffusivity in 45 patients (35 with normal T-tau). The T-tau pathology group showed more hippocampus atrophy and memory impairment than the normal T-tau group. In the T-tau normal group: (1) memory was related with white matter diffusivity [fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (DR)], and (2) FA of the genu corpus callosum was a unique predictor of variance for verbal learning, and HcV did not contribute to this prediction. The smaller sample size in the T-tau pathology group precludes firm conclusions. In the normal T-tau group, white matter tract and memory changes may be associated with normal aging, or with non-tau related pathological mechanisms.

  16. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jânio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Methods: We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. Results: A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). Conclusions: CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle). PMID:26229733

  17. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis.

  18. Glycoconjugates in sweat glands and other structures of skin from normal and cystic fibrosis subjects.

    PubMed

    Hazen-Martin, D J; Sens, D A; Spicer, S S

    1986-12-01

    In this study, glycoconjugates of human skin varied in structure between cell types in an individual and often between individuals for a given cell type. Stored secretory material in dark cells of the sweat gland coil contained complex carbohydrate with terminal alpha-galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose, or sialic acid. The plasmalemma of clear cells in the secretory coil stained conspicuously for terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine, and the cytosol of clear cells contained lectin-reactive glycogen in the majority of specimens. Superficial and deep cells of the sweat duct evidenced plasmalemmal glycoconjugate with terminal N-acetylgalactosamine. However, only the superficial cell plasmalemma in the duct stained for terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose, and sialic acid. In several specimens, only the deep cells in the sweat duct revealed plasmalemmal glycoconjugate with terminal beta-galactose. Sebaceous glands alone displayed lectin affinity demonstrative of terminal alpha-galactose and like other sites stained for terminal beta-galactose and alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine. The epithelium in epidermis and hair follicles appeared similar, except for epidermis failing to evidence fucose and alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine with certain lectins. Both underwent changes in glycoconjugate composition with cell maturation. Skin from control subjects and patients with cystic fibrosis did not differ in lectin-binding properties. Abnormalities observed in cystic fibrosis specimens included decreased volume of sebaceous glands and, in two cases, increased infiltration of macrophages staining for terminal N-acetylgalactosamine.

  19. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  20. [Comparative effects of couscous and pasta on glycemia in normal subjects and type I diabetics].

    PubMed

    Jamel, N; Hajri, S; Jenkins, D J; Bousnina, S; Naggati, K; Jedidi, H; Boukhris, R; Bennaceur, B

    1990-01-01

    8 healthy subjects have eaten in the morning, after an overnight fast, in two separated occasions and in a randomised order 50 gr of CHO as pasta or couscous. Blood glucose after pasta ingestion was lower at 30 mn (p less than 0.05) at 45 mn (p less than 0.01) and at 60 mn (p less than 0.05). Area under the curve after pasta was significantly reduced (p less than 0.01). In a second time 6 IDDM patients have eaten in a randomised order a meal made of pasta with tomato sauce (P = 11%, F = 30%, G = 59%) or couscous with vegetables and sauce (P = 10%, F = 37%, G = 53%). Blood glucose after the pasta was lower than couscous at 90 mn (p less than 0.05) the area under the curve after the pasta ingestion was reduced of 38% but did'nt reach significance. In conclusion couscous has a higher glycemic effect than pasta although it has a similar composition. This phenomenon is still observed when the cereal products are mixed with other foods and ingested by IDDM patients.

  1. Renal scintigraphy predicts global cardiovascular risk in hypertensive subjects with normal serum creatinine levels.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Alberto; Rampin, Lucia; Montemurro, Domenico; Schiavon, Laura; Zuin, Marco; Grassetto, Gaia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Ramazzina, Emilio; Rubello, Domenico

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND. This cross-sectional study investigates the role of renal scintigraphy on cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification in normoalbuminuric, non-diabetic hypertensive subjects (HTs) free from CV disease and renal dysfunction. METHODS. In 200 HTs aged 55-75 years, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured by technetium-99m-diethylene triamine pentacetic acid clearance during renal scintigraphy. Stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as GFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). For comparing the impact of different methods for CKD diagnosis on CV risk stratification, CKD was also considered as GFR estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and Cockcroft-Gault's formula. Target organ damage (TOD) was assessed by echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography. Gender-specific odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals for CKD were derived from a multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis. Global CV risk was stratified according to routine examinations, TOD and CKD. RESULTS. In 38% of cases, an unknown stage III CKD was found. Independent of age, CKD was predicted by history of hypertension (OR = 1.69, p = 0.0001), albuminuria (OR = 1.25, p = 0.0001), smoking (OR = 1.85, p = 0.028) and pulse pressure (OR = 1.21, p = 0.019) in men only. Men had an increased risk of CKD (OR = 2.62, p = 0.002) in comparison with women. Prevalence of TOD was significantly higher only in HTs having CKD diagnosed by renal scintigraphy; TOD and CKD assessment added to classic risk factors modified the CV risk stratification from low-moderate to high and very high. CONCLUSIONS. Renal scintigraphy is an important aid in risk stratification and should be performed in HTs aged >55 years. Pulse pressure was the main blood pressure component that predicted the risk of stage III CKD.

  2. The effect of a Lucia jig for 30 minutes on neuromuscular re-programming, in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mariangela Salles Pereira; Palinkas, Marcelo; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak; Sousa, Luiz Gustavo de; Siéssere, Selma; Semprini, Marisa; Bataglion, Cristiane; Bataglion, César

    2012-01-01

    The Lucia jig is a technique that promotes neuromuscular reprogramming of the masticatory system and allows the stabilization of the mandible without the interference of dental contacts, maintaining the mandible position in harmonic condition with the musculature in normal subjects or in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). This study aimed to electromyographically analyze the activity (RMS) of the masseter and temporal muscles in normal subjects (control group) during the use of an anterior programming device, the Lucia jig, in place for 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes to demonstrate its effect on the stomatognathic system. Forty-two healthy dentate individuals (aged 21 to 40 years) with normal occlusion and without parafunctional habits or temporomandibular dysfunction (RDC/TMD) were evaluated on the basis of the electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporal muscles before placement of a neuromuscular re-programming device, the Lucia jig, on the upper central incisors. There were no statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles in the different time periods. The Lucia jig changed the electromyographic activity by promoting a neuromuscular reprogramming. In most of the time periods, it decreased the activation of the masticatory muscles, showing that this device has wide applicability in dentistry. The use of a Lucia jig over 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes did not promote any statistically significant increase in muscle activity despite differences in the data, thus showing that this intra-oral device can be used in dentistry.

  3. Lactate: Brain Fuel in Human Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison with Normal Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; Horning, Michael A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that lactate shuttling helps support the nutritive needs of injured brains. To that end, we utilized dual isotope tracer [6,6-2H2]glucose, that is, D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate techniques involving arm vein tracer infusion along with simultaneous cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with nonpenetrating brain injuries (n=12) were entered into the study following consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from control volunteers (n=6). Patients were studied 5.7±2.2 (mean±SD) days post-injury; during periods when arterial glucose concentration tended to be higher in TBI patients. As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgluc, i.e., net glucose uptake) was significantly suppressed following TBI (p<0.001). However, lactate fractional extraction, an index of cerebral lactate uptake related to systemic lactate supply, approximated 11% in both healthy control subjects and TBI patients. Further, neither the CMR for lactate (CMRlac, i.e., net lactate release), nor the tracer-measured cerebral lactate uptake differed between healthy controls and TBI patients. The percentages of lactate tracer taken up and released as 13CO2 into the JB accounted for 92% and 91% for control and TBI conditions, respectively, suggesting that most cerebral lactate uptake was oxidized following TBI. Comparisons of isotopic enrichments of lactate oxidation from infused [3-13C]lactate tracer and 13C-glucose produced during hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis (GNG) showed that 75–80% of 13CO2 released into the JB was from lactate and that the remainder was from the oxidation of glucose secondarily labeled from lactate. Hence, either directly as lactate uptake, or indirectly via GNG, peripheral lactate production accounted for ∼70% of carbohydrate (direct lactate uptake+uptake of glucose from lactate) consumed by the

  4. Neural Mechanisms of Verb Argument Structure Processing in Agrammatic Aphasic and Healthy Age-Matched Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Cynthia K.; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Fix, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior peri-sylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions on the basis of argument structure complexity. The aim of…

  5. Effect of different protein types on second meal postprandial glycaemia in normal weight and normoglycemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Silva Ton, Winder Tadeu; das Graças de Almeida, Crislaine; de Morais Cardoso, Leandro; Marvila Girondoli, Yassana; Feliciano Pereira, Patrícia; Viana Gomes Schitini, Josiane Keila; Galvão Cândido, Flávia; Marques Arbex, Priscila; de Cássia Gonçalves Alfenas, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Introducción: La diabetes mellitus es una enfermedad epidémica que afecta a 346 millones de personas en el mundo. El control glicémico es la clave para la prevención y el control de la diabetes. Algunas proteínas pueden estimular la liberación de insulina y modular la respuesta glicémica. Objetivos: Evaluar el efecto del consumo de diferentes tipos de proteínas (proteína de suero de leche, proteína de soja y la clara de huevo) de la glicemia postprandial en una segunda comida en individuos de peso normal y normoglicémicos. Metodología: Este fue un ensayo clínico aleatorizado cruzado. Después de un ayuno nocturno de 12 horas, diez individuos asistieron al laboratorio para beber uno de los batidos de proteínas (suero de leche, soja o clara de huevo) o la bebida control. Treinta minutos más tarde, los individuos consumieron una solución de glucosa (25 g de glucosa). La respuesta glicémica fue monitorizada en los tiempos 0 (antes de solución de glucosa) y 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 y 120 min (después del consumo de la solución de glucosa). El área incrementada bajo la curva de glicemia (iAUC) fue calculada por el método trapezoidal. Por otra parte, la respuesta glicémica se evaluó mediante un nuevo método que utiliza la ecuación de iG. Resultados: En comparación con el control, las bebidas de suero de leche y de proteína de soja reducen iAUC postprandial en 56,5% (p = 0,004) y 44,4% (p = 0,029), respectivamente. La proteína de suero es la única proteína capaz de evitar grandes fluctuaciones y un pico de glicemia postprandial. La evaluación de la respuesta glicémica por la ecuación iG mostró correlación positiva con iAUC (Pearson 0,985, p < 0,05). Conclusión: El consumo de suero de leche y proteína de soja 30 minutos antes de una carga de glucosa resultó en menor iAUC en comparación con la bebida control. La proteína del suero mantiene la glucemia postprandial más estable.

  6. Longitudinal hair chromium profiles of elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stupar, Janez; Vrtovec, Matjaz; Dolinsek, Franci

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal hair chromium (H-Cr) profiles in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 59; age, 62 +/- 9 years) and healthy elderly (control) subjects (n = 49; age, 59 +/- 10 years) matched by age and sex were measured by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, providing data on the magnitude of variation of Cr content along the hair length. H-Cr average (H-Cr(av)) and H-Cr proximal (H-Cr(pr))(.), relating to the average Cr content of the whole hair and the proximal 3-mm hair length, respectively, were also obtained. No significant difference between the healthy and diabetic group was found in mean H-Cr(av) or H-Cr(pr) contents (248 +/- 108 vs 247 +/- 143 and 233 +/- 98 vs 278 +/- 195 ng/g, respectively. However, women in the control group had significantly lower H-Cr values (P < .01) compared with men, but this difference was absent in the diabetic population. The distribution of log H-Cr(pr) values in the control population displayed a Gaussian shape, in contrast to the substantially wider distribution, skewed toward lower H-Cr(pr) values, observed in the diabetic group. The magnitude of variation in H-Cr content in the patient group over an interval of approximately 2 to 3 months (time of growth of the hair sampled) was found to be a factor of more than 2 larger than that in the control population (+/- 58% vs +/- 26%). A strong relationship (R = 0.656; P < .01) between log H-Cr(pr) and log fasting plasma Cr was observed in the diabetic group (n = 20). The mean fasting plasma Cr value of this group was 0.41 +/- 0.10 microg Cr per liter. No correlation between H-Cr(av.) and duration of diabetes was observed. A strong positive association was observed in the control population between H-Cr(pr) and fasting plasma insulin (n = 22; R = 0.6157; P < .01), and H-Cr(pr) and fasting plasma glucose (n = 24; R = 0.4118; P < .05), which is indicative of the interrelation of these parameters. In the control population, H-Cr(av) showed a

  7. Effects of short term high frequency negative pressure ventilation on gas exchange using the Hayek oscillator in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Hardinge, F. M.; Davies, R. J.; Stradling, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The Hayek oscillator is a negative pressure cuirass that can operate at a range of frequencies to provide ventilation, and is a technique which could potentially be used on a general ward. This study examined the effect of different frequencies and different ranges of inspiratory and expiratory pressures on gas exchange, respiratory rate, and blood pressure in normal subjects. METHODS--Eight normal subjects received five minute periods of ventilation using the Hayek oscillator at five different frequencies, and a combination of two spans of inspiratory and expiratory pressures and two mean chamber pressures. A "sham" or control period was also performed at each frequency. Measurements were made of changes in gas exchange, spontaneous respiratory rate, and blood pressure before and after ventilation. RESULTS--There was significant intersubject variation in all results, independent of their height and weight. "Sham" settings acted as true controls in terms of gas exchange, but produced a fall in respiratory rate at 30 oscillations/min. The lower oscillatory frequencies of 30 and 60 oscillations/min produced the greatest increase in oxygenation, decrease in end tidal carbon dioxide pressure, and decrease in spontaneous respiratory rate. These effects were most significant at higher spans of pressure and were different from "sham" settings. No adverse effects were observed on blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS--The Hayek oscillator can provide assisted ventilation for short periods in normal conscious subjects with no adverse side effects on blood pressure. Maximal changes in gas exchange and a significant reduction in the spontaneous respiratory rate are seen when a combination of lower frequencies (30 and 60 oscillations/min) and higher spans of pressure are used. PMID:7886648

  8. Mental representation of normal subjects about the sources of knowledge in different semantic categories and unique entities.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido; Ciaraffa, Francesca; Silveri, Maria Caterina; Marra, Camillo

    2009-11-01

    According to the "sensory-motor model of semantic knowledge," different categories of knowledge differ for the weight that different "sources of knowledge" have in their representation. Our study aimed to evaluate this model, checking if subjective evaluations given by normal subjects confirm the different weight that various sources of knowledge have in the representation of different biological and artifact categories and of unique entities, such as famous people or monuments. Results showed that the visual properties are considered as the main source of knowledge for all the living and nonliving categories (as well as for unique entities), but that the clustering of these "sources of knowledge" is different for biological and artifacts categories. Visual data are, indeed, mainly associated with other perceptual (auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and tactual) attributes in the mental representation of living beings and unique entities, whereas they are associated with action-related properties and tactile information in the case of artifacts.

  9. Observation of cone and rod photoreceptors in normal subjects and patients using a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Duncan, Jacque L.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) to resolve cones and rods in normal subjects, and confirm our findings by comparing cone and rod spacing with published histology measurements. Cone and rod spacing measurements are also performed on AOSLO images from two different diseased eyes, one affected by achromatopsia and the other by acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). The potential of AOSLO technology in the study of these and other retinal diseases is illustrated. PMID:21833357

  10. Cortical connectivity patterns during imagination of limb movements in normal subjects and in a spinal cord injured patient.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Mattiocco, Marco; De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Ursino, Mauro; Zavaglia, Melissa; Gao, Shangkai; Wei, Wu; Babiloni, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    The problem of the definition and evaluation of brain connectivity has become a central one in neuroscience during the latest years, as a way to understand the organization and interaction of cortical areas during the execution of cognitive or motor tasks. In this paper we propose the use of the DTF method on cortical signals estimated from high resolution EEG recordings. An application of the proposed technique to the estimation of cortical connectivity pattern in normal subjects and in one spinal cord injured patient is also provided.

  11. Hyperglycemia-conditioned increase in alpha-2-macroglobulin in healthy normal subjects: a phenomenon correlated with deficient antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Giugliano, D

    1989-01-01

    Induced hyperglycemia in normal subjects increases alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and alpha 2M concentration and reduces antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, while it does not affect ATIII plasma concentration. Hyperglycemia-determined variations in ATIII activity and alpha 2M molecules are correlated in an inverse and parallel fashion. A compensatory role for the increase in alpha 2M in the regulation of the coagulation system may be hypothesized. Moreover, these data provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may influence the levels of some risk factors for the development of complications in diabetes.

  12. A geometric approach to study the contact mechanisms in the patellofemoral joint of normal versus patellofemoral pain syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kamrul; Duke, Kajsa; Mustafy, Tanvir; Adeeb, Samer M; Ronsky, Janet L; El-Rich, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics of the patellofemoral (PF) joint is complex in nature, and the aetiology of such manifestations of PF instability as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is still unclear. At this point, the particular factors affecting PFPS have not yet been determined. This study has two objectives: (1) The first is to develop an alternative geometric method using a three-dimensional (3D) registration technique and linear mapping to investigate the PF joint contact stress using an indirect measure: the depth of virtual penetration (PD) of the patellar cartilage surface into the femoral cartilage surface. (2) The second is to develop 3D PF joint models using the finite element analysis (FEA) to quantify in vivo cartilage contact stress and to compare the peak contact stress location obtained from the FE models with the location of the maximum PD. Magnetic resonance images of healthy and PFPS subjects at knee flexion angles of 15°, 30° and 45° during isometric loading have been used to develop the geometric models. The results obtained from both approaches demonstrated that the subjects with PFPS show higher PD and contact stresses than the normal subjects. Maximum stress and PD increase with flexion angle, and occur on the lateral side in healthy and on the medial side in PFPS subjects. It has been concluded that the alternative geometric method is reliable in addition to being computationally efficient compared with FEA, and has the potential to assess the mechanics of PFPS with an accuracy similar to the FEA.

  13. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  14. Associations Between Physical Fitness Indices and Working Memory in Breast Cancer Survivors and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Raine, Lauren B.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study examined the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, heart rate recovery, and physical activity on working memory in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Method: Using a case-control design, 32 women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis and completed primary treatment within the past 36-months (11 radiation only; 21 chemotherapy) and 30 age-matched women with no previous cancer diagnosis completed a n-back continuous performance task commonly used as an assessment of working memory. In addition, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery were measured during a submaximal graded exercise test and physical activity was measured using 7-days of accelerometer monitoring. Results: Breast cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy had poorer heart rate recovery (p = .010) and engaged in less physical activity than women who had received radiation only (p = .004) or non-cancer controls (p = .029). Cancer treatment (radiation; chemotherapy) predicted differences in reaction times on the 1-back working memory task (p = .029). However, more rapid heart rate recovery predicted shorter reaction times on the 1-back task in the age-matched control group (p = .002). All participants with greater cardiorespiratory fitness displayed greater accuracy independent of disease status on the 1-back task (p = .017). No significant group differences in reaction times were observed for 2-back target trials between breast cancer survivors and controls. However, greater total physical activity predicted shorter reaction times in breast cancer survivors (radiation, chemotherapy) on the 2-back task (p = .014). In addition, all participants who exhibited more rapid heart rate recovery demonstrated better greater accuracy regardless of disease status (p = .013). Conclusion: These findings support differences in physical activty participation, heart rate recovery, and 1- and 2-back working memory reaction

  15. The acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition in normal subjects, and in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed

    McKay, J; Rawlings, M D; Cobden, I; James, O F

    1982-10-01

    1 The effects of single doses (25 g and 50 g) oral ethanol on the disposition of acetanilide (50 mg/kg metabolic active mass) has been studied in normal subjects, and in patients with chronic non-alcoholic liver disease. 2 In normal subjects, ethanol produced a dose-dependent increase in acetanilide half-life, and a decrease in acetenilide clearance. There was a significant correlation (rs = 0.71, P less than 0.01) between the 90 min blood ethanol concentration and the reduction in acetanilide clearance. 3 In patients with liver disease, ethanol produced a similar proportional change in acetanilide half-life and clearance, but these were less consistent. Moreover, liver disease itself was associated with an increase in acetenilide half-life, and a reduction in clearance. 4 It is concluded that single oral doses of ethanol, comparable to those consumed during social drinking, may inhibit some forms of microsomal oxidation and thus have important clinical implications.

  16. Optic Nerve Head (ONH) Topographic Analysis by Stratus OCT in Normal Subjects: Correlation to Disc Size, Age, and Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Barbara C.; Cantor, Louis B.; WuDunn, Darrell; Hoop, Joni; Lipyanik, Jennifer; Patella, Vincent Michael; Budenz, Donald L.; Greenfield, David S.; Savell, Jonathan; Schuman, Joel S.; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study optic nerve head (ONH) topography parameters measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) in normal subjects and to analyze ONH data for differences in relation to disc size, ethnicity, and age. Methods Three hundred sixty-seven normal subjects underwent Stratus optical coherence tomography ONH measurement using the fast optic disc scan protocol software package 3.0. Only ONH scans meeting specific qualification criteria were included for data analysis ensuring appropriate scan quality and reliability. ONH topographic parameters of qualified scans were analyzed for differences in regards to optic disc size, age, and ethnicity. Results Two hundred and twelve qualified ONH scans were included for data analysis. Mean disc area was 2.27±0.41 mm2 and optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width increased with disc size, whereas vertical integrated rim area did not. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, and rim area decreased and cup area increased with age. Mean optic disc area was larger in African-Americans as compared with Hispanics or Whites and this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions Optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width correlated to disc size. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, rim area, and cup area, changed with age. African-American optic discs had larger disc area measurements as compared with Whites optic discs and this difference was statistically significant. PMID:19855299

  17. Orexin-A is Associated with Increases in Cerebrospinal Fluid Phosphorylated-Tau in Cognitively Normal Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ricardo S.; Ducca, Emma L.; Wohlleber, Margaret E.; Tanzi, Emily B.; Gumb, Tyler; Twumasi, Akosua; Tweardy, Samuel; Lewis, Clifton; Fischer, Esther; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Cuartero-Toledo, Maria; Sheikh, Mohammed O.; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Lu, Shou-En; Mosconi, Lisa; Glodzik, Lidia; Schuetz, Sonja; Varga, Andrew W.; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M.; de Leon, Mony J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the role of orexin-A with respect to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers, and explore its relationship to cognition and sleep characteristics in a group of cognitively normal elderly individuals. Methods: Subjects were recruited from multiple community sources for National Institutes of Health supported studies on normal aging, sleep and CSF biomarkers. Sixty-three participants underwent home monitoring for sleep-disordered breathing, clinical, sleep and cognitive evaluations, as well as a lumbar puncture to obtain CSF. Individuals with medical history or with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of disorders that may affect brain structure or function were excluded. Correlation and linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between orexin-A and CSF AD-biomarkers controlling for potential sociodemographic and sleep confounders. Results: Levels of orexin-A, amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42), phosphorylated-tau (P-Tau), total-tau (T-Tau), Apolipoprotein E4 status, age, years of education, reported total sleep time, number of awakenings, apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI), excessive daytime sleepiness, and a cognitive battery were analyzed. Subjects were 69.59 ± 8.55 years of age, 57.1% were female, and 30.2% were apolipoprotein E4+. Orexin-A was positively correlated with Aβ42, P-Tau, and T-Tau. The associations between orexin-A and the AD-biomarkers were driven mainly by the relationship between orexin-A and P-Tau and were not influenced by other clinical or sleep characteristics that were available. Conclusions: Orexin-A is associated with increased P-Tau in normal elderly individuals. Increases in orexin-A and P-Tau might be a consequence of the reduction in the proportion of the deeper, more restorative slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep reported with aging. Clinical Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01962779. Citation: Osorio RS, Ducca EL, Wohlleber ME, Tanzi EB

  18. Studies of the Ability to Hold the Eye in Eccentric Gaze: Measurements in Normal Subjects with the Head Erect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Leigh, R. John; Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, William H.; Kornilova, Ludmila

    2006-01-01

    We studied the ability to hold the eyes in eccentric horizontal or vertical gaze angles in 68 normal humans, age range 19-56. Subjects attempted to sustain visual fixation of a briefly flashed target located 30 in the horizontal plane and 15 in the vertical plane in a dark environment. Conventionally, the ability to hold eccentric gaze is estimated by fitting centripetal eye drifts by exponential curves and calculating the time constant (t(sub c)) of these slow phases of gazeevoked nystagmus. Although the distribution of time-constant measurements (t(sub c)) in our normal subjects was extremely skewed due to occasional test runs that exhibited near-perfect stability (large t(sub c) values), we found that log10(tc) was approximately normally distributed within classes of target direction. Therefore, statistical estimation and inference on the effect of target direction was performed on values of z identical with log10t(sub c). Subjects showed considerable variation in their eyedrift performance over repeated trials; nonetheless, statistically significant differences emerged: values of tc were significantly higher for gaze elicited to targets in the horizontal plane than for the vertical plane (P less than 10(exp -5), suggesting eccentric gazeholding is more stable in the horizontal than in the vertical plane. Furthermore, centrifugal eye drifts were observed in 13.3, 16.0 and 55.6% of cases for horizontal, upgaze and downgaze tests, respectively. Fifth percentile values of the time constant were estimated to be 10.2 sec, 3.3 sec and 3.8 sec for horizontal, upward and downward gaze, respectively. The difference between horizontal and vertical gazeholding may be ascribed to separate components of the velocity position neural integrator for eye movements, and to differences in orbital mechanics. Our statistical method for representing the range of normal eccentric gaze stability can be readily applied in a clinical setting to patients who were exposed to environments

  19. Normal and shear strains of the left ventricle in healthy human subjects measured by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal studies have shown that shear deformation of myocardial sheets in transmural planes of left ventricular (LV) wall is an important mechanism for systolic wall thickening, and normal and shear strains of the LV free wall differ from those of the interventricular septum (IVS). We sought to test whether these also hold for human hearts. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers (male 23 and female 7, aged 34 ± 6 years) from Outpatient Department of the University of Tokyo Hospital were included. Echocardiographic images were obtained in the left decubitus position using a commercially available system (Aloka SSD-6500, Japan) equipped with a 3.5-MHz transducer. The ECG was recorded simultaneously. The peak systolic radial normal strain (length change), shear strain (angle change) and time to peak systolic radial normal strain were obtained non-invasively by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Results The peak systolic radial normal strain in both IVS and LV posterior wall (LVPW) showed a trend to increase progressively from the apical level to the basal level, especially at short axis views, and the peak systolic radial normal strain of LVPW was significantly greater than that of IVS at all three levels. The time to peak systolic radial normal strain was the shortest at the basal IVS, and increased progressively from the base to the apical IVS. It gradually increased from the apical to the basal LVPW in sequence, especially at short axis views. The peak of radial normal strain of LVPW occurred much later than the peak of IVS at all three levels. For IVS, the shear deformation was clockwise at basal level, and counterclockwise at mid and apical levels in LV long-axis view. For LVPW, the shear deformations were all counterclockwise in LV long-axis view and increased slightly from base to the apex. LVPW showed larger shear strains than IVS at all three levels. Bland-Altman analysis shows very good agreement between measurements taken by the

  20. Circadian rhythm of wrist temperature in normal-living subjects A candidate of new index of the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, J A; Rol, M A; Mendiola, P; Madrid, J A

    2008-11-28

    Most circadian rhythms are under the control of a major pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Some of these rhythms, called marker rhythms, serve to characterize the timing of the internal temporal order. A marker rhythm, (e.g., one used in chronotherapy) has to be periodic and easy to measure over long periods using non-invasive methods. The most frequent reference variables for human chronotherapy include salivary melatonin or cortisol, urinary 6-sulfatoximelatonin, actimetry and core body temperature (CBT). Recent evidence suggests that sleepiness may be more closely linked to increased peripheral skin temperature than to a core temperature drop, and that distal skin temperature seems to be correlated and phase-advanced with respect to CBT, suggesting that heat loss from the extremities may drive the circadian CBT rhythm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the wrist skin temperature rhythm could be used as a possible index of the human circadian system. To this end, wrist skin temperature (WT1), as determined by a wireless data logger in healthy normal living subjects, was correlated with sleep-wake diaries and oral temperature (OT) recordings. WT and sleep habits were studied in 99 university students. Each subject wore a wireless iButton sensor attached to the inner side of a sport wristband. Our results show that the WT rhythm exhibits an inverse phase relationship with OT, and it is phase-advanced by 60 min with respect to OT. WT started to increase in association to bed time and dropped sharply after awakening. A secondary WT increase, independent of feeding, was observed in the early afternoon. In conclusion, WT wireless recording can be considered a reliable procedure to evaluate circadian rhythmicity, and an index to establish and follow the effects of chronotherapy in normal living subjects.

  1. Are the prevalence and treatment of asthma similar in elite athletes and the aged-matched non-athlete population?

    PubMed

    Locke, S; Marks, G

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medications in elite athletes compared with an age-matched non-athlete population. Data were collected from the respiratory component of annual medical screening of 424 elite athletes from the Queensland Academy of Sport. Measures included the prevalence of current asthma and ever doctor-diagnosed asthma, and the prevalence of use of treatment for asthma including beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroid medication. The prevalence of current asthma in athletes aged 18-29 years was 14% (95% CI, 9-19%), which did not differ significantly from the prevalence in the non-athlete control population (11%; 95% CI, 9-12%, P=0.3). Of athletes with current asthma, 27% were not taking any medications for asthma, and 25% were treated with short-acting beta-agonist medications alone and were not taking inhaled corticosteroids. These data indicate that the overall cumulative and period prevalence of asthma in Queensland athletes is similar to that in the general age-matched population. Athletes use beta-agonists with a frequency similar to the general population.

  2. "Resetting" of postural tremors at the wrist with mechanical stretches in Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1992-05-01

    The response of postural wrist tremors to brief mechanical displacements was compared in two groups of patients, one with classical hereditary essential tremor (n = 18) and another with typical Parkinson's disease (n = 13). These groups were compared with an additional group of normal subjects mimicking wrist tremor (n = 9). The degree to which brief mechanical displacements of the wrist produced by torque pulses of three different sizes could modulate the timing of rhythmic electromyographic bursts in the forearm flexor muscles was quantified by deriving a resetting index, which could range between 0 (no phase resetting) and 1 (complete phase resetting). In all three groups of subjects studied, the resetting index varied significantly with the size of the mechanical perturbation and, in an inverse fashion, with the ongoing tremor amplitude. When due allowance for these factors was made, the difference in mean resetting indexes between the three groups of patients and subjects was reduced to the extent that no definitive statement could be made as to whether brief mechanical perturbations had more effect on essential tremor than parkinsonian tremor. The method is therefore unlikely to be useful in differentiating the common causes of postural wrist tremors.

  3. The serotonin-dopamine interaction measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and C-11 raclopride in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the interaction between serotonin and dopamine can be measured with C-11 raclopride and PET in the baboon brain. A series of studies was undertaken to extend dim findings to the normal human brain. PET studies were conducted in male control subjects (n=8) using the CTI 931 tomograph. Two C-11 raclopride scans were performed, prior to and 180 minutes following administration of the selective serotonin releasing agent, fenfluramine (60mg/PO). The neuroendocrine response to fenfluramine challenge is commonly used in psychiatric research as an index of serotonin activity. The C-11 raclopride data were analyzed with the distribution volume method. For the group of subjects, an increase was observed in the striatum to cerebellum ratio (specific to non-specific binding ratio), in excess of the test-retest variability of the ligand. Variability in response was observed across subjects. These results are consistent with our previous findings in the baboon that citalopram administration increased C-11 raclopride binding, consistent with a decrease in endogenous dopamine. In vivo microdialysis studies in freely moving rats confirmed that citalopram produces a time-dependent decrease in extracellular dopamine levels, consistent with the PET results. In vivo PET studies of the serotonin-dopamine interaction are relevant to the evaluation of etiologic and therapeutic mechanisms in schizophrenia and affective disorder.

  4. Effect of bolus hardness on the chewing pattern and activation of masticatory muscles in subjects with normal dental occlusion.

    PubMed

    Piancino, Maria Grazia; Bracco, Pietro; Vallelonga, Teresa; Merlo, Andrea; Farina, Dario

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of bolus hardness on the kinematic of mastication and jaw-elevator muscle activity in subjects with normal dental occlusion and function. The mandibular motion and the surface EMG envelope of the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles were assessed in twelve subjects during mastication of a soft and hard bolus of the same size. When chewing the hard bolus, the chewing pattern in the frontal plane was significantly higher and wider, with smaller closure angle and higher peak velocity than when chewing the soft bolus. EMG peak amplitude of both the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles was higher for the side of the bolus but the contralateral side increased its activity significantly more than the ipsilateral side when the hardness of the bolus increased (for the masseter, mean+/-SD: 130.4+/-108.1% increase for the contralateral side and 29.6+/-26.9% for the ipsilateral side). Moreover, the peak EMG activity for both muscles occurred more distant from the closure point with hard bolus. The increased activity of the contralateral side may help maintaining the mandibular equilibrium, with indirect participation to the power stroke generated by the chewing-side masseter. The results provide kinematic and EMG adaptations to bolus hardness in healthy subjects and can be used as normative data in the development of methods for early diagnosis of impaired chewing function.

  5. Binocular interaction and steady-state visual evoked potentials. I. A study in normal subjects and in subjects with defective binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Bagolini, B; Porciatti, V; Falsini, B

    1988-01-01

    A correlate of binocular-neuron activity was found in some properties of visual evoked potentials (VEPs), such as facilitation (defined as a binocular response greater than the sum of the monocular responses) and changes in latency (shortening of binocular VEP latency as compared to that of monocular VEPs). Monocular and binocular steady-state VEPs in response to phase-alternating gratings of different contrast and both spatial and temporal frequency were recorded in three normal subjects. Fourier analysis of the responses was performed to isolate the component at the reversal frequency. Binocular VEPs showed facilitation in the low-contrast range (3%-10%). Facilitation was highest for gratings that had spatial frequency of 0.6-2 cycles/degree (c/d), alternating at 16 reversals per second. Phase shortening was found across a parameter range larger than that at which amplitude facilitation occurred. These results suggest that both amplitude facilitation and phase shortening in binocular VEPs may provide an objective measure of binocular visual function in clinical ophthalmology.

  6. [An evaluation of the pulmonary venous flow pattern by transesophageal and transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in a normal subject].

    PubMed

    Cottini, E; Giacone, G; Cosentino, M; Rando, G; Vintaloro, G; De Roberto, S

    1994-10-01

    Transesophageal echocardiographic studies have permitted a pulmonary venous flow velocity pattern to be identified which is comparable to that recorder using invasive methods. The pattern consists of 4 stages: an anterograde systolic flow with an early (S1) and late (S2) peak velocity, a diastolic anterograde flow (D) and a retrograde flow liked to atrial contraction (Ar). The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of pulmonary venous flow velocity using transesophageal and transthoracic colour Doppler echocardiography in normal subjects in an attempt to: 1) determine normal values derived from the pulmonary venous flow pattern which may contribute to future studies; 2) find correlations between the pattern of pulmonary venous flow and a number of physiological, hemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters which take account of the morphological variations of this flow pattern within a normal range; 3) demonstrate the possibility of being able to carry out study using transthoracic colour Doppler echocardiography. The study was carried out in 38 normal subjects aged between 15 and 76 years old (mean 45 +/- 15) who underwent transthoracic and transesophageal colour-Doppler echocardiography. The following parameters were measured: left atrium diameter, diameters and telediastolic and telesystolic volumes of the left ventricle, ejection fraction and systolic percentage shortening of the left ventricle, peak velocity of the mitral flow pattern and the pulmonary venous flow pattern. The results obtained show that: 1) the pattern of pulmonary venous flow alters with ageing causing the prevalence of systolic over diastolic peak velocity; 2) the pulmonary venous flow parameters which appear to be most significant in hemodynamic terms are the peak velocities of the early systolic flow and anterograde diastolic flow and the ratios S1/S2 and S2/D; 3) the echocardiographic parameters most closely correlated with the peak velocity of pulmonary venous flow are the

  7. Effect of age and gender on sudomotor and cardiovagal function and blood pressure response to tilt in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Dyck, P. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Slezak, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Normative data are limited on autonomic function tests, especially beyond age 60 years. We therefore evaluated these tests in a total of 557 normal subjects evenly distributed by age and gender from 10 to 83 years. Heart rate (HR) response to deep breathing fell with increasing age. Valsalva ratio varied with both age and gender. QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test) volume was consistently greater in men (approximately double) and progressively declined with age for all three lower extremity sites but not the forearm site. Orthostatic blood pressure reduction was greater with increasing age. HR at rest was significantly higher in women, and the increment with head-up tilt fell with increasing age. For no tests did we find a regression to zero, and some tests seem to level off with increasing age, indicating that diagnosis of autonomic failure was possible to over 80 years of age.

  8. Perilymphatic pressure dynamics following posture change in patients with Menière's disease and in normal hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Rosingh, H J; Wit, H P; Albers, F W

    1998-01-01

    The hydrostatic pressure of the inner ear depends on the cerebrospinal fluid pressure through the cochlear aqueduct. The time-course of inner ear pressure change following rapid change in cerebrospinal fluid pressure is related to the aqueduct patency. In this study the patency of the cochlear aqueduct in 27 patients with Menière's disease (28 affected ears, 16 non-affected ears) and in 12 normal hearing subjects (18 control ears) was assessed non-invasively by means of the MMS-10 Tympanic Displacement Analyser. Following a rapid change in body position, changes in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid pressure were found to influence perilymphatic pressure within 1 min. No significant differences were found among affected ears, non-affected ears and control ears.

  9. Determination of mono- and dihydroxy-vitamin D metabolites in normal subjects and patients with different calcium metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hummer, L; Riis, B J; Christiansen, C; Rickers, H

    1985-11-01

    Reliable assays to determine the vitamin D metabolites are useful aids in the study of disorders involving vitamin D metabolism, and in the evaluation of the response in patients receiving vitamin D treatment. We report here the establishment in our laboratory of a method capable of measuring 25(OH)D, (including 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3), 1,25(OH)2D and 24,25(OH)2D in a single blood sample. The method involves methanol/dichloromethane extraction and Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. The monhydroxylated fraction was purified on Lipidex 5000 and separated in 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 on high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), followed by ultra violet absorbance (UV) detection. The dihydroxylated fraction was separated by HPLC and quantified by protein-binding assays. The method is precise and accurate. The vitamin D metabolites were measured in different groups of patients and in normal subjects.

  10. Reproducibility of MEG auditory evoked field source localizations in normal human subjects using a seven-channel gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Teale, P; Goldstein, L; Reite, M; Sheeder, J; Richardson, D; Edrich, J; Zimmerman, J E

    1996-09-01

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) auditory evoked fields (EF) were recorded from 12 normal adult subjects over both hemispheres on two separate occasions at least one week apart using a seven-channel second-order gradiometer. Stimuli were computer-generated at 25-msec duration, 1 kHz tone pips. Responses to 100 stimuli were averaged, and source estimates with confidence intervals were computed, for the 100-msec latency auditory EF component, termed M100. Root-mean-squared (rms) differences in x, y, and z locations were approximately 0.7 cm on the two occasions; strength and orientation differences were 18 nA-m and 11 degrees, respectively. This spatial accuracy using a seven-channel instrument, compares favorably with other currently available technologies for localization of brain function.

  11. Effects of hydrophilic and lipophilic beta-blockers on heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Pitzalis, M V; Mastropasqua, F; Massari, F; Forleo, C; Passantino, A; Colombo, R; Totaro, P; Rizzon, P

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of a hydrophilic and a lipophilic beta-blocker on the autonomic nervous system, 20 normal subjects were studied under baseline conditions and 7 days after being randomly assigned to metoprolol (200 mg/day), nadolol (80 mg/day), and placebo. Under each condition, the time-domain parameters were analyzed by means of 24-hour ECG monitoring and the frequency-domain parameters by means of the autoregressive method using 10-minute ECGs during rest, controlled respiration, and after a head-up tilt test. The alpha index (the gain in the relationship between the RR period and systolic arterial pressure variability) was also calculated. Both nadolol and metoprolol significantly increased all of the time-domain parameters except the standard deviation of the RH intervals; they also modified the frequency-domain parameters. Both blunted the significant reduction in the high frequency (HF) component and alpha index during tilt. In normal subjects, hydrophilic and lipophilic beta-blockers similarly modify the time- and frequency-domain parameters that are particularly evident when high sympathetic tone is present (during daytime and tilt). The value of the alpha index was increased by both beta-blockers in the HF, but not in the low frequency band; this difference might be due to the fact that the former is a measure of the vagal component of the baroreflex control and the latter a measure of the sympathetic component. The effects of hydrophilic and lipophilic beta-blockers on the time- and frequency-domain parameters of heart rate variability are similar.

  12. The fears, phobias and anxieties of children with autism spectrum disorders and Down syndrome: comparisons with developmentally and chronologically age matched children.

    PubMed

    Evans, David W; Canavera, Kristin; Kleinpeter, F Lee; Maccubbin, Elise; Taga, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the fears and behavior problems of 25 children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 43 children with Down syndrome (DS), 45 mental age (MA) matched children, and 37 chronologically age (CA) matched children. Children's fears, phobias, anxieties and behavioral problems were assessed using parent reports. Significant differences emerged across the diagnostic groups on a variety of fears. Children with ASD were reported to have more situation phobias and medical fears, but fewer fears of harm/injury compared to all other groups. The groups also differed in terms of the pattern of correlations between fears, phobias, anxieties and behavior problems. For children with ASD, fears, phobias and anxieties were closely related to problem behaviors, whereas fears, phobias, and anxieties were less related to behavioral symptoms for the other groups of subjects. Such findings suggest that children with ASD exhibit a distinct profile of fear and anxiety compared to other mental age and chronologically age-matched children, and these fears are related to the symptoms associated with ASD.

  13. Impact of physical training on the ultrastructure of midthigh muscle in normal subjects and in patients treated with glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Horber, F F; Hoopeler, H; Scheidegger, J R; Grünig, B E; Howald, H; Frey, F J

    1987-01-01

    Exercise-training might be a logical method to reverse muscle atrophy and weakness in patients treated with glucocorticoids. The purpose of the present investigation was to establish whether a treatment with low dose prednisone (10 +/- 2.9 mg/d) modulates the effect of a moderate strength type isokinetic training during 7 wk (21 sessions of 20 min) on "muscle efficiency" (power output/muscle mass) and on concomitant changes in ultrastructure of the thigh muscle measured by quantitative electron-microscopic morphometry. Training caused a similar increase in "muscle efficiency" in patients on prednisone (n = 9) as in normal volunteers (n = 9). In normal subjects the increase in muscle efficiency was associated with an increase in sarcoplasm, whereas in patients on prednisone the functional improvement was associated with an increase in sarcoplasm, capillaries, and mitochondria content. Thus, a therapy with low dose prednisone does not abrogate training-induced improvement of muscle efficiency but modulates the ultrastructural response of the muscle to the training. Images PMID:3558821

  14. Nocturnal sustained attention during sleep deprivation can be predicted by specific periods of subjective daytime alertness in normal young humans.

    PubMed

    Taillard, Jacques; Moore, Nicholas; Claustrat, Bruno; Coste, Olivier; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    In our 24-h society, nocturnal sleep-related accidents are common. Because all individuals are not equal in their responses to sleep loss, it is very important to identify predictors of vulnerability to sleep deprivation in normal subjects. We investigated the performance of a cognitive test of sustained attention, electroencephalogram theta/alpha power, subjective sleepiness, and two circadian markers (core temperature and melatonin) in 18 healthy men (nine morning types and nine evening types, 21.4 +/- 1.9 years) during a 36-h sleep deprivation in a constant routine protocol. Sleep need (self-reported) and baseline sleep structure were also investigated. Nighttime performance impairment was defined as the difference between the mean nocturnal number of lapses (00:00-07:30 [corrected] hours) and the mean diurnal number of lapses (07:30-20:30 hours) expressed as a percentage. Feeling fully alert in the morning just after awakening and/or sleepy in early afternoon were the only two factors (Multiple R > 0.80, > 60% of explained variance) which better predicted the decrease in performances of nocturnal operational tasks requiring sustained attention.

  15. Gender, Race, and Diet Affect Platelet Function Tests in Normal Subjects Contributing to a High Rate of Abnormal Results

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Garrett, Katherine; Stein, Sidney F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To assess sources of variability in platelet function tests in normal subjects, 64 healthy young adults were tested on 2–6 occasions at 2 week intervals using 4 methods: platelet aggregation (AGG) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the Bio/Data PAP-4 Aggregometer (BD) and Chrono-Log Lumi-Aggregometer (CL); and AGG in whole blood (WB) in the CL and Multiplate Platelet Function Analyzer (MP), with ATP release (REL) in CL-PRP and CL-WB. Food and medication exposures were recorded prospectively for 2 weeks prior to each blood draw. At least one AGG abnormality was seen in 21% of 81 drug-free specimens with CL-PRP, 15% with CL-WB, 13% with BD-PRP, and 6% with MP-WB, increasing with inclusion of REL to 28% for CL-PRP and 30% for CL-WB. Epinephrine AGG and REL were significantly reduced in males (P<0.0001). Ristocetin AGG and collagen and thrombin REL were significantly reduced in Blacks (P<0.0001). One-third of specimens drawn following flavonoid-rich food exposures had aberrant results, compared to 8.5% of specimens without such exposures (P=0.0035). PRP tests had less intra-individual variation than WB tests. Gender, race, diet, and test system affected results of platelet function testing in healthy subjects, suggesting caution when interpreting the results of platelet function testing in patients. PMID:24617520

  16. The generation mechanisms and repeatability of 2F1-F2 distortion product otoacoustic emissions: study on normally hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, M; Wilson, H K; Bell, S; Tognola, G; Ravazzani, P; Lutman, M E

    2006-01-01

    The 2F1-F2 distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) is considered to consist of two generation mechanisms, the so-called place-fixed and wave-fixed mechanisms, depending on the frequency ratio F2/F1. The general assumption is that for a small frequency ratio there is a predominantly place-fixed emission mechanism, while with a larger frequency ratio there is a predominantly wave-fixed mechanism. There is also a lack of published data on the repeatability of the two components when separated. One aim of this study was therefore to identify the wave-fixed and place-fixed components of the 2F1-F2 DPOAE using a time-window separation method. The second aim was to quantify the test-retest repeatability of the separated 2F1-F2 DPOAE components in a group of normally hearing subjects. Results confirmed the presence of wave-fixed and place-fixed components for 2F1-F2 and a predominance of place or wave-fixed DPOAE as a function of frequency ratio. This pattern varied somewhat among subjects. Moreover, regardless of which component was stronger for any F2/F1, both components were highly repeatable across time within individual ears.

  17. Evaluation of Lower Limb Motor Function Using Wireless Motion Sensors—A Comparison of Normal Elderly Subjects and those Requiring Support Level 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Numata, Takayuki; Kuwae, Yutaka; Sekine, Masaki; Tsuji, Miwa; Okabe, Ichiro; Hara, Keita; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Tamura, Toshiyo

    This study quantitatively compared lower limb motility of normal subjects and those requiring support level 1 (support_1). We developed a wireless inertia sensor with an embedded tri-axial accelerometer and angular velocity sensor. Six normal elderly subjects and ten elderly subjects who were classified as support_1 by the Japanese care insurance system participated in the study. We attached the wireless motion sensors to the center of the lower back and both thighs in the subjects. Subjects were then asked to walk 10 m and perform a stepping exercise. For the evaluation, the cadence, pitch angle, and pitch angular velocity of the thigh auto-correlation function and root mean square (RMS) on the lower back were calculated. The autocorrelation coefficient function for the support_1 subjects was smaller than in the normal subjects, while the RMS was larger in support_1. These differences indicated that the gait and balance abilities of the support_1 subjects were poorer than those of the normal subjects. This suggests that our wireless motion sensor is useful for assessing the motility of the lower limbs while walking and climbing steps.

  18. "ECG variability contour" method reveals amplitude changes in both ischemic patients and normal subjects during Dipyridamole stress: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Dori, Guy; Gershinsky, Michal; Ben-Haim, Simona; Lewis, Basil S; Bitterman, Haim

    2011-11-01

    To detect and quantify consistent ECG amplitude changes, the "ECG variability contour" (EVC) method was proposed. Using this method we investigated amplitude changes in subjects undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with Dipyridamole (Dp). Fifty-three patients having reversible perfusion defects and 19 normal subjects (NS) who were free of: perfusion defects on their MPI, standard ST-T changes during Dp stress, and a negative clinical follow up. Mean ∏¹(<∏¹>) was similar for the NS and patient group (6.2 ± 6.1 vs. 6.3 ± 6.2, P = 0.95). <∏¹> was 4.6 ± 3.0 in patients not having ST-T changes during Dp stress (n = 42), whereas in patients having ST-T changes (n = 11) it was 13.1 ± 10.2 (P < 0.001). For both groups <∏(QRS)> was smaller than <∏(ST)>, which in turn was smaller than <∏(T)>. The values of <∏(QRS)>, <∏(ST)>, and <∏(T)> for the NS, patients without and with ST-T changes were: 26.8 ± 28.6, 42.6 ± 41.8, 44.9 ± 36.5; 19.6 ± 20.8, 26.4 ± 31.4, 38.7 ± 27.3; 51.0 ± 30.0, 71.0 ± 36.8, 75.1 ± 20.9, respectively (P < 0.05 for all comparisons of patients with versus without ST-T changes). This study showed that Dp stress, with or without hypoperfusion, had a clear effect on myocyte electrophysiology, expressed by consistent ECG amplitude changes, detected by the EVC method. The EVC method did not distinguish between NS and patients in this clinical setting.

  19. Biochemical and cardiovascular measures in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.; Haran, I.; Attias, J.; Shapira, I.; Shahar, A. )

    1989-11-01

    Reports on a potential relationship between noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and cardiovascular as well as biochemical measures are controversial. This study compares the means of certain cardiovascular and biochemical measures in subjects with NIHL with those in subjects exposed to similar occupational noise, but demonstrating normal hearing. This might indicate certain predisposing factors for NIHL. Eight hundred noise-exposed subjects were divided into two age-matched hearing groups (NIHL and normal hearing). The results showed that the mean values of all the variables examined in both hearing groups were within the normal range. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of the distribution of subjects for the indices measured.

  20. The effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies for patients with SLE and normal human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Stearns, Nancy A.; Li, Xingfu; Pisetsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To elucidate specificity further, the effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with lupus was tested by ELISA to calf thymus (CT) DNA; we also assessed the binding of plasmas of patients and normal human subjects (NHS) to Micrococcus luteus (MC) DNA. As these studies showed, spermine can dose-dependently inhibit SLE anti-DNA binding to CT DNA and can promote dissociation of preformed immune complexes. With MC DNA as antigen, spermine failed to inhibit the NHS anti-DNA binding. Studies using plasmas adsorbed to a CT DNA cellulose affinity indicated that SLE plasmas are mixtures of anti-DNA that differ in inhibition by spermine and binding to conserved and non-conserved determinants. Together, these studies demonstrate that spermine can influence the binding of anti-DNA autoantibodies and may contribute to the antigenicity of DNA. PMID:24732074

  1. Effect of the cold pressor test on diffusing capacity. Comparison of normal subjects and those with Raynaud's disease and progressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J

    1983-09-01

    Single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dsb) was measured before and during immersion of one hand in ice water (cold pressor test) in the following three groups of subjects: (1) normal subjects; (2) patients with isolated Raynaud's disease; and (3) patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and progressive systemic sclerosis. No change in Dsb was found in normal subjects or patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. Patients with isolated Raynaud's disease showed a rise in Dsb during cold pressor testing, the mean increase being 8 percent. These results suggest that a rise in Dsb during exposure to cold is a response unique to patients with isolated Raynaud's disease or Raynaud's phenomenon without progressive systemic sclerosis, and not a normal physiologic response to cold. The lack of change in Dsb in response to cold in progressive systemic sclerosis, interpreted by other authors as an indicator of pulmonary vascular disease, resembles the normal response to a challenge with cold.

  2. Prematurely delivered rats show improved motor coordination during sensory-evoked motor responses compared to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Megan E; Brumley, Michele R

    2014-05-10

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat.

  3. Reproducibility of radionuclide angiographic measurements of left ventricular function in normal subjects at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, M.T.; Rerych, S.K.; Newman, G.E.; Bounous, E.P. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    In this investigation we determined the reproducibility of radionuclide measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, pulmonary transit time, pulmonary blood volume and cardiac output in 10 normal subjects. First-pass radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed at rest and during upright, submaximal bicycle exercise on day 1 and day 3. The resting heart rate for the group decreased from 79 +- 17 beats/min on day 1 to 71 +-14 beats/min on day 3 (p < 0.01). This biologic variation probably contributed to the small but significant decreases in ejection fraction (62 +- 7 to 59 +- 7%, p < 0.05) and cardiac output (7.7 +- 1.9 to 6.6 +- 1.51/min, p < 0.02), and the increase in pulmonary transit time (5.8 +- 1.6 to 6.2 +- 1.3 seconds, p < 0.05) between day 1 and day 3. The mean variabilities in ejection fraction, cardiac output and pulmonary transit time were 4.0 +- 3.8%, 1.24 +- 1.23 1/min and 0.65 +- 0.64 second, respectively. No significant differences between studies were observed in resting end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and stroke volume. The mean variability in end-diastolic volume was 9.9 +- 5.1 ml. Heart rate varied less during exercise to the same work load, and only pulmonary transit time and blood volume differed significantly between studies. During exercise the mean variabilities in ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output and pulmonary transit time were 3.2 +- 2.5%, 9.8 +- 6.2 ml, 1.59 +- 0.671/min and 0.25 +- 0.25 second, respectively. Radionuclide measurements of left ventricular function are highly reproducible if obtained under comparable hemodynamic conditions.

  4. Accurate discrimination of Alzheimer's disease from other dementia and/or normal subjects using SPECT specific volume analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Yoshii, Fumuhito; Kazama, Toshiki; Kawada, Shuichi; Imai, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Discrimination between Alzheimer's disease and other dementia is clinically significant, however it is often difficult. In this study, we developed classification models among Alzheimer's disease (AD), other dementia (OD) and/or normal subjects (NC) using patient factors and indices obtained by brain perfusion SPECT. SPECT is commonly used to assess cerebral blood flow (CBF) and allows the evaluation of the severity of hypoperfusion by introducing statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We investigated a total of 150 cases (50 cases each for AD, OD, and NC) from Tokai University Hospital, Japan. In each case, we obtained a total of 127 candidate parameters from: (A) 2 patient factors (age and sex), (B) 12 CBF parameters and 113 SPM parameters including (C) 3 from specific volume analysis (SVA), and (D) 110 from voxel-based analysis stereotactic extraction estimation (vbSEE). We built linear classifiers with a statistical stepwise feature selection and evaluated the performance with the leave-one-out cross validation strategy. Our classifiers achieved very high classification performances with reasonable number of selected parameters. In the most significant discrimination in clinical, namely those of AD from OD, our classifier achieved both sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) of 96%. In a similar way, our classifiers achieved a SE of 90% and a SP of 98% in AD from NC, as well as a SE of 88% and a SP of 86% in AD from OD and NC cases. Introducing SPM indices such as SVA and vbSEE, classification performances improved around 7-15%. We confirmed that these SPM factors are quite important for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  6. Stable Schizophrenia Patients Learn Equally Well as Age-Matched Controls and Better than Elderly Controls in Two Sensorimotor Rotary Pursuit Tasks

    PubMed Central

    De Picker, Livia J.; Cornelis, Claudia; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Fransen, Erik; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sensorimotor performance and learning in stable schizophrenia patients, healthy age- and sex-matched controls and elderly controls on two variations of the rotary pursuit: circle pursuit (true motor learning) and figure pursuit (motor and sequence learning). Method: In the circle pursuit, a target circle, rotating with increasing speed along a predictable circular path on the computer screen, must be followed by a cursor controlled by a pen on a writing tablet. In the eight-trial figure pursuit, subjects learn to draw a complex figure by pursuing the target circle that moves along an invisible trajectory between and around several goals. Tasks were administered thrice (day 1, day 2, day 7) to 30 patients with stable schizophrenia (S), 30 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (C), and 30 elderly participants (>65 years; E) and recorded with a digitizing tablet and pressure-sensitive pen. The outcome measure accuracy (% of time that cursor is within the target) was used to assess performance. Results: We observed significant group differences in accuracy, both in circle and figure pursuit tasks (E < S < C, p < 0.01). Strong learning effects were found in each group. Learning curves were similar in circle pursuit but differed between groups in figure pursuit. When corrected for group differences in starting level, the learning gains over the three sessions of schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls were equal and both were larger than those of the elderly controls. Conclusion: Despite the reduced sensorimotor performance that was found in the schizophrenia patients, their sensorimotor learning seems to be preserved. The relevance of this finding for the evaluation of procedural learning in schizophrenia is discussed. The better performance and learning rate of the patients compared to the elderly controls was unexpected and deserves further study. PMID:25505425

  7. Loudness functions with air and bone conduction stimulation in normal-hearing subjects using a categorical loudness scaling procedure.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan; Zeitooni, Mehrnaz

    2013-07-01

    In a previous study (Stenfelt and Håkansson, 2002) a loudness balance test between bone conducted (BC) sound and air conducted (AC) sound was performed at frequencies between 0.25 and 4 kHz and at levels corresponding to 30-80 dB HL. The main outcome of that study was that for maintaining equal loudness, the level increase of sound with BC stimulation was less than that of AC stimulation with a ratio between 0.8 and 0.93 dB/dB. However, because it was shown that AC and BC tone cancellation was independent of the stimulation level, the loudness level difference did not originate in differences in basilar membrane stimulation. Therefore, it was speculated that the result could be due to the loudness estimation procedure. To investigate this further, another loudness estimation method (adaptive categorical loudness scaling) was here employed in 20 normal-hearing subjects. The loudness of a low-frequency and a high-frequency noise burst was estimated using the adaptive categorical loudness scaling technique when the stimulation was bilaterally by AC or BC. The sounds where rated on an 11-point scale between inaudible and too loud. The total dynamic range for these sounds was over 80 dB when presented by AC (between inaudible and too loud) and the loudness functions were similar for the low and the high-frequency stimulation. When the stimulation was by BC the loudness functions were steeper and the ratios between the slopes of the AC and BC loudness functions were 0.88 for the low-frequency sound and 0.92 for the high-frequency sound. These results were almost equal to the previous published results using the equal loudness estimation procedure, and it was unlikely that the outcome stems from the loudness estimation procedure itself. One possible mechanism for the result was loudness integration of multi-sensory input. However, no conclusive evidence for such a mechanism could be given by the present study. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  8. The Relationship between Vitamin D and Coronary Artery Ectasia in Subjects with a Normal C-Reactive Protein Level

    PubMed Central

    Cagirci, Goksel; Yuksel, Isa Oner; Bayar, Nermin; Koklu, Erkan; Guven, Ramazan; Arslan, Sakir

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Vitamin D is generally known to be closely related to inflammation. The effects of vitamin D on coronary artery disease (CAD) are not fully explained. Nowadays, coronary artery ectasia (CAE) cases are common and are regarded as being a kind of CAD. We aimed to investigate, in a case-control study, the relationship between vitamin D and CAE without an associated inflammatory process. Subjects and Methods This study population included 201 patients (CAE group, 121 males; mean age, 61.2±6.4 years) with isolated CAE; and 197 healthy individuals (control group, 119 males; mean age, 62.4±5.8 years), comprising the control group, who had normal coronary arteries. These participants concurrently underwent routine biochemical tests, tests for inflammatory markers, and tests for 25-OH vitamin D in whole-blood draws. These parameters were compared. Results There are no statistical significance differences among the groups for basic clinical characteristics (p>0.05). Inflammatory markers were recorded and compared to exclude any inflammatory process. All of them were similar, and no statistical significance difference was found. The average parathyroid hormone (PTH) level of patients was higher than the average PTH level in controls (41.8±15.1 pg/mL vs. 19.1±5.81 pg/mL; p<0.001). Also, the average 25-OH vitamin D level of patients was lower than the average 25-OH vitamin D level of controls (14.5±6.3 ng/mL vs. 24.6±9.3 ng/mL; p<0.001). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the observed cut-off value for vitamin D between the control group and patients was 10.8 and 85.6% sensitivity and 75.2% specificity (area under the curve: 0.854, 95% confidence interval: 0.678-0.863). Conclusion We found that there is an association between vitamin D and CAE in patients who had no inflammatory processes. Our study may provide evidence for the role of vitamin D as a non-inflammatory factor in the pathophysiology of CAE. PMID:28382079

  9. Effect of digoxin on the heart in normal subjects: influence of isometric exercise and autonomic blockade: a noninvasive study.

    PubMed

    Partanen, J; Heikkilä, J; Pellinen, T; Nieminen, M S

    1988-03-01

    1. Eight healthy subjects were studied before digoxin and after successive therapy periods of 1 week 0.125, 0.25 and 0.50 mg of digoxin. The mean serum concentrations (+/- s. d.) were 0.4 +/- 0.2, 0.6 +/- 0.3 and 1.4 +/- 0.5 nmol l-1, respectively. The effects of digitalis were studied by echocardiography and systolic time intervals at rest and after 3 min handgrip exercise. Effects of simultaneous autonomic blockade induced by atropine and propranolol were also examined. 2. Digoxin in increasing doses slowed the heart rate at rest; with the daily dose of 0.50 mg from 63 +/- 10 to 53 +/- 6 beats min-1, and fractional shortening rose from 28 +/- 6 to 33 +/- 3% (P less than 0.05 for both). Preload, afterload and cardiac output did not change. The electromechanic systolic time index (QS2I) decreased (P less than 0.001) and the observed alteration of QS2I was dose-related. 3. The influence of digoxin was similar during isometric exercise, except for unchanged fractional shortening. 4. During autonomic blockade digoxin slowed the intrinsic heart rate from 93 +/- 6 to 86 +/- 6 beats min-1 (0.25 mg) and to 83 +/- 6 beats min-1 (0.50 mg) (P less than 0.01 for both). QS2I was shortened (P less than 0.01). Echocardiographically determined ejection phase indices remained unchanged. 5. When handgrip stress was induced during autonomic blockade, digoxin evoked a clearcut increase in contractile function, resembling the effects of digoxin alone at rest. Thus, fractional shortening increased by 14% and QS2I decreased by 16 ms (P less than 0.01 for both). 6. We conclude that digoxin increases the contractility in normal heart without changes in loading conditions. The rise in inotropy at rest is obvious from both fractional shortening by echo and systolic time intervals. The same takes place during handgrip with autonomic blockade, when the heart lacks sympathetic support. The influence of long-term digoxin on heart rate is partly direct without autonomic mediation. The effect of

  10. Effect of digoxin on the heart in normal subjects: influence of isometric exercise and autonomic blockade: a noninvasive study.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, J; Heikkilä, J; Pellinen, T; Nieminen, M S

    1988-01-01

    1. Eight healthy subjects were studied before digoxin and after successive therapy periods of 1 week 0.125, 0.25 and 0.50 mg of digoxin. The mean serum concentrations (+/- s. d.) were 0.4 +/- 0.2, 0.6 +/- 0.3 and 1.4 +/- 0.5 nmol l-1, respectively. The effects of digitalis were studied by echocardiography and systolic time intervals at rest and after 3 min handgrip exercise. Effects of simultaneous autonomic blockade induced by atropine and propranolol were also examined. 2. Digoxin in increasing doses slowed the heart rate at rest; with the daily dose of 0.50 mg from 63 +/- 10 to 53 +/- 6 beats min-1, and fractional shortening rose from 28 +/- 6 to 33 +/- 3% (P less than 0.05 for both). Preload, afterload and cardiac output did not change. The electromechanic systolic time index (QS2I) decreased (P less than 0.001) and the observed alteration of QS2I was dose-related. 3. The influence of digoxin was similar during isometric exercise, except for unchanged fractional shortening. 4. During autonomic blockade digoxin slowed the intrinsic heart rate from 93 +/- 6 to 86 +/- 6 beats min-1 (0.25 mg) and to 83 +/- 6 beats min-1 (0.50 mg) (P less than 0.01 for both). QS2I was shortened (P less than 0.01). Echocardiographically determined ejection phase indices remained unchanged. 5. When handgrip stress was induced during autonomic blockade, digoxin evoked a clearcut increase in contractile function, resembling the effects of digoxin alone at rest. Thus, fractional shortening increased by 14% and QS2I decreased by 16 ms (P less than 0.01 for both). 6. We conclude that digoxin increases the contractility in normal heart without changes in loading conditions. The rise in inotropy at rest is obvious from both fractional shortening by echo and systolic time intervals. The same takes place during handgrip with autonomic blockade, when the heart lacks sympathetic support. The influence of long-term digoxin on heart rate is partly direct without autonomic mediation. The effect of

  11. Use of the body composition monitor for fluid status measurements in elderly malnourished subjects.

    PubMed

    Keane, David F; Bowra, Kim; Kearney, Kathryn; Lindley, Elizabeth

    2016-12-26

    Most haemodialysis (HD) patients are able to finish dialysis at or below the normally hydrated weight determined using the body composition monitor (BCM). However, a minority become symptomatic when they are still fluid overloaded based on BCM-measured overhydration (OH). Malnourished patients frequently fall into this group, suggesting that they may have OH that is inaccessible to ultrafiltration. To isolate any effect of malnutrition on BCM-measured OH from those relating to renal failure, OH measurements for twenty elderly subjects with normal renal function who were classified as malnourished were compared with an age-matched cohort with no known nutritional issues. BCM measurements were also made on five malnourished HD patients. Mean OH for malnourished subjects with normal renal function was not significantly different from an age-matched cohort without known nutritional deficiencies (1.3 and 1.1 litres respectively; p=0.5). Post-dialysis OH for HD patients ranged from -0.1 to +4.5 litres. A slightly elevated BCM-measured OH appears to be common in elderly subjects and may be explained by changes in the composition of adipose tissue. The effect of malnutrition could not be isolated from sarcopenia, but this study supports the need for caution when reducing target weight in vulnerable patients.

  12. Orange juice decreases low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic subjects and improves lipid transfer to high-density lipoprotein in normal and hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Thais B; Aptekmann, Nancy P; Araujo, Milena P; Vinagre, Carmen C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2010-10-01

    Orange juice (OJ) is regularly consumed worldwide, but its effects on plasma lipids have rarely been explored. This study hypothesized that consumption of OJ concentrate would improve lipid levels and lipid metabolism, which are important in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function in normolipidemic (NC) and hypercholesterolemic (HCH) subjects. Fourteen HCH and 31 NC adults consumed 750 mL/day OJ concentrate (1:6 OJ/water) for 60 days. Eight control subjects did not consume OJ for 60 days. Plasma was collected before and on the last day for biochemical analysis and an in vitro assay of transfers of radioactively labeled free-cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids, and triglycerides from lipoprotein-like nanoemulsions to HDL. Orange juice consumption decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (160 ± 17 to 141 ± 26 mg/dL, P < .01) in the HCH group but not in the NC group. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides remained unchanged in both groups. Free-cholesterol transfer to HDL increased (HCH: 4.4 ± 2 to 5.6 ± 1%, NC: 3.2 ± 2 to 6.2 ± 1%, P< .05) whereas triglyceride (HCH 4.9 ± 1 to 3.1 ± 1%, NC 4.4 ± 1 to 3.4 ± 1%, P< .05) and phospholipid (HCH 21.6 ± 2 to 18.6 ± 3%, NC 20.2 ± 2 to 18.4 ± 2%, P < .05) transfers decreased in both groups. Cholesteryl-ester transfer decreased only in HCH (3.6 ± 1 to 3.1 ± 1%, P < .05), but not in NC. In control subjects, plasma lipids and transfers were unaltered for 60 days. Thus, by decreasing atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in HCH and increasing HDL ability to take up free cholesterol in HCH and NC, OJ may be beneficial to both groups as free-cholesterol transfer to HDL is crucial for cholesterol esterification and reverse cholesterol transport.

  13. [Study of the fatty acid components of the triglyceride fraction of the blood in normal and thalassemic subjects, using gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Gilli, G; Moiraghi Ruggenini, A; Nani, E; Bottura, G; Mastretta, L

    1977-01-01

    Thin layer chromatography was used to separate the triglyceridic fraction of plasma lipides in normal (19) and thalassaemic (15) subjects. Gas chromatographic analysis of the fraction was then carried out and the fatty acids represented were identified qualitatively and quantitatively. Statistically significant variations, specifically increase in arachidonic acid and reduction in palmitic and linoleic acids, were observed in the thalassaemic patients.

  14. Peripheral mononuclear leucocyte beta adrenoceptors and non-specific bronchial responsiveness to methacholine in young and elderly normal subjects and asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, M. J.; Crowley, J. J.; Nielson, C. P.; Charan, N. B.; Vestal, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--As beta adrenoceptor dysfunction occurs in both the normal elderly subject and in young asthmatic patients, the hypothesis was examined that age related beta adrenoceptor changes are important in the pathogenesis of late onset asthma in old age. METHODS--Subjects were non-smokers who comprised 17 young normal subjects of mean (SE) age 29.4 (1.3) years, 17 elderly normal subjects of 67.2 (1.3) years, seven young asthmatic patients of 31.0 (2.8) years, and 17 elderly asthmatic patients of 68.5 (1.4) years. All asthmatic patients withheld inhalers for 12 hours and oral treatment for 24 hours before each study day. Subjects underwent an inhaled methacholine challenge (Newcastle dosimeter method) on two nonconsecutive days. The slope of the flow at 50% of the vital capacity (FEF50) dose-response curve was derived from the percentage fall in FEE50 divided by methacholine dose (sFEF50). Beta-adrenoceptor density (Bmax) and affinity (%KH) were determined with (125I)iodocyanopindolol as the radioligand in membranes prepared from mononuclear leucocytes. RESULTS--Log sFEF50 was shown to be reproducible (repeatability coefficient 0.41) on the two study days and was inversely related to %KH but not to Bmax. Multiple regression analysis (all 58 subjects, overall R2 = 0.57) revealed an inverse relation between log sFEF50 and %KH, and between log sFEF50 and Bmax. The inverse relation between log sFEF50 and %KH was preserved whereas that between log sFEF50 and Bmax was lost when young asthmatic subjects or when all asthmatic subjects were excluded from multiple regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS--The beta adrenoceptor dysfunction observed in late onset asthma may be similar to that seen during ageing. Thus late onset asthma may represent the extreme of a spectrum of age associated beta adrenoceptor dysfunction. PMID:8153936

  15. Preserved Learning during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test in Patients with Schizophrenia, Age-Matched Controls, and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Claudia; De Picker, Livia J.; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Morrens, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit–symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol–digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning, and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition, the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (N = 30) were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N = 30) and healthy elderly volunteers (N = 30) during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test (SDST). The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time) and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time). The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7). Symbol–digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning. Results: The repetition of the same symbol–digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing. Conclusion: The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed was found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, a large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the

  16. Elevation of miR-221 and -222 in the internal mammary arteries of diabetic subjects and normalization with metformin.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Chasity B; Lightell, Daniel J; Moss, Stephanie C; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E; Woods, T Cooper

    2013-07-15

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased intimal thickening and accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. We measured the expression of two microRNAs that promote intimal thickening, miR-221/222, and mRNA encoding a downstream target, p27(Kip1), in internal mammary artery (IMA) segments collected from 37 subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The segments were stratified into three groups: non-diabetic subjects (ND), diabetic subjects not on metformin (DMMet-), and diabetic subjects on metformin (DMMet+). The DMMet- group exhibited a significant increase in miR-221/222 and decrease in p27(Kip1) mRNA compared to both the ND and DMMet+ groups. miR-221/222 levels inversely correlated with metformin dose. VSMCs isolated from the IMAs of the DMMet- group proliferate at a faster rate than those of the ND and DMMet+ groups. Further studies into the importance of miR-221/222 in the increased intimal thickening observed in diabetic subjects is warranted.

  17. Elevation of miR-221 and -222 in the Internal Mammary Arteries of Diabetic Subjects and Normalization with Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Chasity B.; Lightell, Daniel J.; Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased intimal thickening and accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. We measured the expression of two microRNAs that promote intimal thickening, miR-221/222, and mRNA encoding a downstream target, p27Kip1, in internal mammary artery (IMA) segments collected from 37 subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The segments were stratified into three groups: non-diabetic subjects (ND), diabetic subjects not on metformin (DMMet−), and diabetic subjects on metformin (DMMet+). The DMMet− group exhibited a significant increase in miR-221/222 and decrease in p27Kip1 mRNA compared to both the ND and DMMet+ groups. miR-221/222 levels inversely correlated with metformin dose. VSMCs isolated from the IMAs of the DMMet− group proliferate at a faster rate than those of the ND and DMMet+ groups. Further studies into the importance of miR-221/222 in the increased intimal thickening observed in diabetic subjects is warranted. PMID:23648338

  18. [Pharmacokinetic study of pyrazinamide and pyrazinoic acid in subjects with normal renal function and patients with renal failure].

    PubMed

    Vayre, P; Chambraud, E; Fredj, G; Thuillier, A

    1989-01-01

    The main pharmacokinetic parameters of pyrazinamide and pyrazinoïc acid (its major metabolite) were determined after oral administration of 1,500 mg/d in 10 patients with normal renal function and of 1,000 mg/d in 10 patients with impaired renal function (renal insufficiency). This study shows that, with these dosage regimens, almost all the pharmacokinetic parameters are identical for pyrazinamide and pyrazinoic acid in patients with normal renal function and patients with impaired renal function. Comparison of results between patients allows us to propose a dosage regimen of 1,000 mg/d as maintenance in patients with renal insufficiency.

  19. Influence of high-normal serum TSH levels on major cardiovascular risk factors and Visceral Adiposity Index in euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Giandalia, A; Russo, G T; Romeo, E L; Alibrandi, A; Villari, P; Mirto, A A; Armentano, G; Benvenga, S; Cucinotta, D

    2014-09-01

    Although several observations indicate that serum TSH levels in the high normal range are related to cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors in the general population, similar data are limited in diabetic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations between TSH serum levels within the normal range and major metabolic and non-metabolic CVD risk factors in a cohort of euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects. Thyroid hormones, TSH levels, anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, glucose control, and blood pressure were measured in 490 euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects, consecutively attending two outpatient diabetic units in Southern Italy. In all subjects, we also calculated the Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI), an obesity-related index associated with CVD risk. Diabetic women showed higher mean serum TSH levels and lower FT4 concentration than diabetic men, while FT3 levels were comparable in the two genders. Stratifying the study population according to quartiles of TSH levels, subjects in the highest TSH quartile were more likely to be female and younger, with higher values of BMI and waist circumference (P = 0.05 both), higher triglycerides (P = 0.002) and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations (P = 0.01), higher VAI values (P = 0.02), and lower FT4 levels (P = 0.05), when compared to those in the lowest quartile. At multivariate analysis, a younger age, female gender, triglycerides levels, and waist circumference were independently associated with higher TSH levels. In conclusion, in type 2 diabetic subjects with no evidence of thyroid disease, higher TSH concentrations within the normal range were more frequent in women and in younger subjects, and they were associated with visceral obesity and higher triglycerides concentrations, two well-known CVD risk factors.

  20. Abnormally Small Neuromuscular Junctions in the Extraocular Muscles From Subjects With Idiopathic Nystagmus and Nystagmus Associated With Albinism

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Linda K.; Willoughby, Christy L.; Anderson, Jill S.; Bothun, Erick D.; Stager, David; Felius, Joost; Lee, Helena; Gottlob, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is often associated with abnormalities of axonal outgrowth and connectivity. To determine if this manifests in extraocular muscle innervation, specimens from children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were examined and compared to normal age-matched control extraocular muscles. Methods Extraocular muscles removed during normal surgery on children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were immunostained for neuromuscular junctions, myofiber type, the immature form of the acetylcholine receptor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and compared to age-matched controls. Results Muscles from both the idiopathic INS and INS and albinism groups had neuromuscular junctions that were 35% to 71% smaller based on myofiber area and myofiber perimeter than found in age-matched controls, and this was seen on both fast and slow myosin heavy chain isoform–expressing myofibers (all P < 0.015). Muscles from subjects with INS and albinism showed a 7-fold increase in neuromuscular junction numbers on fast myofibers expressing the immature gamma subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. The extraocular muscles from both INS subgroups showed a significant increase in the number and size of slow myofibers compared to age-matched controls. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed in control muscle but was virtually absent in the INS muscles. Conclusions These studies suggest that, relative to the final common pathway, INS is not the same between different patient etiologies. It should be possible to modulate these final common pathway abnormalities, via exogenous application of appropriate drugs, with the hope that this type of treatment may reduce the involuntary oscillatory movements in these children. PMID:27092717

  1. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.; Karacan, I.

    1987-07-01

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreaming CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming.

  2. Effect of sleep deprivation on the growth hormone response to the alpha-3 adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine, in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Kiely, M E; Guyda, H

    1997-01-01

    One night's sleep deprivation (SD) increased the growth hormone (GH) response to clonidine (20 ug/kg i.v.) in 11 normal men ( p < 0.005). This finding may indicate that SD enhances alpha-2 adrenergic receptor function or that the GH response to GH releasing factor in increased by SD.

  3. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  4. Assessment of Microcirculatory Hemoglobin Levels in Normal and Diabetic Subjects using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy in the Visible Region — a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Anand, B. S. Suresh; Nivetha, K. Bala; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, R.

    2015-07-01

    Light-based diagnostic techniques provide a minimally invasive way for selective biomarker estimation when tissues transform from a normal to a malignant state. Spectroscopic techniques based on diffuse reflectance characterize the changes in tissue hemoglobin/oxygenation levels during the tissue transformation process. Recent clinical investigations have shown that changes in tissue oxygenation and microcirculation are observed in diabetic subjects in the initial and progressive stages. In this pilot study, we discuss the potential of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the visible (Vis) range to differentiate the skin microcirculatory hemoglobin levels between normal and advanced diabetic subjects with and without neuropathy. Average concentration of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the probed tissue volume is estimated for a total of four different sites in the foot sole. The results indicate a statistically significant decrease in average total hemoglobin and increase in hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels for diabetic foot compared with a normal foot. The present study demonstrates the ability of reflectance spectroscopy in the Vis range to determine and differentiate the changes in tissue hemoglobin and hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels in normal and diabetic subjects.

  5. Potential Benefits and Harms of Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Amongst Obese, Overweight and Normal Weight Subjects-A Narrative Review of Human and Animal Evidence.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2017-01-19

    Intermittent energy restriction (IER) has become popular as a means of weight control amongst people who are overweight and obese, and is also undertaken by normal weight people hoping spells of marked energy restriction will optimise their health. This review summarises randomised comparisons of intermittent and isoenergetic continuous energy restriction for weight loss to manage overweight and obesity. It also summarises the potential beneficial or adverse effects of IER on body composition, adipose stores and metabolic effects from human studies, including studies amongst normal weight subjects and relevant animal experimentation. Six small short term (<6 month) studies amongst overweight or obese individuals indicate that intermittent energy restriction is equal to continuous restriction for weight loss, with one study reporting greater reductions in body fat, and two studies reporting greater reductions in HOMA insulin resistance in response to IER, with no obvious evidence of harm. Studies amongst normal weight subjects and different animal models highlight the potential beneficial and adverse effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on ectopic and visceral fat stores, adipocyte size, insulin resistance, and metabolic flexibility. The longer term benefits or harms of IER amongst people who are overweight or obese, and particularly amongst normal weight subjects, is not known and is a priority for further investigation.

  6. Quantitative radionuclide angiography in assessment of hemodynamic changes during upright exercise: observations in normal subjects, patient with coronary artery disease and patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.A.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    Quantitative radionuclide angiography was used to evaluate hemodynamic changes in three subject groups during symptom-limited upright exercise. The 12 normal subjects had significant increases in heart rate, stroke volume, left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output during exercise; changes in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were not significant. In the 24 patients with coronary artery disease there were significant increases in heart rate and cardiac output during exercise, but insignificant changes in end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction. The change in diastolic volume in these patients was determined by the extent of coronary artery disease, propranolol therapy, end point of exercise and presence of collateral vessels. Furthermore, patients with previous myocardial infarction had a lower ejection fraction and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes during exercise than those without myocardial infarction. In the 12 patients with chronic aortic regurgitation of moderate to severe degree, there was a decrease in the end-diastolic volume during exercise. This response was distinctly different from that of the normal subjects or the patients with coronary artery disease. All three groups had a significant decrease in pulmonary transit time during exercise. It is concluded that changes in cardiac output in normal subjects during upright exercise are related to augmentation of stroke volume and tachycardia, whereas in patients with coronary artery disease they are related mainly to tachycardia.

  7. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects.

  8. [Distribution in normal subjects of performance in Token test: a basic study for the diagnosis of learning disabilities].

    PubMed

    Koeda, T; Terakawa, S; Shiota, M

    2000-01-01

    For the diagnosis of specific reading disorder (SRD) we studied the distribution in 187 elementary school children of the scores of Token test. Token test was performed under two conditions: listening and reading by presenting the same sentences. The diagnosis required a normal score under the listening condition, an abnormally low score under the reading condition and significantly large discrepancy between them. This test is valid and convenient for the diagnosis of SRD.

  9. Thyroid gland morphology in young adults: normal subjects versus those with prior low-dose neck irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.A.; Komorowski, R.A.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1983-12-01

    Thyroid glands obtained at autopsy from young adults were studied to establish more accurately the ''normal'' morphology in the groups 20 to 40 years of age. A total of 56 autopsy specimens (many obtained from trauma victims) were examined in detail by totally embedding and sectioning the thyroid glands. The morphology of these thyroid glands also was compared to that of surgically removed thyroid glands from 47 young adult patients with prior low-dose neck irradiation. The ''normal'' thyroid specimens frequently showed morphologic features, such as thyroid tissue outside the recognizable capsule of the gland (40 of 56 patients) and in the strap muscles of the neck (six of 56 patients), which are conditions commonly considered as evidence for invasive thyroid carcinoma. The thyroid glands from the ''normal'' young adult population were significantly different from those thyroid glands surgically removed from patients who had received irradiation. The irradiated thyroid glands invariably showed multiple nodules of a wide variety of histologic types, extensive lymphocytic infiltrates, and distorting fibrosis as well as a high incidence of malignancy (27 of 47 patients). A single 0.1 cm focus of papillary carcinoma was found in one specimen in the nonirradiated thyroid group. This study suggests that ''occult'' thyroid carcinomas in the group 20 to 40 years of age are rare and are significantly fewer in number than in the older population (P less than 0.02).

  10. Peak exercise left ventricular performance in normal subjects and in athletes assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomai, F; Ciavolella, M; Gaspardone, A; De Fazio, A; Basso, E G; Giannitti, C; Scali, D; Versaci, F; Crea, F; Gioffrè, P A

    1992-08-15

    The role of Frank-Starling law of the heart in determining the increase in cardiac output during exercise in humans is still controversial (e.g., the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of left ventricular [LV] filling during the shortened diastolic interval). Ten weight lifters, 12 swimmers and 12 sedentary subjects who underwent maximal upright bicycle exercise testing were studied. First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed both at rest and at peak exercise using a multicrystal gamma camera. Compared with resting values, heart rate and cardiac index at peak exercise increased by 101 +/- 16 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 6.7 +/- 2.8 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in weight lifters, by 96 +/- 9 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 9.5 +/- 2 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in swimmers, and by 103 +/- 9 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 7.3 +/- 1.8 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in sedentary subjects. Stroke volume increased by 20.5 +/- 9.8 ml/m2 (p less than 0.001) in swimmers only. End-diastolic volume at peak exercise did not change in weight lifters and in swimmers; it decreased by 8.2 +/- 8.6 ml/m2 (p less than 0.01) in sedentary subjects. A significant correlation was found between the decrease in end-systolic volume and the increase in peak rapid filling rate at peak exercise in all 3 groups (r = 0.65, p less than 0.05 in weight lifters; r = 0.59, p less than 0.05 in swimmers; r = 0.67, p less than 0.05 in sedentary subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The Intra- and Inter-rater Reliabilities of the Forward Head Posture Assessment of Normal Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seok Hyun; Son, Sung Min; Kwon, Jung Won; Lee, Na Kyung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] Assessment of posture is an important goal of physical therapy interventions for preventing the progression of forward head posture (FHP). The purpose of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliabilities of the assessment of FHP. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 45 participants (20 male subjects, 25 female subjects) from a university student population. Two physical therapists assessed FHP using images of head extension. FHP is characterized by the measurement of angles and distances between anatomical landmarks. Forward shoulder angle of 54° or less was defined as FHP. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated using Kendall’s Taub correlation coefficients. [Results] Intra-class correlation of intra-rater measurements indicated an excellent level of reliability (0.91), and intra-class correlation of inter-rater measurements showed a good level of reliability in the assessment of FHP (0.75). [Conclusion] Assessment of FHP is an important component of evaluation and affects the design of the treatment regimen. The assessment of FHP was reliably measured by two physical therapists. It could therefore become a useful method for assessing FHP in the clinical setting. Future studies will be needed to provide more detailed quantitative data for accurate assessment of posture. PMID:24259842

  12. The Intra- and Inter-rater Reliabilities of the Forward Head Posture Assessment of Normal Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seok Hyun; Son, Sung Min; Kwon, Jung Won; Lee, Na Kyung

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] Assessment of posture is an important goal of physical therapy interventions for preventing the progression of forward head posture (FHP). The purpose of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliabilities of the assessment of FHP. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 45 participants (20 male subjects, 25 female subjects) from a university student population. Two physical therapists assessed FHP using images of head extension. FHP is characterized by the measurement of angles and distances between anatomical landmarks. Forward shoulder angle of 54° or less was defined as FHP. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated using Kendall's Taub correlation coefficients. [Results] Intra-class correlation of intra-rater measurements indicated an excellent level of reliability (0.91), and intra-class correlation of inter-rater measurements showed a good level of reliability in the assessment of FHP (0.75). [Conclusion] Assessment of FHP is an important component of evaluation and affects the design of the treatment regimen. The assessment of FHP was reliably measured by two physical therapists. It could therefore become a useful method for assessing FHP in the clinical setting. Future studies will be needed to provide more detailed quantitative data for accurate assessment of posture.

  13. Not quite PIB-positive, not quite PIB-negative: slight PIB elevations in elderly normal control subjects are biologically relevant.

    PubMed

    Mormino, Elizabeth C; Brandel, Michael G; Madison, Cindee M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Marks, Shawn; Baker, Suzanne L; Jagust, William J

    2012-01-16

    Researchers employing Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography (PIB-PET) imaging have consistently indentified old normal control (oNC) subjects with elevated tracer uptake, suggesting the presence of beta-amyloid deposition in these individuals. However, a consensus regarding the level at which PIB reveals a biologically meaningful signal does not exist (ie. an appropriate cutoff value for PIB positivity remains unclear). In this exploratory study, we sought to investigate the range of PIB distribution volume ratio (DVR) values present in our oNC cohort (N=75, age range=58-97). oNC subjects were classified based on global PIB index values (average DVR across prefrontal, parietal, lateral temporal and cingulate cortices) by employing two approaches: (1) an iterative outlier approach that revealed a cutoff value of 1.16 (IO-cutoff) and (2) an approach using data from a sample of young normal control subjects (N=11, age range=20-30) that yielded a cutoff value of 1.08 (yNC-cutoff). oNC subjects falling above the IO-cutoff had values similar to AD subjects ("PIB+", 15%). Subjects falling between the 2 cutoffs were considered to have ambiguous PIB status ("Ambig", 20%) and the remaining oNC were considered "PIB-" (65%). Additional measures capturing focal DVR magnitude and extent of elevated DVR values were consistent with the classification scheme using PIB index values, and revealed evidence for elevated DVR values in a subset of PIB- oNC subjects. Furthermore, there were a greater proportion of ambiguously elevated values compared to low values, and these elevated values were present in regions known to show amyloid deposition. The analyses presented in this study, in conjunction with recently published pathological data, suggest a biological relevance of slight PIB elevations in aging.

  14. The effect of Yohimbine, an alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the growth hormone response to apomorphine in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Guyda, H

    1996-01-01

    Yohimbine HCl (16 mg po) administered 30 min before clonidine (CLON) (2 ug/kg infused over 10 min) (N = 5) or apomorphine HCl (Apo) (0.5 mg sc) (N = 10) antagonized the growth hormone (GH) response to CLON but had no effect on the GH response to Apo in normal men. This finding suggests that in humans, alpha2 adrenergic mechanisms do not modulate dopaminergic function, at least not in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and that the GH response to Apo is not mediated via an alpha2 adrenergic link. PMID:8820174

  15. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  16. Susceptibility to tinnitus revealed at 2 kHz range by bilateral lower DPOAEs in normal hearing subjects with noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Job, Agnès; Raynal, Marc; Kossowski, Michel

    2007-01-01

    We investigated potential markers of susceptibility to tinnitus in a group of normal hearing young pilots aged 25-35 years and with 8 +/- 5 years of aircraft noise exposure. 316 pilots were interviewed about their tinnitus status and were tested for hearing thresholds (audiograms) and distortion products otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE-grams). There was no subject with permanent tinnitus. 23% reported having occasionally perceived tinnitus after flight missions and 77% reported never having experienced tinnitus after flight missions. General discomfort in the ears to noise was higher in the occasional tinnitus group (15 vs. 6%). The major finding was that difference of susceptibility to tinnitus in normal hearing subjects exposed to noise on a daily basis seemed to be clearly related to lower DPOAEs, bilaterally, in the 1500- to 2800-kHz range. However, no difference could be observed between groups on audiograms at the 2-kHz frequency range. This study provided evidence of outer hair cell dysfunctions in normal hearing subjects exposed to noise and susceptible to tinnitus. Hypersensitivity to noise and decreased DPOAEs in a non-noise-specific frequency range support the idea of another alteration mechanism than noise itself. This point was discussed in the light of recent publications.

  17. Cognitive patterns of normal elderly subjects are consistent with frontal cortico-subcortical and fronto-parietal neuropsychological models of brain aging.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Natalia; Łojek, Emilia; Kijanowska-Haładyna, Beata; Nestorowicz, Jakub; Harasim, Andrzej; Pluta, Agnieszka; Sobańska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Three neuropsychological theories have been developed according to a possible existence of a similar pattern of cognitive decline in elderly individuals and patients with brain damage. The respective neuropsychological theories attribute age-related deficits to: (a) dysfunction of the frontal lobes, (b) temporo-parietal dysfunction, or (c) decline of right-hemisphere functions. In the present study, we examined which of these theories best explains the cognitive patterns of normal elderly subjects older than 80 years of age (old elderly). Thirty normal old elderly subjects, 14 patients with subcortical vascular dementia, 14 with mild Alzheimer's disease, 15 with damage of the right hemisphere of the brain, and 20 young elderly controls participated. A test battery covering the main cognitive domains was administered to all participants. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed five groups of individuals with different cognitive patterns across the whole sample. Old elderly subjects were assigned to four groups according to: (a) preserved overall cognitive performance, (b) processing speed decline, (c) attention decline, or (d) executive impairment. The results of the study are most congruent with models emphasizing frontal-lobe cortical-subcortical and fronto-parietal changes in old age. The results also indicate considerable heterogeneity in the cognitive patterns of normal old elderly adults.

  18. [Studies on evaluation of the oxygen transport system function with multistage treadmill stress testing: comparison between normal control subjects and patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Doba, N; Kushiro, T; Tomiyama, H; Hayashida, N; Yamashina, A; Abe, H; Hinohara, S

    1989-07-01

    The oxygen transport system (OTS) function was evaluated with multistage treadmill stress testing on 171 normal control subjects and 80 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). After Bruce's definition, OTS function was expressed with functional aerobic impairment (FAI), left ventricular impairment (LVI) or myocardial aerobic impairment (MAI), heart rate impairment (HRI) or chronotropic reserve impairment (CRI) and peripheral circulatory impairment (PCI). All subjects were monitored on heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiogram and endtidal O2 and CO2 before and every one minute during the symptom limited maximal stress testing. Seventy three of 80 coronary patients were subjected to the coronary arteriography and were classified into four groups; 31 with single vessel disease (SVD), 20 with double vessel disease (DVD), 15 with triple vessel disease (TVD) and 7 with A-C bypass surgery. Comparison between normal control subjects and the CHD patients with regard to the relation of age and VO2max derived from the linear regression analysis disclosed the identical age-related decrease in VO2max in both groups. The age corrected VO2max in the CHD patients, however, was 2.2 METS less than that of normal control subjects. Therefore, the level of VO2max in CHD patients was determined not only by disease, but also by ageing process itself. Comparisons among three CHD groups with regard to FAI, LVI, HRI and PCI clearly demonstrated different functional impairments paralleling to the severity of the disease process. On the other hand, the patients with A-C bypass surgery revealed almost identical functional impairment to the patients with SVD. In conclusion, these simple and noninvasive evaluations of the oxygen transport system could give us valuable informations reasonably differentiating the clinical status of the patients with CHD.

  19. A new radiographic method for evaluation of the position of the carpus in the coronal plane: results in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Aufauvre, B; Herzberg, G; Garret, J; Berthonneaud, E; Dimnet, J

    1999-01-01

    The methods used to quantify pathological variations of the position of the carpus in the coronal plane, mainly ulnar translation of the carpus from trauma or rheumatoid disease, are often difficult to use in arthritic or postsurgical wrists; moreover, they require the measurement of the whole length of the third metacarpal. The aim of this study was to determine a reliable and easy-to-use index to analyse the position of the carpus in the coronal plane. One hundred PA X-rays of normal wrists were studied, of which 56 presented with a medial hamate facet of the lunate. An index of position of the carpus in the coronal plane is defined as the ratio of orthogonal distances from [1] the most medial point of the distal radius and [2] the most medial point of the capitate to the long axis of the radius: its mean value being 1.06 (+/- 0.13) in this series of normal wrists. The index is influenced by the presence of a medial hamate facet of the lunate, but is not dependent on the ulnar head and radial styloid process, nor on the length of the third metacarpal. To help to define the usefulness of the index in quantifying the different types of ulnar carpal translations in clinical practice, further studies are required.

  20. Epigenetic modifications at DMRs of placental genes are subjected to variations in normal gestation, pathological conditions and folate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Beenish; Mahajan, Aatish; Bagga, Rashmi; Hamid, Abid; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2017-01-01

    Invasive placentation and cancer development shares many similar molecular and epigenetic pathways. Paternally expressed, growth promoting genes (SNRPN, PEG10 and MEST) which are known to play crucial role in tumorogenesis, are not well studied during placentation. This study reports for the first time of the impact of gestational-age, pathological conditions and folic acid supplementation on dynamic nature of DNA and histone methylation present at their differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we reported the association between low DNA methylation/H3K27me3 and higher expression of SNRPN, PEG10 and MEST in highly proliferating normal early gestational placenta. Molar and preeclamptic placental villi, exhibited aberrant changes in methylation levels at DMRs of these genes, leading to higher and lower expression of these genes, respectively, in reference to their respective control groups. Moreover, folate supplementation could induce gene specific changes in mRNA expression in placental cell lines. Further, MEST and SNRPN DMRs were observed to show the potential to act as novel fetal DNA markers in maternal plasma. Thus, variation in methylation levels at these DMRs regulate normal placentation and placental disorders. Additionally, the methylation at these DMRs might also be susceptible to folic acid supplementation and has the potential to be utilized in clinical diagnosis. PMID:28098215

  1. Impact of Limiting Visual Input on Gait: Individuals with Parkinson Disease, Age-matched Controls and Healthy Young Participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilgram, Laura M.; Earhart, Gammon M.; Pickett, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal and limited vision gait was investigated in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD), healthy older and healthy young individuals. Participants walked a GAITRite mat with normal vision or vision of lower limbs occluded. Results indicate individuals with PD walked more slowly, with shorter and wider steps and spent more time in double support with limited vision as compared to full vision. Healthy young and old individuals took shorter steps but were otherwise unchanged between conditions. PMID:26987577

  2. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow in Normal Chinese-American Subjects by Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sowmya; Tan, Ou; Wu, Shuang; Nittala, Muneeswar Gupta; Huang, David; Varma, Rohit; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in normal, healthy Chinese Americans by using semi-automated analysis of Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) scans. Methods. Two hundred sixty-six normal, healthy Chinese-American participants (266 eyes) were enrolled from The Chinese American Eye Study. All participants underwent complete ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and Doppler FD-OCT imaging, using the circumpapillary double circular scan protocol. Total retinal blood flow and other vascular parameters (e.g., venous and arterial cross-sectional area and their velocities) were calculated by using Doppler OCT of Retinal Circulation software. Associations between TRBF and other clinical parameters were assessed by using bivariate correlations and linear regression. Results. The mean age of study participants was 57.40 ± 5.60 (range, 50–82) years. The mean TRBF was 49.34 ± 10.08 (range, 27.17–78.08, 95% confidence interval: 25.98–69.10) μL/min. The mean venous area was 0.0548 (±0.0084) mm2. Superior retinal hemispheric blood flow (25.50 ± 6.62 μL/min) was slightly greater than inferior retinal hemispheric blood flow (23.84 ± 7.19 μL/min, P = 0.008). The mean flow velocity was 15.16 ± 3.12 mm/s. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between TRBF and age (r = −0.15, P = 0.012). No significant correlation was found between TRBF and axial length (r = 0.11, P = 0.08). Retinal blood flow was not significantly correlated with any other clinical parameters, including body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and intraocular pressure. Conclusions. Normal Doppler OCT-derived total retinal blood values in a Chinese-American population showed considerable variability, some of which was explained by age. These observations should help design future studies evaluating TRBF in populations with eye disease. PMID:25670487

  3. TNF-α and antibodies to periodontal bacteria discriminate between Alzheimer’s disease patients and normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kamer, Angela R.; Craig, Ronald G.; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Dasanayake, Ananda P.; Norman, Robert G.; Boylan, Robert J.; Nehorayoff, Andrea; Glodzik, Lidia; Brys, Miroslaw; de Leon, Mony J.

    2009-01-01

    The associations of inflammation/immune responses with clinical presentations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remain unclear. We hypothesized that TNF-α and elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria would be greater in AD compared to normal controls (NL) and their combination would aid clinical diagnosis of AD. Plasma TNF-α and antibodies against periodontal bacteria were elevated in AD patients compared with NL and independently associated with AD. The number of positive IgG to periodontal bacteria incremented the TNF-α classification of clinical AD and NL. This study shows that TNF-α and elevated numbers of antibodies against periodontal bacteria associate with AD and contribute to the AD diagnosis. PMID:19767111

  4. Incomplete contacts in partial slip subject to varying normal and shear loading, and their representation by asymptotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, R. M. N.; Hills, D. A.; Ramesh, R.; Barber, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    We develop a method for the solution of partial slip contact problems suffering complex loading cycles where, generally, the normal load, shear force and, potentially, differential bulk tensions are all functions of time, using an edge-asymptote approach. The size of the slip zone and local shear traction distribution are revealed as functions of time. The results are then re-worked in asymptotic form, so that they do not hinge on inherent symmetry and anti-symmetry conditions for the contact overall, and are of general applicability. The multipliers on the local solutions (generalised stress intensity factors) are also appropriate as a means of taking laboratory tests quantifying fretting fatigue and employing them to wholly different prototypical problems.

  5. Diurnal secretion of ghrelin, growth hormone, insulin binding proteins, and prolactin in normal weight and overweight subjects with and without the night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe S; Geliebter, Allan; Kristiansen, Ingrid; Firgenschau, Yngve; Goll, Rasmus; Florholmen, Jon R

    2012-12-01

    The regulatory peptide ghrelin has been proposed to help mediate both hunger and sleep. The neuroendocrine circadian patterns in the night eating syndrome (NES) have been distinguished by an attenuated nocturnal rise in the plasma concentrations of melatonin and leptin and a greater increase in the concentrations of cortisol. In this study we wanted to test the hypothesis that night eaters have disturbances in the circadian levels of ghrelin, growth hormone (GH) and associated regulatory peptides. In 12 female night eaters (6 normal weight and 6 overweight), and 25 healthy controls (12 normal weight and 13 overweight), blood was sampled over a 24-hour period. Four meals were served from 8 AM to 8 PM, and blood samples were drawn every second hour for determination of plasma ghrelin concentrations and GH by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Analysis of serum GH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and prolactin were performed by ELISA. In healthy normal weight subjects there was a slight but non significant nocturnal increase of ghrelin, whereas a more or less flat curve was observed for healthy overweight, NES normal weight and NES overweight patients. The RMANOVA analysis showed a significant independent lowering effect of overweight on the grand mean of ghrelin. No direct effects on NES normal weight and overweight subjects were found, but a near-significant interaction was found between healthy overweight and overweight NES subjects. There were independent significant lowering effects of overweight and NES on the serum GH levels. During the time course no changes in the serum levels of IGF-1 or IGFB-3 were observed. Independent significant lowering effects of overweight and NES on the levels of IGF-1 were detected, whereas a near significant reduction in the global levels of IGFBP-3 was observed in both NES groups. Finally, significant nocturnal changes were observed for serum levels of prolactin in all four subgroups. Grand mean levels tended to be higher in NES subjects whereas the opposite

  6. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  7. A study of the effect of diet on glycosylated haemoglobin and albumin levels and glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ryle, A J; Davie, S; Gould, B J; Yudkin, J S

    1990-12-01

    As factors other than the degree of glucose tolerance or ambient blood glucose may determine glycosylated haemoglobin levels, we have investigated the effects of dietary glucose and soluble fibre supplementation on glucose tolerance, glycosylated haemoglobin and glycosylated albumin in non-diabetic subjects. Eleven non-diabetic subjects (7 M, 4 F; age 26.5 +/- 6.5 (+/- SD) yr; BMI 21.6 +/- 3.1 kg m-2) followed a high-soluble-fibre (5 g guar gum thrice daily)/low-glucose diet, or a low-soluble-fibre/high-glucose (500 ml glucose drink providing 100 g glucose per day) diet, each for 6 weeks, in randomized order. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed at recruitment and after each diet period, and fasting blood was assayed for glycosylated albumin by affinity chromatography, and glycosylated haemoglobin by four different methods. Adherence to guar and glucose supplementation was assessed at 89.5 +/- 7.5% and 97.1 +/- 3.5%, respectively. There was no significant effect of either diet on mean fasting, 1-h or 2-h plasma glucose concentration, or glycosylated haemoglobin levels by any assay. Glycosylated albumin was 1.71 +/- 0.35% at entry, fell to 1.33 +/- 0.30% (p less than 0.01) with high-fibre and rose to 1.95 +/- 0.23% (p less than 0.02) after a high-glucose diet. Insulin, total- and HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by either diet. A high-glucose diet increases, and a high-soluble-fibre diet decreases, levels of glycosylated albumin without effects on glucose tolerance or glycosylated haemoglobin.

  8. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q.; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected. PMID:27916817

  9. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  10. Same noses, different nasalance scores: data from normal subjects and cleft palate speakers for three systems for nasalance analysis.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences. The nasalance distance was largest for the Nasometer and smallest for the OroNasal System. When the calculation was based on nasalance magnitudes, results for sensitivity ranged from 57.9% to 81.8% and results for specificity ranged from 62.0% to 76.0%. When the calculation was based on nasalance distances, results for sensitivity ranged from 84.2% to 100.0% and results for specificity ranged from 82.0% to 100.0%. Results suggest that nasalance scores from the three systems are not interchangeable. Diagnostic efficacy improved when the calculations were based on nasalance distances rather than magnitudes, but further research is warranted to corroborate these findings.

  11. [Activity of Vegetative Nervous System and Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines During Glucose Tolerance Test in Subjects With Optimal and High Normal Blood Pressure].

    PubMed

    Mangileva, T A

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen patients with high normal (main group) and 15 subjects with optimal (control group) blood pressure (BP) were examined. Fasting and postprandial (60 and 120 min after oral intake of glucose) levels of glucose, insulin, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and C-reactive protein were measured. At the same time spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) was done. Body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance index (as HOMA-IR) were calculated. In patients with high normal BP total power of HRV was decreased (p < 0.05) and dynamic changes of HRV after glucose loading were blunted. In persons with optimal BP transient elevation of low frequency component and low/high ratio in 60 min after onset of glucose tolerance test (GTT) were registered; values of both parameters were higher than in the main group (p < 0.05). Changes in vegetative nervous system activity in control group were accompanied by transient elevations of levels of inflammatory cytokines: IL-10 and TNF-α in 60 min, IL-6 in 120 min after GTT onset (p < 0.05), which at that moment were higher than in patients with high normal BP (p < 0.05). Fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations and glucose level 60 min after glucose intake were higher in patients from the main group (p < 0.05). In both groups positive correlations between BMI and HOMA-IR were observed (r1 = 0.70 & r2 = 0.78). Subjects with optimal and high normal BP have different variants of vegetative nervous system reactions to pulsatile hyperglycemia which is accompanied by changes of levels of inflammatory cytokines and worsening of carbohydrate metabolism in patients with high normal BP.

  12. Radioimmunological determination of insulinlike growth factors I and II in normal subjects and in patients with growth disorders and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Walter, H; Froesch, E R

    1981-01-01

    Serum levels of immunoreactive insulinlike growth factors (IGF) I and II were determined by a modified IGF I and a new IGF II radioimmunoassay in normal children and adults, and in patients with acromegaly, isolated growth hormone deficiency, and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia. Serum samples were gel filtered by a simple routine procedure at acidic pH to dissociate and separate IGF from the IGF carrier protein. Mean immunoreactive IGF I levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF II) were 193 +/- 58 ng/ml in normal adult subjects, 712 +/- 245 ng/ml in acromegalic patients and 24 +/- 14 ng/ml in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency. The lack of growth hormone alone, irrespective of an otherwise normal hormonal status, appears to be responsible for the drastic decrease of IGF I levels. Oversecretion of growth hormone does not increase the levels of immunoreactive IGF II: mean levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF I) in normal and acromegalic subjects are virtually identical (647 +/- 126 and 641 +/- 189 ng/ml, respectively). Apparently, normal growth hormone levels stimulate IGF II production already maximally. However in growth hormone deficiency immunoreactive IGF II is significantly decreased (252 +/- 99 ng/ml). Thus, IGF II, like IGF I, is growth hormone dependent. But in contrast to IGF I, the growth hormone dependence of IGF II seems to become apparent only at subnormal growth hormone levels. In normal children IGF I is age dependent: it is low in newborn cord sera (51 +/- 20 ng/ml) and gradually rises into the adult range with increasing age. At the onset of and during puberty mean IGF I levels lie above prepubertal values. In contrast, IGF II levels in normal children are independent of age and pubertal stage beyond the first year of life, whereas newborns have significantly lower IGF II values. Hypoglycemia resulting from extrapancreatic tumors is not associated with increased immunoreactive IGF I or II levels. IGF I is

  13. Myocardial uptake and clearance of thallium-201 in normal subjects: comparison of dipyridamole-induced hyperemia with exercise stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, T.D.; Gill, J.B.; Finkelstein, D.M.; Strauss, H.W.; McKusick, K.A.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-09-01

    Thallium-201 uptake and clearance after dipyridamole infusion may differ from that after exercise stress because the hemodynamic effects of these two interventions are different. In this study of normal volunteers, thallium kinetics after dipyridamole (n = 13) were determined from three serial image sets (early, intermediate and delayed) and from serial blood samples and compared with thallium kinetics after exercise (n = 15). Absolute myocardial thallium uptake was greater after dipyridamole compared with exercise (p less than 0.0001), although the relative myocardial distribution was similar. The myocardial clearance (%/h) of thallium was slower after dipyridamole than it was after exercise. Comparing dipyridamole and exercise, the differences in clearance were large from the early to the intermediate image (anterior, -11 +/- 17 versus 24 +/- 5, p = 0.0005; 50 degrees left anterior oblique, -7 +/- 11 versus 15 +/- 8, p = 0.004; 70 degrees left anterior oblique, 3 +/- 9 versus 21 +/- 6, p = 0.001). In contrast, the differences in clearance were small from the intermediate to the delayed image (anterior, 15 +/- 4 versus 20 +/- 2, p = 0.025; 50 degrees left anterior oblique, 15 +/- 4 versus 19 +/- 3, p = 0.13; 70 degrees left anterior oblique, 15 +/- 3 versus 18 +/- 2, p = 0.047). Thallium uptake and clearance in the liver, splanchnic region and spleen were greater after dipyridamole (p less than 0.001). Blood thallium levels were greater after dipyridamole (p less than 0.05) and cleared more slowly (p = 0.07). Thus, myocardial thallium-201 uptake and clearance after dipyridamole infusion differ from thallium kinetics after exercise. This difference is, in part, related to associated differences in extracardiac and blood kinetics. Diagnostic criteria for the detection of abnormal thallium-201 clearance must be specific for the type of intervention.

  14. The relationship of normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and BAC/BrAC ratio in 98 physically fit human test subjects.

    PubMed

    Cowan, J Mack; Burris, James M; Hughes, James R; Cunningham, Margaret P

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC)/breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) ratio was studied in 98 subjects (84 men, 14 women). Subjects consumed alcohol sufficient to produce a BrAC of at least 0.06 g/210 L 45-75 min after drinking. Breath samples were analyzed using an Intoxilyzer 8000 specially equipped to measure breath temperature. Venous blood samples and body temperatures were then taken. The mean body temperature of the men (36.6 degrees C) was lower than the women (37.0 degrees C); however, their mean breath temperatures were virtually identical (men: 34.5 degrees C; women: 34.6 degrees C). The BAC exceeded the BrAC for every subject. BAC/BrAC ratios were calculated from the BAC and BrAC analytical results. There was no difference in the BAC/BrAC ratios for men (1:2379) and women (1:2385). The correlation between BAC and BrAC was high (r = 0.938, p < 0.0001), whereas the correlations between body temperature and end-expired breath temperature, body temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio, and breath temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio were much lower. Neither normal body temperature nor end-expired breath temperature was strongly associated with BAC/BrAC ratio.

  15. Use of an instrumented treadmill for real-time gait symmetry evaluation and feedback in normal and trans-tibial amputee subjects.

    PubMed

    Dingwell, J B; Davis, B L; Frazier, D M

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate a newly developed system for assessing and providing feedback of gait symmetry information in real time to subjects walking on a motorised treadmill (the CCF Treadmill). The advantages of the system are that it allows the rapid collection and comparison of temporal and kinetic parameters of gait for multiple successive strides, at a constant known speed, without forcing subjects to target their footsteps. Gait asymmetries of six normal (mean age 42.7 years) and six unilateral transtibial amputee subjects (mean age 41.7, and average 6.0 years using a prosthesis) were quantified. The amputee group was the reevaluated after receiving five minutes of training with each of three different types of real-time visual feedback (RTVF). Asymmetries in the measured parameters before feedback were 4.6 times greater in the amputee population than in the normal group, and were consistent with the finding of previous authors. Significant decreases in gait asymmetry were demonstrated for all forms of feedback after amputees received feedback training. Results, however, indicated that gait asymmetries for different variables are not necessarily related, and that more work needs to be done to identify those variables for which attaining a more symmetrical gait pattern is most beneficial. Further work also needs to be done to determine the long term effects of such RTVF training. The CCF Treadmill and RTVF were shown to be potentially useful tools both for defining rehabilitation targets and for quantifying patients' progress towards those goals.

  16. Acute effects of an oral supplement of (−)-epicatechin on postprandial fat and carbohydrate metabolism in normal and overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salmeán, Gabriela; Ortiz-Vilchis, Pilar; Vacaseydel, Claudia M.; Rubio-Gayosso, Ivan; Meaney, Eduardo; Villarreal, Francisco; Ramírez-Sánchez, Israel; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia, in particular when accompanied by excessive hypertriglyceridemia, is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, mainly in overweight or obese subjects, as it favors oxidative stress, systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, treatments that favorably modulate metabolism by reducing steep increases in postprandial serum glucose and triglycerides, are of considerable interest. Evidence suggests that (−)-epicatechin (EPI) is responsible for reductions in cardiometabolic risk associated with chocolate consumption these effects may be associated with favorable effects of EPI on postprandial metabolism. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of EPI on postprandial metabolism in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects. Twenty adult volunteers (normal and overweight) underwent oral metabolic tolerance tests in the absence and presence of oral EPI (1 mg/kg). Metabolic responses were examined using indirect calorimetry and determining blood glucose and triglycerides at 0, 2 and 4 hours after metabolic load ingestion. Results show that EPI increased postprandial lipid catabolism, as evidenced by a significant decrease in the respiratory quotient, which implies an increase in fat oxidation. The effect was associated with significantly lower postprandial plasma glucose and triglycerides concentrations. The effects were more prominent in overweight subjects. In conclusion, EPI modulates postprandial metabolism by enhancing lipid oxidation accompanied by reductions in glycemia and triglyceridemia. PMID:24458104

  17. Optimal haematocrit in subjects with normal haemoglobin genotype (HbAA), sickle cell trait (HbAS), and homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS).

    PubMed

    Bowers, A S; Pepple, D J; Reid, H L

    2011-01-01

    The determination of an optimal haematocrit (H0) has important clinical implications if such a level can be attained, and more importantly, maintained. This is defined as a haematocrit level, above or below which oxygen delivery is deleteriously affected. This study is designed to determine an optimal haematocrit in normal (AA), sickle cell trait (AS) and sickle cell disease (SS) subjects. Twenty-seven apparently healthy subjects having normal haemoglobin genotype, 24 with sickle cell trait and 42 with homozygous sickle cell disease were recruited into the study. Whole blood viscosity (WBV) was measured by a Wells Brookfield Cone and Plate Viscometer at a shear rate of 230 sec-1. Haematocrit was determined by an AC.Tron Coulter Counter. The optimal haematocrit was calculated as the inverse of a constant, K, which was derived from the haematocrit and viscosity data. Our findings showed that the H0 varied significantly among the 3 haemoglobin genotypes, in the order AA vs SS and AS vs SS. Additionally, the data indicated an increased H0 in subjects with sickle cell trait, suggesting a possible impairment in oxygen delivery in these individuals.

  18. Sleep disordered breathing as a risk of cardiac events in subjects with diabetes mellitus and normal exercise echocardiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Sinziana; Strohl, Kingman P; Seicean, Andreea; Gibby, Conrad; Marwick, Thomas H

    2013-04-15

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease; however, the contribution of SDB to incident heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), and atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with T2DM is unknown. We followed up 834 consecutive asymptomatic patients with T2DM (age 56 ± 11 years, 369 women) with normal exercise echocardiographic findings for ≤8 years using electronic health records. The demographics, cardiac risk factors, symptoms, diagnoses, and medications were collected at the echocardiography and validated from the electronic health records. SDB was confirmed by a comprehensive sleep evaluation and/or polysomnography before echocardiography. SDB was diagnosed in 188 patients (21%) at baseline; 116 were untreated. During a median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range 3.9 to 6.1), 22 congestive HF, 72 CAD, and 40 AF incident events were observed. In the Cox proportional hazards models, SDB was associated with incident CAD (hazard ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 3.0, p = 0.01; adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.2, p <0.01) and AF (hazard ratio 2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 4.7, p = 0.01; adjusted hazard ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 5.9, p <0.01). Limiting SDB to only those patients diagnosed using polysomnography (n = 132), SDB was associated with incident CAD (hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 3.3, p = 0.03; adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.9, p = 0.01) and HF (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 7.0, p = 0.03; adjusted hazard ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 9.0, p <0.01). Female gender, age, elevated blood pressure, and left ventricular mass were additional correlates of CAD in those with asymptomatic T2DM. In conclusion, the association of SDB with incident CAD, AF, and HF in patients with T2DM justifies more liberal screening for SDB in patients with T2DM

  19. Controlled cross-over study in normal subjects of naloxone-preceding-lactate infusions; respiratory and subjective responses: relationship to endogenous opioid system, suffocation false alarm theory and childhood parental loss

    PubMed Central

    Preter, M.; Lee, S. H.; Petkova, E.; Vannucci, M.; Kim, S.; Klein, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The expanded suffocation false alarm theory (SFA) hypothesizes that dysfunction in endogenous opioidergic regulation increases sensitivity to CO2, separation distress and panic attacks. In panic disorder (PD) patients, both spontaneous clinical panics and lactate-induced panics markedly increase tidal volume (TV), whereas normals have a lesser effect, possibly due to their intact endogenous opioid system. We hypothesized that impairing the opioidergic system by naloxone could make normal controls parallel PD patients' response when lactate challenged. Whether actual separations and losses during childhood (childhood parental loss, CPL) affected naloxone-induced respiratory contrasts was explored. Subjective panic-like symptoms were analyzed although pilot work indicated that the subjective aspect of anxious panic was not well modeled by this specific protocol. Method Randomized cross-over sequences of intravenous naloxone (2 mg/kg) followed by lactate (10 mg/kg), or saline followed by lactate, were given to 25 volunteers. Respiratory physiology was objectively recorded by the LifeShirt. Subjective symptomatology was also recorded. Results Impairment of the endogenous opioid system by naloxone accentuates TV and symptomatic response to lactate. This interaction is substantially lessened by CPL. Conclusions Opioidergic dysregulation may underlie respiratory pathophysiology and suffocation sensitivity in PD. Comparing specific anti-panic medications with ineffective anti-panic agents (e.g. propranolol) can test the specificity of the naloxone + lactate model. A screen for putative anti-panic agents and a new pharmacotherapeutic approach are suggested. Heuristically, the experimental unveiling of the endogenous opioid system impairing effects of CPL and separation in normal adults opens a new experimental, investigatory area. PMID:20444308

  20. The potentiation by caffeine of X-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Furcinitti, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate X-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 hr postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +/- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or X-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +/- 0.12 at 30 hr, rose to 1.66 +/- 0.17 at 41 hr, and decreased to 1.31 +/- 0.13 at 66 hr. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment.

  1. Potentiation by caffeine of x-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Furcinitti, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate x-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 h postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or x-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +- 0.12 at 30 h, rose to 1.66 +- 0.17 at 41 h, and decreased to 1.31 +- 0.13 at 66 h. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment.

  2. The Study of Otoacoustic Emissions and the Suppression of Otoacoustic Emissions in Subjects with Tinnitus and Normal Hearing: An Insight to Tinnitus Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Lucieny; Novanta, Gabriela; Sampaio, Andre Lopes; Augusto Oliveira, Carlos; Granjeiro, Ronaldo; Braga, Silvia Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Analysis of the suppression effect is a simple method to evaluate cochlear status and central auditory mechanisms and, more specifically, the medial olivocochlear system. This structure may be involved in the generation of mechanisms that cause tinnitus and in the pathophysiology of tinnitus in patients with tinnitus and normal hearing. Objective To review the literature of the etiology of tinnitus on the lights of otoacoustic emissions in patients with normal hearing. Data Synthesis Individuals with tinnitus and normal hearing have a higher prevalence of alterations in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions than normal subjects. This fact suggests that dysfunctions of the outer hair cells (OHCs) might be important in the generation of the tinnitus; however, this feature is not always present in those who have the symptoms of tinnitus. Final Comments These findings suggest that OHC dysfunction is not necessary for tinnitus development—that is, there might be mechanisms other than OHC damage in the tinnitus development. On the other hand, OHC dysfunction alone is not sufficient to cause the symptom, because a great many individuals with OHC dysfunction did not complain about tinnitus. PMID:25992175

  3. Effect of Amla fruit (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) on blood glucose and lipid profile of normal subjects and type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Shoaib; Ramzan, Ayesha; Ali, Amanat; Ahmad, Maqsood

    2011-09-01

    The present study evaluated the anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering properties of Emblica officinalis Gaertn. fruit in normal and diabetic human volunteers. The results indicated a significant decrease (P <  0.05) in fasting and 2-h post-prandial blood glucose levels on the 21st day in both normal and diabetic subjects receiving 1, 2 or 3 g E. officinalis powder per day as compared with their baseline values. Significant (P <  0.05) decreases were also observed in total cholesterol and triglycerides in both normal and diabetic volunteers on day 21 that were given either 2 or 3 g E. officinalis powder per day. However, diabetic volunteers receiving only 3 g E. officinalis powder exhibited a significant (P <  0.05) decrease in total lipids on day 21. Both normal and diabetic volunteers receiving 2 or 3 g E. officinalis powder significantly (P <  0.05) improved high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and lowered low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels.

  4. Hemispheric prevalence during chewing in normal right-handed and left-handed subjects: a functional magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Piancino, Maria Grazia; Frongia, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the activation of different cortical areas during nondeliberate chewing of soft and hard boluses in five right-handed and five left-handed subjects with normal occlusion, to determine different hemispheric prevalences. The study was conducted with a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (1.5 T Magnetom Vision - Siemens Medical, Germany) using a head coil. The results showed that the most frequently activated areas were Brodmann's areas four and six in the primary motor and premotor cortex, the insula and Broca's area and, overall, showed greater activity of the cortical mastication area (CMA) in the right hemisphere for right-handed and in the left hemisphere for left-handed subjects.

  5. Normal facial age and gender perception in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Garga; Nakayama, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia is characterized by a severe deficit in face-identity recognition. Most developmental prosopagnosics do not report deficits of facial age or gender perception. We developed tasks for evaluating facial age and gender processing and used them in the largest group of developmental prosopagnosics (N = 18) tested on facial age and gender perception. Care was taken to ensure that the tests were sufficiently sensitive to subtle deficits and required holistic processing as assessed by strong inversion effects in control subjects. Despite severe facial identity deficits, developmental prosopagnosics largely performed these discriminations comparably to controls. The common descriptor "faceblind" implied by the term prosopagnosia is inaccurate as certain kinds of nonidentity facial information, which we call physiognomic features, are processed well by both prosopagnosics and age-matched controls alike. Normal facial age and gender perception in developmental prosopagnosics is consistent with parallel processing models in the cognitive architecture of face processing.

  6. Gastroesophageal and pharyngeal reflux detection using impedance and 24-hour pH monitoring in asymptomatic subjects: defining the normal environment.

    PubMed

    Oelschlager, Brant K; Quiroga, Elina; Isch, John A; Cuenca-Abente, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Airway symptoms are often caused by aspiration of refluxed materials into the larynx. In this study we sought to define the frequency, character, and proximal extent of refluxed contents - including nonacid reflux-in normal subjects using intraluminal impedance to improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux and aspiration. Ten subjects, who had no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease or airway disease, underwent impedance/pH monitoring with a catheter that allowed simultaneous esophageal and pharyngeal monitoring. Impedance detected 496 gastroesophageal reflux episodes in the 10 subjects during 240 hours of study. The majority, 399 (81% of the total) were acid reflux episodes (pH < 4). Ninety-seven were nonacid (pH > 4). Most reflux episodes (348 of 496) reached the mid esophagus (9 cm above lower esophageal sphincter). There were 51 reflux episodes that reached the pharynx (PR). Only 13 (25%) of PR were acidic (pH < 4), while 38 were nonacid. Twenty-six PR episodes were liquid and 25 were mixed (liquid and gas). The median number of PR episodes measured with impedance was 5 (0-10). In asymptomatic subjects, most episodes of gastroesophageal reflux are acidic and reach the midesophagus. Reflux into the PR appears to be more common than previously believed, and most of these episodes are not acidic. Thus, traditional 24-hour pH monitoring may underestimate the presence of pharyngeal reflux. The combination of impedance with pH monitoring markedly enhances our ability to accurately detect potential microaspiration.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of acyclovir and its metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and systemic circulation after administration of high-dose valacyclovir in subjects with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Weller, Stephen; Johnson, Benjamin; Nicotera, Janet; Luther, James M; Haas, David W

    2010-03-01

    Valacyclovir, the L-valyl ester prodrug of acyclovir (ACV), is widely prescribed to treat infections caused by varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus. Rarely, treatment is complicated by reversible neuropsychiatric symptoms. By mechanisms not fully understood, this occurs more frequently in the setting of renal impairment. We characterized the steady-state pharmacokinetics of ACV and its metabolites 9-[(carboxymethoxy)methyl]guanine (CMMG) and 8-hydroxy-acyclovir (8-OH-ACV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the systemic circulation. We administered multiple doses of high-dose valacyclovir to 6 subjects with normal renal function and 3 subjects with chronic renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCl], approximately 15 to 30 ml/min). Dosages were 2,000 mg every 6 h and 1,500 mg every 12 h, respectively. Indwelling intrathecal catheters allowed serial CSF sampling throughout the dosing interval. The average steady-state concentrations of acyclovir, CMMG, and 8-OH-ACV were greater in both the systemic circulation and the CSF among subjects with impaired renal function than among subjects with normal renal function. However, the CSF penetration of each analyte, reflected by the CSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curve over the 6- or 12-h dosing interval (AUC(tau)) ratio, did not differ based on renal function. Renal impairment does not alter the propensity for ACV or its metabolites to distribute to the CSF, but the higher concentrations in the systemic circulation, as a result of reduced elimination, are associated with proportionally higher concentrations in CSF.

  8. Functional ability perceived by individuals following total knee arthroplasty compared to age-matched individuals without knee disability.

    PubMed

    Finch, E; Walsh, M; Thomas, S G; Woodhouse, L J

    1998-04-01

    A comparison of function of individuals 1 year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with healthy control subjects (controls) meaningfully describes outcome in these patients. Perception of function measured by two questionnaires, the Lower Extremity Activity Profile (LEAP) and the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and walking and stair performance was compared between 29 patients, 1 year after TKA, and 40 controls. There was significantly greater perceived difficulty with function in patients with TKA than in controls. In TKA men, LEAP and WOMAC scores correlated respectively with self-paced walk speed (r = -.71 and -.55) and stair performance time (r = 0.70 and 0.68). In TKA women, LEAP difficulty score correlated with self-paced walk speed (r = -.41) and stair performance time (r = -0.71). By 1 year, TKA subjects regained 80% of the function of controls. Perception of function after TKA can be measured by either questionnaire in men; however, the LEAP is the preferable questionnaire with women.

  9. MR elastographic methods for the evaluation of plantar fat pads: preliminary comparison of the shear modulus for shearing deformation and compressive deformation in normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Miller, Timothy B.; Perrinez, Philip R.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Wang, Huifang; Cheung, Yvonne Y.; Wrobel, James S.; Comi, Richard J.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-03-01

    MR elastography (MRE) images the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues; e.g., the shear modulus, μ. The μ of the plantar soft tissues is important in understanding the mechanisms whereby the forces induced during normal motion produce ulcers that lead to amputation in diabetic feet. We compared the compliance of the heel fat pad to compressive forces and to shearing forces. The design of prosthetics to protect the foot depends on the proper understanding of the mechanisms inducing damage. In the heel fat pads of six normal subjects, between 25 and 65 years of age, the μ for deformation perpendicular to the direction of weight bearing is similar but not identical to that determined for deformation along the weight bearing axis. The average difference between μ along the weight bearing axis and μ perpendicular to the weight bearing axis, is well correlated with age (Correlation Coefficient = 0.789). The p-value for the data being random was 0.0347 indicating that the observed difference is not likely to be random. The p-value for control points is 0.8989, indicating a random process. The results are suggestive that the high compressive forces imposed during walking damage the heel fat pads over time resulting in softening to compression preferentially over shearing. It is important to validate the observed effect with larger numbers of subjects, and better controls including measures of activity, and to understand if diseases like diabetes increase the observed damage.

  10. Modulation of postural wrist tremors by magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in patients with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor and in normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1993-05-01

    The effect of magnetic brain stimulation on postural wrist tremor was studied in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, 12 with hereditary essential tremor, and 10 normal subjects who mimicked tremor by making rapid alternating wrist movements. In all patients and normal subjects, magnetic brain stimulation over the contralateral motor cortex at an intensity approximately 10% above threshold produced the following sequence of events: (1) a small direct electromyographic (EMG) response, followed by (2) suppression of the rhythmic EMG activity responsible for the tremor, before (3) reappearance of the tremor time-locked to the stimulus. It is concluded that magnetic brain stimulation over the motor cortex can modulate the oscillatory mechanisms responsible for the generation of postural tremors. Group analysis revealed that the time to reappearance of rhythmic EMG activity varied significantly with the period of parkinsonian postural tremors, but not with the period of essential or mimicked tremors. Magnetic stimulation also significantly shortened the period of parkinsonian postural tremors, but did not influence the period of essential or mimicked tremors. These behavioral differences indicate differences in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying parkinsonian postural tremor and essential tremor.

  11. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  12. Studies on immunoproteasome in human liver. Part I: Absence in fetuses, presence in normal subjects, and increased levels in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasuri, Francesco; Capizzi, Elisa; Bellavista, Elena; Mishto, Michele; Santoro, Aurelia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capri, Miriam; Cescon, Matteo; Grazi, Gian Luca; Grigioni, Walter Franco; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-06-25

    Despite the central role of proteasomes in relevant physiological pathways and pathological processes, this topic is unexpectedly largely unexplored in human liver. Here we present data on the presence of proteasome and immunoproteasome in human livers from normal adults, fetuses and patients affected by major hepatic diseases such as cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis. Immunohistochemistry for constitutive ({alpha}4 and {beta}1) and inducible (LMP2 and LMP7) proteasome subunits, and for the PA28{alpha}{beta} regulator, was performed in liver samples from 38 normal subjects, 6 fetuses, 2 pediatric cases, and 19 pathological cases (10 chronic active hepatitis and 9 cirrhosis). The immunohistochemical data have been validated and quantified by Western blotting analysis. The most striking result we found was the concomitant presence in hepatocyte cytoplasm of all healthy subjects, including the pediatric cases, of constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome subunits, as well as PA28{alpha}{beta}. At variance, immunoproteasome was not present in hepatocytes from fetuses, while a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity for LMP2 and LMP7 was found in pathological samples, directly correlated to the histopathological grade of inflammation. At variance from other organs such as the brain, immunoproteasome is present in livers from normal adult and pediatric cases, in apparent absence of pathological processes, suggesting the presence of a peculiar regulation of the proteasome/immunoproteasome system, likely related to the physiological stimuli derived from the gut microbiota after birth. Other inflammatory stimuli contribute in inducing high levels of immunoproteasome in pathological conditions, where its role deserve further attention.

  13. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Condylar Symmetry and Condyle-Fossa Relationship of the Temporomandibular Joint in Subjects with Normal Occlusion and Malocclusion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnada, Swaroopa Rani; Gaddam, Kranthi Praveen Raju; Perumalla, Kiran; Khan, Imran; Mohammed, Naqeed Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The relationship of the condyle and the mandibular fossa differs in shape with type of malocclusion and skeletal pattern. A review of literature shows till date there are no studies on Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) condyle-fossa relation to the type of malocclusion based on growth pattern. Computed Tomography (CT) provides optimal imaging of the osseous components of the TMJ. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the condyle-fossa relationship and the dimensional and positional symmetries between the right and left condyles in subjects with normal occlusion and malocclusion in different growth patterns utilizing the CT scans of the TMJ. Materials and Methods Sixty subjects with age group of 18-30 years were selected for the study. The sample was divided into three groups based on overbite and growth pattern. The groups included 20 subjects with normal occlusion and average growth pattern, 20 patients with horizontal growth pattern and deep bite, 20 patients with vertical growth pattern and deep bite. The depth of the mandibular fossa, the condyle-fossa relationship, and the concentric position of the condyles were evaluated by the images obtained from the sagittal slices. ANOVA was performed to assess the significance. If it was found significant, post-hoc Tukey’s test was performed to see which two groups were statistically significant. Results No statistically significant difference was found in the anterior joint space and the superior joint space in horizontal and vertical growers with deep bite. Statistically significant (p <0.05) posterior positioning of the condyles was observed (nonconcentric positioning) in vertical growers with deep bite. Conclusion There is a significant change in the position of the condyle in vertical growers compared to average and horizontal growers. Left condyle is more anteriorly placed than the right condyle in all the three groups. There is no significant change in the vertical depth of the mandibular

  14. Sleep laboratory studies in restless legs syndrome patients as compared with normals and acute effects of ropinirole. 1. Findings on objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality.

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Gruber, G; Saletu, M; Brandstätter, N; Hauer, C; Prause, W; Ritter, K; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G

    2000-01-01

    Although the restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder with a relatively high prevalence rate (8% in Austria) and leads to insomnia and excessive daytime tiredness, there is a paucity of sleep laboratory data concerning objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate 12 untreated RLS patients as compared with 12 normal controls and subsequently measure the acute effects of 0.5 mg ropinirole (Requip((R))) - a nonergoline dopamine agonist - as compared with placebo. In 3 nights (adaptation, placebo, ropinirole night) sleep induction, maintenance and architecture were measured objectively by polysomnography, subjective sleep and awakening quality were assessed by self-rating scales and visual-analog scales, and objective awakening quality was evaluated by a psychometric test battery. In polysomnography, RLS patients demonstrated, as compared with normal controls, a decreased total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficacy, increased wakefulness during the total sleep period and frequency of nocturnal awakenings, increased sleep stage S1, decreased S2 and increased stage shifts. Subjective sleep quality tended to decrease, and morning well-being, mood, affectivity and wakefulness were deteriorated. In the noopsyche, fine motor activity and reaction time performance were deteriorated. Ropinirole 0.5 mg induced, as compared with placebo, an increase in TST, sleep efficacy, S2 sleep and stage shifts. In the morning, somatic complaints increased slightly, while fine motor activity and reaction time performance improved. Our findings suggest a key-lock principle in the diagnosis/treatment of RLS and a dopaminergic mechanism in its pathogenesis, which is supported by the data on periodic leg movements during sleep and arousals of the subsequent paper.

  15. The contralateral foot in children with unilateral clubfoot, is the unaffected side normal?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anthony; Chhina, Harpreet; Howren, Alyssa; Alvarez, Christine

    2014-07-01

    The unilateral unaffected clubfoot has previously been used as a control in longitudinal studies of clubfoot outcomes. However, we have observed that the unaffected clubfoot does not necessarily exhibit the same pedobarographic measurements as seen in normal control subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the unaffected foot is indeed normal or if there are differences in the pedobarographic measurements of the unaffected foot compared to healthy normal controls.The Tekscan HR Mat™ was used to dynamically test the walking pattern of 103 subjects with unilateral clubfeet and compare the results to our previously published series of normal controls. Patients were divided into three groups: Group 1 (< 2 years), Group 2 (2-5 years) and Group 3 (>5 years). An unpaired t-test (p < 0.05) was used to compare percentage of stance at initiation of force, the percentage of stance at maximum force, the percentage of stance at termination of force, the maximum percentage force and the average force/time integral between a group of normal age matched controls and the unaffected foot in patients with unilateral clubfoot. Significant differences were identified between the unaffected side and normal controls for the pressure distribution, order of initial contact and foot contact time. These differences evolved and changed with age. The pedobarographic measurements of patients with clubfoot are not normal for the unaffected foot. As such the unaffected foot should not be referred to as normal, nor should it be used as a control.

  16. Evaluation of left ventricular function by radionuclide angiography during exercise in normal subjects and in patients with chronic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iskandrian, A S; Hakki, A H; DePace, N L; Manno, B; Segal, B L

    1983-06-01

    Radionuclide angiography permits evaluation of left ventricular performance during exercise. There are several factors that may affect the results in normal subjects and in patients with chronic coronary heart disease. Important among these are the selection criteria: age, sex, level of exercise, exercise end points, ejection fraction at rest and effects of pharmacologic agents. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise is not a specific marker for coronary heart disease but may be encountered in other cardiac diseases. In addition to the diagnostic considerations, important prognostic data can be obtained. Further studies are needed to determine the prognostic implications of anatomic findings versus the functional abnormalities induced by exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

  17. Stable Internal Reference Genes for the Normalization of Real-Time PCR in Different Sweetpotato Cultivars Subjected to Abiotic Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chang Yoon; Park, Seyeon; Jeong, Jae cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has become one of the most widely used methods for gene expression analysis, but its successful application depends on the stability of suitable reference genes used for data normalization. In plant studies, the choice and optimal number of reference genes must be experimentally determined for the specific conditions, plant species, and cultivars. In this study, ten candidate reference genes of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) were isolated and the stability of their expression was analyzed using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples consisted of tissues from four sweetpotato cultivars subjected to four different environmental stress treatments, i.e., cold, drought, salt and oxidative stress. The results showed that, for sweetpotato, individual reference genes or combinations thereof should be selected for use in data normalization depending on the experimental conditions and the particular cultivar. In general, the genes ARF, UBI, COX, GAP and RPL were validated as the most suitable reference gene set for every cultivar across total tested samples. Interestingly, the genes ACT and TUB, although widely used, were not the most suitable reference genes in different sweetpotato sample sets. Taken together, these results provide guidelines for reference gene(s) selection under different experimental conditions. In addition, they serve as a foundation for the more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in various sweetpotato cultivars. PMID:23251557

  18. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid in 718 normal subjects using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Lowe, Val J.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We have previously described an automated system for the co-registration of PiB and FDG PET images with structural MRI and a neurological anatomy atlas to produce region-specific quantization of cortical activity and amyloid burden. We also reported a global joint PiB/FDG histogram-based measure (FDG-Associated PiB Uptake Ratio - FAPUR) that performed as well as regional PiB ratio in stratifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) patients from normal subjects in an autopsy-verified cohort of 31. In this paper we examine results of this analysis on a clinically-verified cohort of 718 normal volunteers. We found that the global FDG ratio correlated negatively with age (r2 = 0.044) and global PiB ratio correlated positively with age (r2=0.038). FAPUR also correlated negatively with age (r2-.025), and in addition, we introduce a new metric - the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r2) of the joint PiB/FDG histogram which correlates positively (r2=0.014) with age. We then used these measurements to construct age-weighted Z-scores for all measurements made on the original autopsy cohort. We found similar stratification using Z-scores compared to raw values; however, the joint PiB/FDG r2 Z-score showed the greatest stratification ability.

  19. Differential Expression of Complement Markers in Normal and AMD Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Nashine, Sonali; Chwa, Marilyn; Kazemian, Mina; Thaker, Kunal; Lu, Stephanie; Nesburn, Anthony; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and abnormalities in the complement pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to determine the effects of mtDNA from AMD subjects on the complement pathway. Methods Transmitochondrial cybrids were prepared by fusing platelets from AMD and age-matched Normal subjects with Rho0 (lacking mtDNA) human ARPE-19 cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were performed to examine gene and protein expression profiles, respectively, of complement markers in these cybrids. Bioenergetic profiles of Normal and AMD cybrids were examined using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer. Results Significant decreases in the gene and protein expression of complement inhibitors, along with significantly higher levels of complement activators, were found in AMD cybrids compared to Older-Normal cybrids. Seahorse flux data demonstrated that the bioenergetic profiles for Older-Normal and Older-AMD cybrid samples were similar to each other but were lower compared to Young-Normal cybrid samples. Conclusion In summary, since all cybrids had identical nuclei and differed only in mtDNA content, the observed changes in components of complement pathways can be attributed to mtDNA variations in the AMD subjects, suggesting that mitochondrial genome and retrograde signaling play critical roles in this disease. Furthermore, the similar bioenergetic profiles of AMD and Older-Normal cybrids indicate that the signaling between mitochondria and nuclei are probably not via a respiratory pathway. PMID:27486856

  20. NMR-Based Lipid Profiling of High Density Lipoprotein Particles in Healthy Subjects with Low, Normal, and Elevated HDL-Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kostara, Christina E; Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Elisaf, Moses S; Bairaktari, Eleni T

    2017-03-21

    Recent studies suggest that the cholesterol content of HDL (high density lipoproteins) may provide limited information on their antiatherogenic properties and that the composition and particles' structure provide more information on their functionality. We used NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance-based) lipidomics to study the relationships of serum HDL-C (HDL-cholesterol) levels with the lipid composition of HDL particles in three groups of subjects selected on the basis of their HDL-C levels. Subjects with low and high HDL-C levels exhibited differences in HDL lipidome compared to those with normal HDL-C levels. In pattern recognition analysis, the discrimination power among all groups was of high significance. The low HDL-C group presented enrichment of the core in triglycerides and depletion in cholesterol esters, whereas the high HDL-C group showed a decrease in triglycerides content. Additionally, as HDL-C increases, all lipid classes are esterified with higher percentage of unsaturated than saturated fatty acids. In addition to the aforementioned differences, the surface layer is enriched in sphingomyelin and free cholesterol in the high HDL-C level group. NMR-based lipidomic analysis of HDL can be particularly useful since it provides insights into molecular features and helps in the characterization of the atheroprotective function of HDL lipoproteins and in the identification of novel biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

  1. Study on the postprandial blood glucose suppression effect of D-psicose in borderline diabetes and the safety of long-term ingestion by normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Noriko; Iida, Tetsuo; Yamada, Takako; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Takehara, Isao; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamada, Koji; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study was conducted to investigate the safety and effect of D-psicose on postprandial blood glucose levels in adult men and women, including borderline diabetes patients. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover experiment of single ingestion was conducted on 26 subjects who consumed zero or 5 g of D-psicose in tea with a standard meal. The blood glucose levels at fasting and 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after the meal were compared. The blood glucose level was significantly lower 30 and 60 min after the meal with D-psicose (p<0.01, p<0.05), and a significant decrease was also shown in the area under the curve (p<0.01). The results suggest that D-psicose had an effect to suppress the postprandial blood glucose elevation mainly in borderline diabetes cases. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group experiment of long-term ingestion was conducted on 17 normal subjects who took 5 g of D-psicose or D-glucose with meals three times a day for 12 continuous weeks. Neither any abnormal effects nor clinical problems caused by the continuous ingestion of D-psicose were found.

  2. Effects of a chicken collagen hydrolysate on the circulation system in subjects with mild hypertension or high-normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kouguchi, Tomomi; Ohmori, Takashi; Shimizu, Muneshige; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Maeyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Takuya; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Tanabe, Soichi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a chicken collagen hydrolysate (CCH) on the circulation system in humans. A total of 58 subjects with either mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 140-159 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) 90-99 mmHg) or high-normal blood pressure (SBP 130-139 mmHg or DBP 85-89 mmHg) were assigned to two groups, one involving a placebo and the other, the test food (including CCH of 2.9 g/d). The parameters related to each subject's circulation system were monitored over the study period of 18 weeks. The Δbrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), an indicator of arterial stiffness and marker of vascular damage, was significantly lower in the test food group than in the placebo group during the treatment period. The blood pressure in the test food group was also significantly lower than that in the placebo group, while the serum nitrogen oxide was higher in the test food group after the treatment. These results suggest that CCH exerted modulatory effects on the human circulation system.

  3. Comparison of High vs. Normal/Low Protein Diets on Renal Function in Subjects without Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background It was the aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effects of high protein (HP) versus normal/low protein (LP/NP) diets on parameters of renal function in subjects without chronic kidney disease. Methods Queries of literature were performed using the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Trial Register until 27th February 2014. Study specific weighted mean differences (MD) were pooled using a random effect model by the Cochrane software package Review Manager 5.1. Findings 30 studies including 2160 subjects met the objectives and were included in the meta-analyses. HP regimens resulted in a significantly more pronounced increase in glomerular filtration rate [MD: 7.18 ml/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI 4.45 to 9.91, p<0.001], serum urea [MD: 1.75 mmol/l, 95% CI 1.13 to 237, p<0.001], and urinary calcium excretion [MD: 25.43 mg/24h, 95% CI 13.62 to 37.24, p<0.001] when compared to the respective LP/NP protocol. Conclusion HP diets were associated with increased GFR, serum urea, urinary calcium excretion, and serum concentrations of uric acid. In the light of the high risk of kidney disease among obese, weight reduction programs recommending HP diets especially from animal sources should be handled with caution. PMID:24852037

  4. Variance associated with subject velocity and trial repetition during force platform gait analysis in a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hans, Eric C; Zwarthoed, Berdien; Seliski, Joseph; Nemke, Brett; Muir, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Factors that contribute to variance in ground reaction forces (GRF) include dog morphology, velocity, and trial repetition. Narrow velocity ranges are recommended to minimize variance. In a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs, it was hypothesized that the dog subject effect would account for the majority of variance in peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) at a trotting gait, and that narrow velocity ranges would be associated with less variance. Data from 20 normal dogs were obtained. Each dog was trotted across a force platform at its habitual velocity, with controlled acceleration (±0.5 m/s(2)). Variance effects from 12 trotting velocity ranges were examined using repeated-measures analysis-of-covariance. Significance was set at P <0.05. Mean dog bodyweight was 28.4 ± 7.4 kg. Individual dog and velocity significantly affected PVF and VI for thoracic and pelvic limbs (P <0.001). Trial number significantly affected thoracic limb PVF (P <0.001). Limb (left or right) significantly affected thoracic limb VI (P = 0.02). The magnitude of variance effects from largest to smallest was dog, velocity, trial repetition, and limb. Velocity ranges of 1.5-2.0 m/s, 1.8-2.2 m/s, and 1.9-2.2 m/s were associated with low variance and no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF and VI. A combination of these ranges, 1.5-2.2 m/s, captured a large percentage of trials per dog (84.2 ± 21.4%) with no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF or VI. It was concluded that wider velocity ranges facilitate capture of valid trials with little to no effect on GRF in normal trotting dogs. This concept is important for clinical trial design.

  5. The Long-Term Effect of Radical Prostatectomy on Erectile Function, Urinary Continence, and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: A Comparison to Age-Matched Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ponholzer, Anton; Augustin, Herbert; Madersbacher, Stephan; Pummer, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To analyze the impact of radical prostatectomy (RPE) on erectile function and lower urinary tract function in comparison to age-matched healthy men. Materials and Methods. Patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy completed questionnaires containing the IIEF-5, the Bristol female LUTS questionnaire, and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results. Patients after RPE were included (n = 363). Age-matched healthy men (n = 363) were included. The mean IIEF-5 of patients aged 61–70 yrs after RPE was 10.4 ± 6.6 versus 18.8 ± 5.3 in the control cohort; the respective values for men aged 71–80 yrs after RPE were 7.2 ± 6.5 versus 13.6 ± 7.7 in the control cohort. Urinary incontinence after RPE was reported in 41.9% (61–70 years) and 37.7% (71–80) versus 7.5% and 15.1% in the control cohort. The mean IPSS of patients after RPE aged 61–70 yrs was 5.0 ± 4.4 versus 5.5 ± 4.9 in the control cohort; the respective values for men aged 71–80 yrs were 6.0 ± 4.9 versus 7.5 ± 5.7 in the healthy cohort. Conclusions. The negative effect of radical prostatectomy on erectile and urinary incontinence remains substantial. The physiologically declining erectile and lower urinary tract function with ageing reduces the difference between healthy men and those after surgery. Healthy men have a higher IPSS presumably due to the presence of bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:28261619

  6. Exercise performance and cardiovascular health variables in 70-year-old male soccer players compared to endurance-trained, strength-trained and untrained age-matched men.

    PubMed

    Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Andersen, Jesper L; Petersen, Jesper; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Bangsbo, Jens; Saltin, Bengt; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate performance variables and indicators of cardiovascular health profile in elderly soccer players (SP, n = 11) compared to endurance-trained (ET, n = 8), strength-trained (ST, n = 7) and untrained (UT, n = 7) age-matched men. The 33 men aged 65-85 years underwent a testing protocol including measurements of cycle performance, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and body composition, and muscle fibre types and capillarisation were determined from m. vastus lateralis biopsy. In SP, time to exhaustion was longer (16.3 ± 2.0 min; P < 0.01) than in UT (+48%) and ST (+41%), but similar to ET (+1%). Fat percentage was lower (P < 0.05) in SP (-6.5% points) than UT but not ET and ST. Heart rate reserve was higher (P < 0.05) in SP (104 ± 16 bpm) than UT (+21 bpm) and ST (+24 bpm), but similar to ET (+2 bpm), whereas VO2max was not significantly different in SP (30.2 ± 4.9 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1)) compared to UT (+14%) and ST (+9%), but lower (P < 0.05) than ET (-22%). The number of capillaries per fibre was higher (P < 0.05) in SP than UT (53%) and ST (42%) but similar to ET. SP had less type IIx fibres than UT (-12% points). In conclusion, the exercise performance and cardiovascular health profile are markedly better for lifelong trained SP than for age-matched UT controls. Incremental exercise capacity and muscle aerobic capacity of SP are also superior to lifelong ST athletes and comparable to endurance athletes.

  7. The effects of twelve weeks of bed rest on bone histology, biochemical markers of bone turnover, and calcium homeostasis in eleven normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Ruml, L. A.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of 12 weeks of skeletal unloading on parameters of calcium homeostasis, calcitropic hormones, bone histology, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in 11 normal subjects (9 men, 2 women; 34 +/- 11 years of age). Following an ambulatory control evaluation, all subjects underwent 12 weeks of bed rest. An additional metabolic evaluation was performed after 12 days of reambulation. Bone mineral density declined at the spine (-2.9%, p = 0.092) and at the hip (-3.8%, p = 0.002 for the trochanter). Bed rest prompted a rapid, sustained, significant increase in urinary calcium and phosphorus as well as a significant increase in serum calcium. Urinary calcium increased from a pre-bed rest value of 5.3 mmol/day to values as high as 73 mmol/day during bed rest. Immunoreactive parathyroid hormone and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D declined significantly during bed rest, although the mean values remained within normal limits. Significant changes in bone histology included a suppression of osteoblastic surface for cancellous bone (3.1 +/- 1.3% to 1.9 +/- 1.5%, p = 0.0142) and increased bone resorption for both cancellous and cortical bone. Cortical eroded surface increased from 3.5 +/- 1.1% to 7.3 +/- 4.0% (p = 0.018) as did active osteoclastic surface (0.2 +/- 0.3% to 0.7 +/- 0.7%, p = 0.021). Cancellous eroded surface increased from 2.1 +/- 1.1% to 4.7 +/- 2.2% (p = 0.002), while mean active osteoclastic surface doubled (0.2 +/- 0.2% to 0.4 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.020). Serum biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and type I procollagen extension peptide) did not change significantly during bed rest. Urinary biochemical markers of bone resorption (hydroxyproline, deoxypyridinoline, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen) as well as a serum marker of bone resorption (type I collagen carboxytelopeptide) all demonstrated significant increases during bed rest which declined toward normal

  8. Calibration of the normal cutoff values of systolic dyssynchrony of the left ventricular synchronicity in normal subjects using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography and the effects of age and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-Yan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Jun; Tang, Li; Yip, Gabriel; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2014-05-01

    The normal data of left ventricular (LV) synchronicity by real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) are lacking. We assessed the normal range/cutoff values of LV dyssynchrony parameters by RT3DE. For this purpose, RT3DE was performed in 130 healthy subjects, aged 53 ± 12 years. Time to the point of minimal regional systolic volume (Tmsv) was measured from time-volume curves in each segment. Standard deviation (SD) and maximal difference (Dif) of Tmsv were calculated from 16 (6 basal/6 mid/4 apical), 12 (6 basal/6 mid), and 6 (basal) LV segments together with the corresponding parameters adjusted by R-R interval. The data show non-significant difference between Tmsv-16-SD (9.24 ± 3.54 ms) and Tmsv-12-SD (8.80 ± 3.82 ms); with a correlation between two by both unadjusted (ms; r = 0.87) and adjusted (%R-R; r = 0.84) methods (P < 0.001). Heart rate correlated negatively with Tmsv (r = -0.13 to -0.34, P < 0.05-0.001) but had no effect on parameters adjusted for %R-R. Age and gender did not affect any of these parameters. Inter-observer variability was 3.3-4.6 % for 16, 4.8-9.1 % for 12, and 14.4-19.7 % for 6 segments. Thus, RT3DE is a reliable technique for detecting LV systolic dyssynchrony whereas the heart rate, but not age and gender, affects Tmsv parameters. Dyssynchrony parameters by 16 or 12 segments are superior to 6 segments in yielding comprehensive information and lower variability.

  9. Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Hyperinsulinemia with Normal Blood Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes (Prediabetes Insulin Resistance Research)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Chunlin; Gong, Yanping; Fang, Fusheng; Tian, Hui; Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the differences in insulin resistance (IR) among subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), hyperinsulinemia with NGT (HINS), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. 5 NGT, 25 HINS, 25 IGT, and 25 T2DM subjects participated in this research. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique (HECT) was performed in all of them to evaluate IR levels. The relative factors influencing IR were evaluated. The simple insulin sensitivity indices were calculated, and the correlation between each index and the M value was analyzed. Results. The M values of NGT, HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were 11.88 ± 2.93 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.23 ± 1.73 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.37 ± 2.12 mg·kg−1·min−1, and 6.19 ± 1.89 mg·kg−1·min−1, respectively. M values in HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were lower than those in the NGT group (P = 0.005); however, the differences among the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.835). The independent factors influencing the M value were waistline and fasting insulin level (FINS). The simple insulin sensitivity indices, especially Matsuda and Gutt index, were significantly associated with the M value (P < 0.01). Conclusion. IR existed in the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups, and IR levels were consistent in the three groups. The independent factors influencing IR were waistline and FINS. PMID:26770991

  10. Improvement in speech-reading ability by auditory training: Evidence from gender differences in normally hearing, deaf and cochlear implanted subjects.

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, K; Rouger, J; Lagleyre, S; Fraysse, B; Deguine, O; Barone, P

    2009-03-01

    Several neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies on gender differences in speech processing lead to the suggestion that women use the neural network of predictive and integrative analysis of speech to a larger extent than men. During speech-reading there is indeed a lack of reliable clues for word recognition which should emphasize predictive and integrative strategies of the brain. Our study aimed to explore gender differences in deaf and cochlear implanted (CI) patients at different levels during speech-reading, for words or phonemes, that we consider, correspond to increased involvement of predictive and integrative analysis. We collected speech-reading scores in a control group of normally hearing subjects (n=42) and in a group of deaf patients - who are good speech-readers - tested before, early after and late after cochlear implantation (n=97). Patient groups were almost equally distributed between follow-up and new patients. In normally hearing controls, women speech-read words better than men. This difference was also observed in all patients but not in experienced cochlear implant users. We did not observe a gender difference during speech-reading of isolated phonemes neither for controls nor for patients. We conclude that the better speech-reading ability of women for words but not for phonemes is in line with their greater use of predictive and integrative strategies for speech processing. Furthermore, we observed a progressive cross-modal compensation in male CI users after cochlear implantation which suggests a synergetic perceptual facilitation involving the visual and the recovering auditory modalities. This could lead to an improved performance in both auditory and visual modalities, the latter being constantly recruited to complement the crude information provided by the implant. Altogether, our data provide insights into cross-modal compensation in the adult brain following sensory privation.

  11. Cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit in normal human subjects: importance of extra-retinal mechanisms for initial pursuit.

    PubMed

    Ito, Norie; Barnes, Graham R; Fukushima, Junko; Fukushima, Kikuro; Warabi, Tateo

    2013-08-01

    Using a cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit task previously applied to monkeys, we examined the effects of visual motion-memory on smooth-pursuit eye movements in normal human subjects and compared the results with those of the trained monkeys. These results were also compared with those during simple ramp-pursuit that did not require visual motion-memory. During memory-based pursuit, all subjects exhibited virtually no errors in either pursuit-direction or go/no-go selection. Tracking eye movements of humans and monkeys were similar in the two tasks, but tracking eye movements were different between the two tasks; latencies of the pursuit and corrective saccades were prolonged, initial pursuit eye velocity and acceleration were lower, peak velocities were lower, and time to reach peak velocities lengthened during memory-based pursuit. These characteristics were similar to anticipatory pursuit initiated by extra-retinal components during the initial extinction task of Barnes and Collins (J Neurophysiol 100:1135-1146, 2008b). We suggest that the differences between the two tasks reflect differences between the contribution of extra-retinal and retinal components. This interpretation is supported by two further studies: (1) during popping out of the correct spot to enhance retinal image-motion inputs during memory-based pursuit, pursuit eye velocities approached those during simple ramp-pursuit, and (2) during initial blanking of spot motion during memory-based pursuit, pursuit components appeared in the correct direction. Our results showed the importance of extra-retinal mechanisms for initial pursuit during memory-based pursuit, which include priming effects and extra-retinal drive components. Comparison with monkey studies on neuronal responses and model analysis suggested possible pathways for the extra-retinal mechanisms.

  12. THE INCLUSION OF INNER SURFACE BREAKING FLAWS IN PROBABILISTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF REACTOR VESSELS SUBJECTED TO PLANNED NORMAL COOL-DOWN TRANSIENTS1

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Terry L; Kirk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The current regulations, as set forth by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), to insure that lightwater nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to planned reactor startup (heat-up) and shutdown (cool-down) transients are specified in Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50, which incorporates by reference Appendix G to Section XI of the ASME Code. The technical basis for these regulations contains many aspects that are now broadly recognized by the technical community as being unnecessarily conservative and some plants are finding it increasingly difficult to comply with the current regulations. Consequently, a goal of current NRC research is to derive a technical basis for a risk-informed revision to the current requirements that reduces the conservatism and also is consistent with the methods previously used to develop a risk-informed revision to the regulations for accidental transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Previous publications have been successful in illustrating potential methods to provide a risk-informed relaxation to the current regulations for normal transients. Thus far, probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses have been performed at 60 effective full power years (EFPY) for one of the reactors evaluated as part of the PTS re-evaluation project. In these previous analyses/publications, consistent with the assumptions utilized for this particular reactor in the PTS reevaluation, all flaws for this reactor were postulated to be embedded. The objective of this paper is to review the analysis results and conclusions from previous publications on this subject and to attempt to modify/generalize these conclusions to include RPVs postulated to contain only inner-surface breaking flaws or a combination of embedded flaws and inner-surface breaking flaws.

  13. Radioimmunoassay of ''free thyroxin'' in dried blood spots on filter paper - preliminary observations on the effective differentiation of subjects with congenital hypothyroidism from those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, H.; Miyai, K.; Ichihara, K.; Amino, N.; Harada, T.; Nose, O.; Tanizawa, O.

    1982-03-01

    In this sensitive, simple method for measuring ''free thyroxin'' (FT/sub 4/) in eluates of dried blood spots on filter paper by use of a radioimmunoassay kit (Amerlex Free T/sub 4/ RIA), the measurable range of FT/sub 4/ is 1.8 to 57 ng/L (equivalent to the concentration in serum), or 7 to 237 fg/tube. The mean coefficients of variation for within assay-within spots, within assay-between spots, and between assays were 5.3%, 5.0%, and 6.2%, respectively. FT/sub 4/ in blood spotted on filter paper is stable for at least a month when dried and kept at either -20/sup 0/C, 4/sup 0/C, room temperature (about 25/sup 0/C), or 37/sup 0/C. The results for FT/sub 4/ in dried blood spots correlated closely with the free-T/sub 4/ concentration in serum (r = 0.99). The method can be used to differentiate cases of primary and secondary hypothyroidism from normal subjects and those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin. This method may be useful in screening for congenital hypothyroidism, because sample-retesting is not necessary.

  14. The utility of age-specific cut-offs for visual rating of medial temporal atrophy in classifying Alzheimer's disease, MCI and cognitively normal elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Duara, Ranjan; Loewenstein, David A.; Shen, Qian; Barker, Warren; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Curiel, Rosie; Agron, Joscelyn; Santos, Isael; Potter, Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Background: New research criteria for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the mild cognitive impairment stage (MCI-AD) incorporate biomarkers to assign a level of certainty to the diagnosis. Structural MRI is widely available but greatly under-utilized for assessing atrophy of structures affected in early AD, such as the hippocampus (HP), because the quantification of HP volumes (HP-v) requires special expertise, and normative values have not been established. Methods: Elderly subjects (n =273) from the Florida ADRC were classified as having no cognitive impairment (cognitively normal, CN), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or AD. Volumes for the hippocampus (HP-v) were measured on structural MRI scans. A validated visual rating system for measuring medial temporal atrophy (VRS-MTA), including hippocampal, entorhinal cortex and perirhinal cortex atrophy was employed. The participants were subdivided into younger (less than or equal to 75 years of age) and older (greater than 75 years of age) subgroups. Results: Volumetric and VRS-MTA measures were equivalent in predicting classification of CN vs. aMCI for older (area under the receiver operator curves [aROC]: 0.652 vs. 0.723) and younger subjects (aROC: 0.764 vs. 0.736). However, for younger AD subjects, aROC values were significantly higher for VRS-MTA measures (0.920) than for volumetric measures (0.847). Relative to HP-v, VRS-MTA score was significantly more correlated to impairment on a range of memory tests and was more associated with progression of aMCI to AD than HP-v. Conclusion: Structural MRI with VRS-MTA assessment can serve as a biomarker for supporting the diagnosis of MCI-AD. Age-adjusted VRS-MTA scores are at least as effective as HP-v for distinguishing aMCI and AD from CN and for predicting progression from aMCI to AD. VRS-MTA is convenient for use in the clinic as well as for clinical trials and can readily be incorporated into a standardized radiological report. PMID:24065917

  15. A review of the clinical efficacy of the Oral-B oscillating/rotating power toothbrush and the Philips Sonicare toothbrush in normal subject populations.

    PubMed

    Warren, P R; Cugini, M A; Chater, B V; Strate, J

    2004-12-01

    Plaque removal by a toothbrush results from a physical scrubbing of bristles on the tooth surface that removes adherent plaque bacteria. Because of the frequency of brush head motion, some power toothbrushes generally remove plaque more effectively than a manual brush. One power toothbrush, Philips Sonicare, claims also to remove plaque as a result of dynamic fluid activity. This effect has been shown in laboratory studies but clinical evidence is currently lacking. This review evaluated the data from well-controlled clinical studies carried out in normal subjects from a general population comparing the Sonicare toothbrushes with the Oral-B oscillating/rotating power toothbrush technology. It focuses on plaque removal from approximal surfaces where it is difficult for toothbrush bristles to reach, as it is here that any dynamic fluid effect should be most apparent. Results from the review found no evidence to support a greater efficacy for the Sonicare toothbrushes either generally or at approximal surfaces. Data revealed that the oscillating/rotating toothbrush was more effective than the Sonicare toothbrushes with respect to plaque removal. It is possible that factors associated with the clinical situation such as damping resulting from bristle contact with the tooth surface and the high viscosity of saliva and dentifrice may counteract dynamic fluid activity in vivo. This review indicates that dynamic fluid activity beyond the reach of bristles as demonstrated in the laboratory is yet unproven in the clinical situation.

  16. Modulation of postural tremors at the wrist by supramaximal electrical median nerve shocks in essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and normal subjects mimicking tremor.

    PubMed

    Britton, T C; Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    1993-10-01

    The response of postural wrist tremors to supramaximal median nerve stimulation was examined in patients with hereditary essential tremor (n = 10) and Parkinson's disease (n = 9), and in normal subjects mimicking wrist tremor (n = 8). The average frequency of on-going tremor was the same in all three groups. Supramaximal peripheral nerve shocks inhibited and then synchronised the rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity of all types of tremor. The duration of inhibition ranged from 90 to 210ms, varying inversely with the frequency of on-going tremor. There was no significant difference in mean duration of inhibition or in the timing of the first peak after stimulation on the average rectified EMG records between the three groups. The degree to which supramaximal peripheral nerve shocks could modulate the timing of rhythmic EMG bursts in the forearm flexor muscles was also quantified by deriving a resetting index. No significant difference in mean resetting index of the three groups was found. These results suggest that such studies cannot be used to differentiate between the common causes of postural wrist tremors.

  17. Street-Crossing Decision-Making: A Comparison between Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Normal Vision

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Shirin E.; Snyder, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We determined whether the street-crossing decisions of subjects with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were as accurate and precise as those made by young and older subjects with normal vision. Methods. Street-crossing decisions in 13 AMD subjects, and 20 young and 20 older control subjects with normal vision were measured along an un-signalized street for nine different gap times. After calculating the discriminability (d') of the street-crossing decision variable for all gap pairs and entering these d' values into a one-dimensional scaling model, the means of each distribution of the decision variable relative to a “center of gravity” were estimated and plotted against gap time. The resultant plot was a nonlinear function. Street-crossing decision accuracy was computed for each subject as the difference between the x-intercept of the nonlinear function (tCOG) and subjects' measured street-crossing time. Street-crossing decision-making precision was computed as the value of the slope of the nonlinear function at tCOG. Results. We found that all subjects were precise in their street-crossing decisions (P = 0.55). Significant differences in street-crossing accuracy were found as a function of age (P = 0.003). Compared to either the older normally-sighted (P = 0.018) or AMD (P = 0.019) subjects, the young normally-sighted subjects made the least accurate street-crossing decisions. No significant difference in accuracy was found between the AMD and age-matched normally-sighted subjects (P = 0.90). Conclusions. Our data suggested that age and mild central vision loss did not affect significantly a subject's precision in their street-crossing decisions. Age, but not mild central vision loss, significantly affected a subject's accuracy in their street-crossing decisions. PMID:22899756

  18. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  19. Confirming the cognition of rising scores: Fox and Mitchum (2013) predicts violations of measurement invariance in series completion between age-matched cohorts.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mark C; Mitchum, Ainsley L

    2014-01-01

    The trend of rising scores on intelligence tests raises important questions about the comparability of variation within and between time periods. Descriptions of the processes that mediate selection of item responses provide meaningful psychological criteria upon which to base such comparisons. In a recent paper, Fox and Mitchum presented and tested a cognitive theory of rising scores on analogical and inductive reasoning tests that is specific enough to make novel predictions about cohort differences in patterns of item responses for tests such as the Raven's Matrices. In this paper we extend the same proposal in two important ways by (1) testing it against a dataset that enables the effects of cohort to be isolated from those of age, and (2) applying it to two other inductive reasoning tests that exhibit large Flynn effects: Letter Series and Word Series. Following specification and testing of a confirmatory item response model, predicted violations of measurement invariance are observed between two age-matched cohorts that are separated by only 20 years, as members of the later cohort are found to map objects at higher levels of abstraction than members of the earlier cohort who possess the same overall level of ability. Results have implications for the Flynn effect and cognitive aging while underscoring the value of establishing psychological criteria for equating members of distinct groups who achieve the same scores.

  20. Production of Complex Syntax in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study compared the production of complex syntax by 16 older adults diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease and 25 age-matched control subjects. It found that although individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease did not produce frank lexical or grammatical errors, they did find it difficult to access the "best fit" between meaning and…

  1. Atrial natriuretic factor in normal subjects and heart failure patients. Plasma levels and renal, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses to peptide infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, R J; Atlas, S A; Laragh, J H; Kubo, S H; Covit, A B; Ryman, K S; Shaknovich, A; Pondolfino, K; Clark, M; Camargo, M J

    1986-01-01

    We investigated atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in humans, measuring plasma immunoreactive (ir) ANF (in femtomoles per milliliter), and renal, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses to ANF infusion, in normal subjects (NL) and congestive heart failure patients (CHF). Plasma irANF was 11 +/- 0.9 fmol/ml in NL and 71 +/- 9.9 in CHF (P less than 0.01); the latter with twofold right ventricular increment (P less than 0.05). In NL, ANF infusion of 0.10 microgram/kg per min (40 pmol/kg per min) induced increases (P less than 0.05) of absolute (from 160 +/- 23 to 725 +/- 198 mueq/min) and fractional (1-4%) sodium excretion, urine flow rate (from 10 +/- 1.6 to 20 +/- 2.6 ml/min), osmolar (from 3.2 +/- 0.6 to 6.8 +/- 1.2 ml/min) and free water (from 6.8 +/- 1.6 to 13.6 +/- 1.6 ml/min) clearances, and filtration fraction (from 20 +/- 1 to 26 +/- 2%). Plasma renin and aldosterone decreased 33% and 40%, respectively (P less than 0.01). Systolic blood pressure fell (from 112 +/- 3 to 104 +/- 5 mmHg, P less than 0.05) in seated NL; but in supine NL, the only hemodynamic response was decreased pulmonary wedge pressure (from 11 +/- 1 to 7 +/- 1 mmHg, P less than 0.05). In CHF, ANF induced changes in aldosterone and pulmonary wedge pressure, cardiac index, and systemic vascular resistance (all P less than 0.05); however, responses of renin and renal excretion were attenuated. ANF infusion increased hematocrit and serum protein concentration by 5-7% in NL (P less than 0.05) but not in CHF. Images PMID:2945832

  2. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Lean body mass by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) and by urine and dialysate creatinine recovery in CAPD and pre-dialysis patients compared to normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P K; Ladefoged, J; Olgaard, K

    1994-01-01

    The urinary creatinine excretion rate is a function of the muscle mass which, in normal subjects, is shown to be correlated with lean body mass. Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) has been shown to correlate well with other methods for the measurement of body composition. The purpose of the present study was to compare estimates of lean body mass (LBM) by DEXA scan with urine and dialysate creatinine recovery in uremic patients and in normal subjects. We included 63 normal subjects with a creatinine clearance of 60-120 mL/min, 30 uremic predialysis patients with creatinine clearance below 30 mL/min, and 20 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. LBM was measured by DEXA scan on the same day as urine collection and was estimated from creatinine recovery with and without correction for extrarenal creatinine clearance. Results from the normal subjects showed no difference in estimates of LBM by the different methods but, in predialysis and CAPD patients, a significant difference between methods of estimating LBM was found, even when correction for extrarenal clearance in uremic patients was performed. In normal subjects: DEXA 43.6 kg versus creatinine excretion 43.2 kg (NS). In predialysis patients: DEXA 47.8 kg versus 37.6 kg (p < 0.001) corrected 44.8 kg (p < 0.05). In CAPD patients: DEXA 47.2 kg versus 32 kg (p < 0.001) corrected 42.6 kg (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the urine and dialysate creatinine excretion is an inaccurate estimate of LBM, but reflects the muscle mass and, in that respect, is an important tool in the nutritional evaluation of uremic patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effects of prolonged, sequential exposure to acid fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising, normal subjects. Final report, 28 Feb 89-28 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-nine apparently healthy and asymptomatic subjects were selected for a study that screened for sensitivity to ozone. After three hours of ozone exposure (at 0.20 ppm), eighteen of the subjects (46 percent) experienced a 10 percent reduction in forced expiratory volume, an indicator of exhaling ability. After four hours of exposure, 62 percent of the subjects experienced a similar reduction in expiratory volume. Further, narrowing of airways among the sensitive subjects was suggested by results of the methacholine challenge test, a standard test for measuring airway resistance. The lung capacity of all subjects decreased progressively during ozone exposures. Capacity was unchanged during acidic fog and pollutant-free air exposures. No statistically significant differences in airway resistance, airway responsiveness and symptoms that could be attributed to acid fog exposure were observed. The study indicates that exposue to fog containing nitric acid followed by exposure to ozone does not have additive or synergistic acute effects. However, the study confirms earlier indications that many apparently healthy and asymptomatic individuals are susceptible to and adversely affected by ozone at relatively low concentrations.

  5. A high frequency of viral agents yet absence of Borrelia burgdorferi is seen within the myocardium of subjects with normal left ventricular systolic function: an electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Grus, Tomas; Schramlova, Jana; Krsek, Daniel; Vitkova, Ivana; Rohn, Vilem; Lindner, Jaroslav; Wicks, Eleanor; Nemecek, Eduard; Dostalova, Gabriela; Podzimkova, Jana; Linhart, Ales

    2016-03-01

    A wide range of viral agents is associated with the development of acute myocarditis and its possible chronic sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). There is also increasing evidence that Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is associated with DCM in endemic regions for Bb infection. This study sought to use electron microscopy to prospectively analyze the presence of viruses and Bb within the myocardium of 40 subjects with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and 40 patients with new-onset unexplained DCM during the same time period. Virus particles were found within the myocardium of 23 subjects (58%) of both cohorts studied, yet there was no statistically significant difference in virus family presence between those with DCM versus those with preserved LV systolic function. In contrast, Bb was detected only in those subjects with DCM (0 versus 5 subjects; p ˂ 0.05). Polymerase chain reaction was performed on samples from patients who were positive for Bb according to electron microscopy, and Bb was confirmed in 4 out of 5 individuals. Our results demonstrate that the prevalence of viral particles does not differ between subjects with preserved LV systolic function versus those with DCM and therefore suggests that the mere presence of a viral agent within the myocardium is not sufficient to establish a clear link with the development of DCM. In contrast, the presence of Bb was found only within myocardial samples of patients with DCM; this finding supports the idea of a causal relationship between Bb infection and DCM development.

  6. [Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury: a study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings].

    PubMed

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerbral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of "relative luxury perfusion". Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital lobe. After

  7. Age-related and sex-related changes in the normal soft tissue profile of native Northern Sudanese subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Dolci, Claudia; Gibelli, Daniele M; Codari, Marina; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Ferrario, Virgilio F; Elamin, Fadil

    2016-02-01

    Information about age-related and sex-related normative measurements of the nasolabial region in native Northern Sudanese subjects is scanty. We have therefore used a hand-held laser scanner to measure nasolabial angles and distances, and collected the 3-dimensional coordinates of seven landmarks on the facial soft tissues from 654 healthy native Northern Sudanese subjects (327 male and 327 female, aged 4-30 years). From these we calculated five angles and two linear distances and took the mean (SD) for age and sex, and compared them using factorial analysis of variance. All measurements analysed were significantly modified by age in both sexes (p < 0.01) except for the distance from the lower lip to Ricketts' E-line. Sex had a significant effect on the mentolabial and maxillary prominence angles and both distances (p < 0.005). Nasal convexity and the interlabial angle became more obtuse with growth, while the nasolabial and mentolabial angles reduced progressively with female subjects having significantly more obtuse mentolabial angles (p < 0.001). The maxillary prominence angle progressively decreased during childhood, and increased after adolescence, with larger values in male subjects. The upper and lower lip distances from Ricketts' E-line were also significantly larger in male subjects (p < 0.003), but the difference reduced with age. Overall, there were several differences when we compared our data with published data for African and white subjects, which points to the need for ethnic-specific data. Measurements collected in the current study could be used for the quantitative description of facial morphology in native Northern Sudanese children, adolescents, and young adults.

  8. Air and Bone Conduction Thresholds of Deaf and Normal Hearing Subjects before and during the Elimination of Cutaneous-Tactile Interference with Anesthesia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    The study investigated whether low frequency air and bone thresholds elicited at high intensity levels from deaf children with a sensory-neural diagnosis reflect valid auditory sensitivity or are mediated through cutaneous-tactile receptors. Subjects were five totally deaf (mean age 17.0) yielding vibrotactile thresholds but with no air and bone…

  9. Response of incretins (GIP and GLP-1) to an oral glucose load in female and male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Ikawa, Takashi; Akagami, Takafumi; Murai, Kazuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose profile and the response of incretins in healthy young subjects by the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We first reported that plasma glucose and GIP levels were higher in males during the early phase of the OGTT.

  10. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  11. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as "the ball is above the cup", where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6-11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as "the cup is above the drum" or "the bird is below the hat". Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children's scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of improvement, even

  12. Abnormal short-latency synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex of subjects with Becker muscular dystrophy: a rTMS study.

    PubMed

    Golaszewski, Stefan; Schwenker, Kerstin; Bergmann, Jürgen; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen; Nardone, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to further investigate motor cortex excitability in 13 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), six of them with slight mental retardation. RTMS delivered at 5Hz frequency and suprathreshold intensity progressively increases the size of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in healthy subjects; the rTMS-induced facilitation of MEPs was significantly reduced in the BMD patients mentally retarded or classified as borderline when compared with age-matched control subjects and the BMD patients with normal intelligence. The increase in the duration of the cortical silent period was similar in both patient groups and controls. These findings suggest an altered cortical short-term synaptic plasticity in glutamate-dependent excitatory circuits within the motor cortex in BMD patients with intellectual disabilities. RTMS studies may shed new light on the physiological mechanisms of cortical involvement in dystrophinopathies.

  13. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes.A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system.In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4-8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9-7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9-17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6-20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1-6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3-8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant.A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion.

  14. Subjectivity, hygiene, and STI prevention: a normalization paradox in the cleanliness practices of female sex workers in post-socialist China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yeon Jung

    2013-09-01

    This article illuminates the principal mechanisms that increase the risk of STIs for female sex workers in China. It draws primarily on my 26 months of ethnographic fieldwork (2006-2009) in red-light district neighborhoods in Haikou that have become centers of internal migration in post-reform southern China. Chinese sex workers here challenge dominant representations of them as illegal, immoral, and unclean subordinates and understand themselves also as sacrificing, capable, and modern women. I show how the women's conflicted subjectivity, continuously shaped through social networks, affects their personal health decisions and, significantly, leads them to adopt clinically risky practices. I conclude by arguing that public health interventions in southern China in and around certain red-light districts should take these conflicted subjectivities into account in working to improve sex workers' health.

  15. Multiscale cross-approximate entropy analysis as a measurement of complexity between ECG R-R interval and PPG pulse amplitude series among the normal and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liu, Cyuan-Cin; Liu, An-Bang

    2013-01-01

    Physiological signals often show complex fluctuation (CF) under the dual influence of temporal and spatial scales, and CF can be used to assess the health of physiologic systems in the human body. This study applied multiscale cross-approximate entropy (MC-ApEn) to quantify the complex fluctuation between R-R intervals series and photoplethysmography amplitude series. All subjects were then divided into the following two groups: healthy upper middle-aged subjects (Group 1, age range: 41-80 years, n = 27) and upper middle-aged subjects with type 2 diabetes (Group 2, age range: 41-80 years, n = 24). There are significant differences of heart rate variability, LHR, between Groups 1 and 2 (1.94 ± 1.21 versus 1.32 ± 1.00, P = 0.031). Results demonstrated differences in sum of large scale MC-ApEn (MC-ApEn(LS)) (5.32 ± 0.50 versus 4.74 ± 0.78, P = 0.003). This parameter has a good agreement with pulse-pulse interval and pulse amplitude ratio (PAR), a simplified assessment for baroreflex activity. In conclusion, this study employed the MC-ApEn method, integrating multiple temporal and spatial scales, to quantify the complex interaction between the two physical signals. The MC-ApEn(LS) parameter could accurately reflect disease process in diabetics and might be another way for assessing the autonomic nerve function.

  16. Glycogen phosphorylase and its converter enzymes in haemolysates of normal human subjects and of patients with type VI glycogen-storage disease. A study of phosphorylase kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, B; Van Hoof, F; Van den Berghe, G; Hers, H

    1975-01-01

    1. The properties of phosphorylase a, phosphorylase b, phosphorylase kinase and phosphorylase phosphatase present in a human haemolysate were investigated. The two forms of phosphorylase have the same affinity for glucose 1-phosphate but greatly differ in Vmax. Phosphorylase b is only partially stimulated by AMP, since, in the presence of the nucleotide, it is about tenfold less active than phosphorylase a. In a fresh human haemolysate phosphorylase is mostly in the b form; it is converted into phosphorylase a by incubation at 20degreesC, and this reaction is stimulated by glycogen and cyclic AMP. Once activated, the enzyme can be inactivated after filtration of the haemolysate on Sephadex G-25. This inactivation is stimulated by caffeine and glucose and inhibited by AMP and fluoride. The phosphorylase kinase present in the haemolysate can also be measured by the rate of activation of added muscle phosphorylase b, on addition of ATP and Mg2+. 2. The activity of phosphorylase kinase was measured in haemolysates obtained from a series of patients who had been classified as suffering from type VI glycogenosis. In nine patients, all boys, an almost complete deficiency of phosphorylase kinase was observed in the haemolysate and, when it could be assayed, in the liver. A residual activity, about 20% of normal, was found in the leucocyte fraction, whereas the enzyme activity was normal in the muscle. These patients suffer from the sex-linked phosphorylase kinase deficiency previously described by others. Two pairs of siblings, each time brother and sister, displayed a partial deficiency of phosphorylase kinase in the haemolysate and leucocytes and an almost complete deficiency in the liver. This is considered as being the autosomal form of phosphorylase kinase deficiency. Other patients were characterized by a low activity of total (a+b) phosphorylase and a normal or high activity of phosphorylase kinase in their haemolysate. PMID:168880

  17. Arterial Transit Time Effects in Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling CBF Mapping: Insight From a PET and MR Study in Normal Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Maolin; Maguire, R. Paul; Arora, Jagriti; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Weinzimmer, David; Wang, Jinghua; Wang, Yuenan; Kim, Hyeonjin; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Constable, R. Todd

    2010-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT), a key parameter required to calculate absolute cerebral blood flow in arterial spin labeling (ASL), is subject to much uncertainty. In this study, ASL ATTs were estimated on a per-voxel basis using data measured by both ASL and positron emission tomography in the same subjects. The mean ATT increased by 260 ± 20 (standard error of the mean) ms when the imaging slab shifted downwards by 54 mm, and increased from 630 ± 30 to 1220 ± 30 ms for the first slice, with an increase of 610 ± 20 ms over a four-slice slab when the gap between the imaging and labeling slab increased from 20 to 74 mm. When the per-slice ATTs were employed in ASL cerebral blood flow quantification and the in-slice ATT variations ignored, regional cerebral blood flow could be significantly different from the positron emission tomography measures. ATT also decreased with focal activation by the same amount for both visual and motor tasks (~80 ms). These results provide a quantitative relationship between ATT and the ASL imaging geometry and yield an assessment of the assumptions commonly used in ASL imaging. These findings should be considered in the interpretation of, and comparisons between, different ASL-based cerebral blood flow studies. The results also provide spatially specific ATT data that may aid in optimizing the ASL imaging parameters. PMID:19953506

  18. Effects of left primary motor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation on laser-evoked potentials in migraine patients and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Eleonora; Ricci, Katia; Montemurno, Anna; Delussi, Marianna; Invitto, Sara; de Tommaso, Marina

    2016-07-28

    Migraine is characterized by an altered cortical excitability. Because transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can change brain activity noninvasively, it is possible to hypothesize its efficacy in modulating pain in migraine. In this study, we compared the effects of tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) both on subjective pain and on evoked responses induced by laser stimulation (LEPs). Thirty-two patients and sixteen controls were randomized to receive sham stimulation and real tDCS with the anode centered over M1 or DLPFC. Laser Evoked potentials were recorded in basal, sham and tDCS conditions. We did not find significant acute changes in LEPs parameters and pain perception among subjects who received tDCS of both M1 and DLPFC. After DLPFC tDCS, we observed a significant increase of N2-P2 component habituation in migraine patients while M1 stimulation reduced it. These findings may suggest a modulation of abnormal pain processing induced by DLPFC and M1 anodal tDCS and outline the need for future investigations exploring the possible neuronal plasticity changes supporting the clinical effect on migraine.

  19. US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and /sup 60/Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed.

  20. Suppression of glycine-15N incorporation into urinary uric acid by adenine-8-13C in normal and gouty subjects

    PubMed Central

    Seegmiller, J. Edwin; Klinenberg, James R.; Miller, John; Watts, R. W. E.

    1968-01-01

    Adenine inhibited the de novo synthesis of purines in both normal and gouty man as shown by inhibition of the incorporation of glycine-15N into urinary uric acid without altering the incorporation of glycine-15N into urinary creatinine. The diminished purine synthesis did not result in a diminution in the 24 hr excretion of uric acid. This observation was explainable in part by the prompt conversion of adenine to uric acid. In addition to this direct conversion, adenine-8-13C provided a slow and prolonged contribution to urinary uric acid. A feedback inhibition of purine synthesis by nucleotides derived from adenine provides the best interpretation of these results. PMID:5645862

  1. Effect of methacholine induced bronchoconstriction on the pulmonary distribution and plasma pharmacokinetics of inhaled sodium cromoglycate in subjects with normal and hyperreactive airways.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R; Haas, A; Simpson, S; Britten, A; Renwick, A; Holgate, S

    1988-01-01

    Inhalation treatment may be less effective in the presence of bronchoconstriction because of the reduced penetration of drugs into the airways. The effect of bronchoconstriction on the lung deposition and plasma pharmacokinetics of inhaled sodium cromoglycate was examined. Ten subjects attended the laboratory on three occasions. On the first occasion a bronchial provocation test was performed to determine the concentration of methacholine required to reduce the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) by 20% (PC20). On the two subsequent occasions subjects inhaled either saline or their PC20 methacholine, followed five minutes later by an aerosol containing sodium cromoglycate and stannous phytate labelled with technetium-99m. Twenty minutes later a gamma emission lung scan was performed to determine the intrathoracic deposition of the nebulised aerosol. The central:peripheral (C:P) ratio of lung deposition was then calculated. Measurements of FEV1 were made and blood samples taken for analysis of plasma sodium cromoglycate concentration at intervals for four hours. Methacholine led to a 23.4% (SEM 0.6%) lower FEV1 and a 2.8 times higher C:P ratio than those observed after saline. There was a direct correlation between log PC20 methacholine and the increase in the C:P ratio (r = 0.81). Despite these changes with methacholine, the plasma pharmacokinetics of inhaled sodium cromoglycate were not significantly different after methacholine and after saline, except that the maximum concentration achieved (Cmax) was increased. These observations suggest that the area of cromoglycate deposition and the anatomical site are less important in determining the plasma pharmacokinetics of cromoglycate than is the total dose delivered to the lung. PMID:3140407

  2. The Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMPs) Recorded Along the Sternocleidomastoid Muscles During Head Rotation and Flexion in Normal Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Alexander; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Chunming; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Eby, Thomas; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Tone burst-evoked myogenic potentials recorded from tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) (cervical VEMP or cVEMP) are widely used to assess the vestibular function. Since the cVEMP response is mediated by the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR) pathways, it is important to understand how the cVEMPs are determined by factors related to either the sensory components (vestibular end organs) or the motor components (SCM) of the VCR pathways. Compared to the numerous studies that have investigated effects of sound parameters on the cVEMPs, there are few studies that have examined effects of SCM-related factors on the cVEMPs. The goal of the present study is to fill this knowledge gap by testing three SCM-related hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that contrary to the current view, the cVEMP response is only present in the SCM ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. The second hypothesis is that the cVEMP response is not only dependent on tonic level of the SCM, but also on how the tonic level is achieved, i.e., by head rotation or head flexion. The third hypothesis is that the SCM is compartmented and the polarity of the cVEMP response is dependent on the recording site. Seven surface electrodes were positioned along the left SCMs in 12 healthy adult subjects, and tone bursts were delivered to the ipsilateral or contralateral ear (8 ms plateau, 1 ms rise/fall, 130 dB SPL, 50-4000 Hz) while subjects activated their SCMs by head rotation (HR condition) or chin downward head flexion (CD condition). The first hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the contralateral cVEMPs were minimal at all recording sites for all the tested tones during both HR and CD conditions. The second hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the ipsilateral cVEMPs were larger in HR condition than in CD condition at recording sites above and below the SCM midpoint. Finally, the third hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the cVEMPs exhibit reversed polarities at the sites

  3. Early detection of disease: The correlation of the volatile organic profiles from patients with upper respiratory infections with subjects of normal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described whereby a transevaporator is used for sampling 60-100 microns of aqueous sample. Volatiles are stripped from the sample either by a stream of helium and collection on a porous polymer, Tenax, or by 0.8 ml of 2-chloropropane and collected on glass beads. The volatiles are thermally desorbed into a precolumn which is connected to a capillary gas chromatographic column for analysis. The technique is shown to be reproducible and suitable for determining chromatographic profiles for a wide variety of sample types. Using a transevaporator sampling technique, the volatile profiles from 70 microns of serum were obtained by capillary column gas chromatography. The complex chromatograms were interpreted by a combination of manual and computer techniques and a two peak ratio method devised for the classification of normal and virus infected sera. Using the K-Nearest Neighbor approach, 85.7 percent of the unknown samples were classified correctly. Some preliminary results indicate the possible use of the method for the assessment of virus susceptibility.

  4. The effect of normally consumed amounts of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on lipid profiles, body composition and related parameters in overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Pardo, Sabrina; Nguyen, Von T; Melanson, Kathleen J; Yu, Zhiping; Lowther, Britte E; Rippe, James M

    2014-03-17

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has advocated that women and men not consume more than 100 and 150 kcal/day, respectively, from added sugars. These levels are currently exceeded by over 90% of the adult population in the United States. Few data exist on longer-term metabolic effects when sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), the principal sources of added dietary sugars, are consumed at levels typical of the general population. Sixty five overweight and obese individuals were placed on a eucaloric (weight stable) diet for 10-weeks, which incorporated sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 10% or 20% of calories in a randomized, double-blinded study. All groups responded similarly (interaction p > 0.05). There was no change in body weight in any of the groups over the 10-week study, or in systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Likewise, there were no changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or apolipoprotein B (Apo B). We conclude that (1) when consumed as part of a eucaloric diet fructose--when given with glucose (as normally consumed) does not promote weight gain or an atherogenic lipid profile even when consumed at two to four times the level recently recommended by the AHA. (2) There were no differences between HFCS and sucrose on these parameters.

  5. Reading Strategies of Bilingual Normally Progressing and Dyslexic Readers in Hindi and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Ashum; Jamal, Gulgoona

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the reading accuracy of dyslexic readers in comparison to chronological age-matched normally progressing readers in Hindi and English using word reading tasks, matched for spoken frequency of usage, age of acquisition, imageability, and word length. Both groups showed significantly greater reading accuracy in Hindi than in…

  6. Impact of a Traditional Dietary Supplement with Coconut Milk and Soya Milk on the Lipid Profile in Normal Free Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ekanayaka, R. A. I.; Ekanayaka, N. K.; Perera, B.; De Silva, P. G. S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The effects of coconut fat and soya fat on serum lipids are controversial. This study was designed to investigate the lipid effects of coconut milk and soya milk supplementation on the lipid profile of free living healthy subjects. Methods. Sixty (60) healthy volunteers aged 18–57 years were given coconut milk porridge (CMP) for 5 days of the week for 8 weeks, followed by a 2-week washout period, subsequent to which they received isoenergetic soya milk porridge (SMP) for 8 weeks. Results. The LDL (low density lipoprotein) levels decreased with CMP and reached statistical significance in the total study population and in the >130 baseline LDL group. The HDL (high density lipoprotein) levels rose significantly with CMP supplementation (P = 0.000). Conclusions. We conclude that coconut fat in the form of CM does not cause a detrimental effect on the lipid profile in the general population and in fact is beneficial due to the decrease in LDL and rise in HDL. SMP will be of benefit only in those whose baseline LDL levels are elevated. PMID:24282632

  7. An interaction between the serotonin transporter promoter region and dopamine transporter polymorphisms contributes to harm avoidance and reward dependence traits in normal healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Kim, Y S; Lee, H S; Kim, S Y; Kim, C-H

    2006-07-01

    There is evidence for an association between polymorphisms of serotonin- and dopamine-related genes and temperamental personality traits. Recent findings have shown that interactions between allelic variants of the different genes may contribute to personality traits. We examined the effects of serotonin transporter-linked promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene polymorphisms for associations with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) temperament subscales in 209 Koreans. We found that the variants of 5-HTTLPR interacted with the DAT1 gene polymorphism to influence the HA and RD temperament subscales of TCI. Neither of these two genes affected any subscales of TCI alone.Controlling for the effects of gender and age, we found significant interactions between 5-HTTLPR and DAT1 genes on Harm Avoidance (HA) and Reward Dependence (RD) as measured by the TCI (Hotelling's Trace = 3.0, P = 0.02). In the presence of the DAT1 10/10 genotype, subjects of group L of 5-HTTLPR had a significantly higher HA score and significantly lower RD score than those of group S (F = 5.04, df = 1, p = 0.03 and F = 8.35, df = 1, p = 0.004, respectively). These findings suggest that the variants of 5-HTTLPR interacted with the DAT1 gene polymorphism to influence the HA and RD temperament subscales of TCI.

  8. Effects of the intensity of masking noise on ear canal recorded low-frequency cochlear microphonic waveforms in normal hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Compared to auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), cochlear microphonics (CMs) may be more appropriate to serve as a supplement to the test of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Researchers have shown that low-frequency CMs from the apical cochlea are measurable at the tympanic membrane using high-pass masking noise. Our objective is to study the effect of such noise at different intensities on low-frequency CMs recorded at the ear canal, which is not completely known. Six components were involved in this CM measurement including an ear canal electrode (1), a relatively long and low-frequency toneburst (2), and high-pass masking noise at different intensities (3). The rest components include statistical analysis based on multiple human subjects (4), curve modeling based on amplitudes of CM waveforms (CMWs) and noise intensity (5), and a technique based on electrocochleography (ECochG or ECoG) (6). Results show that low-frequency CMWs appeared clearly. The CMW amplitude decreased with an increase in noise level. It decreased first slowly, then faster, and finally slowly again. In conclusion, when masked with high-pass noise, the low-frequency CMs are measurable at the human ear canal. Such noise reduces the low-frequency CM amplitude. The reduction is noise-intensity dependent but not completely linear. The reduction may be caused by the excited basal cochlea which the low-frequency has to travel and pass through. Although not completely clear, six mechanisms related to such reduction are discussed.

  9. Serum high-molecular weight adiponectin decreases abruptly after an oral glucose load in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, but not those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Noriyuki; Hara, Kenji; Yatsuka, Chikako; Nakano, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Suetsugu, Mariko; Nakamachi, Takafumi; Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko; Haruki, Kohsuke; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2009-10-01

    Adiponectin exists in the blood as 3 forms, which are a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form. We investigated whether circulating HMW adiponectin levels were altered by oral glucose or fat ingestion. Forty male subjects underwent a 75-g oral glucose loading test (OGTT), and 11 healthy subjects (5 women and 6 men) received a fat loading test. Serum levels of HMW and total adiponectin were measured during the OGTT and the fat loading test. The fat loading test was performed for at least 8 hours. Among the 40 male subjects, 11 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 9 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 11 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 9 had diabetes mellitus (DM). In all 40 subjects, the serum total adiponectin level did not change significantly, whereas serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly after a glucose load and reached 92.2% of the basal level at 120 minutes after the OGTT (P < .01). The HMW to total adiponectin ratio decreased significantly from 0.47 +/- 0.15 at baseline to 0.43 +/- 0.13 at 120 minutes after a glucose load (P < .05). Serum HMW adiponectin measured at 120 minutes after the OGTT decreased significantly to 86.0% and 85.6% of the basal level in subjects with NGT or IFG, respectively (both P < .01). In subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or DM, however, serum HMW adiponectin did not change. The area under the curve for insulin at 30 minutes after a glucose load during the OGTT was significantly larger in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .05). In addition, the insulinogenic index (DeltaI(0-30)/DeltaG(0-30)) was significantly higher in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .001). Percentage changes in serum HMW adiponectin of the baseline at 120 minutes correlated negatively with those in serum insulin (r = -0.468, P = .0023), but not plasma glucose, of the baseline at 30 minutes in 40 subjects. On the other hand, serum triglycerides increased significantly after an oral fat load in

  10. The effect of short-term dietary supplementation with glucose on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose and oral glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Cunningham, K M; Wishart, J M; Jones, K L; Read, N W

    1996-04-01

    Recent observations indicate that gastric emptying may be influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of a high glucose diet on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, and the impact of any changes in gastric emptying on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in response to glucose and fructose loads. Gastric emptying of glucose and fructose (both 75 g dissolved in 350 ml water) were measured in seven normal volunteers on separate days while each was on a "standard' diet and an identical diet supplemented with 440 g/day of glucose for 4-7 days. Venous blood samples for measurement of plasma glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels were taken immediately before and for 180 min after ingestion of glucose and fructose loads. Dietary glucose supplementation accelerated gastric emptying of glucose (50% emptying time 82 +/- 8 vs 106 +/- 10 min, p = 0.004) and fructose (73 +/- 9 vs 106 +/- 9 min, p = 0.001). After ingestion of glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin (p < 0.05) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (p < 0.05) were higher during the glucose-supplemented diet. In contrast, plasma glucose concentrations at 60 min and 75 min were lower (p < 0.05) on the glucose-supplemented diet. We conclude that short-term supplementation of the diet with glucose accelerates gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, presumably as a result of reduced feedback inhibition of gastric emptying from small intestinal luminal receptors. More rapid gastric emptying of glucose has a significant impact on glucose tolerance.

  11. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  12. Decreased Cutaneous Resonance Running Time in Cured Leprosy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Song, S.P.; Elias, P.M.; Lv, C.Z.; Shi, Y.J.; Guang, P.; Zhang, X.J.; Feingold, K.R.; Man, M.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objectives Leprosy prominently involves both the skin and peripheral neural tissues and some symptoms persist after microbial cure. Because alterations in the dermis also occur in leprosy, we assessed here whether there were changes in cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), a parameter that is influenced by collagen properties, in cured leprosy subjects. Methods A reviscometer was used to measure the CRRT at various directions on the dorsal hand and the flexural forearms of 76 cured leprosy subjects aged 50–85 years and 68 age-matched normal subjects. Results In comparison to normal subjects, CRRTs on the hands and the forearms were significantly reduced in all directions in cured leprosy, except at the 1–7, 2–8 and 3–9 o'clock directions on the forearms. CRRTs were reduced significantly at both the 4–10 and 5–11 o'clock directions on the forearm in lepromatous (73.33 ± 4.19 at 4–10 o'clock and 67.44 ± 2.71 at 5–11 o'clock direction) and borderline lepromatous types (77.58 ± 5.84 at 4–10 o'clock and 79.85 ± 6.81 at 5–11 o'clock direction) as compared with normal (143.10 ± 7.75 at 4–10 o'clock and 125.18 ± 8.14 at 5–11 o'clock direction). On the hand, CRRTs at all directions, except that at 4–10 o'clock direction, were also significantly reduced in lepromatous and borderline lepromatous types in comparison with normal. Significant differences in CRRT at some directions were found among the various subtypes of leprosy. Conclusion CRRTs were abnormal in the cured leprosy subjects as a whole, but varied with leprosy subtypes, which suggested that the extent of reduction of CRRTs correlates with the severity of immune alteration. These results suggest that CRRT measurements could be a useful approach to quantify the extent of some residual abnormalities in cured leprosy and perhaps could also be used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. PMID:19648783

  13. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  14. The effect of backpack weight on the standing posture and balance of schoolgirls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Chow, Daniel H K; Kwok, Monica L Y; Cheng, Jack C Y; Lao, Miko L M; Holmes, Andrew D; Au-Yang, Alexander; Yao, Fiona Y D; Wong, M S

    2006-10-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the effect of carrying a backpack on adolescent posture and balance, but the effect of backpack loading combined with other factors affecting balance, such as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), has not been determined. This study examines the effects of backpack load on the posture and balance of schoolgirls with AIS and normal controls. The standing posture of 26 schoolgirls with mild AIS (mean age 13, Cobb angle 10-25 degrees ) and 20 age-matched normal schoolgirls were recorded without a backpack and while carrying a standard dual-strap backpack loaded at 7.5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15% of the subject's bodyweight (BW). Kinematics of the pelvis, trunk and head were recorded using a motion analysis system and centre of pressure (COP) data were recorded using a force platform. Reliable COP data could only be derived for 13 of the subjects with AIS. Increasing backpack load causes a significantly increased flexion of the trunk in relation to the pelvis and extension of the head in relation to the trunk, as well as increased antero-posterior range of COP motion. While backpack load appears to affect balance predominantly in the antero-posterior direction, differences between groups were more evident in the medio-lateral direction, with AIS subjects showing poor balance in this direction. Overall, carrying a backpack causes similar sagittal plane changes in posture and balance in both normal and AIS groups. Load size or subject group did not influence balance, but the additive effect of backpack carrying and AIS on postural control alters the risk of fall in this population. Therefore, load limit recommendations based on normal subjects should not be applicable to subjects with AIS.

  15. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of ampicillin (2.0 grams) and sulbactam (1.0 gram) coadministered to subjects with normal and abnormal renal function and with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Blum, R A; Kohli, R K; Harrison, N J; Schentag, J J

    1989-09-01

    The single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered ampicillin (2.0 g) and sulbactam (1.0 g) were studied in normal subjects and in patients with various degrees of creatinine clearance (CLCR). Six normal subjects (CLCR, greater than 60 ml/min), six patients with mild renal failure (CLCR, 31 to 60 ml/min), four patients with severe renal failure (CLCR, 7 to 30 ml/min), and four patients requiring maintenance hemodialysis (CLCR, less than 7 ml/min) were studied. The terminal half-lives for ampicillin and sulbactam more than doubled in patients with severe renal failure compared with subjects with normal renal function and mild renal insufficiency. CLCR significantly correlated with ampicillin (r = 0.88) and sulbactam (r = 0.54) total body clearance. Mean steady-state volume of distribution and nonrenal clearance for ampicillin and sulbactam were not affected by renal function. Hemodialysis approximately doubled the ampicillin and sulbactam total body clearance. Mean totals of 34.8 +/- 4.0% of the ampicillin dose and 44.7 +/- 3.2% of the sulbactam dose were removed during a 4-h hemodialysis treatment. A slight rebound in concentrations in serum after hemodialysis was observed for both drugs in all four subjects. In hemodialysis patients, the ampicillin half-life was 17.4 +/- 8.0 h and the sulbactam half-life was 13.4 +/- 7.4 h. The ampicillin and sulbactam half-lives were appreciably altered during the hemodialysis period (means of 2.2 and 2.3 h, respectively). The nearly parallel decrease in total body clearance, with volume of distribution and nonrenal clearance remaining relatively constant, suggests that the same ratio of ampicillin to sulbactam is appropriate regardless of renal function. An adjustment of the ampicillin (2.0 g) and sulbactam (1.0 g) dose to twice daily would be appropriate in patients with a CLCR between 7 and 30 ml/min. Doses should be given every 24 h for those undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. On hemodialysis days, doses should

  17. Fitter Women Did Not Have Attenuated Hemodynamic Responses to Psychological Stress Compared with Age-Matched Women with Lower Levels of Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sisitha U.; Torres, Susan J.; Hussein, Mais; Fraser, Steve F.; Lambert, Gavin W.; Turner, Anne I.

    2017-01-01

    According to the ‘cross stressor adaptation hypothesis’, regular exercise acts as a buffer against the detrimental effects of stress. Nevertheless, evidence that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness moderate hemodynamic responses to acute psychological stress is inconclusive, especially in women. Women aged 30–50 years (in the mid-follicular phase of the menstrual cycle) with higher (n = 17) and lower (n = 17) levels of fitness were subjected to a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Continuous, non-invasive measurements were made of beat-to-beat, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), maximum slope, pulse interval (PI) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Maximal oxygen consumption was significantly (p<0.001) higher in the ‘higher fit’ women. Lower fit women had higher fasting glucose, resting heart rate, waist to hip ratios and elevated serum triglyceride and cholesterol/ HDL ratios compared with higher fit women (p<0.05 for all). While all measured parameters (for both groups)displayed significant (p<0.001) responses to the TSST, only HR, PI and LVET differed significantly between higher and lower fit women (p<0.001 for all) with the higher fit women having the larger response in each case. It was also found that higher fit women had significantly shorter time to recovery for maximum slope compared with the lower fit women. These findings provide little support for the notion that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness result in lower cardiovascular responsivity to psychological stress in women but may indicate that lower fit women have blunted responses to stress. PMID:28081200

  18. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    López-Yoldi, Miguel; Stanhope, Kimber L; Garaulet, Marta; Chen, X Guoxia; Marcos-Gómez, Beatriz; Carrasco-Benso, María Paz; Santa Maria, Eva M; Escoté, Xavier; Lee, Vivien; Nunez, Marinelle V; Medici, Valentina; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Sáinz, Neira; Huerta, Ana E; Laiglesia, Laura M; Prieto, Jesús; Martínez, J Alfredo; Bustos, Matilde; Havel, Peter J; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J

    2017-04-01

    Cardiotrophin (CT)-1 is a regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed whether CT-1 also acts to peripherally regulate metabolic rhythms and adipose tissue core clock genes in mice. Moreover, the circadian pattern of plasma CT-1 levels was evaluated in normal-weight and overweight subjects. The circadian rhythmicity of oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) was disrupted in aged obese CT-1-deficient (CT-1(-/-)) mice (12 mo). Although circadian rhythms of Vo2 were conserved in young lean CT-1(-/-) mice (2 mo), CT-1 deficiency caused a phase shift of the acrophase. Most of the clock genes studied (Clock, Bmal1, and Per2) displayed a circadian rhythm in adipose tissue of both wild-type (WT) and CT-1(-/-) mice. However, the pattern was altered in CT-1(-/-) mice toward a lower percentage of the rhythm or lower amplitude, especially for Bmal1 and Clock. Moreover, CT-1 mRNA levels in adipose tissue showed significant circadian fluctuations in young WT mice. In humans, CT-1 plasma profile exhibited a 24-h circadian rhythm in normal-weight but not in overweight subjects. The 24-h pattern of CT-1 was characterized by a pronounced increase during the night (from 02:00 to 08:00). These observations suggest a potential role for CT-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms.-López-Yoldi, M., Stanhope, K. L., Garaulet, M., Chen, X. G., Marcos-Gómez, B., Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Santa Maria, E. M., Escoté, X., Lee, V., Nunez, M. V., Medici, V., Martínez-Ansó, E., Sáinz, N., Huerta, A. E., Laiglesia, L. M., Prieto, J., Martínez, J. A., Bustos, M., Havel, P. J., Moreno-Aliaga, M. J. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects.

  19. Quantitative Changes in the Mitochondrial Proteome from Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment, Early Stage and Late Stage Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Bert C.; Wang, Jianquan; Markesbery, William R.; Lovell, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The major barrier to treating or preventing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its unknown etiology/pathogenesis. Although increasing evidence supports a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD, there have been few studies that simultaneously evaluate changes in multiple mitochondrial proteins. To evaluate changes in suites of potentially interacting mitochondrial proteins, we applied 2-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and the isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) method to identify and quantify proteins in mitochondrial enriched fractions isolated from short postmortem interval temporal pole specimens from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 4 subjects pooled), early Alzheimer’s disease (EAD, 4 subjects pooled), late-stage AD (LAD, 8 subjects pooled) and age-matched normal control (NC, 7 subjects pooled) subjects. A total of 112 unique, non-redundant proteins were identified and quantified in common to all three stages of disease progression. Overall, patterns of protein change suggest activation of mitochondrial pathways that include proteins responsible for transport and utilization of ATP. These proteins include adenine nucleotide translocase (ADT1), voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs), hexokinase (HXK1) and creatine kinase (KCRU). Comparison of protein changes throughout the progression of AD suggests the most pronounced changes occur in EAD mitochondria. PMID:20061648

  20. Plasma antibodies to Abeta40 and Abeta42 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wuhua; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Kuwano, Ryozo; Abe, Koji; Shoji, Mikio

    2008-07-11

    Antibodies to amyloid beta protein (Abeta) are present naturally or after Abeta vaccine therapy in human plasma. To clarify their clinical role, we examined plasma samples from 113 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 205 normal controls using the tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) assay. A high positive rate of TAPIR was revealed in AD (45.1%) and age-matched controls (41.2%), however, no significance was observed. No significant difference was observed in the MMS score or disease duration between TAPIR-positive and negative samples. TAPIR-positive plasma reacted with the Abeta40 monomer and dimer, and the Abeta42 monomer weakly, but not with the Abeta42 dimer. TAPIR was even detected in samples from young normal subjects and young Tg2576 transgenic mice. Although the Abeta40 level and Abeta40/42 ratio increased, and Abeta42 was significantly decreased in plasma from AD groups when compared to controls, no significant correlations were revealed between plasma Abeta levels and TAPIR grading. Thus an immune response to Abeta40 and immune tolerance to Abeta42 occurred naturally in humans without a close relationship to the Abeta burden in the brain. Clarification of the mechanism of the immune response to Abeta42 is necessary for realization of an immunotherapy for AD.

  1. Structure of cloned delta-globin genes from a normal subject and a patient with delta-thalassemia; sequence polymorphisms found in the delta-globin gene region of Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Kimura, A; Matsunaga, E; Ohta, Y; Fujiyoshi, T; Matsuo, T; Nakamura, T; Imamura, T; Yanase, T; Takagi, Y

    1982-10-11

    The delta-globin genes of a normal Japanese and a Japanese patient with homozygous delta-thalassemia were cloned, and the nucleotide sequence of a region including the gene was determined. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these two individuals with that of pH delta 1, delta-globin clone from the gene library constructed by Maniatis et al., showed differences in the large intervening sequence (IVS 2), at positions 137, 151, 186, 188, 291, 292 and 540 as one base substitutions, at 339 and 823 as one base additions, at 548 as a one base deletion, and a 9 bp duplication between positions 651 and 659, and differences in the 3'-flanking sequence at 51 and 98 nucleotides 3' to the AATAAA sequence. However, in the region studied, no differences was observed in the nucleotide sequences of the normal subject and the patient with delta-thalassemia. Therefore, these differences may represent polymorphisms of the delta-globin gene present in Japanese individuals. These data suggest that IVS 2 is more divergent than other regions, and that a DNA region(s) other than the globin gene may affect expression of the gene.

  2. Effects of Immediate and Cumulative Syntactic Experience in Language Impairment: Evidence from Priming of Subject Relatives in Children with SLI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garraffa, Maria; Coco, Moreno I.; Branigan, Holly P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the production of subject relative clauses (SRc) in Italian pre-school children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and age-matched typically-developing children (TD) controls. In a structural priming paradigm, children described pictures after hearing the experimenter produce a bare noun or an SRc description, as part of a…

  3. On the accuracy of estimation of basic pharmacokinetic parameters by the traditional noncompartmental equations and the prediction of the steady-state volume of distribution in obese patients based upon data derived from normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2011-06-01

    The steady-state and terminal volumes of distribution, as well as the mean residence time of drug in the body (V(ss), V(β), and MRT) are the common pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using the drug plasma concentration-time profile C(p) (t) following intravenous (i.v. bolus or constant rate infusion) drug administration. These calculations are valid for the linear pharmacokinetic system with central elimination (i.e., elimination rate being proportional to drug concentration in plasma). Formally, the assumption of central elimination is not normally met because the rate of drug elimination is proportional to the unbound drug concentration at elimination site, although equilibration between systemic circulation and the site of clearance for majority of small molecule drugs is fast. Thus, the assumption of central elimination is practically quite adequate. It appears reasonable to estimate the extent of possible errors in determination of these pharmacokinetic parameters due to the absence of central elimination. The comparison of V(ss), V(β), and MRT calculated by exact equations and the commonly used ones was made considering a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. It was found that if the drug plasma concentration profile is detected accurately, determination of drug distribution volumes and MRT using the traditional noncompartmental calculations of these parameters from C(p) (t) yields the values very close to that obtained from exact equations. Though in practice, the accurate measurement of C(p) (t), especially its terminal phase, may not always be possible. This is particularly applicable for obtaining the distribution volumes of lipophilic compounds in obese subjects, when the possibility of late terminal phase at low drug concentration is quite likely, specifically for compounds with high clearance. An accurate determination of V(ss) is much needed in clinical practice because it is critical for the proper selection of drug treatment

  4. Twenty-four-hour osteocalcin, carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen, and aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen rhythms in normal and growth-retarded children.

    PubMed

    Saggese, G; Baroncelli, G I; Bertelloni, S; Cinquanta, L; DiNero, G

    1994-04-01

    The relationships between spontaneous variations in serum 24-h osteocalcin (OC), carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), and aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) concentrations and GH secretion, measured as GH response to provocative pharmacologic stimuli and spontaneous GH secretion during 24 h, were evaluated in prepubertal normal children and in GH-deficient and GH-secreting short normal children (SNC). All the subjects showed a circadian rhythm in smoothed 24-h OC and PICP mean data with higher nocturnal values in comparison with diurnal values. Conversely, serum PIINP concentrations did not vary throughout the day. In children with classic GH deficiency and nonclassic GH deficiency, mean 24-h serum levels and smoothed 24-h mean data for OC, PICP, and PIIINP were significantly reduced (p < 0.001) with respect to age-matched controls. SNC showed mean 24-h OC concentrations similar (p = NS) to those we found in age-matched controls, but they had significantly lower (p < 0.001) diurnal 12-h mean data in comparison with controls. SNC also showed both 24-h PICP and PIIINP mean data and smoothed 24-h PICP and PIIINP mean data significantly lower (from p < 0.02 to p < 0.001) at all the time points of measurement in comparison with controls. Twenty-four-hour PICP and PIIINP mean data were positively related to spontaneous 24-h GH concentrations (r = 0.77, p < 0.005 and r = 0.69, p < 0.005, respectively) and growth velocity (r = 0.85, p < 0.005, and r = 0.70, p < 0.005, respectively), whereas 24-h OC mean data were not.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Presence or absence of carbohydrates and the proportion of fat in a high-protein diet affect appetite suppression but not energy expenditure in normal-weight human subjects fed in energy balance.

    PubMed

    Veldhorst, Margriet A B; Westerterp, Klaas R; van Vught, Anneke J A H; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2010-11-01

    Two types of relatively high-protein diets, with a normal or low proportion of carbohydrates, have been shown effective for weight loss. The objective was to assess the significance of the presence or absence of carbohydrates and the proportion of fat in high-protein diets for affecting appetite suppression, energy expenditure, and fat oxidation in normal-weight subjects in energy balance. Subjects (aged 23 (sd 3) years and BMI 22·0 (sd 1·9) kg/m2) were stratified in two groups. Each was offered two diets in a randomised cross-over design: group 1 (n 22) - normal protein (NP; 10, 60 and 30 % energy (En%) from protein, carbohydrate and fat), high protein (HP; 30, 40 and 30 En%); group 2 (n 23) - normal protein (NP-g; 10, 60 and 30 En%), high protein, carbohydrate-free (HP-0C; 30, 0 and 70 En%) for 2 d; NP-g and HP-0C were preceded by glycogen-lowering exercise (day 1). Appetite was measured throughout day 2 using visual analogue scales (VAS). Energy expenditure (EE) and substrate oxidation (respiratory quotient; RQ) were measured in a respiration chamber (08.00 hours on day 2 until 07.30 hours on day 3). Fasting plasma β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentration was measured (day 3). NP-g and NP did not differ in hunger, EE, RQ and BHB. HP-0C and HP v. NP-g and NP, respectively, were lower in hunger (P < 0·05; P < 0·001) and RQ (P < 0·01; P < 0·001) and higher in EE (P < 0·05; P = 0·07) and BHB (P < 0·05; P < 0·001). Hunger and RQ were lower with HP-0C than HP (693 (sd 208) v. 905 (sd 209) mm VAS × 24 h, P < 0·01; 0·76 (sd 0·01) v. 0·81 (sd 0·02), P < 0·01); BHB was higher (1349 (sd 653) v. 332 (sd 102) μmol/l; P < 0·001). ΔHunger, ΔRQ, and ΔBHB were larger between HP-0C-NP-g than between HP-NP ( - 346 (sd 84) v. - 107 (sd 52) mm VAS ×  24 h, P < 0·01; - 0·09 (sd 0·00) v. - 0·05 (sd 0·00), P < 0·001; 1115 (sd 627) v. 104 (sd 42) μmol/l, P < 0·001). In conclusion, appetite suppression and fat oxidation

  6. Low and moderate-fat plant sterol fortified soymilk in modulation of plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics in subjects with normal to high cholesterol concentrations: report on two randomized crossover studies

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Todd C; Chan, Yen-Ming; Harding, Scott V; Jones, Peter JH

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of various plant sterol (PS)-enriched beverages is effective in lowering plasma cholesterol, the lipid-lowering potential of PS in a soymilk format has not been investigated thoroughly. Therefore, to evaluate the efficacy of PS-enriched soy beverages on plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics, we conducted two separate 28 d dietary controlled cross-over studies. In study 1, the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of a low-fat (2 g/serving) PS enriched soy beverage was examined in 33 normal cholesterolemic subjects in comparison with 1% dairy milk. In study 2, we investigated the efficacy of a moderate-fat (3.5 g/serving) PS-enriched soy beverage on plasma cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol kinetic responses in 23 hypercholesterolemic subjects compared with 1% dairy milk. Both the low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk varieties provided 1.95 g PS/d. Endpoint plasma variables were analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA using baseline values as covariates for plasma lipid measurements. Results In comparison with the 1% dairy milk control, the low-fat soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) total and LDL-cholesterol by 10 and 13%, respectively. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) plasma total and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15% respectively. Fasting triglycerides were reduced by 9.4% following consumption of the moderate-fat soy beverage in comparison with the 1% dairy milk. Both low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy varieties reduced (P < 0.05) LDL:HDL and TC:HDL ratios compared with the 1% dairy milk control. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk reduced (P < 0.05) cholesterol absorption by 27%, but did not alter cholesterol synthesis in comparison with 1% dairy milk. Conclusion We conclude that, compared to 1% dairy milk, consumption of low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverages represents an effective dietary strategy to reduce circulating lipid concentrations in normal to

  7. Intracellular sodium, potassium and magnesium concentration, ouabain-sensitive 86rubidium-uptake and sodium-efflux and Na+, K+-cotransport activity in erythrocytes of normal male subjects studied on two occasions.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, P; Hespel, P; Lommelen, G; Laermans, M; M'Buyamba-Kabangu, J R; Amery, A

    1986-09-01

    The red cell Na+,K+-ATPase pump activity estimated by the ouabain-sensitive 86Rb-uptake or Na+-efflux, the Na+,K+-cotransport activity measured either by the furosemide-sensitive K+- or Na+- efflux or by the ethacrynic acid-sensitive 86Rb-uptake as well as the intraerythrocyte concentration of sodium, potassium and magnesium were studied in 29 normal male subjects with one to three weeks interval between the first and second blood sampling. Both the red cell sodium and potassium concentration, the erythrocyte ouabain-sensitive 86Rb-uptake and Na+-efflux, the furosemide-sensitive Na+- and K+-efflux and the ethacrynic acid-sensitive 86Rb-uptake are stable over time in the same individual. The furosemide-sensitive Na+-and K+-efflux is significantly related to the ethacrynic acid-sensitive 86Rb-uptake. The intraerythrocyte Na+ concentration was negatively related to the ouabain-sensitive 86Rb-uptake, but not to the ouabain-sensitive Na+-efflux; it was, however, negatively related to the rate constant for the ouabain-sensitive Na+-efflux.

  8. Heterogeneous cerebral glucose metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, E; Hasselbalch, S G; Waldemar, G; Juhler, M; Høgh, P; Holm, S; Garde, L; Knudsen, L L; Klinken, L; Gjerris, F

    1995-01-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) has never been investigated in large consecutive groups of patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), a potentially treatable form of dementia with an unpredictable outcome after shunt surgery. Using PET and 18F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose, rCMRglu was studied in 18 patients who fulfilled hydrodynamic criteria for NPH and in whom a biopsy of the frontal cortex was obtained. When compared with an age matched group of 11 healthy subjects, the patients with NPH showed a significant rCMRglu reduction in all cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Individual metabolic patterns, however, disclosed a large topographical heterogeneity. Furthermore, histopathological examination identified Alzheimer's disease or cerebrovascular disease in six cases, and no parenchymal disease or non-specific degenerative processes in the remaining 12. After separating the patients according to the histological diagnosis, the rCMRglu patterns were still heterogeneous, the abnormalities ranging from focal to diffuse in both subgroups. After shunt operation, 11 patients did not improve or worsened clinically. Six patients improved; of those, two had Alzheimer changes and two cerebrovascular changes in their biopsy. The metabolic pattern of these six patients did not differ from the rest of the NPH group. The results indicate that the NPH syndrome may be non-specifically associated with different degenerative disorders. The metabolic heterogeneity, together with the heterogeneous histopathological findings, indicate the necessity of reevaluating the pathogenesis of the NPH syndrome, and may account for the high variability in the success rate of shunt surgery series. Images PMID:7500099

  9. PAN-811 inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death of human Alzheimer's disease-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells via suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valery M; Dancik, Chantée M; Pan, Weiying; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Lebowitz, Michael S; Ghanbari, Hossein A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role in neurotoxicity associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative stress has been shown to be a prominent and early feature of vulnerable neurons in AD. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells are affected at an early stage. Exposure to oxidative stress induces the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes cell damage in the form of protein, lipid, and DNA oxidations. Elevated ROS levels are also associated with increased deposition of amyloid-beta and formation of senile plaques, a hallmark of the AD brain. If enhanced ROS exceeds the basal level of cellular protective mechanisms, oxidative damage and cell death will result. Therefore, substances that can reduce oxidative stress are sought as potential drug candidates for treatment or preventative therapy of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PAN-811, also known as 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone or Triapine, is a small lipophilic compound that is currently being investigated in several Phase II clinical trials for cancer therapy due to its inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase activity. Here we show PAN-811 to be effective in preventing or reducing ROS accumulation and the resulting oxidative damages in both AD-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells.

  10. Skin vasoreactivity to insulin iontophoresis is reduced in elderly subjects and is absent in treated non-insulin-dependent diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Cupisti, Adamasco; Ricco, Roberto; Santoro, Gino; Pentimone, Ferdinando; Carpi, Angelo

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the skin vasoreactivity to insulin in normal subjects and in treated non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients. We measured cutaneous perfusion by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) at rest and during skin cathodal iontophoresis (six pulses of 0.1 mA each for 20 s, with 40 s interval between stimulations) of insulin (0.1 ml Humulin R 100 IU/ml diluted 1/10 with of 0.9% saline solution) in 45 healthy subjects (HS), (25 males, 20 females, aged 45 +/- 18 years), and in 15 treated NIDDM patients (13 males), aged 66 +/- 8 years. Fifteen of the HS were used as controls. In these 15 sex- and age-matched HS and in the patients, we assessed also the skin postischemic hyperemia by LDF. In HS cutaneous blood flux response (CBF) to iontophoresis of insulin in saline (expressed as percent changes from baseline) was significantly higher than CBF response to iontophoresis of pure saline (maximum response: 360 +/- 51% versus 172 +/- 42%, respectively; P < 0.001, ANOVA for repeated measures). The maximum "net" CBF response to insulin (response to insulin minus response to saline) showed a negative correlation (r = -0.361; P < 0.01) with age in HS, and resulted significantly lower in the oldest than in the youngest HS (105 +/- 40% versus 307 +/- 45%, respectively; P < 0.01). No significant correlation was observed between the maximum CBF response to saline and the age of subjects. In NIDDM patients the "net" CBF response to insulin iontophoresis resulted significantly lower than in 15 sex- and age-matched control subjects (maximum response: -50 +/- 89% versus 201 +/- 81%, respectively; P < 0.001, ANOVA for repeated measures). No significant difference was observed between diabetics and controls, nor in basal perfusion (6.5 +/- 1.3 IU versus 6.8 +/- 1.7 IU, respectively) neither in the skin postischemic hyperemia (250 +/-14% versus 258 +/- 27%, respectively). These results confirm that insulin iontophoresis induces a skin vasodilatatory effect in normal

  11. Gait development during lifespan in subjects with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Albertini, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied and evaluated the effects of aging in a group of individuals with Down syndrome, using gait analysis as tool of investigation. 32 individuals suffering from Down syndrome (DS) were enrolled in this study as group of pathological participants. The control group (CG) was composed by 36 healthy subjects (10 children, 15 teenagers and 16 adults) in order to evidence the differences between the normal and the pathological gait evolution in age-matched comparisons. The assessment consisted of 3D gait analysis: all pathological participants performed gait analysis in a longitudinal examination, from childhood to adulthood. Participants with DS evidenced how the delay in cognitive aspects and the typical orthopedic features of DS, as ligament laxity, led to the development of different motor strategies. During childhood, for both the considered populations, we found large variability in the gait indexes, but after this age a split in gait development was evidenced: the participants with DS developed a strategy focused on the reduction of the degrees of freedom, increasing the dispersion of generated power in the frontal plane, while in healthy participants the strategy was focused on the use of all the degrees of freedom, in order to reach the effectiveness of the gesture and finalize their movements in sagittal progression. The present study reinforces the idea that early intervention aimed to improve muscle tone, in order to supply for the excessive ligament laxity and to improve motor coordination, could represent a real goal for a more effective movement and for the prevention of compensatory strategies that increase energy cost.

  12. The Effect of Labels Only and Labels with Instruction on the Concept Attainment of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normally Developing Boys of School Age. Technical Report No. 301.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargiulo, Richard Michael

    Examined were the effects of verbal labels alone and in combination with two types of instruction on the concept attainment of 80 educable mentally retarded and 80 normal boys of school age matched for mental age. For learning the concept "equilateral triangle" Ss were randomly assigned to one of four experimental treatment conditions: verbal…

  13. Normalization of sensorimotor integration by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zittel, S; Helmich, R C; Demiralay, C; Münchau, A; Bäumer, T

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies indicated that sensorimotor integration and plasticity of the sensorimotor system are impaired in dystonia patients. We investigated motor evoked potential amplitudes and short latency afferent inhibition to examine corticospinal excitability and cortical sensorimotor integration, before and after inhibitory 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary sensory and primary motor cortex in patients with cervical dystonia (n = 12). Motor evoked potentials were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle after application of unconditioned transcranial magnetic test stimuli and after previous conditioning electrical stimulation of the right index finger at short interstimulus intervals of 25, 30 and 40 ms. Results were compared to a group of healthy age-matched controls. At baseline, motor evoked potential amplitudes did not differ between groups. Short latency afferent inhibition was reduced in cervical dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. Inhibitory 1 Hz sensory cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation but not motor cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increased motor evoked potential amplitudes in cervical dystonia patients. Additionally, both 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary sensory and primary motor cortex normalized short latency afferent inhibition in these patients. In healthy subjects, sensory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation had no influence on motor evoked potential amplitudes and short latency afferent inhibition. Plasticity of sensorimotor circuits is altered in cervical dystonia patients.

  14. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  15. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Sari, Carolina I; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Phillips, Sarah E; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged -7.5 ± 0.8, -8.1 ± 0.5, and -8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0-120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (-7 ± 3, -8 ± 4, -15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (-28 ± 8, -18 ± 6, and -25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0-120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects with different

  16. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Straznicky, Nora E.; Grima, Mariee T.; Sari, Carolina I.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Phillips, Sarah E.; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A.; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B.; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m2), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged −7.5 ± 0.8, −8.1 ± 0.5, and −8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0−120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (−7 ± 3, −8 ± 4, −15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (−28 ± 8, −18 ± 6, and −25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0−120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Signature in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslie M.; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Knapik-Czajka, Malgorzata; Clark, Christopher M.; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Simon, Adam; Lewczuk, Piotr; Dean, Robert; Siemers, Eric; Potter, William; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Develop a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker signature for mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects. Methods Amyloid-β 1 to 42 peptide (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at the threonine 181 were measured in (1) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained during baseline evaluation of 100 mild AD, 196 mild cognitive impairment, and 114 elderly cognitively normal (NC) subjects in ADNI; and (2) independent 56 autopsy-confirmed AD cases and 52 age-matched elderly NCs using a multiplex immunoassay. Detection of an AD CSF profile for t-tau and Aβ1-42 in ADNI subjects was achieved using receiver operating characteristic cut points and logistic regression models derived from the autopsy-confirmed CSF data. Results CSF Aβ1-42 was the most sensitive biomarker for AD in the autopsy cohort of CSF samples: receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.913 and sensitivity for AD detection of 96.4%. In the ADNI cohort, a logistic regression model for Aβ1-42, t-tau, and APOε4 allele count provided the best assessment delineation of mild AD. An AD-like baseline CSF profile for t-tau/Aβ1-42 was detected in 33 of 37 ADNI mild cognitive impairment subjects who converted to probable AD during the first year of the study. Interpretation The CSF biomarker signature of AD defined by Aβ1-42 and t-tau in the autopsy-confirmed AD cohort and confirmed in the cohort followed in ADNI for 12 months detects mild AD in a large, multisite, prospective clinical investigation, and this signature appears to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. PMID:19296504

  18. On the intercorrelation of some frequency and amplitude parameters of the human EEG and its functional significance. Communication. I: Multidimensional neurodynamic organization of functional states of the brain during intellectual, perceptive and motor activity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lazarev, V V

    1998-01-01

    In 95 normal subjects, a separate evaluation of the amplitude and frequency parameters of EEG by period analysis made it possible to reveal, using factor analysis, four independent groups of parameters--the EEG factors, two of which being independent of the amplitude fluctuations. They were considered as integral EEG characteristics of qualitatively different neurophysiological processes. Decrease of Factor I values during mental activity (called 'general activation') reflected an intercorrelated desynchronization of the wave amplitudes in all the bands, a decrease of alpha-index (percentage presence in epoch) and regularity together with parallel increase of the indices and mean periods of delta- and theta-waves. This generalized reaction has shown 'non-specific' dependence upon novelty and difficulty of the tasks and stimuli with certain task-specific topographical distribution. An increase of values of regional Factor Ia in the anterior areas was caused by delta- and theta-amplitude synchronization, more pronounced during matching the rhymes (MR) than in mental multiplication (MM). An increase of Factor II values (related to increase of the index, frequency and regularity of beta-activity and called 'cortical excitation', CE) was more expressed during MR, whereas an increase of Factor III values (an increase of mean alpha-period and theta-index called 'active selective inhibition', ASI) was characteristic of MM, the latter reaction being evident in the right hemisphere. During analysis of external sound stimuli and rhythmical clenching of a fist, an increase of Factor III values was accompanied by decrease of Factor II values [corrected]; in the motor activity, such reciprocal reaction being localized in the central areas contralateral to the hand moved . Neuropsychological analysis suggests that CE correlates with associative and successively organized mental operations involving search for memory traces and ASI presumably relates to different aspects of mental

  19. Proposal for the standardization of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity assay, and results in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and with prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gabbe, E E; Heinrich, H C; Icagić, F

    1982-02-26

    An effort has been made to standardize the indirect iron saturation excess method for the determination of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) and thus to relinquish the direct adsorption methods for the assay of the serum total iron binding capacity (TIBC) which give falsely high results due to unspecific binding of the saturating iron to serum proteins. In order to eliminate the interfering effects of hydrolytic polymerization of iron(III) on the saturation of apotransferrin in serum and on the colorimetric determination of the unbound iron excess at pH 8.3, conditions have been studied for the preparation of the iron-nitrilotriacetate-complex (Fe(NTA)2) solution at pH 8.3 with respect to its reactivity with the reductant sodium ascorbate and with the chromogen bathophenanthroline-disulfonate in photometric standards and in samples containing iron-saturated serum. The validity of the results for the UIBC thus obtained has been investigated (1) by direct spectrophotometric titration with Fe(NTA)2 of the apotransferrin in serum by measuring the absorbance of transferrin at 470 nm in 50-mm cuvettes, and of the UIBC using the modified indirect iron saturation excess assay, both of which gave the same saturation points, and (2) by the correlation of the TIBC obtained from serum iron determinations and the UIBC, with the transferrin concentration measured by the radial immunodiffusion assay. Results of UIBC determinations are presented along with serum iron concentration, TIBC, and transferrin saturation in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

  20. Stair dimension affects knee kinematics and kinetics in patients with good outcome after TKA similarly as in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Trinler, Ursula K; Baty, Florent; Mündermann, Annegret; Fenner, Verena; Behrend, Henrik; Jost, Bernhard; Wegener, Regina

    2016-10-01

    Joint biomechanics during stair walking may contain important information on functional deficits in patients with orthopaedic conditions but depend on the stair dimension. The goal of this study was to compare knee kinematics and kinetics between patients with good outcome 2 years after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and age-matched controls during stair ascent and descent at two different stair heights. Principal component analysis was used to detect differences in gait mechanics between 15 patients and 15 controls at different stair conditions. Linear mixed models showed differences in knee kinematic and kinetic patterns (in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction) between stair heights. The knee adduction angle was more affected by stair heights in stair ascending whereas knee adduction moment and knee power were more affected during stair descent. Some stair by height and subject effects were small but not significant. Overall, good outcome after TKA is reflected in close-to-normal knee biomechanics during stair walking. Specific stair configuration must be considered when comparing joint biomechanics between subject groups and studies. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1753-1761, 2016.

  1. Eye rubbing-induced changes in intraocular pressure and corneal thickness measured at five locations, in subjects with ocular allergy

    PubMed Central

    Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.; Alanazi, Saud A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To assess the effects of eye rubbing on corneal thickness (CT) and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements obtained 0-30min after habitual eye rubbing in symptomatic patients. METHODS Measurements of IOP and CT were obtained at five locations (central, temporal, superior, nasal and inferior) before, and every 5min for 30min interval after 30s of eye rubbing, for 25 randomly selected eyes of 14 subjects with ocular allergy and 11 age-matched normals. Differences in measurements were calculated in each group [Baseline measurements minus measurements recorded at each time interval after eye rubbing (for IOP), and for each corneal location (for CT)] and comparison were then made between groups (allergic versus control) for differences in any observed effects. RESULTS Within groups, baseline mean IOPs in the allergic patient-group (14.2±3.0 mm Hg) and in the control group (13.1±1.9 mm Hg) were similar at all times, after eye rubbing (P >0.05, for all). The maximum reduction in IOP was 0.8 mm Hg in the control subjects and the maximum increase was also 0.8 mm Hg in the allergic subjects. Between groups (allergic versus control), the changes in IOP remained under 1 mm Hg at all times (P=0.2) after 30min of eye rubbing. Between 0 and 30min of CT measurements after eye rubbing, the mean central CT (CCT), inferior CT (ICT), superior CT (SCT), temporal CT (TCT) and nasal CT (NCT) did not vary significantly from baseline values in the control and allergic-subject groups (P>0.05, for both). Between both groups, changes in CT were similar at all locations (P>0.05) except for the TC which was minimally thinner by about 4.4 µm (P=0.001) in the allergic subjects than in the control subjects, 30min following 30s of eye rubbing. CONCLUSION IOP measured in allergic subjects after 30s of habitual eye rubbing was comparable with that obtained in normal subjects at all times between 0 and 30min. Although, CT in the allergic subjects were similar to those of the control subjects at

  2. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals.

  3. A biomechanical assessment to evaluate breed differences in normal porcine medial collateral ligaments.

    PubMed

    Germscheid, Niccole M; Thornton, Gail M; Hart, David A; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2011-02-24

    Little information is available on the role of genetic factors and heredity in normal ligament behaviour and their ability to heal. Assessing these factors is challenging because of the lack of suitable animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a porcine model in order to evaluate and compare the biomechanical differences of normal medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) between Yorkshire (YK) and red Duroc (RD) breeds. It was hypothesized that biomechanical differences would not exist between normal YK and RD MCLs. Comparisons between porcine and human MCL were also made. A biomechanical testing apparatus and protocol specific to pig MCL were developed. Ligaments were subjected to cyclic and static creep tests and then elongated to failure. Pig MCL morphology, geometry, and low- and high-load mechanical behaviour were assessed. The custom-designed apparatus and protocol were sufficiently sensitive to detect mechanical property differences between breeds as well as inter-leg differences. The results reveal that porcine MCL is comparable in both shape and size to human MCL and exhibits similar structural and material failure properties, thus making it a feasible model. Comparisons between RD and YK breeds revealed that age-matched RD pigs weigh more, have larger MCL cross-sectional area, and have lower MCL failure stress than YK pigs. The effect of weight may have influenced MCL geometrical and biomechanical properties, and consequently, the differences observed may be due to breed type and/or animal weight. In conclusion, the pig serves as a suitable large animal model for genetic-related connective tissue studies.

  4. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  5. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects.

    PubMed

    DiZio, P; Lackner, J R

    2001-02-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  6. Subjective Visual Vertical and Postural Capability in Children Born Prematurely

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Trousson, Clémence; Baud, Olivier; Biran, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared postural stability and subjective visual vertical performance in a group of very preterm-born children aged 3-4 years and in a group of age-matched full-term children. Materials and Methods A platform (from TechnoConcept) was used to measure postural control in children. Perception of subjective visual vertical was also recorded with posture while the child had to adjust the vertical in the dark or with visual perturbation. Two other conditions (control conditions) were also recorded while the child was on the platform: for a fixation of the vertical bar, and in eyes closed condition. Results Postural performance was poor in preterm-born children compared to that of age-matched full-term children: the surface area, the length in medio-lateral direction and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were significantly larger in the preterm-born children group (p < 0.04, p < 0.01, and p < 0.04, respectively). Dual task in both groups of children significantly affected postural control. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) values were more variable and less precise in preterm-born children. Discussion-Conclusions We suggest that poor postural control as well as perception of verticality observed in preterm-born children could be due to immaturity of the cortical processes involved in the motor control and in the treatment of perception and orientation of verticality. PMID:25790327

  7. Near Normalization of Metabolic and Functional Features of the Central Nervous System in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease After Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorina, Paolo; Vezzulli, Paolo; Bassi, Roberto; Gremizzi, Chiara; Falautano, Monica; D’Addio, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Chabtini, Lola; Altamura, Erica; Mello, Alessandra; Caldara, Rossana; Scavini, Marina; Magnani, Giuseppe; Falini, Andrea; Secchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of brain disorders in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is multifactorial and involves the adverse effects of chronic hyperglycemia and of recurrent hypoglycemia. Kidney-pancreas (KP), but not kidney alone (KD), transplantation is associated with sustained normoglycemia, improvement in quality of life, and reduction of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The aim of our study was to evaluate with magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) the cerebral morphology and metabolism of 15 ESRD plus T1D patients, 23 patients with ESRD plus T1D after KD (n = 9) and KP (n = 14) transplantation, and 8 age-matched control subjects. RESULTS Magnetic resonance imaging showed a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in ESRD plus T1D patients (53% [95% CI 36–69]) compared with healthy subjects (25% [3–6], P = 0.04). Brain 1H MRS showed lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)-to-choline ratio in ESRD plus T1D, KD, and KP patients compared with control subjects (control subjects vs. all, P < 0.05) and of NAA-to-creatine ratio in ESRD plus T1D compared with KP and control subjects (ESRD plus T1D vs. control and KP subjects, P ≤ 0.01). The evaluation of the most common scores of psychological and neuropsychological function showed a generally better intellectual profile in control and KP subjects compared with ESRD plus T1D and KD patients. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and ESRD are associated with a precocious form of brain impairment, chronic cerebrovascular disease, and cognitive decline. In KP-transplanted patients, most of these features appeared to be near normalized after a 5-year follow-up period of sustained normoglycemia. PMID:22190674

  8. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  9. Tissue compliance meter is a more reproducible method of measuring radiation-induced fibrosis than late effects of normal tissue-subjective objective management analytical in patients treated with intracavitary brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation: results of a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, A Gabriella; Greenwood, Eleni A; Coplowitz, Shana; Parashar, Bhupesh; Kulidzhanov, Fridon; Christos, Paul J; Fischer, Andrew; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, Kun S Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Identification of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) remains a challenge with Late Effects of Normal Tissue-Subjective Objective Management Analytical (LENT-SOMA). Tissue compliance meter (TCM), a non-invasive applicator, may render a more reproducible tool for measuring RIF. In this study, we prospectively quantify RIF after intracavitary brachytherapy (IB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with TCM and compare it with LENT-SOMA. Thirty-nine women with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stages 0-I breast cancer, treated with lumpectomy and intracavitary brachytherapy delivered by accelerated partial breast irradiation (IBAPBI), were evaluated by two raters in a prospective manner pre-IBAPBI and every 6 months post-IBAPBI for development of RIF, using TCM and LENT-SOMA. TCM classification scale grades RIF as 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe, corresponding to a change in TCM (ΔTCM) between the IBAPBI and nonirradiated breasts of ≤2.9, 3.0-5.9, 6.0-8.9, ≥9.0 mm, respectively. LENT-SOMA scale employs clinical palpation to grade RIF as 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe. Correlation coefficients-Intraclass (ICC), Pearson (r), and Cohen's kappa (κ)-were employed to assess reliability of TCM and LENT-SOMA. Multivariate and univariate linear models explored the relationship between RIF and anatomical parameters [bra cup size], antihormonal therapy, and dosimetric factors [balloon diameter, skin-to-balloon distance (SBD), V150, and V200]. Median time to follow-up from completion of IBAPBI is 3.6 years (range, 0.8-4.9 years). Median age is 69 years (range, 47-82 years). Median breast cup size is 39D (range, 34B-44DDD). Median balloon size is 41.2 cc (range, 37.6-50.0 cc), and median SBD is 1.4 cm (range, 0.2-5.5 cm). At pre-IBAPBI, TCM measurements demonstrate high interobserver agreement between two raters in all four quadrants of both breasts ICC ≥ 0.997 (95% CI 0.994-1.000). After 36 months, RIF is graded by TCM scale as 0

  10. Otolith function assessed with the subjective postural horizontal and standardised stance and gait tasks.

    PubMed

    Beule, A G; Allum, J H J

    2006-01-01

    If otolith function is essential to maintain upright standing while moving along slanted or uneven surfaces, subjects with an otolith deficit should have difficulty judging whether the inclination of the surface on which they are standing is tilted or not. We tested this judgement and compared it with the ability to control trunk sway during standardised stance and gait tests. Thirteen patients with unilateral vestibular nerve neurectomy at least 6 months prior to testing and 39 age-matched controls were asked to move a dynamic posturography platform on which they were standing back to their subjective 'horizontal' position after the platform had been slowly tilted at 0.4 degrees/s to 5 degrees in 8 different directions. Normal subjects left the platform deviated in pitch (forwards-backwards) at about 0.7 degrees on describing the platform as levelled off for all directions of tilt. Patients showed larger deviations of about 1.3 degrees in pitch with significant differences for forward right tilt (1.58+/-0.73 degrees compared to 0.73+/-0.11 degrees for normals; mean and SEM) and for forward left. Roll (lateral) deviations were about 0.4 degrees for normals and 0.5 degrees larger for the patients (for example, for backward left, 1.13+/-0.24 degrees compared to 0.4+/-0.07 degrees in normals). Except for a tendency towards greater deviations to the lesion side of patients with eyes closed, no differences were noted between tests under eyes open and closed conditions. However, for backward and roll tilts patients needed to steady themselves first by grasping a handrail when tested with eyes closed. Stance tests on foam showed increases in roll and pitch trunk sway with respect to controls. Patients had significantly larger trunk roll sway deviations during 1-legged stance tests and during gait trials. For stance trials, the patients lost their balance control prior to the end of the standard 20-second recording time. We conclude that a unilateral loss of otolith inputs

  11. Microstructural callosal abnormalities in normal-appearing brain of children with developmental delay detected with diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Qi; Sun, Yimeng; Kruse, Bernd; Illies, Till; Zeumer, Hermann; Fiehler, Jens; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2009-06-01

    Callosal fibres play an important role in psychomotor and cognitive functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible microstructural abnormalities of the corpus callosum in children with developmental delay, who have normal conventional brain MR imaging results. Seventeen pediatric patients (aged 1-9 years) with developmental delay were studied. Quantitative T2 and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured at the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). Fibre tracking, volumetric determination, as well as fibre density calculations of the CC were also carried out. The results were compared with those of the age-matched healthy subjects. A general elevation of T2 relaxation times (105 ms in patients vs. 95 ms in controls) and reduction of the FA values (0.66 in patients vs. 0.74 in controls) at the genu of the CC were found in patients. Reductions of the fibre numbers (5,464 in patients vs. 8,886 in controls) and volumes (3,415 ml in patients vs. 5,235 ml in controls) of the CC were found only in patients older than 5 years. The study indicates that despite their inconspicuous findings in conventional MRI microstructural brain abnormalities are evident in these pediatric patients suffering from developmental delay.

  12. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  13. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  14. The earliest stage of cognitive impairment in transition from normal aging to Alzheimer disease is marked by prominent RNA oxidation in vulnerable neurons.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; McKeel, Daniel W; Tabaton, Massimo; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2012-03-01

    Although neuronal RNA oxidation is a prominent and established feature in age-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), oxidative damage to neuronal RNA in aging and in the transitional stages from normal elderly to the onset of AD has not been fully examined. In this study, we used an in situ approachto identify an oxidized RNA nucleoside 8-hydroxyguanosine (8OHG) in the cerebral cortex of 65 individuals without dementia ranging in age from 0.3 to 86 years. We also examined brain samples from 20 elderly who were evaluated for their premortem clinicaldementia rating score and postmortem brain pathologic diagnoses to investigate preclinical AD and mild cognitive impairment. Relative density measurements of 8OHG-immunoreactivity revealed a statistically significant increase in neuronal RNA oxidation during aging in the hippocampus and the temporal neocortex. In subjects with mild cognitive impairment but not preclinical AD, neurons of the temporal cortex showed a higher burden of oxidized RNA compared to age-matched controls. These results indicate that, although neuronal RNA oxidation fundamentally occurs as an age-associated phenomenon, more prominent RNA damage than in normal aging correlates with the onset of cognitive impairment in the prodromal stage of AD.

  15. The pathophysiology of the aqueduct stroke volume in normal pressure hydrocephalus: can co-morbidity with other forms of dementia be excluded?

    PubMed

    Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Schofield, Peter; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C

    2005-10-01

    Variable results are obtained from the treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) by shunt insertion. There is a high correlation between NPH and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on brain biopsy. There is an overlap between AD and vascular dementia (VaD), suggesting that a correlation exists between NPH and other forms of dementia. This study seeks to (1) understand the physiological factors behind, and (2) define the ability of, the aqueduct stroke volume to exclude dementia co-morbidity. Twenty-four patients from a dementia clinic were classified as having either early AD or VaD on the basis of clinical features, Hachinski score and neuropsychological testing. They were compared with 16 subjects with classical clinical findings of NPH and 12 aged-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects. MRI flow quantification was used to measure aqueduct stroke volume and arterial pulse volume. An arterio-cerebral compliance ratio was calculated from the two volumes in each patient. The aqueduct stroke volume was elevated in all three forms of dementia, with no significant difference noted between the groups. The arterial pulse volume was elevated by 24% in VaD and reduced by 35% in NPH, compared to normal (P = 0.05 and P = 0.002, respectively), and was normal in AD. There was a spectrum of relative compliance with normal compliance in VaD and reduced compliance in AD and NPH. The aqueduct stroke volume depends on the arterial pulse volume and the relative compliance between the arterial tree and brain. The aqueduct stroke volume cannot exclude significant co-morbidity in NPH.

  16. Different effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin on growth hormone and stable metabolite of prostaglandin E2, 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-M) in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Zacharieva, S; Muchá, I; Popova, J; Andonova, K

    1992-01-01

    Twenty four healthy subjects were placed in two treatment groups: 1. The first group consisted of twelve subjects in whom growth releasing hormone (GRH) (1 microgram/kg.BW) resulted in a marked and sustained elevation of serum growth hormone (GH) and a slight and delayed increase in plasma prostaglandin E2-M. In the second group, consisting also of twelve subjects, somatostatin infusion (500 micrograms/250 ml) was initiated and maintained for 60 min. Serum GH significantly decreased at 30 and 60 min during infusion and 15 min thereafter. We did not observe any changes in plasma prostaglandin E2-M during or after somatostatin infusion. The results obtained confirm previous in vitro studies and suggest a possible link between growth releasing hormone and prostaglandin E2 in their action on growth hormone secretion. It seems that somatostatin does not play a role in the control of prostaglandin E2 release.

  17. Statokinesigram normalization method.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Magalhães

    2017-02-01

    Stabilometry is a technique that aims to study the body sway of human subjects, employing a force platform. The signal obtained from this technique refers to the position of the foot base ground-reaction vector, known as the center of pressure (CoP). The parameters calculated from the signal are used to quantify the displacement of the CoP over time; there is a large variability, both between and within subjects, which prevents the definition of normative values. The intersubject variability is related to differences between subjects in terms of their anthropometry, in conjunction with their muscle activation patterns (biomechanics); and the intrasubject variability can be caused by a learning effect or fatigue. Age and foot placement on the platform are also known to influence variability. Normalization is the main method used to decrease this variability and to bring distributions of adjusted values into alignment. In 1996, O'Malley proposed three normalization techniques to eliminate the effect of age and anthropometric factors from temporal-distance parameters of gait. These techniques were adopted to normalize the stabilometric signal by some authors. This paper proposes a new method of normalization of stabilometric signals to be applied in balance studies. The method was applied to a data set collected in a previous study, and the results of normalized and nonnormalized signals were compared. The results showed that the new method, if used in a well-designed experiment, can eliminate undesirable correlations between the analyzed parameters and the subjects' characteristics and show only the experimental conditions' effects.

  18. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  19. Principal component analysis-T1ρ voxel based relaxometry of the articular cartilage: a comparison of biochemical patterns in osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament subjects

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Colin; Randolph, Allison; Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative MR, including T1ρ mapping, has been extensively used to probe early biochemical changes in knee articular cartilage of subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) and others at risk for cartilage degeneration, such as those with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. However, limited studies have been performed aimed to assess the spatial location and patterns of T1ρ. In this study we used a novel voxel-based relaxometry (VBR) technique coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) to extract relevant features so as to describe regional patterns and to investigate their similarities and differences in T1ρ maps in subjects with OA and subjects six months after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Methods T1ρ quantitative MRI images were collected for 180 subjects from two separate cohorts. The OA cohort included 93 osteoarthritic patients and 25 age-matched controls. The ACLR-6M cohort included 52 patients with unilateral ACL tears who were imaged 6 months after ACL reconstruction, and 10 age-matched controls. Non-rigid registration on a single template and local Z-score conversion were adopted for T1ρ spatial and intensity normalization of all the images in the dataset. PCA was used as a data dimensionality reduction to obtain a description of all subjects in a 10-dimensional feature space. Logistic linear regression was used to identify distinctive features of OA and ACL subjects Results Global prolongation of the Z-score was observed in both OA and ACL subjects compared to controls [higher values in 1st principal component (PC1); P=0.01]. In addition, relaxation time differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers of the lateral tibia and trochlea were observed to be significant distinctive features between OA and ACL subjects. OA subjects demonstrated similar values between the two cartilage layers [higher value in 2nd principal component (PC2); P=0.008], while ACL reconstructed subjects showed T1ρ prolongation

  20. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Aims Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. Method The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. Results In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. Conclusion DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality. PMID:26766911

  1. Effects of niacin on glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression, and clinical events in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels (<100 mg/dl): a combined analysis of the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), and Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study.

    PubMed

    Phan, Binh An P; Muñoz, Luis; Shadzi, Pey; Isquith, Daniel; Triller, Michael; Brown, B Greg; Zhao, Xue-Qiao

    2013-02-01

    Although the effect of niacin on the glucose levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus has been investigated, niacin's effects on the glucose levels and atherosclerosis in subjects with normal glucose levels have not been well established. We examined the effect of niacin on the glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression using quantitative coronary angiography, and clinical events in 407 subjects who had a baseline glucose level <100 mg/dl and were enrolled in the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), or Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study testing active niacin therapy. Although the fasting glucose levels increased significantly within 3 years in both subjects treated with niacin (from 85.6 ± 9.5 to 95.5 ± 19.7 mg/dl, p <0.001) and without niacin (from 85.2 ± 9.6 to 90 ± 17.9 mg/dl, p = 0.009), those treated with niacin had a significantly larger increase in glucose levels than those not taking niacin (9.88 vs 4.05 mg/dl, p = 0.002). Overall, 29% of subjects developed impaired fasting glucose within 3 years. Incident impaired fasting glucose was significantly more likely to be observed in subjects treated with niacin than in those who were not. However, the frequency of new-onset diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (5.6% vs 4.8%, p = 0.5). Niacin-treated subjects compared to untreated subjects had significantly less change in mean coronary stenosis (0.1 ± 0.3% vs 2 ± 12%, p <0.0001) and less major cardiovascular events (8% vs 21%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the use of niacin for 3 years in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels was associated with an increase in blood glucose levels and the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose, but not diabetes mellitus, and was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of coronary stenosis progression and major cardiovascular events.

  2. Low episodic memory performance in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with increased posterior cingulate gray matter N-acetylaspartate: a (1)H MRSI study at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Simon J; Kirchner, Thomas; Wyss, Michael; Van Bergen, Jiri M G; Quevenco, Frances C; Steininger, Stefanie C; Griffith, Erica Y; Meier, Irene; Michels, Lars; Gietl, Anton F; Leh, Sandra E; Brickman, Adam M; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Henning, Anke; Unschuld, Paul G

    2016-12-01

    Low episodic memory performance characterizes elderly subjects at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect neuronal dysfunction within the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus (PCP) region. To investigate a potential association between cerebral neurometabolism and low episodic memory in the absence of cognitive impairment, tissue-specific magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at ultrahigh field strength of 7 Tesla was used to investigate the PCP region in a healthy elderly study population (n = 30, age 70 ± 5.7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 29.4 ± 4.1). The Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) was administered as part of a neuropsychological battery for assessment of episodic memory performance. Significant differences between PCP gray and white matter could be observed for glutamate-glutamine (p = 0.001), choline (p = 0.01), and myo-inositol (p = 0.02). Low Verbal Learning and Memory Test performance was associated with high N-acetylaspartate in PCP gray matter (p = 0.01) but not in PCP white matter. Our data suggest that subtle decreases in episodic memory performance in the elderly may be associated with increased levels of N-acetylaspartate as a reflection of increased mitochondrial energy capacity in PCP gray matter.

  3. Estradiol levels in girls with Turner's syndrome compared to normal prepubertal girls as determined by an ultrasensitive assay.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Courtnay A; Heinrichs, Claudine; Larmore, Kimberly A; Craen, Marguerita; Brown-Dawson, Jacquelyn; Shaywitz, Sally; Ross, Judith; Klein, Karen Oerter

    2003-01-01

    Based on growing evidence that estradiol is produced in small amounts even in the prepubertal ovary, we hypothesized that estradiol levels in girls with Turner's syndrome (TS) are lower than in normal prepubertal girls secondary to the lack of normally functioning ovaries. Estradiol levels in untreated girls with TS have not been previously well defined because of the lack of adequate sensitivity of previously available estradiol assays. We utilized an ultrasensitive assay to study estradiol levels in 34 girls with TS and 34 normal age-matched prepubertal girls between the ages of 5 and 12 years. The average estradiol level in the girls with TS (6.4 +/- 4.9 pmol/l estradiol equivalents) was significantly lower than in the normal prepubertal girls (12.7 +/- 10.8 pmol/l estradiol equivalents; p < 0.01). Girls with TS were significantly shorter, and weighed less than the normal prepubertal girls, as expected. The estradiol level was not significantly correlated with height, bone age, or degree of bone age delay. In conclusion, girls with TS have significantly lower estradiol levels than normal age-matched prepubertal girls. This report is consistent with the hypothesis that the lack of normal ovarian function in girls with TS is evident even before puberty.

  4. Diagnostic effectiveness of quantitative [18F]flutemetamol PET imaging for detection of fibrillar amyloid β using cortical biopsy histopathology as the standard of truth in subjects with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction PET imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) in vivo holds promise for aiding in earlier diagnosis and intervention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment. AD-like Aβ pathology is a common comorbidity in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Fifty patients with iNPH needing ventriculo-peritoneal shunting or intracranial pressure monitoring underwent [18F]flutemetamol PET before (N = 28) or after (N = 22) surgery. Cortical uptake of [18F]flutemetamol was assessed visually by blinded reviewers, and also quantitatively via standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) in specific neocortical regions in relation to either cerebellum or pons reference region: the cerebral cortex of (prospective studies) or surrounding (retrospective studies) the biopsy site, the contralateral homolog, and a calculated composite brain measure. Aβ pathology in the biopsy specimen (standard of truth [SoT]) was measured using Bielschowsky silver and thioflavin S plaque scores, percentage area of grey matter positive for monoclonal antibody to Aβ (4G8), and overall pathology impression. We set out to find (1) which pair(s) of PET SUVR and pathology SoT endpoints matched best, (2) whether quantitative measures of [18F]flutemetamol PET were better for predicting the pathology outcome than blinded image examination (BIE), and (3) whether there was a better match between PET image findings in retrospective vs. prospective studies. Results Of the 24 possible endpoint/SoT combinations, the one with composite-cerebellum SUVR and SoT based on overall pathology had the highest Youden index (1.000), receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (1.000), sensitivity (1.000), specificity (1.000), and sum of sensitivity and specificity for the pooled data as well as for the retrospective and prospective studies separately (2.00, for all 3). The BIE sum of sensitivity and specificity, comparable to that for quantitation, was highest using Bielschowsky

  5. Subjective perception of body sway

    PubMed Central

    Schieppati, M.; Tacchini, E.; Nardone, A.; Tarantola, J.; Corna, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND METHOD—The relation between body sway recorded through a stabilometric platform and the subjective report of steadiness was studied in 20 young and 20 elderly subjects and 20 neuropathic and 20parkinsonian patients standing upright. The trials were performed under two stances (feet apart, feet together) and two visual conditions (eyes open, eyes closed). At the end of each trial, subjects scored their performance on a scale from 10 (complete steadiness) to 0(fall).
RESULTS—In all subjects, independently of the stance conditions, the larger the body sway the smaller the reported score. The function best fitting this relation was linear when sway was expressed on a logarithmic scale. The scoring reproducibility proved high both within and across subjects. Despite the different body sways and scores recorded under the different visual and postural conditions (eyes closed >eyes open, feet together>feet apart) in all groups of subjects and patients, the slopes of the relations between sway and score were broadly superimposable. In the normal subjects, the scores were slightly higher during eyes open than eyes closed trials for corresponding body sways. This was interpreted as a sign of perception of greater stability when vision was allowed. Parkinsonian patients swayed to a similar extent as normal subjects, and their scores were accordingly similar, both with eyes open and eyes closed. Neuropathic patients swayed to a larger extent than normal subjects, and their scores were matched appropriately. Although the slope of their relation with eyes closed was not different from that of normal subjects, with eyes open it was steeper and similar to that with eyes closed, suggesting that these patients did not feel more stable when they could take advantage of vision.
CONCLUSIONS—The subjective evaluation of body sway, irrespective of stance condition, age, neuropathy, and basal ganglia disease, reflects the actual sway, and is inversely proportional

  6. Beta Oscillatory Changes and Retention of Motor Skills during Practice in Healthy Subjects and in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Aaron B.; Moisello, Clara; Lin, Jing; Panday, Priya; Ricci, Serena; Canessa, Andrea; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Quartarone, Angelo; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Isaias, Ioannis U.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Ghilardi, M. Felice

    2017-01-01

    Recently we found that modulation depth of beta power during movement increases with practice over sensory-motor areas in normal subjects but not in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). As such changes might reflect use-dependent modifications, we concluded that reduction of beta enhancement in PD represents saturation of cortical plasticity. A few questions remained open: What is the relation between these EEG changes and retention of motor skills? Would a second task exposure restore beta modulation enhancement in PD? Do practice-induced increases of beta modulation occur within each block? We thus recorded EEG in patients with PD and age-matched controls in two consecutive days during a 40-min reaching task divided in fifteen blocks of 56 movements each. The results confirmed that, with practice, beta modulation depth over the contralateral sensory-motor area significantly increased across blocks in controls but not in PD, while performance improved in both groups without significant correlations between behavioral and EEG data. The same changes were seen the following day in both groups. Also, beta modulation increased within each block with similar values in both groups and such increases were partially transferred to the successive block in controls, but not in PD. Retention of performance improvement was present in the controls but not in the patients and correlated with the increase in day 1 modulation depth. Therefore, the lack of practice-related increase beta modulation in PD is likely due to deficient potentiation mechanisms that permit between-block saving of beta power enhancement and trigger mechanisms of memory formation. PMID:28326029

  7. A Comparison of Chronic Periodontitis in HIV-Seropositive Subjects and the General Population in the Ga-Rankuwa Area, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Khammissa, Razia; Feller, Liviu; Altini, Mario; Fatti, Paul; Lemmer, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The effect of HIV infection on the prevalence and the rate of progression of chronic periodontitis is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare parameters associated with the severity of chronic periodontitis in terms of periodontal probing depths, gingival recession, plaque indexes, and bleeding indexes of HIV-seropositive subjects and healthy age-matched control subjects, and of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy and those not receiving such treatment. Two cohorts of subjects with chronic periodontitis were recruited for this study over a period of six months. There were 30 HIV-seropositive subjects, and 30 control subjects. Periodontal probing depths, gingival marginal recession, plaque indexes, and bleeding indexes were compared by HIV serostatus, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and CD4+ T-cell counts. All participants were black persons between the age of 18 and 45 and were of a similar socioeconomic status and age. The results of this study indicate that chronic periodontitis in HIV-seropositive subjects is similar in terms of mean periodontal probing depth, gingival marginal recession, plaque index, and bleeding index to that in healthy age-matched control subjects, and a low CD4+ T-cell count does not appear to be a risk factor for increased severity of chronic periodontitis. PMID:22970354

  8. Increased resting energy expenditure in subjects with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, N; Katzenellenbogen, S; Nevo, Y

    2004-02-01

    We have studied changes in energy expenditure and body composition in adult males with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, age-matched males with hyperCKemia and age-matched healthy controls. All participants were studied twice, 2-3 years apart. Resting energy expenditure was studied by indirect calorimetry, lean body mass and body fat by dual X-ray absorptiometry, and muscle mass was estimated based on 24-h urinary creatinine excretion. At baseline and 2-3 years later, body fat was significantly higher (P < 0.011 and P < 0.003, respectively) and lean body mass significantly lower (P < 0.024 and P < 0.012, respectively) in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy as compared to subjects with hyperCKemia and healthy controls. Resting energy expenditure, over the study period, increased significantly in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (P < 0.031), but not in patients with hyperCKemia nor in healthy controls. Our study suggests that patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy may have increased energy expenditure relative to healthy subjects. If not met by increased caloric intake, this greater energy expenditure may partially contribute to a further deterioration in their muscle performance.

  9. Echocardiographic Assessment of Cardiac Changes During Normal Pregnancy Among Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Adeyeye, V. O.; Balogun, M. O.; Adebayo, R. A.; Makinde, O. N.; Akinwusi, P. O.; Ajayi, E. A.; Ogunyemi, S. A.; Akintomide, A. O.; Ajayi, E. O.; Adeyeye, A. G.; Ojo, T. O.; Abiodun, O. O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy is a physiological process associated with an increased hemodynamic load and cardiac structural remodeling. Limited echocardiographic information exists on cardiac chambers, left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions, and LV mass during trimesters of normal pregnancy among African women. MATERIALS AND METHODS Echocardiography was done at the beginning of the second trimester, beginning of the third trimester, and middle of the third trimester for 100 normal pregnant women and at one visit for age-matched 100 nonpregnant women. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 software. Analysis of variance was used to compare within trimesters, and a P value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The mean (SD) ages of the patients and controls were 28.20 (±5.91) and 28.35 (±6.06) years, respectively (age range = 19–44 years, P = 0.86). Cardiac chambers, LV systolic function, and LV mass and its index increased significantly during pregnancy. A significant increase in A-wave velocity but slight increase in E-wave velocity and a reduction in tissue e′ velocity at the septal margin but a progressive increase in a′ velocity were also observed (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Cardiac chamber dimensions, LV wall thickness, and mass, most indices of LV systolic and diastolic function, though within normal range, were significantly higher in pregnant than in nonpregnant Nigerian women. PMID:27656092

  10. The vortex formation time to diastolic function relation: assessment of pseudonormalized versus normal filling

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2013-01-01

    In early diastole, the suction pump feature of the left ventricle opens the mitral valve and aspirates atrial blood. The ventricle fills via a blunt profiled cylindrical jet of blood that forms an asymmetric toroidal vortex ring inside the ventricle whose growth has been quantified by the standard (dimensionless) expression for vortex formation time, VFTstandard = {transmitral velocity time integral}/{mitral orifice diameter}. It can differentiate between hearts having distinguishable early transmitral (Doppler E-wave) filling patterns. An alternative validated expression, VFTkinematic reexpresses VFTstandard by incorporating left heart, near “constant-volume pump” physiology thereby revealing VFTkinematic's explicit dependence on maximum rate of longitudinal chamber expansion (E′). In this work, we show that VFTkinematic can differentiate between hearts having indistinguishable E-wave patterns, such as pseudonormal (PN; 0.75 < E/A < 1.5 and E/E′ > 8) versus normal. Thirteen age-matched normal and 12 PN data sets (738 total cardiac cycles), all having normal LVEF, were selected from our Cardiovascular Biophysics Laboratory database. Doppler E-, lateral annular E′-waves, and M-mode data (mitral leaflet separation, chamber dimension) was used to compute VFTstandard and VFTkinematic. VFTstandard did not differentiate between groups (normal [3.58 ± 1.06] vs. PN [4.18 ± 0.79], P = 0.13). In comparison, VFTkinematic for normal (3.15 ± 1.28) versus PN (4.75 ± 1.35) yielded P = 0.006. Hence, the applicability of VFTkinematic for diastolic function quantitation has been broadened to include analysis of PN filling patterns in age-matched groups. PMID:24400169

  11. The anabolic activity of bone tissue, suppressed by disuse, is normalized by brief exposure to extremely low-magnitude mechanical stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, C.; Xu, G.; Judex, S.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally believed that mechanical signals must be large in order to be anabolic to bone tissue. Recent evidence indicates, however, that extremely low-magnitude (<10 microstrain) mechanical signals readily stimulate bone formation if induced at a high frequency. We examined the ability of extremely low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical signals to restore anabolic bone cell activity inhibited by disuse. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to six groups: baseline control, age-matched control, mechanically stimulated for 10 min/day, disuse (hind limb suspension), disuse interrupted by 10 min/day of weight bearing, and disuse interrupted by 10 min/day of mechanical stimulation. After a 28 day protocol, bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia of mechanically stimulated rats increased compared with age-matched control (+97%). Disuse alone reduced BFR (-92%), a suppression only slightly curbed when disuse was interrupted by 10 min of weight bearing (-61%). In contrast, disuse interrupted by 10 min per day of low-level mechanical intervention normalized BFR to values seen in age-matched controls. This work indicates that this noninvasive, extremely low-level stimulus may provide an effective biomechanical intervention for the bone loss that plagues long-term space flight, bed rest, or immobilization caused by paralysis.

  12. Objective Measurement of Daytime Napping, Cognitive Dysfunction and Subjective Sleepiness in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolitho, Samuel J.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Salahuddin, Pierre; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R.; Lewis, Simon J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sleep-wake disturbances and concomitant cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD) contribute significantly to morbidity in patients and their carers. Subjectively reported daytime sleep disturbance is observed in over half of all patients with PD and has been linked to executive cognitive dysfunction. The current study used daytime actigraphy, a novel objective measure of napping and related this to neuropsychological performance in a sample of PD patients and healthy, age and gender-matched controls. Furthermore this study aimed to identify patients with PD who may benefit from pharmacologic and behavioural intervention to improve these symptoms. Methods Eighty-five PD patients and 21 healthy, age-matched controls completed 14 days of wrist actigraphy within two weeks of neuropsychological testing. Objective napping measures were derived from actigraphy using a standardised protocol and subjective daytime sleepiness was recorded by the previously validated Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results Patients with PD had a 225% increase in the mean nap time per day (minutes) as recorded by actigraphy compared to age matched controls (39.2 ± 35.2 vs. 11.5 ± 11.0 minutes respectively, p < 0.001). Significantly, differences in napping duration between patients, as recorded by actigraphy were not distinguished by their ratings on the subjective measurement of excessive daytime sleepiness. Finally, those patients with excessive daytime napping showed greater cognitive deficits in the domains of attention, semantic verbal fluency and processing speed. Conclusion This study confirms increased levels of napping in PD, a finding that is concordant with subjective reports. However, subjective self-report measures of excessive daytime sleepiness do not robustly identify excessive napping in PD. Fronto-subcortical cognitive dysfunction was observed in those patients who napped excessively. Furthermore, this study suggests that daytime actigraphy, a non

  13. Xenon contrast CT-CBF measurements in parkinsonism and normal aging.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Meyer, J S; Kitagawa, Y; Tanahashi, N; Kandula, P; Rogers, R L

    1985-06-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local tissue:blood partition, coefficient (L lambda) values were measured during CT scanning while patients with different types of Parkinson's syndrome (N = 14) inhaled a contrast mixture of 35-37 per cent stable xenon gas in oxygen. Single-compartment analysis fitted to infinity was used to calculate L lambda and LCBF values. Results were compared with results from normal age-matched volunteers (N = 24). Mean hemispheric (p less than 0.05) and subcortical (p less than 0.05) gray matter LCBF values were reduced in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (N = 11), compared to values from age-matched normals. Regionally, LCBF reductions included frontal (p less than 0.001), parietal cortex (p less than 0.05), caudate (p less than 0.05), lentiform nuclei (p less than 0.001) and thalamus (p less than 0.05) reductions. L lambda values were normal. Unilateral tremor and/or rigidity correlated directly with reduced LCBF in contralateral lentiform (p less than 0.01) and caudate (p less than 0.01) nuclei. In postencephalitic Parkinsonism (N = 1) LCBF reductions were diffuse, with normal L lambda values. In the akinetic form of Parkinsonism (N = 1) associated with lacunar infarcts, LCBF and L lambda reductions were patchy. In Parkinsonism following carbon monoxide poisoning (N = 1), LCBF values of gray and white matter were diffusely reduced and L lambda values were reduced in both pallidal regions. When dementia was present together with Parkinsonism (N = 3), LCBF reductions were more diffuse and severe. Dopaminergic deficiency correlated directly with reduced LCBF values, reflecting the severity of Parkinsonism.

  14. Influence of pitch tilts on the perception of gravity-referenced eye level in labyrinthine defective subjects.

    PubMed

    Bringoux, L; Mezey, L E; Faldon, M; Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M

    2007-01-28

    We investigate the role of vestibular information in judging the gravity-referenced eye level (i.e., earth-referenced horizon or GREL) during sagittal body tilt whilst seated. Ten bilateral labyrinthine-defective subjects (LDS) and 10 age-matched controls set a luminous dot to their perception of GREL in darkness, with and without arm pointing. Although judgements were linearly influenced by the magnitude of whole-body tilt, results showed no significant difference between LDS and age-matched controls in the subjective GREL accuracy or in the intra-subject variability of judgement. However, LDS performance without arm pointing was related to the degree of vestibular compensation inferred from another postural study performed with the same patients. LDS did not utilize upper limb input during arm pointing movements as a source of graviceptive information to compensate for the vestibular loss. The data suggest that vestibular cues are not of prime importance in GREL estimates in static conditions. The absence of difference between controls and LDS GREL performance, and the correlation between the postural task and GREL accuracy, indicate that somatosensory input may convey as much graviceptive information required for GREL judgements as the vestibular system.

  15. The role of muscle spindles in ankle movement perception in human subjects with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    van Deursen, R W; Sanchez, M M; Ulbrecht, J S; Cavanagh, P R

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative method to assess muscle spindle function. Three groups of subjects were studied: ten young and healthy subjects, 15 older subjects with diabetic neuropathy, and 15 age-matched controls. All subjects performed an ankle-movement matching task with and without muscle vibration. Input from the plantar cutaneous mechanoreceptors was minimized by using a foot-clamping device. The younger subjects tracked the movement very well, but vibration had a significant effect on their performance (P < 0.001). Similar results were seen in the older control subjects, but they were less successful in tracking movement and slightly less affected by vibration. The neuropathic subjects had the most difficulty tracking, and vibration had only a small but still significant effect on their performance. The interaction between the group and the vibration effect was highly significant (P < 0.001), indicating that the performance of the control subjects changed to a greater degree in the presence of vibration than the performance of the subjects with diabetic neuropathy. Muscle spindles are the primary receptors that are involved in the change in tracking performance when vibration is added during an ankle-movement matching task, and we therefore conclude that the procedure described provides a quantitative evaluation of muscle spindle function. The results demonstrate that diabetic neuropathy degrades muscle sensory function, which may contribute to the impaired balance and unsteadiness of gait that has been observed in diabetic neuropathy.

  16. [Normal aging and cognition].

    PubMed

    Ska, Bernadette; Joanette, Yves

    2006-03-01

    It is now well documented that normal aging modifies the cognitive functioning and most observations suggest that cognition evolves in the direction of deterioration. The more frequently impaired functions are memory, attention and visual-spatial abilities. On the other hand, some abilities seem to increase, such as vocabulary. Considering the aging effect on cognition, questions remain regarding directionality, universality and reversibility. A great variability in aged related impacts is observed among subjects and among cognitive domains. Some individuals evolved more rapidly than others. Some cognitive functions are more affected by aging than others. General and specific factors are hypothesized to explain the aged related cognitive decline. Among them, educational level, health, cognitive style, life style, personality, are likely to modulate the aged related cognitive evolution by influencing attentional resources and cerebral plasticity. Cognitive resources are essential to develop adaptative strategies. During the life span, resources are activated and increased by learning and training. Considering the role of cognitive resources, successful aging is dependent on several conditions : absence of disease leading to a loss of autonomy, maintenance of cognitive and physical activities, and active and social engaged lifestyle.

  17. Subjective Cognitive Impairment Subjects in Our Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Cavallin, Lena; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Kramberger, Milica Gregoric; Winblad, Bengt; Jelic, Vesna; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical challenge in subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) is to identify which individuals will present cognitive decline. We created a statistical model to determine which variables contribute to SCI and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) versus Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnoses. Methods A total of 993 subjects diagnosed at a memory clinic (2007-2009) were included retrospectively: 433 with SCI, 373 with MCI and 187 with AD. Descriptive statistics were provided. A logistic regression model analyzed the likelihood of SCI and MCI patients being diagnosed with AD, using age, gender, Mini-Mental State Examination score, the ratio of β-amyloid 42 divided by total tau, and phosphorylated tau as independent variables. Results The SCI subjects were younger (57.8 ± 8 years) than the MCI (64.2 ± 10.6 years) and AD subjects (70.1 ± 9.7 years). They were more educated, had less medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and frequently normal cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Apolipoprotein E4/E4 homozygotes and apolipoprotein E3/E4 heterozygotes were significantly less frequent in the SCI group (6 and 36%) than in the AD group (28 and 51%). Within the regression model, cardiovascular risk factors, confluent white matter lesions, MTA and central atrophy increased the AD likelihood for SCI subjects. Conclusions SCI patients form a distinct group. In our model, factors suggesting cardiovascular risk, MTA and central atrophy increased the AD likelihood for SCI subjects. PMID:25538726

  18. Normal probability plots with confidence.

    PubMed

    Chantarangsi, Wanpen; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Kiatsupaibul, Seksan; Hayter, Anthony J; Wan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Normal probability plots are widely used as a statistical tool for assessing whether an observed simple random sample is drawn from a normally distributed population. The users, however, have to judge subjectively, if no objective rule is provided, whether the plotted points fall close to a straight line. In this paper, we focus on how a normal probability plot can be augmented by intervals for all the points so that, if the population distribution is normal, then all the points should fall into the corresponding intervals simultaneously with probability 1-α. These simultaneous 1-α probability intervals provide therefore an objective mean to judge whether the plotted points fall close to the straight line: the plotted points fall close to the straight line if and only if all the points fall into the corresponding intervals. The powers of several normal probability plot based (graphical) tests and the most popular nongraphical Anderson-Darling and Shapiro-Wilk tests are compared by simulation. Based on this comparison, recommendations are given in Section 3 on which graphical tests should be used in what circumstances. An example is provided to illustrate the methods.

  19. Wide-ranging alterations in the brain fatty acid complement of subjects with late Alzheimer’s disease as detected by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Nasaruddin, Muhammad Luqman; Hölscher, Christian; Kehoe, Patrick; Graham, Stewart Francis; Green, Brian Desmond

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed lipid metabolism is a well-established feature of human Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The present study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMES) to profile all detectable fatty acid (FA) species present in post-mortem neocortical tissue (Brodmann 7 region). Quantitative targeted analysis was undertaken from 29 subjects (n=15 age-matched controls; n=14 late-stage AD). GC-MS analysis of FAMES detected a total of 24 FAs and of these, 20 were fully quantifiable. The results showed significant and wide ranging elevations in AD brain FA concentrations. A total of 9 FAs were elevated in AD with cis-13,16-docosenoic acid increased most (170%; P=0.033). Intriguingly, docosahexanoic acid (DHA; C22:6) concentrations were elevated (47%; P=0.018) which conflicts with the findings of others (unaltered or decreased) in some brain regions after the onset of AD. Furthermore, our results appear to indicate that subject gender influences brain FA levels in AD subjects (but not in age-matched control subjects). Among AD subjects 7 FA species were significantly higher in males than in females. These preliminary findings pinpoint FA disturbances as potentially important in the pathology of AD. Further work is required to determine if such changes are influenced by disease severity or different types of dementia. PMID:27069549

  20. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  1. Subjective cognitive-affective status following thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Daniela; Ostendorf, Florian; Kopp, Ute A; Kraft, Antje; Bohner, Georg; Nabavi, Darius G; Kathmann, Norbert; Ploner, Christoph J

    2013-02-01

    Previous patient studies suggest that thalamic stroke may yield persistent deficits in several cognitive domains. At present, the subjective dimension and everyday relevance of these impairments is unclear, since many patients with thalamic stroke only show minor changes on physical examination. Here, we have studied subjective consequences of focal thalamic lesions. A sample of 68 patients with a history of ischemic thalamic stroke was examined by using established clinical self-report questionnaires assessing memory, attention, executive functions, emotional status and health-related quality of life. In order to control for general factors related to cerebrovascular disease, self-reports were compared to an age-matched group of 34 patients with a history of transient ischemic attack. Thalamic lesions were co-registered to an atlas of the human thalamus. Lesion overlap and subtraction analyses were used for lesion-to-symptom mapping. When both patient groups were compared, no significant differences were found for either questionnaire. However, when subgroups were compared, patients with infarctions involving the posterior thalamus showed significant emotional disturbances and elevated anxiety levels compared to patients with more anterior lesions. Our findings thus point to the existence of a persistent affective impairment associated with chronic lesions of the posterior thalamus. This syndrome may result from damage to connections between medial pulvinar and extra-thalamic regions involved in affective processing. Our findings suggest that the posterior thalamus may contribute significantly to the regulation of mood.

  2. Advocating for Normal Birth With Normal Clothes

    PubMed Central

    Waller-Wise, Renece

    2007-01-01

    Childbirth educators need to be aware that the clothes they wear when teaching classes send a nonverbal message to class participants. Regardless of who wears the clothing or what is worn, clothes send a message; thus, both the advantages and disadvantages related to clothing choice should be considered. Ultimately, the message should reflect the values of supporting normal birth. For childbirth educators who are allowed to choose their own apparel to wear in their classes, street clothes may be the benchmark for which to strive. This article discusses the many nonverbal messages that clothes convey and provides support for the choice of street clothes as the dress for the professional childbirth educator; thus, “normal clothes to promote normal birth.” PMID:18408807

  3. Normalization in human somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Gijs Joost; Arnedo, Vanessa; Offen, Shani; Heeger, David J; Grant, Arthur C

    2015-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activity in human somatosensory cortex and to test for cross-digit suppression. Subjects received stimulation (vibration of varying amplitudes) to the right thumb (target) with or without concurrent stimulation of the right middle finger (mask). Subjects were less sensitive to target stimulation (psychophysical detection thresholds were higher) when target and mask digits were stimulated concurrently compared with when the target was stimulated in isolation. fMRI voxels in a region of the left postcentral gyrus each responded when either digit was stimulated. A regression model (called a forward model) was used to separate the fMRI measurements from these voxels into two hypothetical channels, each of which responded selectively to only one of the two digits. For the channel tuned to the target digit, responses in the left postcentral gyrus increased with target stimulus amplitude but were suppressed by concurrent stimulation to the mask digit, evident as a shift in the gain of the response functions. For the channel tuned to the mask digit, a constant baseline response was evoked for all target amplitudes when the mask was absent and responses decreased with increasing target amplitude when the mask was concurrently presented. A computational model based on divisive normalization provided a good fit to the measurements for both mask-absent and target + mask stimulation. We conclude that the normalization model can explain cross-digit suppression in human somatosensory cortex, supporting the hypothesis that normalization is a canonical neural computation.

  4. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  5. Absence of a normal cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adolescent males with Asperger syndrome (AS).

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Mark; Turner-Cobb, Julie; Munro-Naan, Zoe; Jessop, David

    2009-08-01

    In addition to abnormalities in social and communication development, a 'need for sameness' and 'resistance to change' are features of autistic spectrum disorders first identified by Kanner in 1943. Our ability to react to change is modulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a feature of which is a dramatic increase in cortisol upon waking, the Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR). This study examined whether the CAR was evident in 20 adolescent males with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and 18 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls (aged 11-16). Whilst a significant CAR was evidenced in the TD control group, this was not the case for those with AS. A normal diurnal decrease in cortisol, however, was evident in both groups. The implication that individuals with AS may have an impaired response to change in their environment due to a refractory HPA axis is discussed.

  6. NORMAL QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER THE COX MAZE PROCEDURE FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION.

    PubMed

    Melby, Spencer J; Zierer, Andreas; Lubahn, Jordon G; Bailey, Marci S; Cox, James L; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J

    2008-05-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation(AF) has been shown in numerous studies to significantly decrease patient quality of life. The Cox-Maze procedure has excellent long-term efficacy in curing AF. However, it is unknown whether this procedure improves long-term quality of life in these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine late quality of life in patients that underwent a lone Cox-Maze procedure. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2003, 163 patients underwent a Cox-Maze procedure for lone AF at our institution. Of these, 68 patients agreed and completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Health Survey. Scores from the age-matched general US population were normalized to a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10 to facilitate comparison. Collected data were compared to the norm-based score for each domain using a one-sample t-test. Four patients were removed from analysis because of AF recurrence. RESULTS: There were 52 males(81%). Mean age was 52.6±9.5 years. Preoperatively, 37 patients(58%) had paroxysmal and 25 patients(39%) had persistent or permanent AF. The mean duration of AF before surgery was 9.8±8.2 years. There was no statistical difference in norm-based scores between the Cox-Maze procedure group and the age-matched general US population in any of the eight health domains at a mean follow-up of 8.7±3.7 years. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the Cox-Maze procedure cures atrial fibrillation in the majority of patients, and that those patients that are cured obtain a normal quality of life as compared to the general population at late follow-up.

  7. The Subject of Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    I work selectively with poststructuralist theories in order to give an account of the subject of policy as a constitutive relationship between social policy and the embodied human subject. Drawing on theories of subjectivity, narrative and governmentality, I articulate possibilities for analysing narrated accounts of experience as a mode of…

  8. Gendered Subjectivities of Spacetimematter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juelskjaer, Malou

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates enactments of human subjectivities with a focus on how subjectivities may be studied if spatiality and temporality are taken up as constituting forces in the production of subjectivities. By reading poststructuralist feminist theorising, agential realism and empirical material diffractively through each other I re-situate…

  9. Normal cardiac function in mice with supraphysiological cardiac creatine levels.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Hernandez, Alejandro; Nienaber, Jeffrey; Mishra, Rajashree; Pinilla, Miguel; Burchette, James; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Jacobs, Danny O

    2014-02-01

    Creatine and phosphocreatine levels are decreased in heart failure, and reductions in myocellular phosphocreatine levels predict the severity of the disease and portend adverse outcomes. Previous studies of transgenic mouse models with increased creatine content higher than two times baseline showed the development of heart failure and shortened lifespan. Given phosphocreatine's role in buffering ATP content, we tested the hypothesis whether elevated cardiac creatine content would alter cardiac function under normal physiological conditions. Here, we report the creation of transgenic mice that overexpress the human creatine transporter (CrT) in cardiac muscle under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac transgene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and human CrT protein expression was documented on Western blots and immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-CrT antibody. High-energy phosphate metabolites and cardiac function were measured in transgenic animals and compared with age-matched, wild-type controls. Adult transgenic animals showed increases of 5.7- and 4.7-fold in the content of creatine and free ADP, respectively. Phosphocreatine and ATP levels were two times as high in young transgenic animals but declined to control levels by the time the animals reached 8 wk of age. Transgenic mice appeared to be healthy and had normal life spans. Cardiac morphometry, conscious echocardiography, and pressure-volume loop studies demonstrated mild hypertrophy but normal function. Based on our characterization of the human CrT protein expression, creatine and phosphocreatine content, and cardiac morphometry and function, these transgenic mice provide an in vivo model for examining the therapeutic value of elevated creatine content for cardiac pathologies.

  10. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  11. Positron brain imaging--normal patterns and asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Finklestein, S.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Correia, J.A.; Buonanno, F.S.; Chang, J.; Brownell, G.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    Regional brain physiology was investigated in 11 normal resting right-handed subjects using positron emission tomography. Cerebral blood flow was studied in all subjects. Cerebral oxygen metabolism was studied in six subjects, and cerebral glucose metabolism was also studied in one subject. In five subjects, physiological activity was higher in left frontotemporal regions than right. These findings may be related to structural cerebral asymmetries or to activation of brain language centers.

  12. Subject position affects EEG magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Rice, Justin K; Rorden, Christopher; Little, Jessica S; Parra, Lucas C

    2013-01-01

    EEG (electroencephalography) has been used for decades in thousands of research studies and is today a routine clinical tool despite the small magnitude of measured scalp potentials. It is widely accepted that the currents originating in the brain are strongly influenced by the high resistivity of skull bone, but it is less well known that the thin layer of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) has perhaps an even more important effect on EEG scalp magnitude by spatially blurring the signals. Here it is shown that brain shift and the resulting small changes in CSF layer thickness, induced by changing the subject's position, have a significant effect on EEG signal magnitudes in several standard visual paradigms. For spatially incoherent high-frequency activity the effect produced by switching from prone to supine can be dramatic, increasing occipital signal power by several times for some subjects (on average 80%). MRI measurements showed that the occipital CSF layer between the brain and skull decreases by approximately 30% in thickness when a subject moves from prone to supine position. A multiple dipole model demonstrated that this can indeed lead to occipital EEG signal power increases in the same direction and order of magnitude as those observed here. These results suggest that future EEG studies should control for subjects' posture, and that some studies may consider placing their subjects into the most favorable position for the experiment. These findings also imply that special consideration should be given to EEG measurements from subjects with brain atrophy due to normal aging or neurodegenerative diseases, since the resulting increase in CSF layer thickness could profoundly decrease scalp potential measurements.

  13. Normalized medical information visualization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Somolinos, Roberto; Castro, Antonio; Velázquez, Iker; Moreno, Oscar; García-Pacheco, José L; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    A new mark-up programming language is introduced in order to facilitate and improve the visualization of ISO/EN 13606 dual model-based normalized medical information. This is the first time that visualization of normalized medical information is addressed and the programming language is intended to be used by medical non-IT professionals.

  14. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  15. Processing Coordinate Subject-Verb Agreement in L1 and L2 Greek

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsa, Maria; Tsimpli, Ianthi M.; Marinis, Theodoros; Stavrou, Melita

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the processing of subject-verb (SV) number agreement with coordinate subjects in pre-verbal and post-verbal positions in Greek. Greek is a language with morphological number marked on nominal and verbal elements. Coordinate SV agreement, however, is special in Greek as it is sensitive to the coordinate subject's position: when pre-verbal, the verb is marked for plural while when post-verbal the verb can be in the singular. We conducted two experiments, an acceptability judgment task with adult monolinguals as a pre-study (Experiment 1) and a self-paced reading task as the main study (Experiment 2) in order to obtain acceptance as well as processing data. Forty adult monolingual speakers of Greek participated in Experiment 1 and a hundred and forty one in Experiment 2. Seventy one children participated in Experiment 2: 30 Albanian-Greek sequential bilingual children and 41 Greek monolingual children aged 10–12 years. The adult data in Experiment 1 establish the difference in acceptability between singular VPs in SV and VS constructions reaffirming our hypothesis. Meanwhile, the adult data in Experiment 2 show that plural verbs accelerate processing regardless of subject position. The child online data show that sequential bilingual children have longer reading times (RTs) compared to the age-matched monolingual control group. However, both child groups follow a similar processing pattern in both pre-verbal and post-verbal constructions showing longer RTs immediately after a singular verb when the subject was pre-verbal indicating a grammaticality effect. In the post-verbal coordinate subject sentences, both child groups showed longer RTs on the first subject following the plural verb due to the temporary number mismatch between the verb and the first subject. This effect was resolved in monolingual children but was still present at the end of the sentence for bilingual children indicating difficulties to reanalyze and integrate

  16. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001), harmony (p < 0.001), and symmetry (p < 0.001) of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  17. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... techniques and neuroimaging, and finding improved treatments and preventions. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus × What research is being ...

  18. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  19. Genital and subjective sexual arousal in postmenopausal women: influence of laboratory-induced hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Brotto, Lori A; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2002-01-01

    The current study was aimed at comparing genital and subjective sexual arousal in pre- and postmenopausal women and exploring the effects of heightened sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity on these parameters. Seventy-one women (25 young and premenopausal, 25 postmenopausal, and 21 age-matched premenopausal women) participated in two counterbalanced sessions consisting of genital arousal assessment with vaginal photoplethysmography and subjective arousal assessment with self-report questionnaires. SNS activity was enhanced using laboratory-induced hyperventilation. Results demonstrated no significant differences between pre- and postmenopausal women on genital and subjective measures of arousal in response to neutral and erotic films. SNS manipulation increased genital excitement only in young, premenopausal women. These data suggest that prior SNS enhancement can differentiate pre- from postmenopausal genital arousal. Data also revealed significant correlations between genital and subjective sexual arousal in older pre- and postmenopausal women, but not in young premenopausal women. These data are the first to directly compare genital-subjective correlations between pre- and postmenopausal women.

  20. Linear and angular control of circular walking in healthy older adults and subjects with cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Adam D; Paquette, Caroline; Jones, Geoffrey Melvill; Block, Edward W; Fletcher, William A; Hu, Bin; Horak, Fay B

    2012-05-01

    Linear and angular control of trunk and leg motion during curvilinear navigation was investigated in subjects with cerebellar ataxia and age-matched control subjects. Subjects walked with eyes open around a 1.2-m circle. The relationship of linear to angular motion was quantified by determining the ratios of trunk linear velocity to trunk angular velocity and foot linear position to foot angular position. Errors in walking radius (the ratio of linear to angular motion) also were quantified continuously during the circular walk. Relative variability of linear and angular measures was compared using coefficients of variation (CoV). Patterns of variability were compared using power spectral analysis for the trunk and auto-covariance analysis for the feet. Errors in radius were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar damage as compared to controls. Cerebellar subjects had significantly larger CoV of feet and trunk in angular, but not linear, motion. Control subjects also showed larger CoV in angular compared to linear motion of the feet and trunk. Angular and linear components of stepping differed in that angular, but not linear, foot placement had a negative correlation from one stride to the next. Thus, walking in a circle was associated with more, and a different type of, variability in angular compared to linear motion. Results are consistent with increased difficulty of, and role of the cerebellum in, control of angular trunk and foot motion for curvilinear locomotion.

  1. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p < 0.001) with normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p < 0.05). The MMP9 level (ng/mL) in WS (147.2 ± 28.5) was not significantly different in comparison with those from age-matched normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing. PMID:27195193

  2. The Eppelsheimer Subject Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gordon

    1971-01-01

    Since 1945, a method of catalog classification, originally devised by H.W. Eppelsheimer for the Mainz City Library, has found wide acceptance. It is a complex of catalogs which combines features of both subject classification and alphabetical subject indexing. (25 references) (Author/NH)

  3. Body as subject1

    PubMed Central

    MEIR, IRIT; PADDEN, CAROL A.; ARONOFF, MARK; SANDLER, WENDY

    2011-01-01

    The notion of subject in human language has a privileged status relative to other arguments. This special status is manifested in the behavior of subjects at the morphological, syntactic, semantic and discourse levels. Here we bring evidence that subjects have privileged status at the lexical level as well, by analyzing lexicalization patterns of verbs in three different sign languages. Our analysis shows that the sublexical structure of iconic signs denoting state of affairs in these languages manifests an inherent pattern of form–meaning correspondence: the signer’s body consistently represents one argument of the verb, the subject. The hands, moving in relation to the body, represent all other components of the event – including all other arguments. This analysis shows that sign languages provide novel evidence in support of the centrality of the notion of subject in human language. It also solves a typological puzzle about the apparent primacy of object in sign language verb agreement, a primacy not usually found in spoken languages, in which subject agreement ranks higher. Our analysis suggests that the subject argument is represented by the body and is part of the lexical structure of the verb. Because it is always inherently represented in the structure of the sign, the subject is more basic than the object, and tolerates the omission of agreement morphology. PMID:23066169

  4. Apparent diffusion coefficient normalization of normal liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Jia-Yin; Li, Jin-Ning; Yang, Da-Wei; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yang, Zheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been reported to be a helpful biomarker for detection and characterization of lesion. In view of the importance of ADC measurement reproducibility, the aim of this study was to probe the variability of the healthy hepatic ADC values measured at 3 MR scanners from different vendors and with different field strengths, and to investigate the reproducibility of normalized ADC (nADC) value with the spleen as the reference organ. Thirty enrolled healthy volunteers received DWI with GE 1.5T, Siemens 1.5T, and Philips 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) systems on liver and spleen (session 1) and were imaged again after 10 to 14 days using only GE 1.5T MR and Philips 3.0T MR systems (session 2). Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and the calculated nADC values (ADCliver/ADCspleen) were statistically evaluated between 2 sessions. In session 1, ADC and nADC values of liver were evaluated for the scanner-related variability by 2-way analysis of variance and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) of ADCs and nADCs of liver were calculated for both 1.5 and 3.0-T MR system. Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and related nADCs between 2 sessions were found to be satisfactory with ICC values of 0.773 to 0.905. In session 1, the liver nADCs obtained from different scanners were consistent (P = 0.112) without any significant difference in multiple comparison (P = 0.117 to >0.99) by using 2-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis of Bonferroni method, although the liver ADCs varied significantly (P < 0.001). nADCs measured by 3 scanners were in good interscanner agreements with ICCs of 0.685 to 0.776. The mean CV of nADCs of both 1.5T MR scanners (9.6%) was similar to that of 3.0T MR scanner (8.9%). ADCs measured at 3 MR scanners with different field strengths and vendors

  5. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  6. Dissociative Mothers' Subjective Experience of Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lynn R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of 54 mothers with a dissociative disorder, 20 mothers with other mental problems, and 20 normal mothers investigated what effect, if any, dissociation had on parenting. When tested on the Subjective Experiences of Parenting Scale, mothers with dissociation presented significantly more negative parenting behavior and attitudes. (CR)

  7. [Subjective sensitivity to noise].

    PubMed

    Belojević, G

    1991-01-01

    It is likely that individual variations in subjectively estimated noise sensitivity influence different social and psychophysiological reactions of people exposed to noise. Subjective noise sensitivity might be a relatively stable personal characteristic. A correlation have been found between high sensitiveness to noise and some medical symptoms (sleep disturbance, nervousness, depression), and worse work performance in noisy environments. An introvert person with neurotic symptoms is more frequently found in people highly sensitive to noise. Testing for subjective sensitivity to noise might be helpful in professional selection and orientation for noisy work-places as well as in housing advising.

  8. Subjective scaling of smooth surface friction.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Scott, S H

    1996-05-01

    1. Six men and four women, 30-51 yr of age, were asked to use the tip of the washed and dried index finger to stroke six different featureless, flat surfaces mounted on a three-dimensional force platform. The six surfaces were rosin-coated glass, glass, satin-finished aluminum, poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) plastic, Teflon, and nyloprint (polyamide plastic). The subjects were requested to indicate where the sensation produced by each surface should be placed on an unidimensional scale represented by an 18cm line labeled at one end by the words "most slippery" and at the other end by the words "most sticky." The coefficients of friction for each surface and for each subject were subsequently assessed by asking each subject to stroke the surfaces as if they were assessing its slipperiness for 5 s. 2. The finger forces normal and tangential to the stroked surfaces were digitized at 250 Hz and stored on a laboratory computer. The ratio of the mean tangential force to the mean perpendicular force during stroking was used to calculate the mean coefficient of kinetic friction. The mean friction for all subjects ranged from 0.43 for the nyloprint surface to 2.79 for the rosin-coated glass. Correlation coefficients calculated between the subjective estimates of friction and the measured coefficients of friction for each subject individually resulted in a mean correlation of 0.85 (n = 10, P < 0.001). 3. These data indicate that subjects can accurately scale relative differences in the friction of macroscopically smooth, flat surfaces, by modulating the tangential force applied to the finger while keeping the normal force relatively constant. The fact that subjects maintained a relatively constant normal force and instead varied the tangential force across different surfaces suggests that receptors sensitive to these tangential forces are important in the perception of smooth surface friction.

  9. The variability problem of normal human walking.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-03-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from a group of normal subjects and to test whether or not the expected differences would prove to be statistically significant. Fifteen healthy male subjects were recorded on video while they walked across two force platforms. Ten kinematic and kinetic parameters were selected and input to a statistical cluster analysis to determine whether or not the 15 subjects could be divided into different 'families' (clusters) of walking strategy. The net joint moments showed a variability corroborating earlier reports. The cluster analysis showed that the 15 subjects could be grouped into two clusters of 5 and 10 subjects, respectively. Five parameters differed significantly, so the group of 5 subjects was characterized by (1) a higher peak knee joint extensor moment, (2) more flexed knee joint angle at heel strike, (3) during the whole stance phase, (4) lower peak knee joint flexor moment and (5) lower ankle joint angle at flat foot position. Calculation of bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint showed a value of 64 N/kg body weight in the K+ group and 55 N/kg in the K- group (p<0.05). It is unknown if differences of similar magnitude contribute to early joint degeneration in some individuals while not in others.

  10. Are Children "Normal"?

    PubMed

    Black, Dan A; Kolesnikova, Natalia; Sanders, Seth G; Taylor, Lowell J

    2013-03-01

    We examine Becker's (1960) contention that children are "normal." For the cross section of non-Hispanic white married couples in