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Sample records for age-matched normal subjects

  1. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  2. Sensorimotor Control of Tracking Movements at Various Speeds for Stroke Patients as Well as Age-Matched and Young Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Di; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2015-01-01

    There are aging- and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control in daily activities, but their mechanisms have not been well investigated. This study explored speed-, aging-, and stroke-induced changes on sensorimotor control. Eleven stroke patients (affected sides and unaffected sides) and 20 control subjects (10 young and 10 age-matched individuals) were enrolled to perform elbow tracking tasks using sinusoidal trajectories, which included 6 target speeds (15.7, 31.4, 47.1, 62.8, 78.5, and 94.2 deg/s). The actual elbow angle was recorded and displayed on a screen as visual feedback, and three indicators, the root mean square error (RMSE), normalized integrated jerk (NIJ) and integral of the power spectrum density of normalized speed (IPNS), were used to investigate the strategy of sensorimotor control. Both NIJ and IPNS had significant differences among the four groups (P<0.01), and the values were ranked in the following order: young controls < age-matched controls

  3. No consistent difference in gray matter volume between individuals with fibromyalgia and age-matched healthy subjects when controlling for affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Michael C; Harris, Richard E; Sundgren, Pia C; Welsh, Robert C; Fernandes, Carlo R; Clauw, Daniel J; Williams, David A

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for the presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p< or =.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={-28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=-.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  4. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  5. Research with Diagnostic Drawings for Normal and Alzheimer's Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Nancy M.

    1994-01-01

    Designed and tested battery of drawing techniques with scoring methodology appropriate for investigation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Variables as a whole and most hypothesized drawing features provided significant discrimination between age-matched controls and AD subjects. Capability to discriminate was also provided by objective measures of use…

  6. The pupillary light reflex in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1981-01-01

    In 19 normal subjects the pupillary reflex to light was studied over a range of stimulus intensities by infrared electronic pupillography and analysed by a computer technique. Increasing stimulus intensity was associated with an increase in direct light reflex amplitude and maximum rate of constriction and redilatation. Latency from stimulus to onset of response-decreased with increasing stimulus intensity. The normal range for each of these parameters is given and the significance of these results in clinical pupillary assessment discussed. PMID:7326222

  7. Event-related brain potentials, bilateral electrodermal activity and Mangina-Test performance in learning disabled/ADHD pre-adolescents with severe behavioral disorders as compared to age-matched normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mangina, C A; Beuzeron-Mangina, J H; Grizenko, N

    2000-07-01

    disabled/ADHD with severe behavioral disorders as opposed to normal subjects. PMID:10828376

  8. Pre-sleep behaviour in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ellis; Lemmens; Parkes

    1995-12-01

    Behaviour in the 2-h period before sleep onset was evaluated in 90 subjects with normal sleep/wake habits using an anonymous self-report questionnaire. This determined the timing of events from the initial preparation for sleep. The nature of the pre-sleep environment, the level of physical activity, and patterns of feeding behaviour were recorded together with self-ratings of tiredness, mood and security. Estimated sleep duration and sleep quality were determined. Ninety of 120 subjects responded. Sleep 'preparatory latency', from the time of initial sleep preparation to sleep onset, was 77 +/- 48 min; bed time to sleep onset time (sleep latency) was 41 +/- 42 min; lights out to sleep onset latency was 26 +/- 45 min. The estimated total sleep time was 7 +/- 1 h. In the pre-sleep period, mean noise and illumination levels were low and environmental temperature rating was at the median point on a very cold-very hot scale (mean scale scores: 23, 28 and 50, respectively). All subjects went to the bathroom before going to bed. Twenty-five percent of normal subjects had a snack or meal in the 2-h period before sleep onset. Sixty percentage recorded setting an alarm, 27% had a bath or shower, 23% checked door locks or windows and 49% read in bed. Nine percent of subjects slept with a cat on the bed. Humans, like other animal species, show a complex behavioural sequence in the 2-h period before falling asleep. A constant environment with limited metabolic activity may predispose to thermoregulatory changes prior to sleep onset. PMID:10607159

  9. Working Memory Processing In Normal Subjects and Subjects with Dyslexia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, S. M.; Lajiness-O'Neill, R.; Weiland, B. J.; Mason, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to determine the neuroanatomical location of working memory (WM) processes. Differences between subjects with dyslexia (SD; n=5) and normal readers (NR; n=5) were studied during two WM tasks. A spatial WM task (SMW) consisted of blocks visually presented in one of 12 positions for 2 s each. Subjects were to determine if the current position matched the position presented 2 slides earlier (N-Back Test). The verbal task (VMW) consisted of presentation of a single letter. The location of cortical activity during SWM in NR (determined with MR-FOCUSS analysis) was in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and right angular gyrus (AG). Similar activation was seen in SD with a slight delay of approximately 20 ms. During VWM activity was seen in LEFT STG and LEFT AG in NR. In contrast for SD, activation was in the RIGHT STG and RIGHT AG. This study demonstrates the possibility to differentiate WM processing in subjects with and without learning disorders.

  10. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  11. Cervical Spine Stenosis Measures in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Ryan T; Maldjian, Catherine; Mattacola, Carl G; Straub, Stephen J; Sitler, Michael R

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare 2 methods of determining cervical spinal stenosis (Torg ratio, space available for the cord [SAC]); determine which of the components of the Torg ratio and the SAC account for more of the variability in the measures; and present standardized SAC values for normal subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DESIGN AND SETTING: The research design consisted of a posttest-only, comparison-group design. The independent variable was method of measurement (Torg ratio and SAC). The dependent variables were Torg ratio and SAC scores. SUBJECTS: Fourteen men (age = 24.4 +/- 2.5 years, height = 181.0 +/- 5.8 cm, weight = 90 +/- 13.5 kg) participated in this study. The C3 to C7 vertebrae were examined in each subject (n = 70). MEASUREMENTS: The Torg ratio was determined by dividing the sagittal spinal-canal diameter by the corresponding sagittal vertebral-body diameter. The SAC was determined by subtracting the sagittal spinal-cord diameter from the corresponding sagittal spinal-canal diameter. The Torg ratio and SAC were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: The SAC ranged from 2.5 to 10.4 mm and was greatest at C7 in 71% (10 of 14) of the subjects. The SAC was least at C3 or C5 in 71% (10 of 14) of the subjects. A Pearson product moment correlation revealed a significant relationship between the Torg ratio and SAC (r =.53, P <.01). Regression analyses revealed the vertebral body (r (2) =.58) accounted for more variability in the Torg ratio than the spinal canal (r (2) =.48). Also, the spinal canal (r (2) =.66) accounted for more variability in the SAC than the spinal cord (r (2) =.23). CONCLUSIONS: The SAC measure relies more on the spinal canal compared with the Torg ratio and, therefore, may be a more effective indicator of spinal stenosis. This is relevant clinically because neurologic injury related to stenosis is a function of the spinal canal and the spinal cord (not the vertebral body). Further research must be done, however, to validate the SAC

  12. Transcranial cerebral oximetry in random normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Mukesh; Stark, Jennifer; Dujovny, Manuel; Alp, M. Serdar; Widman, Ronald; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Near infrared optical spectroscopy is becoming a useful method for monitoring regional cerebral oxygenation status. The method is simple, reliable and noninvasive and the information which it provides is clinically significant in managing a growing number of neurological ailments. Use of this technique has been described previously by numerous authors. In the present study, regional cerebral oxygen saturation was measured at rest in 94 subjects randomly elected from a diverse population of individuals. This sample consisted of 38 males and 65 females, with the age ranging from 18 - 70. There were 68 light-skinned individuals and 35 with darker skin comprising various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was recorded as 67.14 plus or minus 8.84%. The association of the mean regional cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation in various group of individuals in relationship of their age, race, sex and skin color is examined.

  13. Effects of age of serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in cocaine abusers and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J.

    1995-05-01

    We measured the effect of age on serotonin 5-HT2 receptor availability and compared it with the effects on dopamine D2 receptors on 19 chronic cocaine abusers (35.2{plus_minus}9.8 years, range 18-54 years old) and 19 age matched normal controls using positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 N-methylspiperone (NMS). 5-HT2 Receptor availability was measure din frontal (FR), occipital (OC), cingulate (CI) and orbitofrontal (OF) cortices using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest to that in the cerebelium (CB) which is a function of Bmax/Kd. D2 receptor availability in the basal ganglia was measured using the {open_quotes}ratio index{close_quotes} (slope of striatum/CB versus time over 180 min of the scan) which is a function of Bmax. 5-HT2 Receptor availability differed among regions and were as follows: CI>OF>OC>FC.5-HT2 Receptor availability decreased significantly with age. This effect was more accentuated for 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR than in OC(df=1, p<0.025). Striatal dopamine D2 receptors were also found to decrease significantly with age (r=0.63, p<0.007). In a given subject, D2 receptor availability was significantly correlated with 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR (r=0.51, p<0.035) but not in OC. The values for 5-HT2 receptor availability were not different in normal subjects and cocaine abusers. These results document a decline in 5-HT2 and D2 receptors with age and document an association between frontal 5-HT2 and striatal D2 receptor availability. These results did not show any changes in 5-HT2 receptor availability in cocaine abusers as compared to control subjects.

  14. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Moser, K.M.; Hartman, M.T.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A vital factor conditioning the usage of the pulmonary perfusion (Q) scan in the evaluation of patients suspected of pulmonary embolism is the prevalence of abnormal Q scans in subjects free of cardiopulmonary disease. Because this prevalence has not been well defined, we performed Q scans in 80 nonsmoking subjects 18 to 29 yr of age having no known active cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject underwent a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and PA chest roentgenogram, followed by a 6-view Q scan. Two subjects in whom a Q defect was suspected underwent a /sup 133/Xe equilibrium-washout ventilation (V) scan. All Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by 2 experienced readers. Seventy-nine of the 80 Q scans were read as normal. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect. One of the 80 subjects, who had a mild pectus excavatum, had a left upper lobe subsegmental defect, which was not seen on the V scan. Based on the statistical analysis of these data, no more than 3.68% of normal nonsmoking persons in this age group may have a lobar or segmental Q scan defect and no more than 6.77% may have a subsegmental defect (with 95% confidence). Therefore, our study indicated that Q scan defects, particularly lobar or segmental, are rarely present among normal nonsmokers in this age group.

  15. INDUCTIVE CONCEPT FORMATION IN NORMAL AND RETARDED SUBJECTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ELAM, CLAUDE B.

    CONCEPT FORMATION--AS IT IS AFFECTED BY SUBJECTS (NORMAL AND RETARDED), PROBLEMS (SIMULTANEOUS, SUCCESSIVE, AND SIMILARITY-DIFFERENCE), RESPONSES (MANUAL AND VERBAL), REINFORCEMENT (100 PERCENT AND PARTIAL REINFORCEMENT), AND STIMULI--WAS INVESTIGATED. ELEVEN SEPARATE EXPERIMENTS ARE DESCRIBED. IT WAS FOUND THAT--(1) CONCEPT ATTAINMENT IS…

  16. Association of hypometabolism and amyloid levels in aging, normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Stephen D.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jordan, Lennon; Kantarci, Kejal; Boeve, Bradley; Jack, Clifford R.; Knopman, David; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the relationship of amyloid, seen on Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, and metabolism, seen on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, in normal subjects to better understand pathogenesis and biomarker selection in presymptomatic subjects. Methods: Normal participants (aged 70–95 years; 600 with PiB-PET, FDG-PET, and MRI) were included. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation and subcategorized participants into amyloid-negative (<1.4), high-normal (1.4–1.5), positive (1.5–2.0), and markedly positive (>2.0) PiB standardized uptake value ratio groups representing different levels of amyloid brain load. Associations with metabolism were assessed in each group. Relationships with APOE ε4 carriage were evaluated. Results: Hypometabolism in “Alzheimer disease (AD)-signature” regions was strongly associated with PiB load. Hypometabolism was greater with more positive PiB levels. Additional, more-diffuse cortical hypometabolism was also found to be associated with PiB, although less so. No hypermetabolism was seen in any subset. No significant incremental hypometabolism was seen in APOE-positive vs -negative subjects. Conclusions: Hypometabolism in PiB-positive, cognitively normal subjects in a population-based cohort occurs in AD-signature cortical regions and to a lesser extent in other cortical regions. It is more pronounced with higher amyloid load and supports a dose-dependent association. The effect of APOE ε4 carriage in this group of subjects does not appear to modify their hypometabolic “AD-like” neurodegeneration. Consideration of hypometabolism associated with amyloid load may aid trials of AD drug therapy. PMID:24793183

  17. Aspartame metabolism in normal adults, phenylketonuric heterozygotes, and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Filer, L J; Stegink, L D

    1989-01-01

    This study reviews clinical studies testing the effects of various doses of aspartame on blood levels of phenylalanine, aspartate, and methanol in normal subjects and known phenylketonuric heterozygotes. The effect of aspartame on the phenylalanine-to-large neutral amino acid ratio under various feeding situations is shown. The clinical studies of aspartame in diabetic subjects are limited to observations of its effects on blood levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, and glucagon. These studies clearly demonstrate the safety of this high-intensity sweetener for use by humans. PMID:2653751

  18. Mucociliary clearance mechanism in smoking and nonsmoking normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Isawa, T.; Teshima, T.; Hirano, T.; Ebina, A.; Konno, K.

    1984-03-01

    Mucociliary clearance mechanisms were evaluated in 17 normal subjects visually and qualitatively by radioaerosol inhalation cinescintigraphy of the lung, and quantitatively by calculating the following indices: (a) overall or regional lung retention ratio; (b) airway deposition ratio; (c) airway retention ratio; (d) airway clearance efficiency; and (e) alveolar deposition ratio. The inhaled aerosol deposited homogeneously throughout the lungs, and mucus transport was always cephalad in direction and constant in velocity, although a temporary stasis of mucus was seen in smokers. Overall lung retention ratio was significantly smaller and airway deposition ratio was significantly larger in the smokers than in nonsmokers, but there was no difference between the groups in airway retention ratio or airway clearance efficiency. There was an inverse relationship between alveolar deposition ratio and cigarette consumption. Mucociliary clearance mechanisms were well maintained in the normal subjects, but in the smokers inhaled aerosol tended to deposit more proximally.

  19. Spatial bias: attentional and intentional influence in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R L; Adair, J C; Na, D; Williamson, D J; Heilman, K M

    1997-01-01

    Normal subjects often demonstrate a spatial bias on line bisection (LB) and cancellation (CA) tasks. We wanted to learn if horizontal spatial bias found in normal subjects may be dissociable into sensory-attentional (ATT) and motor-intentional (INT) subgroups similar to those described in brain-injured patients with spatial neglect. We studied the influence of ATT and INT factors on the spatial bias observed in normal subjects using a new technique that uncouples the direction of action from the direction of attention. This technique also allowed us to test both LB and CA tasks on the same individuals. Our results show that ATT bias significantly influenced performance on an LB task, whereas performance on a CA task was influenced by biases in both the ATT and INT systems. In addition, the overall bias on these two tasks reflects an interaction between the biases induced by the ATT and INT systems that may be in the same or different directions. PMID:9008524

  20. Circulating Levels of Irisin in Hypopituitary and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Bello, Lara; Pértega-Diaz, Sonia; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Outeiriño-Blanco, Elena; Eiras-Leal, Raquel; Varela-Rodriguez, Bárbara; Juiz-Valiña, Paula; Pérez-Fontán, Miguel; Cordido, María; Cordido, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Context The recently identified myokine irisin conveys some of the benefits of exercise. Hypopituitarism with adult growth hormone deficiency (HP) is a situation characterized by decreased GH secretion and an altered body composition. Objective Our aim was to study the skeletal muscle hormone irisin in HP, and compare the results with a similar group of normal subjects. Participants and Methods Seventeen HP patients and fifty-one normal subjects of similar age and sex were studied. The diagnosis of GH deficiency was confirmed by the presence of pituitary disease and a peak GH secretion below 3 μg/L after an insulin tolerance test. The patients were adequately treated for all pituitary hormone deficits, except for GH. Fasting serum irisin was measured with an enzyme immunoassay, and HOMA-IR, QUICKI and HOMA-β were calculated. Results Fasting irisin levels (ng/ml) were similar in normal [208.42 (168.44–249.23)] and HP patients [195.13 (178.44–241.44)]. In the control group there were moderate significant positive correlations between irisin and BMI, waist circumference, leptin, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, triglycerides, and cholesterol. In the control group there were moderate significant negative correlations between irisin and IGF-I and QUICKI. In the hypopituitary group there were moderate significant positive correlations between irisin and body fat and HOMA-β. Conclusions We found similar irisin levels in GH deficiency hypopituitary patients when compared with normal subjects. The correlation between irisin and adiposity related factors suggests that that in the case of this clinical model, irisin is regulated by adiposity and not by GH. PMID:27472279

  1. Laryngeal penetration during deglutition in normal subjects of various ages.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Alicia; Logemann, Jeri; Rademaker, Alfred; Pauloski, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    This study examined the frequency of penetration of liquid, paste, and masticated materials into the airway during videofluoroscopic studies of normal swallow in 98 normal subjects who were from 20 to 94 years of age. The purposes of the study were to define frequency and level of penetration using the penetration-aspiration scale as a result of age, bolus volume, viscosity, and gender, and to describe the body's sensorimotor response to the penetration based on audible coughs or throat clearing on the audio channel of each videotaped fluoroscopic study. Frequencies of penetration were defined in relation to bolus volume, age, gender, and bolus viscosity from swallows of 1, 3, 5, and 10 ml and cup-drinking of thin liquids; 3 ml of pudding; (1/4) of a Lorna Doone cookie; and a bite of an apple. Results showed that penetrations were significantly more frequent after age 50 and thick viscosities penetrated only in subjects age 50 and over. For persons under 50, 7.4% of swallows exhibited penetration, while for people age 50 and over, 16.8% of swallows showed penetration. Significantly more penetration occurred on larger liquid boluses. There was no relationship between gender and frequency of penetration. None of the subjects that penetrated showed a sensorimotor response to the penetration, which may relate to the relatively shallow depth of the penetration. PMID:17216388

  2. Characterization of fractures subjected to normal and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Min-Kwang

    Results from a series of laboratory experiments to determine fracture specific stiffness, for a fracture subjected to shear and normal stress, are presented and analyzed. The experimental work focuses on the determination of relations between normal and shear fracture specific stiffness and between spatial distribution of fracture specific stiffness and fluid flow through the fracture The ratio of shear to normal fracture specific stiffness is experimentally investigated on a fracture subjected to shear as well as normal stress. Synthetic fractures made of gypsum and lucite were prepared with different fracture surface conditions: either well-mated or non-mated. For well-mated fracture surfaces, asperities were created by casting gypsum against sandpaper. A block of gypsum was cast against the sandpaper and then a second block was cast against the first block such that the two contact surfaces were well-mated. The surface roughness was controlled by using the sandpapers with different average grit size. Non-mated fracture surfaces were fabricated with two lucite blocks that were polished (lucite PL) or sand-blasted (lucite SB) along their contact surface. In the experiments, each specimen was subjected to normal and shear loading while the fracture was probed with transmitted and reflected compressional and shear waves. Shear and normal fracture specific stiffnesses were calculated using the displacement discontinuity theory. For non-mated fractures, the stiffness ratio was not sensitive to the application of shear stress and, as normal stress increased, approached a theoretical ratio which was determined assuming that the transmission of compressional and shear waves was equal. The stiffness ratio obtained from well-mated fractures ranged from 0.5 to 1.4, which deviated from the conventional assumption that shear and normal fracture specific stiffness are equal. The stiffness ratio increased with increasing surface roughness and with increasing shear stress. For

  3. Urinary and metabolic clearances of arginine vasopressin in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, A.M.; Steciak, E.

    1986-08-01

    Synthetic arginine vasopressin (AVP) was infused into 11 hydrated normal subjects at five different infusion rates ranging from 10 to 350 U kg min . Each infusion rate was continued for 1 h, and urinary determinations were made on the 30- to 60-min specimens during which time there was no further rise in plasma AVP. Urinary AVP concentrations ( U/ml) and excretion rates ( U/min) increased linearly with increasing infusion rates, and the concentration of AVP in urine increased 120 times more rapid than plasma. Urinary and metabolic clearances of AVP also increased linearly with the maximum urinary clearance being 60.6% of the creatinine clearance. The total metabolic clearance of AVP (including urinary clearance) was 17.8 times that of the urinary clearance of AVP alone. These data clarify the relationships between plasma and urinary AVP in normal hydrated subjects during AVP infusion under steady-state conditions and emphasize the potential advantage of measuring urinary AVP as a monitor of endogenous AVP secretion. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  4. Centrifuge modeling of buried continuous pipelines subjected to normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Majid; Rojhani, Mahdi; Galandarzadeh, Abbas; Takada, Shiro

    2013-03-01

    Seismic ground faulting is the greatest hazard for continuous buried pipelines. Over the years, researchers have attempted to understand pipeline behavior mostly via numerical modeling such as the finite element method. The lack of well-documented field case histories of pipeline failure from seismic ground faulting and the cost and complicated facilities needed for full-scale experimental simulation mean that a centrifuge-based method to determine the behavior of pipelines subjected to faulting is best to verify numerical approaches. This paper presents results from three centrifuge tests designed to investigate continuous buried steel pipeline behavior subjected to normal faulting. The experimental setup and procedure are described and the recorded axial and bending strains induced in a pipeline are presented and compared to those obtained via analytical methods. The influence of factors such as faulting offset, burial depth and pipe diameter on the axial and bending strains of pipes and on ground soil failure and pipeline deformation patterns are also investigated. Finally, the tensile rupture of a pipeline due to normal faulting is investigated.

  5. 99Tcm-MAG3 renogram deconvolution in normal subjects and in normal functioning kidney grafts.

    PubMed

    González, A; Puchal, R; Bajén, M T; Mairal, L; Prat, L; Martin-Comin, J

    1994-09-01

    This study provides values of transit times obtained by 99Tcm- mercaptoacetyl triglycine (99Tcm-MAG3) renogram deconvolution for both normal subjects and kidney graft recipients. The analysis included 50 healthy kidney units from 25 volunteers and 28 normal functioning kidney grafts. The parameters calculated for the whole kidney (WK) and for the renal parenchyma (P) were: mean transit time (MTT) and times at 20% (T20) and 80% (T80) of renal retention function initial height. For healthy kidneys the WK MTT was 174 +/- 27 s and P MTT 148 +/- 22 s. The WK T20 values were 230 +/- 33 s and P T20 231 +/- 34 s. The WK T80 was 108 +/- 19 s and P T80 106 +/- 12 s. Whole kidney and parenchymal values of transit times for normal functioning kidney grafts do not present significant differences with respect to healthy kidneys. PMID:7816379

  6. Dietary induced subclinical vitamin K deficiency in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, G; Sadowski, J A; O'Brien, M E

    1993-01-01

    A subclinical vitamin K deficiency was induced in 32 healthy subjects (four groups of eight males and females) aged 20-40 and 60-80 yr residing in the Metabolic Research Unit of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Volunteers were initially fed (4 d) a baseline-period diet containing the recommended daily allowance for vitamin K which is equivalent to 80 micrograms/d of phylloquinone (vitamin K1). During the baseline period various parameters of vitamin K nutritional status were monitored. The baseline period was followed by a 13-d depletion period during which the subjects were fed a very low vitamin K1 diet (approximately 10 micrograms/d). After depletion, the subjects entered a 16-d repletion period (four stages lasting 4 d each) during which time they were repleted with 5, 15, 25, and 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day. Vitamin K1 depletion dramatically and significantly decreased plasma vitamin K1 levels (P < 0.0001) in both elderly and young groups to values 13-18% of day 1 (elderly 0.22 nM, young 0.14 nM). Repleting the subjects with up to 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day failed, in the case of the young subjects, to bring plasma vitamin K1 levels back into the normal range. Dietary vitamin K1 restriction induced different responses in the urinary excretion of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid between the young and the elderly subjects with values decreasing significantly (P < 0.03) in the young while remaining unchanged in the elderly. The vitamin K1 depletion period had no significant effect on either prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, or Factor VII and protein C (as determined by antigenic and functional assays). By using a monoclonal antibody, decarboxy prothrombin was found to increase slightly but significantly in both groups (P < 0.05) as a consequence of the low vitamin K1 diet. This study clearly shows that a diet low in vitamin K1 can result in a functional subclinical deficiency of vitamin K

  7. Analysis of the Electroretinogram in normals and pathological subjects+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasi, M.; Andaloro, G.; Barraco, R.; Bellomonte, L.; Brai, M.

    2000-04-01

    The Electroretinogram (ERG) is a composite signal reflecting the complex response of the retinal different parts. It is known that the rod and cone systems contribute to this response. The most used method to analyze the data is the study of the b-wave amplitude and peak time change against the intensity of the stimulus theoretically investigated by an approach based on a simplified picture of a single responding photoreceptorial population in scotopic or photopic condition. The aim of the present paper is to investigate the dependence of the amplitude and the implicit time of the a- and b-wave of the ERG on the input luminance level to obtain hints devoted to recognize the different contribution to the response of the two systems, rods and cones, in normals and pathological subjects.

  8. Regulation of sphingolipid synthesis in renal cells from normal subjects and familial hypercholesterolemic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Clarke, K.S.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of lipoproteins on sphingolipid metabolism in proximal renal tubular cells from normal subjects and low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) subjects (TB,BA,DD,VH) employing (/sup 3/H)serine and (/sup 3/H)glucose. The results were: normal cells - 1) LDL (25 ..mu..g/ml) decreased the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide and LacCer about 2-3 fold; 2) the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingomyelin was also reduced 2 fold by LDL; 3) LDL modified by reductive methylation of lysine residues (which is not recognized by the LDL receptor) did not decrease the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingolipids; FH cells - In contrast to normal cells, LDL (100 ..mu..g/ml) stimulated both the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose into LacCer and of (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide, LacCer and sphingomyelin 2-3 fold in cells lacking LDL receptors. The authors conclude that the endogenous synthesis of sphingolipids in normal renal cells may be regulated by the LDL receptor. Lack of LDL receptor, as in FH cells, results in increased sphingolipid synthesis and storage of LacCer.

  9. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  10. Correlations of leuko-araiosis with cerebral atrophy and perfusion in elderly normal subjects and demented patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, J; Meyer, J S; Ichijo, M; Kobari, M; Terayama, Y; Weathers, S

    1993-01-01

    CT images of leuko-araiosis in brain slices were quantified according to volumes of reduced Hounsfield units in frontal periventricular white matter in groups of elderly patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 23) and dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT, n = 16). Volumes of leuko-araiosis, estimates of atrophic cerebral tissue, and local cerebral perfusion utilising inhalation of xenon gas as the indicator were correlated on the same CT slices. Ratios of frontal leuko-araiosis to total brain tissue volume were similar for patients with MID and DAT (mean 5.7 (SD 2.1)% v 6.5 (3.2%)), and both were significantly greater than ratios in elderly normal volunteers (3.1(1.3)%, 0 < 0.001). Cerebral atrophy (measured as the ratio of volumes of cerebrospinal fluid to total brain area) for DAT patients was 17.0 (6.7)%, which was greater than for MID patients (12.5 (5.4)%; p < 0.05) and both types of patients showed more cerebral atrophy than did age matched, elderly normal subjects. Cerebral perfusion was decreased in all regions measured in patients with MID and DAT compared with elderly normal subjects. Multi variate regression analyses correlated frontal leuko-araiosis with reductions of local cerebral blood flow in subcortical grey matter (p < 0.025) in patients with vascular dementia but not in those with DAT. These quantitative measures implicate decreased perfusion due to atherosclerosis in territories supplied by the deep penetrating cerebral arteries in the pathogenesis of leuko-araiosis in patients with vascular dementia, but suggest a different pathogenesis for leuko-araiosis in Alzheimer's disease. Images PMID:8437007

  11. Modeling Longitudinal Data Containing Non-Normal Within Subject Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan; Glenn, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) human research program is to advance safe human spaceflight. This involves conducting experiments, collecting data, and analyzing data. The data are longitudinal and result from a relatively few number of subjects; typically 10 – 20. A longitudinal study refers to an investigation where participant outcomes and possibly treatments are collected at multiple follow-up times. Standard statistical designs such as mean regression with random effects and mixed–effects regression are inadequate for such data because the population is typically not approximately normally distributed. Hence, more advanced data analysis methods are necessary. This research focuses on four such methods for longitudinal data analysis: the recently proposed linear quantile mixed models (lqmm) by Geraci and Bottai (2013), quantile regression, multilevel mixed–effects linear regression, and robust regression. This research also provides computational algorithms for longitudinal data that scientists can directly use for human spaceflight and other longitudinal data applications, then presents statistical evidence that verifies which method is best for specific situations. This advances the study of longitudinal data in a broad range of applications including applications in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

  12. Effects of Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscle Training in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Hajime; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and expiratory muscle training (EMT) on ventilatory muscle strength, pulmonary function and responses during exercise testing. Young healthy women were randomly assigned to 3 groups: IMT (n=16); EMT (n=16); or untrained normal controls (NC, n=8). Subjects in the IMT and EMT groups trained for 15 minutes twice daily over 2 weeks at loads of 30% maximal inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength, respectively. Ventilatory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength; PImax and PEmax, respectively), pulmonary function and progressive exercise testing was performed. Both PImax and PEmax increased in the IMT group, and PEmax increased in the EMT group. Neither trained group demonstrated any change in pulmonary function or peak values during exercise testing. In the IMT group, exercise-induced increases in heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2/kg) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) decreased with training, as did increases in VO2/kg and RPE in the EMT group. The increased ventilatory muscle strength in both IMT and EMT groups might improve ventilatory efficacy during exercise, and increased inspiratory muscle strength might facilitate oxygen delivery through improved circulatory responses. PMID:25792941

  13. Monitoring eustachian tube opening: preliminary results in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Mondain, M; Vidal, D; Bouhanna, S; Uziel, A

    1997-10-01

    Sonometry studies the changes of sound intensities induced by the eustachian tube opening in the external meatus when a constant sound is applied in the nasal cavity. The function of the eustachian tube is not disturbed by the test procedure. An original portable device with a high signal-to-noise ratio has been developed in our lab. This device was able to detect a 6-dB sound pressure level (SPL) signal in a 100-dB SPL noise. Long-duration recordings of auditory tubal openings could be performed. This work presents the data found in normal subjects. One hundred twenty healthy ears were recorded. Eustachian tube openings were detected in 62.5% of the cases. Of the 1777 openings recorded, the average opening duration was 430 ms +/- 183 ms. The average number of eustachian tube openings was 21.7+/-16.4 (for 15 minutes). All swallowing did not necessary open the eustachian tube. This work shows that this new device allows long-duration recording of eustachian tube function in everyday life conditions. PMID:9331323

  14. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  15. Comparison of the nerve fiber layer of type 2 diabetic patients without glaucoma with normal subjects of the same age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Takis, Alexandros; Alonistiotis, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Nikolaos; Papaconstantinou, Dimitris; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Background The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 was compared to normal subjects of similar age and sex, having first excluded any risk factors for glaucoma. The correlation between the RNFL thickness and the severity of diabetic retinopathy was investigated at its primary stages and with other ocular and diabetic parameters. Methods A prospective, case series study was carried out. Twenty-seven diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, 24 diabetic patients with mild retinopathy, and 25 normal, age-matched subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and imaging with scanning laser polarimetry for the evaluation of the RNFL. Multivariate analysis was applied in order to investigate the correlation between RNFL and diabetic parameters, such as age, duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin; and ocular parameters, such as cup to disc ratio, levels of normal intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness. Results The mean inferior average of RNFL and the temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal standard deviation were statistically significantly lower in both diabetic groups, and the nerve fiber index was higher (P=0.04) compared to the normal group. There was no statistically significant difference between the diabetic groups. The factor analysis showed no significant correlation between the RNFL and the previously mentioned diabetic and ocular parameters. Conclusion The existence of diabetes should be seriously considered in evaluating the results of scanning laser polarimetry. Multivariate analysis for RNFL was used for the first time. PMID:24596452

  16. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  17. Sham-feeding decreases cardiac output in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H B; Jensen, E W; Madsbad, S; Nielsen, S L; Burcharth, F; Christensen, N J

    1992-07-01

    The cardiovascular effect of sham-feeding was measured in seven healthy non-obese human subjects by the Fick principle using the carbon dioxide rebreathing method. The subjects were resting in the sitting position and were exposed to the sight and smell but not the taste of a breakfast meal. Cardiac output decreased significantly from a mean value of 4.0 1 min-1 to 3.5 1 min-1 during sham-feeding (Friedman, P = 0.004). The cardiac output returned to basal values in all seven subjects when the sensory stimulus was removed. The decrease in cardiac output was due to a decreased stroke volume, whereas heart rate and blood pressure did not change. The mechanism of the decrease in cardiac output during sham-feeding remains to be established. PMID:1505165

  18. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  19. Absorption and disposition kinetics of amoxicillin in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Arancibia, A; Guttmann, J; González, G; González, C

    1980-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of amoxicillin were studied in healthy fasted subjects afqer both oral and intravenous administration of a single 500-mg dose. Serum levels and urinary excretion rates were determined at various time intervals by a microbiological method. The conventional two-compartment model with elimination occurring from the central compartment was used to analyze the data. Mean values were 3.40 h-1 for alpha and 0.68 h-1 for beta. Distribution constants kappa 12 and kappa 21 were 0.92 h-1 and 1.99 h-1, respectively. The rate constant for elimination from the central compartment, kappa 10, was 1.16 h-1. The volume of distribution was 20.2 liters (0.30 liter/kg), and the serum clearance was 13.3 liters/h. The absorption rate constant, kappa a, in the oral study, calculated by the Loo-Riegelman method, was 1.02 h-1, and the absorption half-life was 0.72 h. Absolute bioavailability after the oral dose was determined by comparing both the areas under the curve (AUC) and fractions of the antibiotic excreted unchanged in the urine. The AUC after oral administration was 77.4% of the intravenous AUC. On the other hand, recovery from the urine was 43.4% after the oral dose and 57.4% after the intravenous dose, indicating 76.5% bioavailability. PMID:7387142

  20. Pharmacological enhancement of memory or cognition in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Gary; Cox, Conor D.; Gall, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of expanding memory or cognitive capabilities above the levels in high functioning individuals is a topic of intense discussion among scientists and in society at large. The majority of animal studies use behavioral endpoint measures; this has produced valuable information but limited predictability for human outcomes. Accordingly, several groups are pursuing a complementary strategy with treatments targeting synaptic events associated with memory encoding or forebrain network operations. Transcription and translation figure prominently in substrate work directed at enhancement. Notably, the question of why new proteins would be needed for a now-forming memory given that learning-driven synthesis presumably occurred throughout the immediate past has been largely ignored. Despite this conceptual problem, and some controversy, recent studies have reinvigorated the idea that selective gene manipulation is a plausible route to enhancement. Efforts to improve memory by facilitating synaptic encoding of information have also progressed, in part due of breakthroughs on mechanisms that stabilize learning-related, long-term potentiation (LTP). These advances point to a reductionistic hypothesis for a diversity of experimental results on enhancement, and identify under-explored possibilities. Cognitive enhancement remains an elusive goal, in part due to the difficulty of defining the target. The popular view of cognition as a collection of definable computations seems to miss the fluid, integrative process experienced by high functioning individuals. The neurobiological approach obviates these psychological issues to directly test the consequences of improving throughput in networks underlying higher order behaviors. The few relevant studies testing drugs that selectively promote excitatory transmission indicate that it is possible to expand cortical networks engaged by complex tasks and that this is accompanied by capabilities not found in normal animals

  1. Regional distributions of brain glutamate and glutamine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Goryawala, Mohammed Z; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Maudsley, Andrew A

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) play an important role in neuronal regulation and are of value as MRS-observable diagnostic biomarkers. In this study the relative concentrations of these metabolites have been measured in multiple regions in the normal brain using a short-TE whole-brain MRSI measurement at 3 T combined with a modified data analysis approach that used spatial averaging to obtain high-SNR spectra from atlas-registered anatomic regions or interest. By spectral fitting of high-SNR spectra this approach yielded reliable measurements across a wide volume of the brain. Spectral averaging also demonstrated increased SNR and improved fitting accuracy for the sum of Glu and Gln (Glx) compared with individual voxel fitting. Results in 26 healthy controls showed relatively constant Glu/Cr and Gln/Cr throughout the cerebrum, although with increased values in the anterior cingulum and paracentral lobule, and increased Gln/Cr in the superior motor area. The deep gray-matter regions of thalamus, putamen, and pallidum show lower Glu/Cr compared with cortical white-matter regions. Lobar measurements demonstrated reduced Glu/Cr and Gln/Cr in the cerebellum as compared with the cerebrum, where white-matter regions show significantly lower Glu/Cr and Gln/Cr as compared with gray-matter regions across multiple brain lobes. Regression analysis showed no significant effect of gender on Glu/Cr or Gln/Cr measurement; however, Glx/Cr ratio was found to be significantly negatively correlated with age in some lobar brain regions. In summary, this methodology provides the spectral quality necessary for reliable separation of Glu and Gln at 3 T from a single MRSI acquisition enabling generation of regional distributions of metabolites over a large volume of the brain, including cortical regions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27351339

  2. Analysis of abstract and concrete word processing in persons with aphasia and age-matched neurologically healthy adults using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Kiran, Swathi

    2014-08-01

    The concreteness effect occurs in both normal and language-disordered populations. Research suggests that abstract and concrete concepts elicit differing neural activation patterns in healthy young adults, but this is undocumented in persons with aphasia (PWA). Three PWA and three age-matched controls were scanned using fMRI while processing abstract and concrete words. Consistent with current theories of abstract and concrete word processing, abstract words elicited activation in verbal areas, whereas concrete words additionally activated multimodal association areas. PWA show greater differences in neural activation than age-matched controls between abstract and concrete words, possibly due to an exaggerated concreteness effect. PMID:23548150

  3. Pulmonary performance of elderly normal subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exposed to 0. 3 ppm nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Utell, M.J.; Bauer, M.A.; Smeglin, A.M.; Frampton, M.W.; Cox, C.; Speers, D.M.; Gibb, F.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Symptoms and changes in pulmonary function of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and elderly normal subjects, induced by a 4-h exposure to 0.3 ppm NO2, were investigated using a double-blind, crossover design with purified air. The 5-day experimental protocol required approximately 2 wk with at least a 5-day separation between randomized 4-h exposures to either NO2 or air which included several periods of exercise. Over a 2-yr period, COPD subjects, all with a history of smoking, consisting of 13 men and 7 women (mean age of 60.0 yr) and 20 elderly normal subjects of comparable age and sex were evaluated. During intermittent light exercise, COPD subjects demonstrated progressive decrements in FVC and FEV1 compared with baseline with 0.3 ppm NO2, but not with air. Differences in percent changes from baseline data (air-NO2) showed an equivocal reduction in FVC by repeated measures of analysis of variance and cross-over t tests (p less than 0.10). Subgroup analyses suggested that responsiveness to NO2 decreased with severity of COPD; in elderly normal subjects, NO2-induced reduction in FEV1 was greater among smokers than never-smokers. A comparison of COPD and elderly normal subjects also revealed distinctions in NO2-induced responsiveness.

  4. Cephalometric Appraisal of Tongue and Related Soft Tissues in Normal and Open Bite Subjects at Rest

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Usha; Akhare, Pankaj J; Mute, Bhumika K

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the tongue position of normal and open bite subjects at rest and to study if there is any difference in the hyoid bone and posterior pharyngeal wall positions in normal and open bite subjects. Materials and Methods: Sample size consisted of 48 individuals with 24 subjects having normal occlusion and 24 subjects having open bite malocclusion within the age range of 16 to 25 y. Standardized Lateral cephalograms were taken for all the subjects. The subjects were asked to protrude their tongue as much as possible. The dorsum of the tongue was then coated with a palatable suspension of Barium Sulphate (MICROBAR). The subjects were asked to swallow on command, after 10 sec of the swallow, lateral cephalograms were taken. Statistical Analysis: t-test Results: The antero-posterior relationship of maxilla and mandible to the cranial base is normal in both the groups. The open bite subjects had a larger over jet and as compared to the normal subjects, and had steeper mandibular planes.It was also seen that as the total tongue occupancy area increased so did the partial tongue occupancy area. Conclusion: A significant positive correlation was found between the horizontal position of the tongue tip and the lower incisor position in the normal group, also for the ratio of total tongue area to total oral area & the ratio of upper tongue area to the anterior oral area in the normal and openbite groups. There was no difference in the position of the tongue, hyoid bone and posterior wall in the normal and openbite groups. The mandibular plane angle and palatal plane - mandibular plane angles were found to be larger in the openbite subjects as compared to normal subjects. Supra-eruption of the maxillary molars was seen in the openbite group leading to a downward and backward rotation of the mandible. The maxillary and mandibular incisors were more proclinated in the normal as well as openbite groups. PMID:25738079

  5. Atrial electromechanical sequence in normal subjects and patients with DDD pacemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.; Xiao, H. B.; Fujimoto, S.; Gibson, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of right atrial appendage pacing on atrial electromechanical interrelations in patients with DDD pacemakers. DESIGN--Prospective study by M mode echocardiogram, Doppler echocardiogram, and apexcardiogram, along with electrocardiogram and phonocardiogram. SETTING--Tertiary cardiac referral centre. PATIENTS--20 patients with DDD pacemakers and 20 age matched normal controls. RESULTS--Age, RR interval, atrial size, left ventricular size, and fractional shortening were similar in the two groups. Atrial electromechanical delay (the time from the onset of P wave or atrial pacing spike on ECG to the onset of atrial contraction on M mode echogram) was 68 (SD 7) ms at the lateral site of right atrium, 82 (9) ms at the central fibrous body, 93 (11) ms at the lateral site of left atrium in normals. In patients with DDD pacing, however, this delay increased to 85 (22) ms, 117 (23) ms, and 138 (25) ms respectively (all P < 0.01). Interatrial mechanical delay (the time from the onset of right atrial motion to the onset of the left) increased from 25 (6) ms in normal controls to 53 (18) ms in patients (P < 0.01). Intra-atrial mechanical dispersion (the time from the earliest to the latest onset of regional atrial motion around the atrioventricular ring) in the right atrium increased from 6 (2) ms in normals to 19 (2) ms in patients (P < 0.01), but it remained unchanged in the left atrium (6 (2) ms in normal controls v 7 (2) ms in patients, P > 0.05). Peak atrial shortening rate was not different between the two groups. Differences of atrial electromechanical activity between the two groups were also reflected on Doppler echocardiogram and apexcardiogram. CONCLUSIONS--Right atrial appendage pacing disturbs the normal coordinate sequence of right atrial mechanical activity and leads to a striking and variable increase in intra-atrial conduction time as well as in interatrial conduction time. Left atrial contraction remains synchronous although the

  6. Effect of inhaled H1 and H2 receptor antagonist in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N C; Kerr, J W

    1980-01-01

    The effects on airflow resistance of an inhaled H1 receptor antagonist, clemastine, and an H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, have been investigated in normal and asthmatic subjects. No significant changes in specific conductance (sGaw) were seen in six normal subjects. In eight asthmatic subjects a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) occurred at 60 min (< 0.02), and 120 (< 0.05) after the inhalation of clemastine, whereas inhaled cimetidine had no effect on airflow resistance. Clemastine and cimetidine were tested on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal and eight asthmatic subjects. Clemastine significantly reduced the fall in sGaw in normal subjects and the fall in FEV1 in asthmatic subjects, whereas cimetidine had no protective effect. Clemastine and ipratropium bromide were tested on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal subjects. Ipratropium bromide, but not clemastine, significantly reduced the fall in sGaw after methacholine. These results suggest that in normal and asthmatic subjects histamine-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated predominantly via H1 rather than H2 receptors in the airways. PMID:6449094

  7. Line orientation judgment in normal elderly and subjects with dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Ska, B; Poissant, A; Joanette, Y

    1990-10-01

    Ninety-five normal controls divided into three subgroups (55-64 yrs, 65-74 yrs, and 75-84 yrs) and 11 subjects with early dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT) were given a line orientation judgment task (Benton, Varney, & Hamsher, 1978). No difference appeared between the three control subgroups in global score but the difference between controls and DAT subjects was significant. However, some DAT subjects had a global score overlapping the scores of controls. Error types were also analyzed. Results of this analysis showed that some errors appeared in all subjects, normal and DAT, while others were specific to DAT subjects. It was speculated that these error types were a manifestation of a deeper visuospatial deficit, revealing a major problem of the DAT in spatial organization. Thus, this study suggests that an analysis of the error types observed in the line orientation judgment task may be helpful in differentiating normal elderly from early DAT. PMID:2258431

  8. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms in subjects with normal and abnormal body weight.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Lizio, Roberta; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Petito, Annamaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Lecce, Brunello; Mundi, Ciro; Soricelli, Andrea; Limatola, Cristina; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Del Percio, Claudio

    2011-09-15

    It is well known that resting state regional cerebral blood flow is abnormal in obese when compared to normal-weight subjects but the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are poorly known. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that amplitude of resting state cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms differ among underweight, normal-weight, and overweight/obese subjects as a reflection of the relationship between cortical neural synchronization and regulation of body weight. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 16 underweight subjects, 25 normal-weight subjects, and 18 overweight/obese subjects. All subjects were psychophysically healthy (no eating disorders or major psychopathologies). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), beta 2 (20-30Hz), and gamma (30-40Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Statistical results showed that parietal and temporal alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern underweight>normal-weight>overweight/obese (p<0.004), whereas occipital alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern normal-weight>underweight>overweight/obese (p<0.00003). Furthermore, amplitude of the parietal, occipital, and temporal alpha 2 sources was stronger in the normal-weight subjects than in the underweight and overweight/obese subjects (p<0.0007). These results suggest that abnormal weight in healthy overweight/obese subjects is related to abnormal cortical neural synchronization at the basis of resting state alpha rhythms and fluctuation of global brain arousal. PMID:21704716

  9. Category-specific naming errors in normal subjects: the influence of evolution and experience.

    PubMed

    Laws, K R

    2000-10-15

    The importance of "artifactual" variables (such as conceptual familiarity) have been highlighted in current accounts of category-specific disorders for living things (e.g., Funnell & Sheridan, 1992). The difficulties experienced by patients are essentially viewed as an exaggeration of normal processes and the implication is that normal subjects should also have greater difficulty naming living items (because they have lower conceptual familiarity than nonliving things). The current study examined normal subjects' ability to name pictures of artifact-matched sets of living and nonliving things in a naming-to-deadline paradigm. Contrary to the prediction, normal subjects made more nonliving naming errors. Furthermore, female subjects made more nonliving-thing errors than male subjects. These findings could not be reduced to differences in either category-based or gender-based familiarity ratings. Rather, it is proposed that an elaborated domain-specific evolutionary model parsimoniously explains both the greater incidence of living thing deficits in patients and the better performance of normal subjects with living things. PMID:11023642

  10. Length perception and production of normal subjects in proximal versus distal peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jay C; Lee, Byung H; Ji, Jung Min; Jeong, Yong; Kim, Bong Jik; Heilman, Kenneth M; Na, Duk L

    2004-10-01

    We investigated whether the perception or production of a given line length in normal subjects varies according to where in peripersonal space the line is perceived or produced. We also investigated the influence of the direction of movement used to make the line. In Experiment 1, blindfolded normal subjects were asked to estimate distances while the examiner moved the subject's hand in proximal (medial) or distal (lateral) space, moving centripetally or centrifugally. The subjects showed a spatial effect, perceiving the same length as shorter in proximal space than distal space. This result could be related to either a proximal spatial attentional bias or an anisometric representation of spatial distances. In Experiment 2, we attempted to dissociate these hypotheses by studying blindfolded normal subjects, who were requested to produce horizontal lines of a given length (100 or 200 mm) in proximal versus distal peripersonal space using centripetal or centrifugal movements. Centrifugal movements in proximal space were the longest; centrifugal movements in distal space were the shortest: in between were the proximal centripetal and distal centripetal movements which did not differ from each other. These results suggest that in peripersonal space the perception of length in normal subjects is most consistent with anisometric mental representation where the size of mental representations of length units decreases as a function of the distance from the subject's midsagittal plane. Length production, however, may depend on an interaction of the anisometric mental representation and the premotor/intentional factors. PMID:15637784

  11. Effect of visual input on normalized standing stability in subjects with recurrent low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongchul C; Ham, Yong Woon; Sung, Paul S

    2012-07-01

    Although a number of studies have evaluated kinematic stability changes in subjects with low back pain (LBP), the combined sensitivity of normalized standing stability from the ground force and kinematic rotational angle of the body segment were not carefully examined for postural responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normalized standing stability in subjects with and without recurrent LBP while they stood quietly with the tested foot parallel to the other lower extremity at hip width. The subjects were then instructed to stand freely on one leg for 25 s with the contra lateral hip flexed 90° based on dominance side (dominant leg vs. non-dominant lower extremity) and visual condition (eyes open vs. eyes closed). A total of 42 subjects (27 subjects without LBP and 15 subjects with LBP) participated in the study. The dominant leg standing stability was significantly different during the eyes closed condition (0.68±0.30 for control vs. 0.37±0.32 for LBP, T=-3.23, p=0.002) compared to the eyes open condition. The standing kinematic stability, especially of the dominant thigh, was greater in the control subjects than in the subjects with LBP (T=-2.43, p=0.02). This sensitive detection of kinematic imbalance with postural stability is important for effective rehabilitation strategies and to understanding compensatory mechanisms in subjects with recurrent LBP. PMID:22717729

  12. Craniofacial characteristics of Caucasian and Afro-Caucasian Brazilian subjects with normal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    JANSON, Guilherme; QUAGLIO, Camila Leite; PINZAN, Arnaldo; FRANCO, Eduardo Jacomino; de FREITAS, Marcos Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the skeletal, dental and soft tissue characteristics of Caucasian and Afro-Caucasian Brazilian subjects with normal occlusion and to evaluate sexual dimorphism within the groups. Material and Methods The sample comprised lateral cephalograms of untreated normal occlusion subjects, divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 40 Caucasian subjects (20 of each sex), with a mean age of 13.02 years; group 2 included 40 Afro-Caucasian subjects (20 of each sex), with a mean age of 13.02 years. Groups 1 and 2 and males and females within each group were compared with t tests. Results Afro-Caucasian subjects presented greater maxillary protrusion, smaller upper anterior face height and lower posterior face height, larger upper posterior face height, greater maxillary and mandibular dentoalveolar protrusion as well as soft tissue protrusion than Caucasian subjects. The Afro-Caucasian female subjects had less mandibular protrusion and smaller total posterior facial height and upper posterior facial height than males. Conclusions Brazilian Afro-Caucasian subjects have greater dentoalveolar and soft tissue protrusion than Brazilian Caucasian subjects, with slight sexual dimorphism in some variables. PMID:21552712

  13. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

  14. Positive and negative affect recognition in schizophrenia: a comparison with substance abuse and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Bell, M; Bryson, G; Lysaker, P

    1997-11-14

    This study had three aims: to compare a schizophrenia sample (n = 50) with a substance abuse (n = 25) and normal sample (n = 81) on affect recognition; to compare differences in their performance between positive and negative affect recognition; and to introduce a new videotape method of stimulus presentation. Subjects were asked to identify the predominant affect depicted in 21 5-10-s vignettes containing three trials of seven affect states. Results demonstrate significant group differences: normal subjects scored in the normal or mild range, substance abuse (s/a) subjects scored in the mild and moderate ranges, and the schizophrenia sample scored predominantly in the moderate to severe ranges. Accuracies were 92.3% for the normal sample, 77.2 for the s/a sample and 64.8 for the schizophrenia sample. Response dispersions were 97.6% for the schizophrenia group, 69% for the s/a sample and 38% in the normal sample. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed a group by type of affect interaction with schizophrenia subjects showing far greater differential impairment on negative affect recognition. Difficulty of item did not contribute to this difference. Test-retest reliability at 5 months for this new method was r = 0.76, and stability of categorization was very high over 5 months (weighted kappa = 0.93). These affect recognition deficits in schizophrenia are discussed as they relate to lateralization of brain function, high EE families, social skills impairment and implications for rehabilitation services. PMID:9463840

  15. Adipose tissue infiltration in normal-weight subjects and its impact on metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Oliva-Olivera, Wilfredo; Omiste, Antonio; Castellano-Castillo, Daniel; Lhamyani, Said; Camargo, Antonio; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    Discordant phenotypes, metabolically healthy obese and unhealthy normal-weight individuals, are always interesting to provide important insights into the mechanistic link between adipose tissue dysfunction and associated metabolic alterations. Macrophages can release factors that impair the proper activity of the adipose tissue. Thus, studying subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues, we investigated for the first time the differences in monocyte/macrophage infiltration, inflammation, and adipogenesis of normal-weight subjects who differed in their degree of metabolic syndrome. The study included 92 normal-weight subjects who differed in their degree of metabolic syndrome. Their anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured. RNA from subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues was isolated, and mRNA expression of monocyte/macrophage infiltration (CD68, CD33, ITGAM, CD163, EMR-1, CD206, MerTK, CD64, ITGAX), inflammation (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], IL-10, IL-1b, CCL2, CCL3), and adipogenic and lipogenic capacity markers (PPARgamma, FABP4) were measured. Taken together, our data provide evidence of a different degree of macrophage infiltration between the adipose tissues, with a higher monocyte/macrophage infiltration in subcutaneous adipose tissue in metabolically unhealthy normal-weight subjects, whereas visceral adipose tissue remained almost unaffected. An increased macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue and its consequences, such as a decrease in adipogenesis function, may explain why both the obese and normal-weight subjects can develop metabolic diseases or remain healthy. PMID:26829067

  16. Lipid profile but not highly sensitive C-reactive protein helps distinguish prehypertensives from normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, T.; Manjula, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early identification of the prehypertensive state can greatly improve the disease risk management. Although increased levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and dyslipidemia is reported among patients with hypertension, the correlation of these parameters among prehypertensives in not known. Hence, the present study was designed to compare the levels of serum hsCRP and lipid profile among prehypertensives and normal subjects and correlate it with blood pressure (BP) levels. Materials and Methods: Anthropometric measurements and BP were recorded in 40 prehypertensive and 40 normal subjects. Subjects were assigned to a group based on their BP as per Joint National Committee 7 criteria. Serum hsCRP and lipid profile were measured and correlated with BP levels. Results: Serum hsCRP showed no significant difference between the two groups. There was no significant correlation of BP with hsCRP in both the groups. Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were significantly increased in prehypertensives as compared to normal subjects. There was no significant association between BP and lipid parameters in prehypertensives. Conclusions: Significant increase of TC and LDL but not hsCRP was evident among prehypertensives as compared to normal subjects. PMID:26283827

  17. EFFECTS OF 0.1 PPM NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON AIRWAYS OF NORMAL AND ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been reported that inhalation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) will enhance the bronchial reactivity of asthmatics. This study was designed to evaluate the respiratory effect of a 1-h exposure of normal subjects and of atopic asthmatics to 0.1 parts per million (ppm) NO2. Fifteen...

  18. Normalizing the Educated Subject: A Foucaultian Analysis of High-Stakes Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I use concepts from Michel Foucault to analyze the ways in which the high-stakes accountability movement has appropriated the technology of the examination to redefine the educated subject as a normalized case. Partly this has become possible because of the role that educational research has played in laying out the conditions for…

  19. Safety of the HyperSound® Audio System in Subjects with Normal Hearing.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ritvik P; Mattson, Sara L; Kappus, Brian A; Seitzman, Robin L

    2015-06-11

    The objective of the study was to assess the safety of the HyperSound® Audio System (HSS), a novel audio system using ultrasound technology, in normal hearing subjects under normal use conditions; we considered pre-exposure and post-exposure test design. We investigated primary and secondary outcome measures: i) temporary threshold shift (TTS), defined as >10 dB shift in pure tone air conduction thresholds and/or a decrement in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) >10 dB at two or more frequencies; ii) presence of new-onset otologic symptoms after exposure. Twenty adult subjects with normal hearing underwent a pre-exposure assessment (pure tone air conduction audiometry, tympanometry, DPOAEs and otologic symptoms questionnaire) followed by exposure to a 2-h movie with sound delivered through the HSS emitter followed by a post-exposure assessment. No TTS or new-onset otological symptoms were identified. HSS demonstrates excellent safety in normal hearing subjects under normal use conditions. PMID:26779330

  20. Safety of the HyperSound® Audio System in Subjects with Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Sara L.; Kappus, Brian A.; Seitzman, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the safety of the HyperSound® Audio System (HSS), a novel audio system using ultrasound technology, in normal hearing subjects under normal use conditions; we considered pre-exposure and post-exposure test design. We investigated primary and secondary outcome measures: i) temporary threshold shift (TTS), defined as >10 dB shift in pure tone air conduction thresholds and/or a decrement in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) >10 dB at two or more frequencies; ii) presence of new-onset otologic symptoms after exposure. Twenty adult subjects with normal hearing underwent a pre-exposure assessment (pure tone air conduction audiometry, tympanometry, DPOAEs and otologic symptoms questionnaire) followed by exposure to a 2-h movie with sound delivered through the HSS emitter followed by a post-exposure assessment. No TTS or new-onset otological symptoms were identified. HSS demonstrates excellent safety in normal hearing subjects under normal use conditions. PMID:26779330

  1. Lipreading sentences with vibrotactile vocoders: performance of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, L E; Demorest, M E; Coulter, D C; O'Connell, M P

    1991-12-01

    Three vibrotactile vocoders were compared in a training study involving several different speech perception tasks. Vocoders were: (1) the Central Institute for the Deaf version of the Queen's University vocoder, with 1/3-oct filter spacing and logarithmic output scaling (CIDLog) [Engebretson and O'Connell, IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-33, 712-716 (1986)]; (2) the same vocoder with linear output scaling (CIDLin); and (3) the Gallaudet University vocoder designed with greater resolution in the second formant region, relative to the CID vocoders, and linear output scaling (GULin). Four normal-hearing subjects were assigned to either of two control groups, visual-only control and vocoder control, for which they received the CIDLog vocoder. Five normal-hearing and four hearing-impaired subjects were assigned to the linear vocoders. Results showed that the three vocoders provided equivalent information in word-initial and word-final tactile-only consonant identification. However, GULin was the only vocoder significantly effective in enhancing lipreading of isolated prerecorded sentences. Individual subject analyses showed significantly enhanced lipreading by the three normal-hearing and two hearing-impaired subjects who received the GULin vocoder. Over the entire training period of the experiment, the mean difference between aided and unaided lipreading of sentences by the GULin aided hearing-impaired subjects was approximately 6% words correct. Possible explanations for failure to confirm previous success with the CIDLog vocoder [Weisenberger et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 1764-1775 (1989)] are discussed. PMID:1838561

  2. Strength and duration of priming effects in normal subjects and amnesic patients.

    PubMed

    Squire, L R; Shimamura, A P; Graf, P

    1987-01-01

    In three separate experiments, we assessed the strength and duration of word completion effects in amnesic patients and two control groups. In Experiment 1 subjects studied words under a semantic orienting condition and were given tests of word completion and recognition memory after an immediate, 2-hr or 4-day delay. In the word completion test for Experiment 1, we presented three-letter word stems that could be completed to form several common words, one of which had been presented previously (e.g. MOT for MOTEL), and subjects completed each stem with the first word that came to mind. Priming effects were equivalent in amnesic patients and control subjects and they reached baseline levels within 2 hr. In Experiments 2 and 3, subjects studied words under either a semantic or a nonsemantic orienting condition, and word completion was tested at the same three delays using cues that uniquely specified the study words (e.g. JUI for JUICE; or A--A--In for ASSASSIN). In these experiments, amnesic patients exhibited both smaller and shorter lasting word completion effects than control subjects. Specifically, amnesic patients exhibited word completion effects that seldom lasted as long as 2 hr, whereas control subjects usually exhibited completion effects lasting 4 days. An important additional finding was that control subjects exhibited larger and longer-lasting word completion effects when tested under the semantic orienting condition than when tested under the nonsemantic orienting condition. Amnesic patients were not affected by this manipulation. Moreover, under the nonsemantic orienting condition, control subjects and amnesic patients performed similarly. The results show that word completion performance is not always fully intact in amnesic patients. Long-lasting word completion effects found in normal subjects may be mediated by declarative or elaborative retrieval processes, which are impaired in amnesic patients. If so, priming as measured by word completion

  3. Reduced àudiogram ripple' in normally-hearing subjects with weak otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, S; Lutman, M E

    1999-01-01

    Correspondence between spectral patterns in otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and the fine structure of the pure-tone audiogram has often been noted, but the link is by no means clearly understood nor complete in all subjects. This paper presents part of a broader study focusing on individuals with normal hearing but anomalously weak OAEs, the primary purpose of which was to determine the reasons for the weak OAEs. Subjects were selected from an exhaustive search of some 400 ears of highly co-operative adults, and comprised a test group of subjects with normal hearing thresholds but weak OAEs, and a control group of normals from the same sample. Reported here are data on audiogram fine structure measured in the two groups of subjects. The basic finding is that the subjects with weak OAEs also exhibited significantly less audiogram fine structure than the controls, as evaluated by analysing the periodicity in the respective threshold curves as well as by identifying and quantifying individual peaks in the curves. These findings first provide further evidence of an underlying link between the fine structure of the audiogram and OAEs, as proposed by Kemp in his original work. Second, assuming that the degree of fine structure would be largely unaffected by minor middle ear alterations, our findings suggest that predominantly cochlear rather than middle ear factors are responsible for the low levels of OAEs in the normal subjects of our test group. Finally, the results presented suggest that, like OAEs, audiogram fine structure measurements provide information on the auditory system that is not available in the conventional pure-tone audiogram. PMID:10548372

  4. Comprehending Psychological Defenses: Developmental Differences between Normal and Disturbed Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Andrew; Rybash, John

    Investigated were similarities and differences in the ability of 26 normally developing and 26 conduct-disordered children and adolescents to comprehend psychologically defensive behavior and the cognitive processes underlying differences due to age. Matched by cognitive level, subjects viewed vignettes depicting another child behaving…

  5. Shotgun MS proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Gharib, Sina A; Schnapp, Lynn M; Goodlett, David R

    2014-10-01

    We provide a review of proteomic techniques used to characterize the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome of normal healthy subjects. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is the most common technique for sampling the components of the alveolar space. The proteomic techniques used to study normal BALF include protein separation by 2DE, whereby proteins were identified by comparison to a reference gel as well as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS, also known as shotgun proteomics. We summarize recent progress using shotgun MS technologies to define the normal BALF proteome. Surprisingly, we find that despite advances in shotgun proteomic technologies over the course of the last 10 years, which have resulted in greater numbers of proteins being identified, the functional landscape of normal BALF proteome was similarly described by all methods examined. PMID:24616423

  6. Shotgun MS proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V.; Gharib, Sina A.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Goodlett, David R.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a review of proteomic techniques used to characterize the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome of normal healthy subjects. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is the most common technique for sampling the components of the alveolar space. The proteomic techniques used to study normal BALF include protein separation by 2D gel electrophoresis whereby proteins were identified by comparison to a reference gel as well as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry technique, also known as shotgun proteomics. We summarize recent progress using shotgun MS technologies to define the normal BALF proteome. Surprisingly, we find that despite advances in shotgun proteomic technologies over the course of the last ten years, which have resulted in greater numbers of proteins being identified, the functional landscape of normal BALF proteome was similarly described by all methods examined. PMID:24616423

  7. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 22 Age Matched Male and Female Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek; Masiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this electrophysiological neuroimaging study was to provide a deeper mechanistic understanding of both olanzapine and risperidone pharmacodynamics relative to gender. In doing so, we age-matched 22 men and women and evaluated their resting-state EEG recordings and later used standard low resolution brain Electrotomography to visualize the differences in brain activity amongst the two patient groups. Methods In this investigation, electroencephalogram (EEG) data were analyzed from male and female schizophrenia patients treated with either olanzapine or risperidone, both atypical antipsychotics, during their in-patient stay at the Department of Psychiatry. Twenty-two males and females were age-matched and EEG recordings were analyzed from 19 Ag/AgCl electrodes. Thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). 3D statistical non-paramentric maps for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were finally computed. Results The results indicated that, relative to males patients, females schizophrenia patients had increased neuronal synchronization in delta frequency, slow-wave, EEG band located in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, within the middle frontal gyrus (t= -2.881, p < 0.03580). These findings suggest that females experience greater dopamine (D2) receptor and serotonin (5-HT2) receptor neuronal blockade relative to age-matched males. Further, our finding provided insight to the pharmacodynamics of second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone. Conclusion When compared to male patients, female patients, suffering from schizophrenia, have D2 and 5-HT2 receptors that are blocked more readily than age-matched male schizophrenia patients. Clinically, this may translate into a quicker time to treatment-response in females as compared to male patients. PMID:26617679

  8. Frictionless contact of an elastic punch subject to the normal load and bending moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Shao, G.; Zhu, L.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional contact problem of a trapezium shaped punch pressed into a frictionless, elastically similar half-plane and subject sequentially to the normal load and bending moment is considered. The model of a tilted flat punch is used to evaluate the pressure distribution and the contact deformation within the contact zone. Comparisons of the results generated by the analytical technique to those computed by the finite element method demonstrate the high level of accuracy attained by both methods. The presented numerical results illustrate the effects of the normal load, bending moment, and internal angles of the punch geometry on the contact stresses.

  9. Changes in oxygen saturation and heart frequency during sleep in young normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, F; Peset, R

    1984-01-01

    Changes in oxygen saturation and heart frequency were measured during sleep in a group of 21 normal subjects (9 women and 12 men) aged 19-25. At the time of the investigation all were non-smokers, they had no respiratory complaints, and indices of lung function (lung volumes, volume-pressure diagram, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide) were within normal limits. In contrast to published data, there were no major changes in oxygen saturation and no differences between men and women. PMID:6474401

  10. Effect of background motion on line bisection performance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Na, Duk L; Son, Youngchul; Kim, Chi Hun; Lee, Byung Hwa; Shon, Young-Min; Lee, Kwang Joo; Lee, Kyung Min; Adair, John C; Watson, Robert T; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that optokinetic stimulation (OKS) influences line bisection (LB) performance in normal subjects and patients with hemispatial neglect. Since subjects were required to attend to stationary targets on a moving background, prior experimental designs might have induced an illusion of target motion or induced motion (IM) in a direction opposite the background. The current study tested whether the IM affects LB performance in normal subjects and how the speed of targets also influences LB. Thirty-two right-handed normal volunteers (aged 28.0 +/- 5.3 years) were asked to bisect stationary lines with a background of horizontal OKS. These stimuli were generated by computer displayed on a large screen via a beam projector. The OKS was varied according to direction (leftward or rightward) and speed (9.4 degrees/sec or 56.1 degrees/sec), producing 4 different experimental conditions. Mean bisection errors in all conditions were compared with a control condition with no background OKS. For each condition, subjects rated the degree of IM on a 5 point scale. With fast rate OKS, subjects reported minimal IM and LB errors were in the same direction as background motion, a finding that replicates previous studies. Conversely, the slow OKS rate caused subjects to report IM and resulted in deviation of the bisection mark in a direction opposite the background OKS. While this discrepancy between the slow and fast OKS conditions might be related to motion illusion, we did not find a direct correlation between the degree of IM and bisection errors and thus reasons for these results remain unexplained. PMID:12507047

  11. Sleep and nocturnal acid reflux in normal subjects and patients with reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Freidin, N; Fisher, M J; Taylor, W; Boyd, D; Surratt, P; McCallum, R W; Mittal, R K

    1991-01-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux may be important in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. This study aimed to determine whether: (1) gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs during sleep in patients with reflux oesophagitis and, if so, to explore the mechanism, and (2) the sleep pattern of patients with oesophagitis is different from that of control subjects. After a standard evening meal, simultaneous manometric, oesophageal pH, and polysomnographic recordings were obtained in 11 patients with endoscopic oesophagitis and 11 control subjects. Patients with gastrooesophageal reflux disease had significantly more total reflux episodes throughout the nocturnal monitoring period than control subjects (105 v 6). Ninety two of 105 episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients occurred during the awake state and 10 during sleep stage II. A number of reflux episodes occurred during brief periods of arousal from the various sleep stages. Of the 105 reflux events recorded in patients, 42 were induced by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, 20 by stress reflux, 22 by free reflux mechanisms, and in 21 the mechanism was unclear. The sleep pattern and the time spent in each sleep stage was not different between the two groups. It is concluded that the awake state is crucial for the occurrence of nocturnal reflux episodes in normal subjects as well as in patients with reflux oesophagitis and that the difference between the frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux between normal subjects and patients cannot be explained by different sleep patterns. PMID:1752454

  12. The metabolic and hemodynamic effects of prolonged bed rest in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chobanian, A. V.; Lille, R. D.; Tercyak, A.; Blevins, P.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation in six normal subjects of the effects of chronic bed rest on the interrelationships between cardiovascular hemodynamics, catecholamine metabolism, vascular reactivity, renin and aldosterone activity, and electrolyte and fluid balance. Negative sodium and potassium balances and reductions in plasma volume were observed in all subjects, but plasma renin activity and aldosterone secretory rate showed no significant change. Other findings included the observation that major decreases in sodium balance and plasma volume occurred in the early bed rest period and did not correlate closely with the degree of orthostatic intolerance.

  13. Effects of naloxone on upper airway collapsibility in normal sleeping subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Meurice, J. C.; Marc, I.; Sériès, F.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the possible influence of endorphin release on upper airway collapsibility the effects of naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, were measured. METHODS: The effects of naloxone on upper airway collapsibility were studied in five normal sleeping men in a pilot study. During a sleep fragmentation night the subjects received either naloxone or a volume matched saline placebo in a double blind crossover design. Critical pressure (Pcrit) was measured during a morning nap following sleep fragmentation. RESULTS: The plasma levels of endorphins increased during sleep fragmentation nights. Pcrit was significantly greater after placebo than after naloxone infusion. CONCLUSIONS: Naloxone may reduce upper airway collapsibility in normal sleeping subjects following sleep fragmentation. PMID:8795677

  14. [Box and block test of manual dexterity in normal subjects and in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendes, M F; Tilbery, C P; Balsimelli, S; Moreira, M A; Cruz, A M

    2001-12-01

    Recently new disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) were introduced which can change the natural course of the disease. In clinical trials with these new agents the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is often used as a primary outcome instrument to measure neurological impairment and disability. A number of limitations have been identified when using the EDSS, some of wich are because the EDSS is an ordinal scale that is heavily biased to locomotor function. In this study we applied the box and block test of manual dexterity in normal subjects and relapsing-remitting MS patients. The results were that 64.8% of the female and 80.7% of the male patients had significant changes on this task compared with normal subjects, and as this test is easily applied and is sensitive in detecting upper extremity functional ability, we recommend its use in clinical trials to evaluate new drugs in MS patients. PMID:11733833

  15. Inequality of the direct and consensual light reflexes in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Ellis, C J; Smith, S E

    1979-01-01

    Anisocoria in darkness and during reflex responses to unilateral light stimulation was studied in 150 normal subjects with television pupillometry. It was commonly found that the direct light reaction of the stimulation eye exceeded the consensual reaction of the other eye. This light-induced anisocoria, termed 'contraction anisocoria', had a mean value of 0.075 mm or 6.1 % of light reflex amplitude. The measurement showed a high degree of repeatability in 20 subjects who were tested on two occasions a year apart. It occurred in the presence and absence of prior dark adaptation and increased proportionally with reflex amplitude as the intensity of the stimulating light was raised. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT, CONTRARY TO PREVIOUS OPINION, A SMALL DEGREE OF CONTRACTION ANISOCORIA IS NORMAL. PMID:465430

  16. Patterns of brain structural connectivity differentiate normal weight from overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arpana; Mayer, Emeran A.; Sanmiguel, Claudia P.; Van Horn, John D.; Woodworth, Davis; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Fling, Connor; Love, Aubrey; Tillisch, Kirsten; Labus, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alterations in the hedonic component of ingestive behaviors have been implicated as a possible risk factor in the pathophysiology of overweight and obese individuals. Neuroimaging evidence from individuals with increasing body mass index suggests structural, functional, and neurochemical alterations in the extended reward network and associated networks. Aim To apply a multivariate pattern analysis to distinguish normal weight and overweight subjects based on gray and white-matter measurements. Methods Structural images (N = 120, overweight N = 63) and diffusion tensor images (DTI) (N = 60, overweight N = 30) were obtained from healthy control subjects. For the total sample the mean age for the overweight group (females = 32, males = 31) was 28.77 years (SD = 9.76) and for the normal weight group (females = 32, males = 25) was 27.13 years (SD = 9.62). Regional segmentation and parcellation of the brain images was performed using Freesurfer. Deterministic tractography was performed to measure the normalized fiber density between regions. A multivariate pattern analysis approach was used to examine whether brain measures can distinguish overweight from normal weight individuals. Results 1. White-matter classification: The classification algorithm, based on 2 signatures with 17 regional connections, achieved 97% accuracy in discriminating overweight individuals from normal weight individuals. For both brain signatures, greater connectivity as indexed by increased fiber density was observed in overweight compared to normal weight between the reward network regions and regions of the executive control, emotional arousal, and somatosensory networks. In contrast, the opposite pattern (decreased fiber density) was found between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the anterior insula, and between thalamus and executive control network regions. 2. Gray-matter classification: The classification algorithm, based on 2 signatures with 42

  17. In normal subjects bracing impairs the function of the inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Prandi, E; Couture, J; Bellemare, F

    1999-05-01

    Normal subjects can increase their capacity to sustain hyperpnoea by bracing their arms on fixed objects, a procedure which is also known to reduce dyspnoea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, it was tested whether bracing per se could improve the function of the diaphragm. The effect of bracing on diaphragm function was studied in six normal subjects by recording changes in oesophageal (delta Poes) and transdiaphragmatic (delta Pdi) pressure during inspiratory capacity (IC) manoeuvres in the seated and upright postures, and in the seated posture, also during bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation (BPNS) at functional residual capacity (FRC). The pattern of ribcage motion and deformation associated with bracing and with diaphragm contraction was also evaluated using inductance plethysmography and magnetometers. Bracing increased FRC by >300 mL and reduced IC by approximately 200 mL, in both postures. Delta Pdi during BPNS decreased on average by 15% indicating an impaired diaphragmatic function. The ribcage was deformed with bracing and was more distortable during BPNS. In conclusion, in normal subjects, bracing impairs the function of the inspiratory muscles and reduces ribcage stability. These negative effects cannot explain the improved capacity to sustain hyperpnoea when the arms are braced. PMID:10414407

  18. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of (1- TC)palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H2 YO dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting.

  19. Attentional bias in normal subjects performing visual and tactile radial line bisections.

    PubMed

    Chewning, J; Adair, J C; Heilman, E B; Heilman, K M

    1998-11-01

    Misbisection of lines is thought to represent an attentional bias. When radial lines (intersection of the midsagittal and transverse planes) are presented below eye level, normal subjects are biased toward far peripersonal space in the visual modality and to near peripersonal space in the tactile modality. These errors may be related to a body centered, a retinotopic, or an object centered attentional bias. The purpose of this study was to contrast the body centered and retinotopic-objective centered hypotheses by having 12 normal subjects perform visual and tactile bisections of radial lines that are above and below eye level. The top of the page, which may be defined by retinotopic or object centered coordinates, contains the portion of the line that is most distant from our bodies when the page is below eye level. However, above eye level, the top of a radial line would be the portion of the page that is most proximal to our bodies. We observed that when stimuli are presented below eye level, normal subjects have a visual bias toward far peripersonal space or the top of the page or both, and have a tactile bias in the opposite direction. In the above eye position we found no overall bias in either modality. Because above eye level the body centered bias should have remained the same but the retinotopic or object centered bias should have reversed, our results suggest that the body and object centered or retinotopic biases, which are oriented in opposite directions, nullified each other. PMID:9842756

  20. Inhibition of Primary ADP-Induced Platelet Aggregation in Normal Subjects after Administration of Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ennio C.; Levin, Nathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The evidence indicating that platelets may play a role in the occurrence of certain thromboembolic phenomena has stimulated a search for inhibitors of platelet function. This report presents data to indicate that nitrofurantoin is a potent inhibitor of primary ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The addition of 10 μM nitrofurantoin to citrated platelet-rich plasma obtained from 12 normal subjects produced a 29±6% (2 SD) inhibition of the velocity of platelet aggregation induced by 2 μM ADP. The inhibitory effect of nitrofurantoin demonstrated competitive kinetics in respect to ADP. The intravenous (180 mg) or oral (200 mg) administration of nitrofurantoin produced a serum nitrofurantoin concentration ranging from 2.7 to 23 μM in 28 normal subjects. Platelet-rich plasma obtained from these subjects demonstrated inhibition of the velocity of ADP-induced platelet aggregation that correlated with the log of the serum nitrofurantoin concentration (P < 0.001). Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was also inhibited in a dose-related manner, and the bleeding time was significantly prolonged in the two subjects with the highest serum nitrofurantoin concentration. These studies indicate that nitrofurantoin in vivo inhibits platelet function to a degree that is proportional to the serum nitrofurantoin concentration. PMID:4729043

  1. Signals consistent with microbubbles detected in legs of normal human subjects after exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, J C; Phillips, S D; Donoghue, T G; Alvarenga, D L; Knaus, D A; Magari, P J; Buckey, J C

    2010-02-01

    Exercise may produce micronuclei (presumably gas-filled bubbles) in tissue, which could serve as nucleation sites for bubbles during subsequent decompression stress. These micronuclei have never been directly detected in humans. Dual-frequency ultrasound (DFU) is a resonance-based, ultrasound technique capable of detecting and sizing small stationary bubbles. We surveyed for bubbles in the legs of six normal human subjects (ages 28-52 yr) after exercise using DFU. Eleven marked sites on the left thigh and calf were imaged using standard imaging ultrasound. Subjects then rested in a reclining chair for 2 h before exercise. For the hour before exercise, a series of baseline measurements was taken at each site using DFU. At least six baseline measurements were taken at each site. Subjects exercised at 80% of their age-adjusted maximal heart rate for 30 min on an upright bicycle ergometer. After exercise, the subjects returned to the chair, and multiple postexercise measurements were taken at the marked sites. Measurements continued until no further signals consistent with bubbles were returned or 1 h had elapsed. All subjects showed signals consistent with bubbles after exercise at at least one site. The percentage of sites in a given subject showing signals significantly greater than baseline (P < 0.01) at first measurement ranged from 9.1 to 100%. Overall, 58% of sites showed signals consistent with bubbles at the first postexercise measurement. Signals decreased over time after exercise. These data strongly suggest that exercise produces bubbles detectable using DFU. PMID:19875715

  2. Similar ventilation distribution in normal subjects prone and supine during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Nieto, M J; Peces-Barba, G; González Mangado, N; Paiva, M; Verbanck, S

    2002-02-01

    Multiple-breath washout (MBW) tests, with end-expiratory lung volume at functional residual capacity (FRC) and 90% O(2), 5% He, and 5% SF(6) as an inspired gas mixture, were performed in healthy volunteers in supine and prone postures. The semilog plot of MBW N(2) concentrations was evaluated in terms of its curvilinearity. The MBW N(2) normalized slope analysis yielded indexes of acinar and conductive ventilation heterogeneity (Verbanck S, Schuermans D, Van Muylem A, Paiva M, Noppen M, and Vincken W. J App Physiol 83: 1907-1916, 1997). Also, the difference between SF(6) and He normalized phase III slopes was computed in the first MBW expiration. Only MBW tests with similar FRC in the prone and supine postures (P > 0.1; n = 8) were considered. Prone and supine postures did not reveal any significant differences in curvilinearity, N(2) normalized slope-derived indexes of conductive or acinar ventilation heterogeneity, nor SF(6)-He normalized phase III slope difference in the first MBW expiration (P > 0.1 for all). The absence of significant changes in any of the MBW indexes suggests that ventilation heterogeneity is similar in the supine and prone postures of normal subjects breathing near FRC. PMID:11796673

  3. Effects of ventilation inhomogeneity on DLcoSB-3EQ in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D J; Prabhu, M B; Mink, J T; Graham, B L

    1992-12-01

    In patients with airflow obstruction, we found that ventilation inhomogeneity during vital capacity single-breath maneuvers was associated with decreases in the three-equation single-breath CO diffusing capacity of the lung (DLcoSB-3EQ) when breath-hold time (tBH) decreased. We postulated that this was due to a significant resistance to diffusive gas mixing within the gas phase of the lung. In this study, we hypothesized that this phenomenon might also occur in normal subjects if the breathing cycle were altered from traditional vital capacity maneuvers to those that increase ventilation inhomogeneity. In 10 normal subjects, we examined the tBH dependence of both DLcoSB-3EQ and the distribution of ventilation, measured by the mixing efficiency and the normalized phase III slope for helium. Preinspiratory lung volume (V0) was increased by keeping the maximum end-inspiratory lung volume (Vmax) constant or by increasing V0 and Vmax. When V0 increased while Vmax was kept constant, we found that the tBH-independent and the tBH-dependent components of ventilation inhomogeneity increased, but DLcoSB-3EQ was independent of V0 and tBH. Increasing V0 and Vmax did not change ventilation inhomogeneity at a tBH of 0 s, but the tBH-dependent component decreased. DLcoSB-3EQ, although independent of tBH, increased slightly with increases in Vmax. We conclude that in normal subjects increases in ventilation inhomogeneity with increases in V0 do not result in DLcoSB-3EQ becoming tBH dependent. PMID:1490979

  4. Classifying depression patients and normal subjects using machine learning techniques and nonlinear features from EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Hosseinifard, Behshad; Moradi, Mohammad Hassan; Rostami, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosing depression in the early curable stages is very important and may even save the life of a patient. In this paper, we study nonlinear analysis of EEG signal for discriminating depression patients and normal controls. Forty-five unmedicated depressed patients and 45 normal subjects were participated in this study. Power of four EEG bands and four nonlinear features including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), higuchi fractal, correlation dimension and lyapunov exponent were extracted from EEG signal. For discriminating the two groups, k-nearest neighbor, linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression as the classifiers are then used. Highest classification accuracy of 83.3% is obtained by correlation dimension and LR classifier among other nonlinear features. For further improvement, all nonlinear features are combined and applied to classifiers. A classification accuracy of 90% is achieved by all nonlinear features and LR classifier. In all experiments, genetic algorithm is employed to select the most important features. The proposed technique is compared and contrasted with the other reported methods and it is demonstrated that by combining nonlinear features, the performance is enhanced. This study shows that nonlinear analysis of EEG can be a useful method for discriminating depressed patients and normal subjects. It is suggested that this analysis may be a complementary tool to help psychiatrists for diagnosing depressed patients. PMID:23122719

  5. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  6. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  7. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  8. CD36 haplotypes are associated with lipid profile in normal-weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is a common metabolic disorder that may result from abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles. Disorders of lipoprotein concentrations and elevated concentration of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) are risk factors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). CD36 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and polymorphisms in the CD36 gene are related to cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between genotypes and haplotypes of five polymorphisms in the CD36 gene with lipid levels in young normal-weight subjects. Methods A total of 232 unrelated subjects with normal-weight of 18 to 25 years old (157 women and 75 men) were randomly selected. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Genotyping of the polymorphisms -33137A/G (rs1984112), -31118G/A (rs1761667), -22674 T/C (rs2151916), 27645 Ins/Del (rs3840546) and 30294G/C (rs1049673) in the CD36 receptor gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism, linkage disequilibrium analysis among the five polymorphisms and an analysis of haplotype were estimated. Results HDL-C levels was lower in men than in women (P = 0.03). However, the median oxLDL levels in men was higher than in women (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C and glucose (P > 0.05). HDL-C levels were lower in the subjects with TC genotype of polymorphism -22674 T/C (P = 0.04), but the carriers of TT genotype had lower oxLDL levels (P = 0.01). LDL-C levels were higher in young carriers of CC genotype for 30294G/C polymorphism than non-carriers (P = 0.03). The subjects carrying the AATDC haplotype had 3.2 times presumably higher risk of LDL-C > 100 mg/dL than the carrying the AGTIG haplotype (P = 0.02), whereas the subjects carrying the AATIC haplotype had 2.0 times presumably

  9. Insulin sensitivity regulates autonomic control of heart rate variation independent of body weight in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Bergholm, R; Westerbacka, J; Vehkavaara, S; Seppälä-Lindroos, A; Goto, T; Yki-Järvinen, H

    2001-03-01

    It is unclear whether insulin sensitivity independent of body weight regulates control of heart rate variation (HRV) by the autonomic nervous system. Insulin action on whole-body glucose uptake (M-value) and heart rate variability were measured in 21 normal men. The subjects were divided into 2 groups [normally insulin sensitive (IS, 8.0 +/- 0.4 mg/kg.min) and less insulin sensitive (IR, 5.1 +/- 0.3 mg/kg.min)] based on their median M-value (6.2 mg/kg x min). Spectral power analysis of heart rate variability was performed in the basal state and every 30 min during the insulin infusion. The IS and IR groups were comparable, with respect to age (27 +/- 2 vs. 26 +/- 2 yr), body mass index (22 +/- 1 vs. 23 +/- 1 kg/m(2)), body fat (13 +/- 1 vs. 13 +/- 1%), systolic (121 +/- 16 vs. 117 +/- 14 mm Hg) and diastolic (74 +/- 11 vs. 73 +/- 11 mm Hg) blood pressures, and fasting plasma glucose (5.4 +/- 0.1 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) concentrations. Fasting plasma insulin was significantly higher in the IR (30 +/- 4 pmol/L) than in the IS (17 +/- 3 pmol/L, P < 0.05) group. In the IS group, insulin significantly increased the normalized low-frequency (LFn) component, a measure of predominantly sympathetic nervous system activity, from 36 +/- 5 to 48 +/- 4 normalized units (nu; 0 vs. 30-120 min, P < 0.001); whereas the normalized high-frequency (HFn) component, a measure of vagal control of HRV, decreased from 66 +/- 9 to 48 +/- 5 nu (P < 0.001). No changes were observed in either the normalized LF component [35 +/- 5 vs. 36 +/- 2 nu, not significant (NS)] or the normalized HF component (52 +/- 6 vs. 51 +/- 4 nu, NS) in the IR group. The ratio LF/HF, a measure of sympathovagal balance, increased significantly in the IS group (0.92 +/- 0.04 vs. 1.01 +/- 0.04, P < 0.01) but remained unchanged in the IR group (0.91 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.92 +/- 0.03, NS). Heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressures remained unchanged during the insulin infusion in both groups. We conclude that

  10. Establishment of normal reference ranges for glycemic variability in Chinese subjects using continuous glucose monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Hong; Ran, Xingwu; Yang, Wenying; Li, Qiang; Peng, Yongde; Li, Yanbing; Gao, Xin; Luan, Xiaojun; Wang, Weiqing; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Glycemic variability is increasingly recognized as an important issue in diabetes management. However, the lack of normative values may limit its applicability in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to establish preliminary normal reference ranges for glycemic variability by analyzing continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data obtained from healthy Chinese adults. Material/Methods Three-day CGM data were obtained from 434 healthy adults at 10 academic hospitals throughout China. Glycemic variability was calculated as the 24-hour mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) and standard deviations (SD) of blood glucose readings. Results 434 healthy subjects (male 213, female 221; age 43±14, 20–69 years old; BMI 21.8±1.7 kg/m2, 18.5–24.9 kg/m2) completed the study. MAGE and SD values for the 434 healthy subjects were 1.73 (1.08) mmol/L and 0.75 (0.42) mmol/L [median (interquartile range)], respectively. In both men and women, MAGE and SD tended to increase with age. Neither MAGE nor SD showed a significant difference between men and women. Values for both parameters were non-normally distributed within the population. The 95th percentiles of MAGE and SD were 3.86 and 1.40 mmol/L, respectively. These values were adopted as the upper limits of normal. Conclusions MAGE <3.9 mmol/L and SD <1.4 mmol/L are recommended as the normal reference ranges for glycemic variability in Chinese adults. The values established in this study may facilitate the adoption of glycemic variability as a metric of overall glycemic control in diabetes. PMID:21169911

  11. Effect of cisapride on the gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C A; Holden, S; Brown, C; Read, N W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cisapride, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, on the transit of a standard meal through the stomach, small intestine and colon was studied in 10 normal subjects. Cisapride had no significant effect on gastric emptying but decreased mouth to caecum transit time (p less than 0.01). Stool weight and frequency were not significantly increased but the time for the first appearance of stool markers and the arrival of 20% and 50% of stool markers was decreased after cisapride (p less than 0.05). PMID:3817579

  12. The effect of inhaled bronchoconstrictors on transcutaneous gas tensions in normal adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Gray, B; Barnes, N

    1987-01-01

    The administration of histamine and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) by nebulised aerosol in logarithmically increasing doses to normal subjects resulted in significant bronchoconstriction. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) was monitored during and after the bronchial challenge tests. Following histamine challenge there was significant hypoxaemia in all subjects (mean fall in tcPO2, 20 mmHg). However, following LTD4 administration, there was a small and insignificant fall in tcPO2. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (tcPCO2) was also monitored throughout bronchial challenge, but showed no significant change. We suggest that the hypoxaemia following histamine challenge was due to increased ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching in the lung induced by histamine deposition. PMID:3673787

  13. Brain parenchymal density measurements by CT in demented subjects and normal controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, M.; Danziger, W.L.; Chi, D.; Hughes, C.P.; Coben, L.A.

    1983-06-01

    Parachymal density measurements of 14 regions of gray and white matter from each cerebral hemisphere were made from CT scans of 25 subjects who had varying degrees of dementia as measured by a global Clinical Dementia Rating, and also from CT scans of 33 normal control subjects. There were few significant differences between the two groups in the mean density value for each of the regions examined, although several individual psychometric tests did correlate with density changes. Moreover, for six regions in the cerebral cortex, and for one region in the thalamus of each hemisphere, we found no significant correlation between the gray-white matter density difference and dementia. There was, however, a loss of the discriminability between the gray and white matter with an increase in the size of the ventricles. These findings may be attributed to the loss of white matter volume.

  14. Comparison of methods of estimating body fat in normal subjects and cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Sawitsky, A.; Gartenhaus, W.; Yasumura, S.; Vaswani, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    Total body fat can be indirectly estimated by the following noninvasive techniques: determination of lean body mass by measurement of body potassium or body water, and determination of density by underwater weighing or by skinfold measurements. The measurement of total body nitrogen by neutron activation provides another technique for estimating lean body mass and hence body fat. The nitrogen measurement can also be combined with the measurement of total body potassium in a two compartment model of the lean body mass from which another estimate of body fat can be derived. All of the above techniques are subject to various errors and are based on a number of assumptions, some of which are incompletely validated. These techniques were applied to a population of normal subjects and to a group of cancer patients. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed in terms of their ability to estimate total body fat.

  15. Effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on respiratory resistance in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    van den Elshout, F J; van Herwaarden, C L; Folgering, H T

    1991-01-01

    The effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on respiratory resistance were studied in 15 healthy subjects and 30 asthmatic subjects. Respiratory resistance (impedance) was measured with the pseudo-random noise forced oscillation technique while the subjects rebreathed from a wet spirometer in a closed respiratory circuit in which end tidal carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) could be controlled. Hypercapnia was induced by partially short circuiting the carbon dioxide absorber, and hypocapnia by voluntary hyperventilation. The circulating air was saturated with water vapour and kept at body temperature and ambient pressure. A rise of end tidal PCO2 of 1 kPa caused a significant fall in respiratory resistance in both normal and asthmatic subjects (15% and 9% respectively). A fall of PCO2 of 1 kPa did not cause any significant change in impedance in the control group. In the asthmatic patients resistance increased by 13%, reactance fell by 45%, and the frequency dependence of resistance rose 240%. These findings confirm that hypocapnia may contribute to airway obstruction in asthmatic patients, even when water and heat loss are prevented. PMID:1908137

  16. Biochemical and hemodynamic changes in normal subjects during acute and rigorous bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Afonin, Victor B.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Rigorous bed rest (RBR) induces significant biochemical and circulatory changes. However, little is known about acute rigorous bed rest (ARBR). Measuring biochemical and circulatory variables during ARBR and RBR the aim of this study was to establish the significance of ARBR effect. Studies were done during 3 days of a pre-bed rest (BR) period and during 7 days of ARBR and RBR period. Thirty normal male individuals aged, 24.1±6.3 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided equally into three groups: 10 subjects placed under active control conditions served as unrestricted ambulatory control subjects (UACS), 10 subjects submitted to an acute rigorous bed rest served as acute rigorous bed rested subjects (ARBRS) and 10 subjects submitted to a rigorous bed rest served as rigorous bed rested subjects (RBRS). The UACS were maintained under an average running distance of 9.7 km day -1. For the ARBR effect simulation, ARBRS were submitted abruptly to BR for 7 days. They did not have any prior knowledge of the exact date and time when they would be asked to confine to RBR. For the RBR effect simulation, RBRS were subjected to BR for 7 days on a predetermined date and time known to them right away from the start of the study. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma cortisol (PC), plasma aldosterone (PA), plasma and urinary sodium (Na) and potassium (K) levels, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased significantly, and urinary aldosterone (UA), stroke volume (SV) and plasma volume (PV) decreased significantly ( p<0.05) in ARBRS and RBRS as compared with their pre-BR values and the values in UACS. Electrolyte, hormonal and hemodynamic responses were significantly ( p<0.05) greater and occurred significantly faster ( p<0.05) during ARBR than RBR. Parameters change insignificantly ( p>0.05) in UACS compared with pre-BR control values. It was concluded that, the more abruptly muscular activity is restricted in experimental subjects

  17. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17 015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample. PMID:26538188

  18. The Relationship of the Clinical Disc Margin and Bruch's Membrane Opening in Normal and Glaucoma Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Navid; Miraftabi, Arezoo; Henry, Sharon; Chung, Norman; Nowroozizadeh, Sarah; Caprioli, Joseph; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypotheses that the mismatch between the clinical disc margin (CDM) and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) is a function of BMO area (BMOA) and is affected by the presence of glaucoma. Methods A total of 45 normal eyes (45 subjects) and 53 glaucomatous eyes (53 patients) were enrolled and underwent radial optic nerve head (ONH) imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The inner tip of the Bruch's membrane (BM) and the clinical disc margin were marked on radial scans and optic disc photographs, and were coregistered with custom software. The main outcome measure was the difference between the clinical disc area (CDA) and BMOA, or CDA−BMOA mismatch, as a function of BMOA and diagnosis. Multivariate regression analyses were used to explore the influence of glaucoma and BMOA on the mismatch. Results Global CDA was larger than BMOA in both groups but the difference was statistically significant only in the normal group (1.98 ± 0.37 vs. 1.85 ± 0.45 mm2, P = 0.02 in the normal group; 1.96 ± 0.38 vs. 1.89 ± 0.56 mm2, P = 0.08 in the glaucoma group). The sectoral CDA−BMOA mismatch was smaller in superotemporal (P = 0.04) and superonasal (P = 0.05) sectors in the glaucoma group. The normalized CDA−BMOA difference decreased with increasing BMOA in both groups (P < 0.001). Presence or severity of glaucoma did not affect the CDA−BMOA difference (P > 0.14). Conclusions Clinical disc area was larger than BMOA in normal and glaucoma eyes but reached statistical significance only in the former group. The CDA−BMOA mismatch diminished with increasing BMOA but was not affected by presence of glaucoma. These findings have important clinical implications regarding clinical evaluation of the ONH. PMID:27031840

  19. Laterality effects in normal subjects' recognition of familiar faces, voices and names. Perceptual and representational components.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2013-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a different hemispheric specialization may exist for different modalities of person identification, with a prevalent right lateralization of the sensory-motor systems allowing face and voice recognition and a prevalent left lateralization of the name recognition system. Data supporting this claim concern, however, much more disorders of familiar people recognition observed in patients with focal brain lesions than results of experimental studies conducted in normal subjects. These last data are sparse and in part controversial, but are important from the theoretical point of view, because it is not clear if hemispheric asymmetries in the recognition of faces, voices and names are limited to their perceptual processing, or also extend to the domain of their cortical representations. The present review has tried to clarify this issues, taking into account investigations that have evaluated in normal subjects laterality effects in recognition of familiar names, faces and voices, by means of behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging techniques. Results of this survey indicate that: (a) recognition of familiar faces and voices show a prevalent right lateralization, whereas recognition of familiar names is lateralized to the left hemisphere; (b) the right hemisphere prevalence is greater in tasks involving familiar than unfamiliar faces and voices, and the left hemisphere superiority is greater in the recognition of familiar than unfamiliar names. Taken together, these data suggest that hemispheric asymmetries in the recognition of faces, voices and names are not limited to their perceptual processing, but also extend to the domain of their cortical representations. PMID:23542500

  20. The effect of Stokes shift in the discrimination of urine of cervical cancer from normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Stokes shift spectroscopy has been considered as a potential tool in characterization of multiple components present in tissues and biofluids. Since, the intensity and resolution of the fluorophores depends on the Stokes shift, different opinion has been reflected by the researchers in fixing the Stokes shift. Also, not many studies have been reported on the characterization of biofluids and especially on the diagnosis of cancer. Urine is considered as an important diagnostic biofluid as it is rich in many metabolites where many of them are native fluorophores. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the urine of normal subjects and patients with cervical cancer as function of different Stokes shift. It is observed that Neopterin and Riboflavin are the main fluorophores contribute to the variation between normal and cervical cancer subjects. Ratio variables based linear discriminant analysis shows that the Stokes shift of 40 nm and 60 nm may be considered for better characterization with better signal to noise ratio when compared to others.

  1. Insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow in normal subjects during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Fernqvist-Forbes, E.; Linde, B.; Gunnarsson, R.

    1988-09-01

    We studied the effects of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the absorption of 10 U /sup 125/I-labeled soluble human insulin injected sc in the thigh in 10 normal subjects. The disappearance of /sup 125/I from the injection site was followed by external gamma-counting. Subcutaneous blood flow (ATBF) was measured concomitantly with the 133Xe washout technique. The plasma glucose nadir (mean, 2.0 +/- 0.1 (+/- SE) mmol/L) occurred at 33 +/- 3 min and resulted in maximal arterial plasma epinephrine concentrations of approximately 6 nmol/L. From 30 min before to 60 min after the glucose nadir the (/sup 125/I)insulin absorption rate was depressed compared to that during normoglycemia. The first order disappearance rate constants were reduced by approximately 50% (P less than 0.01) during the first 30-min interval after the glucose nadir. During the same period ATBF increased by 100% (P less than 0.05). The results suggest that in normal subjects the absorption of soluble insulin from a sc depot is depressed in connection with hypoglycemia, despite considerably elevated ATBF.

  2. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Segmentation on FD-OCT Scans of Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Markus A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Mardin, Christian Y.; Tornow, Ralf P.

    2010-01-01

    Automated measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness on circular OCT B-Scans provide physicians additional parameters for glaucoma diagnosis. We propose a novel retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation algorithm for frequency domain data that can be applied on scans from both normal healthy subjects, as well as glaucoma patients, using the same set of parameters. In addition, the algorithm remains almost unaffected by image quality. The main part of the segmentation process is based on the minimization of an energy function consisting of gradient and local smoothing terms. A quantitative evaluation comparing the automated segmentation results to manually corrected segmentations from three reviewers is performed. A total of 72 scans from glaucoma patients and 132 scans from normal subjects, all from different persons, composed the database for the evaluation of the segmentation algorithm. A mean absolute error per A-Scan of 2.9 µm was achieved on glaucomatous eyes, and 3.6 µm on healthy eyes. The mean absolute segmentation error over all A-Scans lies below 10 µm on 95.1% of the images. Thus our approach provides a reliable tool for extracting diagnostic relevant parameters from OCT B-Scans for glaucoma diagnosis. PMID:21258556

  3. Estimation of cortical magnification from positional error in normally sighted and amblyopic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zahra; Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Besle, Julien; Webb, Ben S.; Barrett, Brendan T.; McGraw, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for deriving the linear cortical magnification factor from positional error across the visual field. We compared magnification obtained from this method between normally sighted individuals and amblyopic individuals, who receive atypical visual input during development. The cortical magnification factor was derived for each subject from positional error at 32 locations in the visual field, using an established model of conformal mapping between retinal and cortical coordinates. Magnification of the normally sighted group matched estimates from previous physiological and neuroimaging studies in humans, confirming the validity of the approach. The estimate of magnification for the amblyopic group was significantly lower than the normal group: by 4.4 mm deg−1 at 1° eccentricity, assuming a constant scaling factor for both groups. These estimates, if correct, suggest a role for early visual experience in establishing retinotopic mapping in cortex. We discuss the implications of altered cortical magnification for cortical size, and consider other neural changes that may account for the amblyopic results. PMID:25761341

  4. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dell, S.; Hensley, B.; Hall, J. W.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Antonelli, P. J.; Green, G. E.; Miller, J. M.; Guire, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is availability of an established clinical paradigm with real world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects. Design Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93–95 (n=10), 98–100 (n=11), or 100–102 (n=12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of four hours. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured prior to and after music exposure. Post-music tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and one week later. Results Changes in thresholds after the lowest level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a “notch” configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean=6.3±3.9dB; range=0–13 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hours post-exposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1-week post-exposure. Conclusions These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function following digital music player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be

  5. Effect of co-trimoxazole and sulfamethoxazole on serum creatinine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roy, M T; First, M R; Myre, S A; Cacini, W

    1982-01-01

    Significant elevation of serum creatinine concentration and reduction in creatinine clearance have been reported following cotrimoxazole therapy in patients with normal and impaired renal function. Both components of co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, have been proposed as the causative agent. Ten healthy male volunteers were treated for seven days with either sulfamethoxazole (5 subjects) or co-trimoxazole (5 subjects) in the usual recommended doses. After a one-week recovery period, the subjects were allocated to the alternate treatment regimen for another seven days. Cotrimoxazole caused a mean elevation in the serum creatinine concentration of 0.12 mg/dl over the base-line value (p less than 0.05). Sulfamethoxazole produced an insignificant fall in the serum creatinine level. The increase in the serum creatinine concentration induced by co-trimoxazole was reversed seven days after discontinuation of the drug. From this study, it can be concluded that either trimethoprim alone or an interaction between trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is responsible for the increase in serum creatinine observed following co-trimoxazole therapy and that sulfamethoxazole alone is not the causative agent. PMID:7071907

  6. Elafin/elastase-specific inhibitor in bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects and farmer's lung.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, G M; Sallenave, J M; Israél-Assayag, E; Cormier, Y; Gauldie, J

    1996-10-01

    Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1(PI)) cannot fully explain the total neutrophil elastase (NE) inhibitory capacity detected in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, suggesting the existence of other NE inhibitor(s). In the present study, we measured the concentrations of elafin, a newly described, low-molecular-weight serine proteinase inhibitor, SLPI, and alpha1(PI) in BAL fluids from eight healthy subjects, 13 asymptomatic farmers, seven farmers with active farmer's lung (FL), and seven farmers with previous (Ex) FL. In addition to SLPI and alpha1(PI), elafin was present in BAL fluids from control subjects and asymptomatic farmers, 13 (7-31) and 12 (7-67) mmol/mol of albumin (median and range) respectively. Elafin concentration increased significantly to 105 (38-207) mmol/mol of albumin in farmers with active FL and was also elevated in farmers with Ex FL. Elafin levels were highly correlated with lung inflammatory cell numbers, especially lymphocytes, and the decrease in single-breath diffusion capacity (DLCO). Elafin and SLPI were linked to yet uncharacterized proteins in BAL fluids. In conclusion, elafin is a constituent of BAL fluid from normal subjects and is found in enhanced concentrations in FL and in farmers with lymphocytic alveolitis. This suggests that elafin may play a role in lung homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:8887613

  7. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  8. Determinants of dynamic hyperinflation during metronome-paced tachypnea in COPD and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C B; Calligaro, G L; Quinn, M M; Eshaghian, P; Coskun, F; Abrazado, M; Bateman, E D; Raine, R I

    2014-01-01

    In COPD, dynamic hyperinflation (DH) occurs during exercise and during metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT). We investigated the relationship of DH with breathing pattern and ventilation (V˙E) in COPD and normal subjects (NS). In 35 subjects with moderate COPD and 17 younger healthy volunteers we measured inspiratory capacity (IC), breathing frequency (fR), expiratory time (TE), ventilation (V˙E) and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) at baseline and after 30s of MPT at 40breaths/min with metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2. A reduction in IC (ΔIC) was taken to indicate DH. In COPD subjects, DH correlated with TE but not with V˙E or PETCO2, and was best predicted by total lung capacity. NS also showed DH (although less than in COPD), which correlated with PETCO2 but not with fR, TE or V˙E. We conclude that MPT evokes DH in both NS and patients with COPD. TE is the most important determinant of DH during MPT in patients with COPD. PMID:23994176

  9. Betaxolol and glucose-insulin relationships: studies in normal subjects taking glibenclamide or metformin.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A J; Davies, I B; Warrington, S J

    1990-11-01

    1. The potential interaction between selective beta 1-adrenoceptor blockers and sulphonylureas or biguanides was studied by comparing the beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist betaxolol with placebo in 12 normal subjects taking glibenclamide or metformin in a single-blind crossover group study. 2. After a 4 day run-in period on no treatment, six subjects took glibenclamide 2.5 mg twice daily, and six subjects took metformin 850 mg twice daily from day 5 to day 19. All subjects took betaxolol 20 mg daily from day 10 to day 13, and placebo from day 5 to day 10 and from day 13 to day 19. 3. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured fasting and 60 min after a standard breakfast for 3 successive days during each study treatment; plasma potassium, sodium and betaxolol concentrations were also measured. 4. Fasting glucose, insulin and potassium concentrations did not differ significantly between betaxolol and placebo treatment periods in either glibenclamide- or metformin-treated groups. Post-prandial glucose and insulin concentrations were lower and higher, respectively, relative to fasting concentrations but there was no significant difference between any of the treatment periods. Glibenclamide produced significant increases in insulin concentrations compared with drug-free periods (P less than 0.01). Plasma potassium and sodium concentrations were not affected by any of the treatments. 5. Plasma betaxolol concentrations were adequate for beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade. 6. This study suggests that selective beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade with betaxolol does not change fasting or post-prandial glucose-insulin relationships during simultaneous treatment with either the sulphonylurea glibenclamide or the biguanide metformin. PMID:2125460

  10. Assessment of gastric emptying in normal subjects with sucralfate (Carafate) and Amphojel

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; McCallum, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum-containing antacids (e.g Amphojel) and aluminum-containing compounds such as sucralfate (Carafate) have been shown in animal and human studies to delay gastric emptying, and are one proposed mechanism of action for healing of duodenal ulcers. Therefore, the authors designed a study to study the effects of Carafate and Amphojel on gastric emptying. Ten normal volunteers of mean age 27 years with no previous history of upper gastrointestinal diseases were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of 30gm of cooked chicken liver injected with lmCi of 99m-Tc-S-C, mixed with 7.5 oz. of beef stew, and eaten with 4 oz. of water labeled with 100..mu..Ci of 111-In-DTPA. Immediately after ingestion of the meal, the subject was placed supine under a gamma camera. Gastric emptying (GE) was expressed as percent emptied. On separate days the subject was given either lgm of Carafate (190mg Al/gm) or placebo in a double blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. On the third day, each subject was given 30cc of Amphojel (105mg Al/5cc) followed 30 minutes later by the test meal. GE at 2 hours for the solid meal was 60%, 69%, and 54% and 79%, 86% and 68% at 3 hours for placebo, Carafate, and Amphojel respectively. A small but not significant difference in gastric emptying between Amphojel and placebo was seen from 2 to 3 hours. For the liquid meal approximately 90% emptying was present at 1 hour for all three studies. Further studies are needed to determine whether these medications administered in the standard doses given here may affect gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients.

  11. Association of Waist Circumference and Body Fat Weight with Insulin Resistance in Male Subjects with Normal Body Mass Index and Normal Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryoma; Yano, Yutaka; Yasuma, Taro; Onishi, Yuki; Suzuki, Toshinari; Maruyama-Furuta, Noriko; Gabazza, Esteban C; Sumida, Yasuhiro; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the relationship of the waist circumference (WC) and body fat weight (BF) with insulin resistance in subjects with normal body mass index (BMI) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during a routine medical check-up. Methods We categorized 167 male subjects in three groups as follows: a group with normal BMI but high WC (normal-BMI/high-WC group; 22≤BMI<25 kg/m(2), waist ≥85 cm; n=31), a group with normal BMI and normal WC (normal-BMI/normal-WC group, waist <85 cm; n=68), and a group with low normal BMI and normal WC (low normal-BMI/normal-WC group; 18.5≤BMI<22 kg/m(2) and waist<85 cm; n=68). We measured the plasma glucose and serum insulin levels before glucose loading and after 30 and 120 minutes and calculated several indexes of insulin secretion and sensitivity. Results Subjects from the normal-BMI/high-WC group showed significantly decreased Matsuda index and increased homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) compared with normal-BMI/normal-WC group. Univariate regression analyses showed significant correlation of HOMA-IR with WC (r=0.39) and BF (r=0.37). Matsuda index was significantly correlated with WC (r=-0.39) and BF (r=-0.47). The multiple regression analysis showed that the BF is significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (p<0.05) and Masuda index (p<0.005) among the clinical variables and with HOMA-IR (p<0.05) and Masuda index (p<0.0001) among the anthropometric variables but not with WC in either analysis. Conclusion Decreased Matsuda index and increased HOMA-IR were observed in subjects from the normal-BMI/high-WC group. Multivariate analysis showed that BF is associated with decreased Matsuda index and increased HOMA-IR and that WC is not associated with either factors. PMID:27250047

  12. Heroin snorters versus injectors: comparison on drug use and treatment outcome in age-matched samples.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M J; Chutuape, M A; Stitzer, M L

    1998-12-01

    Drug use histories and treatment outcomes were compared for age, race and gender-matched samples of intravenous (IV; n = 28) versus intranasal (IN; n = 28) opiate abusers entering a 3-day inpatient detoxification unit. Data were derived from the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) interview. Both groups reported daily heroin use prior to detoxification, but IV users reported more days of alcohol and multiple drug use during the past 30 days. Despite age matching, IV users also started using alcohol at an earlier age and accumulated more lifetime months of regular alcohol, cocaine and multidrug use. IV users were more likely to enter treatment following the detox, but no significant outcome differences were noted at 1 and 3 months post-detoxification. The results show that intravenous, as compared to intranasal, opiate users have both a more severe pattern and a more extensive history of the use of non-opiate drugs. PMID:10933336

  13. Right Heart 4DMRI Flow Visualization in Normal and Hypertensive subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Schroeder, Joyce

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in time-resolved 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) have allowed for the 3-dimensional characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV) and right atrium (RA). In this talk, an overview of a large, ongoing, multi-disciplinary investigation of 4D right heart hemodynamics in normal and pathologic patients is given, as well as lessons learned from 4DMRI cardiac research. Time-resolved visualization techniques for understanding and communicating complex right heart flow structures throughout the cardiac cycle are presented. Finally, a qualitative visual comparison of 3D flow structures in the vena cava, RA, and RV between healthy subjects and pulmonary hypertensive patients is presented.

  14. Automated segmentation of intramacular layers in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography structural images from normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xusheng; Yousefi, Siavash; An, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross-sectional structural images is important for assisting ophthalmologists in clinical decision making in terms of both diagnosis and treatment. We present an automatic approach for segmenting intramacular layers in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) images using a searching strategy based on locally weighted gradient extrema, coupled with an error-removing technique based on statistical error estimation. A two-step denoising preprocess in different directions is also employed to suppress random speckle noise while preserving the layer boundary as intact as possible. The algorithms are tested on the FD-OCT volume images obtained from four normal subjects, which successfully identify the boundaries of seven physiological layers, consistent with the results based on manual determination of macular OCT images. PMID:22559689

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Plasma Insulin Disappearance in Nonketotic Diabetic Patients and in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Navalesi, Renzo; Pilo, Alessandro; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Cecchetti, Paolo; Masoni, Antonio

    1978-01-01

    The studies so far reported on the metabolic clearance rate of insulin in human diabetes mellitus have given conflicting results, probably because they have been conducted on few patients and have used a variety of experimental techniques and data treatments. We investigated the kinetics of insulin distribution and degradation in 35 normal subjects and in 42 nonketotic, nonobese, overtly diabetic patients, of whom 26 were above 40 yr old and 16 were 40 yr old or less at diagnosis. The design of the study combined (a) the use of a tracer to perturb minimally the steady state and to avoid glucose infusion; (b) the preparation of purified [125I]-monoiodoinsulin, which has a metabolic behavior similar to that of native insulin; and (c) noncompartmental analysis of the plasma immunoprecipitable 125I-insulin disappearance curves, which were recorded for 2 h after pulse i.v. injection of the tracer. Metabolic clearance rate was found to be similar in diabetics (404±18 ml/min·m2, mean±SEM) and in normals (420±14), although the latter-onset patients had slightly, if not significantly, lower metabolic clearance rate values than the earlier-onset diabetics (385±19 and 443±36, respectively). The initial distribution volume of the hormone also did not significantly differ in diabetics and normals and was similar to plasma volume. The reentry rate into the initial distribution volume of the hormone and the total, plasma-equivalent distribution volume of insulin were both significantly raised in diabetics (251±12 ml/min·m2 and 10.3±0.5 liters/m2) in comparison with normals (195±8 and 7.5±0.3). The posthepatic delivery rate of insulin was found to be slightly raised in later-onset diabetics (194±20 mU/h·m2), but somewhat reduced in earlier-onset diabetics (133±15) in comparison with normals (172±14); these differences reflected the different basal plasma insulin concentrations in these three groups. Chronic treatment with oral hypoglycemic drugs, age, duration of

  16. Fluticasone Induces Epithelial Injury and Alters Barrier Function in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    MacRedmond, Ruth E.; Singhera, Gurpreet K.; Wadsworth, Samuel J.; Attridge, Susan; Bahzad, Mohammed; Williams, Kristy; Coxson, Harvey O.; White, Steven R.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The airway epithelium has a number of roles pivotal to the pathogenesis of asthma, including provision of a physical and immune barrier to the inhaled environment. Dysregulated injury and repair responses in asthma result in loss of airway epithelial integrity. Inhaled corticosteroids are a corner stone of asthma treatment. While effective in controlling asthma symptoms, they fail to prevent airway remodeling. Direct cytopathic effects on the airway epithelium may contribute to this. Methods This study examined the effects of a 4-week treatment regimen of inhaled fluticasone 500 μg twice daily in healthy human subjects. Induced sputum was collected for cell counts and markers of inflammation. Barrier function was examined by diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid (DTPA) clearance measured by nuclear scintillation scan, and albumin concentration in induced sputum. Results Steroid exposure resulted in epithelial injury as measured by a significant increase in the number of airway epithelial cells in induced sputum. There was no change in airway inflammation by induced sputum inflammatory cell counts or cytokine levels. Epithelial shedding was associated with an increase in barrier function, as measured by both a decrease in DTPA clearance and decreased albumin in induced sputum. This likely reflects the normal repair response. Conclusion Inhaled corticosteroids cause injury to normal airway epithelium. These effects warrant further evaluation in asthma, where the dysregulated repair response may contribute to airway remodeling. PMID:25324978

  17. Significance of normal range urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in Chinese subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing; Zhang, Jin-ping; Xie, Ling-ting; He, Yi-fan; Lv, Yan-yu; Jiang, Hong; Xing, Xiao-Yan

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate clinical features of Chinese metabolic syndrome (MS) subjects with normal urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) and to estimate independent correlation factor for UACR. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in participants having MS. The patients with different grade of albuminuria were divided into 4 groups according to the value of UACR (<10, 10-20, 21-30, >30 mg/g). All underwent biochemical tests. Bioelectrical impedance body fat content, islet β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were measured. Multivariable linear regression models were applied to further determine association between UACR and clinical factors with adjustment. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), TG, fat mass, fat content and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly higher in the group with UACR at 10-20 mg/g than those in the group with UACA lower than 10 mg/g (P<0.05). Multivariable linear regression showed that TG, HbA1c, waist-hip ratio (WHR) and SBP were independently associated with UACR. The patients with normal UACR had abnormal levels of MS components. The factors independently associated with UACR were TG, HbA1c, WHR and SBP. PMID:26670437

  18. Effect of ventilation inhomogeneity on "intrabreath" measurements of diffusing capacity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D J; Prabhu, M B; Mink, J T; Graham, B L

    1993-08-01

    In normal seated subjects we increased single-breath ventilation inhomogeneity by changing both the preinspiratory lung volume and breath-hold time and examined the ensuing effects on two different techniques of measuring the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). We measured the mean single-breath DLCO using the three-equation method (DLCOSB-3EQ) and also measured DLCO over discrete intervals during exhalation by the "intrabreath" method (DLCOexhaled). We assessed the distribution of ventilation using the normalized phase III slope for helium (SN). DLCOSB-3EQ was unaffected by preinspiratory lung volume and breath-hold time. DLCOexhaled increased with increasing preinspiratory lung volume and decreased with increasing breath-hold time. These changes correlated with the simultaneously observed changes in ventilation inhomogeneity as measured by SN (P < 0.01). We conclude that measurements of DLCOexhaled do not accurately reflect the mean DLCO. Intrabreath methods of measuring DLCO are based on the slope of the exhaled CO concentration curve, which is affected by both ventilation and diffusion inhomogeneities. Although DLCOexhaled may theoretically provide information about the distribution of CO uptake, the concomitant effects of ventilation nonuniformity on DLCOexhaled may mimic or mask the effects of diffusion nonuniformity. PMID:8226498

  19. On the nature of heart rate variability in a breathing normal subject: A stochastic process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Teodor; Petelczyc, Monika; Żebrowski, Jan J.; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kabat, Marek; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Piotrowska, Anna Justyna; Szelenberger, Waldemar

    2009-06-01

    Human heart rate is moderated by the autonomous nervous system acting predominantly through the sinus node (the main cardiac physiological pacemaker). One of the dominant factors that determine the heart rate in physiological conditions is its coupling with the respiratory rhythm. Using the language of stochastic processes, we analyzed both rhythms simultaneously taking the data from polysomnographic recordings of two healthy individuals. Each rhythm was treated as a sum of a deterministic drift term and a diffusion term (Kramers-Moyal expansion). We found that normal heart rate variability may be considered as the result of a bidirectional coupling of two nonlinear oscillators: the heart itself and the respiratory system. On average, the diffusion (noise) component measured is comparable in magnitude to the oscillatory (deterministic) term for both signals investigated. The application of the Kramers-Moyal expansion may be useful for medical diagnostics providing information on the relation between respiration and heart rate variability. This interaction is mediated by the autonomous nervous system, including the baroreflex, and results in a commonly observed phenomenon—respiratory sinus arrhythmia which is typical for normal subjects and often impaired by pathology.

  20. Multiple Subject Barycentric Discriminant Analysis (MUSUBADA): How to Assign Scans to Categories without Using Spatial Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Hervé; Williams, Lynne J.; Connolly, Andrew C.; Gobbini, M. Ida; Dunlop, Joseph P.; Haxby, James V.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new discriminant analysis (DA) method called Multiple Subject Barycentric Discriminant Analysis (MUSUBADA) suited for analyzing fMRI data because it handles datasets with multiple participants that each provides different number of variables (i.e., voxels) that are themselves grouped into regions of interest (ROIs). Like DA, MUSUBADA (1) assigns observations to predefined categories, (2) gives factorial maps displaying observations and categories, and (3) optimally assigns observations to categories. MUSUBADA handles cases with more variables than observations and can project portions of the data table (e.g., subtables, which can represent participants or ROIs) on the factorial maps. Therefore MUSUBADA can analyze datasets with different voxel numbers per participant and, so does not require spatial normalization. MUSUBADA statistical inferences are implemented with cross-validation techniques (e.g., jackknife and bootstrap), its performance is evaluated with confusion matrices (for fixed and random models) and represented with prediction, tolerance, and confidence intervals. We present an example where we predict the image categories (houses, shoes, chairs, and human, monkey, dog, faces,) of images watched by participants whose brains were scanned. This example corresponds to a DA question in which the data table is made of subtables (one per subject) and with more variables than observations. PMID:22548125

  1. Relation between QT interval variability and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    El-Hamad, Fatima; Lambert, Elisabeth; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2015-10-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval (QTV) is sought to provide an indirect noninvasive measure of sympathetic nerve activity, but a formal quantification of this relationship has not been provided. In this study we used power contribution analysis to study the relationship between QTV and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). ECG and MSNA were recorded in 10 healthy subjects in the supine position and after 40° head-up tilt. Power spectrum analysis was performed using a linear autoregressive model with two external inputs: heart period (RR interval) variability (RRV) and MSNA. Total and low-frequency power of QTV was decomposed into contributions by RRV, MSNA, and sources independent of RRV and MSNA. Results show that the percentage of MSNA power contribution to QT is very small and does not change with tilt. RRV power contribution to QT power is notable and decreases with tilt, while the greatest percentage of QTV is independent of RRV and MSNA in the supine position and after 40° head-up tilt. In conclusion, beat-to-beat QTV in normal subjects does not appear to be significantly affected by the rhythmic modulations in MSNA following low to moderate orthostatic stimulation. Therefore, MSNA oscillations may not represent a useful surrogate for cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at moderate levels of activation, or, alternatively, sympathetic influences on QTV are complex and not quantifiable with linear shift-invariant autoregressive models. PMID:26276814

  2. Control of limb dynamics in normal subjects and patients without proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sainburg, R L; Ghilardi, M F; Poizner, H; Ghez, C

    1995-02-01

    1. We recently showed that patients lacking proprioceptive input from their limbs have particular difficulty performing multijoint movements. In a pantomimed slicing gesture requiring sharp reversals in hand path direction, patients showed large hand path distortions at movement reversals because of failure to coordinate the timing of the separate reversals at the shoulder and elbow joints. We hypothesized that these reversal errors resulted from uncompensated effects of inertial interactions produced by changes in shoulder joint acceleration that were transferred to the elbow. We now test this hypothesis and examine the role of proprioceptive input by comparing the motor performance of five normal subjects with that of two patients with large-fiber sensory neuropathy. 2. Subjects were to trace each of six template lines presented randomly on a computer screen by straight overlapping out-and-back movements of the hand on a digitizing tablet. The lines originated from a common starting position but were in different directions and had different lengths. Directions and lengths were adjusted so that tracing movements would all require the same elbow excursion, whereas shoulder excursion would vary. The effects of varying interaction torques on elbow kinematics were then studied. The subject's dominant arm was supported in the horizontal plane by a low-inertia brace equipped with ball bearing joints and potentiometers under the elbow and shoulder. Hand position was monitored by a magnetic pen attached to the brace 1 cm above a digitizing tablet and could be displayed as a screen cursor. Vision of the subject's arm was blocked and the screen cursor was blanked at movement onset to prevent visual feedback during movement. Elbow joint torques were calculated from joint angle recordings and compared with electromyographic recordings of elbow joint musculature. 3. In control subjects, outward and inward paths were straight and overlapped the template lines regardless of

  3. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  4. Transcorneal electrical stimulation increases chorioretinal blood flow in normal human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kurimoto, Takuji; Oono, Shinichirou; Oku, Hidehiro; Tagami, Yuichi; Kashimoto, Ryousuke; Takata, Masashi; Okamoto, Norio; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Mimura, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this article is to investigate the effect of transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) on chorioretinal blood flow in healthy human subjects. Methods The chorioretinal blood flow of 10 healthy subjects was measured before and after TES by laser speckle flowgraphy and expressed as the square blur rate (SBR). The chorioretinal blood flow was determined before and immediately after TES and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 24, and 40 h after TES in three different areas: the margin of the optic disc, a point located midway between the optic disc and macula, and the macula area. The SBR of the stimulated eye is expressed relative to the value of the fellow eye. The mean standardized blur ratio was calculated as the ratio of the standardized SBR to the baseline SBR. The changes of intraocular pressure (IOP), blood pressure (BP), and pulse rate (PR) were determined after each measurement of the SBR. The ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated from BP and IOP. Results The mean standardized blur ratio at the optic disc did not change significantly throughout the course of the experiment. However, the mean standardized blur ratio midway between the optic disc and macula and at the macula area were significantly higher after TES than that after sham stimulation at 3 and 24 h (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively). At all times, the mean BP, PR, IOP, and OPP were not significantly different from the prestimulation values. Conclusions TES increases the chorioretinal blood flow in normal subjects with minimal effects on the systemic blood circulation and the IOP. The increase in chorioretinal blood flow may be one of the beneficial effects that TES has on ischemic retinal diseases. PMID:21188156

  5. Segmentation of retinal layers in volumetric OCT scans of normal and glaucomatous subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2011-03-01

    Volumetric scans of current SD-OCT devices can contain on the order of 50 million pixels. Due to this size and because quantitative measurements in these scans are often needed, automatic segmentation of these scans is required. In this paper, a fully automatic retinal layer segmentation algorithm is presented, based on pixel-classification. First, each pixel is augmented by intensity and gradient data from a local neighborhood, thereby producing a feature vector. These feature vectors are used as inputs for a support vector machine, which classifies each pixel as above or below each interface. Finally, a level set method regularizes the result, producing a smooth surface within the three-dimensional space. Volumetric scans of 10 healthy and 8 glaucomatous subjects were acquired with a Spectralis OCT. Each scan consisted of 193 B-scans, 512 A-lines per B-scan (5 times averaging) and 496 pixels per A-line. Two B-scans of each healthy subject were manually segmented and used to train the support vector machine. One B-scan of each glaucomatous subjects was manually segmented and used only for performance assessment of the algorithm. The root-mean-square errors for the normal eyes were 3.7, 15.4, 15.0 and 5.5 μm for the vitreous/retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), RNFL/ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer/inner nuclear layer and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid interfaces, respectively, and 5.5, 11.5, 9.5 and 6.2 μm for the glaucomatous eyes. Based on the segmentation, retinal and RNFL thickness maps and blood vessel masks were produced.

  6. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Relates to Hypo-Sympathetic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, leaving astronauts hemodynamically compromised after landing. Because of this hypovolemia, crew members are able to withstand a postflight 10 minute upright tilt test only if they are able to mount a hyper-sympathetic response. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that about 30% of astronauts, primarily female, have postflight sympathetic responses to tilt that are equal to or less than their preflight responses and thus, they become presyncopal. Part of the mission of the cardiovascular lab at the Johnson Space Center is to identify susceptible crewmembers before flight so that individualized countermeasures can be prescribed. The goal of this study was to develop a ground based model of hypovolemia that could be used for this purpose We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, would reproduce the landing day rate of presyncope during upright tilt in normal volunteers. Further, we hypothesized that, during hypovolemia, subjects who had sympathetic responses that were equal to or less than their normovolemic responses would become presyncopal during upright tilt tests. We studied 20 subjects, 13 male and 7 female, on two separate occasions: during normovolemia and hypovolemia. We induced hypovolemia with intravenous furosemide 40 hours prior to the experiment day, followed by a 10MEq Na diet. On the normovolemia and hypovolemia test days, plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing arterial pressure, heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. A two factor, repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the differences between group (presyncopal vs. non-presyncopal) and day (normovolemia vs. hypovolemia) effects. There were no differences in baseline arterial pressure between normovolemia and hypovolemia or between presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups, but heart rates were higher with hypovolemia in both groups (presyncopal

  7. Radiographic Analysis of the Sacropelvic Parameters of the Spine and Their Correlation in Normal Asymptomatic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, G.; Acharya, Shankar; K.L, Kalra; Chahal, Rupinder

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective Sacropelvic parameters in various spine and hip disorders have been published in various studies. We aimed to study the normal sacropelvic parameters and curvatures of the spine and their correlation in asymptomatic Indian adults in relation to variations in sex and age. Methods The study included 101 asymptomatic adults (50 men and 51 women with an average age of 47.16 and 48.59 years, respectively). For each subject, the thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS) were measured from standing lateral radiographs. After stratification of the group by sex and age with a cutoff of 50 years, descriptive, correlation, and regression analysis were performed using SPSS software. Results The average PI, SS, PT, LL, and TK values were 55.48 (±5.31), 35.99 (±7.53), 17.97 (±7.16), 48.84 (±9.82), and 32.55 (±10.92), respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in these values with regards to sex and age < 50 years and > 50 years but the pelvic incidence was found to be higher in women. A positive correlation between the PI and SS and a negative correlation between the SS and PT was observed. A positive correlation between the TK and LL was found in subjects > 50 years. Simple and multiple regression analyses were also performed for different groups. Conclusion The current study is the first of asymptomatic Indian adults and provides invaluable information to the clinicians about the normal range of sacropelvic and spinopelvic parameters, which is useful to plan spinal deformity corrections and to evaluate pathologic conditions associated with abnormal angular values. PMID:26933619

  8. Radiographic Analysis of the Sacropelvic Parameters of the Spine and Their Correlation in Normal Asymptomatic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, G; Acharya, Shankar; K L, Kalra; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective Sacropelvic parameters in various spine and hip disorders have been published in various studies. We aimed to study the normal sacropelvic parameters and curvatures of the spine and their correlation in asymptomatic Indian adults in relation to variations in sex and age. Methods The study included 101 asymptomatic adults (50 men and 51 women with an average age of 47.16 and 48.59 years, respectively). For each subject, the thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS) were measured from standing lateral radiographs. After stratification of the group by sex and age with a cutoff of 50 years, descriptive, correlation, and regression analysis were performed using SPSS software. Results The average PI, SS, PT, LL, and TK values were 55.48 (±5.31), 35.99 (±7.53), 17.97 (±7.16), 48.84 (±9.82), and 32.55 (±10.92), respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in these values with regards to sex and age < 50 years and > 50 years but the pelvic incidence was found to be higher in women. A positive correlation between the PI and SS and a negative correlation between the SS and PT was observed. A positive correlation between the TK and LL was found in subjects > 50 years. Simple and multiple regression analyses were also performed for different groups. Conclusion The current study is the first of asymptomatic Indian adults and provides invaluable information to the clinicians about the normal range of sacropelvic and spinopelvic parameters, which is useful to plan spinal deformity corrections and to evaluate pathologic conditions associated with abnormal angular values. PMID:26933619

  9. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of human apolipoprotein CII. A study in normal and hypertriglyceridemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, M L; Srivastava, L S; Chen, C Y; Perisutti, C G; Campbell, M; Lutmer, R F; Glueck, C J

    1977-07-01

    A specific, precise, and sensitive double-antibody radioimmunoassay for the measurement of human apolipoprotein CII (apoCII) was developed. ApoCII was labeled with (125)I (chloramine-T) and monospecific antibody was raised in rabbits. No appreciable cross-reactivity with apolipoproteins CI, CIII, AI, AII, low density lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma was observed. Lipoproteins containing apoCII displaced the standard curve in parallel. ApoCII measurement was not affected by pretreatment of plasma with tetramethylurea, ethanol-diethyl ether, or heating. Mean (+/-SE) plasma-immunoreactive apoCII in 47 normotriglyceridemic subjects was 51.8+/-3.2 mug/ml, generally comparable with previous estimates of its concentration by other methods. ApoCII levels in 9 subjects with type IIB lipoprotein pattern, 14 with the type IV lipoprotein pattern, and 5 with type V lipoprotein pattern were respectively, 89.9+/-4.6, 85.4+/-6.9, 132.8+/-21.0 mug/ml, all higher than normals (P < 0.001). Plasma apoCII and triglyceride concentrations correlated in normo- and hypertriglyceridemics (r = 0.36 and 0.58, P < 0.05). Plasma triglycerides correlated inversely with the fraction of total apoCII in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-free plasma (r = -0.75, P < 0.01). There was no correlation between plasma apoCII and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. In normotriglyceridemics, VLDL apoCII levels correlated with in vitro lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activator activities (r = 0.89, P < 0.01). In hypertriglyceridemic subjects the mean concentrations of apoCII per milligrams VLDL protein, LPL activator activity per milligrams VLDL protein, and LPL activator activity per micrograms VLDL apoCII were all lower than in normotriglyceridemics, P < 0.05. As plasma triglycerides and apoCII increase, apoCII is redistributed from high density lipoprotein to VLDL. However, the amount of apoCII per milligram VLDL protein and its LPL activator potency per milligram VLDL protein are reduced. These

  11. Psychophysiology and psychoacoustics of music: Perception of complex sound in normal subjects and psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Iakovides, Stefanos A; Iliadou, Vassiliki TH; Bizeli, Vassiliki TH; Kaprinis, Stergios G; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George S

    2004-01-01

    Perception of complex sound is a process carried out in everyday life situations and contributes in the way one perceives reality. Attempting to explain sound perception and how it affects human beings is complicated. Physics of simple sound can be described as a function of frequency, amplitude and phase. Psychology of sound, also termed psychoacoustics, has its own distinct elements of pitch, intensity and tibre. An interconnection exists between physics and psychology of hearing. Music being a complex sound contributes to communication and conveys information with semantic and emotional elements. These elements indicate the involvement of the central nervous system through processes of integration and interpretation together with peripheral auditory processing. Effects of sound and music in human psychology and physiology are complicated. Psychological influences of listening to different types of music are based on the different characteristics of basic musical sounds. Attempting to explain music perception can be simpler if music is broken down to its basic auditory signals. Perception of auditory signals is analyzed by the science of psychoacoustics. Differences in complex sound perception have been found between normal subjects and psychiatric patients and between different types of psychopathologies. PMID:15050030

  12. Acute effects of ethanol and acetate on glucose kinetics in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Koivisto, V.A.; Ylikahri, R.; Taskinen, M.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of two ethanol doses on glucose kinetics and assessed the role of acetate as a mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance. Ten normal males were studied on four occasions, during which either a low or moderate ethanol, acetate, or saline dose was administered. Both ethanol doses similarly inhibited basal glucose production. The decrease in R{sub a} was matched by a comparable decrease in glucose utilization (R{sub d}), resulting in maintenance of normoglycemia. During hyperinsulinemia glucose disposal was lower in the moderate than the low-dose ethanol or saline studies. During acetate infusion, the blood acetate level was comparable with those in the ethanol studies. Acetate had no effect on glucose kinetics. In conclusion, (1) in overnight fasted subjects, ethanol does not cause hypoglycemia because its inhibitory effect on R{sub a} is counterbalanced by equal inhibition of R{sub d}; (2) basal R{sub a} and R{sub d} are maximally inhibited already by small ethanol doses, whereas inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal requires a moderate ethanol dose; and (3) acetate is not the mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance.

  13. Subjective cognitive concerns, amyloid-β, and neurodegeneration in clinically normal elderly

    PubMed Central

    Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Pietras, Alison C.; Marshall, Gad A.; Vannini, Patrizia; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether neuroimaging biomarkers of amyloid-β (Aβ) and neurodegeneration (ND) are associated with greater self-reported subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) in clinically normal older individuals. Methods: A total of 257 participants underwent Pittsburgh compound B PET, PET with fluorodeoxyglucose 18F, and structural MRI, as well as a battery of neuropsychological measures including several questionnaires regarding SCC. Individuals were classified into 4 biomarker groups: biomarker negative (Aβ−/ND−), amyloidosis alone (Aβ+/ND−), amyloidosis plus ND (Aβ+/ND+), and ND alone (Aβ−/ND+). Results: Both Aβ and ND were independently associated with greater SCC controlling for objective memory performance. By contrast, neither Aβ nor ND was associated with objective memory performance controlling for SCC. Further examination revealed greater SCC in individuals with Aβ or ND positivity compared to biomarker-negative individuals. In addition, greater SCC predicted Aβ positivity when controlling for ND status. Conclusions: When individuals were grouped by biomarker status, those who were positive on Aβ or ND had the highest report of SCC compared to biomarker-negative individuals. Findings were consistent when SCC was used to predict Aβ positivity. Taken together, results suggest that both Aβ and ND are associated with SCC, independent of objective memory performance. Enrichment of individuals with SCC may increase likelihood of Aβ and ND markers in potential participants for secondary prevention trials. PMID:26048028

  14. Psychophysiology and psychoacoustics of music: Perception of complex sound in normal subjects and psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Iakovides, Stefanos A; Iliadou, Vassiliki TH; Bizeli, Vassiliki TH; Kaprinis, Stergios G; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George S

    2004-03-29

    Perception of complex sound is a process carried out in everyday life situations and contributes in the way one perceives reality. Attempting to explain sound perception and how it affects human beings is complicated. Physics of simple sound can be described as a function of frequency, amplitude and phase. Psychology of sound, also termed psychoacoustics, has its own distinct elements of pitch, intensity and tibre. An interconnection exists between physics and psychology of hearing.Music being a complex sound contributes to communication and conveys information with semantic and emotional elements. These elements indicate the involvement of the central nervous system through processes of integration and interpretation together with peripheral auditory processing.Effects of sound and music in human psychology and physiology are complicated. Psychological influences of listening to different types of music are based on the different characteristics of basic musical sounds. Attempting to explain music perception can be simpler if music is broken down to its basic auditory signals. Perception of auditory signals is analyzed by the science of psychoacoustics. Differences in complex sound perception have been found between normal subjects and psychiatric patients and between different types of psychopathologies. PMID:15050030

  15. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  16. Oro-facial activities in sleep bruxism patients and in normal subjects: a controlled polygraphic and audio-video study.

    PubMed

    Dutra, K M C; Pereira, F J; Rompré, P H; Huynh, N; Fleming, N; Lavigne, G J

    2009-02-01

    To our knowledge, the large spectrum of sleep motor activities (SMA) present in the head and neck region has not yet been systematically estimated in normal and sleep bruxism (SB) subjects. We hypothesized that in the absence of audio-video signal recordings, normal and SB subjects would present a high level of SMA that might confound the scoring specificity of SB. A retrospective analysis of several SMA, including oro-facial activities (OFA) and rhythmic masticatory muscle activities (RMMA), was made from polygraphic and audio-video recordings of 21 normal subjects and 25 SB patients. Sleep motor activities were scored, blind to subject status, from the second night of sleep recordings. Discrimination of OFA included the following types of activities: lip sucking, head movements, chewing-like movements, swallowing, head rubbing and scratching, eye opening and blinking. These were differentiated from RMMA and tooth grinding. The frequency of SMA per hour of sleep was lower in normal subjects in comparison with SB patients (P < 0.001). Up to 85% of all SMA in normal subjects were related to OFA while 30% of SMA in SB patients were related to OFA scoring (P < 0.001). The frequency of RMMA was seven times higher in SB patients than in normal subjects (P < 0.001). Several SMA can be observed in normal and SB subjects. In the absence of audio-video signal recordings, the discrimination of various types of OFA is difficult to achieve and may lead to erroneous estimation of SB-related activities. PMID:18976258

  17. Heritability of Craniofacial Structures in Normal Subjects and Patients with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Comyn, Francois-Louis; Keenan, Brendan T.; Cater, Jacqueline; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    should be able to identify genes associated with these intermediate craniofacial phenotypes. Citation: Chi L, Comyn FL, Keenan BT, Cater J, Maislin G, Pack AI, Schwab RJ. Heritability of craniofacial structures in normal subjects and patients with sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1689-1698. PMID:25197806

  18. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O’Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite® system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns. PMID:26957776

  19. Minimum Audible Angles Measured with Simulated Normally-Sized and Oversized Pinnas for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Test Subjects.

    PubMed

    Rønne, Filip M; Laugesen, Søren; Jensen, Niels S; Pedersen, Julie H

    2016-01-01

    The human pinna introduces spatial acoustic cues in terms of direction-dependent spectral patterns that shape the incoming sound. These cues are specifically useful for localization in the vertical dimension. Pinna cues exist at frequencies above approximately 5 kHz, a frequency range where people with hearing loss typically have their highest hearing thresholds. Since increased thresholds often are accompanied by reduced frequency resolution, there are good reasons to believe that many people with hearing loss are unable to discriminate these subtle spectral pinna--cue details, even if the relevant frequency region is amplified by hearing aids.One potential solution to this problem is to provide hearing-aid users with artificially enhanced pinna cues-as if they were listening through oversized pinnas. In the present study, it was tested whether test subjects were better at discriminating spectral patterns similar to enlarged-pinna cues. The enlarged-pinna patterns were created by transposing (T) generic normal-sized pinna cues (N) one octave down, or by using the approach (W) suggested by Naylor and Weinrich (System and method for generating auditory spatial cues, United States Patent, 2011). The experiment was cast as a determination of simulated minimum audible angle (MAA) in the median saggital plane. 13 test subjects with sloping hearing loss and 11 normal-hearing test subjects participated. The normal-hearing test subjects showed similar discrimination performance with the T, W, and N-type simulated pinna cues, as expected. However, the results for the hearing-impaired test subjects showed only marginally lower MAAs with the W and T-cues compared to the N-cues, while the overall discrimination thresholds were much higher for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal-hearing test subjects. PMID:27080661

  20. Orthophosphate transport in the erythrocyte of normal subjects and of patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed Central

    Tenenhouse, H S; Scriver, C R

    1975-01-01

    We have examined the mechanism of TCA-soluble orthophosphate (Pi) transfer across the membrane of mature human erythrocytes in normal subjects and in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (X-LH). The studies were carried out largely at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, in partial stimulation of conditions in vivo. (a) At physiological concentrations (1-2 mM) Pi enters the intact normal erythrocyte down its chemical gradient and under no conditions could we identify a steady-state trans-membrane gradient for Pi greater than 0.6. Calculations of the phosphate anion distribution ratio using the Nernst equation yield theoretical values that closely approximate observed values. (b) Glycolytic inhibitors have little effect on total entry of 32Pi inti erythrocytes but they do affect the intracellular distribution of Pi. In the presence of iodoacetamide, label accumulates almost exclusively in the orthophosphate pool and less than 1% enters the organic phosphate pool. (c) Specific activity measurements in unblocked cells indicate that Pi anion equilibrates first with its intracellular Pi pool. These initial findings imply that neither group translocation, nor energy coupling, influence Pi permeation into the human erythrocytes. (d) The relationship between 32P entry and extracellular Pi concentration is parabolic in the presence of chloride, and linear in the presence of sulfate. The kinetics of concentration dependent entrance cannot be examined and saturability of Pi entry cannot be identified under these conditions. (e) The competitive inhibitor arsenate partially inhibits the initial rate and steady-state flux of orthophosphate in erythrocytes treated with iodoacetamide to inhibit glycolysis. However, a significant portion of Pi transport escapes arsenate inhibition. (f) Activation energies for Pi entry, in nonglycolizing erythrocytes are much higher than those required by simple diffusion in an aqueous system. (g) Neither the inward or outward movement of Pi is modulated by

  1. Active versus Passive Proprioceptive Straight-Ahead Pointing in Normal Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chokron, Sylvie; Colliot, Pascale; Atzeni, Thierry; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Ohlmann, Theophile

    2004-01-01

    Eighty blindfolded healthy female subjects participated in an active and a passive straight-ahead pointing task to study the estimation of the subjective sagittal middle in the presence or absence of an active haptic exploration. Subjects were to point straight-ahead with their left or right index finger starting from different right- or…

  2. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  3. QT Is Longer in Drug-Free Patients with Schizophrenia Compared with Age-Matched Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kumiko; Ozeki, Yuji; Okayasu, Hiroaki; Takano, Yumiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Hori, Hiroaki; Orui, Masami; Horie, Minoru; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    The potassium voltage-gated channel KCNH2 is a well-known gene in which mutations induce familial QT interval prolongation. KCNH2 is suggested to be a risk gene for schizophrenia. Additionally, the disturbance of autonomic control, which affects the QT interval, is known in schizophrenia. Therefore, we speculate that schizophrenic patients have characteristic features in terms of the QT interval in addition to the effect of antipsychotic medication. The QT interval of patients with schizophrenia not receiving antipsychotics (n = 85) was compared with that of patients with schizophrenia receiving relatively large doses of antipsychotics (n = 85) and healthy volunteers (n = 85). The QT interval was corrected using four methods (Bazett, Fridericia, Framingham or Hodges method). In ANCOVA with age and heart rate as covariates, patients not receiving antipsychotic treatment had longer QT intervals than did the healthy volunteers, but antipsychotics prolonged the QT interval regardless of the correction method used (P<0.01). Schizophrenic patients with and without medication had a significantly higher mean heart rate than did the healthy volunteers, with no obvious sex-related differences in the QT interval. The QT interval prolongation may be manifestation of a certain biological feature of schizophrenia. PMID:24887423

  4. Respiratory depression following morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P I; Joel, S P; John, L; Wedzicha, J A; Maclean, M; Slevin, M L

    1995-01-01

    1. Morphine 6-glucuronide (M6G) is a metabolite of morphine with analgesic activity. A double-blind, randomised comparison of the effects of morphine and M6G on respiratory function was carried out in 10 normal subjects after i.v. morphine (10 mg 70 kg-1) or M6G (1, 3.3 and 5 mg 70 kg-1). Analgesic potency was also assessed using an ischaemic pain test and other toxic effects were monitored. 2. Following morphine there was a significant increase in arterial PCO2, as measured by blood gases 45 min post dose (0.54 +/- 0.24 (s.d.) kPa, P < 0.001), and in transcutaneous PCO2 from 15 min post dose until the end of the study period (4 h), whereas blood gas and transcutaneous PCO2 were unchanged after M6G at 1.0, 3.3 and 5.0 mg 70 kg-1. This increased PCO2 following morphine was associated with an increase in expired CO2 concentration (FECO2) (0.20 +/- 0.14% expired air at 15 min post dose, P = 0.002), compared with small but significant reductions in FECO2 following morphine 6-glucuronide (-0.15 +/- 0.17% at 1 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.030, -0.14 +/- 0.15% at 3.3 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.017, -0.18 +/- 0.11% at 5 mg 70 kg-1 P = 0.024). Maximum transcutaneous PCO2 was significantly increased after morphine (0.63 +/- 0.28 kPa P = 0.009), but was not changed after M6G at 1 mg (0.10 +/- 0.34 kPa P = 0.11) 3.3 mg (0.06 +/- 0.37 kPa P = 0.34) or 5 mg (0.26 +/- 0.07 kPa P = 0.10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562297

  5. Effects of prolonged fasting and sustained lipolysis on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Salgin, B; Marcovecchio, M L; Humphreys, S M; Hill, N; Chassin, L J; Lunn, D J; Hovorka, R; Dunger, D B

    2009-03-01

    Normal beta-cells adjust their function to compensate for any decrease in insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to explore whether a prolonged fast would allow a study of the effects of changes in circulating free fatty acid (FFA) levels on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity and whether any potential effects could be reversed by the antilipolytic agent acipimox. Fourteen (8 female, 6 male) healthy young adults (aged 22.8-26.9 yr) without a family history of diabetes and a body mass index of 22.6 +/- 3.2 kg/m(2) were studied on three occasions in random order. Growth hormone and FFA levels were regularly measured overnight (2200-0759), and subjects underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test in the morning (0800-1100) on each visit. Treatment A was an overnight fast, treatment B was a 24-h fast with regular administrations of a placebo, and treatment C was a 24-h fast with regular ingestions of 250 mg of acipimox. The 24-h fast increased overnight FFA levels (as measured by the area under the curve) 2.8-fold [51.3 (45.6-56.9) vs. 18.4 (14.4-22.5) *10(4) micromol/l*min, P < 0.0001], and it led to decreases in insulin sensitivity [5.7 (3.6-8.9) vs. 2.6 (1.3-4.7) *10(-4) min(-1) per mU/l, P < 0.0001] and the acute insulin response [16.3 (10.9-21.6) vs. 12.7 (8.7-16.6) *10(2) pmol/l*min, P = 0.02], and therefore a reduction in the disposition index [93.1 (64.8-121.4) vs. 35.5 (21.6-49.4) *10(2) pmol/mU, P < 0.0001]. Administration of acipimox during the 24-h fast lowered FFA levels by an average of 20% (range: -62 to +49%; P = 0.03), resulting in a mean increase in the disposition index of 31% (P = 0.03). In conclusion, the 24-h fast was accompanied by substantial increases in fasting FFA levels and induced reductions in the acute glucose-simulated insulin response and insulin sensitivity. The use of acipimox during the prolonged fast increased the disposition index, suggesting a partial reversal of the effects of fasting on the acute insulin response and insulin

  6. A matched-subject comparison of underachievers with normals on intellectual, behavioral, and emotional variables.

    PubMed

    Klinge, V; Rennick, P M; Lennox, K

    1977-01-01

    Children labeled as underachievers are compared to a matched group functioning normally within the classroom. Factor analyses of the data from several tests reveal that the "normal" children not only have achieved higher academic performance but also have better learning aptitude. The inference may be made that many "underachievers" actually have a low general aptitude when carefully measured. PMID:845331

  7. Blood pressure, intraerythrocyte content, and transmembrane fluxes of sodium during normal and high salt intake in subjects with and without a family history of hypertension: evidence against a sodium transport inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, O; Andersson, O; Herlitz, H; Jonsson, O; Nauclér, J; Wikstrand, J; Berglund, G

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen young normotensive men with a family history of hypertension in two generations (H) and 15 age-matched control subjects (C) were studied with respect to blood pressure (BP), intraerythrocyte sodium content (IeNa), sodium influx, and rate of sodium efflux. The investigations were done during normal salt intake and after 4 weeks of ordinary intake plus 12 g NaCl daily. BP did not increase significantly in either of the two groups during increased salt intake. During normal salt intake H had a significantly (p less than 0.01) higher IeNa (9.5 +/- 1.5 mmol/L) compared with C (8.2 +/- 1.4 mmol/L). During high salt intake IeNa in H decreased significantly to 8.1 +/- 1.2 mmol/L, the difference from C (7.6 +/- 1.2 mmol/L) not being significant. While the Na influx was similar in the two groups, the rate constant for Na efflux was significantly lower during normal salt intake in H (0.23 +/- 0.08 vs 0.29 +/- 0.1 h-1, p less than 0.05). Salt intake increased the efflux rate constant significantly in H (0.28 +/- 0.08 h-1, p less than 0.05), while it did not change significantly in C (0.32 +/- 0.08 h-1) compared with the value for normal salt intake. Our results suggest that young men with a hereditary predisposition to hypertension have a higher IeNa secondary to a lower rate of Na efflux, while a normal Na influx indicates normal cell permeability to Na. The findings in H during high Na intake--a decreased IeNa and an increased efflux rate of Na--do not favor the existence of a sodium transport inhibitor, in subjects predisposed to hypertension, increasing during high salt intake and volume expansion and acting through inhibition of the Na efflux. PMID:6204156

  8. Effect of Plantago ovata (psyllium) husk and seeds on sterol metabolism: studies in normal and ileostomy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, I C; Brodie, B; Eastwood, M A

    1994-02-01

    The diet of six normal and five ileostomy subjects was supplemented with 10 g/d Plantago ovata psyllium husk for 3 wk while six normal and four ileostomy subjects received 10 g/d psyllium seed. Fecal and ileostomy output, sterol excretion, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured before and after supplementation. The husk had no effect on cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations in either normal or ileostomy subjects. Total and high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were reduced on average by 6.4% and 9.3%, respectively, in the normal group after seed supplementation. No effect on fecal bile acid excretion in the normal subjects was found after both regimes. Ileostomy bile acids were increased (on average 25%) after seed supplementation, whereas no effect on cholesterol concentrations was found. These results suggest that psyllium seed might be more effective than the husk in reducing serum cholesterol, that this cholesterol-lowering effect is not mediated by increased fecal bile acid losses, and increased ileal losses of bile acids might be compensated for by enhanced reabsorption in the colon. PMID:8310991

  9. Optimization of speech in noise with three signal processing algorithms for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Bas A. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Lyzenga, Johannes

    2002-05-01

    In this study a three-dimensional Simplex procedure was applied to optimize speech in noise by a combination of signal processing algorithms for different acoustic conditions and hearing losses. The algorithms used to span the three dimensions are noise reduction, spectral tilting, and spectral enhancement, respectively. Additionally, we studied the algorithms for their main effects and interaction effects within the optimization process. The subjects were asked to evaluate two consecutive, differently processed sentences on listening comfort. Three different noise types and two signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were used. Three groups of subjects participated: normal hearing, normal hearing with simulated impaired auditory filtering (by spectral smearing), and sensorineurally hearing-impaired subjects. For the normal-hearing group we applied S/N=0 dB. For the hearing-impaired and the simulated hearing-impaired subjects we applied S/N=5 dB. We will discuss the similarities and differences in the response patterns of the three groups. Also, the individual preferences will be related to the hearing capacity, and to the type of interfering noise. Finally, we will discuss differences in the perceptual features that are used to judge listening comfort of the fragments by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects.

  10. Low- and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses in normal subjects and pancreas transplant recipients: role of extrinsic innervation.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, G E; Hoffmann, R G; Johnson, C P; Kissebah, A H

    1992-01-01

    Low-frequency ultradian and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses were studied in normal subjects and in metabolically stable pancreas transplant recipients. Insulin secretion pulsatility was evaluated after deconvoluting the pulsatile plasma C peptide concentrations with its kinetic coefficients. In normal subjects, ultradian insulin secretion pulses with periodicities of 75-115 min were consistently observed during the 24-h secretory cycle. Pulse period and relative amplitude during the overnight rest (95 +/- 4 min and 27.6 +/- 2.4%) were similar to those during the steady state of continuous enteral feeding (93 +/- 5 min and 32.6 +/- 3.3%). Sampling at 2-min intervals revealed the presence of high-frequency insulin secretion pulses with periodicities of 14-20 min and an average amplitude of 46.6 +/- 5.4%. Pancreas transplant recipients had normal fasting and fed insulin secretion rates. Both low- and high-frequency insulin secretion pulses were present. The high-frequency pulse characteristics were identical to normal. Low-frequency ultradian pulse periodicity was normal but pulse amplitude was increased. Thus, ultradian insulin secretory pulsatility is a consistent feature in normal subjects. The low- and high-frequency secretion pulsatilities are generated independent of extrinsic innervation. Autonomic innervation might modulate low-frequency ultradian pulse amplitude exerting a dampening effect. PMID:1644923

  11. Comparison of circadian variations using FEV1 and peak expiratory flow rates among normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Troyanov, S.; Ghezzo, H.; Cartier, A.; Malo, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Most studies that describe circadian variations in asthma have used maximum rate of peak expiratory flow (PEF) rather than forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to assess airway calibre. This study was designed to assess circadian variations in PEF and FEV1 measured simultaneously and to compare variations in these measurements in normal and asthmatic subjects in a stable clinical state. METHODS--Twenty nine subjects (nine asthmatic subjects on bronchodilators, 10 on inhaled steroids, and 10 normal controls) were asked to record their PEF and FEV1 with a new portable instrument every two hours during the day and once on waking at night for two weeks. Circadian variations were examined in different ways using arithmetical indices and cosinor analysis. RESULTS--78% of PEF values and 75% of FEV1 values were considered to be reproducible and were included in the analysis. Variations obtained using PEF did not differ from those obtained using FEV1. Significant cosinor variations were found in at least 50% of recording days for most of the subjects and showed the same features as for arithmetical indices. Daily variations in PEF and FEV1 were significantly correlated with airway calibre and PC20 methacholine (r approximately 0.5 to approximately 0.6). CONCLUSIONS--PEF is as satisfactory as FEV1 for describing circadian variations among normal subjects and stable asthmatic subjects. PMID:8091322

  12. The Effects of Rehearsal Instructions Upon the Paired-Associate Learning of Normal and Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Donald A.; Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1972-01-01

    Pattern of results suggests that retardates were relatively deficient in the spontaneous use of effective rehearsal mechanisms, but could perform as well as normals when instructed to use a specific rehearsal strategy. (Authors)

  13. Spread of electrical activity at cortical level after repetitive magnetic stimulation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lorenzano, C; Gilio, F; Inghilleri, M; Conte, A; Fofi, L; Manfredi, M; Berardelli, A

    2002-11-01

    In normal subjects, focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the hand motor area evokes muscle potentials (MEPs) from muscles in the hand (target muscles) and the arm (non-target muscles). In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the spread of MEPs induced by focal rTMS in non-target muscles. rTMS was delivered with a Magstim stimulator and a figure-of-eight coil placed over the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) motor area of the left hemisphere. Trains of 10 stimuli were given at a suprathreshold intensity (120% of motor threshold) and at frequencies of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded simultaneously from the FDI (target muscle) and the contralateral biceps muscle and from the FDI muscle ipsilateral to the side of stimulation (non-target muscle). rTMS delivered in trains to the FDI motor area of the left hemisphere elicited MEPs in the contralateral FDI (target muscle) that gradually increased in amplitude over the course of the train. Focal rTMS trains also induced MEPs in the contralateral biceps (non-target muscle) but did so only after the second or third stimulus; like target-muscle MEPs, in non-target muscle MEPs progressively increased in amplitude during the train. At no frequency did rTMS elicit MEPs in the FDI muscle ipsilateral to the site of stimulation. rTMS left the latency of EMG responses in the FDI and biceps muscles unchanged during the trains of stimuli. The latency of biceps MEPs was longer after rTMS than after a single TMS pulse. In conditioning-test experiments designed to investigate the cortical origin of the spread, a single TMS pulse delivered over the left hemisphere at an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 50, 100 and 150 ms reduced the amplitude of the test MEP evoked by a single TMS pulse delivered over the right hemisphere; and a conditioning rTMS train delivered over the left hemisphere increased the amplitude of the test MEP evoked by a single TMS pulse over the

  14. Stimulus-Dominance Effects and Lateral Asymmetries for Language in Normal Subjects and in Patients with a Single Functional Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stefano, Marirosa; Marano, Elena; Viti, Marzia

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of language laterality by the dichotic fused-words test may be impaired by interference effects revealed by the dominant report of one member of the stimuli-pair. Stimulus-dominance and ear asymmetry were evaluated in normal population (48 subjects of both sex and handedness) and in 2 patients with a single functional hemisphere.…

  15. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  16. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  17. Beyond Normalization and Impairment: Theorizing Subjectivity in Learning Difficulties--Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Scott; Dyson, Simon; Hiles, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Normalization and social role valorization continue to play a central role in shaping debates and practice relating to learning difficulties. In the context of recent arguments this paper draws on the work of Foucault to deconstruct these theories. Foucault's work alerts us to a conceptual confusion at their heart which reproduces a common but…

  18. Identification of musical instruments by normal-hearing subjects listening through a cochlear-implant simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Rebecca D.; Eddington, Donald

    2002-05-01

    Signal processing in a cochlear implant (CI) is primarily designed to convey speech and environmental sounds, and can cause distortion of musical timbre. Systematic investigation of musical instrument identification through a CI has not yet revealed how timbre is affected by the implant's processing. In this experiment, the bandpass filtering, rectification, and low-pass filtering of an implant are simulated in MATLAB. Synthesized signals representing 12 common instruments, each performing a major scale, are processed by simulations using up to 8 analysis channels. The unprocessed recordings, together with the 8 simulation conditions for 12 instruments, are presented in random order to each of the subjects. The subject's task is to identify the instrument represented by each item. The subjects also subjectively score each item based on similarity and pleasantness. We anticipate performance using the simulation will be worse than the unprocessed condition because of the limited information delivered by the envelopes of the analysis channels. These results will be analyzed as a confusion matrix and provide a basis for contrasting the information used by subjects listening to the unprocessed and processed materials. Understanding these differences should aid in the development of new processing strategies to better represent music for cochlear implant users.

  19. Effect of visual stimulus using central and peripheral visual field on postural control of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Park, Du-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of visual stimulus using central and peripheral vision fields on postural control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 40 young adult volunteers (15 males, 25 females) who had been informed of the study purpose and procedure. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of differing visual stimulus. Each group was given visual intervention in a standing position for 3 minutes. Postural control was evaluated before and after visual intervention. [Results] The results of the functional reach test and body sway test showed significant differences among the four groups. [Conclusion] The two-way peripheral vision-field group showed significantly more body sway after visual intervention than the other three groups. This finding may suggest two-way peripheral vision field is a more effective visual stimulus for training postural control and balance. PMID:27390412

  20. Incremental threshold loading: a standard protocol and establishment of a reference range in naive normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P H; Cowley, A J; Kinnear, W J

    1997-12-01

    Incremental threshold loading (ITL) has been proposed as a test of inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. To date, however, there has been no standardized protocol for an ITL test, and no reference range, with different investigators using a variety of different pressure increments in small numbers of subjects. We developed an ITL test using the weighted plunger (WP) principle, which uses standard increments of pressure. In our protocol subjects inspire through the WP generating an initial threshold opening pressure of 10 cmH2O. This pressure is raised at 2 min intervals in increments of 5 cmH2O until they fail to lift the plunger on two consecutive attempted breaths. Sixty healthy volunteers (30 males and 30 females) aged 20-80 yrs performed the ITL test. Twelve subjects (six females and six males) performed the test twice to assess reproducibility and repeatability. Using stepwise multiple linear regression, we regressed the maximum threshold pressure sustained for a full 2 min (Pmax) against age, height, weight and static maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP). Pmax was significantly related to age but not to either height or weight, the regression equation for males was Pmax (cmH2O)=103.8 - (1.0 x age in years), and for females was Pmax (cmH2O)=93.7 - (1.0 x age in years). The within-subject standard deviation for those repeating the ITL test was 5.4 cmH2O. Incremental threshold loading is a simple technique with good reproducibility, which most naive subjects can use without difficulty. By using standard pressure increments and performing the test in a large number of naive subjects, we have established a reference range that should be applicable wherever similar pressure increments are used. PMID:9493675

  1. Control of the head in response to tilt of the body in normal and labyrinthine-defective human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, T; Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M; Buckwell, D; Day, B

    1995-12-15

    1. Head movement responses to discrete, unpredictable tilts of the trunk from earth upright were studied in normal and labyrinthine-defective (LD) subjects. Tilts of the seated, restrained trunk, were delivered in pitch and roll about head-centred axes and approximated raised cosine displacements with peak amplitudes of 20-30 deg and durations of 1.5-2 s. Subjects performed mental arithmetic with eyes closed or read earth-fixed text. 2. At the onset of tilt the head momentarily lagged behind the trunk because of inertia. Subsequently, head control varied widely with three broad types: (i) head relatively fixed to the trunk (in normal subjects and some patients); (ii) head unstable, falling in the direction of gimbal tilt (typical of acute patients for pitch motion); (iii) compensatory head movement in the opposite direction to gimbal tilt (observed consistently in normal subjects and in well-adapted patients). 3. EMG was well developed in subjects with compensatory head movement and consisted of an initial burst of activity at minimum latencies of 25-50 ms (means 72-108 ms), followed by a prolonged peak; both occurring in the 'side up' neck muscles, appropriate for righting the head. These muscles are shortened during the initial head lag so the responses cannot be stretch reflexes. In normal subjects their origin is predominantly labyrinthine but in patients they may be an 'unloading response' of the neck. 4. Head stability in space was superior with the visual task for all subjects but vision only partially compensated for labyrinthine signals in unstable patients. 5. Modelling the responses to tilt suggests that, in LD subjects, the short-latency burst could be driven by signals from the neck of the relative acceleration between head and trunk tilt. The longer latency EMG could be driven by a signal of head tilt in space. Normally, this signal is probably otolithic. In patients it could be synthesized from summing proprioceptive signals of position of head on

  2. Creativity in Manic-Depressives, Cyclothymes, Their Normal Relatives, and Control Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ruth L.; And Others

    Although previous studies support familial and individual relationships between creativity and affective illness, most have examined eminent creative individuals. This is the first study of creativity in subjects defined only by psychodiagnostic criteria. Creative accomplishment over the adult lifetime was assessed broadly using a new instrument,…

  3. [The effect of visual feedback exercises on balance in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Barona, R; Zapater, E; Montalt, J; Armengot, M; Basterra, J

    1994-01-01

    The effects of visual feedback exercises on balance was studied in normal individuals, to evaluate the efficacy of visual feedback of postural oscillation in improving stability. A DINAS-CAN dynamometric platform designed by the Valencian Institute of Biomechanics (IBv) was used. Before to commencing training sessions, we determined the following parameters in each individual: (a) static stability, via posturography; and (b) individual ability to displace and voluntarily maintain the center of gravity within the limits of stability. All static measures were poorer after training, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.01). In contrast, the exercises performed via visual feedback of postural control improved significantly (p < 0.01). Training by visual feedback facilitates integration of visual, somatosensory, and vestibular information. In normal individuals, stability improves under excentric conditions, but no improvement is seen in the central resting position. PMID:8068357

  4. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Related to Hypoadrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.; Waters, Wendy W.; Shi, Shang-Jin; Hayashi, Yuho; Perez, Sondra A.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, making astronauts hemodynamically compromised. After landing, astronauts separate into two groups. One group compensates for the hypovolemia with a hyper-sympathetic response during upright tilt testing and can complete a tilt test with few symptoms. The other group is unable to mount a hyper-sympathetic response and experiences orthostatic hypotension and presyncope during upright tilt tests. We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, also would cause subjects to separate into presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups according to their sympathetic responses during tilt. We studied 20 subjects, including 10 veteran astronauts, on three occasions. On Days 1 (normovolemia) and 3 (hypovolemia), plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Forty hours prior to Day 3, subjects were given intravenous furosemide, followed by 36 hours of a 10MEq Na diet. Statistical comparisons were made between normovolemia and hypovolemia responses. This protocol reproduced landing day tilt test outcomes with 100% fidelity in the astronauts. Similarly to patterns reported after flight, non-presyncopal subjects had greater norepinephrine responses to tilt during hypovolemia compared to normovolemia (580 plus or minus 79 vs. 298 plus or minus 37 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but presyncopal subjects had no increase (180 plus or minus 44 vs. 145 plus or minus 32 pg/ml, P=NS). This model can be used to predict astronauts who will become presyncopal on landing day, so that prospective, individualized countermeasures can be developed. Within patient populations, it can be used to study the interaction of volemic state and the sympathetic nervous system.

  5. Effects of piretanide, bumetanide and frusemide on electrolyte and urate excretion in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C J; Homeida, M; Roberts, F; Bogie, W

    1978-08-01

    1. The pharmacological actions of a new short acting loop diuretic were investigated in nine healthy male subjects and compared with those of frusemide and bumetanide. Subjects received 6 mg piretanide/day, 40 mg frusemide/day or 1 mg bumetanide/day for a period of 1 week. 2. Comparison of effects following the first dose administered showed that 6 mg piretanide is of similar potency to 40 mg frusemide in terms of diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis but is less potent than 1 mg bumetanide. 3. All three diuretics caused a decrease in urate excretion and a rise in serum uric acid. 4. Piretanide was well tolerated. Further investigation is required to ascertain what clinical advantage it offers over frusemide and bumetanide. PMID:678389

  6. A binocular contribution to the production of optokinetic nystagmus in normal and stereoblind subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. M.; Held, R.; Bauer, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Viewing a large patterned field moving in one direction produces a regular pattern of eye movements known as optokinetic nystagmus (OKN). Fox et al. (1978) showed that the mechanism producing OKN can utilize purely binocular or 'cyclopean' input. Experiments reported confirm that finding and extend it to demonstrate that the binocularity of this mechanism is not disrupted in subjects who lack stereopsis. This result indicates that there exists more than one binocular process in the visual system.

  7. Increased levels of plasma amyloid-beta are related to cortical thinning and cognitive decline in cognitively normal elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Llado-Saz, Sandra; Atienza, Mercedes; Cantero, Jose L

    2015-10-01

    Plasma levels of circulating amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are of particular interest in Alzheimer' disease, but little is known about cognitive and cortical correlates of peripheral Aβ levels in normal aging. Here, we compared cognitive functioning, vascular risk factors, and patterns of cortical thickness between cognitively intact elderly subjects with low (N = 60) and high (N = 60) plasma Aβ levels (cutoffs: 225 pg/mL and 23 pg/mL for Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, respectively). Overall, subjects with high Aβ levels showed lower cognitive performance and thinner cortex than those with low Aβ levels. More specifically, subjects with high Aβ1-40 showed bilateral thinning of the prefrontal cortex, poorer objective memory, slower processing speed, and lower nonverbal reasoning skills, whereas subjects with high Aβ1-42 had thinner temporal lobe, poorer everyday memory, and increased levels of homocysteine. Overall, these results suggest that high plasma Aβ levels in normal elderly subjects are associated with subclinical markers of vulnerable aging, which may be helpful at predicting different trajectories of aging in cognitively intact older adults. PMID:26182906

  8. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  9. Acute hyperglycemia alters von Willebrand factor but not the fibrinolytic system in elderly subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Ludovico; Coppola, Antonino; Grassia, Antonio; Mastrolorenzo, Luigia; Lettieri, Biagio; De Lucia, Domenico; De Nanzio, Annarita; Gombos, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    To assess whether acute hyperglycemia affects fibrinolytic balance in elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 40 non-obese elderly subjects (20 NGT, age 68 +/- 8 years; and 20 IGT, age 69 +/- 11 years) were studied. On two experimental days, randomly allocated and spaced 1 week apart, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were measured in each subject at baseline (0) and 30, 60, 90, 120 min after the ingestion of 75 g glucose or a similarly sweet dose of aspartame (250 mg) (control test). In both NGT and IGT elderly subjects, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and fibrinogen plasma levels did not significantly change after both oral aspartame and glucose load. In IGT subjects, vWF plasmatic levels decreased after glucose (not aspartame) oral load, reaching the minimum level at 90 min after load (82.7 +/- 7.8 versus 93.7 +/- 10.2, P <0.01). These results demonstrate that acute hyperglycemia does not modify plasma fibrinolysis in elderly subjects. The decrease of plasma concentration of vWF in IGT elderly subjects requires cautious interpretation and further extensive investigations. PMID:15613917

  10. Coupled vibrations of rectangular buildings subjected to normally-incident random wind loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Foutch, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for analyzing the three-directional coupled dynamic response of wind-excited buildings is presented. The method is based on a random vibration concept and is parallel to those currently used for analyzing alongwind response. Only the buildings with rectangular cross-section and normally-incident wind are considered. The alongwind pressures and their correlations are represented by the well-known expressions that are available in the literature. The acrosswind forces are assumed to be mainly due to vortex shedding. The torque acting on the building is taken as the sum of the torque due to random alongwind forces plus the torque due to asymmetric acrosswind forces. The study shows the following: (1) amplitude of acrosswind vibrations can be several times greater than that of alongwind vibrations; (2) torsional vibrations are significant if the building has large frontal width, and/or it is asymmetric, and/or its torsional natural frequency is low; (3) even a perfectly symmetric structure with normally incident wind can experience significant torsional vibrations due to the randomness of wind pressures. ?? 1987.

  11. Dissociations among structural-perceptual, lexical-semantic, and event-fact memory systems in Alzheimer, amnesic, and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, J D; Keane, M M; Stanger, B Z; Kjelgaard, M M; Corkin, S; Growdon, J H

    1994-03-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), patients with global amnesia (AMN), and normal control (NC) subjects received tests of recall and recognition, word-completion priming, and incomplete-picture priming. The AD and AMN patients had impaired recall and recognition. The AD patients, but not the AMN patients, had impaired word-completion priming. In contrast, the AD patients had intact incomplete-picture priming, a form of priming shown to be perceptual in normal subjects. These results provide neuropsychological evidence for a dissociation between two components of repetition priming, perceptual priming as measured with identification tasks and nonperceptual priming as measured with generation tasks. Preserved perceptual priming in AD may be mediated by the occipital regions that are relatively spared in AD; compromised nonperceptual priming may be mediated by temporal regions that show dense neuropathological changes early in AD. PMID:8004991

  12. Investigation of cytokines, oxidative stress, metabolic, and inflammatory biomarkers after orange juice consumption by normal and overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Grace K. Z. S.; Cesar, Thais B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal adiposity has been linked to metabolic abnormalities, including dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, and low-grade inflammation. Objective To test the hypothesis that consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ) would improve metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory biomarkers and cytokine levels in normal and overweight subjects with increased waist circumference. Design Subjects were divided into two groups in accordance with their body mass index: normal and overweight. Both groups of individuals consumed 750 mL of OJ daily for 8 weeks. Body composition (weight, height, percentage of fat mass, and waist circumference); metabolic biomarkers (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and glycated hemoglobin); oxidative biomarkers (malondialdehyde and DPPH•); inflammatory biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]); cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ); and diet were evaluated before and after consumption of OJ for 8 weeks. Results The major findings of this study were: 1) no alteration in body composition in either group; 2) improvement of the lipid profile, evidenced by a reduction in total cholesterol and LDL-C; 3) a potential stimulation of the immune response due to increase in IL-12; 4) anti-inflammatory effect as a result of a marked reduction in hsCRP; and 5) antioxidant action by the enhancement of total antioxidant capacity and the reduction of lipid peroxidation, in both normal and overweight subjects. Conclusions OJ consumption has a positive effect on important biomarkers of health status in normal and overweight subjects, thereby supporting evidence that OJ acts as functional food and could be consumed as part of a healthy diet to prevent metabolic and chronic diseases. PMID:26490535

  13. Lung deposition patterns of directly labelled salbutamol in normal subjects and in patients with reversible airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, R; Biddiscombe, M F; Mak, V H; Short, M D; Spiro, S G

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Earlier studies of aerosol deposition in the lungs have relied on indirect labelling of Teflon spheres of a similar size distribution to the drug in question and have assumed similar aerodynamic properties. Using a modification of a new technique for directly labelling salbutamol, the deposition of salbutamol within the lungs of normal subjects and patients with asthma has been studied with the use of a metered dose inhaler (MDI) alone, an MDI with a spacer device, and a dry powder inhaler (DPI). METHOD--Salbutamol was directly labelled with technetium-99m and placed in an MDI or DPI. Ten normal subjects and 19 patients with asthma inhaled 200 micrograms of salbutamol by means of the MDI alone, the MDI with a spacer device attached, and by DPI on separate days. Deposition was assessed by a dual headed gamma camera after inhalation of the drug. RESULTS--The total mean (SD) percentage deposition of the drug in the normal subjects was 21.6% (8.9%) with the MDI alone, 20.9% (7.8%) with the MDI with spacer, and 12.4% (3.5%) with the DPI. For the patients, the mean percentage deposition was 18.2% (7.8%) with the MDI alone, 19.0% (8.9%) with the MDI and spacer, and 11.4% (5.0%) with the DPI. Bronchodilatation achieved by the patients was similar with all three techniques. Mean peripheral lung deposition was significantly greater with a spacer device than when the MDI was used alone in both normal subjects (49.4% (6.1%) v 44.1% (9.9%)) and patients (38.6% (11.1%) v 30.4% (9.4%)). CONCLUSIONS--The deposition of directly labelled salbutamol from an MDI is greater than previously estimated by indirect labelling techniques. The deposition of labelled salbutamol from a DPI, however, is little different from that measured by indirect techniques. PMID:8322237

  14. Effect of adhesive interleaving and discontinuous plies on failure of composite laminates subject to transverse normal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a series of tests to determine the effects of adhesive interleaving and discontinuous plies (plies with end-to-end gaps) on the displacements, failure loads and failure modes of graphite-epoxy laminates subjected to transverse normal loads are presented. Adhesive interleaving can be used to contain local damage within a group of plies, i.e., to arrest crack propagation on the interlaminate level, and it can increase the amount of normal displacement the laminate can withstand before failure. However, the addition of adhesive interleaving to a laminate does not significantly increase its load carrying capability. A few discontinuous plies in a laminate can reduce the normal displacement and load at failure by 10 to 40 percent compared to a laminate with no discontinuous plies, but the presence of the ply discontinuities does not generally change the failure location or the failure mode of the laminate.

  15. Angiotensin infusion effects on left ventricular function. Assessment in normal subjects and in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Laskey, W K; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-02-01

    Radionuclide multigating of the cardiac cycle was employed to assess effects of angiotensin infusion on left ventricular function. In six normal subjects, angiotensin infusion decreased heart rate (HR) from 72 +/- SEM 2 to 57 +/- 2 beats/min (P less than 0.001); while systolic blood pressure (BP) increased from 119 +/- 2 to 178 +/- 1 mm Hg (P less than 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) declined from 58 +/- 1 to 47 +/- 2 percent (P less than 0.05). In contrast, in 11 normal subjects, supine exercise increased HR and systolic BP by 55 and 49 percent, whereas EF increased from 64 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 1 (P less than 0.001). In ten patients with CAD, angiotensin infusion produced no change in HR, increased systolic BP by 34 percent, and decreased EF by 11 percent. Angiotensin infusion induced left ventricular depression in normal subjects and in patients with CAD. It cannot substitute for exercise in intervention radionuclide ventriculography. PMID:7353411

  16. The effect on skin blood flow of short-term venous hypertension in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, T R; Chittenden, S J; Coleridge Smith, P D; Scurr, J H

    1991-02-01

    Plugging of skin capillaries by activated white blood cells is one of the proposed mechanisms by which skin damage may be initiated in chronic venous insufficiency. The aim of this study was to determine whether a microcirculatory deficit was induced in the skin by raising the venous pressure proximally for thirty minutes. Seventeen subjects with no evidence of venous or arterial disease had laser Doppler velocimetry performed in the goiter region of the leg; 8 different subjects had the measurement done on the dorsum of the hand. Peak hyperemic response following three minutes of ischemia was measured before and after a thirty-minute period of sustained venous hypertension applied by a proximal tourniquet inflated to 80 mm Hg. A decrease in the peak flow: baseline flow ratio (median ratio 2.25 before, 1.70 after, p less than 0.02) and an increase in the time taken to reach maximal hyperemia (median time ten seconds before, twenty seconds after, p less than 0.01) were observed after the period of venous hypertension in the lower limb. The second parameter, but not the first, was significantly affected in the upper limb. The authors conclude that a microvascular deficit in the skin is demonstrable after a short period of venous hypertension. This is consistent with the white-cell-trapping theory, but other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:1826074

  17. Correlation between tests of attention and performance on grooved and Purdue pegboards in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Niederberger, Uwe; Seelhorst, Ulrike

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the relation between tests of manual dexterity and attentional functions with 49 normal, right-handed medical students (26 women, 23 men, ages 19-30 years) who were assessed with a Purdue Pegboard Test, Grooved Pegboard Test, and a Test for Attentional Performance, comprising measures of tonic and phasic alertness and divided attention. Weak to moderately high partial correlations controlling for finger size were obtained between pegboard test performance of the left hand and phasic alertness (r = .31-.50). Purdue Pegboard Assembly subtest scores were weakly correlated with divided attention (r = -.39). These findings suggest that attention is an important determinant of performance for manual dexterity tests of the nondominant hand. PMID:12434843

  18. The softest sound levels of the human voice in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Šrámková, Hana; Granqvist, Svante; Herbst, Christian T; Švec, Jan G

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the softest sound levels of phonation presents technical and methodological challenges. This study aimed at (1) reliably obtaining normative data on sustained softest sound levels for the vowel [a:] at comfortable pitch; (2) comparing the results for different frequency and time weighting methods; and (3) refining the Union of European Phoniatricians' recommendation on allowed background noise levels for scientific and equipment manufacturers' purposes. Eighty healthy untrained participants (40 females, 40 males) were investigated in quiet rooms using a head-mounted microphone and a sound level meter at 30 cm distance. The one-second-equivalent sound levels were more stable and more representative for evaluating the softest sustained phonations than the fast-time-weighted levels. At 30 cm, these levels were in the range of 48-61 dB(C)/41-53 dB(A) for females and 49 - 64 dB(C)/35-53 dB(A) for males (5% to 95% quantile range). These ranges may serve as reference data in evaluating vocal normality. In order to reach a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10 dB for more than 95% of the normal population, the background noise should be below 25 dB(A) and 38 dB(C), respectively, for the softest phonation measurements at 30 cm distance. For the A-weighting, this is 15 dB lower than the previously recommended value. PMID:25618070

  19. Clearance and synthesis rates of beta 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis and in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Floege, J.; Bartsch, A.; Schulze, M.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M.; Smeby, L.C. )

    1991-08-01

    Retention of {beta} 2-microglobulin in patients undergoing hemodialysis is associated with a {beta} 2-microglobulin-derived amyloidosis. Removal of {beta} 2-microglobulin by renal replacement therapy has been proposed for the prevention of this amyloidosis. Currently, however, data on the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in patients undergoing hemodialysis are scarce, and consequently it remains speculative how much removal would be necessary to counterbalance synthesis. The plasma kinetics of iodine 131-labeled {beta} 2-microglobulin were therefore examined in 11 patients with anuria who were undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Five healthy persons served as controls. Kinetic modeling of the plasma curves showed that the data fitted a two-pool model (r2 greater than 0.96) consisting of a rapid 2 to 4 hour distribution phase followed by a less steep curve, described by the plasma (metabolic) clearance (Clp). Synthetic rates were calculated from Clp and the {beta} 2-microglobulin steady state plasma concentration (plus {beta} 2-microglobulin removal during hemodialysis in the case of high flux hemodialysis). The results showed a significantly higher Clp in normal controls as compared with patients undergoing hemodialysis (65.5 {plus minus} 12.8 ml/min (mean {plus minus} SD) versus 3.4 {plus minus} 0.7 ml/min). In contrast, the {beta} 2-microglobulin synthesis rate in the patient group (3.10 {plus minus} 0.79 mg/kg/day) was not significantly different from that of normal controls (2.40 {plus minus} 0.67 mg/kg/day), which was due to markedly elevated {beta} 2-microglobulin plasma concentrations in the patients (37.6 {plus minus} 14.1 mg/L vs 1.92 {plus minus} 0.27 mg/L). These findings suggest that the presence of end-stage renal disease does not have a significant impact on the beta 2-microglobulin generation rate.

  20. Platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin in normal subjects, and in patients with benign and malignant tumours of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, C.; Zonca, M.; Tavella, A. M.; Petitti, E.; Massobrio, M.; Nigam, S.; Slater, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    Platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin (PG12) was determined in normal male and female subjects, and in patients with benign and malignant tumours of the breast. The IC50 overall mean values for PG12 on ADP-induced platelet aggregation were similar for normal men and women, being 0.97 +/- 0.05 ng ml-1 and 0.83 +/- 0.07 ng ml-1 respectively. However, there were significant differences in the IC50 values for women in the 1st (0.81 +/- 0.06 ng ml-1) vs. 2nd (1.37 +/- 0.13 ng ml-1) phase of the menstrual cycle; post-menopausal women gave similar values to normal males and to pre-menopausal women in the 1st phase of the cycle. No significant differences were found between normal subjects and patients with benign or malignant tumours of the breast when account was taken of the status of the patient in relation to the phase of the menstrual cycle and the menopause. The importance of the hormonal status in evaluating changes in platelet sensitivity in patients with breast cancer is strongly emphasised. PMID:3881119

  1. Sex and handedness differences in size of cerebral ventricles of normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Ali Riza; Dane, Senol; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Ozdikici, Mete; Diyarbakirli, Semih

    2004-01-01

    Sex and handedness differences in the volumes of cerebral ventricles were studied in 20 right- and 21 left-handed subjects. To assess the volumes of cerebral ventricles, Cavalieri's method was used using MRI. In right-handers, the volume of the lateral ventricle was higher in the right side than in the left side, but, in left-handers, it was higher in the left side than in the right side. The volumes of right-lateral and third ventricles were larger in right-handers than in left -handers. There were no sex related differences in terms of the volumes of right- and left -lateral, third, and fourth ventricles. These results suggest that left-handedness is an important factor reducing the sizes of all the brain ventricles. PMID:14660068

  2. Relative activity of cerebral subcortical gray matter in varying states of attention and awareness in normal subjects and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Levy, J.; Wagner, N.; Spire, J.P.; Jacobsen, J.; Meltzer, H.; Metz, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    An important aspect of the study of brain function involves measurement of the relationships; between activities in the subcortical gray matter of the caudate and of the thalamus; and between these structures and functional cortical areas. The authors have studied these relationships in 22 subjects under different conditions of activation, sleep and sensory deprivation using a PET VI system and F-18-2DG to determine regional cerebral metabolism. Subject activating conditions were maintained throughout the period of equilibration of F-18-2DG and E.E.G.'s were monitored. Multiple tomographic slices of 1-2 million counts were obtained simultaneously with slice separation of 14mm and each plane parallel to the cantho-meatal line. In activated and non-activated awake conditions for normal subjects, left and right thalmus-to-caudate ratios were similar and greater than unity. This relationship was maintained in non-REM sleep, but was reversed and divergent in REM sleep and sensory deprivation; this was also evident in 3/4 narcoleptics awake and asleep in non-REM and REM and 2/3 schizophrenics and affective disorder, subjects. This approach appears to have potential for characterizating normal and disordered regional cerebral function.

  3. Multimedia consent for research in people with schizophrenia and normal subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Dilip V; Palmer, Barton W; Golshan, Shahrokh; Eyler, Lisa T; Dunn, Laura B; Meeks, Thomas; Glorioso, Danielle; Fellows, Ian; Kraemer, Helena; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2009-07-01

    Limitations of printed, text-based, consent forms have long been documented and may be particularly problematic for persons at risk for impaired decision-making capacity, such as those with schizophrenia. We conducted a randomized controlled comparison of the effectiveness of a multimedia vs routine consent procedure (augmented with a 10-minute control video presentation) as a means of enhancing comprehension among 128 middle-aged and older persons with schizophrenia and 60 healthy comparison subjects. The primary outcome measure was manifest decisional capacity (understanding, appreciation, reasoning, and expression of choice) for participation in a (hypothetical) clinical drug trial, as measured with the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Brief Assessment for Capacity to Consent (UBACC). The MacCAT-CR and UBACC were administered by research assistants kept blind to consent condition. Additional assessments included standardized measures of psychopathology and cognitive functioning. Relative to patients in the routine consent condition, schizophrenia patients receiving multimedia consent had significantly better scores on the UBACC and on the MacCAT-CR understanding and expression of choice subscales and were significantly more likely to be categorized as being capable to consent than those in the routine consent condition (as categorized with several previously established criteria). Among the healthy subjects, there were few significant effects of consent condition. These findings suggest that multimedia consent procedures may be a valuable consent aid that should be considered for use when enrolling participants at risk for impaired decisional capacity, particularly for complex and/or high-risk research protocols. PMID:18245061

  4. Comparison of cervical magnetic stimulation and bilateral percutaneous electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerves in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Wragg, S; Aquilina, R; Moran, J; Ridding, M; Hamnegard, C; Fearn, T; Green, M; Moxham, J

    1994-10-01

    Cervical magnetic stimulation is a new technique for stimulating the phrenic nerves, and may offer an alternative to percutaneous electrical stimulation for assessing diaphragmatic strength in normal subjects and patients in whom electrical stimulation is technically difficult or poorly tolerated. We compared cervical magnetic stimulation with conventional supramaximal bilateral percutaneous electrical stimulation in nine normal subjects. We measured oesophageal pressure (Poes), gastric pressure (Pgas) and transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi). The maximal relaxation rate (MRR) was also measured. The mean magnetic twitch Pdi was 36.5 cmH2O (range 27-48 cmH2O), significantly larger than electrical twitch Pdi, mean 29.7 cmH2O (range 22-40 cmH2O). The difference in twitch Pdi was explained entirely by twitch Poes, and it is possible that the magnetic technique stimulates some of the nerves to the upper chest wall muscles as well as the phrenic nerves. We compared bilateral, rectified, integrated, diaphragm surface electromyographic (EMG) responses in three subjects and found results within 10% in each subject, indicating similar diaphragmatic activation. The within occasion coefficient of variation, i.e. same subject/same session, was 6.7% both for magnetic and electrical twitch Pdi. The between occasion coefficient of variation, i.e. same subject/different days, was 6.6% for magnetic stimulation and 8.8% for electrical. There was no difference between relaxation rates measured with either technique. We conclude that magnetic stimulation is a reproducible and acceptable technique for stimulating the phrenic nerves, and that it provides a potentially useful alternative to conventional electrical stimulation as a nonvolitional test of diaphragm strength. PMID:7828686

  5. Neural Mechanisms of Verb Argument Structure Processing in Agrammatic Aphasic and Healthy Age-Matched Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Cynthia K.; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Fix, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior peri-sylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions on the basis of argument structure complexity. The aim of…

  6. Lung deposition of budesonide inhaled via Turbuhaler: a comparison with terbutaline sulphate in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Borgström, L; Bondesson, E; Morén, F; Trofast, E; Newman, S P

    1994-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate whether lung deposition of budesonide and terbutaline sulphate differs, and to determine lung deposition of budesonide inhaled at different peak inspiratory flows, through Turbuhaler. Lung deposition of budesonide, a lipophilic substance, and of terbutaline sulphate, a hydrophilic substance, was therefore compared, after administration via an inspiratory flow-driven, multi-dose, powder inhaler (Turbuhaler, Astra Draco AB) to 10 healthy volunteers. The radionuclide 99mTc was used to label drug particles, and radioactivity, indicating drug deposition, was measured using a gamma camera. Budesonide was inhaled at a normal flow of 58 l.min-1 and at a slow flow of 36 l-min-1. At the faster flow, a mean +/- SD 27.7 +/- 9.5% of the metered dose was deposited in the lung and at the slower flow 14.8 +/- 3.3% was deposited (p < 0.001). Mean lung deposition of terbutaline sulphate inhaled at 57 l.min-1 was 27.0 +/- 7.7%. We conclude that inspiratory flow has an important effect on lung deposition, but water solubility appears to have no effect. PMID:8143834

  7. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis. PMID:22666773

  8. Median and ulnar nerve conduction determinations in the Erb's point--axilla segment in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, M; Lee, M; Ginzburg, J; Alba, A

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-one median and 22 ulnar nerves were tested in 12 patients for motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and motor nerve conduction time (MNCT) in the segments from Erb's point (N) to axilla (A) bilaterally. It was found that on this segment for both nerves, MNCV values equal to or smaller than 51 m/s or conduction times equal to or longer than 4 ms are to be considered abnormal. For comparative studies and for checking the normality of the tested nerves in their entire length, the more distally located segments in the same nerve were also tested. For diagnostic purposes, the differences between right and left MNCV or MNCT values determined in the same person on N-A segments of homologous nerves were analysed. Motor nerve conduction velocity or MNCT determinations on the N-A nerve segment are expected to replace MNCV determinations on the longer N-AE (AE=100 mm above elbow) nerve segment, which is now in use, for diagnosis of the thoracic outlet syndrome. Images PMID:660207

  9. Glucose and glycogen metabolism in erythrocytes from normal and glycogen storage disease type III subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Shimon W.; Chayoth, Reuben; Levin, Stanley; Lazarovitz, Ela; Rubinstein, David

    1968-01-01

    Active glycogen metabolism has been demonstrated in both normal and glycogen-rich erythrocytes taken from patients with type III glycogen storage disease. Activity of all enzymes catalyzing the reactions required for the synthesis and degradation of glycogen have been demonstrated in the mature erythrocytes. Uniformly labeled glucose-14C is incorporated into glycogen in intact cells of both types during incubation. Replacement of the glucose-14C by unlabeled glucose in the medium resulted in a significant loss of radioactivity from cellular glycogen. In the absence of the substrate a progressive shortening of outer branches occurred during incubation of intact glucogen-rich cells. Using cells from patients with type III glycogen storage disease, which have sufficient glycogen content to be analyzed by β-amylolysis, we demonstrated that the glucosyl units are first incorporated in the outer tiers, then transferred to the core where they tend to accumulate due to the absence of amylo-1,6-glucosidase. The glycogen-rich cells have a more rapid rate of glucose utilization upon incubation which is not reflected by a higher lactate production. The increased rate of glucose utilization did not result from an increased rate of glucose incorporation into glycogen in affected cells. The rate of 14CO2 production from glucose-1-14C during incubation was not significantly different in the two types of cells unless methylene blue was added as an electron acceptor, in which case the glycogen-rich cells oxidized glucose to CO2 more rapidly. PMID:5240360

  10. The effect of a week's beta-adrenoceptor antagonism on daytime heart-rates, subjective responses to exercise, and physical activity in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, J M; Wharrad, H J; Wilson, C G; Birmingham, A T

    1985-01-01

    The effects on heart rate (HR) and physical activity of 1 week's treatment with three different beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (20 mg betaxolol (Lorex); 160 mg propranolol LA; or 100 mg atenolol daily) have been compared with placebo in a double-blind study of 12 normal men. On the fifth day of each treatment a body-borne tape-recorder was worn during waking hours for recording of ECG and footfall signals. Each record was calibrated in terms of the subject's response to laboratory ergometer exercise, and a computer analysis provided objective indices of physical activity. While on beta-adrenoceptor antagonists the subjects perceived standard exercise as significantly harder than on placebo and reported more side-effects (albeit mild and transient). Ambulatory monitoring of HR showed that subjects spent 13% of their waking day at heart rates below 50 beats min-1 while on propranolol, compared with 1% on placebo and 20% on atenolol and betaxolol. On these latter drugs, the group spent as much as 10% of their waking time with HR below 45 beats min-1. The lowest individual heart-rates recorded were below 35 beats min-1. Objective indices of physical activity, such as the duration of periods spent with heart rates above the HR found at 100 W in the ergometer test, showed no differences between the treatments. This negative finding was confirmed by pedometer step counts over the whole week. PMID:2859043

  11. [Comparative effects of couscous and pasta on glycemia in normal subjects and type I diabetics].

    PubMed

    Jamel, N; Hajri, S; Jenkins, D J; Bousnina, S; Naggati, K; Jedidi, H; Boukhris, R; Bennaceur, B

    1990-01-01

    8 healthy subjects have eaten in the morning, after an overnight fast, in two separated occasions and in a randomised order 50 gr of CHO as pasta or couscous. Blood glucose after pasta ingestion was lower at 30 mn (p less than 0.05) at 45 mn (p less than 0.01) and at 60 mn (p less than 0.05). Area under the curve after pasta was significantly reduced (p less than 0.01). In a second time 6 IDDM patients have eaten in a randomised order a meal made of pasta with tomato sauce (P = 11%, F = 30%, G = 59%) or couscous with vegetables and sauce (P = 10%, F = 37%, G = 53%). Blood glucose after the pasta was lower than couscous at 90 mn (p less than 0.05) the area under the curve after the pasta ingestion was reduced of 38% but did'nt reach significance. In conclusion couscous has a higher glycemic effect than pasta although it has a similar composition. This phenomenon is still observed when the cereal products are mixed with other foods and ingested by IDDM patients. PMID:2332095

  12. Frataxin mRNA isoforms in FRDA patients and normal subjects: effect of tocotrienol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Marini, Marina; Bolotta, Alessandra; Malisardi, Gemma; Manfredini, Stefano; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Pini, Antonella; Tasco, Gianluca; Casadio, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by deficient expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin involved in the formation of iron-sulphur complexes and by consequent oxidative stress. We analysed low-dose tocotrienol supplementation effects on the expression of the three splice variant isoforms (FXN-1, FXN-2, and FXN-3) in mononuclear blood cells of FRDA patients and healthy subjects. In FRDA patients, tocotrienol leads to a specific and significant increase of FXN-3 expression while not affecting FXN-1 and FXN-2 expression. Since no structural and functional details were available for FNX-2 and FXN-3, 3D models were built. FXN-1, the canonical isoform, was then docked on the human iron-sulphur complex, and functional interactions were computed; when FXN-1 was replaced by FXN-2 or FNX-3, we found that the interactions were maintained, thus suggesting a possible biological role for both isoforms in human cells. Finally, in order to evaluate whether tocotrienol enhancement of FXN-3 was mediated by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG), PPARG expression was evaluated. At a low dose of tocotrienol, the increase of FXN-3 expression appeared to be independent of PPARG expression. Our data show that it is possible to modulate the mRNA expression of the minor frataxin isoforms and that they may have a functional role. PMID:24175286

  13. Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) antigen in obese and normal weight subjects.

    PubMed

    Salamati, S; Martins, C; Kulseng, B

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its cell wall components have been used as one of the alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters in the feed industry. Antibodies to cell wall mannan of this yeast (ASCA) have been traditionally used in the study of Crohn's disease (CD). We applied ASCA in relation to obesity. This study aims (i) to determine the concentration of ASCA (immunoglobulin A [IgA] and immunoglobulin G [IgG]) in obese compared with normal weight individuals and (ii) to determine if there is a correlation between ASCA concentrations, obesity indices and C-reactive protein. Forty obese individuals (body mass index [BMI] > 35 kg m(-2) ) and 18 healthy (BMI < 25 kg m(-2) ) volunteers participated in this case-control study. Binding activity of serum IgA and IgG to the cell wall mannan of S. cerevisiae was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More than one-third of the obese individual (35%) showed elevated titres of ASCA compared with the control group (5%). This antibody was positively associated with weight (P = 0.01), BMI (P = 0.02) and waist circumference (P = 0.02), but not with C-reactive protein. It seems that ASCA are not only specific for CD but are also associated with obesity. S. cerevisiae or a related antigen may play a role in the matrix of this complex condition. PMID:25611585

  14. Measuring mandibular asymmetry in Class I normal subjects using 3D novel coordinate system

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Nadia Abou; Kau, Chung How

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Orthodontic treatment plays a major role in cosmetic dentistry. A harmonious facial balance is normally the end point in comprehensive orthodontic outcomes. In order to achieve this goal, correct diagnosis of asymmetry should be done starting from the outer facial morphology forms and progressively moving to the dental occlusion. The prime importance of measuring mandibular asymmetry is its tremendous effect on the occlusion. Objective: The aim of this study was to measure mandibular asymmetry in a cohort Class I molar relationship comparing right and left sides using new three-dimensions (3D) imaging technique with the aid of 3D software (in vivo 5.2.3 [San Jose, CA]). Materials and Methods: 35 DICOM files were initially collected retrospectively and seven were excluded due to (1) condylar resorption, (2) history of trauma and (3) unclear DICOM file. A new coordinate system was set for the mid-sagittal plane (MSP), Frankfort horizontal plane and frontal plane (FP). Each cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was appraised using 16 evaluation criteria bilaterally. Five mandibular landmarks were selected: Condylion_R, Gonion_R, Menton, Gonion_L and Condylion_L. Using these points, the mandible was further divided into four parts: (1) Ramus length right side, body of the mandible right side, body of the Ramus left side and Ramus length left side. The angles between each line and the three different planes were acquired in order to compare each line from a 3D aspect. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for the 28 CBCTs. Results: Significant bilateral differences were reported in the angle between the ramus length and MSP and the ramus length and the FP (P < 0.05). Significant lateroanterior shift of the mandibular ramus on the left side in comparison with the right side. Conclusion: Viewing an object using three different angles between the four parts of the mandible and each plane is a valid method to replicate the actual object. PMID:24987596

  15. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jânio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Methods: We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. Results: A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). Conclusions: CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle). PMID:26229733

  16. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  17. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  18. Renal scintigraphy predicts global cardiovascular risk in hypertensive subjects with normal serum creatinine levels.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Alberto; Rampin, Lucia; Montemurro, Domenico; Schiavon, Laura; Zuin, Marco; Grassetto, Gaia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Ramazzina, Emilio; Rubello, Domenico

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND. This cross-sectional study investigates the role of renal scintigraphy on cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification in normoalbuminuric, non-diabetic hypertensive subjects (HTs) free from CV disease and renal dysfunction. METHODS. In 200 HTs aged 55-75 years, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured by technetium-99m-diethylene triamine pentacetic acid clearance during renal scintigraphy. Stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as GFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). For comparing the impact of different methods for CKD diagnosis on CV risk stratification, CKD was also considered as GFR estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and Cockcroft-Gault's formula. Target organ damage (TOD) was assessed by echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography. Gender-specific odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals for CKD were derived from a multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis. Global CV risk was stratified according to routine examinations, TOD and CKD. RESULTS. In 38% of cases, an unknown stage III CKD was found. Independent of age, CKD was predicted by history of hypertension (OR = 1.69, p = 0.0001), albuminuria (OR = 1.25, p = 0.0001), smoking (OR = 1.85, p = 0.028) and pulse pressure (OR = 1.21, p = 0.019) in men only. Men had an increased risk of CKD (OR = 2.62, p = 0.002) in comparison with women. Prevalence of TOD was significantly higher only in HTs having CKD diagnosed by renal scintigraphy; TOD and CKD assessment added to classic risk factors modified the CV risk stratification from low-moderate to high and very high. CONCLUSIONS. Renal scintigraphy is an important aid in risk stratification and should be performed in HTs aged >55 years. Pulse pressure was the main blood pressure component that predicted the risk of stage III CKD. PMID:22017389

  19. Effects of 0. 75ppM sulfur dioxide on pulmonary function parameters of normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, R.W.; House, D.; Friedman, M.; Hazacha, M.; Green, J.; Raggio, L.; Roger, L.J.

    1981-07-01

    Of 31 young, healthy male volunteers who participated in this study, 15 were exposed to air (control) and 16 to 0.75 ppm (2.15 mg/m/sup 3/) SO/sub 2/ for 2 hr at 21/sup o/C and 60% relative humidity. At the end of the first hour, the subjects exercised for 15 min on a treadmill at 6.4 kmph, with a 10% grade. Methods employed in evaluation of pulmonary function included body plethysmography, spirometry, and multigas rebreathing test. From the battery of 15 pulmonary function parameters, only the pattern of airway resistance changes was significantly altered by SO/sub 2/ exposure, although spirometric parameters followed a similar pattern. Eight of the SO/sub 2/-exposed subjects, with one or more positive allergen skin tests, appeared to be significantly more reactive to SO/sub 2/ than skin test-negative subjects. All subjects remained asymptomatic. The small number of changes observed appeared to be reversible and do not suggest a significant health hazard to normal human subjects exposed to SO/sub 2/ under these conditions.

  20. Higher Plasma ApoE Levels are Associated with Low-Normal Thyroid Function: Studies in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    van Tienhoven-Wind, L J N; Dallinga-Thie, G M; Dullaart, R P F

    2016-07-01

    Low-normal thyroid function within the euthyroid range may confer higher plasma triglycerides, but relationships with plasma apolipoprotein (apo) E, which plays an important role in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich apoB-containing lipoproteins, are unknown. We determined relationships of plasma apoE with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (free T4) in euthyroid subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). TSH, free T4, lipids, and apoE were measured in fasting plasma from 72 T2DM subjects and 82 nondiabetic subjects. The APOE genotype was also determined. Free T4 was slightly higher in T2DM (p=0.030), but TSH levels were not different vs. nondiabetic subjects. The APOE genotype distribution was not different between the groups. None of the participants had the ε2/ε2 genotype. Plasma triglycerides were higher in T2DM (p=0.037). ApoB and apoE levels were not different between the groups. In all subjects combined, multivariable analysis showed that plasma triglycerides (p=0.039), non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol (p=0.030), and apoE levels (p=0.002) were each independently and positively associated with TSH after adjustment for age, sex, T2DM and the presence of the APOE ε3 allele. Furthermore, the associations of TSH with apoE remained present after adjustment for either triglycerides, non-HDL cholesterol, or apoB (p=0.005 to 0.023). The presence of T2DM did not modify the relationships of TSH with these (apo) lipoprotein variables (p=0.11 to 0.36). In conclusion, low-normal thyroid function, as indicated by higher TSH levels within the euthyroid range, may influence the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by affecting apoE regulation. PMID:26916531

  1. Lactate: Brain Fuel in Human Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison with Normal Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; Horning, Michael A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that lactate shuttling helps support the nutritive needs of injured brains. To that end, we utilized dual isotope tracer [6,6-2H2]glucose, that is, D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate techniques involving arm vein tracer infusion along with simultaneous cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with nonpenetrating brain injuries (n=12) were entered into the study following consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from control volunteers (n=6). Patients were studied 5.7±2.2 (mean±SD) days post-injury; during periods when arterial glucose concentration tended to be higher in TBI patients. As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgluc, i.e., net glucose uptake) was significantly suppressed following TBI (p<0.001). However, lactate fractional extraction, an index of cerebral lactate uptake related to systemic lactate supply, approximated 11% in both healthy control subjects and TBI patients. Further, neither the CMR for lactate (CMRlac, i.e., net lactate release), nor the tracer-measured cerebral lactate uptake differed between healthy controls and TBI patients. The percentages of lactate tracer taken up and released as 13CO2 into the JB accounted for 92% and 91% for control and TBI conditions, respectively, suggesting that most cerebral lactate uptake was oxidized following TBI. Comparisons of isotopic enrichments of lactate oxidation from infused [3-13C]lactate tracer and 13C-glucose produced during hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis (GNG) showed that 75–80% of 13CO2 released into the JB was from lactate and that the remainder was from the oxidation of glucose secondarily labeled from lactate. Hence, either directly as lactate uptake, or indirectly via GNG, peripheral lactate production accounted for ∼70% of carbohydrate (direct lactate uptake+uptake of glucose from lactate) consumed by the

  2. A pilot study of flaccid penile blood flow patterns in normal subjects and patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Siraj, Q H; Hilson, A J; Bomanji, J; Ahmed, M

    1993-11-01

    Dynamic penile scintigraphy was performed using 99Tcm-labelled autologous erythrocytes in five normally potent volunteers and 22 patients with erectile dysfunction including 11 patients with psychogenic and 11 patients with vasculogenic impotence (four arteriogenic, three venogenic, three arteriogenic and venogenic, one arteriogenic and neurogenic). Penile radioactivity changes in the flaccid state were monitored by a gamma camera for 60 min after injection of the radionuclide. The penile time-activity curves of the normal controls characteristically showed secondary pulses of increased activity of variable amplitude, duration and frequency, consistent with phasic increase in penile blood pool. This normal rhythmic pattern was impaired in patients with penile arterial insufficiency whereas a blunted pattern was seen in most patients with functional impotence as well as in patients with nonarteriogenic organic impotence with a psychological overlay. This study provides new insights into the flaccid penile circulatory physiology, which may contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction. In arteriogenic subjects, the impaired response may be attributable to an inadequacy of penile arterial inflow as well as secondarily due to the resultant sinusoidal dysfunction subsequent to penile ultrastructural damage due to an altered nutritive environment. Increased adrenergic activity in patients with psychogenic impotence may be responsible for the observed deviation from the normal pattern. PMID:8290170

  3. Observation of cone and rod photoreceptors in normal subjects and patients using a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Duncan, Jacque L.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) to resolve cones and rods in normal subjects, and confirm our findings by comparing cone and rod spacing with published histology measurements. Cone and rod spacing measurements are also performed on AOSLO images from two different diseased eyes, one affected by achromatopsia and the other by acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). The potential of AOSLO technology in the study of these and other retinal diseases is illustrated. PMID:21833357

  4. Large-scale copy number variants (CNVs): Distribution in normal subjects and FISH/real-time qPCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying; Liu, Xudong; Harvard, Chansonette; Nolin, Sarah L; Brown, W Ted; Koochek, Maryam; Holden, Jeanette JA; Lewis, ME Suzanne; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic copy number variants (CNVs) involving >1 kb of DNA have recently been found to be widely distributed throughout the human genome. They represent a newly recognized form of DNA variation in normal populations, discovered through screening of the human genome using high-throughput and high resolution methods such as array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). In order to understand their potential significance and to facilitate interpretation of array-CGH findings in constitutional disorders and cancers, we studied 27 normal individuals (9 Caucasian; 9 African American; 9 Hispanic) using commercially available 1 Mb resolution BAC array (Spectral Genomics). A selection of CNVs was further analyzed by FISH and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Results A total of 42 different CNVs were detected in 27 normal subjects. Sixteen (38%) were not previously reported. Thirteen of the 42 CNVs (31%) contained 28 genes listed in OMIM. FISH analysis of 6 CNVs (4 previously reported and 2 novel CNVs) in normal subjects resulted in the confirmation of copy number changes for 1 of 2 novel CNVs and 2 of 4 known CNVs. Three CNVs tested by FISH were further validated by RT-qPCR and comparable data were obtained. This included the lack of copy number change by both RT-qPCR and FISH for clone RP11-100C24, one of the most common known copy number variants, as well as confirmation of deletions for clones RP11-89M16 and RP5-1011O17. Conclusion We have described 16 novel CNVs in 27 individuals. Further study of a small selection of CNVs indicated concordant and discordant array vs. FISH/RT-qPCR results. Although a large number of CNVs has been reported to date, quantification using independent methods and detailed cellular and/or molecular assessment has been performed on a very small number of CNVs. This information is, however, very much needed as it is currently common practice to consider CNVs reported in normal subjects as benign changes when detected in

  5. Effects of inhalation of beta 2-sympathicomimetic and anticholinergic agents on the impedance of the respiratory system in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, G; Vonk, H M; Wouters, E F

    1990-05-01

    Impedance measurement of the respiratory system by forced oscillations is a sensitive and accurate method to detect mechanical parameters, especially in normal subjects. The effects of inhalation of 0.2 mg of fenoterol and 0.02 mg of ipratropium bromide on the impedance of the respiratory system was studied in 20 healthy subjects in a frequency spectrum between 4 and 52 Hz. Both agents caused a statistically significant decrease in resistance (Rrs). Inhalation of fenoterol and ipratropium bromide caused a significant increase in reactance (Xrs). The decrease in Rrs was greater after inhalation of fenoterol than after ipratropium bromide. Fenoterol and ipratropium bromide caused qualitatively similar changes in Rrs and Xrs of the respiratory system. The changes in Rrs can be explained by dilation of the central airways. The changes in Xrs are supposed to be the result of an increase in the capacitance of the lungs. PMID:2139600

  6. Cadmium intake and systemic exposure in postmenopausal women and age-matched men who smoke cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Ebert-McNeill, Andrea; Clark, Sara P; Miller, James J; Birdsall, Paige; Chandar, Manisha; Wu, Lucia; Cerny, Elizabeth A; Hall, Patricia H; Johnson, Maribeth H; Isales, Carlos; Chutkan, Norman; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2012-11-01

    Mean blood cadmium (B-Cd) concentrations are two- to threefold higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. The basis for this phenomenon is not well understood. We conducted a detailed, multifaceted study of cadmium exposure in smokers. Groups were older smokers (62±4 years, n = 25, 20% male) and nonsmokers (62±3 years, n = 16, 31% male). Each subject's cigarettes were machine smoked, generating individually paired measures of inhaled cadmium (I-Cd) versus B-Cd; I-Cd and B-Cd were each evaluated three times, at monthly intervals. Urine cadmium (U-Cd) was analyzed for comparison. In four smokers, a duplicate-diet study was conducted, along with a kinetic study of plasma cadmium versus B-Cd. Female smokers had a mean B-Cd of 1.21ng Cd/ml, with a nearly 10-fold range (0.29-2.74ng Cd/ml); nonsmokers had a lower mean B-Cd, 0.35ng Cd/ml (p < 0.05), and narrower range (0.20-0.61ng Cd/ml). Means and ranges for males were similar. Estimates of cadmium amounts inhaled daily for our subjects smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes/day were far less than the 15 µg Cd reported to be ingested daily via diet. This I-Cd amount was too low to alone explain the 3.5-fold elevation of B-Cd in our smokers, even assuming greater cadmium absorption via lungs than gastrointestinal tract; cadmium accumulated in smokers' lungs may provide the added cadmium. Finally, B-Cd appeared to be linearly related to I-Cd values in 75% of smokers, whereas 25% had far higher B-Cd, implying a possible heterogeneity among smokers regarding circulating cadmium concentrations and potentially cadmium toxicity. PMID:22831969

  7. Comparison of complexity of EMG signals between a normal subject and a patient after stroke--a case study.

    PubMed

    Ao, Di; Sun, Rui; Song, Rong

    2013-01-01

    An innovative method to quantitatively assess the motor function of upper extremities for post-stroke patients is proposed. A post-stroke patient and a normal subject were recruited to conduct a special performance of voluntary elbow flexion and extension by following a sinusoidal trajectory from 30° to 90° at 6 different peak angular velocities in a horizontal plane. During the test, the elbow angle and subject's electromyographic (EMG) signal (biceps brachii and triceps brachii) were recorded simultaneously. Fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) was applied to analyze the EMG signals. The results showed observable differences in fApEn when the control and the patient (unaffected and affected arms) were compared, and an uptrend of fApEn was detected with the increase in the tracking velocities in both the normal individual and patient (unaffected and affected arm). The fApEn values, which are a measure of complexity of EMG, could be used for the quantitative evaluation of the deficiencies of motor control induced by stroke. PMID:24110849

  8. The acute effects of ethanol on acetanilide disposition in normal subjects, and in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    McKay, J; Rawlings, M D; Cobden, I; James, O F

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of single doses (25 g and 50 g) oral ethanol on the disposition of acetanilide (50 mg/kg metabolic active mass) has been studied in normal subjects, and in patients with chronic non-alcoholic liver disease. 2 In normal subjects, ethanol produced a dose-dependent increase in acetanilide half-life, and a decrease in acetenilide clearance. There was a significant correlation (rs = 0.71, P less than 0.01) between the 90 min blood ethanol concentration and the reduction in acetanilide clearance. 3 In patients with liver disease, ethanol produced a similar proportional change in acetanilide half-life and clearance, but these were less consistent. Moreover, liver disease itself was associated with an increase in acetenilide half-life, and a reduction in clearance. 4 It is concluded that single oral doses of ethanol, comparable to those consumed during social drinking, may inhibit some forms of microsomal oxidation and thus have important clinical implications. PMID:7138735

  9. Studies of the Ability to Hold the Eye in Eccentric Gaze: Measurements in Normal Subjects with the Head Erect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Leigh, R. John; Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, William H.; Kornilova, Ludmila

    2006-01-01

    We studied the ability to hold the eyes in eccentric horizontal or vertical gaze angles in 68 normal humans, age range 19-56. Subjects attempted to sustain visual fixation of a briefly flashed target located 30 in the horizontal plane and 15 in the vertical plane in a dark environment. Conventionally, the ability to hold eccentric gaze is estimated by fitting centripetal eye drifts by exponential curves and calculating the time constant (t(sub c)) of these slow phases of gazeevoked nystagmus. Although the distribution of time-constant measurements (t(sub c)) in our normal subjects was extremely skewed due to occasional test runs that exhibited near-perfect stability (large t(sub c) values), we found that log10(tc) was approximately normally distributed within classes of target direction. Therefore, statistical estimation and inference on the effect of target direction was performed on values of z identical with log10t(sub c). Subjects showed considerable variation in their eyedrift performance over repeated trials; nonetheless, statistically significant differences emerged: values of tc were significantly higher for gaze elicited to targets in the horizontal plane than for the vertical plane (P less than 10(exp -5), suggesting eccentric gazeholding is more stable in the horizontal than in the vertical plane. Furthermore, centrifugal eye drifts were observed in 13.3, 16.0 and 55.6% of cases for horizontal, upgaze and downgaze tests, respectively. Fifth percentile values of the time constant were estimated to be 10.2 sec, 3.3 sec and 3.8 sec for horizontal, upward and downward gaze, respectively. The difference between horizontal and vertical gazeholding may be ascribed to separate components of the velocity position neural integrator for eye movements, and to differences in orbital mechanics. Our statistical method for representing the range of normal eccentric gaze stability can be readily applied in a clinical setting to patients who were exposed to environments

  10. Modulation of Coronary Heart Disease Risk by Insulin Resistance in Subjects With Normal Glucose Tolerance or Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, Danit; Reaven, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis This study is based on the hypothesis that: 1)coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is accentuated in the insulin resistant subset of persons with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or prediabetes (PreDM); 2)the prevalence of insulin resistance, and associated abnormalities, is greater in subjects with PreDM; and 3)insulin resistance is the major contributor to increased CHD risk in these individuals. Methods A 75 g oral glucose challenge was used to classify volunteers as having NGT or PreDM. Steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the insulin suppression test subdivided both groups into insulin sensitive (IS=SSPG <8.4 mmol/L) or resistant (IR=SSPG ≥8.4 mmol/L). Measurements were made of demographic characteristics, blood pressure, and lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, and comparisons made between the subgroups. Results Subjects with PreDM (n=127) were somewhat older, more likely to be non-Hispanic men, with increased adiposity than those with NGT (n=315). In addition, they had higher FPG concentrations, were insulin resistant (SSPG concentration; 11.4 vs. 7.2 mmol/L), with higher blood pressures, and a significantly more adverse CHD risk lipid profile (p<0.001). Twice as many subjects with PreDM were IR (72% vs. 35 %), and the CHD risk profile was significantly worse in the IR subgroups in those with either NGT or PreDM. Conclusions/interpretation CHD risk profile is significantly more adverse in subjects with PreDM as compared to individuals with NGT. However, glucose tolerance status is not the only determinant of CHD risk in nondiabetic individuals, and differences in degree of insulin resistance significantly modulate CHD risk in subjects with NGT or PreDM. PMID:25358836

  11. The influence of potassium administration and of potassium deprivation on plasma renin in normal and hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hans R.; Baer, Leslie; Sealey, Jean E.; Ledingham, John G. G.; Laragh, John H.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of potassium administration and of dietary potassium deprivation on plasma renin activity and aldosterone excretion has been studied in 10 normal subjects and in 12 hypertensive patients maintained on a constant dietary regimen. Potassium administration reduced plasma renin activity in 18 of 28 studies of both normal and hypertensive subjects. Suppression of renin often occurred despite sodium diuresis induced by potassium administration. The renin suppression was related to induced changes in plasma potassium concentration and urinary potassium excretion. The failure of suppression of plasma renin in 10 studies could be accounted for by the smaller amounts of potassium administered to these subjects, together with a possibly overriding influence of an induced sodium diuresis. In six studies potassium deprivation invariably increased plasma renin activity even though a tendency for sodium retention often accompanied this procedure. The data indicate that both the suppression of plasma renin activity induced by potassium administration and the stimulation of renin activity which follows potassium depletion occur independently of associated changes in either aldosterone secretion or in sodium balance. However, the results do suggest that in various situations, the influence of potassium on plasma renin activity may be either amplified or preempted by changes in sodium balance. These interactions between potassium and plasma renin could be mediated by an ill-defined extrarenal pathway. But the findings are more consistent with an intrarenal action of potassium ions to modify renin release. Potassium might modify renin secretion directly by acting on the juxtaglomerular cells or by a change in its tubular reabsorption or secretion. The effects of potassium ions on renin secretion might also be mediated indirectly via an induced change in tubular sodium transport. PMID:4319970

  12. The serotonin-dopamine interaction measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and C-11 raclopride in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the interaction between serotonin and dopamine can be measured with C-11 raclopride and PET in the baboon brain. A series of studies was undertaken to extend dim findings to the normal human brain. PET studies were conducted in male control subjects (n=8) using the CTI 931 tomograph. Two C-11 raclopride scans were performed, prior to and 180 minutes following administration of the selective serotonin releasing agent, fenfluramine (60mg/PO). The neuroendocrine response to fenfluramine challenge is commonly used in psychiatric research as an index of serotonin activity. The C-11 raclopride data were analyzed with the distribution volume method. For the group of subjects, an increase was observed in the striatum to cerebellum ratio (specific to non-specific binding ratio), in excess of the test-retest variability of the ligand. Variability in response was observed across subjects. These results are consistent with our previous findings in the baboon that citalopram administration increased C-11 raclopride binding, consistent with a decrease in endogenous dopamine. In vivo microdialysis studies in freely moving rats confirmed that citalopram produces a time-dependent decrease in extracellular dopamine levels, consistent with the PET results. In vivo PET studies of the serotonin-dopamine interaction are relevant to the evaluation of etiologic and therapeutic mechanisms in schizophrenia and affective disorder.

  13. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of bariatric surgery on cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber function in obese subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using sudorimetry and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Method Patients were evaluated at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. All subjects were assessed using SudoscanTM to measure electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of hands and feet, time and frequency domain analysis of HRV, Neurologic Impairment Scores of lower legs (NIS-LL), quantitative sensory tests (QST) and sural nerve conduction studies. Results Seventy subjects completed up to 24-weeks of follow-up (24 non-T2DM, 29 pre-DM and 17 T2DM). ESC of feet improved significantly towards normal in T2DM subjects (Baseline = 56.71±3.98 vs 12-weeks = 62.69±3.71 vs 24-weeks = 70.13±2.88, p<0.005). HRV improved significantly in T2DM subjects (Baseline sdNN (sample difference of the beat to beat (NN) variability) = 32.53±4.28 vs 12-weeks = 44.94±4.18 vs 24-weeks = 49.71±5.19, p<0,001 and baseline rmsSD (root mean square of the difference of successive R-R intervals) = 23.88±4.67 vs 12-weeks = 38.06±5.39 vs 24-weeks = 43.0±6.25, p<0.0005). Basal heart rate (HR) improved significantly in all groups, as did weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), insulin and HOMA2-IR (homeostatic model assessment) levels improved significantly in pre-DM and T2DM subjects. On multiple linear regression analysis, feet ESC improvement was independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at baseline, and improvement in A1C at 24 weeks, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Sudomotor function improvement was not associated with baseline weight, BMI, % body fat or lipid levels. Improvement in basal HR was also independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at

  14. The Apathy Evaluation Scale: A Comparison of Subject, Informant, and Clinician Report in Cognitively Normal Elderly and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Brendan; Donovan, Nancy J.; Munro, Catherine E.; Aghjayan, Sarah L.; Wigman, Sarah E.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marshall, Gad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Apathy is a common neuropsychiatric symptom in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Detecting apathy accurately may facilitate earlier diagnosis of AD. The Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) is a promising tool for measurement of apathy in prodromal and possibly preclinical AD. Objective To compare the three AES sub-scales—subject-reported (AES-S), informant-reported (AES-I), and clinician-reported (AES-C)—over time in individuals at risk for AD due to MCI and advanced age (cognitively normal [CN] elderly). Methods Mixed effects longitudinal models were used to assess predictors of score for each AES sub-scale. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess which AES sub-scales predict progression from MCI to AD dementia. Results Fifty seven MCI and 18 CN subjects (ages 53–86) were followed for 1.4±1.2 years and 0.7±0.7 years, respectively. Across the three mixed effects longitudinal models, the common findings were associations between greater apathy and greater years in study, a baseline diagnosis of MCI (compared to CN), and male sex. CN elderly self-reported greater apathy compared to that reported by informants and clinicians, while individuals with MCI under-reported their apathy compared to informants and clinicians. Of the three sub-scales, the clinician-reported AES (AES-C) best predicted transition from MCI to AD dementia. Conclusion In a sample of CN elderly and elderly with MCI, apathy increased over time, particularly in men and those with MCI. Self-reported AES scores may be more sensitive than informant and clinician-report when subjects are CN, but less reliable if subjects have MCI. Moreover, the clinician-reported AES sub-scale predicted progression from MCI to AD dementia. PMID:26401564

  15. Effect of age and gender on sudomotor and cardiovagal function and blood pressure response to tilt in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Dyck, P. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Slezak, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Normative data are limited on autonomic function tests, especially beyond age 60 years. We therefore evaluated these tests in a total of 557 normal subjects evenly distributed by age and gender from 10 to 83 years. Heart rate (HR) response to deep breathing fell with increasing age. Valsalva ratio varied with both age and gender. QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test) volume was consistently greater in men (approximately double) and progressively declined with age for all three lower extremity sites but not the forearm site. Orthostatic blood pressure reduction was greater with increasing age. HR at rest was significantly higher in women, and the increment with head-up tilt fell with increasing age. For no tests did we find a regression to zero, and some tests seem to level off with increasing age, indicating that diagnosis of autonomic failure was possible to over 80 years of age.

  16. Biomagnetic and bioelectric detection of gastric slow wave activity in normal human subjects – a correlation study

    PubMed Central

    Somarajan, S; Muszynski, ND; Obioha, C; Richards, WO; Bradshaw, LA

    2012-01-01

    We measured gastric slow wave activity simultaneously with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer, mucosal electrodes, and cutaneous electrodes in 18 normal human subjects (11 women and 7 men). We processed signals with Fourier spectral analysis and SOBI blind-source separation techniques. We observed a high waveform correlation between mucosal electromyogram (EMG) and multichannel SQUID magnetogastrogram (MGG). There was a lower waveform correlation between mucosal EMG and cutaneous electrogastrogram (EGG), but the correlation improved with application of SOBI. There was also a high correlation between the frequency of the electrical activity recorded in MGG and in mucosal electrodes (r =0.97). We concluded that SQUID magnetometers noninvasively record gastric slow wave activity that is highly correlated with the activity recorded by invasive mucosal electrodes. PMID:22735166

  17. Oral Spirochetes Implicated in Dental Diseases Are Widespread in Normal Human Subjects and Carry Extremely Diverse Integron Gene Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Rho, Mina; Doak, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The NIH Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has produced several hundred metagenomic data sets, allowing studies of the many functional elements in human-associated microbial communities. Here, we survey the distribution of oral spirochetes implicated in dental diseases in normal human individuals, using recombination sites associated with the chromosomal integron in Treponema genomes, taking advantage of the multiple copies of the integron recombination sites (repeats) in the genomes, and using a targeted assembly approach that we have developed. We find that integron-containing Treponema species are present in ∼80% of the normal human subjects included in the HMP. Further, we are able to de novo assemble the integron gene cassettes using our constrained assembly approach, which employs a unique application of the de Bruijn graph assembly information; most of these cassette genes were not assembled in whole-metagenome assemblies and could not be identified by mapping sequencing reads onto the known reference Treponema genomes due to the dynamic nature of integron gene cassettes. Our study significantly enriches the gene pool known to be carried by Treponema chromosomal integrons, totaling 826 (598 97% nonredundant) genes. We characterize the functions of these gene cassettes: many of these genes have unknown functions. The integron gene cassette arrays found in the human microbiome are extraordinarily dynamic, with different microbial communities sharing only a small number of common genes. PMID:22635997

  18. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11383909

  19. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11508792

  20. Smoking, white blood cell counts, and TNF system activity in Japanese male subjects with normal glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smokers have increased white blood cell (WBC) counts and the activation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The effect of smoking on WBC counts and TNF system activity, however, has not been separately investigated yet. Subjects and Methods One hundred and forty-two Japanese male subjects with normal glucose tolerance were recruited. They were stratified into two groups based on the questionnaire for smoking: one with current smokers (n = 48) and the other with current non-smokers (n = 94). Whereas no significant differences were observed in age, BMI, high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, and TNF-α between the two groups, current smokers had significantly higher soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNF-R1) (1203 ± 30 vs. 1116 ± 21 pg/ml, p = 0.010) and increased WBC counts (7165 ± 242 vs. 5590 ± 163/μl, p < 0.001) and lower HDL cholesterol (55 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 1 mg/dl, p = 0.031) as compared to current non-smokers. Next, we classified 48 current smokers into two subpopulations: one with heavy smoking (Brinkman index ≥ 600) and the other with light smoking (Brinkman index < 600). Results Whereas no significant difference was observed in age, BMI, HMW adiponectin, WBC counts and TNF-α, sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 were significantly higher in heavy smoking group (1307 ± 44 vs. 1099 ± 30 pg/ml, p < 0.001; 2166 ± 86 vs. 827 ± 62 pg/ml, p = 0.005) than in light smoking group, whose sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 were similar to non-smokers (sTNF-R1: 1116 ± 15 pg/ml, p = 0.718, sTNF-R2; 1901 ± 32 pg/ml, p = 0.437). In contrast, WBC counts were significantly increased in heavy (7500 ± 324/μl, p < 0.001) or light (6829 ± 352/μl, p = 0.001) smoking group as compared to non-smokers (5590 ± 178/μl). There was no significant difference in WBC counts between heavy and light smoking group (p = 0.158). Conclusion We can hypothesize that light smoking is associated with an increase in WBC counts, while heavy smoking is responsible for TNF activation in Japanese male

  1. Influence of sympathetic stimulation and parasympathetic withdrawal on Doppler echocardiographic left ventricular diastolic filling velocities in young normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, K A; Cerqueira, M; Veith, R C; Stratton, J R

    1991-03-01

    To determine the effects of parasympathetic withdrawal or sympathetic stimulation on Doppler echocardiographic measures of left ventricular diastolic filling, we studied 10 young normal subjects aged 21 to 29 years during separate infusions of atropine (0.8 mg followed by 0.4 mg every 10 minutes until heart rate greater than 110 beats/min or a total dose of 2 mg was attained) and epinephrine (10, 25 and 50 ng/kg/min for 12 minutes each). At the highest atropine dose, heart rate increased from 60 +/- 9 to 105 +/- 8 beats/min (mean +/- standard deviation), the diastolic filling period decreased by 61% (573 +/- 141 to 222 +/- 34 ms), the peak early (E) filling decreased 23% (77 +/- 12 to 61 +/- 11 cm/s), the peak atrial (A) filling increased 103% (40 +/- 6 to 81 +/- 17 cm/s), and the E/A ratio decreased by 60% (2.0 +/- 0.5 to 0.8 +/- 0.3) (all p less than 0.001). These alterations were not correlated to changes in systolic function, preload, blood pressure or plasma catecholamines, all of which were unchanged. However, atropine-induced changes in diastolic filling period were highly correlated to changes in E peak (r = 0.64, p less than 0.01), A peak (r = -0.95, p less than 0.001) and the E/A ratio (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001). The effects of atropine on the E/A ratio were normalized by dividing the E/A ratio by the diastolic filling period (E/A/diastolic filling period).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1998284

  2. Influence of Pleasant and Unpleasant Auditory Stimuli on Cerebral Blood Flow and Physiological Changes in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomotaka; Konno, Michiyo; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Takemura, Naohiro; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in emotion and emotional regulation. The valence asymmetry hypothesis, proposes that the left/right asymmetry of the PFC activity is correlated with specific emotional responses to stressors. However, this hypothesis still seems to leave room for clarifying neurophysiological mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of stimuli with positive and negative valence sounds (hereafter PS, NS) selected from the International Affective Digitized Sounds-2 on physiological and physiological responses, including PFC activity in normal participants. We studied the effect of both stimuli using 12 normal subjects (mean age 26.8 years) on cerebral blood oxygenation in the bilateral PFC by a multi-channel NIRS, alpha wave appearance rate in theta, alpha, beta by EEG, autonomic nervous function by heart rate, and emotional conditions by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the visual analogue scale (VAS). PS was selected over 7.00 and NS were fewer than 3.00 in the Pleasure values. Sounds were recorded during 3 s and reproduced at random using software. Every task session was designed in a block manner: seven rests with Brown Noise (30 s) and six tasks (30 s) blocks. All participants performed each session in random order with eyes closed. A paired Student's t-test was used for comparisons (P<0.05). PFC activity showed increases bilaterally during both stimuli with a greater activation of the left side in PS and a tendency of more activation by NS in the right PFC. Significantly greater alpha wave intensity was obtained in PS. Heart rate tended to show smaller values in PS. The STAI level tended to show smaller values in PS, and a significantly greater VAS score was obtained in PS which indicated 'pleasant'. Despite the limitations of this study such as the low numbers of the subjects, the present study indicated that PS provided pleasant psychological and physiological responses and NS

  3. Variability of normal vocal fold dynamics for different vocal loading in one healthy subject investigated by phonovibrograms.

    PubMed

    Doellinger, Michael; Lohscheller, Joerg; McWhorter, Andrew; Kunduk, Melda

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the potential of high-speed digital imaging technique (HSI) and the phonovibrogram (PVG) analysis in normal vocal fold dynamics by studying the effects of continuous voice use (vocal loading) during the workday. One healthy subject was recorded at sustained phonation 13 times within 2 consecutive days in the morning before and in the afternoon after vocal loading, respectively. Vocal fold dynamics were extracted and visualized by PVGs. The characteristic PVG patterns were extracted representing vocal fold vibration types. The parameter values were then analyzed by statistics regarding vocal load, left-right PVG asymmetries, anterior-posterior PVG asymmetries, and opening-closing differences. For the first time, the direct impact of vocal load could be determined by analyzing vocal fold dynamics. For same vocal loading conditions, equal dynamical behavior of the vocal folds were confirmed. Comparison of recordings performed in the morning with the recordings after work revealed significant changes in vibration behavior, indicating impact of occurring vocal load. Left-right asymmetries in vocal fold dynamics were found confirming earlier assumptions. Different dynamics between opening and closing procedure as well as for anterior and posterior parts were found. Constant voice usage stresses the vocal folds even in healthy subjects and can be detected by applying the PVG technique. Furthermore, left-right PVG asymmetries do occur in healthy voice to a certain extent. HSI in combination with PVG analysis seems to be a promising tool for investigation of vocal fold fatigue and pathologies resulting in small forms of dynamical changes. PMID:18313896

  4. Circulating non-22 kDa growth hormone isoforms after a repeated GHRH stimulus in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Coya, R; Algorta, J; Boguszewski, C L; Vela, A; Carlsson, L M S; Aniel-Quiroga, A; Busturia, M A; Martul, P

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of non-22 kDa GH isoforms in relation to total GH concentration after a repeated GHRH stimulus in healthy subjects. We studied 25 normal volunteers (12 males and 13 females, mean age 13.1 years, range 6-35), who received two GHRH bolus (1.5 mug/kg body weight, i.v.) administered separately by an interval of 120 minutes. The proportion of non-22 kDa GH was determined by the 22 kDa GH exclusion assay (GHEA), which is based on immunomagnetic extraction of monomeric and dimeric 22 kDa GH from serum, and quantitation of non-22 kDa GH isoforms using a polyclonal GH assay. Samples were collected at baseline and at 15-30 min intervals up to 240 min for total GH concentration. Non-22 kDa GH isoforms were measured in samples where peak GH after GHRH was observed. Total GH peaked after the first GHRH bolus in all subjects (median 37.2 ng/ml; range: 10.4-94.6). According to GH response to the second GHRH stimulus, the study group was divided in "non-responders" (n=7; 28%), with GH peak levels lower than 10 ng/ml (median GH: 8.7 ng/ml; range 7.3-9.6) and "responders" (n=18; 72%), who showed a GH response greater than 10 ng/ml (median 17 ng/ml; range 10.1-47.0). The median proportion of non-22 kDa GH on the peak of GH secretion after the first GHRH administration was similar in both groups ("responders" median: 8.6%, range 7-10.9%; "non-responders" median: 8.7%, range 6.7-10.3%), independently of the type of response after the second GHRH. In contrast, the median proportion of non-22 kDa GH was greater at time of GH peak after the second GHRH bolus in the "non-responders" (median 11.4%; range 9.1-14.3%) in comparison with the "responders" (median 9.1%; range 6.7-11.9%; p=0.003). A significant negative correlation between the total GH secreted and the percentage of non-22 kDa isoforms was seen in the "non-responders" (p=0.003). These differences in GH response to repeated GHRH stimulation and in the pattern of GH isoforms at GH

  5. Biochemical and cardiovascular measures in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.; Haran, I.; Attias, J.; Shapira, I.; Shahar, A. )

    1989-11-01

    Reports on a potential relationship between noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and cardiovascular as well as biochemical measures are controversial. This study compares the means of certain cardiovascular and biochemical measures in subjects with NIHL with those in subjects exposed to similar occupational noise, but demonstrating normal hearing. This might indicate certain predisposing factors for NIHL. Eight hundred noise-exposed subjects were divided into two age-matched hearing groups (NIHL and normal hearing). The results showed that the mean values of all the variables examined in both hearing groups were within the normal range. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of the distribution of subjects for the indices measured.

  6. Action of cannabidiol on the anxiety and other effects produced by delta 9-THC in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Zuardi, A W; Shirakawa, I; Finkelfarb, E; Karniol, I G

    1982-01-01

    The object of the experiment was to verify whether cannabidiol (CBD) reduces the anxiety provoked by delta 9-THC in normal volunteers, and whether this effect occurs by a general block of the action of delta 9-THC or by a specific anxiolytic effect. Appropriate measurements and scales were utilized and the eight volunteers received, the following treatments in a double-blind procedure: 0.5 mg/kg delta 9-THC, 1 mg/kg CBD, a mixture containing 0.5 mg/kg delta 9-THC and 1 mg/kg CBD and placebo and diazepam (10 mg) as controls. Each volunteer received the treatments in a different sequence. It was verified that CBD blocks the anxiety provoked by delta 9-THC, however this effect also extended to marihuana-like effects and to other subjective alterations induced by delta 9-THC. This antagonism does not appear to be caused by a general block of delta 9-THC effects, since no change was detected in the pulse-rate measurements. Several further effects were observed typical of CBD and of an opposite nature to those of delta 9-THC. These results suggest that the effects of CBD, as opposed to those of delta 9-THC, might be involved in the antagonism of effects between the two cannabinoids. PMID:6285406

  7. Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects.

    PubMed

    Ravaglia, G; Forti, P; Maioli, F; Zanardi, V; Dalmonte, E; Grossi, G; Cucinotta, D; Macini, P; Caldarera, M

    2000-01-01

    Increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are a known risk factor for vascular disease and have been reported in association with cognitive impairment of old age. Alternatively, however, increased tHcy levels may simply be an indicator of B vitamin deficiency. We evaluated the relationship between plasma tHcy levels, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels, and the scores at a battery of neuropsychological tests in 54 healthy cognitively normal subjects aged 65 years and over. Hyperhomocysteinemia prevalence (plasma tHcy>15 micromol/L) was about 24%. In univariate analysis, vitamin B12 levels were associated with both verbal memory and visuo-spatial skills, whereas no association was found between psychometric test scores and folate levels or tHcy levels. However, none of the univariate associations of neuropsychological test scores and serum B12 vitamin levels was confirmed when adjusting for age, education and other confounding variables. In conclusion, although a relationship between homocysteine, B vitamins and poor cognitive skills in the elderly is plausible, this study does not suggests that such relationship is biologically important. PMID:11115804

  8. On the clinical relevance of mismatch negativity: results from subjects with normal hearing and cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P; Snik, A; van den Broek, P

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) provides an objective measure for evaluating subjects with problems related to speech processing. For a valid neurophysiological profile of speech-processing mechanisms, an efficient procedure to elicit MMNs is needed. In Experiment 1 of this study, MMN recordings were conducted in adults with normal hearing on the effects of decreasing the duration of the interstimulus interval (ISI). Shortening ISI duration does not seem to have a high impact on the individual MMN quality, whereas it does influence group MMN quality. In Experiment 2, MMNs were elicited in a group of cochlear implant users by using a speech sound contrast/ba/-/da/. A group of good performers produced a significant MMN, whereas a group of moderate performers did not. There seems to be a relation between speech perception ability and MMN quality. To fundamentally understand the effects of electrical stimulation of the inner ear and to clinically adjust rehabilitation, diverse data are needed on different aspects of auditory processing. Optimizing the procedure to elicit and MMN is therefore of great clinical value. PMID:9390795

  9. Application of the Oral Minimal Model to Korean Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Min Hyuk; Oh, Tae Jung; Choi, Karam; Lee, Jung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background The oral minimal model is a simple, useful tool for the assessment of β-cell function and insulin sensitivity across the spectrum of glucose tolerance, including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in humans. Methods Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured during a 180-minute, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in 24 Korean subjects with NGT (n=10) and T2DM (n=14). The parameters in the computational model were estimated, and the indexes for insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were compared between the NGT and T2DM groups. Results The insulin sensitivity index was lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The basal index of β-cell responsivity, basal hepatic insulin extraction ratio, and post-glucose challenge hepatic insulin extraction ratio were not different between the NGT and T2DM groups. The dynamic, static, and total β-cell responsivity indexes were significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The dynamic, static, and total disposition indexes were also significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. Conclusion The oral minimal model can be reproducibly applied to evaluate β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in Koreans. PMID:27273909

  10. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  11. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  12. Stable Schizophrenia Patients Learn Equally Well as Age-Matched Controls and Better than Elderly Controls in Two Sensorimotor Rotary Pursuit Tasks

    PubMed Central

    De Picker, Livia J.; Cornelis, Claudia; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Fransen, Erik; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sensorimotor performance and learning in stable schizophrenia patients, healthy age- and sex-matched controls and elderly controls on two variations of the rotary pursuit: circle pursuit (true motor learning) and figure pursuit (motor and sequence learning). Method: In the circle pursuit, a target circle, rotating with increasing speed along a predictable circular path on the computer screen, must be followed by a cursor controlled by a pen on a writing tablet. In the eight-trial figure pursuit, subjects learn to draw a complex figure by pursuing the target circle that moves along an invisible trajectory between and around several goals. Tasks were administered thrice (day 1, day 2, day 7) to 30 patients with stable schizophrenia (S), 30 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (C), and 30 elderly participants (>65 years; E) and recorded with a digitizing tablet and pressure-sensitive pen. The outcome measure accuracy (% of time that cursor is within the target) was used to assess performance. Results: We observed significant group differences in accuracy, both in circle and figure pursuit tasks (E < S < C, p < 0.01). Strong learning effects were found in each group. Learning curves were similar in circle pursuit but differed between groups in figure pursuit. When corrected for group differences in starting level, the learning gains over the three sessions of schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls were equal and both were larger than those of the elderly controls. Conclusion: Despite the reduced sensorimotor performance that was found in the schizophrenia patients, their sensorimotor learning seems to be preserved. The relevance of this finding for the evaluation of procedural learning in schizophrenia is discussed. The better performance and learning rate of the patients compared to the elderly controls was unexpected and deserves further study. PMID:25505425

  13. Aspartame ingestion with and without carbohydrate in phenylketonuric and normal subjects: effect on plasma concentrations of amino acids, glucose, and insulin.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Novak, L C; Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; Persoon, T J; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Krause, W L

    1990-04-01

    Seven subjects homozygous for phenylketonuria (PKU) and seven normal subjects were administered four beverage regimens after an overnight fast: unsweetened beverage, beverage providing carbohydrate (CHO), beverage providing aspartame (APM), and beverage providing APM plus CHO. The APM dose (200 mg) was the amount provided in 12 oz of diet beverage; the CHO was partially hydrolyzed starch (60 g). Plasma amino acid concentrations were determined after dosing and the molar plasma phenylalanine (Phe) to large neutral amino acid (LNAA) ratio calculated. APM administration without CHO did not increase plasma Phe concentrations over baseline values in either normal or PKU subjects (5.48 +/- 0.85 and 150 +/- 23.0 mumols/dL, respectively). Similarly, the Phe/LNAA did not increase significantly. Ingestion of beverage providing APM and CHO did not significantly increase plasma Phe concentrations over baseline values in either normal or PKU subjects. However, ingestion of beverage providing CHO (with or without APM) significantly decreased plasma levels of valine, isoleucine, and leucine 1.5 to 4 hours after dosing in both normal and PKU subjects, thereby increasing the Phe/LNAA ratio significantly. These data indicate that changes noted in Phe/LNAA values after ingestion of beverage providing APM plus CHO were due to CHO. The plasma insulin response to beverage providing CHO (with or without APM) was significantly higher in PKU subjects than in normals. PMID:2182973

  14. Assessment of oxygen saturation in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using Flow Oximetry System

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Annam, Rachel E.; Sepah, Yasir J.; Luu, Long; Bittencourt, Millena G.; Jang, Hyun S.; Lemaillet, Paul; Munoz, Beatriz; Duncan, Donald D.; West, Sheila; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess oxygen saturation (StO2) in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using the modified version of the Flow Oximetry System (FOS) and a novel assessment software. Methods The FOS and novel assessment software were used to determine StO2 levels in arteries and veins located between 1 and 2 mm from the margin of the optic disc and in the macular area. Results Eighteen normal subjects, 15 diabetics without diabetic retinopathy (DM no DR), and 11 with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) were included in final analysis. The mean [± standard deviation (SD)] StO2 in retinal arteries was 96.9%±3.8% in normal subjects; 97.4%±3.7% in DM no DR; and 98.4%±2.0% in NPDR. The mean venous StO2 was 57.5%±6.8% in normal subjects; 57.4%±7.5% in DM no DR; and 51.8%±6.8% in NPDR. The mean arterial and venous StO2 across the three groups were not statistically different (P=0.498 and P=0.071, respectively). The arterio-venous differences between the three study groups, however, were found to be statistically significant (P=0.015). Pairwise comparisons have demonstrated significant differences when comparing the A-V difference in the NPDR group to either normal subjects (P=0.02) or diabetic patients without DR (P=0.04). Conclusions The arterio-venous difference was greater, and statistically significant, in patients with NPDR when compared to normal subjects and to patients with diabetes and no retinopathy. The mean venous StO2 was lower, but not statistically significant, in NPDR compared with diabetics without retinopathy and with normal subjects. PMID:25694958

  15. Accurate discrimination of Alzheimer's disease from other dementia and/or normal subjects using SPECT specific volume analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Yoshii, Fumuhito; Kazama, Toshiki; Kawada, Shuichi; Imai, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Discrimination between Alzheimer's disease and other dementia is clinically significant, however it is often difficult. In this study, we developed classification models among Alzheimer's disease (AD), other dementia (OD) and/or normal subjects (NC) using patient factors and indices obtained by brain perfusion SPECT. SPECT is commonly used to assess cerebral blood flow (CBF) and allows the evaluation of the severity of hypoperfusion by introducing statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We investigated a total of 150 cases (50 cases each for AD, OD, and NC) from Tokai University Hospital, Japan. In each case, we obtained a total of 127 candidate parameters from: (A) 2 patient factors (age and sex), (B) 12 CBF parameters and 113 SPM parameters including (C) 3 from specific volume analysis (SVA), and (D) 110 from voxel-based analysis stereotactic extraction estimation (vbSEE). We built linear classifiers with a statistical stepwise feature selection and evaluated the performance with the leave-one-out cross validation strategy. Our classifiers achieved very high classification performances with reasonable number of selected parameters. In the most significant discrimination in clinical, namely those of AD from OD, our classifier achieved both sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) of 96%. In a similar way, our classifiers achieved a SE of 90% and a SP of 98% in AD from NC, as well as a SE of 88% and a SP of 86% in AD from OD and NC cases. Introducing SPM indices such as SVA and vbSEE, classification performances improved around 7-15%. We confirmed that these SPM factors are quite important for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Effect of Vegetarianism and Smoking on Vitamin B12, Thiocyanate, and Folate Levels in the Blood of Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dastur, D. K.; Quadros, E. V.; Wadia, N. H.; Desai, M. M.; Bharucha, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Vitamin B12, thiocyanate, and folate levels in the blood were estimated in 69 apparently normal subjects, of whom 26 were non-vegetarian non-smokers, 19 non-vegetarian smokers, 15 vegetarian non-smokers, and nine vegetarian smokers. The serum total (cyanide-extracted) B12 level (value A) ranged from 105 to 728 pg/ml, with a mean of 292 pg/ml. The highest values were found in non-vegetarian non-smokers and the lowest in vegetarian smokers. There was no significant difference in value A between smokers as a group and non-smokers as a group. On the other hand, in vegetarians value A was very significantly lower than in non-vegetarians regardless of their smoking habits. It is suggested that A may represent both the protein-bound and free forms of vitamin B12 in the blood, and B mainly the free B12, which may be the physiologically active form. The plasma thiocyanate level varied from 1·0 to 15 μmol/100 ml, being, as expected, much higher in smokers (mean 8·20 μmol/100 ml) than in non-smokers (mean 2·02 μmol/100 ml). There was a rough correlation between falling B12 levels and rising thiocyanate levels. The serum folate level ranged from 2·75 to 15·75 ng/ml, and was slightly but significantly higher in vegetarians (mean 6·60 ng/ml) than in non-vegetarians (mean 4·79 ng/ml), reflecting the greater content of folate in a vegetarian diet. PMID:5046479

  17. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  18. Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy vs standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A non-randomized, age-matched single center trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Yoen TK; Bosscha, Koop; Prins, Hubert A; Lips, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the safety of single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomies with standard four-port cholecystectomies. METHODS: Between January 2011 and December 2012 datas were gathered from 100 consecutive patients who received a single-port cholecystectomy. Patient baseline characteristics of all 100 single-port cholecystectomies were collected (body mass index, age, etc.) in a database. This group was compared with 100 age-matched patients who underwent a conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the same period. Retrospectively, per- and postoperative data were added. The two groups were compared to each other using independent t-tests and χ2-tests, P values below 0.05 were considered significantly different. RESULTS: No differences were found between both groups regarding baseline characteristics. Operating time was significantly shorter in the total single-port group (42 min vs 62 min, P < 0.05); in procedures performed by surgeons the same trend was seen (45 min vs 59 min, P < 0.05). Peroperative complications between both groups were equal (3 in the single-port group vs 5 in the multiport group; P = 0.42). Although not significant less postoperative complications were seen in the single-port group compared with the multiport group (3 vs 9; P = 0.07). No statistically significant differences were found between both groups with regard to length of hospital stay, readmissions and mortality. CONCLUSION: Single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the potential to be a safe technique with a low complication rate, short in-hospital stay and comparable operating time. Single-port cholecystectomy provides the patient an almost non-visible scar while preserving optimal quality of surgery. Further prospective studies are needed to prove the safety of the single-port technique. PMID:26328034

  19. Spontaneous platelet aggregation in normal subject assessed by a laser light scattering method: an attempt at standardization.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Hiroko; Sugihara, Hiroshi; Hamano, Hitoshi; Sato, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Yamada, Yukio; Taki, Masashi; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Hoshi, Keiko; Fusegawa, Yuichi; Satoh, Kaneo; Ozaki, Yukio; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2008-06-01

    Platelet aggregometry by the laser light scattering (LS) method is sufficiently sensitive to detect small platelet aggregates that form spontaneously in vitro in the absence of agonists. Platelet aggregation without agonists is named spontaneous platelet aggregation (SPA). Since SPA has been suggested to be associated with various thrombotic diseases, it is essential to measure SPA and to establish a standard range of SPA values. In this study, we measured SPA in 167 healthy subjects by the LS method and attempted to clarify various factors influencing SPA, including the blood collection procedure. We also attempted to establish a tentative standard range of SPA values. SPA was quantitatively measured in terms of the maximum total LS intensity, which reflects small aggregates formed over 10 minutes (SMAX) and the area under the total LS intensity curve of small aggregates (SAUC). Since both the values of SMAX and SAUC were skewed and the log SMAX and log AUC values showed a normal distribution, the statistical analyses were performed using log SMAX and log SAUC. The log SMAX and log SAUC were significantly higher in the samples collected using a tourniquet and/or a 21 G needle, than in those collected without a tourniquet and/or with an 18 G needle. The log SAUC values were significantly lower in samples obtained with a syringe and/or 3.8% sodium citrate than in those obtained in vacuum sampling tubes and/or 3.13% or 3.14% sodium citrate. The Ht and plasma glucose concentration influenced the log SMAX values. We propose that to standardize SPA measurements, the measurements should be completed within two hours of blood sample collection and collected using the regular concentration of citrate. The standard range of SMAX values measured in samples obtained using a tourniquet and a 21 G needle was 2.0-23.99 (*10(3) mV*count). The standard range of SAUC values measured under same conditions was 0.58-9.12 (*10(6) mV*count*min). The standard range of SMAX values

  20. [Normal values of the major parameters of lower limb veins in Russian cosmonauts prior to flight and in healthy untrained subjects].

    PubMed

    Kotovskaya, A R; Fomina, G A; Salnikov, A V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents normal values of the major parameters of lower limb veins in cosmonauts during preparations for space flight and volunteers leading a common life. The authors report the results and discuss the causes for differences in normal leg venous parameters in these groups of subjects. Incomparability of measurements made in cosmonauts and common people is demonstrated. Changes in lower limb veins of a cosmonaut in microgravity can be evaluated only relative to his/her normal values of the major venous parameters (capacitance, compliance and filling) before flight. PMID:25958461

  1. Influence of the PNPLA3 rs738409 Polymorphism on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Renal Function among Normal Weight Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Oniki, Kentaro; Saruwatari, Junji; Izuka, Tomoko; Kajiwara, Ayami; Morita, Kazunori; Sakata, Misaki; Otake, Koji; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    In normal weight subjects (body mass index < 25 kg/m2), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is likely to coexist with metabolic diseases. The patatin-like phospholipase 3 (PNPLA3) polymorphism rs738409 (c.444C>G) is associated with the risk of NAFLD and/or renal dysfunction; however, the influence of the weight status on the associations remains unknown. We aimed to clarify the associations of the PNPLA3 polymorphism with the risk of NAFLD and/or renal dysfunction, while also paying careful attention to the weight status of the subjects. Cross-sectional and retrospective longitudinal studies with 5.5 ± 1.1 years of follow-up were conducted in 740 and 393 Japanese participants (61.2 ± 10.5 and 67.5 ± 6.0 years), respectively, during a health screening program. Among 591 subjects who did not have a habitual alcohol intake and/or hepatitis B or C virus infections, the PNPLA3 G/G genotype was associated with the risk for NAFLD in normal weight subjects [odds ratio (95% CI): 3.06 (1.11–8.43), P < 0.05]. Among all subjects, carriers of the PNPLA3 G/G genotype with a normal weight had a lower eGFR than those of the C/C genotype [partial regression coefficient (SE): -3.26 (1.48), P < 0.05]. These associations were replicated in the longitudinal analyses. Among the overweight subjects, none of the genotypes were significantly associated in the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses; however, the power of the analyses was small, especially in the analyses among overweight subjects. The findings of this study suggest that carriers of the PNPLA3 G/G genotype with a normal weight status should nevertheless be carefully monitored for the presence of NAFLD and/or renal dysfunction. PMID:26200108

  2. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.; Karacan, I.

    1987-07-01

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreaming CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming.

  3. Analysis with Support Vector Machine Shows HIV-Positive Subjects without Infectious Retinitis Have mfERG Deficiencies Compared to Normal Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Michael H.; Falkenstein, Irina; Kozak, Igor; Hao, Jiucang; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Sejnowski, Terrance; Freeman, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To test the following hypotheses: (1) eyes from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have electrophysiologic abnormalities that manifest as multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) abnormalities; (2) the retinal effects of HIV in immune-competent HIV individuals differ from the effects in immune-incompetent HIV individuals; (3) strong machine learning classifiers (MLCs), like support vector machine (SVM), can learn to use mfERG abnormalities in the second-order kernel (SOK) to distinguish HIV from normal eyes; and (4) the mfERG abnormalities fall into patterns that can be discerned by MLCs. We applied a supervised MLC, SVM, to determine if mfERGs in eyes from patients with HIV differ from mfERGs in HIV-negative controls. Methods Ninety-nine HIV-positive patients without visible retinopathy were divided into 2 groups: (1) 59 high-CD4 individuals (H, 104 eyes), 48.5 ± 7.7 years, whose CD4 counts were never observed below 100, and (2) 40 low-CD4 individuals (L, 61 eyes), 46.2 ± 5.6 years, whose CD4 counts were below 100 for at least 6 months. The normal group (N, 82 eyes) had 41 age-matched HIV-negative individuals, 46.8 ± 6.2 years. The amplitude and latency of the first positive curve (P1, hereafter referred to as a) and the first negative curve (N1, referred to as b) in the SOK of 103 hexagon patterns of the central 28° of the retina were recorded from the eyes in each group. SVM was trained and tested with cross-validation to distinguish H from N and L from N. SOK was chosen as a presumed detector of inner retinal abnormalities. Classifier performance was measured with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve to permit comparison of MLCs. Improvement in performance and identification of subsets of the most important features were sought with feature selection by backward elimination. Results In general, the SOK b-parameters separated L from N and H from N better than a-parameters, and latency separated L from N and

  4. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects. IV. The prevalence of abnormal scans in smokers 30 to 49 years of age

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Kapitan, K.S.; Brewer, N.S.; Ashburn, W.L.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    The usefulness of ventilation-perfusion scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is limited by the wide range of pulmonary diseases that are associated with abnormal scans, and by the largely undetermined prevalence of abnormal scans in persons without cardiopulmonary disease. In prior studies, we found perfusion defects to be rarely present in young persons and in older nonsmokers. To determine if normal older smokers have a higher prevalence of abnormal ventilation and perfusion scans, we performed six-view /sup 99m/Tc perfusion (Q) scans and /sup 133/Xe ventilation (V) scans in 40 subjects 30 to 49 yr of age who had no known cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject had undergone a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and posteroanterior chest roentgenogram prior to scanning. All V and Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by two experienced readers. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect on two views. One subject had a matched subsegmental defect, and one subject had delayed washout from a subsegmental area of the right upper lobe during V scanning, with a normal Q scan. We conclude that abnormal V and Q scans are uncommon among normal smokers 30 to 49 yr of age.

  5. Effect of redesigned Indian mixed meals on blood glucose and insulin levels in normal versus type 2 diabetic subjects--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pande, Ashwini; Krishnamoorthy, Geetha; Moulick, N

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the glycemic as well as insulinemic response of seven types of Indian vegetarian mixed meals (MMs). Each of the seven MMs was given at weekly intervals to both normal and type 2 diabetic subjects on the same day to reduce variations in food preparations. In this Indian study, each MM consisted of five to six food items with a low glycemic index (GI) ranging from 28.98 to 46.12%, glycemic load ranging from 15.58 to 23.8 g and energy value (calculated) from each test meal ranging from 403 to 502 kcal. All the seven meals were found to have postprandial glycemic control in normal subjects which ranged from 86 to 102.4 mg%, and a good postprandial glycemic control in type 2 diabetic subjects which ranged from 132.8 to 148.4 mg%, and hence appropriate for routine consumption by diabetic subjects. The glycemic and insulinemic pattern of all these MMs was similar in normal and diabetic subjects. Sustained intake of such low GI MMs by diabetic can result in good glycemic control. PMID:21696299

  6. A cephalometric evaluation of tongue from the rest position to centric occlusion in the subjects with class II division 1 malocclusion and class I normal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sanjeev K.; Tandon, Pradeep; Agrawal, D. K.; Prabhat, K. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the common types of oro-dental morphopathologic relationship is the Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Therefore, the study of tongue position in Class II Division 1 may reveal a role of the tongue in the etiology or diagnosis of malocclusion. Aims: Present study was done with the aim to evaluate the tongue position radiographically in centric occlusion and rest position in the subjects with Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion and subjects with Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion and to find out any differences in tongue position between Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion and Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion group. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on lateral cephalogram of 40 subjects between the age ranges of 16 to 22 years. The samples were divided into the Angle's Class 1 normal occlusion group (Group I) and the Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion group (Group II) with the 20 in each groups. The study involved the evaluation of tongue position at rest position and centric occlusion on the lateral head cephalogram. Results: This study for the evaluation of the tongue position from the rest position to the centric occlusion showed no statistically significant changes in both groups. However, there were greater changes in various parameters (From the rest position to the centric occlusion) in the subjects with Angle's Class II Division 1 malocclusion as compared to the subjects with the Angle's Class I normal occlusion group. Conclusion: From the present study following conclusion can be drawn: with the closure of mandible from the rest position to centric occlusion the tongue moved antero-superiorly in the tip region, superiorly in the dorsum region, and antero-superiorly in the posterior region in normal occlusion and postero-superiorly in Class II Division 1 malocclusion. PMID:24987623

  7. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  8. Elevation of miR-221 and -222 in the internal mammary arteries of diabetic subjects and normalization with metformin.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Chasity B; Lightell, Daniel J; Moss, Stephanie C; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E; Woods, T Cooper

    2013-07-15

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased intimal thickening and accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. We measured the expression of two microRNAs that promote intimal thickening, miR-221/222, and mRNA encoding a downstream target, p27(Kip1), in internal mammary artery (IMA) segments collected from 37 subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The segments were stratified into three groups: non-diabetic subjects (ND), diabetic subjects not on metformin (DMMet-), and diabetic subjects on metformin (DMMet+). The DMMet- group exhibited a significant increase in miR-221/222 and decrease in p27(Kip1) mRNA compared to both the ND and DMMet+ groups. miR-221/222 levels inversely correlated with metformin dose. VSMCs isolated from the IMAs of the DMMet- group proliferate at a faster rate than those of the ND and DMMet+ groups. Further studies into the importance of miR-221/222 in the increased intimal thickening observed in diabetic subjects is warranted. PMID:23648338

  9. Influence of high-normal serum TSH levels on major cardiovascular risk factors and Visceral Adiposity Index in euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Giandalia, A; Russo, G T; Romeo, E L; Alibrandi, A; Villari, P; Mirto, A A; Armentano, G; Benvenga, S; Cucinotta, D

    2014-09-01

    Although several observations indicate that serum TSH levels in the high normal range are related to cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors in the general population, similar data are limited in diabetic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations between TSH serum levels within the normal range and major metabolic and non-metabolic CVD risk factors in a cohort of euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects. Thyroid hormones, TSH levels, anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, glucose control, and blood pressure were measured in 490 euthyroid type 2 diabetic subjects, consecutively attending two outpatient diabetic units in Southern Italy. In all subjects, we also calculated the Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI), an obesity-related index associated with CVD risk. Diabetic women showed higher mean serum TSH levels and lower FT4 concentration than diabetic men, while FT3 levels were comparable in the two genders. Stratifying the study population according to quartiles of TSH levels, subjects in the highest TSH quartile were more likely to be female and younger, with higher values of BMI and waist circumference (P = 0.05 both), higher triglycerides (P = 0.002) and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations (P = 0.01), higher VAI values (P = 0.02), and lower FT4 levels (P = 0.05), when compared to those in the lowest quartile. At multivariate analysis, a younger age, female gender, triglycerides levels, and waist circumference were independently associated with higher TSH levels. In conclusion, in type 2 diabetic subjects with no evidence of thyroid disease, higher TSH concentrations within the normal range were more frequent in women and in younger subjects, and they were associated with visceral obesity and higher triglycerides concentrations, two well-known CVD risk factors. PMID:24385267

  10. Moderate variations of mood/emotional states related to alterations in cochlear otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus onset in young normal hearing subjects exposed to gun impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Job, Agnès; Cian, Corinne; Esquivié, Dominique; Leifflen, Daniel; Trousselard, Marion; Charles, Corinne; Nottet, Jean-Bertrand

    2004-07-01

    This study was designed to test whether under impulse noise exposure mood and emotional states could play a role in the onset of tinnitus and/or could modify cochlear sensitivity objectively measured with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The experimental design consisted in a short follow-up study of 54 young military subjects (20+/-2 years old), psychologically normal, with normal hearing, during two consecutive days of target practice rounds. Data collection included an abbreviated version of the profile of mood states (POMSs) inventory [Profile of Mood States, Educational and Industrial Testing Service, San Diego, 1971], questionnaires on tinnitus perception (previous history and after shooting) and DPOAEs measurements before and after shooting. Higher scores of tension-anxiety were found in subjects having previous history of tinnitus. Association between tinnitus previous history and tinnitus after shooting was found significant. Perception of tinnitus after target practice rounds was associated with significantly lower DPOAEs at 3 kHz. The most tense-anxious subjects were found to have DPOAEs decreases of 3.35+/-6 dB at 3 kHz after shooting. This study clearly shows that, in young healthy population, psychologically normal and with normal hearing, moderate variations in mood and emotional states were related to tinnitus onset and DPOAEs alterations. It is possible that stronger variations in mood and/or emotional condition would increase risks of tinnitus and alterations of cochlear sensitivity. PMID:15219318

  11. The rate of loss of CR1 from ageing erythrocytes in vivo in normal subjects and SLE patients: no correlation with structural or numerical polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, F; Botto, M; Walport, M J

    1988-01-01

    The stability of CR1 (complement receptor type 1) on ageing erythrocytes in vivo was examined in a group of normal subjects who had been genotyped using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (detected using a cDNA probe for CR1) that correlates with the numerical expression of CR1 on normal erythrocytes (H = allele correlating with high expression, L = low). Erythrocytes were separated into 5 fractions of increasing age on discontinuous Percoll gradients. Mean CR1 numbers on erythrocytes fell from 636 molecules per cell in the first fraction to 384 in the fifth in the HH group and from 478 to 315 in the LL group. There was no difference in the rate of decline of CR1 numbers between the groups. A group of nine SLE patients was also studied in the same way; their genotypes were HH (four) and HL (five). Mean CR1 numbers amongst all of these patients fell from 477 to 232, a faster rate of decline than in a genotypically matched group of normal subjects. There was no difference in the prevalence of the different structural allotypes amongst 30 SLE patients compared with 21 normal subjects. These data provide further evidence that there are enhanced extracellular mechanisms for the removal of CR1 from erythrocytes of SLE patients and do not support the hypothesis that inherited variation in CR1 expression on erythrocytes increases disease susceptibility to SLE. PMID:2899464

  12. Assessment of Microcirculatory Hemoglobin Levels in Normal and Diabetic Subjects using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy in the Visible Region — a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Anand, B. S. Suresh; Nivetha, K. Bala; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, R.

    2015-07-01

    Light-based diagnostic techniques provide a minimally invasive way for selective biomarker estimation when tissues transform from a normal to a malignant state. Spectroscopic techniques based on diffuse reflectance characterize the changes in tissue hemoglobin/oxygenation levels during the tissue transformation process. Recent clinical investigations have shown that changes in tissue oxygenation and microcirculation are observed in diabetic subjects in the initial and progressive stages. In this pilot study, we discuss the potential of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the visible (Vis) range to differentiate the skin microcirculatory hemoglobin levels between normal and advanced diabetic subjects with and without neuropathy. Average concentration of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the probed tissue volume is estimated for a total of four different sites in the foot sole. The results indicate a statistically significant decrease in average total hemoglobin and increase in hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels for diabetic foot compared with a normal foot. The present study demonstrates the ability of reflectance spectroscopy in the Vis range to determine and differentiate the changes in tissue hemoglobin and hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels in normal and diabetic subjects.

  13. Quantitative radionuclide angiography in assessment of hemodynamic changes during upright exercise: observations in normal subjects, patient with coronary artery disease and patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.A.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    Quantitative radionuclide angiography was used to evaluate hemodynamic changes in three subject groups during symptom-limited upright exercise. The 12 normal subjects had significant increases in heart rate, stroke volume, left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output during exercise; changes in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were not significant. In the 24 patients with coronary artery disease there were significant increases in heart rate and cardiac output during exercise, but insignificant changes in end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction. The change in diastolic volume in these patients was determined by the extent of coronary artery disease, propranolol therapy, end point of exercise and presence of collateral vessels. Furthermore, patients with previous myocardial infarction had a lower ejection fraction and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes during exercise than those without myocardial infarction. In the 12 patients with chronic aortic regurgitation of moderate to severe degree, there was a decrease in the end-diastolic volume during exercise. This response was distinctly different from that of the normal subjects or the patients with coronary artery disease. All three groups had a significant decrease in pulmonary transit time during exercise. It is concluded that changes in cardiac output in normal subjects during upright exercise are related to augmentation of stroke volume and tachycardia, whereas in patients with coronary artery disease they are related mainly to tachycardia.

  14. Thyroid gland morphology in young adults: normal subjects versus those with prior low-dose neck irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.A.; Komorowski, R.A.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1983-12-01

    Thyroid glands obtained at autopsy from young adults were studied to establish more accurately the ''normal'' morphology in the groups 20 to 40 years of age. A total of 56 autopsy specimens (many obtained from trauma victims) were examined in detail by totally embedding and sectioning the thyroid glands. The morphology of these thyroid glands also was compared to that of surgically removed thyroid glands from 47 young adult patients with prior low-dose neck irradiation. The ''normal'' thyroid specimens frequently showed morphologic features, such as thyroid tissue outside the recognizable capsule of the gland (40 of 56 patients) and in the strap muscles of the neck (six of 56 patients), which are conditions commonly considered as evidence for invasive thyroid carcinoma. The thyroid glands from the ''normal'' young adult population were significantly different from those thyroid glands surgically removed from patients who had received irradiation. The irradiated thyroid glands invariably showed multiple nodules of a wide variety of histologic types, extensive lymphocytic infiltrates, and distorting fibrosis as well as a high incidence of malignancy (27 of 47 patients). A single 0.1 cm focus of papillary carcinoma was found in one specimen in the nonirradiated thyroid group. This study suggests that ''occult'' thyroid carcinomas in the group 20 to 40 years of age are rare and are significantly fewer in number than in the older population (P less than 0.02).

  15. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. PMID:27422504

  16. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) at 7 Tesla correlates with amyloid beta in hippocampus and brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Simon J.; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton F.; Wyss, Michael; Steininger, Stefanie C.; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Meier, Irene B.; Kälin, Andrea M.; Leh, Sandra E.; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD). While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh Compund-B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET), Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR intensity. Methods: Fourteen healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T). Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho), followed by Holm–Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right: rho = 0.86; left: rho = 0.84), Brainstem (rho = 0.85) and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho = 0.82). Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  17. Metabolic Abnormalities Are Common among South American Hispanics Subjects with Normal Weight or Excess Body Weight: The CRONICAS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Benziger, Catherine P.; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Gilman, Robert H.; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam; Málaga, Germán; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to characterize metabolic status by body mass index (BMI) status. Methods The CRONICAS longitudinal study was performed in an age-and-sex stratified random sample of participants aged 35 years or older in four Peruvian settings: Lima (Peru’s capital, costal urban, highly urbanized), urban and rural Puno (both high-altitude), and Tumbes (costal semirural). Data from the baseline study, conducted in 2010, was used. Individuals were classified by BMI as normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2), and as metabolically healthy (0–1 metabolic abnormality) or metabolically unhealthy (≥2 abnormalities). Abnormalities included individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance. Results A total of 3088 (age 55.6±12.6 years, 51.3% females) had all measurements. Of these, 890 (28.8%), 1361 (44.1%) and 837 (27.1%) were normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Overall, 19.0% of normal weight in contrast to 54.9% of overweight and 77.7% of obese individuals had ≥3 risk factors (p<0.001). Among normal weight individuals, 43.1% were metabolically unhealthy, and age ≥65 years, female, and highest socioeconomic groups were more likely to have this pattern. In contrast, only 16.4% of overweight and 3.9% of obese individuals were metabolically healthy and, compared to Lima, the rural and urban sites in Puno were more likely to have a metabolically healthier profile. Conclusions Most Peruvians with overweight and obesity have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as a majority of those with a healthy weight. Prevention programs aimed at individuals with a normal BMI, and those who are overweight and obese, are urgently needed, such as screening for elevated fasting cholesterol and glucose. PMID:26599322

  18. EFFECTS OF A 0.75PPM SULFUR DIOXIDE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION PARAMETERS OF NORMAL HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Of 31 young, healthy male volunteers who participated in this study, 15 were exposed to air (control) and 16 to 0.75 ppm (2.15 mg/cu. m. ) SO2 for 2 hr at 21C and 60% relative humidity. At the end of the first hour, the subjects exercised for 15 min on a treadmill at 6.4 kmph, wi...

  19. Enhanced Absorption of Nasulin™, an Ultrarapid-Acting Intranasal Insulin Formulation, Using Single Nostril Administration in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Stote, Robert; Miller, Michael; Marbury, Thomas; Shi, Leon; Strange, Poul

    2011-01-01

    Background This pharmacokinetic (PK) study was designed to investigate the maximum intranasal insulin dose that could be achieved by repeated doses in a single nostril of a nasal spray of recombinant regular human insulin 1% in combination with cyclopentadecalactone (CPE-215) 2%, a compound that enhances absorption of molecules across mucous membranes (Nasulin™, CPEX Pharmaceuticals, Inc.). Method A nine-period crossover study of 8 healthy, nonsmoking subjects (ages 18–50, body mass index <33 kg/m2, weight >70 kg) were studied. In a fasted state, subjects were randomly given 25, 50, and 75 U in a single nostril on the first day and randomly given 50, 75, and 100 U doses utilizing both nostrils on two subsequent days. After a 45-minute PK assessment, subjects were given a meal. To determine the mechanism of enhanced absorption in a single nostril, a second study utilizing 24 subjects under similar conditions received 25 U, placebo (P) that included CPE-215 plus 25 U, and 50 U in a single nostril. Results Single nostril administration revealed enhanced absorption with maximum concentrations (Cmax) of 13, 65, and 96 µU/ml for the 25, 50, and 75 U doses, respectively. Dual nostril administration in two cohorts resulted in Cmax of 31/42, 65/52, and 88/79 µU/ml for the 50, 75, and 100 U, respectively. In the second cohort, Cmax was 23, 19, 56 µU/ml for the 25, P + 25, and 50 U doses, respectively. Conclusions Repeated dosing in a single nostril resulted in enhanced absorption; this was not due to the increased CPE-215 but to the increased insulin administered. PMID:21303633

  20. The effect of Yohimbine, an alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the growth hormone response to apomorphine in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Guyda, H

    1996-01-01

    Yohimbine HCl (16 mg po) administered 30 min before clonidine (CLON) (2 ug/kg infused over 10 min) (N = 5) or apomorphine HCl (Apo) (0.5 mg sc) (N = 10) antagonized the growth hormone (GH) response to CLON but had no effect on the GH response to Apo in normal men. This finding suggests that in humans, alpha2 adrenergic mechanisms do not modulate dopaminergic function, at least not in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and that the GH response to Apo is not mediated via an alpha2 adrenergic link. PMID:8820174

  1. Higher serum uric acid level increases risk of prehypertension in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, but not pre-diabetes and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I-H; Wu, J-S; Sun, Z-J; Lu, F-H; Chang, C-S; Chang, C-J; Yang, Y-C

    2016-08-01

    Although the association between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and prehypertension has been reported in previous studies, it is unknown whether their relationship is similar in subjects with diabetes, pre-diabetes and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). This study thus aimed to investigate the relationship between SUA and prehypertension in subjects with different glycemic status, including NGT, pre-diabetes and diabetes. A total of 12 010 participants were included after excluding subjects with blood pressure ⩾140/90 mm Hg, history of hypertension, leukaemia, lymphoma, hypothyroidism, medication for hypertension and hyperuricemia and missing data. Subjects were divided into four groups based on SUA quartiles (male Q1: ⩽345.0, Q2: 345.0-392.6, Q3: 392.6-440.2, Q4: ⩾440.2 μmol l(-1) and female Q1: ⩽249.8, Q2: 249.8-285.5, Q3: 285.5-333.1, Q4: ⩾333.1 μmol l(-1)). Diabetes, pre-diabetes and NGT were assessed according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Normotension and prehypertension were defined according to the JNC-7 (The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) criteria. The SUA was significantly higher in prehypertensive subjects as compared with normotensive subjects. SUA, as a continuous variable, was positively associated with prehypertension in subjects with NGT but not pre-diabetes and diabetes. Besides, NGT subjects with the highest quartile of SUA exhibited a higher risk of prehypertension after adjustment for other confounding factors. In pre-diabetes and diabetes groups, none of SUA quartiles was significantly related to prehypertension. SUA was significantly associated with an increased risk of prehypertension in subjects with NGT but insignificantly in subjects with pre-diabetes and diabetes. PMID:26911534

  2. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  3. CDR molecular localization of possible anti-idiotypic anti-DNA antibodies in normal subjects, patients with SLE, and SLE first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Williams, R W; Malone, C C; Silvestris, F

    1995-07-01

    Patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with disease worsening or severe flares frequently show very low levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-F(ab')2 antibody. Anti-F(ab')2 antibody probably represents a polyclonal collection of generic anti-idiotypic antibodies involved in immune homeostasis. We synthesized the entire variable regions of the heavy and light chains (VH and VL) of two monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies, V88 and 2A4, as overlapping 7-mers on small polypropylene pins and tested these linear segments of anti-DNA V-regions for reactivity against serum samples from 10 normal subjects with high serum IgG anti-F(ab')2, 11 normal subjects with low anti-F(ab')2, 5 patients with SLE with active uncontrolled disease, 3 patients with SLE in remission, and 8 unaffected normal first-degree SLE relatives. VH and VL regions of a human monoclonal IgG anti-rabies antibody were also tested as a control. Concordant IgG antibody reacting with the same complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) was arbitrarily scored as indicative of the presence of anti-idiotypic antibody in test serum samples. Among normal subjects with either high or low serum anti-F(ab')2 levels, 10% to 21% showed strong concordant anti-CDR reactions with either the monoclonal anti-DNA or the control monoclonal anti-rabies V-region sequences. However, all patients with active SLE showed no detectable anti-CDR-reactive antibody. Patients with SLE in remission often showed return of strong concordant anti-CDR antibody. Normal unaffected SLE relatives also showed high levels of anti-CDR reactivity for both monoclonal anti-DNA and anti-rabies antibody sequences. PMID:7602233

  4. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow in Normal Chinese-American Subjects by Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sowmya; Tan, Ou; Wu, Shuang; Nittala, Muneeswar Gupta; Huang, David; Varma, Rohit; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in normal, healthy Chinese Americans by using semi-automated analysis of Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) scans. Methods. Two hundred sixty-six normal, healthy Chinese-American participants (266 eyes) were enrolled from The Chinese American Eye Study. All participants underwent complete ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and Doppler FD-OCT imaging, using the circumpapillary double circular scan protocol. Total retinal blood flow and other vascular parameters (e.g., venous and arterial cross-sectional area and their velocities) were calculated by using Doppler OCT of Retinal Circulation software. Associations between TRBF and other clinical parameters were assessed by using bivariate correlations and linear regression. Results. The mean age of study participants was 57.40 ± 5.60 (range, 50–82) years. The mean TRBF was 49.34 ± 10.08 (range, 27.17–78.08, 95% confidence interval: 25.98–69.10) μL/min. The mean venous area was 0.0548 (±0.0084) mm2. Superior retinal hemispheric blood flow (25.50 ± 6.62 μL/min) was slightly greater than inferior retinal hemispheric blood flow (23.84 ± 7.19 μL/min, P = 0.008). The mean flow velocity was 15.16 ± 3.12 mm/s. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between TRBF and age (r = −0.15, P = 0.012). No significant correlation was found between TRBF and axial length (r = 0.11, P = 0.08). Retinal blood flow was not significantly correlated with any other clinical parameters, including body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and intraocular pressure. Conclusions. Normal Doppler OCT-derived total retinal blood values in a Chinese-American population showed considerable variability, some of which was explained by age. These observations should help design future studies evaluating TRBF in populations with eye disease. PMID:25670487

  5. Event-related potentials elicited during a context-free homograph task in normal versus schizophrenic subjects

    PubMed Central

    SALISBURY, DEAN F.; O’DONNELL, BRIAN F.; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.; NESTOR, PAUL G.; SHENTON, MARTHA E.

    2009-01-01

    Thought disorder in schizophrenia may involve abnormal semantic activation or faulty working memory maintenance. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while sentences reading “THE NOUN WAS ADJECTIVE/VERB” were presented to 34 schizophrenic and 34 control subjects. Some nouns were homographs with dominant and subordinate meanings. Their sentence ending presented information crucial for interpretation (e.g., The bank was [closed, steep]). Greatest N400 activity to subordinate homograph-meaning sentence endings in schizophrenia would reflect a semantic bias to strong associates. N400 to all endings would reflect faulty verbal working memory maintenance. Schizophrenic subjects showed N400 activity to all endings, suggesting problems in contextual maintenance independent of content, but slightly greater N400 activity to subordinate endings that correlated with the severity of psychosis. Future research should help determine whether a semantic activation bias in schizophrenia toward strong associates is reflected in ERP activity or whether this effect is overshadowed by faulty verbal working memory maintenance of context. PMID:10934904

  6. Enhanced Power Within the Default Mode Network in Normal Subjects with Elevated Scores on an Egocentric Scale

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mark W.G; Persinger, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Integrated global power from the primary structures that composed the Default Mode Network (DMN) and from a random collection of other structures were measured by sLORETA (standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography) for young university volunteers who had completed an inventory that contained a subscale by which egocentricity has been inferred. Subjects who exhibited higher scores for egocentricity displayed significantly more power within the DMN structures relative to comparison areas. This was not observed for individuals whose egocentricity scores were lowest where the power differences between the DMN and comparison structures were not significant statistically. DMN power was greater in the right hemisphere than the left for men but greater in the left hemisphere than the right for women. The results are consistent with our operating metaphor that elevation of power or activity within the DMN is associated with greater affiliation with the self and its cognitive contents. PMID:25419254

  7. Influences of the breathing route on upper airway dynamics properties in normal awake subjects with constant mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Verin, Eric; Sériès, Frédéric

    2006-11-01

    MB (mouth breathing) promotes the occurrence of sleep-disordered breathing even in non-apnoeic subjects. Considering that MO (mouth opening) contributes to an increase in UA (upper airway) collapsibility independently of MB, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of breathing route on UA dynamics in the presence of MO. Bilateral anterior magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation was performed 2 s after expiratory onset in 12 healthy male subjects during wakefulness (age, 50+/-5 years; body mass index, 27.8+/-2.4 kg/m(2)) during MB through a mouthpiece and during exclusive NB (nasal breathing) with the same mouthpiece in place. Twitch-induced V(I) (instantaneous flow), P(ph) and P(es) (pharyngeal and oesophageal pressures respectively) were recorded and the corresponding resistances were measured. A polynomial regression model, V(I)=k(1)P(d)+k(2)P(d)(2), was used to characterize flow-pressure relationship and to determine the P(d) value at which UA collapses. There was no difference in UA dynamic properties between NB and MB when UA collapse occurred above the pharyngeal catheter. For twitches where UA collapse occurred lower in the UA, pharyngeal resistance decreased from NB to MB (2.0+/-0.3 and 1.5+/-0.2 cmH(2)Oxl(-1)xs respectively; P=0.02; values are means+/-S.D.), whereas closing pressure increased (-25.7+/-10.1 and -18.0+/-3.0 cmH(2)O respectively; P=0.04). We conclude that (i) in the presence of MO the dynamic properties of the proximal UA free of phasic activity do not differ between NB and MB, and (ii) MB decreases the upstream resistance and increases collapsibility of the distal UA. PMID:16753041

  8. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  9. Nutritional regulation of cholesterol synthesis and apolipoprotein B kinetics: studies in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and normal subjects treated with a high carbohydrate, low fat diet.

    PubMed

    Stacpoole, P W; von Bergmann, K; Kilgore, L L; Zech, L A; Fisher, W R

    1991-11-01

    High carbohydrate, low fat diets decrease plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apoB) mass in normal subjects and in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanisms for these effects, four normal, four FH heterozygous, and one FH homozygous subjects were studied on a basal (45% carbohydrate, 40% fat) diet and during continuous nasogastric infusion of Vivonex (90% carbohydrate, 1% fat). For the entire group, the mean changes in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides were -90, -95, -14 (all P less than 0.01) and +114 (P less than 0.02) mg/dl, respectively. Fecal sterol balance measurements demonstrated a 24% decrease in whole body cholesterol synthesis in normals, from 8.4 +/- 4.4 (mean +/- SD) to 6.4 +/- 1.3 mg/kg per day and in FH subjects, a 58% decrease, from 11.4 +/- 5.6 to 4.8 +/- 1.7 mg/kg per day (both P less than 0.05). ApoB kinetic studies were performed using a [3H]leucine tracer in two normals and three FH heterozygotes on both basal and Vivonex regimens, and the results were analyzed by compartmental modeling using the SAAM program. Total apoB production was not altered in a consistent manner by carbohydrate feeding. ApoB secretion, however, was shifted from the production of small VLDL/IDL-like particles to large VLDL by Vivonex, with an accompanying increase in intrahepatic assemblage time before secretion. In the two normal subjects, Vivonex induced an increase in apoB loss as VLDL/IDL; however, in the FH patients no such loss occurred. A decrease (P less than 0.05) in the residence time of LDL-apoB occurred for all subjects and was the primary determinant of the fall in plasma LDL concentration, since LDL-apoB transport did not change consistently. Thus, in FH patients, a high carbohydrate, low fat diet results in suppression of cholesterol synthesis and a fall in plasma LDL concentration due to an increased plasma clearance rate for

  10. Pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid following administration of aspirin tablets and three different forms of soluble aspirin in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Attardo Parrinello, G; Vitiello, B; Perucca, E

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of an innovative formulation of soluble aspirin (l-ornithine acetylsalicylate, ldB 1003) was compared with that of conventional tablets and two other soluble dosage forms (d, l-lysine acetylsalicylate and a buffered effervescent formulation of acetylsalicylic acid) after administration of single oral doses in six normal volunteers. All soluble forms showed a rapid absorption profile, peak plasma salicylic acid levels being attained after about 30 min on average and without statistically significant differences among the solutions tested. As compared to the soluble formulations, acetylsalicylic acid given as tablets resulted in slower absorption, with peak plasma salicylic acid levels being reached more than 1 h after dosing. Despite these differences in time course of plasma level profiles, the extent of absorption was similar for all formulations. Apart from the potential advantages in terms of improved gastric tolerability, the increased rate of absorption of aspirin solutions is therapeutically useful whenever a rapid onset of action is required. In this respect, the kinetic pattern of the innovative formulation compares favourably with that of other available soluble dosage forms. PMID:2517497

  11. Functional neuroimaging of human central auditory processing in normal subjects and patients with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Engelien, A; Stern, E; Silbersweig, D

    2001-02-01

    Auditory sensory processing in the human cerebral cortex is disturbed in several neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from devastating perceptual deficits in neuropsychological syndromes such as cortical deafness and auditory agnosia to the problem of involuntary hallucinatory perception in schizophrenia. With modern non-invasive functional imaging techniques (e.g., PET, fMRI, and MEG), the normal auditory cortical functional anatomy can now be studied in humans in vivo, as well as its disruption in pathological conditions. This article will summarize current knowledge on human central auditory perception in health and disease, with an emphasis on recent functional neuroimaging studies, in the context of clinical and basic neuroscientific knowledge. New strategies include a focus on the role of other, non-temporal brain areas for auditory processing, particularly in the frontal lobes, and the combined use of techniques offering both precise spatial and temporal resolution. One step towards this goal has been the recent development of a silent, event-related fMRI scanning technique. PMID:11320447

  12. Effects of Hyul-Bu-Chuke-Tang on Erythrocyte Deformability and Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Park, Joo-Young; Byeon, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Young-Jee; Park, Jung-Mi; Park, Seong-Uk; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Hyul-bu-chuke-tang (HCEt) is a well-known traditional herbal medicine that is used for the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disorders. We investigated the acute effects of HCEt on erythrocyte deformability and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity (CVR) in healthy male subjects. Materials and Methods. We examined erythrocyte deformability in an HCEt group (n = 14) and a control group (n = 10). CVR was measured using hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the middle cerebral artery and transcranial Doppler (TCD) in the HCEt group (n = 11). A historical control group (n = 10) of CVR measurements was also created from our previous study. All measurements were performed prior to and 1, 2, and 3 hours after HCEt administration. Results. HCEt significantly improved erythrocyte deformability 1 hour after administration compared to the control group (2.9 ± 1.1% versus −0.6 ± 1.0%, P = 0.034). HCEt significantly improved the CVR 2 hours after administration compared to the historical control group (9.1 ± 4.0% versus −8.1 ± 4.1%, P = 0.007). The mean blood pressure and pulse rate did not vary from baseline values in either group. Conclusions. We demonstrated that HCEt improved erythrocyte deformability and CVR. Our findings suggest that an improvement in erythrocyte deformability contributes to HCEt's effect on cerebral microcirculation. PMID:22690250

  13. Effects of High Doses of Cholecalciferol in Normal Subjects: A Randomized Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Birgitte; Frandsen, Niels Erik; Brandi, Lisbet; Rasmussen, Knud; Oestergaard, Ove Vyff; Oedum, Lars; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Hansen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D repletion with high doses of vitamin D is often recommended to patients and healthy subjects. The safety, especially concerning changes in urinary calcium excretion is of great importance. Methods In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 40 healthy volunteers, we examined the changes in mineral metabolism during supplementation with 3000 IU of oral cholecalciferol daily during 4 months. Results Both 25(OH)vitamin D and 1,25(OH)2vitamin D increased significantly in the active treated group as compared to the placebo group (186% versus 14% (P<0.001) and 28% versus – 8% (P<0.001)). No change was observed in urinary calcium excretion in the active group compared to the placebo group (P = 0.891). Fibroblast growth factor 23 increased significantly by 10% (P<0.018) in the active group. However, there was no difference in changes in FGF23 between treatment groups (P = 0.457). Conclusion High dose cholecalciferol significantly increases 25(OH)vitamin D and 1,25(OH)2vitamin D levels compared to placebo. No changes in urinary calcium excretion or other measured components of the mineral metabolism were found between groups. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952562. PMID:25166750

  14. Effects of Different Proportion of Carbohydrate in Breakfast on Postprandial Glucose Excursion in Normal Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Glucose Regulation Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xin; Wang, Chun; Lifang, Lv; Chen, Dawei; Yang, Yanzhi; Liu, Guanjian; Wen, Hu; Chen, Lihong; He, Liping; Li, Xiujun; Tian, Haoming; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The variability of postprandial plasma glucose is an independent risk factor for diabetes. The type and amount of carbohydrate may be important determinants of glycemic control. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of different proportions of carbohydrate in breakfast on postprandial blood glucose fluctuations in impaired glucose regulation (IGR) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects. Subjects and Methods This is a cross-sectional study of two groups including 55 subjects with IGR and 78 individuals with NGT. Their recorded breakfast was sorted into low-carbohydrate (LC) (carbohydrate <45%), medium-carbohydrate (MC) (carbohydrate 45–65%), and high-carbohydrate (HC) (carbohydrate >65%) meals according to the proportion of carbohydrate. Glucose concentrations were continuously measured with a continuous glucose monitoring system, and parameters such as the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose and postprandial glucose excursion (PPGE) were calculated to evaluate postprandial glucose fluctuations. Results The postprandial fluctuations of glucose increased gradually with increased proportions of carbohydrate in breakfast in both IGR and NGT subjects. For the MC and HC meals, iAUC, PPGE, postprandial glucose spike (PGS), and mean blood glucose were significantly greater than those in the NGT group (P<0.05), respectively. The median time to PGS and the time period in which glucose concentrations decreased to baseline after the MC and HC meals in the IGR group were significantly longer than those in the NGT group (P<0.01), respectively. Compared with the NGT subjects for the HC meal, the IGR subjects consuming the MC meal had greater PGS, range of glucose concentrations, SD, and PPGE (P<0.05). Conclusions The proportion of carbohydrate in breakfast contributes to glucose excursions in the NGT and IGR subjects. In the IGR subjects, a HC meal should be avoided and a LC meal should be recommended to prevent development of

  15. Characteristics of Maxillary Morphology in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients Compared to Normal Subjects and Skeletal Class III Patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chanyuan; Yin, Ningbei; Zheng, Yilue; Song, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This study is to investigate the anatomical features of maxillae in unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients with maxillary retrusion. Additionally, the dissimilarities of retruded maxillae between the UCLP patients and the skeletal class III patients were compared. Craniofacial measurements were carried out among 32 UCLP adult patients with maxillary retrusion (GC), 24 adult patients in class III (SNA < 80°, ANB < 0°) patients (GIII), and 32 normal controls (GN). The authors measured the width and length of the maxillae, as well as their relative positions to the coronal plane passing through basion. The independent sample group t test was performed, and P < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. In the GC group, the anterior and posterior maxillary length (A1-P3M⊥CP and P3M-P6M⊥CP) and overall maxillary length (A1-P6M⊥CP) at the dental level, the interdental widths of the maxillae, the maxillary volume (GM), and the volume consisting of maxilla and maxillary sinus (GT) significantly reduced compared with the GN group (P < 0.05). The distances from the points on the maxillae to the coronal plane (A1⊥CP, P3M⊥CP, and P6M⊥CP) in the GC and GIII groups were smaller than those in the GN group (P < 0.05). In summary, for the UCLP patients, the decreased prominence of maxillary complex could be mainly caused by the shortened maxillary length; meanwhile, posterior position of the maxillary body may have some influence on the maxillary protrusion. While for the class III patients, maxillary retrusion was resulted from malposition and malmorphology on an equal basis. PMID:26267583

  16. Effects of central cholinergic blockade on striatal dopamine release measured with positron emission tomography in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, S L; Smith, G S; Logan, J; Brodie, J D; Simkowitz, P; MacGregor, R R; Fowler, J S; Volkow, N D; Wolf, A P

    1993-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to measure changes in the concentrations of synaptic dopamine and acetylcholine. Whether induced directly or indirectly through interactions with other neurotransmitters, these studies support the use of PET for investigating the functional responsiveness of a specific neurotransmitter to a pharmacologic challenge. In an extension of these findings to the human brain, PET studies designed to measure the responsiveness of striatal dopamine release to central cholinergic blockade were conducted in normal male volunteers using high-resolution PET and [11C]raclopride, a D2-dopamine receptor antagonist. [11C]Raclopride scans were performed prior to and 30 min after systemic administration of the potent muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, scopolamine (0.007 mg/kg). After scopolamine administration, [11C]raclopride binding decreased in the striatum (specific binding) but not in the cerebellum (nonspecific binding) resulting in a significant decrease, exceeding the test/retest variability of this ligand (5%), in the ratio of the distribution volumes of the striatum to the cerebellum (17%). Furthermore, scopolamine administration did not alter the systemic rate of [11C]raclopride metabolism or the metabolite-corrected plasma input function. These results are consistent not only with the known inhibitory influence that acetylcholine exerts on striatal dopamine release but also with our initial 18F-labeled N-methylspiroperidol and benztropine studies. Thus these data support the use of PET for measuring the functional responsiveness of an endogenous neurotransmitter to an indirect pharmacologic challenge in the living human brain. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8265632

  17. Normal weight obesity and mortality in United States subjects ≥60 years of age (from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).

    PubMed

    Batsis, John A; Sahakyan, Karine R; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P; Bartels, Stephen J; Somers, Virend K; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-15

    Current body mass index (BMI) strata likely misrepresent the accuracy of true adiposity in older adults. Subjects with normal BMI with elevated body fat may metabolically have higher cardiovascular and overall mortality than previously suspected. We identified 4,489 subjects aged ≥60 years (BMI = 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2)) with anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance measurements from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys III (1988 to 1994) and mortality data linked to the National Death Index. Normal weight obesity (NWO) was classified in 2 ways: creation of tertiles with highest percentage of body fat and body fat percent cutoffs (men >25% and women >35%). We compared overall and cardiovascular mortality rates, models adjusted for age, gender, smoking, race, diabetes, and BMI. The final sample included 1,528 subjects, mean age was 70 years, median (interquartile range) follow-up was 12.9 years (range 7.5 to 15.3) with 902 deaths (46.5% cardiovascular). Prevalence of NWO was 27.9% and 21.4% in men and 20.4% and 31.3% in women using tertiles and cutoffs, respectively. Subjects with NWO had higher rates of abnormal cardiovascular risk factors. Lean mass decreased, whereas leptin increased with increasing tertile. There were no gender-specific differences in overall mortality. Short-term mortality (<140 person-months) was higher in women, whereas long-term mortality (>140 person-months) was higher in men. We highlight the importance of considering body fat in gender-specific risk stratification in older adults with normal weight. In conclusion, NWO in older adults is associated with cardiometabolic dysregulation and is a risk for cardiovascular mortality independent of BMI and central fat distribution. PMID:23993123

  18. [Activity of Vegetative Nervous System and Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines During Glucose Tolerance Test in Subjects With Optimal and High Normal Blood Pressure].

    PubMed

    Mangileva, T A

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen patients with high normal (main group) and 15 subjects with optimal (control group) blood pressure (BP) were examined. Fasting and postprandial (60 and 120 min after oral intake of glucose) levels of glucose, insulin, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and C-reactive protein were measured. At the same time spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) was done. Body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance index (as HOMA-IR) were calculated. In patients with high normal BP total power of HRV was decreased (p < 0.05) and dynamic changes of HRV after glucose loading were blunted. In persons with optimal BP transient elevation of low frequency component and low/high ratio in 60 min after onset of glucose tolerance test (GTT) were registered; values of both parameters were higher than in the main group (p < 0.05). Changes in vegetative nervous system activity in control group were accompanied by transient elevations of levels of inflammatory cytokines: IL-10 and TNF-α in 60 min, IL-6 in 120 min after GTT onset (p < 0.05), which at that moment were higher than in patients with high normal BP (p < 0.05). Fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations and glucose level 60 min after glucose intake were higher in patients from the main group (p < 0.05). In both groups positive correlations between BMI and HOMA-IR were observed (r1 = 0.70 & r2 = 0.78). Subjects with optimal and high normal BP have different variants of vegetative nervous system reactions to pulsatile hyperglycemia which is accompanied by changes of levels of inflammatory cytokines and worsening of carbohydrate metabolism in patients with high normal BP. PMID:26320287

  19. Effect of heart rate on left ventricular diastolic transmitral flow velocity patterns assessed by Doppler echocardiography in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M R; Clifton, G D; Pennell, A T; DeMaria, A N

    1991-03-15

    Although a number of factors, including age and ventricular loading, are known to influence the pattern of left ventricular (LV) filling as depicted by Doppler echocardiographic transmitral flow velocities, few and conflicting data are available regarding the influence of heart rate (HR). Therefore, 20 volunteers (mean age 30 years) were evaluated with pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography, performed with the sample volume placed at the mitral anulus level in the apical 4-chamber projection. Transmitral flow measurements comprised peak and integrated early passive (E) and late atrial (A) filling velocities and the slope of velocity decline from peak E filling. Measurements were recorded during baseline (sinus rhythm, mean 70 beats/min) and during transesophageal atrial pacing (mean 88 beats/min). LV end-diastolic dimension, mean arterial pressure and PR interval (corrected for pacing-induced delay in interatrial conduction time) were unchanged during pacing versus baseline measurements. Peak and integrated E filling velocities averaged 0.59 +/- 0.09 m/s and 6 +/- 1 cm, respectively, at baseline and were not significantly greater at the higher HR. In contrast, baseline peak and integrated A velocities averaged 0.37 +/- 0.06 m/s and 2.3 +/- 0.7 cm, respectively, but were significantly greater at the higher HR (0.5 +/- 0.07 m/s and 3.2 +/- 1.1 cm, respectively [p less than 0.003 vs baseline for each]). Further analysis of a subgroup of 9 subjects for whom Doppler measurements were available at 3 HRs (sinus 70; pacing 80 and 90) yielded strong evidence for a linear relation between HR and peak A velocity (A = 0.008 HR - 0.21, with p less than 0.0001 for significance of the linear trend).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2000796

  20. A new method for evaluation of intestinal muscle contraction properties: studies in normal subjects and in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, H; Liao, D; Pedersen, J; Drewes, A M

    2007-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease that involves the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Seventy-five per cent of systemic sclerosis patients experience symptoms arising from oesophagus. The intestine has less frequently been subject for studies than the oesophagus. When the small intestine becomes involved, nausea, vomiting, bloating, diarrhoea and malabsorption may occur. Previous studies have shown decreased and abnormal intestinal motility, dilatation and a stiffer wall. The aim was to study muscle mechanics in systemic sclerosis patients using novel analysis of intestinal muscle contraction force-velocity and power. A volume-controlled duodenal ramp-distension protocol was used in nine patients and eight healthy controls. The wall stretch ratio, tension, shortening velocity and muscle power were computed from pressure and cross-sectional area data recorded by an impedance planimetry system. The tension-stretch ratio relation obtained in patients was shifted to the left, indicating a stiffer wall. The in vivo tension-shortening velocity relationship was quantified using Hill's equation. The maximum preload tension (tension at zero velocity) was lower in the patients than in the healthy controls (P < 0.001). The muscle power was lowest in the patients. An association was found between the duration of the disease and the maximum stretch ratio (P < 0.05). The study represents the first data with application of in vivo muscle force-velocity relations in patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Systemic sclerosis patients had increased stiffness and impaired muscle dynamics of the duodenum. Decreased muscle function and increased wall stiffness may explain the GI symptoms reported in this patient group. PMID:17187584

  1. Filter bleeding time: a new in vitro test of hemostasis. I. Evaluation in normal and thrombocytopenic subjects.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, S; Stropp, J Q; Claypool, D A; Didisheim, P; Dewanjee, M K

    1983-07-01

    Disadvantages of current bleeding time methods include poor reproducibility, limited repeatability, and at times scar formation. We report a new, in vitro technique which circumvents these problems. Venous blood is collected in sodium citrate, stored capped in a siliconized tube at 37 degrees C until use, and made to flow under constant pressure through a filter of Woven Dacron. Flow rate progressively falls as platelet aggregates occlude the filter, as verified by scanning electron microscopy and 111Indium-labeled platelet radioactivity of the filter. Filter bleeding time (FBT) was 4.33 +/- 1.79 (means x +/- SD) min in 23 healthy human volunteers and 3.08 +/- 1.08 min in 14 normal dogs. Bleeding volume (BV) (number of drops) was 29 +/- 12 in the humans and 16 +/- 6 in the dogs. Initial bleeding rate (IBR) (number of drops during first minute) was 14 +/- 3 in citrated blood and 25 +/- 5 drops/min in EDTA blood of the humans (P = 9 X 10(-10)), 8 +/- 2 in citrated blood and 14 +/- 6 drops/min in EDTA blood of the dogs (P = .0004). Percent platelet reduction during passage of blood through the filter (PCR) was 27.5 +/- 7.2 in citrated blood and 4.9 +/- 2.6 in EDTA blood of the humans (P = 2 X 10(-12)), while in dogs it was 25.7 +/- 8.3 in citrated blood and 5.3 +/- 4.2 in EDTA blood (P = 8 X 10(-7)). The results of these parameters using human platelet rich plasmas (PRPs) were similar to those with human whole blood, but significant decrease of drop rate was not observed in canine PRPs during passage of PRP through the filter. FBT, BV, and IBR were correlated (r = -0.91, -0.84 and -0.62 respectively) with platelet count in 12 specimens obtained from 4 dogs in which thrombocytopenia (107 to 4 X 10(3) platelets/microliter) was induced by estradiol. This new test is unaffected by specimen transport by pneumatic tube, is sensitive to platelets, and should be useful for analysis of both quantitative and qualitative platelet abnormalities in man. PMID:6612700

  2. Differences in metabolic biomarkers in the blood and gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells among normal weight, mildly obese and moderately obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Seo, Yu Ri; Ryu, Ri; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-09-01

    We compared metabolic biomarkers in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression profiles among normal weight (BMI, 18·5-23 kg/m2), mildly obese (BMI, 25-27·5 kg/m2) and moderately obese Korean adult men (BMI, 27·5-30 kg/m2). High leptin, lipids (except LDL- and HDL-cholesterol) and apoB levels and low adiponectin and HDL-cholesterol levels were present in the plasma of both mildly and moderately obese subjects. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and liver damage were altered in moderately obese subjects but not in mildly obese subjects. PBMC transcriptome data showed enrichment of pathways involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance, bone metabolism, cancer, inflammation and fibrosis in both mildly and moderately obese subjects. Signalling pathways involved in oxidative phosphorylation, TAG synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and insulin production; mammalian target of rapamycin, forkhead box O, ras-proximate-1, RAS and transforming growth factor-β signalling; as well as extracellular matrix-receptor interaction were enriched only in moderately obese subjects, indicating that changes in PBMC gene expression profiles, according to metabolic disturbances, were associated with the development and/or aggravation of obesity. In particular, fourteen and fifteen genes differentially expressed only in mildly obese subjects and in both mildly and moderately obese subjects, respectively, could be used as early or stable biomarkers for diagnosing and treating obesity-associated metabolic disturbance. We characterised BMI-associated metabolic and molecular biomarkers in the blood and provided clues about potential blood-based targets for preventing or treating obesity-related complications. PMID:27501771

  3. The Study of Otoacoustic Emissions and the Suppression of Otoacoustic Emissions in Subjects with Tinnitus and Normal Hearing: An Insight to Tinnitus Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Lucieny; Novanta, Gabriela; Sampaio, Andre Lopes; Augusto Oliveira, Carlos; Granjeiro, Ronaldo; Braga, Silvia Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Analysis of the suppression effect is a simple method to evaluate cochlear status and central auditory mechanisms and, more specifically, the medial olivocochlear system. This structure may be involved in the generation of mechanisms that cause tinnitus and in the pathophysiology of tinnitus in patients with tinnitus and normal hearing. Objective To review the literature of the etiology of tinnitus on the lights of otoacoustic emissions in patients with normal hearing. Data Synthesis Individuals with tinnitus and normal hearing have a higher prevalence of alterations in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions than normal subjects. This fact suggests that dysfunctions of the outer hair cells (OHCs) might be important in the generation of the tinnitus; however, this feature is not always present in those who have the symptoms of tinnitus. Final Comments These findings suggest that OHC dysfunction is not necessary for tinnitus development—that is, there might be mechanisms other than OHC damage in the tinnitus development. On the other hand, OHC dysfunction alone is not sufficient to cause the symptom, because a great many individuals with OHC dysfunction did not complain about tinnitus. PMID:25992175

  4. The potentiation by caffeine of X-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Furcinitti, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate X-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 hr postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +/- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or X-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +/- 0.12 at 30 hr, rose to 1.66 +/- 0.17 at 41 hr, and decreased to 1.31 +/- 0.13 at 66 hr. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment.

  5. Potentiation by caffeine of x-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Furcinitti, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate x-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 h postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or x-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +- 0.12 at 30 h, rose to 1.66 +- 0.17 at 41 h, and decreased to 1.31 +- 0.13 at 66 h. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment.

  6. Right ventricular ejection fraction during exercise in normal subjects and in coronary artery disease patients: assessment by multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Maddahi, J.; Berman, D.S.; Matsuoka, D.T.; Waxman, A.D.; Forrester, J.S.; Swan, H.J.C.

    1980-07-01

    The response of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) during exercise and its relationship to the location and extent of coronary artery disease are not fully understood. We have recently developed and validated a new method for scintigraphic evaluation of RVEF using rapid multiple-gated equilibrium scintigraphy and multiple right ventricular regions of interest. The technique has been applied during upright bicycle exercise in 10 normal subjects and 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Resting RVEF was not significantly different between the groups (0.49 +- 0.04 vs 0.47 +- 0.09, respectively, mean +- SD). In all 10 normal subjects RVEF rose (0.49 +- 0.04 to 0.66 +- 0.08, p < 0.01) at peak exercise. At peak exercise in coronary artery disease patients, the group RVEF remained unchanged (0.47 +- 0.09 to 0.50 +- 0.11, p = NS), but the individual responses varied. In the coronary artery disease patients, the relationship between RVEF response to exercise and exercise left ventricular function, septal motion and right coronary artery stenosis were studied. Significant statistical association was found only between exercise RVEF and right coronary artery stenosis. RVEF rose during exercise in seven of seven patients without right coronary artery stenosis (0.42 +- 0.06 to 0.58 +- 0.08, p = 0.001) and was unchanged or fell in 12 of 13 patients with right coronary artery stenosis (0.50 +- 0.09 to 0.45 +- 0.10, p = NS). We conclude that (1) in normal subjects RVEF increases during upright exercise and (2) although RVEF at rest is not necessarily affected by coronary artery disease, failure of RVEF to increase during exercise, in the absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or valvular heart disease, may be related to the presence of significant right coronary artery stenosis.

  7. Oligoclonality in the human CD8+ T cell repertoire in normal subjects and monozygotic twins: implications for studies of infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, J.; Hingorani, R.; Choi, I. H.; Silver, J.; Pergolizzi, R.; Gregersen, P. K.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated CD8+ T cell clonal dominance using a PCR assay for the CDR3 length of T cell receptors belonging to a limited number of TCRBV segments/families. In this study, we have modified this approach in order to analyze more comprehensively the frequency of oligoclonality in the CD8+ T cell subset in 25 known TCRBV segments/families. In order to assess the relative roles of genes and environment in the shaping of a clonally restricted CD8+ T cell repertoire, we have analyzed clonal dominance in the CD8+ T cell population of monozygotic twins, related siblings, and adoptees. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Oligoclonality was assessed in the CD8+ T cell subsets using a multiplex PCR approach to assay for CDR3 length variation across 25 different TCRBV segments/families. Specific criteria for oligoclonality were established, and confirmed by direct sequence analysis of the PCR products. This assay was used to investigate the CD8+ T cell repertoire of 56 normal subjects, as well as six sets of monozygotic (MZ) twins. RESULTS: Seventy-two percent of normal subjects (n = 56) had evidence of oligoclonality in the CD8+ T cell subset, using well-defined criteria. Although MZ twins frequently displayed CD8+ T cell clonal dominance, the overall pattern of oligoclonality was very diverse within each twin pair. However, we occasionally observed dominant CD8+ T cell clones that were highly similar in sequence in both members of some twin pairs. Not a single example of such similarity was observed in normal controls or siblings. CONCLUSIONS: Oligoclonality of circulating CD8+ T cells is a characteristic feature of the human immune system; both host genetic factors and environment shape the pattern of oligoclonality in this T cell subset. The high frequency of this phenomenon in normal subjects provides a background with which to evaluate CD8+ T cell oligoclonality in the setting of infection or autoimmune disease. Further phenotypic and functional

  8. Hemispheric prevalence during chewing in normal right-handed and left-handed subjects: a functional magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Piancino, Maria Grazia; Frongia, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the activation of different cortical areas during nondeliberate chewing of soft and hard boluses in five right-handed and five left-handed subjects with normal occlusion, to determine different hemispheric prevalences. The study was conducted with a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (1.5 T Magnetom Vision - Siemens Medical, Germany) using a head coil. The results showed that the most frequently activated areas were Brodmann's areas four and six in the primary motor and premotor cortex, the insula and Broca's area and, overall, showed greater activity of the cortical mastication area (CMA) in the right hemisphere for right-handed and in the left hemisphere for left-handed subjects. PMID:20491233

  9. Reaction time, impulse speed, overall synaptic delay and number of synapses in tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects and thinner sniffers.

    PubMed

    Chentanez, T; Keatisuwan, W; Akaraphan, A; Chaunchaiyakul, R; Lechanavanich, C; Hiranrat, S; Chaiwatcharaporn, C; Glinsukon, T

    1988-01-01

    In control subjects, warned auditory reaction time (RT) for a given effector organ was less than the warned visual RT for the same organ. The RT of the circuits between eye or ear or sites of tactile stimulation (SOS) and the index fingers were significantly shorter than that between eye or ear or the same SOS and the right or left big toes. The greater the distance between the SOS and the brain the longer the RT of the response by a given effector organ. The overall signal speed (OASS) from the neck to the index finger was less than that from the neck to the big toe. The OASS from the neck to a given effector was less than that from the toe to the same effector. Sensory nerve impulse speed was slightly faster than motor nerve impulse speed. The overall synaptic delay and estimated number of synapses (ENOS) of simple tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects did not significantly vary with site of tactile stimulation or effector organ. The mean number of synapses of various tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects was estimated to be between 69 and 77, which is far greater than the number of synapses in the touch-tactile and motor pathways combined. The overall synaptic delay in the tactile reaction neuronal circuits between SOS and the left and right big toes were significantly lower in sniffers than in control subjects. This may be due to a decrease in either the average synaptic delay, the number of synapses, or both in the tactile reaction neuronal circuits between sites of stimulation and big toes (but not index fingers) in sniffers. PMID:3393601

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Acyclovir and Its Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Systemic Circulation after Administration of High-Dose Valacyclovir in Subjects with Normal and Impaired Renal Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Weller, Stephen; Johnson, Benjamin; Nicotera, Janet; Luther, James M.; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Valacyclovir, the l-valyl ester prodrug of acyclovir (ACV), is widely prescribed to treat infections caused by varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus. Rarely, treatment is complicated by reversible neuropsychiatric symptoms. By mechanisms not fully understood, this occurs more frequently in the setting of renal impairment. We characterized the steady-state pharmacokinetics of ACV and its metabolites 9-[(carboxymethoxy)methyl]guanine (CMMG) and 8-hydroxy-acyclovir (8-OH-ACV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the systemic circulation. We administered multiple doses of high-dose valacyclovir to 6 subjects with normal renal function and 3 subjects with chronic renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCl], ∼15 to 30 ml/min). Dosages were 2,000 mg every 6 h and 1,500 mg every 12 h, respectively. Indwelling intrathecal catheters allowed serial CSF sampling throughout the dosing interval. The average steady-state concentrations of acyclovir, CMMG, and 8-OH-ACV were greater in both the systemic circulation and the CSF among subjects with impaired renal function than among subjects with normal renal function. However, the CSF penetration of each analyte, reflected by the CSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curve over the 6- or 12-h dosing interval (AUCτ) ratio, did not differ based on renal function. Renal impairment does not alter the propensity for ACV or its metabolites to distribute to the CSF, but the higher concentrations in the systemic circulation, as a result of reduced elimination, are associated with proportionally higher concentrations in CSF. PMID:20038622

  11. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  12. Postprandial glucose and insulin responses to rolled oats ingested raw, cooked or as a mixture with raisins in normal subjects and type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, O; Winther, E; Hermansen, K

    1989-01-01

    Cooking and processing of food may account for differences in blood glucose and insulin responses to food with similar contents of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. The present study was carried out to see if short-term cooking of rolled oats caused an increase in blood glucose. Furthermore, we wanted to see if dried fruit could substitute for some of the starch without deterioration of the postprandial blood glucose response. We therefore compared the blood glucose and insulin responses to three isocaloric, carbohydrate equivalent meals in 11 normal subjects and 9 Type 2 diabetic patients. Meals composed either of raw rolled oats, oatmeal porridge or a mixture of raw rolled oats with raisins were served. In normal subjects, the three meals produced similar glucose (75 +/- 22, 51 +/- 16 and 71 +/- 23 (+/- SE) mmol l-1 180 min, respectively) and insulin response curves (3160 +/- 507, 2985 +/- 632 and 2775 +/- 398 mU l-1 180 min, respectively). Type 2 diabetic patients also showed similar postprandial blood glucose (515 +/- 95, 531 +/- 83 and 409 +/- 46 mmol l-1 180 min, respectively) and insulin (5121 +/- 850, 6434 +/- 927 and 6021 +/- 974 mU l-1 180 min, respectively) responses to the three meals. Thus short-term cooking of rolled oats has no deleterious effect on blood glucose and insulin responses, and substitution of 25% of the starch meal with simple sugars (raisins) did not affect the blood glucose or insulin responses. PMID:2524340

  13. Studies on immunoproteasome in human liver. Part I: Absence in fetuses, presence in normal subjects, and increased levels in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasuri, Francesco; Capizzi, Elisa; Bellavista, Elena; Mishto, Michele; Santoro, Aurelia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capri, Miriam; Cescon, Matteo; Grazi, Gian Luca; Grigioni, Walter Franco; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-06-25

    Despite the central role of proteasomes in relevant physiological pathways and pathological processes, this topic is unexpectedly largely unexplored in human liver. Here we present data on the presence of proteasome and immunoproteasome in human livers from normal adults, fetuses and patients affected by major hepatic diseases such as cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis. Immunohistochemistry for constitutive ({alpha}4 and {beta}1) and inducible (LMP2 and LMP7) proteasome subunits, and for the PA28{alpha}{beta} regulator, was performed in liver samples from 38 normal subjects, 6 fetuses, 2 pediatric cases, and 19 pathological cases (10 chronic active hepatitis and 9 cirrhosis). The immunohistochemical data have been validated and quantified by Western blotting analysis. The most striking result we found was the concomitant presence in hepatocyte cytoplasm of all healthy subjects, including the pediatric cases, of constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome subunits, as well as PA28{alpha}{beta}. At variance, immunoproteasome was not present in hepatocytes from fetuses, while a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity for LMP2 and LMP7 was found in pathological samples, directly correlated to the histopathological grade of inflammation. At variance from other organs such as the brain, immunoproteasome is present in livers from normal adult and pediatric cases, in apparent absence of pathological processes, suggesting the presence of a peculiar regulation of the proteasome/immunoproteasome system, likely related to the physiological stimuli derived from the gut microbiota after birth. Other inflammatory stimuli contribute in inducing high levels of immunoproteasome in pathological conditions, where its role deserve further attention.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and effects of L-dopa on visual function in normal and amblyopic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a single dose of levodopa on visual cortex, based on functional MRI (fMRI), and on visual function, based on psychophysical tests, in amblyopic and normal subjects. METHOD: A prospective, randomized trial of a single dose of levodopa (2 mg/kg body weight) was undertaken in an institutional setting in nine normal and six amblyopic subjects, who were assessed at baseline and 90 minutes after levodopa ingestion. fMRI of occipital visual cortex was undertaken with a 1.5T GE MRI scanner utilizing the BOLD contrast technique. fMRI stimuli were two gratings (0.5, 2.0 cycles/degree of visual angle) that counterphased at 4 Hz. fMRI parameters for analysis included AREA and LEVEL of activation and a SUMMED score (AREA x LEVEL). Psychophysical tests included visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereoacuity, and binocular fusion. RESULTS: At baseline, AREA of activation (P = .05) and SUMMED score (P = .05) were significantly less in the amblyopic compared to the dominant eyes. Psychophysically, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were significantly worse in the amblyopic eye. Following levodopa ingestion, there was significant decrease in LEVEL of activation in the amblyopic eye, even though visual acuity showed significant improvement (P = .03). Also, amblyopes showed a significant increase and normals showed some decrease in interocular difference in LEVEL of activation (P = .04). CONCLUSION: Unique information was obtained when fMRI was utilized to assess visual cortical function. While levodopa improved visual acuity in the amblyopic eye, it decreased the LEVEL of activation based on fMRI, a counterintuitive finding. The results highlight the value of utilizing fMRI to assess amblyopia and provide new directions for research. PMID:14971587

  15. The intra-examiner reliability of manual muscle testing of the hip and shoulder with a modified sphygmomanometer: a preliminary study of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Perossa, Daniel R; Dziak, Martin; Vernon, Howard T; Hayashita, Kaye

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intrarater reliability of manual muscle assessment of the hip and shoulder using a modified sphygmomanometer. In addition, it was intended to establish a preliminary database of values from normal, healthy male and female volunteers. Eighty subjects participated in the test sessions, 40 males and 40 females between the ages of 19-22. Forty subjects participated in each of the hip and shoulder test sessions. Each examiner tested different paired movements on the subjects in one single session for the two separate joints. The tested movements consisted of hip extension, flexion and abduction and shoulder abduction, extension, flexion, internal and external rotation. All movements were tested by the patient-initiated method. Each movement was repeated twice, with a 30-35 second rest interval between the trials. The results showed that the intratester reliability coefficients for the hip ranged from 0.94-0.97, while, for the shoulder, the range was 0.86-0.97. Norms are expressed as mean (SD) values. These data conformed to previously established expectations, in that side-to-side differences were less than 10% and test values for males were larger than females in all tests. It was concluded that manual muscle assessment using a modified sphygmomanometer has acceptable intra-examiner reliability for the hip and shoulder when using the patient-initiated method. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8

  16. Intensively managed young children with type 1 diabetes consume high-fat, low-fiber diets similar to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sanjeev N; Volkening, Lisa K; Quinn, Nicolle; Laffel, Lori M B

    2014-05-01

    Despite significant emphasis on nutrition, older children with diabetes demonstrate poor dietary quality. We tested the hypothesis that dietary quality in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) would be better than age-matched children in the US population. Dietary data from children with T1D (n = 67) aged 2 to 12 years attending a pediatric diabetes clinic were compared with a nationally representative, age-matched sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 1691). Multiple 24-hour dietary recalls were used. Recommended intakes were based on national guidelines, and dietary quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. More children with T1D were overweight or obese compared with children participating in NHANES (42% vs 30%, P = .04). Greater proportions of children with T1D met daily recommendations for vegetables (22% vs 13%, P = .03), whole grains (12% vs 5%, P = .005), and dairy (55% vs 36%, P = .001) compared with NHANES children, whereas similar proportions met daily fruit recommendations (40% vs 33%, P = .2). Less than one-third of all children limited total fat to recommended levels; children with T1D consumed more saturated fat than did NHANES children (14% vs 12% total energy intake, P = .0009). Fiber intakes were very low in both groups. Compared with NHANES children, children with T1D had higher Healthy Eating Index-2005 scores (59.6 vs 49.7, P = .0006) primarily because of lower intakes of added sugars. The nutritional intake of young children with T1D remains suboptimal in the contemporary era of diabetes management. Despite focused nutrition management, young children with T1D consume high-fat, low-fiber diets comparable with youth in the general population. PMID:24916556

  17. Secreted proteome profiling in human RPE cell cultures derived from donors with age related macular degeneration and age matched healthy donors.

    PubMed

    An, Eunkyung; Lu, Xiaoning; Flippin, Jessica; Devaney, Joseph M; Halligan, Brian; Hoffman, Eric P; Hoffman, Eric; Strunnikova, Nataly; Csaky, Karl; Hathout, Yetrib

    2006-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by progressive loss of central vision, which is attributed to abnormal accumulation of macular deposits called "drusen" at the interface between the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane. In the most severe cases, drusen deposits are accompanied by the growth of new blood vessels that breach the RPE layer and invade photoreceptors. In this study, we hypothesized that RPE secreted proteins are responsible for drusen formation and choroidal neovascularization. We used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with LC-MS/MS analysis and ZoomQuant quantification to assess differential protein secretion by RPE cell cultures prepared from human autopsy eyes of AMD donors (diagnosed by histological examinations of the macula and genotyped for the Y402H-complement factor H variant) and age-matched healthy control donors. In general, RPE cells were found to secrete a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, complement factors, and protease inhibitors that have been reported to be major constituents of drusen (hallmark deposits in AMD). Interestingly, RPE cells from AMD donors secreted 2 to 3-fold more galectin 3 binding protein, fibronectin, clusterin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and pigment epithelium derived factor than RPE cells from age-matched healthy donors. Conversely, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) was found to be down regulated by 2-fold in AMD RPE cells versus healthy RPE cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis grouped these differentially secreted proteins into two groups; those involved in tissue development and angiogenesis and those involved in complement regulation and protein aggregation such as clusterin. Overall, these data strongly suggest that RPE cells are involved in the biogenesis of drusen and the pathology of AMD. PMID:17022631

  18. Tensor-Based Morphometry as a Neuroimaging Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease: An MRI Study of 676 AD, MCI, and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D.; Parikshak, Neelroop; Lee, Suh; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    In one of the largest brain MRI studies to date, we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to create 3D maps of structural atrophy in 676 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly controls, scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Using inverse-consistent 3D non-linear elastic image registration, we warped 676 individual brain MRI volumes to a population mean geometric template. Jacobian determinant maps were created, revealing the 3D profile of local volumetric expansion and compression. We compared the anatomical distribution of atrophy in 165 AD patients (age: 75.6 ± 7.6 years), 330 MCI subjects (74.8 ± 7.5), and 181 controls (75.9 ± 5.1). Brain atrophy in selected regions-of-interest was correlated with clinical measurements - the sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR-SB), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the logical memory test scores - at voxel level followed by correction for multiple comparisons. Baseline temporal lobe atrophy correlated with current cognitive performance, future cognitive decline, and conversion from MCI to AD over the following year; it predicted future decline even in healthy subjects. Over half of the AD and MCI subjects carried the ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene, which increases risk for AD; they showed greater hippocampal and temporal lobe deficits than non-carriers. ApoE2 gene carriers - 1/6 of the normal group - showed reduced ventricular expansion, suggesting a protective effect. As an automated image analysis technique, TBM reveals 3D correlations between neuroimaging markers, genes, and future clinical changes, and is highly efficient for large-scale MRI studies. PMID:18691658

  19. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative imaging characteristics of [11C]PiB and [18F]flutemetamol in normal control and Alzheimer's subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mountz, James M.; Laymon, Charles M.; Cohen, Ann D.; Zhang, Zheng; Price, Julie C.; Boudhar, Sanaa; McDade, Eric; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuritic amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark pathologic lesions of Alzheimer's disease, are thought to develop before the symptoms of brain failure are clinically detectable. Imaging methods capable of detecting the presence of neuritic amyloid plaques should improve a clinician's ability to identify Alzheimer's disease during the earliest symptomatic phase and to identify at-risk individuals presymptomatically. Currently the best studied amyloid imaging ligand is [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PiB). However, the 20-minute half-life of this radiotracer limits its use. This study is designed to evaluate the performance characteristics of [18F]flutemetamol and to independently compare results to [11C]PiB in the same subjects. Methods Twenty-three subjects, 15 cognitively normal (NL) and 8 with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's Dementia (AD), underwent [11C]PiB and [18F]flutemetamol PET scans within 28 days of study enrollment. We studied both normal and AD subjects to assess the uptake characteristics across a range of amyloid positivity. Blinded visual reads were conducted by five raters. Correlation analyses were performed between cortical SUVR for the two tracers and also between rater scores and SUVR for each tracer. Overall reader accuracy for classifying scans as amyloid positive or negative was determined for each tracer using SUVR classification as the standard. Results The linear correlation coefficient between global cortical SUVR for the two tracers was R2 = 0.85, indicating that both tracers have similar retention characteristics. The two tracers were well correlated for rater-determined AD-like positivity (Cohen κ = 0.82). Averaged visual ratings and global cortical SUVR disagreed on their classification in 2/23 [11C]PiB scans and 4/23 [18F]flutemetamol scans. Conclusions [11C]PiB and [18F]flutemetamol have similar retention characteristics across a range of amyloid negative to positive subjects. Both tracers

  20. Differential Expression of Complement Markers in Normal and AMD Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Nashine, Sonali; Chwa, Marilyn; Kazemian, Mina; Thaker, Kunal; Lu, Stephanie; Nesburn, Anthony; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and abnormalities in the complement pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to determine the effects of mtDNA from AMD subjects on the complement pathway. Methods Transmitochondrial cybrids were prepared by fusing platelets from AMD and age-matched Normal subjects with Rho0 (lacking mtDNA) human ARPE-19 cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were performed to examine gene and protein expression profiles, respectively, of complement markers in these cybrids. Bioenergetic profiles of Normal and AMD cybrids were examined using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer. Results Significant decreases in the gene and protein expression of complement inhibitors, along with significantly higher levels of complement activators, were found in AMD cybrids compared to Older-Normal cybrids. Seahorse flux data demonstrated that the bioenergetic profiles for Older-Normal and Older-AMD cybrid samples were similar to each other but were lower compared to Young-Normal cybrid samples. Conclusion In summary, since all cybrids had identical nuclei and differed only in mtDNA content, the observed changes in components of complement pathways can be attributed to mtDNA variations in the AMD subjects, suggesting that mitochondrial genome and retrograde signaling play critical roles in this disease. Furthermore, the similar bioenergetic profiles of AMD and Older-Normal cybrids indicate that the signaling between mitochondria and nuclei are probably not via a respiratory pathway. PMID:27486856

  1. The effect of rizatriptan, ergotamine, and their combination on human peripheral arteries: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Seidelin, Kaj; Stepanavage, Michael; Lines, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Aims To compare the peripheral vasoconstrictor effects of ergotamine, rizatriptan, and their combination, in normal subjects. Methods This was a double-blind, four-way, crossover study. Sixteen young male volunteers, selected as responders to the vasoconstrictor effect of 0.5 mg ergotamine i.v., were administered 10 mg oral rizatriptan, 0.25 mg i.v. ergotamine, 10 mg oral rizatriptan +0.25 mg i.v. ergotamine, and placebo. The vasoconstrictor effect on peripheral arteries was measured with strain gauge plethysmography up to 8 h after dosing. The 8 h assessment period was divided into two 4 h intervals to assess the immediate (0–4 h) vs sustained effect (4–8 h) of treatment. Results For the 0–4 h interval, the decreases in peripheral systolic blood pressure gradients were: placebo (−1 mmHg [95% CI: −3, 1])normal subjects, rizatriptan 10 mg orally had only a small transient vasoconstrictor effect on peripheral arteries compared with the sustained and more pronounced effect of 0.25 mg i.v. ergotamine. Furthermore, rizatriptan exerted no additional effect on ergotamine-induced constriction of peripheral arteries when the two drugs were given in combination. PMID:12100223

  2. Dimeric Le(a) (Le(a)-on-Le(a)) status of beta-haptoglobin in sera of colon cancer, chronic inflammatory disease and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yeol; Yoon, Seon-Joo; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Bernert, Bradford; Ullman, Thomas; Itzkowitz, Steven H; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2010-05-01

    The glycosyl epitope dimeric Lea (Lea-on-Lea), defined by mouse monoclonal antibody NCC-ST-421, was identified previously as tumor-associated antigen, expressed highly in various human cancer tissues and cell lines derived therefrom, but with minimal expression in various normal tissues. In the present study, we observed clearly higher expression of this epitope, defined by ST421, in beta-haptoglobin (beta-Hap) from sera of patients with colorectal cancer, compared to normal, healthy subjects or patients with chronic inflammatory processes (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis). We focused, therefore, on biochemical characterization of glycosyl epitope status expressed in beta-Hap. We concluded that the dimeric Lea epitope is carried by O-linked but not by N-linked structure, based on the following observations: i) Treatment of beta-Hap with alpha-L-fucosidase reduced its reactivity with ST421, but did not affect its reactivity with anti-Hap antibody. In contrast, treatment of purified beta-Hap with PNGase F, which releases N-linked glycans, had no effect on reactivity with ST421, but changed molecular mass from 40 kDa to 30 kDa. ii) Strong reactivity of Colo205 supernatant with ST421 was reduced clearly by pre-incubation of cells with benzyl-alpha-GalNAc. PMID:20372805

  3. Variance associated with subject velocity and trial repetition during force platform gait analysis in a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Eric C.; Zwarthoed, Berdien; Seliski, Joseph; Nemke, Brett; Muir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Factors that contribute to variance in ground reaction forces (GRF) include: dog morphology, velocity, and trial repetition. Narrow velocity ranges are recommended to minimize variance. In a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs, we hypothesized that the dog subject effect would account for the majority of variance in peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) at a trotting gait, and that narrow velocity ranges would be associated with less variance. Data from twenty normal dogs were obtained. Each dog was trotted across a force platform at its habitual velocity, with controlled acceleration (±0.5m/s2). Variance effects from twelve trotting velocity ranges were examined using repeated-measures analysis-of-covariance. Significance was set at P<0.05. Mean dog body weight was 28.4 ± 7.4 kg. Individual dog and velocity significantly affected PVF and VI for thoracic and pelvic limbs (P<0.001). Trial number significantly affected thoracic limb PVF (P<0.001). Limb (left or right) significantly affected thoracic limb VI (P=0.02). The magnitude of variance effects from largest to smallest was dog, velocity, trial repetition, and limb. Velocity ranges of 1.5–2.0 m/s, 1.8–2.2 m/s, and 1.9–2.2 m/s were associated with low variance and no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF and VI. A combination of these ranges, 1.5–2.2 m/s, captured a large percentage of trials per dog (84.2±21.4%) with no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF or VI. We conclude wider velocity ranges facilitate capture of valid trials with little to no effect on GRF in normal trotting dogs. This concept is important for clinical trial design. PMID:25457264

  4. Variance associated with subject velocity and trial repetition during force platform gait analysis in a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hans, Eric C; Zwarthoed, Berdien; Seliski, Joseph; Nemke, Brett; Muir, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Factors that contribute to variance in ground reaction forces (GRF) include dog morphology, velocity, and trial repetition. Narrow velocity ranges are recommended to minimize variance. In a heterogeneous population of clinically normal dogs, it was hypothesized that the dog subject effect would account for the majority of variance in peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) at a trotting gait, and that narrow velocity ranges would be associated with less variance. Data from 20 normal dogs were obtained. Each dog was trotted across a force platform at its habitual velocity, with controlled acceleration (±0.5 m/s(2)). Variance effects from 12 trotting velocity ranges were examined using repeated-measures analysis-of-covariance. Significance was set at P <0.05. Mean dog bodyweight was 28.4 ± 7.4 kg. Individual dog and velocity significantly affected PVF and VI for thoracic and pelvic limbs (P <0.001). Trial number significantly affected thoracic limb PVF (P <0.001). Limb (left or right) significantly affected thoracic limb VI (P = 0.02). The magnitude of variance effects from largest to smallest was dog, velocity, trial repetition, and limb. Velocity ranges of 1.5-2.0 m/s, 1.8-2.2 m/s, and 1.9-2.2 m/s were associated with low variance and no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF and VI. A combination of these ranges, 1.5-2.2 m/s, captured a large percentage of trials per dog (84.2 ± 21.4%) with no significant effects on thoracic or pelvic limb PVF or VI. It was concluded that wider velocity ranges facilitate capture of valid trials with little to no effect on GRF in normal trotting dogs. This concept is important for clinical trial design. PMID:25457264

  5. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory gel for the prevention of peripheral vein thrombophlebitis. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Payne-James, J J; Bray, M J; Kapadia, S; Rana, S K; McSwiggan, D; Silk, D B

    1992-04-01

    A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study was undertaken to determine whether topical application of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory gel to skin overlying peripheral vein cannula sites has a role in reducing the incidence or delaying the onset of peripheral vein thrombophlebitis. Fifty normal subjects had intravenous cannulae placed in right and left arms. Subjects were randomised to receive twice daily application of either active nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory gel or placebo gel to each cannula site. Cannula sites were observed and signs and symptoms of inflammation recorded up to 108 h. If any site had signs extending beyond 2 cm then the cannula was removed. Cannula sites that had 'active' gel applied had half the incidence of marked signs at 108 h (44% vs 22%, p less than 0.05). These results suggest that local application of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory gel to cannula sites may have a significant role to play in the prevention of peripheral vein thrombophlebitis. PMID:1519685

  6. The effects of twelve weeks of bed rest on bone histology, biochemical markers of bone turnover, and calcium homeostasis in eleven normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Ruml, L. A.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of 12 weeks of skeletal unloading on parameters of calcium homeostasis, calcitropic hormones, bone histology, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in 11 normal subjects (9 men, 2 women; 34 +/- 11 years of age). Following an ambulatory control evaluation, all subjects underwent 12 weeks of bed rest. An additional metabolic evaluation was performed after 12 days of reambulation. Bone mineral density declined at the spine (-2.9%, p = 0.092) and at the hip (-3.8%, p = 0.002 for the trochanter). Bed rest prompted a rapid, sustained, significant increase in urinary calcium and phosphorus as well as a significant increase in serum calcium. Urinary calcium increased from a pre-bed rest value of 5.3 mmol/day to values as high as 73 mmol/day during bed rest. Immunoreactive parathyroid hormone and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D declined significantly during bed rest, although the mean values remained within normal limits. Significant changes in bone histology included a suppression of osteoblastic surface for cancellous bone (3.1 +/- 1.3% to 1.9 +/- 1.5%, p = 0.0142) and increased bone resorption for both cancellous and cortical bone. Cortical eroded surface increased from 3.5 +/- 1.1% to 7.3 +/- 4.0% (p = 0.018) as did active osteoclastic surface (0.2 +/- 0.3% to 0.7 +/- 0.7%, p = 0.021). Cancellous eroded surface increased from 2.1 +/- 1.1% to 4.7 +/- 2.2% (p = 0.002), while mean active osteoclastic surface doubled (0.2 +/- 0.2% to 0.4 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.020). Serum biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and type I procollagen extension peptide) did not change significantly during bed rest. Urinary biochemical markers of bone resorption (hydroxyproline, deoxypyridinoline, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen) as well as a serum marker of bone resorption (type I collagen carboxytelopeptide) all demonstrated significant increases during bed rest which declined toward normal

  7. Assessment of the effects of dobutamine on myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism in normal human subjects using nitrogen-13 ammonia and carbon-11 acetate.

    PubMed

    Krivokapich, J; Huang, S C; Schelbert, H R

    1993-06-01

    The dual purposes of this study with positron emission tomography were to measure the effects of dobutamine on myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism, and to compare carbon-11 (C-11) acetate versus nitrogen-13 (N-13) ammonia in quantitating flow in normal subjects. Flow was quantitated with N-13 ammonia at rest and at peak dobutamine infusion (40 micrograms/kg/min) in 21 subjects. In 11 subjects, oxidative metabolism was also estimated at rest and peak dobutamine infusion using the clearance rate of C-11 acetate, k mono (min-1). A 2-compartment kinetic model was applied to the early phase of the C-11 acetate data to estimate flow. The rest and peak dobutamine rate-pressure products were 7,318 +/- 1,102 and 19,937 +/- 3,964 beats/min/mm Hg, respectively, and correlated well (r = 0.77) with rest and peak dobutamine flows of 0.77 +/- 0.14 and 2.25 ml/min/g determined using N-13 ammonia as a flow tracer. Rest and dobutamine flows estimated with C-11 acetate were highly correlated with those determined with N-13 ammonia (r = 0.92). k mono increased from 0.05 +/- 0.01 to 0.18 +/- 0.02 min-1, and correlated highly with the increase in flows (r = 0.91) and rate-pressure products (r = 0.94). Thus, the increase in cardiac demand associated with dobutamine is highly correlated with an increase in supply and oxidative metabolism. C-11 acetate is a unique tracer that can be used to image both flow and metabolism simultaneously. PMID:8498380

  8. Assessment of the cardiac autonomic neuropathy among the known diabetics and age-matched controls using noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests in a South-Indian population: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sukla, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Rao, Nambaru Lakshmana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a rural area of South India, among the known diabetics after comparing them with the age-matched healthy controls, utilizing noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was conducted for 4 months (October 2014 to January 2015) at an Urban Health and Training Center (UHTC) of a Medical College located in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu. The study was conducted among 126 diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients and in 152 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to ensure comparability between the cases and controls and, thus, reduce variability due to demographic variables. All the study subjects (cases and controls) were selected from the patients attending UHTC during the study duration, provided they satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study participants were subjected to undergo noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. The associations were tested using paired t-test for the continuous (mean ± standard deviation) variables. Results: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2% (67/126). On further classification, positive (abnormal) results were obtained in 56 (sympathetic – 44.4%) and 51 (parasympathetic – 40.5%) diabetic cases. Overall, heart rate variation during deep breathing was found to be the most sensitive test to detect parasympathetic autonomic neuropathy while the diastolic blood pressure response to sustained handgrip exercise was the most sensitive method to detect sympathetic neuropathy dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2%. Even though cardiac autonomic neuropathy can be detected by various invasive tests, noninvasive tests remain a key tool to detect

  9. Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Hyperinsulinemia with Normal Blood Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes (Prediabetes Insulin Resistance Research)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Chunlin; Gong, Yanping; Fang, Fusheng; Tian, Hui; Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the differences in insulin resistance (IR) among subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), hyperinsulinemia with NGT (HINS), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. 5 NGT, 25 HINS, 25 IGT, and 25 T2DM subjects participated in this research. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique (HECT) was performed in all of them to evaluate IR levels. The relative factors influencing IR were evaluated. The simple insulin sensitivity indices were calculated, and the correlation between each index and the M value was analyzed. Results. The M values of NGT, HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were 11.88 ± 2.93 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.23 ± 1.73 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.37 ± 2.12 mg·kg−1·min−1, and 6.19 ± 1.89 mg·kg−1·min−1, respectively. M values in HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were lower than those in the NGT group (P = 0.005); however, the differences among the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.835). The independent factors influencing the M value were waistline and fasting insulin level (FINS). The simple insulin sensitivity indices, especially Matsuda and Gutt index, were significantly associated with the M value (P < 0.01). Conclusion. IR existed in the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups, and IR levels were consistent in the three groups. The independent factors influencing IR were waistline and FINS. PMID:26770991

  10. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  11. Radioimmunoassay of ''free thyroxin'' in dried blood spots on filter paper - preliminary observations on the effective differentiation of subjects with congenital hypothyroidism from those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, H.; Miyai, K.; Ichihara, K.; Amino, N.; Harada, T.; Nose, O.; Tanizawa, O.

    1982-03-01

    In this sensitive, simple method for measuring ''free thyroxin'' (FT/sub 4/) in eluates of dried blood spots on filter paper by use of a radioimmunoassay kit (Amerlex Free T/sub 4/ RIA), the measurable range of FT/sub 4/ is 1.8 to 57 ng/L (equivalent to the concentration in serum), or 7 to 237 fg/tube. The mean coefficients of variation for within assay-within spots, within assay-between spots, and between assays were 5.3%, 5.0%, and 6.2%, respectively. FT/sub 4/ in blood spotted on filter paper is stable for at least a month when dried and kept at either -20/sup 0/C, 4/sup 0/C, room temperature (about 25/sup 0/C), or 37/sup 0/C. The results for FT/sub 4/ in dried blood spots correlated closely with the free-T/sub 4/ concentration in serum (r = 0.99). The method can be used to differentiate cases of primary and secondary hypothyroidism from normal subjects and those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin. This method may be useful in screening for congenital hypothyroidism, because sample-retesting is not necessary.

  12. Immunity in young adult survivors of childhood leukemia is similar to the elderly rather than age-matched controls: Role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Azanan, Mohamad Shafiq; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; Chua, Ling Ling; Lum, Su Han; Abdul Ghafar, Sayyidatul Syahirah; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul; Lewin, Sharon R; Woo, Yin Ling; Ariffin, Hany; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Many treatment complications that occur late in childhood cancer survivors resemble age-related comorbidities observed in the elderly. An immune phenotype characterized by increased immune activation, systemic inflammation, and accumulation of late-differentiated memory CD57(+) CD28(-) T cells has been associated with comorbidities in the elderly. Here, we explored if this phenotype was present in young adult leukemia survivors following an average of 19 years from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy completion, and compared this with that in age-matched controls. We found that markers of systemic inflammation-IL-6 and human C-reactive protein and immune activation-CD38 and HLA-DR on T cells, soluble CD (sCD)163 from monocytes and macrophages-were increased in survivors compared to controls. T-cell responses specific to cytomegalovirus (CMV) were also increased in survivors compared to controls while CMV IgG levels in survivors were comparable to levels measured in the elderly (>50years) and correlated with IL-6, human C-reactive protein, sCD163, and CD57(+) CD28(-) memory T cells. Immune activation and inflammation markers correlated poorly with prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy exposure. These data suggest that CMV infection/reactivation is strongly correlated with the immunological phenotype seen in young childhood leukemia survivors and these changes may be associated with the early onset of age-related comorbidities in this group. PMID:27129782

  13. Efficacy of frovatriptan and other triptans in the treatment of acute migraine of normal weight and obese subjects: a review of randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Saracco, Maria Gabriella; Allais, Gianni; Tullo, Vincenzo; Zava, Dario; Pezzola, Deborha; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Omboni, Stefano; Benedetto, Chiara; Bussone, Gennaro; Aguggia, Marco

    2014-05-01

    An association between obesity and migraine has been observed in recent studies and it is supported by plausible biological mechanisms. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of frovatriptan and other triptans in the acute treatment of migraine, in patients enrolled in three randomized, double-blind, crossover, Italian studies and classified according to body mass index (BMI) levels, as normal weight or non-obese (NO, BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) and overweight or obese subjects (O, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)). 414 migraineurs with or without aura were randomized to frovatriptan 2.5 mg or rizatriptan 10 mg (study 1), frovatriptan 2.5 mg or zolmitriptan 2.5 mg (study 2), frovatriptan 2.5 mg or almotriptan 12.5 mg (study 3). After treating up to three episodes of migraine in 3 months with the first treatment, patients switched to the alternate treatment for the next 3 months. The present analysis assessed triptan efficacy in 220 N and in 109 O subjects of the 346 individuals of the intention-to-treat population. The proportion of pain free at 2 h did not significantly differ between frovatriptan and the comparators in either NO (30 vs. 34 %) or O (24 vs. 27 %). However, the rate of pain free at 2 h was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in NO than in O, irrespective of the type of triptan. Pain relief at 2 h was also similar between drug treatments for either subgroup. Pain relapse occurred at 48 h in significantly (p < 0.05) fewer episodes treated with frovatriptan in both NO (26 vs. 36 %) and O (27 vs. 49 %). The rate of 48-h relapse was similar in NO and O with frovatriptan, while it was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in O with the comparators. Frovatriptan, in contrast to other triptans, retains a sustained antimigraine effect in NO and even more so in O subjects. PMID:24867847

  14. Psychological characteristics and subjective intolerance for xenobiotic agents of normal young adults with trait shyness and defensiveness. A parkinsonian-like personality type?

    PubMed

    Bell, I R; Schwartz, G E; Amend, D; Peterson, J M; Kaszniak, A W; Miller, C S

    1994-07-01

    The present study examines the psychological characteristics and self-reported responses to xenobiotic agents such as tobacco smoke and pesticide of normal young adults with personality traits similar to those claimed for Parkinsonian patients. Previous research, though controversial, has suggested that persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) have premorbid personality traits that may include shyness and repressive defensiveness. Other epidemiological evidence indicates that PD patients may have premorbidly increased prevalence of anxiety, affective, and/or somatoform disorders; decreased rates of smoking and alcohol consumption; and elevated exposure to herbicides or pesticides. A total of 783 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course completed the Cheek-Buss Scale (shyness), the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (defensiveness), Symptom Checklist 90 (revised), the Mastery Scale, a health history checklist, and rating scales for frequency of illness from alcohol and 10 common environmental chemicals. Subjects were divided into four groups on the basis of above- versus below-median scores on the Cheek-Buss and Marlowe-Crowne scales (persons high in shyness and defensiveness, those high only in shyness, those high only in defensiveness, and those low in both shyness and defensiveness). The group high in shyness but low in defensiveness had the highest, whereas the group low in shyness but high in defensiveness had the lowest, total scores on the SCL-90-R; the two shyest groups were lowest in sense of mastery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8021635

  15. Street-Crossing Decision-Making: A Comparison between Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Normal Vision

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Shirin E.; Snyder, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We determined whether the street-crossing decisions of subjects with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were as accurate and precise as those made by young and older subjects with normal vision. Methods. Street-crossing decisions in 13 AMD subjects, and 20 young and 20 older control subjects with normal vision were measured along an un-signalized street for nine different gap times. After calculating the discriminability (d') of the street-crossing decision variable for all gap pairs and entering these d' values into a one-dimensional scaling model, the means of each distribution of the decision variable relative to a “center of gravity” were estimated and plotted against gap time. The resultant plot was a nonlinear function. Street-crossing decision accuracy was computed for each subject as the difference between the x-intercept of the nonlinear function (tCOG) and subjects' measured street-crossing time. Street-crossing decision-making precision was computed as the value of the slope of the nonlinear function at tCOG. Results. We found that all subjects were precise in their street-crossing decisions (P = 0.55). Significant differences in street-crossing accuracy were found as a function of age (P = 0.003). Compared to either the older normally-sighted (P = 0.018) or AMD (P = 0.019) subjects, the young normally-sighted subjects made the least accurate street-crossing decisions. No significant difference in accuracy was found between the AMD and age-matched normally-sighted subjects (P = 0.90). Conclusions. Our data suggested that age and mild central vision loss did not affect significantly a subject's precision in their street-crossing decisions. Age, but not mild central vision loss, significantly affected a subject's accuracy in their street-crossing decisions. PMID:22899756

  16. Analysis of rapid alternating movements in Cree subjects exposed to methylmercury and in subjects with neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Beuter, A; de Geoffroy, A; Edwards, R

    1999-01-01

    To quantify rapid alternating movements (RAMs) we used a simple prototype developed in our laboratory that requires the subject to rotate two hand-held foam spheres connected to optical encoders via flexible rods. Ninety-six participants, including 30 control subjects, 36 Cree subjects exposed to methylmercury, 21 subjects with Parkinson's disease, 6 subjects with cerebellar deficits, and 3 subjects with essential tremor, were involved in the study (though data for 5 were later removed). Twelve characteristics were developed and calculated from the raw data. Conditions examined included two hands at natural cadence (NC2), right and left hands separately at fast cadence (FCl), and both hands at fast cadence (FC2). Two ratios (FC2/NC2) and (FC2/FC1) combining these conditions were also examined. Test-retest reliability was >0.80 for most characteristics but was <0.70 for some characteristics, especially in the conditions executed at normal cadence. Correlations between characteristics and numbers of outliers with respect to the control group distribution were used to reduce the set of characteristics from 12 to 7 (i.e., duration, range, maximum slope, similarity in shape, smoothness, sharpness, and coherence). ANOVAs on the three largest groups generated significant results for most characteristics in the three conditions and the two ratios for Cree subjects and subjects with Parkinson's disease. ANOVAs on 3 age-matched groups (n=6) suggest that methylmercury affects the performance of the Cree subjects with the higher exposure, especially in terms of smoothness, sharpness, and coherence. These preliminary results suggest that this test is sufficiently specific and sensitive to characterize the performance of different groups of subjects. Ratios tend to improve discrimination for Cree subjects in a few characteristics but not for patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:9931228

  17. Intra individual variability in markers of proteinuria for normal subjects and those with cadmium induced renal dysfunction: interpretation of results from untimed, random urine samples.

    PubMed

    Howard J Mason Alison J Stevenson Nerys Williams Michael Morgan

    1999-01-01

    The project aimed to help interpretation of urinary protein measurements, namely -2-microglobulin, retinol-binding protein, albumin and total protein in untimed, random urine samples as indicating significant changes in renal tubular reabsorption and glomerular permeability in an individual. A standard methodology used in clinical laboratory medicine was applied to calculate the intra-individual biological variation for these analytes. This parameter in conjunction with a laboratory's analytical variation allows definition of uncertainty about a single urine protein measurement, significant changes above normal variation in serial measurements within an individual and a defined level of maximum acceptable analytical imprecision. Repeat urine samples were obtained over a period of one week from a group of cadmium-exposed workers, 90% of whom had long-term tubular proteinuria, and a group of five unexposed volunteers with normal renal function. Dilute samples defined as having creatinines less than 3 mmol l-1 were excluded, as were urines with pH less than 5.5 for -2-microglobulin. Samples were analysed twice after randomisation in large batches. There was no evidence of any diurnal variation in the four protein measurements from samples collected between early morning and 16:00 hours. Creatinine or specific gravity correction of urine results for all four proteins only marginally reduced the uncertainty associated with an individual measurement asreflecting the true excretion value. For those subjects with defined tubular proteinuria, variability in retinol-binding protein excretion was less than that for -2- microglobulin. About 30% of the samples had urine pHs of 5.5 or less where -2- microglobulin degradation occurs. Using our laboratory analytical precision the minimum changes between serial creatinine-corrected measurements that are needed to be considered statistically significant (p < 0.05) is 110% for retinol-binding protein, 177% for -2-microglobulin, 70

  18. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Yan, Zhihan; Wang, Tingyu; Yang, Xiaokai; Feng, Feng; Fan, Luping; Jiang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) differences of the bilaterial cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL) after normal sleep (NS) and after sleep deprivation (SD). Methods A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight males, eight females) underwent an fMRI scan twice at random: once following NS and the other following 24 hours’ SD, with an interval of 1 month between the two scans. The fMRI scanning included resting state and acupuncture stimulation. The special activated regions located during the acupuncture stimulation were selected as regions of interest for rsFC analysis. Results Bilateral CPLs were positively activated by acupuncture stimulation. In the NS group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral CPL, bilateral frontal lobe (BFL), left precuneus and right inferior parietal lobule, while the right CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral temporal lobe, right cerebellum anterior lobe, right CPL, left frontal lobe, left anterior cingulate, right posterior cingulate, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule. In the SD group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the left posterior cingulate gyrus bilateral CPL, left precuneus, left precentral gyrus, BFL, and the left parietal lobe, while the right CPL showed rsFC with bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral CPL, left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. Compared with the NS group, the left CPL had increased rsFC in the SD group with the right inferior frontal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, right thalamus, and bilateral precuneus, and decreased rsFC with the BFL, while the right CPL had increased rsFC with the left superior frontal gyrus and decreased rsFC with the left precentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, and the BFL. Conclusion Bilateral CPL are possibly involved in acupuncture stimulation in different manners, and the right CPL showed more rsFC impairment. PMID:26064046

  19. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1295724

  20. Effects of low dose aspirin (81 mg) on proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Amaranthus caudatus labeling in normal-risk and high-risk human subjects for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Aoki, Toshihiro; Ruffin, Mack T; Normolle, Daniel P; Boland, C Richard; Brenner, Dean E

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical observations provide support for a colorectal cancer chemopreventive role for aspirin. We have evaluated the effects of aspirin on proliferation biomarkers in normal-risk and high-risk human subjects for colorectal cancer. Colorectal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 24h after 28 daily doses of 81 mg of aspirin from 13 high-risk and 15 normal-risk subjects for colorectal cancer. We evaluated aspirin's effects on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry and epithelial mucin histochemistry using the lectin, Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA) in crypt sections from rectal biopsies. The baseline whole crypt PCNA LIs differed significantly between normal-risk and high-risk subjects. PCNA LIs are not affected by 28 days of aspirin at 81 mg daily. ACA LIs are decreased by 28 days of aspirin at 81 mg daily in both normal-risk and high-risk subjects. Aspirin's effects on ACA LIs may have mechanistic and biological implications that deserve further attention. PCNA and ACA LIs are not useful as proliferation biomarkers for aspirin's chemopreventive activity in morphologically normal human colorectal mucosa. PMID:15068834

  1. Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.; Werfel, Krystal; Camarata, Stephen; Bess, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children using a standardized measure. Methods As part of a larger ongoing study, the authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (Varni, Burwinkle, Katz, Meeske, & Dickinson, 2002). This standardized scale provides a measure of general fatigue, sleep/rest fatigue, cognitive fatigue, and an overall composite measure of fatigue. To date, data from 10 children with hearing loss (CHL) and 10 age-matched children with normal hearing (CNH) have been analyzed. Results These preliminary results show that subjective fatigue is increased in school-age children with hearing loss (Cohen's d = 0.78–1.90). In addition, the impact of hearing loss on fatigue in school-age children appears pervasive across multiple domains (general, sleep/rest, and cognitive fatigue). Conclusion School-age CHL reported significantly more fatigue than did CNH. These preliminary data are important given the negative academic and psychosocial consequences associated with fatigue. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for this increased fatigue in school-age children with hearing loss, and to identify factors that may modulate (e.g., degree of loss) and mediate (e.g., hearing aid or cochlear implant use) its impact. PMID:23824428

  2. Duodeno-Gastric-Esophageal Reflux—What is Pathologic? Comparison of Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus and Age-Matched Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgarten, Eva; Pütz, Benito; Hölscher, Arnulf H.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to analyse pH- and bile-monitoring data in patients with Barrett’s esophagus and in age- and gender-matched controls. Subjects and Methods Twenty-four consecutive Barrett’s patients (8 females, 16 males, mean age 57 years), 21 patients with esophagitis (10 females, 11 males, mean age 58 years), and 19 healthy controls (8 females, 11 males, mean age 51 years), were included. Only patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy. All groups were investigated with manometry, gastric and esophageal 24-h pH, and simultaneous bile monitoring according to a standardized protocol. A bilirubin absorption >0.25 was determined as noxious bile reflux. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) method was applied to determine the optimal cutoff value of pathologic bilirubin levels. Results Of Barrett’s patients, 79% had pathologic acidic gastric reflux (pH<4 >5% of total measuring time). However, 32% of healthy controls also had acid reflux (p < 0.05) without any symptoms. The median of esophageal bile reflux was 7.8% (lower quartile (LQ)–upper quartile (UQ) = 1.6–17.8%) in Barrett’s patients, in patients with esophagitis, 3.5% (LQ–UQ = 0.1–13.5), and in contrast to 0% (LQ–UQ = 0–1.0%) in controls, p = 0.001. ROC analysis showed the optimal dividing value for patients at more than 1% bile reflux over 24 h (75% sensitivity, 84% specificity). Conclusion An optimal threshold to differentiate between normal and pathological bile reflux into the esophagus is 1% (24-h bile monitoring with an absorbance >0.25). PMID:17436133

  3. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as “the ball is above the cup”, where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6–11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as “the cup is above the drum” or “the bird is below the hat”. Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children’s scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of

  4. Doppler ultrasonography reveals blood flow signals within the masses of invasive moles in subjects with normal hCG levels after chemotherapy: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XI; DUAN, ZHAO

    2013-01-01

    A consensus has formed that patients with invasive moles should continue with one to three cycles of chemotherapy after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels have decreased to a normal level. However, the management plan has not been agreed for cases where Doppler ultrasonography (DU) indicates blood-flow signals within the tumor mass after one to three cycles of chemotherapy when the hCG concentration has returned to normal. The present study describes the clinical and therapeutic courses of three patients with invasive moles with confirmed blood-flow signals (by DU) after their hCG levels had normalized. One patient underwent surgery to remove the mass within the uterine muscle, while the other two patients decided to cease chemotherapy and were managed by follow-up appointments; all three patients had good outcomes. These data illustrate that patients with invasive moles should be followed up if DU indicates blood-flow signals in the tumor mass after one to three cycles of chemotherapy when the hCG level has decreased back to a normal level. PMID:24137443

  5. Effects of prolonged, sequential exposure to acid fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising, normal subjects. Final report, 28 Feb 89-28 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-nine apparently healthy and asymptomatic subjects were selected for a study that screened for sensitivity to ozone. After three hours of ozone exposure (at 0.20 ppm), eighteen of the subjects (46 percent) experienced a 10 percent reduction in forced expiratory volume, an indicator of exhaling ability. After four hours of exposure, 62 percent of the subjects experienced a similar reduction in expiratory volume. Further, narrowing of airways among the sensitive subjects was suggested by results of the methacholine challenge test, a standard test for measuring airway resistance. The lung capacity of all subjects decreased progressively during ozone exposures. Capacity was unchanged during acidic fog and pollutant-free air exposures. No statistically significant differences in airway resistance, airway responsiveness and symptoms that could be attributed to acid fog exposure were observed. The study indicates that exposue to fog containing nitric acid followed by exposure to ozone does not have additive or synergistic acute effects. However, the study confirms earlier indications that many apparently healthy and asymptomatic individuals are susceptible to and adversely affected by ozone at relatively low concentrations.

  6. Respiratory effects of two-hour exposure with intermittent exercise to ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide alone and in combination in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adult male healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.15 ppm each of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination, with intermittent light exercise for two hours. Three of the 7 subjects developed cough during deep inspiration and one subject had chest pain during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. Among the various indices of pulmonary function tests, specific airway conductane (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was the most sensitive index to examine the changes produced by the exposure to O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. Significant decrease of G/sub aw//V/sub tg/ in comparison with control measurements was observed in 6 of 7 subjects during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone, and in all subjects during exposures to the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. However, no significant enhancement of effect was observed in the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants, although a slightly greater decrease of airway resistance/volume of thoracic gas (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was observed for the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants than for O/sub 3/ alone.

  7. Visual function assessment in simulated real-life situations in patients with age-related macular degeneration compared to normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Barteselli, G; Gomez, M L; Doede, A L; Chhablani, J; Gutstein, W; Bartsch, D-U; Dustin, L; Azen, S P; Freeman, W R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual function variations in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared to normal eyes under different light/contrast conditions using a time-dependent visual acuity testing instrument, the Central Vision Analyzer (CVA). Methods Overall, 37 AMD eyes and 35 normal eyes were consecutively tested with the CVA after assessing best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) using ETDRS charts. The CVA established visual thresholds for three mesopic environments (M1 (high contrast), M2 (medium contrast), and M3 (low contrast)) and three backlight-glare environments (G1 (high contrast, equivalent to ETDRS), G2 (medium contrast), and G3 (low contrast)) under timed conditions. Vision drop across environments was calculated, and repeatability of visual scores was determined. Results BCVA significantly reduced with decreasing contrast in all eyes. M1 scores for BCVA were greater than M2 and M3 (P<0.001); G1 scores were greater than G2 and G3 (P<0.01). BCVA dropped more in AMD eyes than in normal eyes between M1 and M2 (P=0.002) and between M1 and M3 (P=0.003). In AMD eyes, BCVA was better using ETDRS charts compared to G1 (P<0.001). The drop in visual function between ETDRS and G1 was greater in AMD eyes compared to normal eyes (P=0.004). Standard deviations of test–retest ranged from 0.100 to 0.139 logMAR. Conclusion The CVA allowed analysis of the visual complaints that AMD patients experience with different lighting/contrast time-dependent conditions. BCVA changed significantly under different lighting/contrast conditions in all eyes, however, AMD eyes were more affected by contrast reduction than normal eyes. In AMD eyes, timed conditions using the CVA led to worse BCVA compared to non-timed ETDRS charts. PMID:25081294

  8. Longitudinal Assessment of Optical Quality and Intraocular Scattering Using the Double-Pass Instrument in Normal Eyes and Eyes with Short Tear Breakup Time

    PubMed Central

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Yanome, Kyohei; Igarashi, Akihito; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the longitudinal changes in optical quality including intraocular scattering in normal eyes and eyes with short tear breakup time (TBUT). Methods We prospectively examined twenty eyes of 20 healthy subjects, and age-matched twenty eyes of 20 short TBUT subjects. The modulation transfer function (MTF) cutoff frequency, the Strehl ratio, and the objective scattering index (OSI) were quantitatively assessed using an Optical Quality Analysis System. We investigated the changes in these variables measured consecutively at the initial examination, 5, and 10 seconds without blinking. We also compared these variables in eyes with short TBUT with those in normal eyes. Results No significant differences in the MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, or OSI were detected over a 10-second period in normal eyes. These variables also became significantly degraded even over a 5-second period in eyes with short TBUT (p<0.01). We found significant differences in these variables at 5 and 10 seconds (p<0.05), but none immediately after the blink between normal and short TBUT eyes. Conclusions Optical quality including intraocular scattering deteriorated significantly with time in eyes with short TBUT, whereas we found significant differences over a 10-second period in normal eyes. Eyes with short TBUT showed greater deterioration in optical quality after the blink than normal eyes. The longitudinal assessment of optical quality may be effective in distinguishing eyes with short TBUT from normal eyes. PMID:24324787

  9. Air and Bone Conduction Thresholds of Deaf and Normal Hearing Subjects before and during the Elimination of Cutaneous-Tactile Interference with Anesthesia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    The study investigated whether low frequency air and bone thresholds elicited at high intensity levels from deaf children with a sensory-neural diagnosis reflect valid auditory sensitivity or are mediated through cutaneous-tactile receptors. Subjects were five totally deaf (mean age 17.0) yielding vibrotactile thresholds but with no air and bone…

  10. High frequency of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infections: patients with peripheral arterial disease and those with risk factors for cardiovascular diseases compared to normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, S S; Stivala, A; Bonaccorso, C; Anzaldi, M; Fiore, V; Simili, M; Neri, S; Garozzo, A; Tempera, G; Nicoletti, G

    2010-12-01

    The role of bacterial infections, mainly Chlamydophila pneumoniae, on atherosclerotic processes as well as the therapeutic utility of additional antibiotic treatment is still an open question. In this study we compared the serological profiles of 160 patients (80 with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), diagnosed with an ankle/brachial index (ABI) ≤ 0.9 and 80 with risk factors for cardiovascular disease - CVD) with those of 80 healthy subjects, serum levels of specific C. pneumoniae antibodies using the microimmunofluorescence test. Our results show that PAD patients had a higher frequency of C. pneumoniae infection than those with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This frequency was lower if compared to the previous two groups in controls. 44 out of the 80 (55%) patients with PAD and 34 out of the 80 (42.58%) subjects with risk factors for cardiovascular disease were seropositive while only 24 of the 80 (30%) healthy subjects showed seropositivity to C. pneumoniae. Furthermore, higher anticorpal titers were also found in patients with peripheral arterial disease and in patients with cardiovascular risk factors if compared to healthy subjects. On the basis of these results, we confirm that C. pneumoniae infection is frequent in peripheral arterial disease patients and we believe that it could be considered as an additional risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21303746

  11. Abnormal short-latency synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex of subjects with Becker muscular dystrophy: a rTMS study.

    PubMed

    Golaszewski, Stefan; Schwenker, Kerstin; Bergmann, Jürgen; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen; Nardone, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to further investigate motor cortex excitability in 13 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), six of them with slight mental retardation. RTMS delivered at 5Hz frequency and suprathreshold intensity progressively increases the size of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in healthy subjects; the rTMS-induced facilitation of MEPs was significantly reduced in the BMD patients mentally retarded or classified as borderline when compared with age-matched control subjects and the BMD patients with normal intelligence. The increase in the duration of the cortical silent period was similar in both patient groups and controls. These findings suggest an altered cortical short-term synaptic plasticity in glutamate-dependent excitatory circuits within the motor cortex in BMD patients with intellectual disabilities. RTMS studies may shed new light on the physiological mechanisms of cortical involvement in dystrophinopathies. PMID:26562314

  12. Description of a novel Janus kinase 3 P132A mutation in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and demonstration of previously reported Janus kinase 3 mutations in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Riera, Ludovica; Lasorsa, Elena; Bonello, Lisa; Sismondi, Francesca; Tondat, Fabrizio; Di Bello, Cristiana; Di Celle, Paola Francia; Chiarle, Roberto; Godio, Laura; Pich, Achille; Facchetti, Fabio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Marmont, Filippo; Zanon, Carlo; Bardelli, Alberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2011-09-01

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) are frequently seen in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). Meanwhile, JAK3 activating substitutions have been found in a few megakaryocytic cell lines and in primary myeloid leukemia (AMKL). Here, we sought to discover novel leukemogenetic mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia of non-Down syndrome (N-DS) by DNA sequencing. A total of 191 normal Caucasian individuals were studied to define single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the JH2 and JH6 domains. Although known activating substitutions were observed in rare cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (V722I [2/134] or P132T [1/119]), all samples were wild-type (WT) for the oncogenic A572V (119/119). Interestingly, a novel homozygous mutation (P132A) was discovered in a patient with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and in vivo studies demonstrated that its ectopic expression was oncogenic in a mouse xenotransplant model. This study defines a novel JAK3 mutation among patients with N-DS AML and demonstrates that normal individuals can also display germline JAK3 substitutions, previously proven to have oncogenic properties, in vitro and in vivo. The discovery of these substitutions in normal donors encourages future studies to define new risk factors among patients with MPDs. PMID:21599579

  13. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes.A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system.In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4-8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9-7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9-17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6-20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1-6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3-8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant.A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  14. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes. A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system. In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4–8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9–7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9–17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6–20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1–6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3–8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant. A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  15. Subjectivity, hygiene, and STI prevention: a normalization paradox in the cleanliness practices of female sex workers in post-socialist China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yeon Jung

    2013-09-01

    This article illuminates the principal mechanisms that increase the risk of STIs for female sex workers in China. It draws primarily on my 26 months of ethnographic fieldwork (2006-2009) in red-light district neighborhoods in Haikou that have become centers of internal migration in post-reform southern China. Chinese sex workers here challenge dominant representations of them as illegal, immoral, and unclean subordinates and understand themselves also as sacrificing, capable, and modern women. I show how the women's conflicted subjectivity, continuously shaped through social networks, affects their personal health decisions and, significantly, leads them to adopt clinically risky practices. I conclude by arguing that public health interventions in southern China in and around certain red-light districts should take these conflicted subjectivities into account in working to improve sex workers' health. PMID:24123232

  16. Comment on “Computed Tomography Evaluation of Craniomandibular Articulation in Class II Division 1 Malocclusion and Class I Normal Occlusion Subjects in North Indian Population”

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ashutosh; Birmani Gaunkar, Ridhima; Arora, Varun; Dixit, Seema K.; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Chandra, Pratik; Agarwal, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Clear statement of objective, appropriate location of landmarks and removal of subjective bias in measurement is essential in all kinds of research, especially, orthodontics. The research design should be rationalistic, purposeful, and in accordance with the objectives of the study. In this communication, we highlight the errors in research design, measurement, analysis, and inferences drawn with the help of a published article as the primary source to explain these simple but useful points. PMID:23738089

  17. Reading Strategies of Bilingual Normally Progressing and Dyslexic Readers in Hindi and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Ashum; Jamal, Gulgoona

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the reading accuracy of dyslexic readers in comparison to chronological age-matched normally progressing readers in Hindi and English using word reading tasks, matched for spoken frequency of usage, age of acquisition, imageability, and word length. Both groups showed significantly greater reading accuracy in Hindi than in…

  18. Effects of the acupoints PC 6 Neiguan and LR 3 Taichong on cerebral blood flow in normal subjects and in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Quirico, P E; Allais, G; Ferrando, M; de Lorenzo, C; Burzio, C; Bergandi, F; Rolando, S; Schiapparelli, P; Benedetto, C

    2014-05-01

    Acupuncture has been proven to be effective in the treatment of various cardiovascular disorders; it acts both on the peripheral flow and on the cerebral flow. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of the insertion of PC 6 Neiguan and LR 3 Taichong acupoints on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA). These effects were measured in a group of patients suffering from migraine without aura (Group M) and in a healthy control group (Group C). In the study, we included 16 patients suffering from migraine without aura, classified according to the criteria of the International Headache Society, and 14 healthy subjects as a control group. The subjects took part in the study on two different days, and on each day, the effect of a single acupoint was evaluated. Transcranial Doppler was used to measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) in the MCA. Our study showed that the stimulation of PC 6 Neiguan in both groups results in a significant and longlasting reduction in the average BFV in the MCA. After pricking LR 3 Taichong, instead, the average BFV undergoes a very sudden and marked increase; subsequently, it decreases and tends to stabilize at a slightly higher level compared with the baseline, recorded before needle insertion. Our data seem to suggest that these two acupoints have very different effects on CBF. The insertion of PC 6 Neiguan probably triggers a vasodilation in MCA, while the pricking of LR 3 Taichong determines a rapid and marked vasoconstriction. PMID:24867849

  19. Effects of left primary motor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation on laser-evoked potentials in migraine patients and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Eleonora; Ricci, Katia; Montemurno, Anna; Delussi, Marianna; Invitto, Sara; de Tommaso, Marina

    2016-07-28

    Migraine is characterized by an altered cortical excitability. Because transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can change brain activity noninvasively, it is possible to hypothesize its efficacy in modulating pain in migraine. In this study, we compared the effects of tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) both on subjective pain and on evoked responses induced by laser stimulation (LEPs). Thirty-two patients and sixteen controls were randomized to receive sham stimulation and real tDCS with the anode centered over M1 or DLPFC. Laser Evoked potentials were recorded in basal, sham and tDCS conditions. We did not find significant acute changes in LEPs parameters and pain perception among subjects who received tDCS of both M1 and DLPFC. After DLPFC tDCS, we observed a significant increase of N2-P2 component habituation in migraine patients while M1 stimulation reduced it. These findings may suggest a modulation of abnormal pain processing induced by DLPFC and M1 anodal tDCS and outline the need for future investigations exploring the possible neuronal plasticity changes supporting the clinical effect on migraine. PMID:27208831

  20. US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and /sup 60/Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed.

  1. Recognition of familiar and unfamiliar melodies in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barlett, J C; Halpern, A R; Dowling, W J

    1995-09-01

    We tested normal young and elderly adults and elderly Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on recognition memory for tunes. In Experiment 1, AD patients and age-matched controls received a study list and an old/new recognition test of highly familiar, traditional tunes, followed by a study list and test of novel tunes. The controls performed better than did the AD patients. The controls showed the "mirror effect" of increased hits and reduced false alarms for traditional versus novel tunes, whereas the patients false-alarmed as often to traditional tunes as to novel tunes. Experiment 2 compared young adults and healthy elderly persons using a similar design. Performance was lower in the elderly group, but both younger and older subjects showed the mirror effect. Experiment 3 produced confusion between preexperimental familiarity and intraexperimental familiarity by mixing traditional and novel tunes in the study lists and tests. Here, the subjects in both age groups resembled the patients of Experiment 1 in failing to show the mirror effect. Older subjects again performed more poorly, and they differed qualitatively from younger subjects in setting stricter criteria for more nameable tunes. Distinguishing different sources of global familiarity is a factor in tune recognition, and the data suggest that this type of source monitoring is impaired in AD and involves different strategies in younger and older adults. PMID:7476239

  2. Comparison of 2.5D and 3D Quantification of Femoral Head Coverage in Normal Control Subjects and Patients with Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui; Liu, Li; Yu, Weimin; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Dianzhong; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is characterized by insufficient femoral head coverage (FHC). Quantification of FHC is of importance as the underlying goal of the surgery to treat hip dysplasia is to restore a normal acetabular morphology and thereby to improve FHC. Unlike a pure 2D X-ray radiograph-based measurement method or a pure 3D CT-based measurement method, previously we presented a 2.5D method to quantify FHC from a single anteriorposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph. In this study, we first quantified and compared 3D FHC between a normal control group and a patient group using a CT-based measurement method. Taking the CT-based 3D measurements of FHC as the gold standard, we further quantified the bias, precision and correlation between the 2.5D measurements and the 3D measurements on both the control group and the patient group. Based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), we investigated the influence of the pelvic tilt on the 2.5D measurements of FHC. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for absolute agreement was used to quantify interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique. The Pearson correlation coefficient, r, was used to determine the strength of the linear association between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements. Student's t-test was used to determine whether the differences between different measurements were statistically significant. Our experimental results demonstrated that both the interobserver reliability and the intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique were very good (ICCs > 0.8). Regression analysis indicated that the correlation was very strong between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Student's t-test showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements of FHC on the patient group (p > 0.05). The results of this study provided convincing evidence demonstrating the validity of the 2.5D measurements

  3. Early detection of disease: The correlation of the volatile organic profiles from patients with upper respiratory infections with subjects of normal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described whereby a transevaporator is used for sampling 60-100 microns of aqueous sample. Volatiles are stripped from the sample either by a stream of helium and collection on a porous polymer, Tenax, or by 0.8 ml of 2-chloropropane and collected on glass beads. The volatiles are thermally desorbed into a precolumn which is connected to a capillary gas chromatographic column for analysis. The technique is shown to be reproducible and suitable for determining chromatographic profiles for a wide variety of sample types. Using a transevaporator sampling technique, the volatile profiles from 70 microns of serum were obtained by capillary column gas chromatography. The complex chromatograms were interpreted by a combination of manual and computer techniques and a two peak ratio method devised for the classification of normal and virus infected sera. Using the K-Nearest Neighbor approach, 85.7 percent of the unknown samples were classified correctly. Some preliminary results indicate the possible use of the method for the assessment of virus susceptibility.

  4. The effect of normally consumed amounts of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup on lipid profiles, body composition and related parameters in overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie; Pardo, Sabrina; Nguyen, Von T; Melanson, Kathleen J; Yu, Zhiping; Lowther, Britte E; Rippe, James M

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has advocated that women and men not consume more than 100 and 150 kcal/day, respectively, from added sugars. These levels are currently exceeded by over 90% of the adult population in the United States. Few data exist on longer-term metabolic effects when sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), the principal sources of added dietary sugars, are consumed at levels typical of the general population. Sixty five overweight and obese individuals were placed on a eucaloric (weight stable) diet for 10-weeks, which incorporated sucrose- or HFCS-sweetened, low-fat milk at 10% or 20% of calories in a randomized, double-blinded study. All groups responded similarly (interaction p > 0.05). There was no change in body weight in any of the groups over the 10-week study, or in systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Likewise, there were no changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or apolipoprotein B (Apo B). We conclude that (1) when consumed as part of a eucaloric diet fructose--when given with glucose (as normally consumed) does not promote weight gain or an atherogenic lipid profile even when consumed at two to four times the level recently recommended by the AHA. (2) There were no differences between HFCS and sucrose on these parameters. PMID:24642950

  5. The Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMPs) Recorded Along the Sternocleidomastoid Muscles During Head Rotation and Flexion in Normal Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Alexander; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Chunming; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Eby, Thomas; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Tone burst-evoked myogenic potentials recorded from tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) (cervical VEMP or cVEMP) are widely used to assess the vestibular function. Since the cVEMP response is mediated by the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR) pathways, it is important to understand how the cVEMPs are determined by factors related to either the sensory components (vestibular end organs) or the motor components (SCM) of the VCR pathways. Compared to the numerous studies that have investigated effects of sound parameters on the cVEMPs, there are few studies that have examined effects of SCM-related factors on the cVEMPs. The goal of the present study is to fill this knowledge gap by testing three SCM-related hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that contrary to the current view, the cVEMP response is only present in the SCM ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. The second hypothesis is that the cVEMP response is not only dependent on tonic level of the SCM, but also on how the tonic level is achieved, i.e., by head rotation or head flexion. The third hypothesis is that the SCM is compartmented and the polarity of the cVEMP response is dependent on the recording site. Seven surface electrodes were positioned along the left SCMs in 12 healthy adult subjects, and tone bursts were delivered to the ipsilateral or contralateral ear (8 ms plateau, 1 ms rise/fall, 130 dB SPL, 50-4000 Hz) while subjects activated their SCMs by head rotation (HR condition) or chin downward head flexion (CD condition). The first hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the contralateral cVEMPs were minimal at all recording sites for all the tested tones during both HR and CD conditions. The second hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the ipsilateral cVEMPs were larger in HR condition than in CD condition at recording sites above and below the SCM midpoint. Finally, the third hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the cVEMPs exhibit reversed polarities at the sites

  6. Radionuclide analysis of ejection time, peak ejection rate, and time to peak ejection rate: response to supine bicycle exercise in normal subjects and in patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.A.; Mancini, G.B.; Gerber, K.H.; Carey, P.H.; Ashburn, W.L.; Higgins, C.B.

    1983-05-01

    Using equilibrium radionuclide angiography, we evaluated the ejection time (ET), peak ejection rate (PER), and time to peak ejection rate (TTp) at test and during supine bicycle exercise in 39 subjects, divided into three groups: group 1 . 13 normal subjects; group 2 . 10 patients with a previous infarction (MI); and group 3 . 16 patients with coronary disease without a previous MI. Normal subjects had greater ejection fractions and PERs than the other two groups at rest or peak exercise (p less than 0.05). PER was no more useful than ejection fraction in identifying cardiac dysfunction at either rest or exercise. The time of its occurrence varied with the group studied, and was slightly but significantly later in systole in groups 2 and 3 when compared to normals (p less than 0.05), though substantial overlap between groups occurred. During exercise, absolute ET shortened in all groups, but actually increased as a function of the R-R interval. The time to peak ejection rate (normalized for the R-R interval) was greater in the noninfarct group (group 3) patients (p less than 0.05) when compared to the group 1 or group 2 individuals at peak exercise. In conclusion, equilibrium radionuclide angiography is a useful technique for the quantification and characterization of events during systole, and is capable of providing information on the timing of events during ejection. Tardokinesis, or the delay of ventricular ejection, is not seen in the response of global indices of left ventricular function to exercise stress. While global early systolic indexes may not detect regional dyssynchrony, their timing during stress may occasionally aid in discerning the presence of cardiac dysfunction.

  7. Human Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Are Present in Normal Peripheral Blood of Young, Middle-Aged, and Aged Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sovalat, Hanna; Scrofani, Maurice; Eidenschenk, Antoinette; Hénon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether the number of human very small embryonic-like stem cells (huVSELs) would vary depending on the age of humans. HuVSELs frequency was evaluated into the steady-state (SS) peripheral blood (PB) of healthy volunteers using flow cytometry analysis. Their numbers were compared with volunteers' age. Blood samples were withdrawn from 28 volunteers (age ranging from 20 to 70 years), who were distributed among three groups of age: “young” (mean age, 27.8 years), “middle” (mean age, 49 years), and “older” (mean age, 64.2 years). Comparing the three groups, we did not observe any statistically significant difference in huVSELs numbers between them. The difference in mRNA expression for PSC markers as SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2 between the three groups of age was not statistically significant. A similar frequency of huVSELs into the SS-PB of young, middle-aged, and aged subjects may indicate that the VSELs pool persists all along the life as a reserve for tissue repair in case of minor injury and that there is a continuous efflux of these cells from the BM into the PB. PMID:26633977

  8. Impact of a Traditional Dietary Supplement with Coconut Milk and Soya Milk on the Lipid Profile in Normal Free Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ekanayaka, R. A. I.; Ekanayaka, N. K.; Perera, B.; De Silva, P. G. S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The effects of coconut fat and soya fat on serum lipids are controversial. This study was designed to investigate the lipid effects of coconut milk and soya milk supplementation on the lipid profile of free living healthy subjects. Methods. Sixty (60) healthy volunteers aged 18–57 years were given coconut milk porridge (CMP) for 5 days of the week for 8 weeks, followed by a 2-week washout period, subsequent to which they received isoenergetic soya milk porridge (SMP) for 8 weeks. Results. The LDL (low density lipoprotein) levels decreased with CMP and reached statistical significance in the total study population and in the >130 baseline LDL group. The HDL (high density lipoprotein) levels rose significantly with CMP supplementation (P = 0.000). Conclusions. We conclude that coconut fat in the form of CM does not cause a detrimental effect on the lipid profile in the general population and in fact is beneficial due to the decrease in LDL and rise in HDL. SMP will be of benefit only in those whose baseline LDL levels are elevated. PMID:24282632

  9. Black tea is not significantly different from water in the maintenance of normal hydration in human subjects: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Carrie H; Hart, Valerie A

    2011-08-01

    There is a belief that caffeinated drinks, such as tea, may adversely affect hydration. This was investigated in a randomised controlled trial. Healthy resting males (n 21) were recruited from the general population. Following 24 h of abstention from caffeine, alcohol and vigorous physical activity, including a 10 h overnight fast, all men underwent four separate test days in a counter-balanced order with a 5 d washout in between. The test beverages, provided at regular intervals, were 4 × 240 ml black (i.e. regular) tea and 6 × 240 ml black tea, providing 168 or 252 mg of caffeine. The controls were identical amounts of boiled water. The tea was prepared in a standardised way from tea bags and included 20 ml of semi-skimmed milk. All food taken during the 12 h intervention period was controlled, and subjects remained at rest. No other beverages were offered. Blood was sampled at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h, and a 24 h urine sample was collected. Outcome variables were whole blood cell count, Na, K, bicarbonate, total protein, urea, creatinine and osmolality for blood; and total volume, colour, Na, K, creatinine and osmolality for urine. Although data for all twenty-one participants were included in the analysis (mean age 36 years and mean BMI 25·8 kg/m(2)), nineteen men completed all conditions. Statistical analysis, using a factorial ANOVA approach within PROC MIXED, revealed no significant differences between tea and water for any of the mean blood or urine measurements. It was concluded that black tea, in the amounts studied, offered similar hydrating properties to water. PMID:21450118

  10. The 3-D motion of the centre of gravity of the human body during level walking. I. Normal subjects at low and intermediate walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Tesio, L; Lanzi, D; Detrembleur, C

    1998-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the mechanical energy changes of the centre of gravity (CG) of the body in the forward, lateral and vertical direction during normal level walking at intermediate and low speeds. DESIGN: Eight healthy adults performed successive walks at speeds ranging from 0.25 to 1.75 m s(-1) over a dedicated force platform system. BACKGROUND: In previous studies, it was shown that the motion of the CG during gait can be altered more than the motion of individual segments. However, more detailed normative data are needed for clinical analysis. METHODS: The positive work done during the step to accelerate the body CG in the forward direction, W(f), to lift it, W(v), to accelerate it in the lateral direction, W(I), and the actual work done by the muscles to maintain its motion with respect to the ground ('external' work), W(ext), were measured. This allowed the calculation of the pendulum-like transfer between gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy of the CG, (percentage recovery, R). At the optimal speed of about 1.3 m s(-1), this transfer allows saving of as much as 65% of the muscular work which would have been otherwise needed to keep the body in motion with respect to the ground. The distance covered by the CG at each step either forward (step length, S(I)), or vertically (vertical displacement, S(v)) was also recorded. RESULTS: W(I) was, as a median, only 1.6-5.9% of W(ext). This ratio was higher, the lower the speed. At each step, W(ext) is needed to sustain two distinct increments of the total mechanical energy of the CG, E(tot). The increment a takes place during the double stance phase; the increment b takes place during the single stance phase. Both of these increments increased with speed. Over the speed range analyzed, the power spent to to sustain the a increment was 2.8-3.9 times higher than the power spent to sustain the b increment. PMID:11415774

  11. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  12. An open-label study to estimate the effect of steady-state erythromycin on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of a single dose of rivaroxaban in subjects with renal impairment and normal renal function

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth T; Vaidyanathan, Seema; Natarajan, Jaya; Ariyawansa, Jay; Haskell, Lloyd; Turner, Kenneth C

    2014-01-01

    Two previously conducted rivaroxaban studies showed that, separately, renal impairment (RI) and concomitant administration of erythromycin (P-glycoprotein and moderate cytochrome P450 3A4 [CYP3A4] inhibitor) can result in increases in rivaroxaban exposure. However, these studies did not assess the potential for combined drug–drug–disease interactions, which—in theory—could lead to additive or synergistic increases in exposure. This study investigated rivaroxaban pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics when co-administered with steady-state (SS) erythromycin in subjects with either mild or moderate RI. Similar to previous studies, rivaroxaban administered alone in RI subjects, or when co-administered with SS erythromycin in normal renal function (NRF) subjects, increased rivaroxaban exposure. When combined, the co-administration of rivaroxaban 10 mg with SS erythromycin in subjects with mild or moderate RI produced mean increases in rivaroxaban AUC∞ and Cmax of approximately 76% and 56%, and 99% and 64%, respectively, relative to NRF subjects, with PD changes displaying a similar trend. No serious adverse events occurred and no persistent adverse events were reported at the end of study. Although these increases were slightly more than additive, rivaroxaban should not be used in patients with RI receiving concomitant combined P-glycoprotein and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors, unless the potential benefit justifies the potential risk. PMID:24964176

  13. An open-label study to estimate the effect of steady-state erythromycin on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of a single dose of rivaroxaban in subjects with renal impairment and normal renal function.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kenneth T; Vaidyanathan, Seema; Natarajan, Jaya; Ariyawansa, Jay; Haskell, Lloyd; Turner, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    Two previously conducted rivaroxaban studies showed that, separately, renal impairment (RI) and concomitant administration of erythromycin (P-glycoprotein and moderate cytochrome P450 3A4 [CYP3A4] inhibitor) can result in increases in rivaroxaban exposure. However, these studies did not assess the potential for combined drug-drug-disease interactions, which-in theory-could lead to additive or synergistic increases in exposure. This study investigated rivaroxaban pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics when co-administered with steady-state (SS) erythromycin in subjects with either mild or moderate RI. Similar to previous studies, rivaroxaban administered alone in RI subjects, or when co-administered with SS erythromycin in normal renal function (NRF) subjects, increased rivaroxaban exposure. When combined, the co-administration of rivaroxaban 10 mg with SS erythromycin in subjects with mild or moderate RI produced mean increases in rivaroxaban AUC∞ and Cmax of approximately 76% and 56%, and 99% and 64%, respectively, relative to NRF subjects, with PD changes displaying a similar trend. No serious adverse events occurred and no persistent adverse events were reported at the end of study. Although these increases were slightly more than additive, rivaroxaban should not be used in patients with RI receiving concomitant combined P-glycoprotein and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors, unless the potential benefit justifies the potential risk. PMID:24964176

  14. Evidence for normal vitamin D receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and genotype in absorptive hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Zerwekh, J E; Hughes, M R; Reed, B Y; Breslau, N A; Heller, H J; Lemke, M; Nasonkin, I; Pak, C Y

    1995-10-01

    Absorptive hypercalciuria (a stone-forming condition) is characterized by gut hyperabsorption of calcium, hypercalciuria, and reduced bone density. Inasmuch as these features implicate enhanced calcitriol action in gut and bone, we analyzed the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene to ascertain whether an abnormality of this gene marks patients with intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. We have compared the frequency of a restriction fragment length polymorphism (Bsm I) associated with different alleles of the VDR gene in a group of 33 well characterized absorptive hypercalciuric patients and a group of 36 normal race- and age-matched control subjects. There was no difference between the distribution of the VDR alleles in the patient population when compared with the normal population. The coding region of VDR messenger RNA was also normal, as determined by both DNA sequence analysis and chemical mismatch cleavage analysis of copy DNA from 11 index absorptive hypercalciuric patients. On the basis of these results, we propose that the enhanced intestinal calcium absorption invariably seen in absorptive hypercalciuria and attendant symptoms of this disorder are not attributable to mutations of the VDR and are not linked to a common VDR genotype. PMID:7559881

  15. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.

  16. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties. PMID:26197871

  17. Sight and sound out of synch: Fragmentation and renormalisation of audiovisual integration and subjective timing

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Elliot D.; Ipser, Alberta; Palmbaha, Austra; Paunoiu, Diana; Brown, Peter; Lambert, Christian; Leff, Alex; Driver, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The sight and sound of a person speaking or a ball bouncing may seem simultaneous, but their corresponding neural signals are spread out over time as they arrive at different multisensory brain sites. How subjective timing relates to such neural timing remains a fundamental neuroscientific and philosophical puzzle. A dominant assumption is that temporal coherence is achieved by sensory resynchronisation or recalibration across asynchronous brain events. This assumption is easily confirmed by estimating subjective audiovisual timing for groups of subjects, which is on average similar across different measures and stimuli, and approximately veridical. But few studies have examined normal and pathological individual differences in such measures. Case PH, with lesions in pons and basal ganglia, hears people speak before seeing their lips move. Temporal order judgements (TOJs) confirmed this: voices had to lag lip-movements (by ∼200 msec) to seem synchronous to PH. Curiously, voices had to lead lips (also by ∼200 msec) to maximise the McGurk illusion (a measure of audiovisual speech integration). On average across these measures, PH's timing was therefore still veridical. Age-matched control participants showed similar discrepancies. Indeed, normal individual differences in TOJ and McGurk timing correlated negatively: subjects needing an auditory lag for subjective simultaneity needed an auditory lead for maximal McGurk, and vice versa. This generalised to the Stream–Bounce illusion. Such surprising antagonism seems opposed to good sensory resynchronisation, yet average timing across tasks was still near-veridical. Our findings reveal remarkable disunity of audiovisual timing within and between subjects. To explain this we propose that the timing of audiovisual signals within different brain mechanisms is perceived relative to the average timing across mechanisms. Such renormalisation fully explains the curious antagonistic relationship between disparate timing

  18. Semantic Features in Fast-Mapping: Performance of Preschoolers with Specific Language Impairment Versus Preschoolers with Normal Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Mary; Plante, Elena; Creusere, Marlena

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the receptive language skills of young children (4-6 years old) with specific language impairment (SLI). Specifically, the authors looked at their ability to fast-map semantic features of objects and actions and compared it to the performance of age-matched peers with normally developing language (NL). Children completed a…

  19. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  20. Plasma antibodies to Abeta40 and Abeta42 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wuhua; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Kuwano, Ryozo; Abe, Koji; Shoji, Mikio

    2008-07-11

    Antibodies to amyloid beta protein (Abeta) are present naturally or after Abeta vaccine therapy in human plasma. To clarify their clinical role, we examined plasma samples from 113 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 205 normal controls using the tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) assay. A high positive rate of TAPIR was revealed in AD (45.1%) and age-matched controls (41.2%), however, no significance was observed. No significant difference was observed in the MMS score or disease duration between TAPIR-positive and negative samples. TAPIR-positive plasma reacted with the Abeta40 monomer and dimer, and the Abeta42 monomer weakly, but not with the Abeta42 dimer. TAPIR was even detected in samples from young normal subjects and young Tg2576 transgenic mice. Although the Abeta40 level and Abeta40/42 ratio increased, and Abeta42 was significantly decreased in plasma from AD groups when compared to controls, no significant correlations were revealed between plasma Abeta levels and TAPIR grading. Thus an immune response to Abeta40 and immune tolerance to Abeta42 occurred naturally in humans without a close relationship to the Abeta burden in the brain. Clarification of the mechanism of the immune response to Abeta42 is necessary for realization of an immunotherapy for AD. PMID:18534566

  1. Effects of Immediate and Cumulative Syntactic Experience in Language Impairment: Evidence from Priming of Subject Relatives in Children with SLI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garraffa, Maria; Coco, Moreno I.; Branigan, Holly P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the production of subject relative clauses (SRc) in Italian pre-school children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and age-matched typically-developing children (TD) controls. In a structural priming paradigm, children described pictures after hearing the experimenter produce a bare noun or an SRc description, as part of a…

  2. Deformation-based brain morphometry to track the course of alcoholism: differences between intra-subject and inter-subject analysis.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2006-03-31

    Substantial changes in brain morphology mark the course of alcoholism from development through dependence, recovery, and relapse. These changes can be characterized with deformation-based morphometry, which quantifies shape differences between anatomical structures, either in different subjects (cross-sectional) or in the same subject over time (longitudinal). Here we present analyses of data from a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study on the effects of alcoholism on brain structure. Images were acquired from alcoholic women (n=7, mean age 47.8+/-8.3 years) and age-matched control women (n=16, mean age 51.2+/-7.5 years). From each subject, we acquired two structural MR brain images, separated by approximately 2 years (mean 21.6+/-7 months). We performed two types of morphometry using log-Jacobian maps of inter-subject and intra-subject nonrigid coordinate transformations, justified by the invariance of relevant statistics (mean, standard deviation, z-score, and t-test) under changes of the spatial and temporal reference coordinate system. With all images from one time point, a cross-sectional inter-subject morphometry determined group differences between alcoholics and normal controls. We compared these results with longitudinal intra-subject morphometry based on two images per subject acquired at different times (approximately 2 years apart). Inter- and intra-subject analysis produced partially conflicting results. Whereas the intra-subject analysis indicated faster ventricular volume increases in the alcoholics (+11% per year) than in the controls (+2% per year), the inter-subject analysis showed, on average, smaller absolute ventricle volumes in the alcoholics than in the controls (-33% relative volume). These differences were confirmed by manual planimetry and were statistically significant whether tested based on difference or change, integrated over the volume of the ventricles. Other changes and group differences were consistent between the

  3. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid temperature analysis using MR diffusion-weighted imaging thermometry in Parkinson's disease patients, multiple system atrophy patients, and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Kaoru; Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho; Sakai, Koji; Nippashi, Yasumasa; Sone, Daichi; Yokoyama, Kota; Ito, Kimiteru; Maikusa, Norihide; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kei; Murata, Miho; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined the temperature of the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (Tv) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and those with multiple system atrophy (MSA) in comparison with healthy subjects, and we examined normal changes in this temperature with aging. Methods Tv was estimated by magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) thermometry in 36 PD patients (19 males, 17 females), 34 MSA patients (17 males, 17 females), 64 age-matched controls (27 men, 37 women), and 114 all-age adult controls (47 men, 67 women; 28–89 years old). The volume of lateral ventricles was also estimated using FreeSurfer in all subjects. Tv and ventricular volume data were compared among the PD and MSA patients and age-matched controls. We also evaluated the relationship between Tv and age in the 114 all-age controls, controlling for ventricular volume. Men and women were analyzed separately. Results The male PD and MSA patients had significantly higher Tv values compared to the male controls, with no significant difference in ventricular volume among them. There was no significant difference in Tv between the female patients and controls. In the all-age male controls, there was a significant negative correlation between Tv and age controlling for ventricular volume, and this was not observed in the women. Conclusion DWI thermometry is a useful and easy method for demonstrating an altered intracranial environment in male patients and healthy controls, but not in females. DWI thermometry can thus be used to help to explore the pathophysiology of Parkinsonian syndromes and to differentiate individuals affected by neurodegenerative disease with autonomic dysfunction from those without it. PMID:26085965

  4. SPM-based count normalization provides excellent discrimination of mild Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment from healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Hammers, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Scheurich, Armin; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Peters, Jürgen; Bartenstein, Peter; Lieb, Klaus; Schreckenberger, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of [(18)F]FDG PET scans between healthy subjects and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) usually require normalization of regional tracer uptake via ROIs defined using additional software. Here, we validate a simple SPM-based method for count normalization. FDG PET scans of 21 mild, 15 very mild AD, 11 aMCI patients and 15 age-matched controls were analyzed. First, we obtained relative increases in the whole patient sample compared to controls (i.e. areas relatively preserved in patients) with proportional scaling to the cerebral global mean (CGM). Next, average absolute counts within the cluster with the highest t-value were extracted. Statistical comparisons of controls versus three patients groups were then performed using count normalization to CGM, sensorimotor cortex (SMC) as standard, and to the cluster-derived counts. Compared to controls, relative metabolism in aMCI patients was reduced by 15%, 20%, and 23% after normalization to CGM, SMC, and cluster-derived counts, respectively, and 11%, 21%, and 25% in mild AD patients. Logistic regression analyses based on normalized values extracted from AD-typical regions showed that the metabolic values obtained using CGM, SMC, and cluster normalization correctly classified 81%, 89% and 92% of aMCI and controls; classification accuracies for AD groups (very mild and mild) were 91%, 97%, and 100%. The proposed algorithm of fully SPM-based count normalization allows for a substantial increase of statistical power in detecting very early AD-associated hypometabolism, and very high accuracy in discriminating mild AD and aMCI from healthy aging. PMID:18691659

  5. The Effect of Labels Only and Labels with Instruction on the Concept Attainment of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normally Developing Boys of School Age. Technical Report No. 301.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargiulo, Richard Michael

    Examined were the effects of verbal labels alone and in combination with two types of instruction on the concept attainment of 80 educable mentally retarded and 80 normal boys of school age matched for mental age. For learning the concept "equilateral triangle" Ss were randomly assigned to one of four experimental treatment conditions: verbal…

  6. The effect of non-steroidal antiandrogen flutamide on luteinizing hormone pulsatile secretion in male-to-female transsexual subjects.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M; Falivene, M R; Carraro, A; Cuttica, C M; Valenti, S; Giordano, G

    1995-06-01

    We evaluated LH pulsatile patterns before and 4 weeks after the oral administration of flutamide (750 mg/day) in 9 male-to-female transsexuals (age range 17-28 yr) requesting gender reassignment. Flutamide was given to explore the feedback role of androgens on the LHRH-LH unit in LH pulsatility in transsexuals. Seven normal age-matched men served as a control group, without receiving flutamide, due to ethical considerations. LH pulsatility was evaluated on samples collected every 15 min for 360 min. FSH, PRL, cortisol, SHBG and sex steroids were evaluated on pooled samples. LH pulses were analyzed by the Santen and Bardin algorithm, slightly modified. No differences in FSH, PRL, total- or free-testosterone, estradiol and SHBG levels were noted between transsexuals and controls. Normal circadian cortisol decline was observed in all subjects. Mean LH levels (p < 0.05) and LH pulses (p < 0.01) were significantly lower in transsexuals. Flutamide induced an increase in mean LH and testosterone levels (p < 0.01). After flutamide administration there was an increase in LH pulse frequency (P < 0.01) and the frequency and amplitude of LH pulses in transsexuals were restored to levels observed in controls. No differences in FSH, PRL or estradiol levels were found after flutamide. These data suggest that a decrease in LH pulse frequency could be an endocrine marker in male-to-female transsexuals. An increase in endogenous androgen negative feed-back could be speculated in these subjects. However, normal testosterone levels indirectly suggest that a normal that a normal qualitative LH secretion is maintained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7594235

  7. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  8. Skin vasoreactivity to insulin iontophoresis is reduced in elderly subjects and is absent in treated non-insulin-dependent diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Cupisti, Adamasco; Ricco, Roberto; Santoro, Gino; Pentimone, Ferdinando; Carpi, Angelo

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the skin vasoreactivity to insulin in normal subjects and in treated non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients. We measured cutaneous perfusion by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) at rest and during skin cathodal iontophoresis (six pulses of 0.1 mA each for 20 s, with 40 s interval between stimulations) of insulin (0.1 ml Humulin R 100 IU/ml diluted 1/10 with of 0.9% saline solution) in 45 healthy subjects (HS), (25 males, 20 females, aged 45 +/- 18 years), and in 15 treated NIDDM patients (13 males), aged 66 +/- 8 years. Fifteen of the HS were used as controls. In these 15 sex- and age-matched HS and in the patients, we assessed also the skin postischemic hyperemia by LDF. In HS cutaneous blood flux response (CBF) to iontophoresis of insulin in saline (expressed as percent changes from baseline) was significantly higher than CBF response to iontophoresis of pure saline (maximum response: 360 +/- 51% versus 172 +/- 42%, respectively; P < 0.001, ANOVA for repeated measures). The maximum "net" CBF response to insulin (response to insulin minus response to saline) showed a negative correlation (r = -0.361; P < 0.01) with age in HS, and resulted significantly lower in the oldest than in the youngest HS (105 +/- 40% versus 307 +/- 45%, respectively; P < 0.01). No significant correlation was observed between the maximum CBF response to saline and the age of subjects. In NIDDM patients the "net" CBF response to insulin iontophoresis resulted significantly lower than in 15 sex- and age-matched control subjects (maximum response: -50 +/- 89% versus 201 +/- 81%, respectively; P < 0.001, ANOVA for repeated measures). No significant difference was observed between diabetics and controls, nor in basal perfusion (6.5 +/- 1.3 IU versus 6.8 +/- 1.7 IU, respectively) neither in the skin postischemic hyperemia (250 +/-14% versus 258 +/- 27%, respectively). These results confirm that insulin iontophoresis induces a skin vasodilatatory effect in normal

  9. Quantitative electroencephalogram of posterior cortical areas of fluent and stuttering participants during reading with normal and altered auditory feedback.

    PubMed

    Rastatter, M P; Stuart, A; Kalinowski, J

    1998-10-01

    In the left and right hemisphere, posterior quantitative electroencephalogram Beta band activity (13.5-25.5 Hz) of seven adult participants who stutter and seven age-matched normal controls was obtained while subjects read text under three experimental conditions of normal auditory feedback, delayed auditory feedback, and frequency-altered feedback. Data were obtained from surface electrodes affixed to the scalp using a commercial electrode cap. Electroencephalogram activity was amplified, band-pass analog-filtered, and then digitized. During nonaltered auditory feedback, stuttering participants displayed Beta band hyperreactivity, with the right temporal-parietal lobe region showing the greatest activity. Under conditions of delayed auditory feedback and frequency-altered auditory feedback, the stuttering participants displayed a decrease in stuttering behavior accompanied by a strong reduction in Beta activity for the posterior-temporal-parietal electrode sites, and the left hemisphere posterior sites evidenced a larger area of reactivity. Such findings suggest than an alteration in the electrical fields of the cortex occurred in the stuttering participants under both conditions, possibly reflecting changes in neurogenerator status or current dipole activity. Further, one could propose that stuttering reflects an anomaly of the sensory-linguistic motor integration wherein each hemisphere generates competing linguistic messages at hyperreactive amplitudes. PMID:9842614

  10. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals.

  11. Oxidative stress in normal-weight obese syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Laura; Galvano, Fabio; Orlandi, Carmine; Bianchi, Alessia; Di Giacomo, Claudia; La Fauci, Luca; Acquaviva, Rosaria; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2010-11-01

    The normal-weight obese (NWO) syndrome was identified in women whose body weight (BW) and BMI are normal but whose fat mass (FM) is >30%. In these subjects, an early inflammatory status has been demonstrated. The aim was to verify whether oxidative stress occurs in NWO. Sixty age-matched white Italian women were studied and subdivided as follows: 20 normal-weight individuals (NW) (BMI <25 kg/m(2); FM% <30%); 20 NWO (BMI <25 kg/m(2); FM% >30%); 20 preobese-obese (OB) (BMI >25 kg/m(2); FM% >30%). Anthropometric, body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) variables, plasma levels of some cytokines, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)), antioxidant nonproteic capacity (ANPC) were measured and compared between groups. Glucose and lipid metabolism parameters were assessed. GSH and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels resulted lower in OB and NWO compared to NW (P < 0.01). LOOH levels resulted higher in OB and NWO (P < 0.01). ANPC in NWO was lower than NW but higher with respect to OB (P < 0.01). Correlation analysis revealed strong associations between GSH levels and BW, BMI, FM% (R = -0.45, at least P < 0.05); waist circumference (W) (R = -0.33, P < 0.05); FFM% (R = 0.45, P < 0.01); IL-1α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-15 (R = -0.39, -0.33, -0.36 -0.34, respectively, P < 0.05); triglycerides (R = -0.416, P < 0.05). LOOH levels were negatively related to FFM% (R = -0.413, P < 0.05) and positively to FM%, IL-15, TNF-α, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides (R = 0.408, R = 0.502, R = 0.341, R = 0.412, R = 0.4036, R = 0.405, R = 0.405, respectively, P < 0.05). The study clearly indicates that NWO, besides being in early inflammatory status, are contextually exposed to an oxidative stress related to metabolic abnormalities occurring in obesity. PMID:20339360

  12. Subjective Visual Vertical and Postural Capability in Children Born Prematurely

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Trousson, Clémence; Baud, Olivier; Biran, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared postural stability and subjective visual vertical performance in a group of very preterm-born children aged 3-4 years and in a group of age-matched full-term children. Materials and Methods A platform (from TechnoConcept) was used to measure postural control in children. Perception of subjective visual vertical was also recorded with posture while the child had to adjust the vertical in the dark or with visual perturbation. Two other conditions (control conditions) were also recorded while the child was on the platform: for a fixation of the vertical bar, and in eyes closed condition. Results Postural performance was poor in preterm-born children compared to that of age-matched full-term children: the surface area, the length in medio-lateral direction and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were significantly larger in the preterm-born children group (p < 0.04, p < 0.01, and p < 0.04, respectively). Dual task in both groups of children significantly affected postural control. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) values were more variable and less precise in preterm-born children. Discussion-Conclusions We suggest that poor postural control as well as perception of verticality observed in preterm-born children could be due to immaturity of the cortical processes involved in the motor control and in the treatment of perception and orientation of verticality. PMID:25790327

  13. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  14. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  15. Neurocognitive Decline in Early-Onset Schizophrenia Compared With ADHD and Normal Controls: Evidence From a 13-Year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Øie, Merete; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2010-01-01

    The issue of neurodegeneration in schizophrenia is controversial. Although most studies indicate that neurocognitive deficits are relatively stable over the course of the illness, conclusions are limited by relatively short follow-up periods and absence of age-matched control groups. Furthermore, nearly all studies deal with adult-onset schizophrenia, and few studies have considered the possible effect of age of onset. The current study represents the first attempt to compare groups of adolescents with schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and normal controls on a comprehensive neurocognitive test battery in a longitudinal design over 13 years. In the baseline study, adolescents with schizophrenia were examined with a broad battery of neurocognitive tests. The comparison groups consisted of adolescents with ADHD and adolescents without a psychiatric diagnosis, between 12 and 18 years of age. In the follow-up study, the schizophrenia group consisted of 15 of the initial 19 individuals, the ADHD group of 19 of the 20 individuals, and the normal comparison group of all 30 individuals. They were reevaluated with the neurocognitive test battery and clinical measures. Subjects with schizophrenia showed a significant decline or arrest in neurocognitive functioning compared with the other 2 groups, particularly in verbal memory, attention, and processing speed. The impairments may be specific to early-onset schizophrenia due to interaction between ongoing brain maturation during adolescence and disease-related mechanisms and/or secondary to neuroleptic treatment in young age and/or social isolation. PMID:18801881

  16. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  17. Morphological analysis of age-related iridocorneal angle changes in normal and glaucomatous cases using anterior segment optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yuko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze age-related morphological changes of the iridocorneal angle in normal subjects and glaucomatous cases, using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Methods This study involved 58 eyes of 58 open-angle glaucoma cases and 72 eyes of 72 age-matched normal-open-angle control subjects. Iridocorneal angle structures in nasal and temporal regions and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured using AS-OCT. Axial length and refractive error were measured by use of an ocular biometer and auto refractor keratometer. Angle opening distance (AOD), angle recess area (ARA), and trabecular-iris space area (TISA), measured at 500 μm (TISA500) and 750 μm (TISA750) distant from the scleral spur, were calculated, in the nasal and temporal regions. A new index, the peripheral angle frame index (PAFI), which represents the peripheral angle structure, was proposed, and was defined as (TISA750-TISA500)/TISA500. Results Refractive power in the glaucoma cases was less than in control cases (P<0.0001). Axial length (P<0.0001) and ACD (P=0.0004) were longer and deeper, respectively, in the glaucoma cases, compared with the control cases. In both control and glaucoma groups, ACD, AOD, ARA, and TISA decreased linearly in an age-dependent manner, while PAFI stayed at relatively constant values throughout the age distribution. AOD in the glaucoma group was longer than in the control group, in both the temporal and nasal regions; ARA and TISA were larger in the glaucoma than in the control group. However, no significant differences in nasal or temporal PAFI were found between the glaucoma and control groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that AS-OCT is useful for the quantitative evaluation of age-related changes in peripheral angle structure in glaucoma and control cases. PMID:24379654

  18. Walking strategies in subjects with congenital or early onset strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Irene; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Padua, Luca; Di Sipio, Enrica; Simbolotti, Chiara; Petroni, Sergio; Tredici, Costanza; Dickmann, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In congenital strabismus, sensory adaptations occur hampering the correct development of normal binocular vision. The aim of this study is to investigate if patients with congenital or early onset exotropic or esotropic strabismus adopt different walking strategies with respect to healthy subjects. Our hypothesis is that the abnormal binocular cooperation, occurring in patients with exotropic or esotropic strabismus, could influence neurosensorial adaptation of the gait pattern. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients were enrolled: 19 with esotropic (ESO) and 6 with exotropic strabismus (EXO). All patients underwent an ophthalmological and orthoptic evaluation. Biomechanical data were collected using a stereophotogrammetric system and a force platform. Twenty-seven age-matched healthy subjects (HS) were used as controls. Results: The comparison between patients with ESO and patients with EXO strabismus showed that the maximal power at the knee and at the ankle was lower in EXO group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). The step width was statistically different between ESO and EXO groups (p < 0.01), lower in patients with ESO and higher in patients with EXO strabismus when compared with HS (though not statistically significant). The deviation angle values showed a relationship with the step width (at the near fixation p < 0.05) and with the maximal power at the knee and at the ankle (at the far fixation for the knee p < 0.001 and for the ankle p < 0.05; at the near fixation for the knee p < 0.05): in the patients with EXO the increased angle deviation is related to larger step width and to lower power at the knee and at the ankle. In the patients with ESO strabismus this relationship is less robust. Discussion: Patients with EXO and ESO strabismus adopt different strategies to compensate their walking difficulties, and these strategies are likely due to an expanded binocular visual field in patients with EXO and to a reduced visual field in

  19. Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Insertion in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Kim, Tae-Woo; Weinreb, Robert N.; Lee, Eun Ji; Girard, Michaël J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) whether there are differences in the location of the anterior lamina cribrosa insertion (ALI) in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and healthy subjects. Methods Fifty three eyes from 53 patients with POAG, and 53 eyes from 53 age-matched healthy subjects were included prospectively in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Twelve radial line B-scans centered on the optic disc in every half-clock-hour meridian were acquired using SS-OCT. The ALI position was assessed by measuring two parameters: (1) ALI distance (ALID)—the distance from the anterior scleral canal opening (ASCO) to the ALI; and (2) marginal anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (mALCSD)—the perpendicular distance from the ASCO plane to the anterior lamina cribrosa surface. These parameters were compared between the two groups for each meridian. Results Both ALID (256±54 vs. 209±37 µm, mean ± SD, p<0.001) and mALCSD (232±63 vs. 187±40 µm, p<0.001) were significantly greater in the POAG group than in the normal group. The largest difference was observed at the 6.5 o′clock and 11.5 o′clock meridians for both ALID and mALCSD. Multiple regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between age and both ALID and mALCSD in the control group, and a negative correlation between mean deviation of the visual field test and both ALID and mALCSD in the POAG group. Conclusions The ALI was displaced posteriorly in eyes with POAG compared to those of healthy controls. This finding suggests that the posteriorly located lamina cribrosa insertion is an important component of glaucomatous optic nerve excavation. PMID:25531761

  20. The APOE Genotype in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mehlig, Kirsten; Rosengren, Annika; Torén, Kjell; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wikkelsö, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amyloid plaque has been reported in brain biopsies from patients with idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and proposed as a significant feature of the pathophysiology. Presence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) allele is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aims To compare the distribution of APOE genotype in iNPH patients with an age-matched population-based control group and with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Methods APOE genotype frequencies were determined in 77 iNPH patients (50 men and 27 women, mean age 71.7 years) diagnosed with iNPH, a sample of 691 AD patients and 638 age-matched population controls (299 men and 339 women) from the INTERGENE cohort. Results The APOE distribution did not differ significantly between the iNPH patients and the control population. The per e4-allele odds-ratio (OR) of iNPH was given by OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.50, 1.60) that was considerably smaller than the per-allele OR of AD, OR = 5.34 (4.10, 7.00). Conclusion The results suggest that the APOE-related risk of AD in patients with iNPH is not higher than in the general population. PMID:27441602

  1. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  2. Some determinants of postprandial lipaemia in Nigerian diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Akanji, A O; Nzegwu, A A; Agbedana, E O

    1992-07-01

    The efficiency of clearance of plasma triacylglycerols (TAG) after fatty meals in non-diabetic Caucasian subjects is believed to determine the plasma level of high-density-lipoproteins-cholesterol (HDL-C). It is unknown if this observation holds in diabetic subjects and in other racial groups. In assessing the factors that determine TAG responses to acute fat loading in a tropical African population with a low prevalence of atherosclerotic disease, twenty (nine obese) non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDDM) patients with optimal glycaemic control and twelve (six obese) age-matched non-diabetic subjects were given meals containing 50 g fat (in butter) and 75 g carbohydrate (in white bread) over 15 min in the morning after a 12 h overnight fast. The fasting plasma levels of glucose, TAG, total cholesterol (total-C), HDL-C, low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol, insulin and glycosylated haemoglobin (HBAlc) were estimated; glucose and TAG levels were also measured postprandially for 8 h at 2 h intervals. Postprandial lipaemia was consistently higher in the diabetic patients (about 50-100% more than values obtained in the non-diabetic subjects, even when corrected for differences in body mass) and correlated positively with age and postprandial glycaemia. This defect in TAG clearance was even worse (by about 50%) when glucose tolerance became further impaired after ten of the diabetic patients stopped oral hypoglycaemic treatment for 1 week and the fat-tolerance test was repeated. In the obese non-diabetic subjects, but not those of normal weight, there were significant negative relationships between the postprandial lipaemia and fasting plasma levels of HDL-C and HDL-C: total-C ratio, as reported in Caucasians. It is concluded that age and the ambient glucose concentration appear to be the important determinants of the efficiency of TAG clearance in diabetic subjects. This accords with clinical observations of increased atherogenic liability with increasing age and poorer

  3. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  4. Predictors of the short-term effect of isoleucine-proline-proline/valine-proline-proline lactotripeptides from casein on office and ambulatory blood pressure in subjects with pharmacologically untreated high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicero, A F G; Rosticci, M; Ferroni, A; Bacchelli, S; Veronesi, M; Strocchi, E; Borghi, C

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the predictors of Isoleucine-Proline-Proline/Valine-Proline-Proline (IPP-VPP) lactotripeptides (LTPs) antihypertensive effect in the context of a short-term large double-blind randomized clinical trial involving 164 pharmacologically untreated subjects in primary prevention for cardiovascular disease. When compared with the baseline, office systolic blood pressure (SBP) (-3.42 mm Hg, P < .001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (-2.35 mm Hg, P < .001) significantly decreased, in the LTP-treated patients only. No significant change in predictors during the study of ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) parameters was observed. A short-term supplementation with LTPs significantly improves the office SBP and DBP, especially in male subjects. The main predictor of LTP antihypertensive effect was the baseline BP. PMID:22574612

  5. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  6. [Translation and validation of the Revised Social Anhedonia Scale (SAS Social Anhedonia Scale, M.L. Eckblad, L.J. Chapman et al., 1982). Study of the internal and concurrent validity in 126 normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, C S; Bungener, C; Pierson, A; Jouvent, R; Widlöcher, D

    1995-01-01

    The Revised Social Anhedonia Scale (SAS) with 40 items (Eckblad et al., 1982) which studies the social dimension of anhedonia has been validated in the United-States (Mishlove & Chapman, 1985). However, no french translation and validation of this scale has been made to date. This work presents the french translation of the Social Anhedonia Scale and its validation. After a back-translation and final adjustment, it has been submitted to a sample of 126 control subjects from the general population. Furthermore, they were asked to fill two other scales: the Chapman Physical Anhedonia (PAS) with 61 items and the Fawcett Pleasure Scale (36 items), both of them exploring the subjects answer in terms of anhedonia/hedonia towards social, sensorial and/or physical experiences. The internal validity has been determined on the one hand by the Cronbach alpha coefficient which showed a strong unidimensional characteristic (0.80) and the other hand by the correlation of each item with the total score using the point biserial coefficient which ranged from .204 to .559. The concurrent validation has been determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient between the french version of social anhedonia scale and the french version of physical anhedonia scale. The values were .42, p = .001. Furthermore, this two scales are significant inversely correled to the french version of the pleasure scale: r = -.22, p = .0125 for the first, and r = -.26, p = .0027 for the second. The internal and concurrent validity of the french version of the revised social anhedonia scale should allow to improve our understanding of anhedonia in psychiatry and psychopathology. PMID:8674468

  7. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Aims Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. Method The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. Results In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. Conclusion DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality. PMID:26766911

  8. Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of right and left ventricular function during exercise after repair of transposition of the great arteries. Comparison with normal subjects and patients with congenitally corrected transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, M.D.; Graham, T.P. Jr.; Bender, H.W.; Jones, J.P.; Patton, J.; Partain, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    We assessed the incidence, clinical significance and etiology of ventricular dysfunction after intraatrial repair of d-transposition of the great arteries in 11 patients, mean age 9 +/- 3 years, who had had Mustard operations. We compared the results to 15 patients who were considered to have normal ventricular function, two patients who had Rastelli operations and five patients with congenitally corrected transposition. Gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography with supine exercise stress testing was used to assess these children. We found no significant difference between our patient groups in exercise capacity, heart rate, or blood pressure response to exercise. However, we found a high incidence of right ventricular dysfunction in the patient groups, manifested by an abnormal right ventricular ejection fraction response to dysfunction in the patient groups, manifested by an abnormal right ventricular ejection fraction response to exercise in six of 11 patients with a Mustard repair, both patients with a Rastelli repair and all five with congenitally corrected transposition. In addition, the left ventricular response to exercise was abnormal in 10 of 11 patients who had undergone a Mustard repair, both patients with a Rastelli repair, and two of five patients with congenitally corrected transposition. We conclude that biventricular dysfunction is frequently present after intraatrial repair of d-transposition of the great arteries. Despite this dysfunction, no significant decrease in exercise tolerance is found in childhood.

  9. Difference in growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) testing following GHRH subacute treatment in normal aging and growth hormone-deficient adults: possible perspectives for therapeutic use of GHRH or its analogs in elderly subjects?

    PubMed

    Iovino, M; Triggiani, V; Giagulli, V A; Iovine, N; Licchelli, B; Resta, F; Sabbà, C; Tafaro, E; Solimando, A; Tommasicchio, A; Guastamacchia, E

    2011-06-01

    The somatotroph axis function shows a decline in the elderly (somatopause). In particular growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) is reduced in aged man but less than that observed in GH-deficient adults (GHDAs). Plasma GH response to GHRH (1 µg/kg BW) was significantly lower in four GHDAs than in seven healthy aged men 30, 60, and 90 min after acute GHRH administration. To verify whether a priming regimen might be able to increase the reduced GH response to GHRH, both healthy aged men and GHDA patients underwent repetitive administration of GHRH (100 µg GHRH intravenously as a single morning dose, every 2 days for 12 days). After the GHRH-priming regimen, plasma GH values 30, 60, and 90 min after the acute GHRH test were significantly higher than values at the corresponding time points before priming regimen in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. These findings confirmed that somatotroph cells become less sensitive to GHRH with normal aging and demonstrate that repetitive administration of GHRH restores the attenuated response only in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. This could support the possible use of GHRH or its analogs instead of recombinant human GH in elderly patients with the advantage of preserving the endogenous pulses of GH with the secretion of the different isoforms of GH. However, concerns arise about the possible role of these molecules in tumorigenesis and tumor growth promotion. PMID:20843274

  10. Intestinal mucins from normal subjects and patients with cystic fibrosis. Variable contents of the disulphide-bound 118 kDa glycoprotein and different reactivities with an anti-(118 kDa glycoprotein) antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Stewart, G

    1989-01-01

    1. A specific antibody was developed against the disulphide-bound 118 kDa glycoprotein of human intestinal mucin and used to establish an e.l.i.s.a. Fourteen purified mucins [eight normal (N) and six cystic fibrosis (CF)] had the same affinity for the antibody in the e.l.i.s.a., but their relative immunoreactivities varied widely (approx. 100,000-fold). In general, CF mucins were more antigenic than N mucins. 2. Variations (approx. 10-fold) were detected in the 118 kDa glycoprotein content of both N and CF mucins (assessed from Coomassie Blue-stained polyacrylamide gels), but these did not appear to be responsible for the differences in mucin immunoreactivity. 3. Variations (approx. 6-fold) were also observed in the size of the 118 kDa peak produced by N and CF mucins on Western blots. These were mostly due to differences in the 118 kDa glycoprotein content of mucins, although a small proportion resulted from changes in the number of antigenic determinants within individual 118 kDa glycoproteins. 4. After concanavalin A affinity chromatography of four reduced mucins (two N and two CF), purified 118 kDa glycoprotein was recovered in the bound fractions from the column, specifically eluted by methyl alpha-mannoside. 5. The amounts of 118 kDa glycoprotein isolated from the four mucins varied as predicted from the size of their 118 kDa bands on Coomassie Blue-stained gels. 6. Three 118 kDa glycoproteins (one N and two CF) showed almost identical reactivity in the e.l.i.s.a.; the fourth had fewer antigenic determinants. 7. Since differences in 118 kDa glycoprotein content and in the number of antigenic determinants within the 118 kDa glycoprotein did not account for variations in the reactivity of native mucins in the e.l.i.s.a., it appeared that accessibility of the 118 kDa glycoprotein to antibody binding may be critical in determining mucin immunoreactivity. This suggests that the three-dimensional conformation of CF mucins may differ from that of N mucins, leading

  11. Training and transfer-of-learning effects in disabled and normal readers: evidence of specific deficits.

    PubMed

    Benson, N J; Lovett, M W; Kroeber, C L

    1997-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the specificity of training and transfer deficits in disabled readers, aged 7 to 9 years. Forty-eight children (reading disabled, age-matched normal controls, and reading-level-matched normal controls) participated in both a reading and a nonreading (music) acquisition paradigm. Children received instruction in grapheme-phoneme and symbol-note correspondence patterns, respectively. Posttraining tests (one day and one week) following rule training compared performance on trained exemplar items with performance on untrained transfer items. Results revealed that normal readers were able to transfer their rule knowledge in both the reading and nonreading (music) acquisition paradigms, while disabled readers were proficient only in the music task, and thus demonstrated transfer deficits specific to learning printed language. Transfer was optimally facilitated for all readers when training procedures included not only presentation of exemplars, but also cues for rule derivation and explicit statement of pattern invariances. PMID:9073377

  12. The vortex formation time to diastolic function relation: assessment of pseudonormalized versus normal filling.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2013-11-01

    In early diastole, the suction pump feature of the left ventricle opens the mitral valve and aspirates atrial blood. The ventricle fills via a blunt profiled cylindrical jet of blood that forms an asymmetric toroidal vortex ring inside the ventricle whose growth has been quantified by the standard (dimensionless) expression for vortex formation time, VFTstandard = {transmitral velocity time integral}/{mitral orifice diameter}. It can differentiate between hearts having distinguishable early transmitral (Doppler E-wave) filling patterns. An alternative validated expression, VFTkinematic reexpresses VFTstandard by incorporating left heart, near "constant-volume pump" physiology thereby revealing VFTkinematic's explicit dependence on maximum rate of longitudinal chamber expansion (E'). In this work, we show that VFTkinematic can differentiate between hearts having indistinguishable E-wave patterns, such as pseudonormal (PN; 0.75 < E/A < 1.5 and E/E' > 8) versus normal. Thirteen age-matched normal and 12 PN data sets (738 total cardiac cycles), all having normal LVEF, were selected from our Cardiovascular Biophysics Laboratory database. Doppler E-, lateral annular E'-waves, and M-mode data (mitral leaflet separation, chamber dimension) was used to compute VFTstandard and VFTkinematic. VFTstandard did not differentiate between groups (normal [3.58 ± 1.06] vs. PN [4.18 ± 0.79], P = 0.13). In comparison, VFTkinematic for normal (3.15 ± 1.28) versus PN (4.75 ± 1.35) yielded P = 0.006. Hence, the applicability of VFTkinematic for diastolic function quantitation has been broadened to include analysis of PN filling patterns in age-matched groups. PMID:24400169

  13. The anabolic activity of bone tissue, suppressed by disuse, is normalized by brief exposure to extremely low-magnitude mechanical stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, C.; Xu, G.; Judex, S.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally believed that mechanical signals must be large in order to be anabolic to bone tissue. Recent evidence indicates, however, that extremely low-magnitude (<10 microstrain) mechanical signals readily stimulate bone formation if induced at a high frequency. We examined the ability of extremely low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical signals to restore anabolic bone cell activity inhibited by disuse. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to six groups: baseline control, age-matched control, mechanically stimulated for 10 min/day, disuse (hind limb suspension), disuse interrupted by 10 min/day of weight bearing, and disuse interrupted by 10 min/day of mechanical stimulation. After a 28 day protocol, bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia of mechanically stimulated rats increased compared with age-matched control (+97%). Disuse alone reduced BFR (-92%), a suppression only slightly curbed when disuse was interrupted by 10 min of weight bearing (-61%). In contrast, disuse interrupted by 10 min per day of low-level mechanical intervention normalized BFR to values seen in age-matched controls. This work indicates that this noninvasive, extremely low-level stimulus may provide an effective biomechanical intervention for the bone loss that plagues long-term space flight, bed rest, or immobilization caused by paralysis.

  14. Alternative normalization methods demonstrate widespread cortical hypometabolism in untreated de novo Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    BERTI, V.; POLITO, C.; BORGHAMMER, P.; RAMAT, S.; MOSCONI, L.; VANZI, E.; DE CRISTOFARO, M. T.; DE LEON, M.; SORBI, S.; PUPI, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previous positron emission tomography (PET) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) studies in Parkinson’s disease (PD) demonstrated that moderate to late stage patients display widespread cortical hypometabolism, whereas early stage PD patients exhibit little or no cortical changes. However, recent studies suggested that conventional data normalization procedures may not always be valid, and demonstrated that alternative normalization strategies better allow detection of low magnitude changes. We hypothesized that these alternative normalization procedures would disclose more widespread metabolic alterations in de novo PD. Methods [18F]FDG PET scans of 26 untreated de novo PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage I-II) and 21 age-matched controls were compared using voxel-based analysis. Normalization was performed using gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) reference regions and Yakushev normalization. Results Compared to GM normalization, WM and Yakushev normalization procedures disclosed much larger cortical regions of relative hypometabolism in the PD group with extensive involvement of frontal and parieto-temporal-occipital cortices, and several subcortical structures. Furthermore, in the WM and Yakushev normalized analyses, stage II patients displayed more prominent cortical hypometabolism than did stage I patients. Conclusion The use of alternative normalization procedures, other than GM, suggests that much more extensive cortical hypometabolism is present in untreated de novo PD patients than hitherto reported. The finding may have implications for our understanding of the basic pathophysiology of early-stage PD. PMID:22695340

  15. Tactile stimulation during development alters the neuroanatomical organization of the optic nerve in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Horiquini-Barbosa, Everton; Lachat, João-José

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the progressive effect of tactile stimulation in the cytoarchitecture of the optic nerve of normal rats during early postnatal development. We used 36 male pups which were randomly assigned to either the tactile-stimulated group (TS-stimulation for 3 min, once a day, from postnatal day (P) 1 to 32) or the non-tactile-stimulated (NTS) group. Morphological analysis were performed to evaluate the alterations caused by tactile stimulation, and morphometric analysis were carried out to determine whether the observed changes in optic nerve cytoarchitecture were significantly different between groups and at three different ages (P18, P22, and P32), thereby covering the entire progression of development of the optic nerve from its start to its completion. The rats of both groups presented similar increase in body weight. The morphometric analysis revealed no difference in the astrocyte density between age-matched groups; however, the oligodendrocyte density of TS group was higher compared to the NTS at P22, and P32, but not at P18. The optic nerve of TS group showed an increase of blood vessels and a reduction of damage fiber density when compared to the age-matched pups of NTS. Taken together, these findings support the view that tactile stimulation, an enriching experience, can positively affects the neuroanatomy of the brain, modifying its cellular components by progressive morphological and morphometric changes. PMID:26879768

  16. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  17. Normal vector magnetocardiogram. I. Correlation with the normal vector ECG.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, J; Oja, S; Malmivuo, J

    1994-07-01

    The vector magnetocardiogram (VMCG) has been measured with the corrected unipositional VMCG lead system and analyzed statistically in 290 normal subjects. The morphologic study of the QRS waveforms showed that in the right-to-left (X) component, the triphasic qRs waveform appeared in 55% of the subjects. The superoinferior (Y) component was characterized by a prominent S wave in 96% of the subjects, and the anteroposterior (Z) component was also characterized by a prominent S wave in 95% . The VMGs were compared with the vector electrocardiograms (VECG) recorded in a subgroup of 200 subjects, in whom both the VMCG and VECG were available for computer analysis. The normal variability of the spatial vector magnitude measurements was significantly greater in the VMCG than in the VECG. Some similarities were observed in the waveforms of the time-averaged QRS complexes between the VMCG and VECG. Multiple linear regression analysis between the VMCG and VECG showed that maximally 27, 45, and 41% of the variation in the instantaneous QRS X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VMCG, respectively, could be explained by the instantaneous X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VECG. PMID:7930985

  18. [Normal aging and cognition].

    PubMed

    Ska, Bernadette; Joanette, Yves

    2006-03-01

    It is now well documented that normal aging modifies the cognitive functioning and most observations suggest that cognition evolves in the direction of deterioration. The more frequently impaired functions are memory, attention and visual-spatial abilities. On the other hand, some abilities seem to increase, such as vocabulary. Considering the aging effect on cognition, questions remain regarding directionality, universality and reversibility. A great variability in aged related impacts is observed among subjects and among cognitive domains. Some individuals evolved more rapidly than others. Some cognitive functions are more affected by aging than others. General and specific factors are hypothesized to explain the aged related cognitive decline. Among them, educational level, health, cognitive style, life style, personality, are likely to modulate the aged related cognitive evolution by influencing attentional resources and cerebral plasticity. Cognitive resources are essential to develop adaptative strategies. During the life span, resources are activated and increased by learning and training. Considering the role of cognitive resources, successful aging is dependent on several conditions : absence of disease leading to a loss of autonomy, maintenance of cognitive and physical activities, and active and social engaged lifestyle. PMID:16527210

  19. Eyeblink conditioning is impaired in subjects with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Kronenbuerger, Martin; Gerwig, Marcus; Brol, Beate; Block, Frank; Timmann, Dagmar

    2007-06-01

    Several lines of evidence point to an involvement of the olivo-cerebellar system in the pathogenesis of essential tremor (ET), with clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction being present in some subjects in the advanced stage. Besides motor coordination, the cerebellum is critically involved in motor learning. Evidence of motor learning deficits would strengthen the hypothesis of olivo-cerebellar involvement in ET. Conditioning of the eyeblink reflex is a well-established paradigm to assess motor learning. Twenty-three ET subjects (13 males, 10 females; mean age 44.3 +/- 22.3 years, mean disease duration 17.4 +/- 17.3 years) and 23 age-matched healthy controls were studied on two consecutive days using a standard delay eyeblink conditioning protocol. Six ET subjects exhibited accompanying clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Care was taken to examine subjects without medication affecting central nervous functioning. Seven ET subjects and three controls on low-dose beta-blocker treatments, which had no effect on eyeblink conditioning in animal studies, were allowed into the study. The ability to acquire conditioned eyeblink responses was significantly reduced in ET subjects compared with controls. Impairment of eyeblink conditioning was not due to low-dose beta-blocker medication. Additionally, acquisition of conditioned eyeblink response was reduced in ET subjects regardless of the presence of cerebellar signs in clinical examination. There were no differences in timing or extinction of conditioned responses between groups and conditioning deficits did not correlate with the degree of tremor or ataxia as rated by clinical scores. The findings of disordered eyeblink conditioning support the hypothesis that ET is caused by a functional disturbance of olivo-cerebellar circuits which may cause cerebellar dysfunction. In particular, results point to an involvement of the olivo-cerebellar system in early stages of ET. PMID:17468116

  20. Plasma and macular responses to lutein supplement in subjects with and without age-related maculopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hui-Hiang; Murray, Ian J; Nolan, Daniel; Carden, Dave; Feather, Jim; Beatty, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence which suggests that macular pigment (MP), which is entirely of dietary origin, protects against age-related maculopathy. We evaluated the effect of a daily 20 mg lutein ester (equivalent of 10 mg/day free lutein) supplement in patients with early age-related maculopathy (ARM), in terms of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and plasma concentrations of lutein. MPOD was measured using a flicker photometric technique in seven ARM sufferers and six age-matched controls over a period of supplementation which lasted 18-20 weeks. Plasma lutein increased from a mean (SD) baseline concentration of 182 (127)ng ml(-1) to a peak of 1077 (165)ng ml(-1) in ARM patients, and from 152 (57) to 1110 (605)ng ml(-1) in control subjects. Mean MPOD had increased significantly from baseline of 0.24 to a peak of 0.31 in ARM sufferers. This mean increment of 0.07 was the same for the age-matched controls (baseline: 0.20; peak: 0.27). The augmentation of MP, and plasma concentrations of lutein, following supplementation in subjects with ARM provides the first evidence the disease is not associated with intestinal malabsorption of the relevant macular carotenoids, and that a diseased macula can accumulate and stabilise lutein and/or zeaxanthin. Furthermore, these results suggest that the beneficial effects of lutein supplementation, if any, may be extended to subjects with established ARM. PMID:15183097

  1. Comparisons of attitudes and practices between obese and normal weight women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shene-Pin; Chiang, Tzu-Yin; Yeh, Sung-Ling; Chien, Yi-Wen

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain baseline data regarding self-reported body image, attitudes toward overweight people, and dietary behaviors of normal-weight and obese women in Taiwan. Fifty obese women (BMI >= 27) and age-matched normal-weight women participated in this study. Written questionnaires were used for data collection. Simple frequency and t-test were used to analyze data. In general, the majority of normal-weight women perceived themselves as being heavier than their actual body weight. The normal-weight group had more high inaccurate images of their bodies than that of the obese group (72% vs. 24%). Obese and normal-weight women had similar attitudes to overweight people, but some of their attitudes showed significant differences. Obese women would prefer to consume more fried foods and drink sugar-containing foods than would normal-weight women (p < 0.05). Education about accurate perceptions of what is normal weight for women and adopting energy-diluted foods for obese women is needed in the future. PMID:17704039

  2. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  3. Is My Penis Normal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Is My Penis Normal? KidsHealth > For Teens > Is My Penis Normal? Print A A A Text Size en ... any guy who's ever worried about whether his penis is a normal size. There's a fairly wide ...

  4. Do normal hips dislocate?

    PubMed

    Alshameeri, Zeiad; Rehm, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    There have been a small number of case reports describing late normal-hip dislocations in children who were later diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip. Here, we contest the assumption that normal hips can dislocate. We argue that (as in our case) the ultrasound scans in all published case reports on late dislocated normal hips did not show results that were entirely normal and therefore, so far, there has been no convincing evidence of a dislocation of a normal hip. We also want to highlight the importance of meticulous ultrasound and clinical assessments of high-risk children by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:25144883

  5. Wide-ranging alterations in the brain fatty acid complement of subjects with late Alzheimer’s disease as detected by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Nasaruddin, Muhammad Luqman; Hölscher, Christian; Kehoe, Patrick; Graham, Stewart Francis; Green, Brian Desmond

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed lipid metabolism is a well-established feature of human Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The present study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMES) to profile all detectable fatty acid (FA) species present in post-mortem neocortical tissue (Brodmann 7 region). Quantitative targeted analysis was undertaken from 29 subjects (n=15 age-matched controls; n=14 late-stage AD). GC-MS analysis of FAMES detected a total of 24 FAs and of these, 20 were fully quantifiable. The results showed significant and wide ranging elevations in AD brain FA concentrations. A total of 9 FAs were elevated in AD with cis-13,16-docosenoic acid increased most (170%; P=0.033). Intriguingly, docosahexanoic acid (DHA; C22:6) concentrations were elevated (47%; P=0.018) which conflicts with the findings of others (unaltered or decreased) in some brain regions after the onset of AD. Furthermore, our results appear to indicate that subject gender influences brain FA levels in AD subjects (but not in age-matched control subjects). Among AD subjects 7 FA species were significantly higher in males than in females. These preliminary findings pinpoint FA disturbances as potentially important in the pathology of AD. Further work is required to determine if such changes are influenced by disease severity or different types of dementia. PMID:27069549

  6. Wide-ranging alterations in the brain fatty acid complement of subjects with late Alzheimer's disease as detected by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Nasaruddin, Muhammad Luqman; Hölscher, Christian; Kehoe, Patrick; Graham, Stewart Francis; Green, Brian Desmond

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed lipid metabolism is a well-established feature of human Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMES) to profile all detectable fatty acid (FA) species present in post-mortem neocortical tissue (Brodmann 7 region). Quantitative targeted analysis was undertaken from 29 subjects (n=15 age-matched controls; n=14 late-stage AD). GC-MS analysis of FAMES detected a total of 24 FAs and of these, 20 were fully quantifiable. The results showed significant and wide ranging elevations in AD brain FA concentrations. A total of 9 FAs were elevated in AD with cis-13,16-docosenoic acid increased most (170%; P=0.033). Intriguingly, docosahexanoic acid (DHA; C22:6) concentrations were elevated (47%; P=0.018) which conflicts with the findings of others (unaltered or decreased) in some brain regions after the onset of AD. Furthermore, our results appear to indicate that subject gender influences brain FA levels in AD subjects (but not in age-matched control subjects). Among AD subjects 7 FA species were significantly higher in males than in females. These preliminary findings pinpoint FA disturbances as potentially important in the pathology of AD. Further work is required to determine if such changes are influenced by disease severity or different types of dementia. PMID:27069549

  7. Bicervical Normal Uterus with Normal Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, CE; Anele, TI; Onyejelam, CC

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of the form of uterine anomaly involving a dual cervical canal in a side-by-side disposition with normal uterine cavity and normal vagina. It portrays a form of congenital uterine anomaly not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. However, there has been a proposed reclassification of mullerian anomalies, which includes this type of anomaly under Type IIIc. The patient was a 31-year-old woman being managed for “secondary infertility.” To report a case of uterine anomaly that is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, only few cases of bicervical normal uterus with normal vagina exist in the literature; one of the cases had an anterior-posterior disposition. This form of uterine abnormality is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies and suggests that a complex interplay of events beyond the classical postulate gives rise to the female genital tract. PMID:25364608

  8. Comparative proteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid between living and post mortem ALS and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    RANGANATHAN, SRIKANTH; NICHOLL, GEORGINA C.B.; HENRY, SARAH; LUTKA, FRAN; SATHANOORI, RAMASRI; LACOMIS, DAVID; BOWSER, ROBERT

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), lack definitive diagnostic tests or biomarkers of disease progression. Most studies that investigate protein abnormalities in ALS have used biofluids such as blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while some have used post mortem tissue or CSF samples. Since ALS disease progression and post mortem effects probably induce significant alterations to protein modifications or proteolysis, we directly examined the CSF proteome from ALS subjects at various lengths of time from symptom onset and at autopsy by mass spectrometry based proteomics. CSF was also obtained from both healthy age-matched control subjects and at autopsy from healthy and Alzheimer's disease (AD) controls. We identified significant differences in the CSF proteome between living and post mortem ALS subjects, as well as living and post mortem control subjects. We also noted differences in the CSF proteome of ALS subjects that have exhibited symptoms for varying lengths of time and between ALS and AD subjects at end-stage of disease. This is the first study describing differences in the CSF proteome from post mortem and living ALS subjects using a mass spectrometric approach. These differences highlight the importance of utilizing CSF from living ALS subjects near the time of symptom onset for the identification of early protein biomarkers, although some protein alterations that occur early in the disease process are maintained throughout the course of disease and in post mortem samples. PMID:17852009

  9. N-acetylaspartate normalization in bipolar depression after lamotrigine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Croarkin, Paul E; Thomas, M Albert; Port, John D; Baruth, Joshua M; Choi, Doo-Sup; Abulseoud, Osama A; Frye, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a general marker of neuronal viability, and total NAA (tNAA), the combined signal of NAA and N-acetylaspartylglutamate, in bipolar depression before and after lamotrigine treatment. Given that NAA is synthesized through direct acetylation of aspartate by acetyl-coenzyme A-L-aspartate-N-acetyltransferase, we hypothesized that treatment with lamotrigine would be associated with an increase in NAA level. Methods Patients with bipolar depression underwent two-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the anterior cingulate at baseline (n = 15) and after 12 weeks of lamotrigine treatment (n = 10). A group of age-matched healthy controls (n = 9) underwent scanning at baseline for comparison. Results At baseline, patients with bipolar depression had significantly lower NAA [mean standard deviation (SD) = 1.13 (0.21); p = 0.02] than controls [mean (SD) = 1.37 (0.27)]. Significant increases in NAA [mean (SD) = 1.39 (0.21); p = 0.01] and tNAA [mean (SD) = 1.61 (0.25); p = 0.02] levels were found after 12 weeks of lamotrigine treatment. Conclusions These data suggest an NAA deficit in bipolar depression that is normalized after lamotrigine treatment. Future research is warranted to evaluate whether baseline NAA level is a potential biomarker for identifying lamotrigine response patterns and whether this functional brain change has an associated clinical response. PMID:25495884

  10. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  11. Cubic-normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gan Chew; Hin, Pooi Ah; Ho, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The power-normal distribution given in Yeo and Johnson in year 2000 is a unimodal distribution with wide ranges of skewness and kurtosis. A shortcoming of the power-normal distribution is that the negative and positve parts of the underlying random variable have to be specified by two different expressions of the standard normal random variable. In this paper, we construct a new distribution, called the cubic-normal distribution, via a single polynomial expression in cubic root function. Apart from having the properties which are similar to those of the power-normal distribution, this cubic-normal distribution can be developed into a multivariate version which is more attractive from the theoretical and computational points of view.

  12. Perspectives on Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, S. Kenneth; Fiorelli, Joseph S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the principle of normalization for developmentally disabled persons from five viewpoints: empirical approaches, social integration, specialization and congregation, cultural norms, and prevention. (Author/CL)

  13. Preliminary findings suggest the number and volume of supragranular and infragranular pyramidal neurons are similar in the anterior superior temporal area of control subjects and subjects with autism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Esther; Camacho, Jasmin; Combs, Zachary; Ariza, Jeanelle; Lechpammer, Mirna; Noctor, Stephen; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the cytoarchitecture of the anterior superior temporal area (TA2) of the postmortem cerebral cortex in 9 subjects with autism and 9 age-matched typically developing subjects between the ages of 13 and 56 years. The superior temporal gyrus is involved in auditory processing and social cognition and its pathology has been correlated with autism. We quantified the number and soma volume of pyramidal neurons in the supragranular layers and pyramidal neurons in the infragranular layers in each subject. We did not find significant differences in the number or volume of supragranular or infragranular neurons in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism compared to typically developing subjects. This report does not support an alteration of supragranular to infragranular neurons in autism. However, further stereological analysis of the number of cells and cell volumes in specific cortical areas is needed to better establish the cellular phenotype of the autistic cerebral cortex and to understand its clinical relevance in autism. PMID:25582788

  14. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  15. Comparison of the Amplitudes of the H-reflex of Post-stroke Hemiplegia Patients and Normal Adults during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare H-reflex characteristics during gait of hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five patients and age-matched twenty-five volunteers in good health were studied. All the subjects could walk independently. [Methods] An MP150 (BIOPAC Systems, Inc., Goleta, CA, USA) was used to record the electromyography (EMG) data collected with Ag-Ag/Cl measurement electrodes (BIOPAC, diameter of 2 cm). [Results] The comparison showed significant differences of Hmax/Mmax ratio (%) in all gait cycles between the stroke group and the control group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study furnished basic reference data for gait strategies and functional training programs for hemiplegic stroke patients. PMID:24259840

  16. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p < 0.001) with normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p < 0.05). The MMP9 level (ng/mL) in WS (147.2 ± 28.5) was not significantly different in comparison with those from age-matched normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing. PMID:27195193

  17. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p < 0.001) with normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p < 0.05). The MMP9 level (ng/mL) in WS (147.2 ± 28.5) was not significantly different in comparison with those from age-matched normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing. PMID:27195193

  18. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  19. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gait) is not normal. You may also have memory problems. Tests that may be done include: Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) with careful testing of walking before and after the spinal tap Head CT scan or MRI of the head

  20. Gendered Subjectivities of Spacetimematter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juelskjaer, Malou

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates enactments of human subjectivities with a focus on how subjectivities may be studied if spatiality and temporality are taken up as constituting forces in the production of subjectivities. By reading poststructuralist feminist theorising, agential realism and empirical material diffractively through each other I re-situate…

  1. The Subject of Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    I work selectively with poststructuralist theories in order to give an account of the subject of policy as a constitutive relationship between social policy and the embodied human subject. Drawing on theories of subjectivity, narrative and governmentality, I articulate possibilities for analysing narrated accounts of experience as a mode of…

  2. Processing Coordinate Subject-Verb Agreement in L1 and L2 Greek

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsa, Maria; Tsimpli, Ianthi M.; Marinis, Theodoros; Stavrou, Melita

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the processing of subject-verb (SV) number agreement with coordinate subjects in pre-verbal and post-verbal positions in Greek. Greek is a language with morphological number marked on nominal and verbal elements. Coordinate SV agreement, however, is special in Greek as it is sensitive to the coordinate subject's position: when pre-verbal, the verb is marked for plural while when post-verbal the verb can be in the singular. We conducted two experiments, an acceptability judgment task with adult monolinguals as a pre-study (Experiment 1) and a self-paced reading task as the main study (Experiment 2) in order to obtain acceptance as well as processing data. Forty adult monolingual speakers of Greek participated in Experiment 1 and a hundred and forty one in Experiment 2. Seventy one children participated in Experiment 2: 30 Albanian-Greek sequential bilingual children and 41 Greek monolingual children aged 10–12 years. The adult data in Experiment 1 establish the difference in acceptability between singular VPs in SV and VS constructions reaffirming our hypothesis. Meanwhile, the adult data in Experiment 2 show that plural verbs accelerate processing regardless of subject position. The child online data show that sequential bilingual children have longer reading times (RTs) compared to the age-matched monolingual control group. However, both child groups follow a similar processing pattern in both pre-verbal and post-verbal constructions showing longer RTs immediately after a singular verb when the subject was pre-verbal indicating a grammaticality effect. In the post-verbal coordinate subject sentences, both child groups showed longer RTs on the first subject following the plural verb due to the temporary number mismatch between the verb and the first subject. This effect was resolved in monolingual children but was still present at the end of the sentence for bilingual children indicating difficulties to reanalyze and integrate

  3. Processing Coordinate Subject-Verb Agreement in L1 and L2 Greek.

    PubMed

    Kaltsa, Maria; Tsimpli, Ianthi M; Marinis, Theodoros; Stavrou, Melita

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the processing of subject-verb (SV) number agreement with coordinate subjects in pre-verbal and post-verbal positions in Greek. Greek is a language with morphological number marked on nominal and verbal elements. Coordinate SV agreement, however, is special in Greek as it is sensitive to the coordinate subject's position: when pre-verbal, the verb is marked for plural while when post-verbal the verb can be in the singular. We conducted two experiments, an acceptability judgment task with adult monolinguals as a pre-study (Experiment 1) and a self-paced reading task as the main study (Experiment 2) in order to obtain acceptance as well as processing data. Forty adult monolingual speakers of Greek participated in Experiment 1 and a hundred and forty one in Experiment 2. Seventy one children participated in Experiment 2: 30 Albanian-Greek sequential bilingual children and 41 Greek monolingual children aged 10-12 years. The adult data in Experiment 1 establish the difference in acceptability between singular VPs in SV and VS constructions reaffirming our hypothesis. Meanwhile, the adult data in Experiment 2 show that plural verbs accelerate processing regardless of subject position. The child online data show that sequential bilingual children have longer reading times (RTs) compared to the age-matched monolingual control group. However, both child groups follow a similar processing pattern in both pre-verbal and post-verbal constructions showing longer RTs immediately after a singular verb when the subject was pre-verbal indicating a grammaticality effect. In the post-verbal coordinate subject sentences, both child groups showed longer RTs on the first subject following the plural verb due to the temporary number mismatch between the verb and the first subject. This effect was resolved in monolingual children but was still present at the end of the sentence for bilingual children indicating difficulties to reanalyze and integrate information

  4. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  5. Spun Almost Normal Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paullin, Katherine L.

    Many of a 3-manifold's properties are determined by the surfaces they contain, and this knowledge leads to the foundation of decision algorithms for 3- manifolds. Popular work influencing the work of 3-manifold algorithms has it's roots in normal surface theory. In a triangulated 3-manifold, Haken and Kneser showed that we could put any incompressible surface into normal form. Expanding on those techniques, Rubinstein and Stocking later showed we could put any strongly irreducible surface into almost normal form. Walsh has more recently shown that in an ideal triangulation of a hyperbolic manifold many surfaces can be spun normalized. One unsolved problem in 3-manifold algorithms is studying the complexity of Lens Space Recognition. Spun almost normalization appears to be a part of solving this larger problem. In this dissertation, I will first discuss a nontraditional technique using graphs of equivalence classes of compressing disks that allows us to take a combinatorial approach to generalize the result of Walsh's to nonhyperbolic manifolds. Using that method, I'll also explore the conditions needed to show that a surface can be spun almost normalized.

  6. Sample preparation and orthogonal chromatography for broad polarity range plasma metabolomics: application to human subjects with neurodegenerative dementia.

    PubMed

    Armirotti, Andrea; Basit, Abdul; Realini, Natalia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Piomelli, Daniele

    2014-06-15

    We describe a simple protocol for the preparation and orthogonal hydrophobic/hydrophilic LC-MS/MS analysis of mouse and human plasma samples, which enables the untargeted ("shotgun") or targeted profiling of hydrophilic, amphipathic, and hydrophobic constituents of plasma metabolome. The protocol is rapid, efficient, and reliable, and offers several advantages compared to current procedures. When applied to a training set of human plasma samples, the protocol allowed for the rapid acquisition of full LogP metabolic profiles in plasma samples obtained from cognitively healthy human subjects and age-matched subjects with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease (n=15 each). Targeted analyses confirmed these findings, which are consistent with data previously published by other groups. PMID:24708938

  7. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  8. Spatial normalization of brain images and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mangin, J-F; Lebenberg, J; Lefranc, S; Labra, N; Auzias, G; Labit, M; Guevara, M; Mohlberg, H; Roca, P; Guevara, P; Dubois, J; Leroy, F; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Cachia, A; Dickscheid, T; Coulon, O; Poupon, C; Rivière, D; Amunts, K; Sun, Z Y

    2016-10-01

    The deformable atlas paradigm has been at the core of computational anatomy during the last two decades. Spatial normalization is the variant endowing the atlas with a coordinate system used for voxel-based aggregation of images across subjects and studies. This framework has largely contributed to the success of brain mapping. Brain spatial normalization, however, is still ill-posed because of the complexity of the human brain architecture and the lack of architectural landmarks in standard morphological MRI. Multi-atlas strategies have been developed during the last decade to overcome some difficulties in the context of segmentation. A new generation of registration algorithms embedding architectural features inferred for instance from diffusion or functional MRI is on the verge to improve the architectural value of spatial normalization. A better understanding of the architectural meaning of the cortical folding pattern will lead to use some sulci as complementary constraints. Improving the architectural compliance of spatial normalization may impose to relax the diffeomorphic constraint usually underlying atlas warping. A two-level strategy could be designed: in each region, a dictionary of templates of incompatible folding patterns would be collected and matched in a way or another using rare architectural information, while individual subjects would be aligned using diffeomorphisms to the closest template. Manifold learning could help to aggregate subjects according to their morphology. Connectivity-based strategies could emerge as an alternative to deformation-based alignment leading to match the connectomes of the subjects rather than images. PMID:27344104

  9. Balance in subjects with congenital or early onset strabismus: Influence of age.

    PubMed

    Dickmann, Anna; Di Sipio, Enrica; Simbolotti, Chiara; Agresta, Antonio; Germanotta, Marco; Tredici, Costanza; Petroni, Sergio; Padua, Luca; Aprile, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between strabismus and balance, and those that do exist focused on patients within a limited age range, while no studies on possible age-related changes have yet been conducted. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate whether the balance strategies adopted by patients with congenital or early onset strabismus change with age. Forty strabismic patients and 36 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Both patients and healthy subjects were divided into three subgroups according to age (children, adolescents, and adults) and underwent a stabilometric evaluation. When we compared the whole group of strabismic patients with the group of healthy subjects, we found that the center of pressure area and the trunk oscillations in the former were significantly different from those in the latter; when we considered the three age groups separately, only values in children with strabismus were different from those in the age-matched control group of healthy subjects. Strabismus was found to affect balance in children by inducing a postural strategy characterized by a reduction in physiological trunk oscillations. Gaining a better insight into postural control in strabismic subjects and its evolution with age may be crucial to improving rehabilitation in such patients and planning tailored rehabilitation treatment. PMID:27109787

  10. Genital and subjective sexual arousal in postmenopausal women: influence of laboratory-induced hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Brotto, Lori A; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2002-01-01

    The current study was aimed at comparing genital and subjective sexual arousal in pre- and postmenopausal women and exploring the effects of heightened sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity on these parameters. Seventy-one women (25 young and premenopausal, 25 postmenopausal, and 21 age-matched premenopausal women) participated in two counterbalanced sessions consisting of genital arousal assessment with vaginal photoplethysmography and subjective arousal assessment with self-report questionnaires. SNS activity was enhanced using laboratory-induced hyperventilation. Results demonstrated no significant differences between pre- and postmenopausal women on genital and subjective measures of arousal in response to neutral and erotic films. SNS manipulation increased genital excitement only in young, premenopausal women. These data suggest that prior SNS enhancement can differentiate pre- from postmenopausal genital arousal. Data also revealed significant correlations between genital and subjective sexual arousal in older pre- and postmenopausal women, but not in young premenopausal women. These data are the first to directly compare genital-subjective correlations between pre- and postmenopausal women. PMID:11898709

  11. Nutrient regulation of post-heparin lipoprotein lipase activity in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, L R; Beety, J M; Wright, J; Morgan, L M

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the immediate effect of ingestion of oral carbohydrate and fat on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity post-heparin in six lean and six obese age-matched women. Subjects were given, on two separate occasions, 340 kcal carbohydrate or an equicaloric amount of fat, both in 300 ml of water. Post-heparin LPL activity (10,000 U) was measured on each occasion 120 minutes after ingestion of the meal. Following oral carbohydrate postprandial plasma insulin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects than in lean (p < 0.01). Impaired glucose tolerance was seen in the obese group. GIP secretion was similar in lean and obese subjects both during oral fat and carbohydrate ingestion. GLP-1 secretion post-carbohydrate was lower in obese subjects. Total LPL activity unadjusted for body weight was similar in the two groups after carbohydrate administration but was significantly lower when adjusted per kg body weight. Total LPL activity was lower in the lean group at 130 minutes after fat administration (p < 0.02). Fasting serum triglycerides were higher in the obese group and were inversely related to the post-carbohydrate LPL activity (r = - 0.65, p < 0.02). Intraluminal lipoprotein lipase activity is not increased in established obesity. Fat and carbohydrate nutrients may affect LPL activity differently in lean and obese subjects. PMID:11280717

  12. Teaching of subject matter.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Richard E

    2004-01-01

    Psychology of subject matter refers to the scientific study of learning and instruction within school subjects. The growing research literature on teaching and learning of school subjects represents one of educational psychology's most productive accomplishments of the past two decades. The purpose of this chapter is to examine representative advances in the psychology of subject matter, including how people learn to read words, comprehend printed passages, write compositions, solve arithmetic word problems, and understand how scientific systems work. The introduction provides a historical overview of how to promote transfer and is followed by reviews of representative research in learning and teaching of reading fluency, reading comprehension, writing, mathematics, and science. PMID:14744232

  13. Normals to a Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Given a parabola in the standard form y[superscript 2] = 4ax, corresponding to three points on the parabola, such that the normals at these three points P, Q, R concur at a point M = (h, k), the equation of the circumscribing circle through the three points P, Q, and R provides a tremendous opportunity to illustrate "The Art of Algebraic…

  14. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  15. Normal Birth: Two Stories

    PubMed Central

    Scaer, Roberta M.

    2002-01-01

    The author shares two stories: one of a normal birth that took place in a hospital with a nurse-midwife in attendance and another of a home birth unexpectedly shared by many colleagues. Both are told with the goal to inform, inspire, and educate. PMID:17273292

  16. Normal Psychosexual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Normal sexual development is reviewed with respect to physical maturation, sexual interests, sex drive", psychosexual competence and maturity, gender role, object choice, children's concepts of sexual differences, sex role preference and standards, and psychosexual stages. Biologic, psychoanalytic and psychosocial theories are briefly considered.…

  17. The Eppelsheimer Subject Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gordon

    1971-01-01

    Since 1945, a method of catalog classification, originally devised by H.W. Eppelsheimer for the Mainz City Library, has found wide acceptance. It is a complex of catalogs which combines features of both subject classification and alphabetical subject indexing. (25 references) (Author/NH)

  18. Body as subject1

    PubMed Central

    MEIR, IRIT; PADDEN, CAROL A.; ARONOFF, MARK; SANDLER, WENDY

    2011-01-01

    The notion of subject in human language has a privileged status relative to other arguments. This special status is manifested in the behavior of subjects at the morphological, syntactic, semantic and discourse levels. Here we bring evidence that subjects have privileged status at the lexical level as well, by analyzing lexicalization patterns of verbs in three different sign languages. Our analysis shows that the sublexical structure of iconic signs denoting state of affairs in these languages manifests an inherent pattern of form–meaning correspondence: the signer’s body consistently represents one argument of the verb, the subject. The hands, moving in relation to the body, represent all other components of the event – including all other arguments. This analysis shows that sign languages provide novel evidence in support of the centrality of the notion of subject in human language. It also solves a typological puzzle about the apparent primacy of object in sign language verb agreement, a primacy not usually found in spoken languages, in which subject agreement ranks higher. Our analysis suggests that the subject argument is represented by the body and is part of the lexical structure of the verb. Because it is always inherently represented in the structure of the sign, the subject is more basic than the object, and tolerates the omission of agreement morphology. PMID:23066169

  19. Serum uric acid levels in normal pregnancy with observations on the renal excretion of urate in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, James A.; Campbell, Stuart; Duncan, Anne M.; Greig, William R.; Buchanan, W. Watson

    1966-01-01

    Serum uric acid estimations were performed in 106 healthy pregnant women during early, middle, and late pregnancy, using an automated colorimetric method. The mean serum uric acid level was significantly lower during early and middle pregnancy than that of 64 age-matched female controls. The serum uric acid level was not significantly different in late pregnancy from the control group. Studies of the daily urinary urate excretion in 31 pregnant women showed normal urinary urate excretion in early pregnancy and enhanced renal loss of urate in middle and late pregnancy. It appears that the renal clearance of urate in pregnancy is high, especially in the middle period when the serum level is low in spite of the increased production of uric acid by the foetus. PMID:5919366

  20. Normal-reflection image

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Common-angle wave-equation migration using the double-square-root is generally less accurate than the common-shot migration because the wavefield continuation equation for thc former involves additional approximations compared to that for the latter. We present a common-angle wave-equation migration that has the same accuracy as common-shot wave-equation migration. An image obtained from common-angle migration is a four- to five-dimensional output volume for 3D cases. We propose a normal-reflection imaging condition for common-angle migration to produce a 3D output volume for 3D migration. The image is closely related to the normal-reflection coefficients at interfaces. This imaging condition will allow amplitude-preserving migration to generate an image with clear physical meaning.

  1. Normal and Malignant Megakaryopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiang; Goldenson, Benjamin; Crispino, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Megakaryopoiesis is the process by which bone marrow progenitor cells develop into mature megakaryocytes (MKs), which in turn produce platelets required for normal hemostasis. Over the past decade, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to MK development and differentiation have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we provide an overview of megakaryopoiesis and summarize the latest developments in this field. Specially, we focus on polyploidization, a unique form of the cell cycle that allows MKs to increase their DNA content, and the genes that regulate this process. In addition, since megakaryocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMKL) and a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), we discuss the biology and genetics of these disorders. We anticipate that an increased understanding of normal megakaryocyte differentiation will provide new insights into novel therapeutic approaches that will directly benefit patients. PMID:22018018

  2. Developmental Topographical Disorientation in a Healthy Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, F.; Incoccia, C.; Palermo, L.; Piccardi, L.; Zompanti, L.; Sabatini, U.; Peran, P.; Guariglia, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of F.G., a healthy, normally developed 22-year-old male subject affected by a pervasive disorder in environmental orientation and navigation who presents no history of neurological or psychiatric disease. A neuro-radiological examination showed no evidence of anatomical or structural alterations to the brain. We submitted the…

  3. Malformed mdx myofibers have normal cytoskeletal architecture yet altered EC coupling and stress-induced Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is dependent on its highly regular structure. In studies of dystrophic (dy/dy) mice, the proportion of malformed myofibers decreases after prolonged whole muscle stimulation, suggesting that the malformed myofibers are more prone to injury. The aim of this study was to assess morphology and to measure excitation-contraction (EC) coupling (Ca2+ transients) and susceptibility to osmotic stress (Ca2+ sparks) of enzymatically isolated muscle fibers of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles from young (2–3 mo) and old (8–9 mo) mdx and age-matched control mice (C57BL10). In young mdx EDL, 6% of the myofibers had visible malformations (i.e., interfiber splitting, branched ends, midfiber appendages). In contrast, 65% of myofibers in old mdx EDL contained visible malformations. In the mdx FDB, malformation occurred in only 5% of young myofibers and 11% of old myofibers. Age-matched control mice did not display the altered morphology of mdx muscles. The membrane-associated and cytoplasmic cytoskeletal structures appeared normal in the malformed mdx myofibers. In mdx FDBs with significantly branched ends, an assessment of global, electrically evoked Ca2+ signals (indo-1PE-AM) revealed an EC coupling deficit in myofibers with significant branching. Interestingly, peak amplitude of electrically evoked Ca2+ release in the branch of the bifurcated mdx myofiber was significantly decreased compared with the trunk of the same myofiber. No alteration in the basal myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (i.e., indo ratio) was seen in malformed vs. normal mdx myofibers. Finally, osmotic stress induced the occurrence of Ca2+ sparks to a greater extent in the malformed portions of myofibers, which is consistent with deficits in EC coupling control. In summary, our data show that aging mdx myofibers develop morphological malformations. These malformations are not associated with gross disruptions in cytoskeletal or t

  4. Cardiac self-perception in obese and normal persons.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R M; Morrell, J A; Watson, D N; Sandoval, S L

    1990-06-01

    Cardiac self-perception was measured in obese and normal weight subjects. Subjects had to judge whether a tone was coincident with their own heartbeat or slightly mismatched. A signal-detection analysis was used to measure sensory sensitivity to the heartbeat separate from nonsensory, response-bias factors. Subjects were able to perform the heartbeat-detection task, with an average sensory sensitivity d' of .58. No significant differences in sensory sensitivity were found between obese and normal-weight subjects, nor were any sex differences noted. Measurement of response bias (Ln beta) indicated that obese subjects had a significantly more lax response criterion than normal-weight subjects. Results are discussed in terms of Schachter's (1971) internality-externality theory of obesity and ramifications for weight control are discussed. PMID:2399094

  5. Altered cerebral protein synthesis in fragile X syndrome: studies in human subjects and knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Mei; Schmidt, Kathleen C; Zametkin, Alan J; Bishu, Shrinivas; Horowitz, Lisa M; Burlin, Thomas V; Xia, Zengyan; Huang, Tianjiang; Quezado, Zenaide M; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated protein synthesis is thought to be a core phenotype of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In a mouse model (Fmr1 knockout (KO)) of FXS, rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) are increased in selective brain regions. We hypothesized that rCPS are also increased in FXS subjects. We measured rCPS with the ℒ-[1-11C]leucine positron emission tomography (PET) method in whole brain and 10 regions in 15 FXS subjects who, because of their impairments, were studied under deep sedation with propofol. We compared results with those of 12 age-matched controls studied both awake and sedated. In controls, we found no differences in rCPS between awake and propofol sedation. Contrary to our hypothesis, FXS subjects under propofol sedation had reduced rCPS in whole brain, cerebellum, and cortex compared with sedated controls. To investigate whether propofol could have a disparate effect in FXS subjects masking usually elevated rCPS, we measured rCPS in C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) and KO mice awake or under propofol sedation. Propofol decreased rCPS substantially in most regions examined in KO mice, but in WT mice caused few discrete changes. Propofol acts by decreasing neuronal activity either directly or by increasing inhibitory synaptic activity. Our results suggest that changes in synaptic signaling can correct increased rCPS in FXS. PMID:23299245

  6. Smell perception in normal tension glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarieh, Maneli; Hauenstein, Daniela; Schoetzau, Andreas; Konieczka, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to quantify the ability to identify odors in normal tension glaucoma (NTG) patients and healthy subjects with and without a primary vascular dysregulation (PVD). Methods Both self-assessment of smell perception and evaluation of odor identification by means of the 12-item odor identification test (“Sniffin’ Sticks”) were performed in the following groups of subjects: 1) 18 NTG patients with PVD (G+), 2) 18 NTG patients without PVD (G-), 3) 18 healthy subjects with PVD (H+) and 4) 18 healthy subjects without PVD (H-). The subjects self-assessment of smell perception was evaluated before the Sniffin’ Sticks test by asking them to judge their ability to identify odors as either “average,” “better than average,” or “worse than average.” Results Subjects with a PVD (G+ and H+) can identify odors significantly better than those without a PVD (G- and H-; in a score scale of 1–12 the score point difference=2.64, 95% CI=1.88–3.40, p<0.001). No significant differences in odor identification was found between NTG (groups G+ and G-) and healthy subjects (groups H+ and H-; score point difference=-0.14, 95% CI=-0.9–0.62, p=0.72). Conclusions Subjects with a PVD can identify odors significantly better than those without a PVD. PMID:20352025

  7. Deep Ecology and Subjectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Grover

    1988-01-01

    Describes Deep Ecology and criticizes its limitations. Discusses mysticism, the bomb, freedom, subjectivity and power as they are addressed by Deep Ecology. Stresses the need to teach ecological balance. (CW)

  8. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  9. Endocrinal and autoimmune linkage: Evidences from a controlled study of subjects with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sheetal; Sinha, Kiran; Kolte, Sachin; Mandal, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic syndrome, characterized by anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovary. With serological markers of autoimmunity found elevated in PCOS, there is a possible link between autoimmunity and PCOS. AIM: The study aimed to investigate the possible correlation between autoimmune markers of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and PCOS. SETTING AND DESIGN: This case control study was conducted at the Department of Pathology of a tertiary care academic center during a 1-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-five subjects with clinical PCOS and 51 age matched control non-PCOS subjects were recruited and subjected to clinical, biochemical, and endocrinal evaluation for AIT. All subjects underwent blood glucose and serum sampling for luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, dehydroepi androsterone, thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, anti-thyroid peroxidase, anti-thyroglobulin (Tg), and insulin. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 12 for Windows. The quantitative variables are described as mean ± standard deviation. To compare quantitative variables between two groups, unpaired t-test was used. The Chi-square/Fischer's exact test was used to compare qualitative variables. ANOVA was used to compare the PCOS and non-PCOS groups. P < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Significantly higher prevalence of AIT (anti-Tg antibodies) was noted in subjects with PCOS as compared to non-PCOS control subjects (P < 0.05). The PCOS subjects had higher insulin resistance index and also twice the level of LH: FSH ratio as compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Higher prevalence of AIT in PCOS subjects suggest possible role of autoimmune phenomenon in the etiopathogenesis of PCOS. More data from longitudinal follow-up studies is required to clearly establish this possible link. PMID:27110073

  10. Regional glucose metabolism using PETT in normal and psychiatric populations

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (/sup 18/FDG) in 150 subjects including normals, schizophrenics, senile dementias, and primary affective disorders was studied. Some of the data analyzed to date are discussed.

  11. Sexual Behavior of a Group of Normal Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offer, Daniel

    1971-01-01

    The author contends that the sexual revolution" is not yet with us. He notes that the findings stress that the majority of normal adolescent subjects move slowly in the direction of heterosexuality. (Author)

  12. Normal black kidney

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohamadi, Aliasghar; Rezayat, Ali Reza Akhavan; Memar, Bahram; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Cand, PhD

    2014-01-01

    A black kidney has 3 major differential diagnoses: hemosiderosis, lipofuscin pigment and melanotic renal cell carcinoma. Excluding lipofuscin, the other 2 are accompanied by an abnormal renal function. We report on a 25-year-old man who intended to donate a kidney to his cousin. On the operating room table when we incised the left flank region and exposed the kidney, we found a firm and black kidney so the operation was cancelled due to potential vascular injuries. Days after the incomplete procedure, we reviewed the donor’s biochemistry and imaging to reassess his renal function, but the results showed quite normal renal function again. The result of Ham test was also negative. Two weeks later, we began the operation, removed the same left kidney and found that it was in the same conditions as it was before. We took the opportunity to send needle biopsies of the kidney for histopathologic analysis. The analysis showed a melanotic kidney without pathological changes in glomeruli and interstitium and vessels. A black kidney may result in hemosiderin, lipofuscin or melanin deposits in the kidney, which can confirm the diagnosis; however, special tests for underlying disease and renal function should be considered. Some causes of black kidney lead to abnormal function, but our patients’s kidney returned to normal. PMID:24839502

  13. RIGHT HEMISPHERIC FUNCTION IN NORMALS, AFFECTIVE DISORDER AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Milind; Roy, Amal; Davis, Elizabeth J.B.; Davis, Rachel

    1996-01-01

    The happy-sad chimeric faces test has been established as a useful test of right hemispheric function. It is known to elicit a left hemifacial bias (LHF bias) in right handed subjects. 41 normals and 19 manic, depressive and schizophrenic patients each were tested. All subjects were strictly right handed. Normals and depressives showed significant LHF bias. Monies and schizophrenics did not show significant LHF Bias. This suggests right hemispheric dysfunction in both mania and schizophrenia. PMID:21584135

  14. Classical subjective expected utility

    PubMed Central

    Cerreia-Vioglio, Simone; Maccheroni, Fabio; Marinacci, Massimo; Montrucchio, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    We consider decision makers who know that payoff-relevant observations are generated by a process that belongs to a given class M, as postulated in Wald [Wald A (1950) Statistical Decision Functions (Wiley, New York)]. We incorporate this Waldean piece of objective information within an otherwise subjective setting à la Savage [Savage LJ (1954) The Foundations of Statistics (Wiley, New York)] and show that this leads to a two-stage subjective expected utility model that accounts for both state and model uncertainty. PMID:23559375

  15. Classical subjective expected utility.

    PubMed

    Cerreia-Vioglio, Simone; Maccheroni, Fabio; Marinacci, Massimo; Montrucchio, Luigi

    2013-04-23

    We consider decision makers who know that payoff-relevant observations are generated by a process that belongs to a given class M, as postulated in Wald [Wald A (1950) Statistical Decision Functions (Wiley, New York)]. We incorporate this Waldean piece of objective information within an otherwise subjective setting à la Savage [Savage LJ (1954) The Foundations of Statistics (Wiley, New York)] and show that this leads to a two-stage subjective expected utility model that accounts for both state and model uncertainty. PMID:23559375

  16. Pornography, normalization, and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Martin S; Williams, Colin J; Kleiner, Sibyl; Irizarry, Yasmiyn

    2010-12-01

    Opponents and proponents of erotic representations (referred to hereafter as "pornography") have described the effects of pornography from their perspective. Little, however, has been done in the way of research to investigate these claims from the consumer's point of view. This especially has been so regarding the positive impact of such consumption on a person's sex life. Using a study group of 245 college students, we examined this question in a framework of scripting theory. We wanted to see whether viewing pornography appeared to expand sexual horizons through normalization and facilitate a willingness to explore new sexual behaviors and sexual relationships through empowerment. The data supported this viewpoint and further showed the effects to be mediated by gender and sexual preference identity. They suggested, however, that established scripts were extended rather than abandoned. We conclude with connections between our findings and the widespread viewing of pornography in contemporary society. PMID:20127507

  17. Normal Untreated Jurkat Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  18. Myotonic Dystrophy: Increased expression of the normal allele in CDM infants muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Radvanyi, H.H.; Gourdon, G.; Junien, C. |

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder characterized by a highly variable clinical phenotype. The mutation has been identified as an unstable trinucleotide CTG repeat in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the myotonin-protein kinase (MT-PK) gene. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM), which represents the most severe phenotype, is exclusively maternally inherited. Recent studies, analysis by Northern blots and RT-PCR provided apparently conflicting results on the mutated allele expression in samples from congenitally affected children. The level of expression of the mutant allele depends on the extent of the repeat in the adult form and is no longer expressed when over 800-1300 repeats, whether in adult forms or in CDM. Could this decrease account for the late onset forms? However, the differences between the two phenotypes cannot be explained by the same mechanism. Alternatively, these differences could be due to differences in expression of the normal allele. We analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of the MT-PK gene in muscle samples from four CDM infants and two aged-matched normal controls. In two of these, the mutant allele (3.3 and 8 kb) was undetectable on Northern blots. We observed an increased expression of the MT-PK gene (10- to 20-fold) in tissues of severely affected congenital patients which can be attributed to the normal allele. Since expression of the normal allele is either normal or slightly decreased in the adult form, the dramatic increase in the congenital form could reflect a disturbance in muscle differentiation. Expression studies of MT-PK at different stages of development and, especially after the 20th week, are therefore required.

  19. Database Subject Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Donald T.; Teitelbaum, Henry H.

    1978-01-01

    Broad subject headings which have been assigned to each of the 86 data bases available or announced on the five major on-line search systems--Lockheed, SDC, BRS, NIM, and New York Times Information Bank--are arranged alphabetically followed by the name(s) of the appropriate data base(s). (JPF)

  20. Introducing Behavioral Subjectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven

    1976-01-01

    A true elaboration of educational goals will include a set of both more and less well-structured aims, corresponding to behavioral objectives and subjectives, which can be tested respectively by direct methods and by less direct methods such as the native speaker or Turing tests. (Author/LS)

  1. Curriculum Costs: Vocational Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, C. E.

    To establish a definition of costs in education, a "concept map" is established to which inevitable questions of inclusion and exclusion can be addressed. A specific case, namely the costs of practical/vocational subjects, is then presented. It also includes a profile of benefits, since with regard to vocational education, much more than with…

  2. Native Americans: Subject Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonanni, Mimmo; Etter, Patricia A.

    This annotated subject guide lists reference material that deals with Native Americans and is available in the Arizona State University Libraries. Entries were published 1933-98, but mostly in the 1980s-90s. The guide is not comprehensive, but rather a selective list of resources useful for researching a topic in a variety of fields. The guide…

  3. Auditory-pupillary responses in deaf subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Naoharu; Otsuka, Koji; Ogawa, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Hayashi, Mami; Ichimura, Akihide; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    Pupillary dilation in response to sound stimuli is well established and is generally considered to represent a startle reflex to sound. We believe that the auditory-pupillary response represents not only a simple startle reflex to sound stimuli but also represents a reaction to stimulation of other sense organs, such as otolith organs. Eight young healthy volunteers without a history of hearing and equilibrium problems and 12 subjects with bilateral deafness participated in this study. Computer pupillography was used to analyze the auditory-pupillary responses of both eyes in all subjects. We found that auditory-pupillary responses occurred even in subjects with bilateral deafness and that this response was comparable to those of normal subjects. We propose that the auditory-pupillary response also relates to vestibular function. Thus, assessing the auditory-pupillary response may be useful for evaluating the vestibulo-autonomic response in patients with peripheral disequilibrium. PMID:20826936

  4. Normality, therapy, and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Giubilini, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    According to human enhancement advocates, it is morally permissible (and sometimes obligatory) to use biomedical means to modulate or select certain biological traits in order to increase people's welfare, even when there is no pathology to be treated or prevented. Some authors have recently proposed to extend the use of biomedical means to modulate lust, attraction, and attachment. I focus on some conceptual implications of this proposal, particularly with regard to bioconservatives' understanding of the notions of therapy and enhancement I first explain what makes the proposal of medicalizing love interesting and unique, compared to the other forms of bioenhancement usually advocated. I then discuss how the medicalization of love bears on the more general debate on human enhancement, particularly with regard to the key notion of "normality" that is commonly used to define the therapy-enhancement distinction. This analysis suggests that the medicalization of love, in virtue of its peculiarity, requires bioconservatives to reconsider their way of understanding and applying the notions of "therapy" and "enhancement." More in particular, I show that, because a non-arbitrary and value-free notion of "therapy" cannot be applied to the case of love, bioconservatives have the burden of either providing some new criterion that could be used for drawing a line between permissible and impermissible medicalization, or demonstrating that under no circumstances-including the cases in which love is already acknowledged to require medical intervention-can love fall within the domain of medicine. PMID:26059959

  5. Institutionalizing Normal: Rethinking Composition's Precedence in Normal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinnell, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Composition historians have recently worked to recover histories of composition in normal schools. This essay argues, however, that historians have inadvertently misconstrued the role of normal schools in American education by inaccurately comparing rhetorical education in normal schools to rhetorical education in colleges and universities.…

  6. PKCδ inhibition normalizes the wound-healing capacity of diabetic human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khamaisi, Mogher; Katagiri, Sayaka; Keenan, Hillary; Park, Kyoungmin; Maeda, Yasutaka; Li, Qian; Qi, Weier; Thomou, Thomas; Eschuk, Danielle; Tellechea, Ana; Veves, Aris; Huang, Chenyu; Orgill, Dennis Paul; Wagers, Amy; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal fibroblast function underlies poor wound healing in patients with diabetes; however, the mechanisms that impair wound healing are poorly defined. Here, we evaluated fibroblasts from individuals who had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 50 years or more (Medalists, n = 26) and from age-matched controls (n = 7). Compared with those from controls, Medalist fibroblasts demonstrated a reduced migration response to insulin, lower VEGF expression, and less phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT), but not p-ERK, activation. Medalist fibroblasts were also functionally less effective at wound closure in nude mice. Activation of the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ) was increased in postmortem fibroblasts from Medalists, fibroblasts from living T1D subjects, biopsies of active wounds of living T1D subjects, and granulation tissues from mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Diabetes-induced PKCD mRNA expression was related to a 2-fold increase in the mRNA half-life. Pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKCδ or expression of a dominant-negative isoform restored insulin signaling of p-AKT and VEGF expression in vitro and improved wound healing in vivo. Additionally, increasing PKCδ expression in control fibroblasts produced the same abnormalities as those seen in Medalist fibroblasts. Our results indicate that persistent PKCδ elevation in fibroblasts from diabetic patients inhibits insulin signaling and function to impair wound healing and suggest PKCδ inhibition as a potential therapy to improve wound healing in diabetic patients. PMID:26808499

  7. KCNQ4 K(+) channels tune mechanoreceptors for normal touch sensation in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Matthias; Lechner, Stefan G; Vardanyan, Vitya; Wetzel, Christiane; Cremers, Cor W; De Leenheer, Els M; Aránguez, Gracia; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel Ángel; Jentsch, Thomas J; Lewin, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    Mutations inactivating the potassium channel KCNQ4 (K(v)7.4) lead to deafness in humans and mice. In addition to its expression in mechanosensitive hair cells of the inner ear, KCNQ4 is found in the auditory pathway and in trigeminal nuclei that convey somatosensory information. We have now detected KCNQ4 in the peripheral nerve endings of cutaneous rapidly adapting hair follicle and Meissner corpuscle mechanoreceptors from mice and humans. Electrophysiological recordings from single afferents from Kcnq4(-/-) mice and mice carrying a KCNQ4 mutation found in DFNA2-type monogenic dominant human hearing loss showed elevated mechanosensitivity and altered frequency response of rapidly adapting, but not of slowly adapting nor of D-hair, mechanoreceptor neurons. Human subjects from independent DFNA2 pedigrees outperformed age-matched control subjects when tested for vibrotactile acuity at low frequencies. This work describes a gene mutation that modulates touch sensitivity in mice and humans and establishes KCNQ4 as a specific molecular marker for rapidly adapting Meissner and a subset of hair follicle afferents. PMID:22101641

  8. Cortical sulci recognition and spatial normalization.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Matthieu; Rivière, Denis; Mangin, Jean-François

    2011-08-01

    Brain mapping techniques pair similar anatomical information across individuals. In this context, spatial normalization is mainly used to reduce inter-subject differences to improve comparisons. These techniques may benefit from anatomically identified landmarks useful to drive the registration. Automatic labeling, classification or segmentation techniques provide such labels. Most of these approaches depend strongly on normalization, as much as normalization depends on landmark accuracy. We propose in this paper a coherent Bayesian framework to automatically identify approximately 60 sulcal labels per hemisphere based on a probabilistic atlas (a mixture of spam models: Statistical Probabilistic Anatomy Map) estimating simultaneously normalization parameters. This way, the labelization method provides also with no extra computational costs a new automatically constrained registration of sulcal structures. We have limited our study to global affine and piecewise affine registration. The suggested global affine approach outperforms significantly standard affine intensity-based normalization techniques in term of sulci alignments. Further, by combining global and local joint labeling, a final mean recognition rate of 86% has been obtained with much more reliable labeling posterior probabilities. The different methods described in this paper have been integrated since the release version 3.2.1 of the BrainVISA software platform (Riviére et al., 2009). PMID:21441062

  9. Is My Child's Appetite Normal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal way, not overeat. That is a good habit for lifelong health. Provided by NIBBLES FOR HEALTH 17 Nutrition Newsletters for Parents of Young Children, USDA, Food and Nutrition Service Is My Child’s Appetite Normal? ...

  10. Aneuploidy in the normal, Alzheimer's disease and ataxia-telangiectasia brain: differential expression and pathological meaning.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Liehr, Thomas; Yurov, Yuri B

    2009-05-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the human brain contains aneuploid cells; however the nature and magnitude of neural aneuploidy in health and disease remain obscure. Here, we have monitored aneuploidy in the cerebral cortex of the normal, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) brain by molecular cytogenetic approaches scoring more than 480,000 neural cells. Using arbitrarily selected set of DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 7, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, X and Y we have determined the mean rate of stochastic aneuploidy per chromosome as 0.5% in the normal human brain (95%CI 0.2-0.7%; SD 0.2%). The overall proportion of aneuploid cells in the normal brain has been estimated at approximately 10%. In the AT brain, we observed a 2-to-5 fold increase of stochastic aneuploidy randomly affecting different chromosomes (mean 2.1%; 95%CI - 1.5-2.6%; SD 0.8%). The overall proportion of aneuploid cells in the brain of AT individuals was estimated at approximately 20-50%. Compared with sex- and age-matched controls, the level of stochastic aneuploidy in the AD brain was not significantly increased. However, a dramatic 10-fold increase of chromosome 21-specific aneuploidy (both hypoploidy and hyperploidy) was detected in the AD cerebral cortex (6-15% versus 0.8-1.8% in control). We conclude that somatic mosaic aneuploidy differentially contributes to intercellular genomic variation in the normal, AD and AT brain. Neural aneuploidy leading to altered cellular physiology may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These data indicate neural aneuploidy to be a newly identified feature of neurodegenerative diseases, similar to other devastative disorders hallmarked by aneuploidy such as chromosome syndromes and cancer. PMID:19344645

  11. 3D comparison of average faces in subjects with oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Bugaighis, Iman; Tiddeman, Bernard; Mattick, Claire R; Hobson, Ross

    2014-08-01

    This prospective cross-sectional, case-controlled morphometric study assessed three dimensional (3D) facial morphological differences between average faces of 103 children aged 8-12 years; 40 with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 23 with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA), 19 with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), 21 with isolated cleft palate (ICP), and 80 gender and age-matched controls. 3D stereophotogrammetric facial scans were recorded for each participant at rest. Thirty-nine landmarks were digitized for each scan, and x-, y-, z-coordinates for each landmark were extracted. A 3D photorealistic average face was constructed for each participating group and subjective and objective comparisons were carried out between each cleft and control average faces. Marked differences were observed between all groups. The most severely affected were groups where the lip and palate were affected and repaired (UCLP and UCLA). The group with midsagittal palatal deformity and repair (ICP) was the most similar to the control group. The results revealed that 3D shape analysis allows morphometric discrimination between subjects with craniofacial anomalies and the control group, and underlines the potential value of statistical shape analysis in assessing the outcomes of cleft lip and palate surgery, and orthodontic treatment. PMID:23172581

  12. Metabolomics unveils urinary changes in subjects with metabolic syndrome following 12-week nut consumption.

    PubMed

    Tulipani, Sara; Llorach, Rafael; Jáuregui, Olga; López-Uriarte, Patricia; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Bullo, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    Through an HPLC-Q-TOF-MS-driven nontargeted metabolomics approach, we aimed to discriminate changes in the urinary metabolome of subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS), following 12 weeks of mixed nuts consumption (30 g/day), compared to sex- and age-matched individuals given a control diet. The urinary metabolome corresponding to the nut-enriched diet clearly clustered in a distinct group, and the multivariate data analysis discriminated relevant mass features in this separation. Metabolites corresponding to the discriminating ions (MS features) were then subjected to multiple tandem mass spectrometry experiments using LC-ITD-FT-MS, to confirm their putative identification. The metabolomics approach revealed 20 potential markers of nut intake, including fatty acid conjugated metabolites, phase II and microbial-derived phenolic metabolites, and serotonin metabolites. An increased excretion of serotonin metabolites was associated for the first time with nut consumption. Additionally, the detection of urinary markers of gut microbial and phase II metabolism of nut polyphenols confirmed the understanding of their bioavailability and bioactivity as a priority area of research in the determination of the health effects derived from nut consumption. The results confirmed how a nontargeted metabolomics strategy may help to access unexplored metabolic pathways impacted by diet, thereby raising prospects for new intervention targets. PMID:21905751

  13. WMAP normalization of inflationary cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Mukherjee, Pia; Leach, Samuel M.

    2006-10-15

    We use the three-year WMAP observations to determine the normalization of the matter power spectrum in inflationary cosmologies. In this context, the quantity of interest is not the normalization marginalized over all parameters, but rather the normalization as a function of the inflationary parameters n{sub S} and r with marginalization over the remaining cosmological parameters. We compute this normalization and provide an accurate fitting function. The statistical uncertainty in the normalization is 3%, roughly half that achieved by COBE. We use the k-l relation for the standard cosmological model to identify the pivot scale for the WMAP normalization. We also quote the inflationary energy scale corresponding to the WMAP normalization.

  14. Abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients: gender differences and partial normalization with antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M; Stanford, Kevin E

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies have observed significant abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of peripheral tissues from drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic (SZ) patients relative to normal controls, including deficits in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are partially normalized following chronic antipsychotic treatment. We hypothesized that postmortem cortical tissue from patients with SZ would also exhibit deficits in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) relative to normal controls, and that these deficits would be greater in drug-free SZ patients. We determined the total fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) (Brodmann area 10) from drug-free and antipsychotic-treated SZ patients (n=21) and age-matched normal controls (n=26) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, significantly lower DHA (-20%) concentrations, and significantly greater vaccenic acid (VA) (+12.5) concentrations, were found in the OFC of SZ patients relative to normal controls. Relative to age-matched same-gender controls, OFC DHA deficits, and elevated AA:DHA, oleic acid:DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6):DHA ratios, were found in male but not female SZ patients. SZ patients that died of cardiovascular-related disease exhibited lower DHA (-31%) and AA (-19%) concentrations, and greater OA (+20%) and VA (+17%) concentrations, relative to normal controls that also died of cardiovascular-related disease. OFC DHA and AA deficits, and elevations in oleic acid and vaccenic acid, were numerically greater in drug-free SZ patients and were partially normalized in SZ patients treated with antipsychotic medications (atypical>typical). Fatty acid abnormalities could not be wholly attributed to lifestyle or postmortem tissue variables. These findings add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of SZ, and suggest that

  15. Quantification of Speech-in-Noise and Sound Localisation Abilities in Children with Unilateral Hearing Loss and Comparison to Normal Hearing Peers

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Ruth M.; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to quantify abilities of children with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) on measures that address known deficits for this population; that is, speech understanding in quiet and noise, and sound localisation. Noise conditions varied by noise type and source location. Parent reports of real-world abilities were also obtained. Performance was compared to gender- and age-matched normal hearing (NH) peers. UHL performance was poorer and more varied compared to NH peers. Among the findings, age correlated with localisation ability for UHL but not NH participants. Low frequency hearing in the better ear of UHL children was associated with performance in noise; however, there was no relation for NH children. Considerable variability was evident in the outcomes of children with UHL and needs to be understood as future treatment options are considered. PMID:25999162

  16. Metabolomics Data Normalization with EigenMS

    PubMed Central

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Nikolic, Sonja B.; Wilson, Richard; Sharman, James E.; Edwards, Lindsay M.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated). Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05) as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data. PMID:25549083

  17. Metabolomics data normalization with EigenMS.

    PubMed

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Nikolic, Sonja B; Wilson, Richard; Sharman, James E; Edwards, Lindsay M

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated). Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05) as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data. PMID:25549083

  18. Dietary intake and clinical, anthropometric and biochemical indices of malnutrition in elderly demented patients and non-demented subjects.

    PubMed

    Burns, A; Marsh, A; Bender, D A

    1989-05-01

    Anthropometric and biochemical indices of nutritional status and weighed dietary intake have been studied in hospitalized patients with senile dementia, demented patients living in the community and age-matched control subjects who were not cognitively impaired. Demented patients were lighter than control subjects, and had a lower body mass index, skinfold thickness, mid-arm circumference and arm muscle bulk. The hospitalized patients were more seriously affected than those living in the community, and body weight was significantly negatively correlated with duration of hospitalization. Over a 6-month period the hospitalized patients showed a further weight loss, while those living in the community did not. Both groups of demented patients had higher intakes of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals than the control subjects. The diet of the hospitalized patients was slightly, but not significantly, superior to that of the patients living in the community. Biochemical evidence of specific vitamin inadequacy was equally prevalent in all three groups of subjects, and there were no significant correlations between the degree of cognitive impairment or behavioural disorder and any of the indices of nutritional state. Clinical signs suggestive of malnutrition were not correlated with either biochemical evidence of deficiency or cognitive impairment and behavioural disturbance. PMID:2503850

  19. Discussion of medical x ray picture normalization