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Sample records for age-predicted maximal heart

  1. Predicted maximal heart rate for upper body exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Talbot, C; Price, M

    2016-03-01

    Age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRMAX ) equations are commonly used for the purpose of prescribing exercise regimens, as criteria for achieving maximal exertion and for diagnostic exercise testing. Despite the growing popularity of upper body exercise in both healthy and clinical settings, no recommendations are available for exercise modes using the smaller upper body muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to determine how well commonly used age-adjusted prediction equations for HRMAX estimate actual HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy young and older adults. A total of 30 young (age: 20 ± 2 years, height: 171·9 ± 32·8 cm, mass: 77·7 ± 12·6 kg) and 20 elderly adults (age: 66 ± 6 years, height: 162 ± 8·1 cm, mass: 65·3 ± 12·3 kg) undertook maximal incremental exercise tests on a conventional arm crank ergometer. Age-adjusted maximal heart rate was calculated using prediction equations based on leg exercise and compared with measured HRMAX data for the arms. Maximal HR for arm exercise was significantly overpredicted compared with age-adjusted prediction equations in both young and older adults. Subtracting 10-20 beats min(-1) from conventional prediction equations provides a reasonable estimate of HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy older and younger adults. PMID:25319169

  2. Effect of Age and Other Factors on Maximal Heart Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.

    1982-01-01

    To reduce confusion regarding reported effects of age on maximal exercise heart rate, a comprehensive review of the relevant English literature was conducted. Data on maximal heart rate after exercising with a bicycle, a treadmill, and after swimming were analyzed with regard to physical fitness and to age, sex, and racial differences. (Authors/PP)

  3. Heart size estimated by echocardiography correlates with maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Young, L E; Marlin, D J; Deaton, C; Brown-Feltner, H; Roberts, C A; Wood, J L N

    2002-09-01

    Maximum oxygen uptake also appears to correlate to athletic performance in horses. In the Thoroughbred industry, there has long been an empirical theory that heart size is related to athletic performance, despite a lack of scientific evidence supporting this assertion. To investigate the relationship between peak oxygen consumption (VO2max) and cardiac size measured by echocardiography, guided M-mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography were performed in 17 conditioned Thoroughbreds with a range of VO2max from 126 to 217 ml/min/kg STPD (mean +/- s.d. 158 +/- 28 m/min/kg). Horses were age 2-10 years and weighed 430-510 kg. Echocardiography was performed using a Vingmed System V echocardiograph with a 2.25 MHz phased array ultrasound transducer. All images were obtained from the right hemithorax using a short axis view of the left ventricle (LV) at the level of the chordae tendinae. All horses were free from significant regurgitation at the aortic or mitral valves. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a standardised incremental treadmill exercise test to fatigue. Maximal oxygen uptake was correlated significantly with LVIDd (r = 0.71; P = 0.001), MWT (r = 0.72; P = 0.001), LV mass (r = 0.78; P = 0.0002) and LV short-axis area (r = 0.69; P = 0.003). When indices of heart size were indexed to bodyweight, the correlation between VO2max and indices of heart size were LVIDd (r = 0.57; P = 0.01), MWT (r = 0.44; P = 0.07), LV mass (r = 0.78; P = 0.0002) and LV short-axis area (r = 0.69; P = 0.003). The current study suggests there is a strong relationship between VO2max and measurements of left ventricular size in Thoroughbred horses when individuals with a range of VO2max are compared. PMID:12405735

  4. Cardiovascular Fitness and Maximal Heart Rate Differences Among Three Ethnic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of differences in maximal heart rate and treadmill time among three ethnic groups revealed no significant age-adjusted differences among white, black, and Mexican-American males, and suggested that black females' lower maximal heart rate may be explained by their lower cardiovascular fitness level when compared to those of other…

  5. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  6. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  7. Maximizing the Effectiveness of Ablation for Arrhythmias in the Congenital Heart Patients.

    PubMed

    Arujuna, Aruna; de Bono, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in adults with congenital heart disease and account for a large proportion of hospitalizations. The complex anatomical heterogeneity, often in the presence of a delicate hemodynamic system, presents a significant electrophysiological challenge. This review outlines current clinical practice and advances in maximizing the effectiveness of ablation for arrhythmias in congenital heart patients. PMID:27289368

  8. Evaluating the Prediction of Maximal Heart Rate in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Anthony D.; Marjerrison, Andrea D.; Lee, Jonah D.; Woodruff, Megan E.; Hanna, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compared measured maximal heart rate (HRmax) to two different HRmax prediction equations [220-age and 208-0.7(age)] in 52 children ages 7-17 years. We determined the relationship of chronological age, maturational age, and resting HR to measured HRmax and assessed seated resting HR and HRmax during a graded exercise test.…

  9. Heart Rate Recovery Is Impaired After Maximal Exercise Testing in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Anthony M.; Ward, Kendra M.; Muntz, Devin S.; Thompson, Alexis A.; Rodeghier, Mark; Fernhall, Bo; Liem, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine heart rate recovery (HRR) as an indicator of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction following maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Study design Recovery phase heart rate (HR) in the first 5 minutes following maximal exercise testing in 60 subjects with SCA and 30 matched controls without SCA was assessed. The difference between maximal HR and HR at both 1-minute (ΔHR1min) and 2-minute (ΔHR2min) recovery was our primary outcome. Results Compared with controls, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly smaller mean ΔHR1min (23 bpm, 95% CI [20, 26] vs. 32 bpm, 95% CI [26, 37], p = 0.006) and ΔHR2min (39 bpm, 95% CI [36, 43] vs. 48 bpm, 95% CI [42, 53], p = 0.011). Subjects with SCA also showed smaller mean changes in HR from peak HR to 1 minute, from 1 minute to 2 minutes and from 2 through 5 minutes of recovery by repeated measures testing. In a multivariable regression model, older age was independently associated with smaller ΔHR1min in subjects with SCA. Cardiopulmonary fitness and hydroxyurea use, however, were not independent predictors of ΔHR1min. Conclusions Children with SCA demonstrate impaired HRR following maximal exercise. Reduced post-exercise HRR in SCA suggests impaired parasympathetic function, which may become progressively worse with age, in this population. PMID:25477159

  10. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  11. Reliability of heart rate measures during walking before and after running maximal efforts.

    PubMed

    Boullosa, D A; Barros, E S; del Rosso, S; Nakamura, F Y; Leicht, A S

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies on HR recovery (HRR) measures have utilized the supine and the seated postures. However, the most common recovery mode in sport and clinical settings after running exercise is active walking. The aim of the current study was to examine the reliability of HR measures during walking (4 km · h(-1)) before and following a maximal test. Twelve endurance athletes performed an incremental running test on 2 days separated by 48 h. Absolute (coefficient of variation, CV, %) and relative [Intraclass correlation coefficient, (ICC)] reliability of time domain and non-linear measures of HR variability (HRV) from 3 min recordings, and HRR parameters over 5 min were assessed. Moderate to very high reliability was identified for most HRV indices with short-term components of time domain and non-linear HRV measures demonstrating the greatest reliability before (CV: 12-22%; ICC: 0.73-0.92) and after exercise (CV: 14-32%; ICC: 0.78-0.91). Most HRR indices and parameters of HRR kinetics demonstrated high to very high reliability with HR values at a given point and the asymptotic value of HR being the most reliable (CV: 2.5-10.6%; ICC: 0.81-0.97). These findings demonstrate these measures as reliable tools for the assessment of autonomic control of HR during walking before and after maximal efforts. PMID:24841837

  12. Maximal oxygen uptake is proportional to muscle fiber oxidative capacity, from chronic heart failure patients to professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; de Ruiter, Jo C; Noordhof, Dionne A; Sterrenburg, Renske; Bloemers, Frank W; de Koning, Jos J; Jaspers, Richard T; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2016-09-01

    V̇o2 max during whole body exercise is presumably constrained by oxygen delivery to mitochondria rather than by mitochondria's ability to consume oxygen. Humans and animals have been reported to exploit only 60-80% of their mitochondrial oxidative capacity at maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max). However, ex vivo quantification of mitochondrial overcapacity is complicated by isolation or permeabilization procedures. An alternative method for estimating mitochondrial oxidative capacity is via enzyme histochemical quantification of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. We determined to what extent V̇o2 max attained during cycling exercise differs from mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity of vastus lateralis muscle in chronic heart failure patients, healthy controls, and cyclists. V̇o2 max was assessed in 20 healthy subjects and 28 cyclists, and SDH activity was determined from biopsy cryosections of vastus lateralis using quantitative histochemistry. Similar data from our laboratory of 14 chronic heart failure patients and 6 controls were included. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity was predicted from SDH activity using estimated skeletal muscle mass and the relationship between ex vivo fiber V̇o2 max and SDH activity of isolated single muscle fibers and myocardial trabecula under hyperoxic conditions. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity was related (r(2) = 0.89, P < 0.001) to V̇o2 max measured during cycling in subjects with V̇o2 max ranging from 9.8 to 79.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) V̇o2 max measured during cycling was on average 90 ± 14% of mitochondrial oxidative capacity. We conclude that human V̇o2 max is related to mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from skeletal muscle SDH activity. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity is likely marginally limited by oxygen supply to mitochondria. PMID:27445298

  13. Isolated quadriceps training increases maximal exercise capacity in chronic heart failure: The role of skeletal muscle convective and diffusive oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Fabio; Reese, Van; Shabetai, Ralph; Wagner, Peter D.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of small muscle mass exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Background How central cardiorespiratory and/or peripheral skeletal muscle factors are altered with small muscle mass training in CHF is unknown. Methods We studied muscle structure and oxygen (O2) transport and metabolism at maximal cycle (whole body) and knee-extensor exercise (KE) (small muscle mass) in 6 healthy controls and 6 patients with CHF who then performed 8 weeks of KE training (both legs, separately) and repeated these assessments. Results Pre-training cycling and KE peak leg O2 uptake (VO2peak) were ~17% and ~15% lower, respectively, in the patients compared to controls. Structurally, KE training increased quadriceps muscle capillarity and mitochondrial density by ~21 and ~25%, respectively. Functionally, despite not altering maximal cardiac output, KE training increased maximal O2 delivery (~54%), arterial-venous O2 (a–v O2) difference (~10%), and muscle O2 diffusive conductance (DMO2) (~39%) (assessed during KE), thereby increasing single leg VO2peak by ~53%, to a level exceeding that of the untrained controls. Post-training, during maximal cycling, O2 delivery (~40%), a–v O2 difference (~15%), and DMO2 (~52%) all increased, yielding an increase in VO2peak of ~40%, matching the controls. Conclusions In the face of continued central limitations, clear improvements in muscle structure, peripheral convective and diffusive O2 transport, and subsequently O2 utilization support the efficacy of local skeletal muscle training as a powerful approach to combat exercise intolerance in CHF. PMID:21920265

  14. The effect of heart rate controlled low resistance circuit weight training and endurance training on maximal aerobic power in sedentary adults.

    PubMed

    Kaikkonen, H; Yrjämä, M; Siljander, E; Byman, P; Laukkanen, R

    2000-08-01

    The effects of a 12-week low resistance circuit weight training (CWT) on cardiovascular and muscular fitness were studied in 90 healthy sedentary adults. The subjects were randomized into three equally fit groups: CWT, Endurance (END) and Control (CON) according to their maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Both training groups exercised for 12 weeks, 3 days a week in sessions of 40 min, with a heart rate (HR) level of 70-80% HRmax. The CWT group trained with air resistance machines. Heart rate was controlled by setting the speed of movement. The END group walked, jogged, cross-country skied or cycled. The net differences (between pre- and posttraining changes) between the CWT and CON groups was statistically significant for VO2max (2.45 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1), 95% CI 1.1; 3.8), for abdominal muscles (3.7 reps, CI 0.3; 7.1), for push-ups (1.1 reps, CI 0.2; 2.1), and for kneeling (2.25 reps, CI 0.01; 4.5). The net difference (between pre- and posttraining changes) in the END and CON groups was statistically significant for VO2max (2.75 ml(-1) x min(-1) x kg(-1), 95% CI 0.9; 4.6), and kneeling (3.0 reps, CI 0.7; 5.3). Low resistance CWT with moderately hard HR level has effects comparable to an equal amount of endurance training on the cardiovascular fitness of sedentary adults. The CWT model was benefical also on muscular fitness. Based on the results, this type of exercise can be recommended for beginners because of its multilevel effects. PMID:10898265

  15. Maximal enzyme activities, and myoglobin and glutathione concentrations in heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda; Insectivora: Soricidae).

    PubMed

    Stewart, J M; Woods, A K; Blakely, J A

    2005-07-01

    We measured the enzymes of glycolysis, Krebs Cycle, beta-oxidation and electron transport in the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of the Northern Short-tailed Shrew, Blarina brevicauda. Additionally, we measured the amount of myoglobin in skeletal and heart muscle as well as the concentration of glutathione in heart. The picture that emerges is of an aerobically well-endowed animal with constrained anaerobic capacity as indicated by small activities of glycolytic enzymes and creatine kinase. Lipid metabolism and amino acid transamination, as well as gluconeogenesis, are predominant in processing carbon resources and probably reflect the large contribution lipid and protein make to the diet of this carnivore. The citrate synthase activity is the largest of any reported value for vertebrate heart (250 U/g). The additional, very active cytochrome c oxidase activity (220 U/g) and large myoglobin concentrations (8 mg/g) in heart are clearly the underpinnings of the rapid metabolic rates reported for small insectivores. The potential for generation of reactive oxygen species must be great since the total glutathione concentration (165 mumol/g) is 300-fold greater in shrew hearts than in hearts of rats. PMID:15914053

  16. Comparison of myocardial /sup 201/Tl clearance after maximal and submaximal exercise: implications for diagnosis of coronary disease: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.M.; Wisneski, J.; Kramer, B.; Hollenberg, M.; Gertz, E.; Stern, D.

    1982-05-01

    Recently the quantitation of regional /sup 201/Tl clearance has been shown to increase the sensitivity of the scintigraphic detection of coronary disease. Although /sup 201/Tl clearance rates might be expected to vary with the degree of exercise, this relationship has not been explored. We therefore evaluated the rate of decrease in myocardial /sup 201/Tl activity following maximal and submaximal stress in seven normal subjects and 21 patients with chest pain, using the seven-pinhole tomographic reconstruction technique. In normals, the mean /sup 201/Tl clearance rate declined from 41% +/- 7 over a 3-hr period with maximal exercise to 25% +/- 5 after 3 hr at a submaximal level (p less than 0.001). Similar differences in clearance rates were found in the normally perfused regions of the left ventricle in patients with chest pain, depending on whether or not a maximal end point (defined as either the appearance of ischemia or reaching 85% of age-predicted heart rate) was achieved. In five patients who did not reach these end points, 3-hr clearance rates in uninvolved regions averaged 25% +/- 2, in contrast to a mean of 38% +/- 5 for such regions in 15 patients who exercised to ischemia or an adequate heart rate. These findings indicate that clearance criteria derived from normals can be applied to patients who are stressed maximally, even if the duration of exercise is limited, but that caution must be used in interpreting clearance rates in those who do not exercise to an accepted end point.

  17. Ultra-weak photon emission of hands in aging prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; van Wijk, Eduard; Yan, Yu; van Wijk, Roeland; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Aging has been one of the several topics intensely investigated during recent decades. More scientists have been scrutinizing mechanisms behind the human aging process. Ultra-weak photon emission is known as one type of spontaneous photon emission that can be detected with a highly sensitive single photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT) from the surface of human bodies. It may reflect the body's oxidative damage. Our aim was to examine whether ultra-weak photon emission from a human hand is able to predict one's chronological age. Sixty subjects were recruited and grouped by age. We examined four areas of each hand: palm side of fingers, palm side of hand, dorsum side of fingers, and dorsum side of hand. Left and right hand were measured synchronously with two independent PMTs. Mean strength and Fano factor values of photon counts were utilized to compare the UPE patterns of males and females of different age groups. Subsequently, we utilized UPE data from the most sensitive PMT to develop an age prediction model. We randomly picked 49 subjects to construct the model, whereas the remaining 11 subjects were utilized for validation. The results demonstrated that the model was a good regression compared to the observed values (Pearson's r=0.6, adjusted R square=0.4, p=9.4E-7, accuracy=49/60). Further analysis revealed that the average difference between the chronological age and predicted age was only 7.6±0.8years. It was concluded that this fast and non-invasive photon technology is sufficiently promising to be developed for the estimation of biological aging. PMID:27472904

  18. Assessment of the influence of age on the rate of heart rate decline after maximal exercise in non-athletic adult males.

    PubMed

    Dimkpa, U; Ibhazehiebo, K

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of age on heart rate (HR) decline after exercise in non-athletic adult males. One hundred and fourteen adult males (66 young, 25 +/- 6.26 years; 48 old, 53 +/- 8.54 years) participated in the study. Subjects performed maximum-effort ergometer exercise in incremental stages. HR was measured at rest and continuously monitored during and after exercise. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) was measured during the exercise using respiratory gas analyser. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from weight and height measurements, while rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was obtained immediately after the exercise. Results indicated age differences in the rate of HR decline with the young presenting significantly higher %HR decline (P<0.001) than old adults at both levels of recovery. When linearly correlated with age, the rate of HR decline in 1 and 3 min indicated variances of (52%,56%) in young adults, and (54%,49%) in the old adults. After controlling for VO(2max), resting HR, BMI and RPE, the influence of age on rate of HR decline in the two phases of recovery disappeared in young. In the older adult group, it reduced greatly in the 1-min recovery (r(2) = 25%; P = 0.001) and disappeared in the 3-min recovery. Pattern of HR recovery did not differ between the two age groups while age threshold was observed in HR recovery in 1 min. In summary, the influence that age appeared to have on the rate of HR decline could not hold when factors affecting HR recovery were taken into account. PMID:19016813

  19. The effect of an aerobic training program on the electrical remodeling of heart high-frequency components of the signal-averaged electrocardiogram is a predictor of the maximal aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Marocolo, M; Nadal, J; Benchimol Barbosa, P R

    2007-02-01

    Increased heart rate variability (HRV) and high-frequency content of the terminal region of the ventricular activation of signal-averaged ECG (SAECG) have been reported in athletes. The present study investigates HRV and SAECG parameters as predictors of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) in athletes. HRV, SAECG and VO2max were determined in 18 high-performance long-distance (25 +/- 6 years; 17 males) runners 24 h after a training session. Clinical visits, ECG and VO2max determination were scheduled for all athletes during the training period. A group of 18 untrained healthy volunteers matched for age, gender, and body surface area was included as controls. SAECG was acquired in the resting supine position for 15 min and processed to extract average RR interval (Mean-RR) and root mean squared standard deviation (RMSSD) of the difference of two consecutive normal RR intervals. SAECG variables analyzed in the vector magnitude with 40-250 Hz band-pass bi-directional filtering were: total and 40-microV terminal (LAS40) duration of ventricular activation, RMS voltage of total (RMST) and of the 40-ms terminal region of ventricular activation. Linear and multivariate stepwise logistic regressions oriented by inter-group comparisons were adjusted in significant variables in order to predict VO2max, with a P < 0.05 considered to be significant. VO2max correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with RMST (r = 0.77), Mean-RR (r = 0.62), RMSSD (r = 0.47), and LAS40 (r = -0.39). RMST was the independent predictor of VO2max. In athletes, HRV and high-frequency components of the SAECG correlate with VO2max and the high-frequency content of SAECG is an independent predictor of VO2max. PMID:17273656

  20. Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connected Home » Heart Health Heath and Aging Heart Health Your Heart Changes to Your Heart With ... are both taking steps toward heart health. Your Heart Your heart is a strong muscle about the ...

  1. Maximally nonlocal theories cannot be maximally random.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Hoban, Matty J; Dhara, Chirag; Prettico, Giuseppe; Acín, Antonio

    2015-04-24

    Correlations that violate a Bell inequality are said to be nonlocal; i.e., they do not admit a local and deterministic explanation. Great effort has been devoted to study how the amount of nonlocality (as measured by a Bell inequality violation) serves to quantify the amount of randomness present in observed correlations. In this work we reverse this research program and ask what do the randomness certification capabilities of a theory tell us about the nonlocality of that theory. We find that, contrary to initial intuition, maximal randomness certification cannot occur in maximally nonlocal theories. We go on and show that quantum theory, in contrast, permits certification of maximal randomness in all dichotomic scenarios. We hence pose the question of whether quantum theory is optimal for randomness; i.e., is it the most nonlocal theory that allows maximal randomness certification? We answer this question in the negative by identifying a larger-than-quantum set of correlations capable of this feat. Not only are these results relevant to understanding quantum mechanics' fundamental features, but also put fundamental restrictions on device-independent protocols based on the no-signaling principle. PMID:25955039

  2. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodova, E.; Shchepakina, E.

    2006-12-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models.

  3. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  4. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years. Alternative Names Cardiac transplant; Transplant - heart; Transplantation - heart Images Heart, section through the middle Heart, ... 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  6. Maximizing Classroom Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to maximize classroom participation in the English-as-a-Second-or-Foreign-Language classroom, and provides a classroom discussion method that is based on real-life problem solving. (Author/VWL)

  7. Maximal Outboxes of Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    An outbox of a quadrilateral is a rectangle such that each vertex of the given quadrilateral lies on one side of the rectangle and different vertices lie on different sides. We first investigate those quadrilaterals whose every outbox is a square. Next, we consider the maximal outboxes of rectangles and those quadrilaterals with perpendicular…

  8. How To: Maximize Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Google is shaking out to be the leading Web search engine, with recent research from Nielsen NetRatings reporting about 40 percent of all U.S. households using the tool at least once in January 2004. This brief article discusses how teachers and students can maximize their use of Google.

  9. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19–3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10–2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17–2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  10. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Albert C; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lu, Tse-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan; Sung, Shih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19-3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10-2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17-2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  11. Metabolic Youth in Middle Age: Predicting Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Davies, Sarah K; Bundy, Jacob G; Leroi, Armand M

    2015-11-01

    Many mutations and allelic variants are known that influence the rate at which animals age, but when in life do such variants diverge from normal patterns of aging? Is this divergence visible in their physiologies? To investigate these questions, we have used (1)H NMR spectroscopy to study how the metabolome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans changes as it grows older. We identify a series of metabolic changes that, collectively, predict the age of wild-type worms. We then show that long-lived mutant daf-2(m41) worms are metabolically youthful compared to wild-type worms, but that this relative youth only appears in middle age. Finally, we show that metabolic age predicts the timing and magnitude of differences in age-specific mortality between these strains. Thus, the future mortality of these two genotypes can be predicted long before most of the worms die. PMID:26381038

  12. Development of a forensically useful age prediction method based on DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Zbieć-Piekarska, Renata; Spólnicka, Magdalena; Kupiec, Tomasz; Parys-Proszek, Agnieszka; Makowska, Żanetta; Pałeczka, Anna; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Płoski, Rafał; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-07-01

    Forensic DNA phenotyping needs to be supplemented with age prediction to become a relevant source of information on human appearance. Recent progress in analysis of the human methylome has enabled selection of multiple candidate loci showing linear correlation with chronological age. Practical application in forensic science depends on successful validation of these potential age predictors. In this study, eight DNA methylation candidate loci were analysed using convenient and reliable pyrosequencing technology. A total number of 41 CpG sites was investigated in 420 samples collected from men and women aged from 2 to 75 years. The study confirmed correlation of all the investigated markers with human age. The five most significantly correlated CpG sites in ELOVL2 on 6p24.2, C1orf132 on 1q32.2, TRIM59 on 3q25.33, KLF14 on 7q32.3 and FHL2 on 2q12.2 were chosen to build a prediction model. This restriction allowed the technical analysis to be simplified without lowering the prediction accuracy significantly. Model parameters for a discovery set of 300 samples were R(2)=0.94 and the standard error of the estimate=4.5 years. An independent set of 120 samples was used to test the model performance. Mean absolute deviation for this testing set was 3.9 years. The number of correct predictions ±5 years achieved a very high level of 86.7% in the age category 2-19 and gradually decreased to 50% in the age category 60-75. The prediction model was deterministic for individuals belonging to these two extreme age categories. The developed method was implemented in a freely available online age prediction calculator. PMID:26026729

  13. Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Tereza; Cucchieri, Attilio; Mihara, Antonio

    2007-02-27

    The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

  14. A Maximal Graded Exercise Test to Accurately Predict VO2max in 18-65-Year-Old Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, James D.; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Hyde, Annette; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an age-generalized regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max) based on a maximal treadmill graded exercise test (GXT; George, 1996). Participants (N = 100), ages 18-65 years, reached a maximal level of exertion (mean plus or minus standard deviation [SD]; maximal heart rate [HR sub…

  15. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  16. How to Take Your Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page 1 of 2 The chart illustrates target heart rate ranges for exercise based on the maximal heart rate for selected ... to the next older age listed. - Compare your heart rate to the target exercise range. • If you are doing moderate exercise, your ...

  17. MAXIM: The Blackhole Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Cash, Webster; Gorenstein, Paul; Windt, David; Kaaret, Phil; Reynolds, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Beyond Einstein Program in NASA's Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe theme spells out the top level scientific requirements for a Black Hole Imager in its strategic plan. The MAXIM mission will provide better than one tenth of a microarcsecond imaging in the X-ray band in order to satisfy these requirements. We will overview the driving requirements to achieve these goals and ultimately resolve the event horizon of a supermassive black hole. We will present the current status of this effort that includes a study of a baseline design as well as two alternative approaches.

  18. Maximal aerobic exercise following prolonged sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, J; Radomski, M; Hart, L; Plyley, M; Shephard, R J

    1989-12-01

    The effect of 60 h without sleep upon maximal oxygen intake was examined in 12 young women, using a cycle ergometer protocol. The arousal of the subjects was maintained by requiring the performance of a sequence of cognitive tasks throughout the experimental period. Well-defined oxygen intake plateaus were obtained both before and after sleep deprivation, and no change of maximal oxygen intake was observed immediately following sleep deprivation. The endurance time for exhausting exercise also remained unchanged, as did such markers of aerobic performance as peak exercise ventilation, peak heart rate, peak respiratory gas exchange ratio, and peak blood lactate. However, as in an earlier study of sleep deprivation with male subjects (in which a decrease of treadmill maximal oxygen intake was observed), the formula of Dill and Costill (4) indicated the development of a substantial (11.6%) increase of estimated plasma volume percentage with corresponding decreases in hematocrit and red cell count. Possible factors sustaining maximal oxygen intake under the conditions of the present experiment include (1) maintained arousal of the subjects with no decrease in peak exercise ventilation or the related respiratory work and (2) use of a cycle ergometer rather than a treadmill test with possible concurrent differences in the impact of hematocrit levels and plasma volume expansion upon peak cardiac output and thus oxygen delivery to the working muscles. PMID:2628360

  19. A novel strategy for forensic age prediction by DNA methylation and support vector regression model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Qu, Hongzhu; Wang, Guangyu; Xie, Bingbing; Shi, Yi; Yang, Yaran; Zhao, Zhao; Hu, Lan; Fang, Xiangdong; Yan, Jiangwei; Feng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    High deviations resulting from prediction model, gender and population difference have limited age estimation application of DNA methylation markers. Here we identified 2,957 novel age-associated DNA methylation sites (P < 0.01 and R2 > 0.5) in blood of eight pairs of Chinese Han female monozygotic twins. Among them, nine novel sites (false discovery rate < 0.01), along with three other reported sites, were further validated in 49 unrelated female volunteers with ages of 20–80 years by Sequenom Massarray. A total of 95 CpGs were covered in the PCR products and 11 of them were built the age prediction models. After comparing four different models including, multivariate linear regression, multivariate nonlinear regression, back propagation neural network and support vector regression, SVR was identified as the most robust model with the least mean absolute deviation from real chronological age (2.8 years) and an average accuracy of 4.7 years predicted by only six loci from the 11 loci, as well as an less cross-validated error compared with linear regression model. Our novel strategy provides an accurate measurement that is highly useful in estimating the individual age in forensic practice as well as in tracking the aging process in other related applications. PMID:26635134

  20. Maximally Expressive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Richardson, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize tasks into a timeline or schedule. Tasks are logically grouped into containers called models. Models are a collection of related tasks, along with their dependencies and requirements, that when met will produce the desired result. One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed; the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor; and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a maximally expressive modeling schema.

  1. Maximally Expressive Task Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Japp, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Theresa G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiment activities for the Space Station. The equipment used in these experiments is some of the most complex hardware ever developed by mankind, the information sought by these experiments is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures for executing the experiments are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of space station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling space station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema. Modeling even the simplest of activities cannot be automated; no sensor can be attached to a piece of equipment that can discern how to use that piece of equipment; no camera can quantify how to operate a piece of equipment. Modeling is a human enterprise-both an art and a science. The modeling schema should allow the models to flow from the keyboard of the user as easily as works of literature flowed from the pen of Shakespeare. The Ground Systems Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center has embarked on an effort to develop a new scheduling engine that is highlighted by a maximally expressive modeling schema. This schema, presented in this paper, is a synergy of technological advances and domain-specific innovations.

  2. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft - CABG) Heart transplant Heart valve surgery Hypoplastic left heart repair Minimally ... Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart transplant Heart valve surgery Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Patent ...

  3. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  4. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD-heart attack; Coronary artery disease-heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  5. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  6. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  7. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a heart attack take part in a cardiac rehabilitation program. ... al. eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  8. Maximal oxygen uptake during exercise using trained or untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Moreira-da-Costa, M; Russo, A K; Piçarro, I C; Silva, A C; Leite-de-Barros-Neto, T; Tarasantchi, J; Barbosa, A S

    1984-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake, VO2 max, was determined for cyclists, long-distance runners and non-athletes during uphill running (treadmill) and cycling (cycloergometer) to compare trained and untrained muscles. Blood lactate, maximal heart rate and maximal ventilation during work were also measured. VO2 max was higher for runners and non-athletes during exercise on the treadmill and higher for cyclists during exercise on the cycloergometer. For runners and non-athletes, maximal heart rate accompanied the increase in VO2 max, whereas similar values were obtained for cyclists on both ergometers. Maximal ventilation during work accompanied the difference in VO2 max in both groups of athletes but among non-athletes it was similar during exercise on both the cycloergometer and the treadmill. Blood lactate was similar during exercise on both ergometers for all groups. These results suggest that the quantitative effects of training on cardiovascular and respiratory functions may only be properly evaluated by using an ergometer which requires an activity similar to that usually performed by the subjects. Cycle riding may possibly induce significant and specific alterations in the muscles involved in the exercise, thus increasing peripheral O2 uptake even after stabilization of maximal cardiac output, whereas running may well induce an improvement of all factors which are responsible for aerobic work power. PMID:6518340

  9. Maximizing Brightness in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Tomizawa, H.; /JAERI-RIKEN, Hyogo

    2011-11-30

    If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should have a 3D-ellipsoidal shape. The emittance at the end of the injector could be as small as the cathode emittance. We explore how the emittance and the brightness can be optimized for photoinjector based on RF gun depending on the peak current requirements. Techniques available to produce those ideal laser pulse shapes are also discussed. If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns, the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should be close to a uniform distribution contained in a 3D-ellipsoid contour. For photo-cathodes which have very fast emission times, and assuming a perfectly uniform emitting surface, this could be achieved by shaping the laser in a pulse of constant fluence and limited in space by a 3D-ellipsoid contour. Simulations show that in such conditions, with the standard linear emittance compensation, the emittance at the end of the photo-injector beamline approaches the minimum value imposed by the cathode emittance. Brightness, which is expressed as the ratio of peak current over the product of the two transverse emittance, seems to be maximized for small charges. Numerical simulations also show that for very high charge per bunch (10nC), emittances as small as 2 mm-mrad could be reached by using 3D-ellipsoidal laser pulses in an S-Band gun. The production of 3D-ellipsoidal pulses is very challenging, but seems worthwhile the effort. We briefly discuss some of the present ideas and difficulties of achieving such pulses.

  10. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get help immediately. It's ... few hours causes the affected heart muscle to die. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  11. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  12. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  13. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil improves heart rate variability and heart rate responses to exercise in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Ninio, Daniel M; Hill, Alison M; Howe, Peter R; Buckley, Jonathan D; Saint, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation and regular physical activity can improve outcomes in patients with established CVD. Exercise has been shown to improve heart rate variability (HRV), a predictor of cardiac death, but whether fish oil benefits HRV is controversial. Obese adults at risk of future coronary disease have impaired HRV and may benefit from these interventions. We evaluated the effect of DHA-rich tuna fish oil supplementation with and without regular exercise on HRV in sedentary, overweight adults with risk factors for coronary disease. In a randomised, double-blind, parallel comparison, sixty-five volunteers consumed 6 g fish oil/d (DHA 1.56 g/d, EPA 0.36 g/d) or sunflower-seed oil (placebo) for 12 weeks. Half of each oil group also undertook regular moderate physical activity (3 d/week for 45 min, at 75 % of age-predicted maximal heart rate (HR)). Resting HR and the HR response to submaximal exercise were measured at weeks 0, 6 and 12. In forty-six subjects, HRV was also assessed by power spectrum analysis of 20 min electrocardiogram recordings taken supine at baseline and 12 weeks. Fish oil supplementation improved HRV by increasing high-frequency power, representing parasympathetic activity, compared with placebo (P = 0.01; oil x time interaction). It also reduced HR at rest and during submaximal exercise (P = 0.008; oil x time interaction). There were no significant fish oil x exercise interactions. Dietary supplementation with DHA-rich fish oil reduced HR and modulated HRV in keeping with an improved parasympathetic-sympathetic balance in overweight adults with risk factors for future coronary disease. PMID:18339222

  15. Ivabradine: Heart Failure and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rahul; Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Neeraj; Lanier, Gregg; Martinez, Mathew W; Freudenberger, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure affects over 5 million people in the United States and carries a high rate of mortality. Ivabradine, a new agent has been added to the current medical options for managing heart failure. It is a selective funny current (If) inhibitor in sinoatrial node and slows its firing rate, prolonging diastolic depolarization without a negative inotropic effect. Ivabradine was only recently approved by Food and Drug administration after the results of Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the If Inhibitor Ivabradine (SHIFT) trial, for a reduction in rehospitalizations from chronic heart failure. This trial assessed patients with stable heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and a heart rate of at least 70 beats per minute at rest on maximally tolerated beta-blocker therapy and demonstrated statistically significant reduction in heart failure hospitalization and deaths. Additionally, ivabradine has been associated with reduced cardiac remodeling, reduced heart rate variability, improvement in exercise tolerance, improved heart failure class of New York Heart Association, and better quality of life. It has also been tried in other conditions, such as inappropriate sinus tachycardia and cardiogenic shock, and is currently in phase II trial for patients with newly diagnosed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26721645

  16. Height loss starting in middle age predicts increased mortality in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Masunari, Naomi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Yamada, Michiko; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mortality risk among Japanese men and women with height loss starting in middle age, taking into account lifestyle and physical factors. A total of 2498 subjects (755 men and 1743 women) aged 47 to 91 years old underwent physical examinations during the period 1994 to 1995. Those individuals were followed for mortality status through 2003. Mortality risk was estimated using an age-stratified Cox proportional hazards model. In addition to sex, adjustment factors such as radiation dose, lifestyle, and physical factors measured at the baseline--including smoking status, alcohol intake, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and diagnosed diseases--were used for analysis of total mortality and mortality from each cause of death. There were a total of 302 all-cause deaths, 46 coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, 58 respiratory deaths including 45 pneumonia deaths, and 132 cancer deaths during the follow-up period. Participants were followed for 20,787 person-years after baseline. Prior history of vertebral deformity and hip fracture were not associated with mortality risk. However, more than 2 cm of height loss starting in middle age showed a significant association with all-cause mortality among the study participants (HR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.31 to 2.38, p = 0.0002), after adjustment was made for sex, attained age, atomic-bomb radiation exposure, and lifestyle and physical factors. Such height loss also was significantly associated with death due to coronary heart disease or stroke (HR = 3.35, 95% CI 1.63 to 6.86, p = 0.0010), as well as respiratory-disease death (HR = 2.52, 95% CI 1.25 to 5.22, p = 0.0130), but not cancer death. Continuous HL also was associated with all-cause mortality and CHD- or stroke-caused mortality. Association between height loss and mortality was still significant, even after excluding persons with vertebral deformity. Height loss of more than 2 cm starting in middle age

  17. ALDOSTERONE DYSREGULATION WITH AGING PREDICTS RENAL-VASCULAR FUNCTION AND CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Underwood, Patricia C.; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N.; Williams, Gordon H.; Adler, Gail K.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Aging and abnormal aldosterone regulation are both associated with vascular disease. We hypothesized that aldosterone dysregulation influences the age-related risk of renal- and cardio-vascular disease. We conducted an analysis of 562 subjects who underwent detailed investigations under conditions of liberal and restricted dietary sodium intake (1,124 visits) in a Clinical Research Center. Aldosterone regulation was characterized by the ratio of maximal suppression-to-stimulation (supine serum aldosterone on a liberal sodium diet divided by the same measure on a restricted sodium diet). We previously demonstrated that higher levels of this Sodium-modulated Aldosterone Suppression-Stimulation Index (SASSI) indicate greater aldosterone dysregulation. Renal plasma flow (RPF) was determined via p-aminohippurate clearance to assess basal renal hemodynamics, and the renal-vascular responses to dietary sodium manipulation and angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Framingham Risk Score. In univariate linear regression, older age (β= -4.60, p<0.0001) and higher SASSI (β= -58.63, p=0.001) predicted lower RPF and a blunted RPF response to sodium loading and AngII infusion. We observed a continuous, independent, multivariate-adjusted interaction between age and SASSI, where the inverse relationship between SASSI and RPF was most apparent with older age (p<0.05). Higher SASSI and lower RPF independently predicted higher Framingham Risk Score (p<0.0001) and together displayed an additive effect. Aldosterone regulation and age may interact to mediate renal-vascular disease. Our findings suggest that the combination of aldosterone dysregulation and renal-vascular dysfunction could additively increase the risk of future cardiovascular outcomes; therefore, aldosterone dysregulation may represent a modifiable mechanism of age-related vascular disease. PMID:24664291

  18. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  19. Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/Go4Life Heart Health Just like an engine makes a car go, your heart keeps your ... all at once —10-minute periods will do. Start by doing activities you enjoy—brisk walking, dancing, ...

  20. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  1. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrhythmias) The use of toxic substances (such as alcohol or drug abuse) Congenital heart defect (a heart problem you were born with) Diabetes Thyroid problems Diagnosis & Tests How will my doctor know if I ...

  2. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    Heart palpitations can be due to: Anxiety, stress, panic attack, or fear Caffeine intake Nicotine intake Cocaine or other illegal drugs Diet pills Exercise Fever However, some palpitations are due to an abnormal heart rhythm, ...

  3. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  4. ST segment/heart rate slope as a predictor of coronary artery disease: comparison with quantitative thallium imaging and conventional ST segment criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelhor, R.S.; Newhouse, K.E.; Vrobel, T.R.; Miron, S.D.; Bahler, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    The ST segment shift relative to exercise-induced increments in heart rate, the ST/heart rate slope (ST/HR slope), has been proposed as a more accurate ECG criterion for diagnosing significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Its clinical utility, with the use of a standard treadmill protocol, was compared with quantitative stress thallium (TI) and standard treadmill criteria in 64 unselected patients who underwent coronary angiography. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the ST/HR slope was an improvement over TI and conventional ST criteria (81%, 67%, and 69%). For patients failing to reach 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate, its diagnostic accuracy was comparable with TI (77% and 74%). Its sensitivity in patients without prior myocardial infarctions was equivalent to that of thallium (91% and 95%). The ST/HR slope was directly related to the angiographic severity (Gensini score) of CAD in patients without a prior infarction (r = 0.61, p less than 0.001). The ST/HR slope was an improved ECG criterion for diagnosing CAD and compared favorably with TI imaging.

  5. Maximize x(a - x)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Five different methods for determining the maximizing condition for x(a - x) are presented. Included is the ancient Greek version and a method attributed to Fermat. None of the proofs use calculus. (LS)

  6. On the maximal diphoton width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Staub, Florian; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into γγ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  7. All maximally entangling unitary operators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2011-11-15

    We characterize all maximally entangling bipartite unitary operators, acting on systems A and B of arbitrary finite dimensions d{sub A}{<=}d{sub B}, when ancillary systems are available to both parties. Several useful and interesting consequences of this characterization are discussed, including an understanding of why the entangling and disentangling capacities of a given (maximally entangling) unitary can differ and a proof that these capacities must be equal when d{sub A}=d{sub B}.

  8. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  9. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures.

    PubMed

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R P; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs - but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genesPDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this "Buccal-Cell-Signature" correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  10. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures

    PubMed Central

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R. P.; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs – but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genes PDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this “Buccal-Cell-Signature” correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  11. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A

    1997-02-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  12. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  13. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26597703

  14. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  15. The heart rate VO2 relationship of aerobic dance: a comparison of target heart rate methods.

    PubMed

    Scharff-Olson, M; Williford, H N; Smith, F H

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) for aerobic dance exercise. Therefore, eleven females completed 20 minutes of aerobic dance with continuous monitoring of HR and VO2. These physiological responses were analyzed with correlation/regression techniques. The results showed that for aerobic dance to produce a response in excess of 50% of VO2 max, the target HR must be approximately 80% of the age-predicted HR max or greater. In contrast, previously reported data for treadmill running shows that 50% of VO2 max is achieved at approximately 65% of age-predicted HR max in females. The maximum heart rate reserve (Karvonen) method was also found to underestimate the actual VO2 of AD. With the Karvonen method, the target heart rate must approximate 65% of maximum HR reserve in order to elicit a VO2 response which is representative of 50% of VO2 max. These data support recent research which illustrates that target heart rate prescriptions derived from treadmill testing may fail to accurately place AD participants in the recommended training zone. PMID:1293420

  16. Maximal exercise performance after adaptation to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D; Lane, L D; Watenpaugh, D E; Gaffney, F A; Buckey, J C; Blomqvist, C G

    1996-08-01

    The cardiovascular system appears to adapt well to microgravity but is compromised on reestablishment of gravitational forces leading to orthostatic intolerance and a reduction in work capacity. However, maximal systemic oxygen uptake (Vo2) and transport, which may be viewed as a measure of the functional integrity of the cardiovascular system and its regulatory mechanisms, has not been systematically measured in space or immediately after return to Earth after spaceflight. We studied six astronauts (4 men and 2 women, age 35-50 yr) before, during, and immediately after 9 or 14 days of microgravity on two Spacelab Life Sciences flights (SLS-1 and SLS-2). Peak Vo2 (Vo2peak) was measured with an incremental protocol on a cycle ergometer after prolonged submaximal exercise at 30 and 60% of Vo2peak. We measured gas fractions by mass spectrometer and ventilation via turbine flowmeter for the calculation of breath-by-breath Vo2, heart rate via electrocardiogram, and cardiac output (Qc) via carbon dioxide rebreathing. Peak power and Vo2 were well maintained during spaceflight and not significantly different compared with 2 wk preflight. Vo2peak was reduced by 22% immediately postflight (P < 0.05), entirely because of a decrease in peak stroke volume and Qc. Peak heart rate, blood pressure, and systemic arteriovenous oxygen difference were unchanged. We conclude that systemic Vo2peak is well maintained in the absence of gravity for 9-14 days but is significantly reduced immediately on return to Earth, most likely because of reduced intravascular blood volume, stroke volume, and Qc. PMID:8872635

  17. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart. The weakening of the heart's pumping ability causes Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs - called edema Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of ...

  18. Having Heart.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A heart comes in many forms. This article shares the experience of behavioral health nurses caring for a suicidal patient who needs a heart. As a team, the nurses and their patient shared the journey of what it takes to achieve an optimum quality of life with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) while battling mental illness. PMID:26731919

  19. Factors affecting maximal acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Desai, H. G.

    1969-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different factors affect the maximal acid secretion of the stomach are discussed with particular reference to nationality, sex, age, body weight or lean body mass, procedural details, mode of calculation, the nature, dose and route of administration of a stimulus, the synergistic action of another stimulus, drugs, hormones, electrolyte levels, anaemia or deficiency of the iron-dependent enzyme system, vagal continuity and parietal cell mass. PMID:4898322

  20. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E

    2014-07-22

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  1. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E.

    2014-01-01

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  2. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  3. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  4. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  5. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  6. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  7. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    Heart palpitations can be due to: Anxiety, stress, panic attack, or fear Caffeine intake Nicotine intake Cocaine or other illegal drugs Diet pills Exercise Fever However, some palpitations are due ...

  8. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... together. About Rise Above HF Rise Above Heart Failure seeks to increase the dialogue about HF and improve the lives of people affected by the condition through awareness, education and support. Through the initiative, AHA strives to ...

  9. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors remove the patient's heart by transecting the aorta , the main pulmonary artery and the superior and ... sewing together the recipient and donor vena cavae, aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. In patients with ...

  10. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  11. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  12. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... may not get enough oxygen. Symptoms may be light-headedness, tiredness, fainting spells, and shortness of breath. Some pacemakers can be used to stop a heart rate that is too fast ( tachycardia ) ...

  13. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms. You must take drugs that prevent transplant rejection for the rest of your life. You will ... heart transplant. The main problem, as with other transplants, is rejection. If rejection can be controlled, survival increases to ...

  14. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  15. Generation and Transmission Maximization Model

    2001-04-05

    GTMax was developed to study complex marketing and system operational issues facing electric utility power systems. The model maximizes the value of the electric system taking into account not only a single system''s limited energy and transmission resources but also firm contracts, independent power producer (IPP) agreements, and bulk power transaction opportunities on the spot market. GTMax maximizes net revenues of power systems by finding a solution that increases income while keeping expenses at amore » minimum. It does this while ensuring that market transactions and system operations are within the physical and institutional limitations of the power system. When multiple systems are simulated, GTMax identifies utilities that can successfully compete on the market by tracking hourly energy transactions, costs, and revenues. Some limitations that are modeled are power plant seasonal capabilities and terms specified in firm and IPP contracts. GTMax also considers detaile operational limitations such as power plant ramp rates and hydropower reservoir constraints.« less

  16. Maximally coherent mixed states: Complementarity between maximal coherence and mixedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Quantum coherence is a key element in topical research on quantum resource theories and a primary facilitator for design and implementation of quantum technologies. However, the resourcefulness of quantum coherence is severely restricted by environmental noise, which is indicated by the loss of information in a quantum system, measured in terms of its purity. In this work, we derive the limits imposed by the mixedness of a quantum system on the amount of quantum coherence that it can possess. We obtain an analytical trade-off between the two quantities that upperbound the maximum quantum coherence for fixed mixedness in a system. This gives rise to a class of quantum states, "maximally coherent mixed states," whose coherence cannot be increased further under any purity-preserving operation. For the above class of states, quantum coherence and mixedness satisfy a complementarity relation, which is crucial to understand the interplay between a resource and noise in open quantum systems.

  17. Explanatory Variance in Maximal Oxygen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Robert McComb, Jacalyn J.; Roh, Daesung; Williams, James S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction equation that could be used to estimate maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) from a submaximal water running protocol. Thirty-two volunteers (n =19 males, n = 13 females), ages 18 - 24 years, underwent the following testing procedures: (a) a 7-site skin fold assessment; (b) a land VO2max running treadmill test; and (c) a 6 min water running test. For the water running submaximal protocol, the participants were fitted with an Aqua Jogger Classic Uni-Sex Belt and a Polar Heart Rate Monitor; the participants’ head, shoulders, hips and feet were vertically aligned, using a modified running/bicycle motion. A regression model was used to predict VO2max. The criterion variable, VO2max, was measured using open-circuit calorimetry utilizing the Bruce Treadmill Protocol. Predictor variables included in the model were percent body fat (% BF), height, weight, gender, and heart rate following a 6 min water running protocol. Percent body fat accounted for 76% (r = -0.87, SEE = 3.27) of the variance in VO2max. No other variables significantly contributed to the explained variance in VO2max. The equation for the estimation of VO2max is as follows: VO2max ml.kg-1·min-1 = 56.14 - 0.92 (% BF). Key Points Body Fat is an important predictor of VO2 max. Individuals with low skill level in water running may shorten their stride length to avoid the onset of fatigue at higher work-loads, therefore, the net oxygen cost of the exercise cannot be controlled in inexperienced individuals in water running at fatiguing workloads. Experiments using water running protocols to predict VO2max should use individuals trained in the mechanics of water running. A submaximal water running protocol is needed in the research literature for individuals trained in the mechanics of water running, given the popularity of water running rehabilitative exercise programs and training programs. PMID:24260003

  18. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  19. Lighting spectrum to maximize colorfulness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Osamu; Nascimento, Sérgio M C

    2012-02-01

    The spectrum of modern illumination can be computationally tailored considering the visual effects of lighting. We investigated the spectral profiles of the white illumination maximizing the theoretical limits of the perceivable object colors. A large number of metamers with various degrees of smoothness were generated on and around the Planckian locus, and the volume in the CIELAB space of the optimal colors for each metamer was calculated. The optimal spectrum was found at the color temperature of around 5.7×10(3) K, had three peaks at both ends of the visible band and at around 510 nm, and was 25% better than daylight and 35% better than Thornton's prime color lamp. PMID:22297368

  20. Varieties of maximal line subbundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxbury, W. M.

    2000-07-01

    The point of this note is to make an observation concerning the variety M(E) parametrizing line subbundles of maximal degree in a generic stable vector bundle E over an algebraic curve C. M(E) is smooth and projective and its dimension is known in terms of the rank and degree of E and the genus of C (see Section 1). Our observation (Theorem 3·1) is that it has exactly the Chern numbers of an étale cover of the symmetric product S[delta]C where [delta] = dim M(E).This suggests looking for a natural map M(E) [rightward arrow] S[delta]C; however, it is not clear what such a map should be. Indeed, we exhibit an example in which M(E) is connected and deforms non-trivially with E, while there are only finitely many isomorphism classes of étale cover of the symmetric product. This shows that for a general deformation in the family M(E) cannot be such a cover (see Section 4).One may conjecture that M(E) is always connected. This would follow from ampleness of a certain Picard-type bundle on the Jacobian and there seems to be some evidence for expecting this, though we do not pursue this question here.Note that by forgetting the inclusion of a maximal line subbundle in E we get a natural map from M(E) to the Jacobian whose image W(E) is analogous to the classical (Brill-Noether) varieties of special line bundles. (In this sense M(E) is precisely a generalization of the symmetric products of C.) In Section 2 we give some results on W(E) which generalise standard Brill-Noether properties. These are due largely to Laumon, to whom the author is grateful for the reference [9].

  1. Fetal Heart Rate Response to Maternal Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monga, Manju

    2016-09-01

    Current guidelines regarding recommended exercise in pregnancy appear consistent with reported research regarding fetal heart changes in response to maternal exercise. Fetal heart rate increases during pregnancy, but maternal exercise appears well tolerated if performed in uncomplicated pregnancies and not in the supine position. Maximal levels of exercise that are well tolerated by the fetus have not yet been well defined; however, recent literature suggests that sustained exercise during pregnancy may have beneficial effects on autonomic control of fetal heart rate and variability that may lead to long-term health benefits. PMID:27388963

  2. Effects of selective cooling of the facial area on physiological and metabolic output during graded maximal or prolonged submaximal exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, A.; Boisvert, P.; Brisson, G. R.; Decarufel, D.; Laurencelle, L.; Dulac, S.; Vogelaere, P.; Therminarias, A.

    1989-06-01

    Physiological and metabolic output responses to facial cooling during a graded maximal exercise and a prolonged submaximal exercise lasting 30 min at 65%dot VO_2 max were investigated in five male subjects. Pedalling on a cycle ergometer was performed both with and without facial cooling (10°C, 4.6 m s-1). Facial cooling at the end of graded maximal exercise apparently had no effect on plasma lactate (LA), maximal oxygen consumption (dot VO_2 max), maximal heart rate (HR max), rectal temperature ( T re), work-load, lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). However, the response to facial cooling after prolonged submaximal exercise is significantly different for heart rate and work-load. The results suggest that facial wind stimulation during maximal exercise does not produce a stress high enough to alter the metabolic and physiological responses.

  3. Physiologic Responses of Able-Bodied and Paraplegic Males to Maximal Arm Ergometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Richard G.; And Others

    A study compared physiologic responses of healthy paraplegic males to those of healthy, able-bodied males during maximal arm ergometry. Fifteen able-bodied, healthy adult males and 13 healthy adult male paraplegics followed an exercise program involving heart rate, increased exercise loads, and oxygen uptake. Results from an analysis of the data…

  4. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined. PMID:26382231

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have ...

  6. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... about women’s risk for heart disease―the #1 killer of women in the United States―and share ... t Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women ® are registered trademarks of U.S. ...

  7. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  8. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart attack known as STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction). "Patients with ischemic heart disease are at the ... failure]. This includes those who have had a myocardial infarction, also called heart attack," Gho said. "Research studying ...

  9. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  10. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  11. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... or both arms, the neck, jaw, or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) — ...

  12. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  13. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  14. Maximal switchability of centralized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Morozov, Ivan; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous time Hopfield-like recurrent networks as dynamical models for gene regulation and neural networks. We are interested in networks that contain n high-degree nodes preferably connected to a large number of N s weakly connected satellites, a property that we call n/N s -centrality. If the hub dynamics is slow, we obtain that the large time network dynamics is completely defined by the hub dynamics. Moreover, such networks are maximally flexible and switchable, in the sense that they can switch from a globally attractive rest state to any structurally stable dynamics when the response time of a special controller hub is changed. In particular, we show that a decrease of the controller hub response time can lead to a sharp variation in the network attractor structure: we can obtain a set of new local attractors, whose number can increase exponentially with N, the total number of nodes of the nework. These new attractors can be periodic or even chaotic. We provide an algorithm, which allows us to design networks with the desired switching properties, or to learn them from time series, by adjusting the interactions between hubs and satellites. Such switchable networks could be used as models for context dependent adaptation in functional genetics or as models for cognitive functions in neuroscience.

  15. A Maximally Supersymmetric Kondo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  16. Maximal Oxygen Intake and Maximal Work Performance of Active College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Susanne L.

    Maximal oxygen intake and associated physiological variables were measured during strenuous exercise on women subjects (N=20 physical education majors). Following assessment of maximal oxygen intake, all subjects underwent a performance test at the work level which had elicited their maximal oxygen intake. Mean maximal oxygen intake was 41.32…

  17. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduced appetite Alternate Names Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - ... of the aorta Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery Patent ductus arteriosus Pediatric heart surgery Tetralogy of Fallot ...

  18. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation Updated:May 26,2016 What ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  19. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis Updated:Aug 10,2016 About ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  20. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  1. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ...

  2. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  3. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inflammation of the heart muscle. Heart failure . Rheumatic (roo-MAT-ik) fever. Cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-a-the), or heart muscle diseases. Other diseases may increase the risk of heart ...

  4. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  5. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries to determine your risk for heart disease Congenital heart disease (heart problems that are present at birth) Problems ... Abnormal results may be due to: Aneurysm Congenital heart disease ... Narrowing of one or more coronary arteries (coronary artery ...

  6. Heart Attack Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Risk Assessment Updated:May 31,2016 We're sorry, but ... Can You Recognize a Heart Attack? Quiz Risk Assessment Patient Information Sheets: Heart Attack Heart Attack Personal ...

  7. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  8. Maximal exercise as a countermeasure to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. D. Jr; Lee, S. M.; Charles, J. B.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigators have suggested that maximal exercise performed 24 h before the end of bed rest, a spaceflight analog, restores prebed rest plasma volume, baroreflex responses, and orthostatic tolerance. PURPOSE: In this case report, we examined the effect of a similar exercise protocol 24 h before a Shuttle landing on the orthostatic responses of four crewmembers (EX) after spaceflights of 8-14 d. Four additional crewmembers (CON) served as controls and did not perform exercise during the final day of the flight. METHODS: Each crewmember performed a 10-min stand test approximately 10 d before launch (L-10) and within 1-2 h of landing (R+0). Cardiac stroke volume was measured (Doppler ultrasound) supine and during each min of standing for three EX and three CON subjects. RESULTS: Preflight, all crewmembers completed the stand test and each group had similar heart rate and blood pressure responses. Postflight, all subjects also completed the 10-min stand test. Each group had similarly elevated supine and standing heart rates, elevated diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures, and reduced pulse pressures compared to L-10. However, postflight cardiac output, mean +/- SEM, (EX: 4.5+/-0.6 L x min(-1); CON: 3.1+/-0.3 L x min(-1)) and stroke volume (EX: 43+/-7 mL x beat; CON: 30+/-6 mL x beat) were higher after 10 min standing in the EX subjects compared to CON subjects. CONCLUSIONS: For these four crewmembers, maximal exercise performed 24 h before landing may have helped maintain stroke volume but did not maintain heart rate and blood pressure responses during standing compared to preflight.

  9. The Relationship between Heart Rate Reserve and Oxygen Uptake Reserve in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Stanley Sai-chuen; Chan, Janus Wan-sze

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2]) and heart rate (HR) responses during rest and exercise in Chinese children and youth and to evaluate the relationships between maximal heart rate (%HRmax), heart rate reserve (%HRR), peak oxygen uptake (%VO[subscript 2]peak), and oxygen uptake…

  10. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart ... heart information http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/heart-disease.html New Heart Guidelines Released; Talk to ...

  11. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  12. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    PubMed Central

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task), (iii) low mental exertion (watching a movie). In each condition, mental exertion was combined with 10 intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 min). Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. PMID:25309404

  13. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  14. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  15. Heart rate variability and heart rate recovery as prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    GRAD, COSMIN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Heart rate (HR) can appear static and regular at rest, during exercise or recovery after exercise. However, HR is constantly adjusted due to factors such as breathing, blood pressure control, thermoregulation and the renin-angiotensin system, leading to a more dynamic response that can be quantified using HRV (heart rate variability). HRV is defined as the deviation in time between successive normal heart beat and is a noninvasive method to measure the total variation in a number of HR interval. HRV can serve as measure of autonomic activity of sino-atrial node. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of certain clinical and paraclinical parameters on heart rate recovery after exercise in patients with ischemic heart disease and the relation with HRV using 24 h Holter monitoring. Methods The study included 46 patients who were submitted to cardiovascular exercise stress test and also to 24 h Holter EKG monitoring. Subjects had a mean age of 56.2±11.2 years, with a minimum of 25 and a maximum of 79 years. The study included 22 (47.8%) men and 24 (52.2%) women. Statistical analysis was performed using MedCalc software version 14.8.1. Multivariate analysis consisted of the construction of several multiple linear regression models. A p value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The HRV values (time domain) were all lower in the IHD compared with the group without coronary heart disease, even if the difference is not statistically significant. Also rest and maximal HR values were similar but during the test varies in the sense that those with IHD had higher values of rest and maximal HR and lower HRR, but not statistically significant. Conclusions HRV is a very easy and safe method if there is an available device and it is used for evaluation of the autonomic nervous system in many cardiovascular diseases, but also in other pathologies. In uncomplicated ischemic heart disease HRV is depressed, but not significant. HRR

  16. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    was therefore the key to achieving this goal. This goal was eventually realized through development of an Excel spreadsheet tool called EMMIE (Excel Mean Motion Interactive Estimation). EMMIE utilizes ground ephemeris nodal data to perform a least-squares fit to inferred mean anomaly as a function of time, thus generating an initial estimate for mean motion. This mean motion in turn drives a plot of estimated downtrack position difference versus time. The user can then manually iterate the mean motion, and determine an optimal value that will maximize command load lifetime. Once this optimal value is determined, the mean motion initially calculated by the command builder tool is overwritten with the new optimal value, and the command load is built for uplink to ISS. EMMIE also provides the capability for command load lifetime to be tracked through multiple TORS ephemeris updates. Using EMMIE, TORS command load lifetimes of approximately 30 days have been achieved.

  17. Validation of a field test to determine the maximal aerobic power in triathletes and endurance cyclists

    PubMed Central

    González‐Haro, C; Galilea, P A; Drobnic, F; Escanero, J F

    2007-01-01

    Objective To validate a field test to assess the maximal and submaximal exercise aerobic adaptation under specific conditions, for endurance modality cyclists and triathletes. Methods 30 male and 4 female endurance modality cyclists and triathletes, with heterogeneous performance levels, performed three incremental tests: one in the laboratory and two in the field. Assessment of the validity of the field protocol was carried out by the Student's t test, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) of the maximal variables (maximal aerobic speed (MAS), maximal aerobic power (MAP), maximal heart rate (HRmax), maximal blood lactate concentration ([La−]max) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)) and submaximal variables (heart rate, HR) measured in each one of the tests. The errors in measurement were calculated. The repeatability of the field tests was assessed by means of the test–retest of the two field tests, and the validity by means of the test–retest of the laboratory test with respect to the mean of the two field tests. Results No significant differences were found between the two field tests for any of the variables studied, but differences did exist for some variables between the laboratory tests with respect to the field tests (MAP, [La−]max, humidity (H), barometric pressure (Pb) and some characteristics of the protocols). The ICC of all the variables was high and the CV for the MAP was small. Furthermore, the measurement errors were small and therefore, assumable. Conclusions The incremental protocol of the proposed field test turned out to be valid to assess the maximal and submaximal aerobic adaptation. PMID:17178775

  18. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  19. Inclusive fitness maximization: An axiomatic approach.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John A; Bossert, Walter

    2014-06-01

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of quasi-inclusive fitness maximization can be derived from axioms on an individual׳s 'as if preferences' (binary choices) for the case in which phenotypic effects are additive. Our results help integrate evolutionary theory and rational choice theory, help draw out the behavioural implications of inclusive fitness maximization, and point to a possible way in which evolution could lead organisms to implement it. PMID:24530825

  20. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  1. [Heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2005-11-01

    While nearly 4,000 patients undergo heart transplantation (HTx) every year in the world, only 27 HTx were performed since February, 1999, because of very strict Organ Transplantation Law in Japan. All were treated with triple immunosuppressive regimen. Although two patients died of infection 4 months and 4 years after HTx, respectively, 23 were discharged and 16 returned to work or go to school. New immunosuppressive drugs, such as sirolimus and everolimus, treatment of presensitized patients before transplantation using cyclophosphamide and intravenous globulin infusion, compact implantable left ventricular assist supports and the future of pediatric HTx in Japan are discussed. PMID:16277260

  2. Heart Health for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of a heart attack. 1. Eat a heart healthy diet. The nutrition facts on the food label can help you make ... heart health for women . (PDF 190KB) Get the facts about heart attacks in women . Learn More About Heart Disease: ...

  3. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ... Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of ...

  4. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » How the Heart Works Explore How the Heart Works What Is... Anatomy Contraction Circulation Electrical System Heart ... Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease How the Lungs Work Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  5. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that [Formula: see text]O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of [Formula: see text]O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  6. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that V˙O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of V˙O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of V˙O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of V˙O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced V˙O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced V˙O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  7. Matching, maximizing, and hill-climbing

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, John M.; Staddon, J. E. R.

    1983-01-01

    In simple situations, animals consistently choose the better of two alternatives. On concurrent variable-interval variable-interval and variable-interval variable-ratio schedules, they approximately match aggregate choice and reinforcement ratios. The matching law attempts to explain the latter result but does not address the former. Hill-climbing rules such as momentary maximizing can account for both. We show that momentary maximizing constrains molar choice to approximate matching; that molar choice covaries with pigeons' momentary-maximizing estimate; and that the “generalized matching law” follows from almost any hill-climbing rule. PMID:16812350

  8. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Brandão, F. G. S. L.; Terra Cunha, M. O.

    2005-10-01

    We study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. In the bipartite case, we find that the same conditions which lead to the uniqueness of the entropy of entanglement as a measure of entanglement exclude the existence of maximally mixed entangled states. In the multipartite scenario, our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of the monogamy of entanglement: we establish the polygamy of entanglement, expressing that if a general state is maximally entangled with respect to some kind of multipartite entanglement, then it is necessarily factorized of any other system.

  9. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, D.; Brandao, F.G.S.L.; Terra Cunha, M.O.

    2005-10-15

    We study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. In the bipartite case, we find that the same conditions which lead to the uniqueness of the entropy of entanglement as a measure of entanglement exclude the existence of maximally mixed entangled states. In the multipartite scenario, our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of the monogamy of entanglement: we establish the polygamy of entanglement, expressing that if a general state is maximally entangled with respect to some kind of multipartite entanglement, then it is necessarily factorized of any other system.

  10. MAXIM Pathfinder x-ray interferometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.; White, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM Pathfinder (MP) mission is under study as a scientific and technical stepping stone for the full MAXIM X-ray interferometry mission. While full MAXIM will resolve the event horizons of black holes with 0.1 microarcsecond imaging, MP will address scientific and technical issues as a 100 microarcsecond imager with some capabilities to resolve microarcsecond structure. We will present the primary science goals of MP. These include resolving stellar coronae, distinguishing between jets and accretion disks in AGN. This paper will also present the baseline design of MP. We will overview the challenging technical requirements and solutions for formation flying, target acquisition, and metrology.

  11. Holes in the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Holes in the Heart? Holes in the heart are simple congenital (kon-JEN- ... the heart. However, some babies are born with holes in the upper or lower septum. A hole ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Keane JF, Lock JE, Fyler DC, eds. Nadas' Pediatric Cardiology . 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO; WB Saunders; ...

  13. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  14. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  15. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  16. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  17. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than normal. You also might get an electrocardiogram (EKG), which measures electrical activity of the heart. None ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC The Heart Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Mitral Valve Prolapse ...

  18. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  19. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... Cardiovascular Nursing; American Heart Association Council on Clinical ... Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, ...

  20. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart muscle is stiff and does not fill up with blood easily. This is called diastolic heart failure. As the heart's pumping becomes less effective, blood may back up in other areas of the body. Fluid ...

  1. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  2. Maximal hypersurfaces in asymptotically stationary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Wald, Robert M.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the work is to extend the results on the existence of maximal hypersurfaces to encompass some situations considered by other authors. The existence of maximal hypersurface in asymptotically stationary spacetimes is proven. Existence of maximal surface and of foliations by maximal hypersurfaces is proven in two classes of asymptotically flat spacetimes which possess a one parameter group of isometries whose orbits are timelike 'near infinity'. The first class consists of strongly causal asymptotically flat spacetimes which contain no 'blackhole or white hole' (but may contain 'ergoregions' where the Killing orbits fail to be timelike). The second class of space times possess a black hole and a white hole, with the black and white hole horizon intersecting in a compact 2-surface S.

  3. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2009-12-15

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n<=7.

  4. Recovery levels after eccentric and concentric loading in maximal force

    PubMed Central

    Örer, Gamze Erikoğlu; Güzel, Nevin Atalay; Arslan, Erşan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the differences in recovery periods after maximal concentric and eccentric exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two participants voluntarily participated and were divided into two groups: the athlete and sedentary groups. An incremental treadmill running test was performed until exhaustion. During the subsequent passive recovery session, heart rate and venous blood lactate level were determined every 3 minutes until the venous blood lactate level reached 2 mmol/l. The same test protocol was implemented 15 days later. [Results] Both groups showed significantly shorter running durations in concentric exercise, while significant differences were found between the athlete and sedentary groups in terms of venous blood lactate level responses. In addition, there were significant differences between the athlete and sedentary groups in terms of running duration and heart rate in concentric and eccentric exercises. [Conclusion] The present study revealed no difference between the athlete and sedentary groups in terms of recovery durations after eccentric and concentric loadings, although the athletes demonstrated faster recovery in terms of HR compared with the sedentary group. It was thought that concentric exercises cause greater physiological responses. PMID:27390407

  5. ISL1 Is Necessary for Maximal Thyrotrope Response to Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Castinetti, F; Brinkmeier, M L; Mortensen, A H; Vella, K R; Gergics, P; Brue, T; Hollenberg, A N; Gan, L; Camper, S A

    2015-10-01

    ISLET1 is a homeodomain transcription factor necessary for development of the pituitary, retina, motor neurons, heart, and pancreas. Isl1-deficient mice (Isl1(-/-)) die early during embryogenesis at embryonic day 10.5 due to heart defects, and at that time, they have an undersized pituitary primordium. ISL1 is expressed in differentiating pituitary cells in early embryogenesis. Here, we report the cell-specific expression of ISL1 and assessment of its role in gonadotropes and thyrotropes. Isl1 expression is elevated in pituitaries of Cga(-/-) mice, a model of hypothyroidism with thyrotrope hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Thyrotrope-specific disruption of Isl1 with Tshb-cre is permissive for normal serum TSH, but T4 levels are decreased, suggesting decreased thyrotrope function. Inducing hypothyroidism in normal mice causes a reduction in T4 levels and dramatically elevated TSH response, but mice with thyrotrope-specific disruption of Isl1 have a blunted TSH response. In contrast, deletion of Isl1 in gonadotropes with an Lhb-cre transgene has no obvious effect on gonadotrope function or fertility. These results show that ISL1 is necessary for maximal thyrotrope response to hypothyroidism, in addition to its role in development of Rathke's pouch. PMID:26296153

  6. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  7. AUC-Maximizing Ensembles through Metalearning

    PubMed Central

    LeDell, Erin; van der Laan, Mark J.; Peterson, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) is often used to measure the performance of an estimator in binary classification problems. An AUC-maximizing classifier can have significant advantages in cases where ranking correctness is valued or if the outcome is rare. In a Super Learner ensemble, maximization of the AUC can be achieved by the use of an AUC-maximining metalearning algorithm. We discuss an implementation of an AUC-maximization technique that is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem. We also evaluate the effectiveness of a large number of different nonlinear optimization algorithms to maximize the cross-validated AUC of the ensemble fit. The results provide evidence that AUC-maximizing metalearners can, and often do, out-perform non-AUC-maximizing metalearning methods, with respect to ensemble AUC. The results also demonstrate that as the level of imbalance in the training data increases, the Super Learner ensemble outperforms the top base algorithm by a larger degree. PMID:27227721

  8. Natural selection and the maximization of fitness.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The notion that natural selection is a process of fitness maximization gets a bad press in population genetics, yet in other areas of biology the view that organisms behave as if attempting to maximize their fitness remains widespread. Here I critically appraise the prospects for reconciliation. I first distinguish four varieties of fitness maximization. I then examine two recent developments that may appear to vindicate at least one of these varieties. The first is the 'new' interpretation of Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection, on which the theorem is exactly true for any evolving population that satisfies some minimal assumptions. The second is the Formal Darwinism project, which forges links between gene frequency change and optimal strategy choice. In both cases, I argue that the results fail to establish a biologically significant maximization principle. I conclude that it may be a mistake to look for universal maximization principles justified by theory alone. A more promising approach may be to find maximization principles that apply conditionally and to show that the conditions were satisfied in the evolution of particular traits. PMID:25899152

  9. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159007.html After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure 1 in 4 survivors develops this serious ... TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of heart failure appears high within a few years of ...

  10. Heart murmurs and other sounds

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has four chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  11. Who Needs a Heart Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Heart Transplant? Most patients referred to heart transplant centers have ... for heart failure. Who Is Eligible for a Heart Transplant? The specialists at the heart transplant center will ...

  12. Resources and energetics determined dinosaur maximal size

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Some dinosaurs reached masses that were ≈8 times those of the largest, ecologically equivalent terrestrial mammals. The factors most responsible for setting the maximal body size of vertebrates are resource quality and quantity, as modified by the mobility of the consumer, and the vertebrate's rate of energy expenditure. If the food intake of the largest herbivorous mammals defines the maximal rate at which plant resources can be consumed in terrestrial environments and if that limit applied to dinosaurs, then the large size of sauropods occurred because they expended energy in the field at rates extrapolated from those of varanid lizards, which are ≈22% of the rates in mammals and 3.6 times the rates of other lizards of equal size. Of 2 species having the same energy income, the species that uses the most energy for mass-independent maintenance of necessity has a smaller size. The larger mass found in some marine mammals reflects a greater resource abundance in marine environments. The presumptively low energy expenditures of dinosaurs potentially permitted Mesozoic communities to support dinosaur biomasses that were up to 5 times those found in mammalian herbivores in Africa today. The maximal size of predatory theropods was ≈8 tons, which if it reflected the maximal capacity to consume vertebrates in terrestrial environments, corresponds in predatory mammals to a maximal mass less than a ton, which is what is observed. Some coelurosaurs may have evolved endothermy in association with the evolution of feathered insulation and a small mass. PMID:19581600

  13. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  14. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  15. Broken Heart Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart attacks are caused by blockages and blood clots forming in the coronary arteries, which supply the heart with blood. If these ... who experience broken heart syndrome have fairly normal coronary arteries, without severe blockages or clots. The heart cells are “stunned” by stress hormones ...

  16. Influence of exercise adherence level on modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors and functional-fitness levels in middle-aged men.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, E S; White, J A; Downie, A; Dalzell, G; Doran, D

    1993-01-01

    The study investigated the potential health benefits of two levels of short-term exercise intervention, compared with non-intervention, on selected modifiable coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and functional fitness states in middle-aged men. All subjects underwent medical screening and signed informed consent before carrying out a standardized graded treadmill walk which required exercise up to 85% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. The results of the test were used together with musculoskeletal fitness assessments, for the prescription of a personalized exercise programme lasting 14 weeks. In all, 55 subjects were classified by adherence into high (HA, n = 20), low (LA, n = 19), or non-adherence (NA, n = 16) groups according to the degree of documented participation in the programme based on standard criteria (American College of Sports Medicine 1978, 1990). In addition, the respective groups of subjects were classified according to other modifiable and non-modifiable CHD risk factors and compared by self-reported levels of activity and sport involvement as well as perceived body weight classification. The results indicated that there were more comprehensive improvements in functional fitness including significant gains in aerobic endurance capacity, muscular endurance and flexibility in the HA group compared with the LA and NA groups. However, there was little or no change in the modifiable CHD risk factors in any of the respective groups, although anthropometric indices of weight, body mass index (BMI), skinfolds and waist:hips ratio tended to decrease in the HA and LA groups but increased marginally in the NA group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358578

  17. Caffeine, maximal power output and fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J H; Signorile, J F; Barnes, W S; Henrich, T W

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of caffeine ingestion on maximal power output and fatigue during short term, high intensity exercise. Nine adult males performed 15 s maximal exercise bouts 60 min after ingestion of caffeine (7 mg.kg-1) or placebo. Exercise bouts were carried out on a modified cycle ergometer which allowed power output to be computed for each one-half pedal stroke via microcomputer. Peak power output under caffeine conditions was not significantly different from that obtained following placebo ingestion. Similarly, time to peak power, total work, power fatigue index and power fatigue rate did not differ significantly between caffeine and placebo conditions. These results suggest that caffeine ingestion does not increase one's maximal ability to generate power. Further, caffeine does not alter the rate or magnitude of fatigue during high intensity, dynamic exercise. PMID:3228680

  18. Energy Band Calculations for Maximally Even Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Richard; Byrd, Jason

    2007-03-01

    Superlattices are multiple-well, semiconductor heterostructures that can be described by one-dimensional potential wells separated by potential barriers. We refer to a distribution of wells and barriers based on the theory of maximally even sets as a maximally even superlattice. The prototypical example of a maximally even set is the distribution of white and black keys on a piano keyboard. Black keys may represent wells and the white keys represent barriers. As the number of wells and barriers increase, efficient and stable methods of calculation are necessary to study these structures. We have implemented a finite-element method using the discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) to calculate E versus k for these superlattices. Use of the FE-DVR method greatly reduces the amount of calculation necessary for the eigenvalue problem.

  19. Maximal Holevo Quantity Based on Weak Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kun; Fei, Shao-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Xi; Cao, Jun-Peng; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The Holevo bound is a keystone in many applications of quantum information theory. We propose “ maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements” as the generalization of the maximal Holevo quantity which is defined by the optimal projective measurements. The scenarios that weak measurements is necessary are that only the weak measurements can be performed because for example the system is macroscopic or that one intentionally tries to do so such that the disturbance on the measured system can be controlled for example in quantum key distribution protocols. We evaluate systematically the maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements for Bell-diagonal states and find a series of results. Furthermore, we find that weak measurements can be realized by noise and project measurements. PMID:26090962

  20. An information maximization model of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  1. On the Relationship between Maximal Reliability and Maximal Validity of Linear Composites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penev, Spiridon; Raykov, Tenko

    2006-01-01

    A linear combination of a set of measures is often sought as an overall score summarizing subject performance. The weights in this composite can be selected to maximize its reliability or to maximize its validity, and the optimal choice of weights is in general not the same for these two optimality criteria. We explore several relationships…

  2. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults.

    PubMed

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  3. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults

    PubMed Central

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  4. Does evolution lead to maximizing behavior?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Laurent; Alger, Ingela; Weibull, Jörgen

    2015-07-01

    A long-standing question in biology and economics is whether individual organisms evolve to behave as if they were striving to maximize some goal function. We here formalize this "as if" question in a patch-structured population in which individuals obtain material payoffs from (perhaps very complex multimove) social interactions. These material payoffs determine personal fitness and, ultimately, invasion fitness. We ask whether individuals in uninvadable population states will appear to be maximizing conventional goal functions (with population-structure coefficients exogenous to the individual's behavior), when what is really being maximized is invasion fitness at the genetic level. We reach two broad conclusions. First, no simple and general individual-centered goal function emerges from the analysis. This stems from the fact that invasion fitness is a gene-centered multigenerational measure of evolutionary success. Second, when selection is weak, all multigenerational effects of selection can be summarized in a neutral type-distribution quantifying identity-by-descent between individuals within patches. Individuals then behave as if they were striving to maximize a weighted sum of material payoffs (own and others). At an uninvadable state it is as if individuals would freely choose their actions and play a Nash equilibrium of a game with a goal function that combines self-interest (own material payoff), group interest (group material payoff if everyone does the same), and local rivalry (material payoff differences). PMID:26082379

  5. How to Generate Good Profit Maximization Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author considers the merits of two classes of profit maximization problems: those involving perfectly competitive firms with quadratic and cubic cost functions. While relatively easy to develop and solve, problems based on quadratic cost functions are too simple to address a number of important issues, such as the use of…

  6. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  7. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  8. Faculty Salaries and the Maximization of Prestige

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Strober, Myra H.

    2007-01-01

    Through the lens of the emerging economic theory of higher education, we look at the relationship between salary and prestige. Starting from the premise that academic institutions seek to maximize prestige, we hypothesize that monetary rewards are higher for faculty activities that confer prestige. We use data from the 1999 National Study of…

  9. Maximizing the Spectacle of Water Fountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    For a given initial speed of water from a spigot or jet, what angle of the jet will maximize the visual impact of the water spray in the fountain? This paper focuses on fountains whose spigots are arranged in circular fashion, and couches the measurement of the visual impact in terms of the surface area and the volume under the fountain's natural…

  10. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  11. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  12. Maximizing the Phytonutrient Content of Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are exploring to what extent the rich genetic diversity of potatoes can be used to maximize the nutritional potential of potatoes. Metabolic profiling is being used to screen potatoes for genotypes with elevated amounts of vitamins and phytonutrients. Substantial differences in phytonutrients am...

  13. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  14. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart contract at the same time. A defibrillator sends an electrical pulse to stop life-threatening ... heart rhythms. These people often receive an implanted defibrillator. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ...

  15. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  16. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  17. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... any drugs you may be taking for Diabetes, high blood pressure, or other medical conditions you have. ... of the arteries Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on ...

  18. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Structure of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  20. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ...

  1. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle. Contrast material ("dye") is ...

  2. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  3. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  4. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  5. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  6. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack. Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  7. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  8. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  9. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  10. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on this ... may help you live a longer, healthier life. Risk Factors You Cannot Change Some of your heart ...

  11. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  12. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... body and the symptoms that tell you your heart failure is getting worse will help you stay healthier ...

  13. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in place, the donor's main arteries—the aorta and pulmonary arteries—are sewn to yours. o ... heart and cause strokes and heart attacks. 4. Diabetes Mellitus Anti-rejection medications can cause diabetes. If ...

  14. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ...

  15. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join us! James T. Willerson MD Cardiovascular Seminar Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources ... Education 12th Annual Diabetes Symposium September 17, 2016 Texas Heart Institute Program Director: Mandeep Bajaj, MD Clinical ...

  16. Heart Rhythm Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Education & Meetings Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ... Education & Meetings less Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ...

  17. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rhythms The treatment of choice for most congenital heart diseases is surgery to repair the defect . There are ... Some inherited factors may play a role in congenital heart disease. Many family members may be affected. If you ...

  18. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  19. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bonow RO. Cardiac catheterization. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... arteriography and intracoronary imaging In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  20. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  1. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines ... Surgery. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  2. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. Treatment of hypertension ...

  3. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  4. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  5. Maximal CP violation in flavor neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasuè, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Since flavor neutrino masses Mμμ,ττ,μτ can be expressed in terms of Mee,eμ,eτ, mutual dependence among Mμμ,ττ,μτ is derived by imposing some constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ. For appropriately imposed constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ giving rise to both maximal CP violation and the maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing, we show various specific textures of neutrino mass matrices including the texture with Mττ = Mμμ∗ derived as the simplest solution to the constraint of Mττ ‑ Mμμ = imaginary, which is required by the constraint of Meμcos θ23 ‑ Meτsin θ23 = real for cos 2θ23 = 0. It is found that Majorana CP violation depends on the phase of Mee.

  6. Hamiltonian formalism and path entropy maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; González, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Maximization of the path information entropy is a clear prescription for constructing models in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here it is shown that, following this prescription under the assumption of arbitrary instantaneous constraints on position and velocity, a Lagrangian emerges which determines the most probable trajectory. Deviations from the probability maximum can be consistently described as slices in time by a Hamiltonian, according to a nonlinear Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation. The connections unveiled between the maximization of path entropy and the Langevin/Fokker-Planck equations imply that missing information about the phase space coordinate never decreases in time, a purely information-theoretical version of the second law of thermodynamics. All of these results are independent of any physical assumptions, and thus valid for any generalized coordinate as a function of time, or any other parameter. This reinforces the view that the second law is a fundamental property of plausible inference.

  7. Nondecoupling of maximal supergravity from the superstring.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael B; Ooguri, Hirosi; Schwarz, John H

    2007-07-27

    We consider the conditions necessary for obtaining perturbative maximal supergravity in d dimensions as a decoupling limit of type II superstring theory compactified on a (10-d) torus. For dimensions d=2 and d=3, it is possible to define a limit in which the only finite-mass states are the 256 massless states of maximal supergravity. However, in dimensions d>or=4, there are infinite towers of additional massless and finite-mass states. These correspond to Kaluza-Klein charges, wound strings, Kaluza-Klein monopoles, or branes wrapping around cycles of the toroidal extra dimensions. We conclude that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in dimensions>or=4. In particular, we conjecture that pure N=8 supergravity in four dimensions is in the Swampland. PMID:17678349

  8. Maximal temperature in a simple thermodynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-06-01

    Temperature in a simple thermodynamical system is not limited from above. It is also widely believed that it does not make sense talking about temperatures higher than the Planck temperature in the absence of the full theory of quantum gravity. Here, we demonstrate that there exist a maximal achievable temperature in a system where particles obey the laws of quantum mechanics and classical gravity before we reach the realm of quantum gravity. Namely, if two particles with a given center of mass energy come at the distance shorter than the Schwarzschild diameter apart, according to classical gravity they will form a black hole. It is possible to calculate that a simple thermodynamical system will be dominated by black holes at a critical temperature which is about three times lower than the Planck temperature. That represents the maximal achievable temperature in a simple thermodynamical system.

  9. Experimental implementation of maximally synchronizable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Buldú, J. M.; Boccaletti, S.; Papo, D.; Hwang, D.-U.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Gutiérrez, R.

    2016-04-01

    Maximally synchronizable networks (MSNs) are acyclic directed networks that maximize synchronizability. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of transforming networks of coupled oscillators into their corresponding MSNs. By tuning the weights of any given network so as to reach the lowest possible eigenratio λN /λ2, the synchronized state is guaranteed to be maintained across the longest possible range of coupling strengths. We check the robustness of the resulting MSNs with an experimental implementation of a network of nonlinear electronic oscillators and study the propagation of the synchronization errors through the network. Importantly, a method to study the effects of topological uncertainties on the synchronizability is proposed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  10. Basic principles of maximizing dental office productivity.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John

    2012-01-01

    To maximize office productivity, dentists should focus on performing tasks that only they can perform and not spend office hours performing tasks that can be delegated to non-dentist personnel. An important element of maximizing productivity is to arrange the schedule so that multiple patients are seated simultaneously in different operatories. Doing so allows the dentist to work on one patient in one operatory without needing to wait for local anesthetic to take effect on another patient in another operatory, or for assistants to perform tasks (such as cleaning up, taking radiographs, performing prophylaxis, or transporting and preparing equipment and supplies) in other operatories. Another way to improve productivity is to structure procedures so that fewer steps are needed to set up and implement them. In addition, during procedures, four-handed dental passing methods can be used to provide the dentist with supplies or equipment when needed. This article reviews basic principles of maximizing dental office productivity, based on the author's observations of business logistics used by various dental offices. PMID:22414506

  11. Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the space-based scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today s technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. MAXIM formation flying requirements are on the order of microns, while Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the order of nanometers. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; and (2) the development of linearized equations of relative motion for a formation operating in an n-body gravitational field. Linearized equations of motion provide the ground work for linear formation control designs.

  12. Revenue maximization in survivable WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Murari; Somani, Arun K.

    2000-09-01

    Service availability is an indispensable requirement for many current and future applications over the Internet and hence has to be addressed as part of the optical QoS service model. Network service providers can offer varying classes of services based on the choice of protection employed which can vary from full protection to no protection. Based on the service classes, traffic in the network falls into one of the three classes viz., full protection, no protection and best-effort. The network typically relies on the best-effort traffic for maximizing revenue. We consider two variations on the best-effort class, (1) all connections are accepted and network tries to protect as many as possible and (2) a mix of protected and unprotected connections and the goal is to maximize revenue. In this paper, we present a mathematical formulation, that captures service differentiation based on lightpath protection, for revenue maximization in a wavelength routed backbone networks. Our approach also captures the service disruption aspect into the problem formulation, as there may be a penalty for disrupting currently working connections.

  13. Maximal acceleration is non-rotating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    1998-06-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer whose acceleration vector is Fermi-Walker transported is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer. The converse is also true if the spacetime is symmetric under reversing both t and 0264-9381/15/6/020/img1 together. Thus a congruence of non-rotating acceleration worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a stationary congruence accelerating locally extremely (SCALE). These congruences are defined completely locally, unlike the case of zero angular momentum observers (ZAMOs), which requires knowledge around a symmetry axis. The SCALE subcase of a stationary congruence accelerating maximally (SCAM) is made up of stationary worldlines that may be considered to be locally most nearly at rest in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. Formulae for the angular velocity and other properties of the SCALEs are given explicitly on a generalization of an equatorial plane, infinitesimally near a symmetry axis, and in a slowly rotating gravitational field, including the far-field limit, where the SCAM is shown to be counter-rotating relative to infinity. These formulae are evaluated in particular detail for the Kerr-Newman metric. Various other congruences are also defined, such as a stationary congruence rotating at minimum (SCRAM), and stationary worldlines accelerating radially maximally (SWARM), both of which coincide with a SCAM on an equatorial plane of reflection symmetry. Applications are also made to the gravitational fields of maximally rotating stars, the Sun and the Solar System.

  14. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  15. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141:e637S-e68S. Read More Angina Coronary heart disease Heart bypass surgery Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol levels Smoking - ...

  16. Working Model Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  17. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  18. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, a portion of the saphenous vein is ... used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta ...

  19. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  20. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  1. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Aneurysm Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Heart Transplant Pacemakers Ventricular Assist Device Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | PRINT | SHARE this page from the ... Is Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is done to correct problems ...

  2. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart bypass surgery creates a new route, called a bypass, for blood and oxygen to go around a blockage to reach your heart. ... heart is still beating. This is called off-pump coronary artery bypass, or OPCAB. To create the bypass graft: The doctor will take a ...

  3. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  4. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  5. Maximal violation of tight Bell inequalities for maximal high-dimensional entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Jaksch, Dieter

    2009-07-15

    We propose a Bell inequality for high-dimensional bipartite systems obtained by binning local measurement outcomes and show that it is tight. We find a binning method for even d-dimensional measurement outcomes for which this Bell inequality is maximally violated by maximally entangled states. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Bell inequality is applicable to continuous variable systems and yields strong violations for two-mode squeezed states.

  6. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  7. What Happens After Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Happens After Heart Surgery? What are the ICU and CCU? In a ... doctors. This is where patients go after open-heart surgery or a heart attack. You’re watched around ...

  8. What Is a Heart Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Heart Transplant? A heart transplant is surgery to remove a ... return to work for many different reasons. The Heart Transplant Process The heart transplant process starts when doctors ...

  9. Medications for Heart Valve Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications for Heart Valve Symptoms Updated:Aug 26,2015 How do medications ... was last reviewed on 03/26/14. Heart Valves Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart ...

  10. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... your doctor if you have symptoms of infective endocarditis (IE). Symptoms of this heart infection include fever, ...

  11. Time course of haemodynamic changes after maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Isea, J E; Piepoli, M; Adamopoulos, S; Pannarale, G; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-12-01

    The haemodynamic changes during 4 h following maximal upright bicycle exercise were evaluated in six normals in a randomized controlled crossover design. Total peripheral resistance was reduced to 2 h (-6.7 mmHg min l-1, P < 0.05); exercising and non-exercising vascular beds were vasodilated for 2 h (-24.1 and -23.8 mmHg min ml-1 100 ml-1 tissue, respectively, P < 0.05), associated with reductions in systolic (-5.8 mmHg, P < 0.05) and diastolic pressure (-8.3 mmHg, P < 0.05). Rise in cardiac index for 1 h (+0.51 min-1 m-2, P < 0.05) was accounted for by an elevated heart rate (+14.4 beats min-1, P < 0.01) as stroke volume was unchanged. Body temperature was elevated until 40 min (+0.20 degrees C, P < 0.05). The return of all haemodynamic variables to control by 3 h suggests a 3 h limit for a hypotensive effect of exercise. Rise in body temperature is not the only factor responsible for the hypotension. PMID:7705377

  12. Comparison of tests for measuring maximal exercise ability in elite swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Min-Hwa; Yu, Kyung-Hun; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare of tests for measuring maximal exercise ability in elite swimmers. The high-school male elite swimmers (n=17) were performed maximal exercise ability tests. The experimental method consisted of a crossover design at 1-week intervals with the swimming tests (field test, water VAMEVAL test, 200-m test, and 400-m test) in random order. It measured the heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and lactate level by physiological factors, and swimming velocity (SV), stroke rate (SR), and stroke length (SL) by mechanical factors. The change of SV, SR, and SL in swimming tests was no significantly different. To compare tests, however, the lactate level and RPE in 200-m test was higher than water VAMEVAL test. The RPE of the 200-m and 400-m tests were higher than the field test and the water VAMEVAL test. Correlations showed between the field test and the 400-m test in heart rate and RPE. Moreover, a correlation observed between the field test and 200-m test in heart rate. In this study, 200-m and 400-m tests were suit to apply the test methods for establishing the exercise intensity appropriate for the underwater training of swimmers. PMID:27419117

  13. Comparison of tests for measuring maximal exercise ability in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Suk, Min-Hwa; Yu, Kyung-Hun; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare of tests for measuring maximal exercise ability in elite swimmers. The high-school male elite swimmers (n=17) were performed maximal exercise ability tests. The experimental method consisted of a crossover design at 1-week intervals with the swimming tests (field test, water VAMEVAL test, 200-m test, and 400-m test) in random order. It measured the heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and lactate level by physiological factors, and swimming velocity (SV), stroke rate (SR), and stroke length (SL) by mechanical factors. The change of SV, SR, and SL in swimming tests was no significantly different. To compare tests, however, the lactate level and RPE in 200-m test was higher than water VAMEVAL test. The RPE of the 200-m and 400-m tests were higher than the field test and the water VAMEVAL test. Correlations showed between the field test and the 400-m test in heart rate and RPE. Moreover, a correlation observed between the field test and 200-m test in heart rate. In this study, 200-m and 400-m tests were suit to apply the test methods for establishing the exercise intensity appropriate for the underwater training of swimmers. PMID:27419117

  14. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  15. What Is Heart Valve Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Heart Valve Surgery? The four valves in your heart make sure that blood flows through your heart in the right direction. Heart valve surgery is done to replace or repair heart valves that Aortic ...

  16. Maximizing versus satisficing: happiness is a matter of choice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Barry; Ward, Andrew; Monterosso, John; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; White, Katherine; Lehman, Darrin R

    2002-11-01

    Can people feel worse off as the options they face increase? The present studies suggest that some people--maximizers--can. Study 1 reported a Maximization Scale, which measures individual differences in desire to maximize. Seven samples revealed negative correlations between maximization and happiness, optimism, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, and positive correlations between maximization and depression, perfectionism, and regret. Study 2 found maximizers less satisfied than nonmaximizers (satisficers) with consumer decisions, and more likely to engage in social comparison. Study 3 found maximizers more adversely affected by upward social comparison. Study 4 found maximizers more sensitive to regret and less satisfied in an ultimatum bargaining game. The interaction between maximizing and choice is discussed in terms of regret, adaptation, and self-blame. PMID:12416921

  17. Electromagnetically induced grating with maximal atomic coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Silvania A.; Araujo, Luis E. E. de

    2011-10-15

    We describe theoretically an atomic diffraction grating that combines an electromagnetically induced grating with a coherence grating in a double-{Lambda} atomic system. With the atom in a condition of maximal coherence between its lower levels, the combined gratings simultaneously diffract both the incident probe beam as well as the signal beam generated through four-wave mixing. A special feature of the atomic grating is that it will diffract any beam resonantly tuned to any excited state of the atom accessible by a dipole transition from its ground state.

  18. Coloring random graphs and maximizing local diversity.

    PubMed

    Bounkong, S; van Mourik, J; Saad, D

    2006-11-01

    We study a variation of the graph coloring problem on random graphs of finite average connectivity. Given the number of colors, we aim to maximize the number of different colors at neighboring vertices (i.e., one edge distance) of any vertex. Two efficient algorithms, belief propagation and Walksat, are adapted to carry out this task. We present experimental results based on two types of random graphs for different system sizes and identify the critical value of the connectivity for the algorithms to find a perfect solution. The problem and the suggested algorithms have practical relevance since various applications, such as distributed storage, can be mapped onto this problem. PMID:17280022

  19. Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith

    2014-11-01

    Very few sports use only endurance or strength. Outside of running long distances on a flat surface and power-lifting, practically all sports require some combination of endurance and strength. Endurance and strength can be developed simultaneously to some degree. However, the development of a high level of endurance seems to prohibit the development or maintenance of muscle mass and strength. This interaction between endurance and strength is called the concurrent training effect. This review specifically defines the concurrent training effect, discusses the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, and proposes strategies to maximize strength and endurance in the high-level athlete. PMID:25355186

  20. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in air transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng

    In air transportation networks the robustness of a network regarding node and link failures is a key factor for its design. An experiment based on the real air transportation network is performed to show that the algebraic connectivity is a good measure for network robustness. Three optimization problems of algebraic connectivity maximization are then formulated in order to find the most robust network design under different constraints. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem with flight routes addition or deletion is first formulated. Three methods to optimize and analyze the network algebraic connectivity are proposed. The Modified Greedy Perturbation Algorithm (MGP) provides a sub-optimal solution in a fast iterative manner. The Weighted Tabu Search (WTS) is designed to offer a near optimal solution with longer running time. The relaxed semi-definite programming (SDP) is used to set a performance upper bound and three rounding techniques are discussed to find the feasible solution. The simulation results present the trade-off among the three methods. The case study on two air transportation networks of Virgin America and Southwest Airlines show that the developed methods can be applied in real world large scale networks. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem is extended by adding the leg number constraint, which considers the traveler's tolerance for the total connecting stops. The Binary Semi-Definite Programming (BSDP) with cutting plane method provides the optimal solution. The tabu search and 2-opt search heuristics can find the optimal solution in small scale networks and the near optimal solution in large scale networks. The third algebraic connectivity maximization problem with operating cost constraint is formulated. When the total operating cost budget is given, the number of the edges to be added is not fixed. Each edge weight needs to be calculated instead of being pre-determined. It is illustrated that the edge addition and the

  1. Maximizing anthracycline tolerability in hematologic malignancies: Treat to each heart's content.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guilherme H; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Caimi, Paolo F; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-05-01

    Anthracyclines are the cornerstone of therapy for a wide spectrum of malignancies and have improved patient survival. Concern for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity often leads to dose reductions or use of second-line regimens, which may adversely impact survival. Development of cardiotoxicity depends on a combination of cumulative dose modulated by individual patient characteristics, which we have termed individual cardiotoxic threshold (ICT). Patients with cancer often have characteristics such as age, gender, genetic predisposition and preexisting cardiovascular disease that can potentiate cardiotoxicity. Specialty cardiovascular assessment, more sensitive monitoring technology, and timely interventions in selected patients can decrease cardiotoxicity and improve patient outcomes. Prophylaxis with cardioprotective agents and other strategies have shown promising results in randomized trials and may improve tolerance to anthracyclines. In this review we introduce the concept of ICT and critically analyze the evidence supporting existing strategies to modulate it and increase cardiovascular tolerability of anthracyclines. PMID:26578029

  2. Potential benefits of maximal exercise just prior to return from weightlessness

    SciTech Connect

    Convertino, V.A.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance of a single maximal bout of exercise during weightlessness within hours of return to earth would enhance recovery of aerobic fitness and physical work capacities under a 1G environment. Ten healthy men were subjected to a 10-d bedrest period in the 6-deg headdown position. A graded maximal supine cycle ergometer test was performed before and at the end of bedrest to simulate exercise during weightlessness. Following 3 h of resumption of the upright posture, a second maximal exercise test was performed on a treadmill to measure work capacity under conditions of 1G. Compared to before bedrest, peak oxygen consumption, V(O/sub 2/), decreased by 8.7 percent and peak heart rate (HR) increased by 5.6 percent in the supine cycle test at the end of bedrest. However, there were no significant changes in peak V(O/sub 2/) and peak HR in the upright treadmill test following bedrest. These data suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise prior to return from 10 d of weightlessness may be adequate to restore preflight aerobic fitness and physical work capacity. 26 references.

  3. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  4. Potential benefits of maximal exercise just prior to return from weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance of a single maximal bout of exercise during weightlessness within hours of return to earth would enhance recovery of aerobic fitness and physical work capacities under a 1G environment. Ten healthy men were subjected to a 10-d bedrest period in the 6-deg headdown position. A graded maximal supine cycle ergometer test was performed before and at the end of bedrest to simulate exercise during weightlessness. Following 3 h of resumption of the upright posture, a second maximal exercise test was performed on a treadmill to measure work capacity under conditions of 1G. Compared to before bedrest, peak oxygen consumption, V(O2), decreased by 8.7 percent and peak heart rate (HR) increased by 5.6 percent in the supine cycle test at the end of bedrest. However, there were no significant changes in peak V(O2) and peak HR in the upright treadmill test following bedrest. These data suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise prior to return from 10 d of weightlessness may be adequate to restore preflight aerobic fitness and physical work capacity.

  5. Effects of heart rate on myocardial thallium-201 uptake and clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Nordrehaug, J.E.; Danielsen, R.; Vik-Mo, H. )

    1989-12-01

    The effects of heart rate on the myocardial uptake and clearance of {sup 201}Tl were studied prospectively in seven healthy men, mean age 43 +/- 7 (s.d.) yr. Initial and delayed (3 hr) thallium images were obtained in three views after three bicycle exercise tests: to maximal, 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate. The mean of three views initial myocardial {sup 201}Tl uptake was higher at maximal than at both 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate, being 81% (p less than 0.01) and 60% (p less than 0.01) of maximal activity, respectively. The myocardial activity in the delayed images was identical. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and the initial myocardial activity, r = 0.86 (p less than 0.001). The mean (range) {sup 201}Tl clearance was 58% (51-65), 47% (34-56), and 34% (22-49) (all differences p less than 0.01), respectively. Concordance among the three individual views in estimating clearance was best for the highest exercise level. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance, r = 0.80 (p less than 0.001). Clearance was altered by only 1.67 x 10%/heart bpm (0.024 hr/heart beat). Clearance in the liver, spleen and lungs increased at submaximal exercise levels. Thus, a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance is the result of changes in the initial exercise myocardial {sup 201}Tl activity. Submaximal exercise may reduce reproducibility of clearance estimation, and the change of myocardial clearance with heart rate seems less than previously suggested.

  6. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the “right mix” of individuals in a population. PMID:26650247

  7. Factors affecting maximal momentary grip strength.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Neale, G; Elia, M

    1985-03-01

    Maximal voluntary grip strength has been measured in normal adults aged 18-70 years (17 f, 18 m) and compared with other indices of body muscle mass. Grip strength (dominant side) was directly proportional to creatinine excretion (r = 0.81); to forearm muscle area (r = 0.73); to upper arm muscle area (r = 0.71) and to lean body mass (r = 0.65). Grip strength relative to forearm muscle area decreased with age. The study of a subgroup of normal subjects revealed a small but significant postural and circadian effect on grip strength. The effect on maximal voluntary grip strength of sedatives in elderly subjects undergoing routine endoscopy (n = 6), and of acute infections in otherwise healthy individuals (n = 6), severe illness in patients requiring intensive care (n = 6), chronic renal failure (n = 7) and anorexia nervosa (n = 6) has been assessed. Intravenous diazepam and buscopan produced a 50 per cent reduction in grip strength which returned to normal within the next 2-3 h. Acute infections reduced grip strength by a mean of 35 per cent and severe illness in patients in intensive care by 60 per cent. In patients with chronic renal failure grip strength was 80-85 per cent of that predicted from forearm 'muscle area' (P less than 0.05). In anorectic patients the values were appropriate for their forearm muscle area. Nevertheless nutritional rehabilitation of one anorectic patient did not lead to a consistent improvement in grip strength. PMID:3926728

  8. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  9. Robust estimation by expectation maximization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Karl Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    A mixture of normal distributions is assumed for the observations of a linear model. The first component of the mixture represents the measurements without gross errors, while each of the remaining components gives the distribution for an outlier. Missing data are introduced to deliver the information as to which observation belongs to which component. The unknown location parameters and the unknown scale parameter of the linear model are estimated by the EM algorithm, which is iteratively applied. The E (expectation) step of the algorithm determines the expected value of the likelihood function given the observations and the current estimate of the unknown parameters, while the M (maximization) step computes new estimates by maximizing the expectation of the likelihood function. In comparison to Huber's M-estimation, the EM algorithm does not only identify outliers by introducing small weights for large residuals but also estimates the outliers. They can be corrected by the parameters of the linear model freed from the distortions by gross errors. Monte Carlo methods with random variates from the normal distribution then give expectations, variances, covariances and confidence regions for functions of the parameters estimated by taking care of the outliers. The method is demonstrated by the analysis of measurements with gross errors of a laser scanner.

  10. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  11. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  12. Comparison of body composition, heart rate variability, aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Erşan; Aras, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the body composition, heart rate variability, and aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes. [Subjects] Six cyclists and eight triathletes with experience in competitions voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects’ body composition was measured with an anthropometric tape and skinfold caliper. Maximal oxygen consumption and maximum heart rate were determined using the incremental treadmill test. Heart rate variability was measured by 7 min electrocardiographic recording. The Wingate test was conducted to determine anaerobic physical performance. [Results] There were significant differences in minimum power and relative minimum power between the triathletes and cyclists. Anthropometric characteristics and heart rate variability responses were similar among the triathletes and cyclists. However, triathletes had higher maximal oxygen consumption and lower resting heart rates. This study demonstrated that athletes in both sports have similar body composition and aerobic performance characteristics. PMID:27190476

  13. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  14. A comparison between laddermill and treadmill maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, M A; Gonzalez, V; Rodriguez, B; Palenciano, L

    1997-01-01

    Maximal O2 consumption (VO2max) is an index of the capacity for work over an 8 h workshift. Running on a treadmill is the most common method of eliciting it, because it is an easy, natural exercise, and also, by engaging large muscle masses, larger values are obtained than by other exercises. It has been claimed, however, that climbing a laddermill elicits a still higher VO2max, probably because more muscle mass is apparently engaged (legs + arms) than on the treadmill (legs only). However, no data in support of this claim have been presented. To see if differences exist, we conducted progressive tests to exhaustion on 44 active coal miners, on a laddermill (slant angle 75 degrees, vertical separation of rungs 25 cm) and on a treadmill set at a 5% gradient. The subjects' mean (range) age was 37.4 (31-47) years, height 174.3 (164-187) cm, body mass 82.2 (64-103) kg. Mean (range) VO2max on the laddermill was 2.83 (2.31-3.64) l x min(-1) and 2.98 (2.03-4.22) l x min(-1) on the treadmill (P < 0.01, Student's paired t-test). Mean (range) of maximal heart rate f(cmax) (beats x min(-1)) on the laddermill and on the treadmill were 181.0 (161-194) and 181.3 (162-195), respectively (NS). Laddermill:treadmill VO2max was negatively related to both treadmill VO2max x kg body mass(-1) (r = -0.410, P < 0.01) and body mass (r = -0.409, P < 0.01). Laddermill:treadmill f(cmax) was negatively related to treadmill VO2max x kg body mass(-1) (r = -0.367, P < 0.02) but not to body mass (r = -0.166, P = 0.28). Our data would suggest that for fitter subjects (VO2max > 2.6 l x min or VO2max kg body mass(-1) > 30 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)) and/or higher body masses (> 70 kg), exercise on the laddermill is not dynamic enough to elicit a VO2max as high as on the treadmill. For such subjects, treadmill VO2max would overestimate exercise capacity for jobs requiring a fair amount of climbing ladders or ladder-like structures. PMID:9404869

  15. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources ... signals in the heart's upper chambers fire abnormally, which interferes with electrical signals coming from ...

  16. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  17. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  18. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α is essential for maximal and efficient cardiac mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, John J.; Boudina, Sihem; Banke, Natasha Hausler; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Han, Xianlin; Young, Deanna M.; Leone, Teresa C.; Gross, Richard W.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; Abel, E. Dale; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    High-capacity mitochondrial ATP production is essential for normal function of the adult heart, and evidence is emerging that mitochondrial derangements occur in common myocardial diseases. Previous overexpression studies have shown that the inducible transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α is capable of activating postnatal cardiac myocyte mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice deficient in PGC-1α (PGC-1α−/− mice), which survive with modestly blunted postnatal cardiac growth. To determine if PGC-1α is essential for normal cardiac energy metabolic capacity, mitochondrial function experiments were performed on saponin-permeabilized myocardial fibers from PGC-1α−/− mice. These experiments demonstrated reduced maximal (state 3) palmitoyl-l-carnitine respiration and increased maximal (state 3) pyruvate respiration in PGC-1α−/− mice compared with PGC-1α+/+ controls. ATP synthesis rates obtained during maximal (state 3) respiration in permeabilized myocardial fibers were reduced for PGC-1α−/− mice, whereas ATP produced per oxygen consumed (ATP/O), a measure of metabolic efficiency, was decreased by 58% for PGC-1α−/− fibers. Ex vivo isolated working heart experiments demonstrated that PGC-1α−/− mice exhibited lower cardiac power, reduced palmitate oxidation, and increased reliance on glucose oxidation, with the latter likely a compensatory response. 13C NMR revealed that hearts from PGC-1α−/− mice exhibited a limited capacity to recruit triglyceride as a source for lipid oxidation during β-adrenergic challenge. Consistent with reduced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative enzyme gene expression, the total triglyceride content was greater in hearts of PGC-1α−/− mice relative to PGC-1α+/+ following a fast. Overall, these results demonstrate that PGC-1α is essential for the maintenance of maximal, efficient cardiac mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, ATP

  19. Dispatch Scheduling to Maximize Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Samson; McCrady, Nate; MINERVA

    2016-01-01

    MINERVA is a dedicated exoplanet detection telescope array using radial velocity measurements of nearby stars to detect planets. MINERVA will be a completely robotic facility, with a goal of maximizing the number of exoplanets detected. MINERVA requires a unique application of queue scheduling due to its automated nature and the requirement of high cadence observations. A dispatch scheduling algorithm is employed to create a dynamic and flexible selector of targets to observe, in which stars are chosen by assigning values through a weighting function. I designed and have begun testing a simulation which implements the functions of a dispatch scheduler and records observations based on target selections through the same principles that will be used at the commissioned site. These results will be used in a larger simulation that incorporates weather, planet occurrence statistics, and stellar noise to test the planet detection capabilities of MINERVA. This will be used to heuristically determine an optimal observing strategy for the MINERVA project.

  20. Maximally polarized states for quantum light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Yustas, Eulogio C.; Bjoerk, Gunnar; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2007-10-15

    The degree of polarization of a quantum field can be defined as its distance to an appropriate set of states. When we take unpolarized states as this reference set, the states optimizing this degree for a fixed average number of photons N present a fairly symmetric, parabolic photon statistic, with a variance scaling as N{sup 2}. Although no standard optical process yields such a statistic, we show that, to an excellent approximation, a highly squeezed vacuum can be taken as maximally polarized. We also consider the distance of a field to the set of its SU(2) transformed, finding that certain linear superpositions of SU(2) coherent states make this degree to be unity.

  1. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  2. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  3. Characterizing maximally singular phase-space distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, J.

    2016-07-01

    Phase-space distributions are widely applied in quantum optics to access the nonclassical features of radiations fields. In particular, the inability to interpret the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution in terms of a classical probability density is the fundamental benchmark for quantum light. However, this phase-space distribution cannot be directly reconstructed for arbitrary states, because of its singular behavior. In this work, we perform a characterization of the Glauber-Sudarshan representation in terms of distribution theory. We address important features of such distributions: (i) the maximal degree of their singularities is studied, (ii) the ambiguity of representation is shown, and (iii) their dual space for nonclassicality tests is specified. In this view, we reconsider the methods for regularizing the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution for verifying its nonclassicality. This treatment is supported with comprehensive examples and counterexamples.

  4. Does Maximizing Information at the Cut Score Always Maximize Classification Accuracy and Consistency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Babcock, Ben

    2016-01-01

    A common suggestion made in the psychometric literature for fixed-length classification tests is that one should design tests so that they have maximum information at the cut score. Designing tests in this way is believed to maximize the classification accuracy and consistency of the assessment. This article uses simulated examples to illustrate…

  5. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  6. Fasting Plasma Insulin at 5 Years of Age Predicted Subsequent Weight Increase in Early Childhood over a 5-Year Period—The Da Qing Children Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan Yan; Wang, Jin Ping; Jiang, Ya Yun; Li, Hui; Hu, Ying Hua; Lee, Kok Onn; Li, Guang Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between hyperinsulinemia and obesity is well known. However, it is uncertain especially in childhood obesity, if initial fasting hyperinsulinemia predicts obesity, or obesity leads to hyperinsulinemia through insulin resistance. Objective To investigate the predictive effect of fasting plasma insulin on subsequent weight change after a 5-year interval in childhood. Methods 424 Children from Da Qing city, China, were recruited at 5 years of age and followed up for 5 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, fasting plasma insulin, glucose and triglycerides were measured at baseline and 5 years later. Results Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age was significantly correlated with change of weight from 5 to 10 years (ΔWeight). Children in the lowest insulin quartile had ΔWeight of 13.08±0.73 kg compare to 18.39±0.86 in the highest insulin quartile (P<0.0001) in boys, and similarly 12.03±0.71 vs 15.80±0.60 kg (P<0.0001) in girls. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive effect of insulin at 5 years of age on subsequent weight gain over 5 years remained statistically significant even after the adjustment for age, sex, birth weight, TV-viewing time and weight (or body mass index) at baseline. By contrast, the initial weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent changes in insulin level 5 years later. Children who had both higher fasting insulin and weight at 5 years of age showed much higher levels of systolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and triglycerides at 10 years of age. Conclusions Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age predicts weight gain and cardiovascular risk factors 5 year later in Chinese children of early childhood, but the absolute weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent change in fasting insulin. PMID:26047327

  7. Evidence for altered alpha-adrenoreceptor responsiveness after a single bout of maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    We studied hemodynamic responses to alpha- and beta-receptor agonists in eight men to test the hypothesis that adrenoreceptor responsiveness is altered within 24 h of the performance of maximal exercise. Adrenoreceptor responsiveness was tested under two experimental conditions (with and without maximal exercise). Adrenoreceptor tests were performed 24 h after each subject performed graded upright cycle ergometry to volitional exhaustion. The 2 test days (experimental conditions) were separated by at least 1 wk, and the order of exercise and no-exercise conditions was counterbalanced. Steady-state graded infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and isoproterenol (Iso) were used to assess alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness, respectively. Slopes calculated from linear regressions between Iso and PE doses and changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and leg vascular resistance for each subject were used as an index of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness. The slope of the relationship between heart rate and Iso with maximal exercise was 1773 +/- 164 beats x microm-1x kg-1x min-1 compared with 1987 +/- 142 beats x microg-1x kg-1x min-1 without exercise (P = 0.158), whereas the slopes of the relationship between vascular resistance to Iso were -438 +/- 123 peripheral resistance units (PRU) x microg-1x kg-1x min-1 with maximal exercise and -429 +/- 105 x microg-1x kg-1 x min-1 without exercise (P = 0.904). Maximal exercise was associated with greater (P < 0.05) vascular resistance (15.1 +/- 2.8 PRU x microg-1 kg-1x min-1) and mean arterial blood pressure (15.8 +/- 2.1 mmHg. microg-1x kg-1x min-1) responses to PE infusion compared with no exercise (9.0 +/- 2.0 PRU x microg-1 kg-1 x min-1 and 10.9 +/- 2.0 mmHg. microg-1x kg-1x min-1, respectively). These results provide evidence that a single bout of maximal exercise increases alpha1-adrenoreceptor responsiveness within 24 h without affecting beta-cardiac and vascular adrenoreceptor responses.

  8. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  9. Mutually Unbiasedness between Maximally Entangled Bases and Unextendible Maximally Entangled Systems in C2⊗ C^{2k}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The mutually unbiasedness between a maximally entangled basis (MEB) and an unextendible maximally entangled system (UMES) in the bipartite system C2⊗ C^{2k} (k>1) are introduced and discussed first in this paper. Then two mutually unbiased pairs of a maximally entangled basis and an unextendible maximally entangled system are constructed; lastly, explicit constructions are obtained for mutually unbiased MEB and UMES in C2⊗ C4 and C2⊗ C8, respectively.

  10. Optimal hematocrit for maximal exercise performance in acute and chronic erythropoietin-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Beat; Arras, Margarete; Keller, Stephan; Rettich, Andreas; Lundby, Carsten; Vogel, Johannes; Gassmann, Max

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment increases hematocrit (Htc) and, consequently, arterial O(2) content. This in turn improves exercise performance. However, because elevated blood viscosity associated with increasing Htc levels may limit cardiac performance, it was suggested that the highest attainable Htc may not necessarily be associated with the highest attainable exercise capacity. To test the proposed hypothesis that an optimal Htc in acute and chronic Epo-treated mice exists--i.e., the Htc that facilitates the greatest O(2) flux during maximal exercise--Htc levels of wild-type mice were acutely elevated by administering novel erythropoiesis-stimulating protein (NESP; wtNESP). Furthermore, in the transgenic mouse line tg6 that reaches Htc levels of up to 0.9 because of constitutive overexpression of human Epo, the Htc was gradually reduced by application of the hemolysis-inducing compound phenylhydrazine (PHZ; tg6PHZ). Maximal cardiovascular performance was measured by using telemetry in all exercising mice. Highest maximal O(2) uptake (VO(2max)) and maximal time to exhaustion at submaximal exercise intensities were reached at Htc values of 0.58 and 0.57 for wtNESP, and 0.68 and 0.66 for tg6PHZ, respectively. Rate pressure product, and thus also maximal working capacity of the heart, increased with elevated Htc values. Blood viscosity correlated with VO(2max). Apart from the confirmation of the Htc hypothesis, we conclude that tg6PHZ adapted better to varying Htc values than wtNESP because of the higher optimal Htc of tg6PHZ compared to wtNESP. Of note, blood viscosity plays a critical role in limiting exercise capacity. PMID:19966291

  11. Effects of different levels of compression during sub-maximal and high-intensity exercise on erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim; Born, Dennis-Peter; Sperlich, Billy

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis whether different levels of sock compression (0, 10, 20, and 40 mmHg) affect erythrocyte deformability and metabolic parameters during sub-maximal and maximal running. Nine well-trained, male endurance athletes (age 22.2 ± 1.3 years, peak oxygen uptake 57.7 ± 4.5 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) carried out four periods of sub-maximal running at 70% of peak oxygen uptake for 30 min followed by a ramp test until exhaustion with and without compression socks that applied different levels of pressure. Erythrocyte deformability, blood lactate, heart rate and arterial partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) were monitored before and during all of these tests. Erythrocyte deformability, heart rate, pO(2) and lactate concentration were unaffected by compression, whereas exercise itself significantly increased erythrocyte deformability. However, the increasing effects of exercise were attenuated when high compression was applied. This first evaluation of the potential effects of increasing levels of compression on erythrocyte deformability and metabolic parameters during (sub-) maximal exercise, revealed no effects whatsoever. PMID:21964909

  12. The stressed heart

    SciTech Connect

    Legato, M.J. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 16 papers. Some of the titles are: Regulation of gene expression in the normal and overloaded heart; Cell stress and the initiation of growth; Subcellular growth of cardiocytes during hypertrophy; Microcirculation is the stressed heart; and The biochemistry of myocardial failure.

  13. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of topics in a question-and-answer format that's brief, easy to follow and easy to read. ... Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of ...

  14. Heart imaging method

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  15. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  16. Heart transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  17. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  18. Heart failure - palliative care

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic heart failure very often gets worse over time. Many people who have heart failure die of ... failure to take in enough calories and nutrients. Wasting of muscles and weight loss are part of the natural disease process. It can help to eat several small ...

  19. Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Women Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... heart-and-circulation, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Women Coronary Heart Disease Sexual Health Women and ...

  20. Heart transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The main problem, as with other transplants, is graft rejection. If rejection can be controlled, then survival can ... major problems are the same all major organ transplants face: a shortage of donor hearts rejection of the transplanted heart cost of the surgery ...

  1. Theory of heart

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, L. . Dept. of Physiology); Hunter, P. . Dept. of Engineering Science); McCulloch, A. )

    1991-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interest in studying the heart from the perspective of the physical sciences: mechanics, fluid flow, electromechanics. This volume is the result of a workshop held in July 1989 at the Institute for Nonlinear Sciences at the University of California at San Diego that brought together scientists and clinicians with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who share an interest in the heart. The chapters were prepared by the invited speakers as didactic reviews of their subjects but also include up-to-date results in their fields. Topics covered include the structure, mechanical properties, and function of the heart and the myocardium, electrical activity of the heart and myocardium, and mathematical models of heart function. Individual chapters are abstracted separately.

  2. Heart murmurs and other sounds

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  3. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  4. Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; PTCA - discharge; Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty - discharge; Heart artery dilatation - discharge ... the blood vessels that supply blood to your heart. You may have had a heart attack or ...

  5. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  6. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  7. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  8. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... This rare but serious infection is called infective endocarditis . The germs can enter the bloodstream through needles, ...

  9. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Alcohol and Heart Disease . Avoiding or limiting caffeine Consume only a moderate amount of caffeine per day, no more than a cup or two of coffee. Learn more about Caffeine and Heart Disease . Eating a heart-healthy diet ...

  10. Maximizing NGL recovery by refrigeration optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Baldonedo H., A.H.

    1999-07-01

    PDVSA--Petroleo y Gas, S.A. has within its facilities in Lake Maracaibo two plants that extract liquids from natural gas (NGL), They use a combined mechanic refrigeration absorption with natural gasoline. Each of these plants processes 420 MMsccfd with a pressure of 535 psig and 95 F that comes from the compression plants PCTJ-2 and PCTJ-3 respectively. About 40 MMscfd of additional rich gas comes from the high pressure system. Under the present conditions these plants produce in the order of 16,800 and 23,800 b/d of NGL respectively, with a propane recovery percentage of approximately 75%, limited by the capacity of the refrigeration system. To optimize the operation and the design of the refrigeration system and to maximize the NGL recovery, a conceptual study was developed in which the following aspects about the process were evaluated: capacity of the refrigeration system, refrigeration requirements, identification of limitations and evaluation of the system improvements. Based on the results obtained it was concluded that by relocating some condensers, refurbishing the main refrigeration system turbines and using HIGH FLUX piping in the auxiliary refrigeration system of the evaporators, there will be an increase of 85% on the propane recovery, with an additional production of 25,000 b/d of NGL and 15 MMscfd of ethane rich gas.

  11. Maximizing exosome colloidal stability following electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2014-03-01

    Development of exosome-based semisynthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum-derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label-free means of enriching exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI-driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo. PMID:24333249

  12. Maximally Expressive Modeling of Operations Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Richardson, Lea; Davis, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed, the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema.

  13. Steganalysis feature improvement using expectation maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Benjamin M.; Peterson, Gilbert L.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2007-04-01

    Images and data files provide an excellent opportunity for concealing illegal or clandestine material. Currently, there are over 250 different tools which embed data into an image without causing noticeable changes to the image. From a forensics perspective, when a system is confiscated or an image of a system is generated the investigator needs a tool that can scan and accurately identify files suspected of containing malicious information. The identification process is termed the steganalysis problem which focuses on both blind identification, in which only normal images are available for training, and multi-class identification, in which both the clean and stego images at several embedding rates are available for training. In this paper an investigation of a clustering and classification technique (Expectation Maximization with mixture models) is used to determine if a digital image contains hidden information. The steganalysis problem is for both anomaly detection and multi-class detection. The various clusters represent clean images and stego images with between 1% and 10% embedding percentage. Based on the results it is concluded that the EM classification technique is highly suitable for both blind detection and the multi-class problem.

  14. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty; Coronary artery angioplasty; Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; Heart artery dilatation ... to carefully guide the catheter up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ...

  15. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  16. Muscle Synergies of Untrained Subjects during 6 min Maximal Rowing on Slides and Fixed Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Shaharudin, Shazlin; Zanotto, Damiano; Agrawal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    The slides ergometer (SE) was an improvisation from fixed ergometer (FE) to bridge the gap of mechanics between ergometer rowing and on-water rowing. The specific mechanical constraints of these two types of ergometers may affect the pattern of muscle recruitment, coordination and adaptation. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscle synergy during 6 minutes maximal rowing on slides (SE) and fixed ergometers (FE). The laterality of muscle synergy was also examined. Surface electromyography activity, power output, heart rate, stroke length and stroke rate were analyzed from nine physically active subjects to assess the rowing performance. Physically active subjects, who were not specifically trained in rowing, were chosen to exclude the training effect on muscle synergy. Principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was applied to extract muscle synergy. Three muscle synergies were sufficient to explain the majority of variance in SE (94.4 ± 2.2 %) and FE (92.8 ± 1.7 %). Subjects covered more rowing distance, exerted greater power output and attained higher maximal heart rate during rowing on SE than on FE. The results proved the flexibility of muscle synergy to adapt to the mechanical constraints. Rowing on SE emphasized on bi-articular muscles contrary to rowing on FE which relied on cumulative effect of trunk and upper limb muscles during propulsive phase. Key points Three muscle synergies were extracted during maximal rowing on both fixed and slides ergometer Untrained subjects emphasized leg muscles while rowing on SE Untrained subjects focused on back muscles during FE rowing PMID:25435771

  17. Muscle Synergies of Untrained Subjects during 6 min Maximal Rowing on Slides and Fixed Ergometer.

    PubMed

    Shaharudin, Shazlin; Zanotto, Damiano; Agrawal, Sunil

    2014-12-01

    The slides ergometer (SE) was an improvisation from fixed ergometer (FE) to bridge the gap of mechanics between ergometer rowing and on-water rowing. The specific mechanical constraints of these two types of ergometers may affect the pattern of muscle recruitment, coordination and adaptation. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscle synergy during 6 minutes maximal rowing on slides (SE) and fixed ergometers (FE). The laterality of muscle synergy was also examined. Surface electromyography activity, power output, heart rate, stroke length and stroke rate were analyzed from nine physically active subjects to assess the rowing performance. Physically active subjects, who were not specifically trained in rowing, were chosen to exclude the training effect on muscle synergy. Principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was applied to extract muscle synergy. Three muscle synergies were sufficient to explain the majority of variance in SE (94.4 ± 2.2 %) and FE (92.8 ± 1.7 %). Subjects covered more rowing distance, exerted greater power output and attained higher maximal heart rate during rowing on SE than on FE. The results proved the flexibility of muscle synergy to adapt to the mechanical constraints. Rowing on SE emphasized on bi-articular muscles contrary to rowing on FE which relied on cumulative effect of trunk and upper limb muscles during propulsive phase. Key pointsThree muscle synergies were extracted during maximal rowing on both fixed and slides ergometerUntrained subjects emphasized leg muscles while rowing on SEUntrained subjects focused on back muscles during FE rowing. PMID:25435771

  18. Effects of rider position on continuous wave Doppler responses to maximal cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Franke, W D; Betz, C B; Humphrey, R H

    1994-03-01

    Using 10 well-trained (VO2peak = 60.6 ml kg-1min-1) college age cyclists and continuous wave Doppler echocardiography, peak acceleration (PkA) and velocity (PkV) of blood flow in the ascending aorta, and the stroke velocity integral (SVI) were assessed to determine if rider position influenced the central haemodynamic responses to graded maximal cycle ergometry. Cyclist position was determined by hand placement on the uprights (UPRI) or drops (DROP) of conventional handlebars or using aerodynamic handlebars (AHB). All subjects consistently achieved a peak workload of 300 W. The Doppler variables did not differ significantly between rider positions at each stage of the maximal exercise tests but did change in response to increasing workloads. PkA was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at workloads > or = 240 W versus < or = 120 W. PkV increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to 180 W and then reached a plateau. SVI increased to a workload of 120 W and then progressively declined, becoming significantly (P < 0.05) less at 300 W. For each stage, neither submaximal VO2, VI nor heart rate (HR) differed significantly between each trial. These results suggest that rider position does not affect the physiological response to maximal bicycle ergometry as responses to each position are similar. PMID:8044492

  19. Effects of rider position on continuous wave Doppler responses to maximal cycle ergometry.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, W D; Betz, C B; Humphrey, R H

    1994-01-01

    Using 10 well-trained (VO2peak = 60.6 ml kg-1min-1) college age cyclists and continuous wave Doppler echocardiography, peak acceleration (PkA) and velocity (PkV) of blood flow in the ascending aorta, and the stroke velocity integral (SVI) were assessed to determine if rider position influenced the central haemodynamic responses to graded maximal cycle ergometry. Cyclist position was determined by hand placement on the uprights (UPRI) or drops (DROP) of conventional handlebars or using aerodynamic handlebars (AHB). All subjects consistently achieved a peak workload of 300 W. The Doppler variables did not differ significantly between rider positions at each stage of the maximal exercise tests but did change in response to increasing workloads. PkA was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at workloads > or = 240 W versus < or = 120 W. PkV increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to 180 W and then reached a plateau. SVI increased to a workload of 120 W and then progressively declined, becoming significantly (P < 0.05) less at 300 W. For each stage, neither submaximal VO2, VI nor heart rate (HR) differed significantly between each trial. These results suggest that rider position does not affect the physiological response to maximal bicycle ergometry as responses to each position are similar. PMID:8044492

  20. Postexercise hypotension after maximal short-term incremental exercise depends on exercise modality.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Felipe A; Midgley, Adrian W; Soares, Pedro P; Farinatti, Paulo T V

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated postexercise hypotension (PEH) after maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) performed using different exercise modalities. Twenty healthy men (aged 23 ± 3 years) performed 3 maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running), separated by 72 h in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), autonomic function (spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and heart rate variability (HRV)), and energy expenditure (EE) were assessed during a 60-min nonexercise control session and for 60 min immediately after each CPET. Total exercise volume (EE during CPET plus 60 min recovery) was significantly higher in running versus cycling and walking CPETs (P ≤ 0.001). Compared with control, only SBP after running CPET was significantly reduced (Δ = -6 ± 8 mm Hg; P < 0.001). Heart rate and cardiac output were significantly increased (P < 0.001) and SVR significantly decreased (P < 0.001) postexercise. BRS and HRV decreased after all CPETs (P < 0.001), whereas sympatho-vagal balance (low- and high-frequency (LF:HF) ratio) increased significantly after all exercise conditions, especially after running CPET (P < 0.001). Changes in SVR, BRS, sympathetic activity (low-frequency component of HRV), and LF:HF ratio were negatively correlated to variations in SBP (range -0.69 to -0.91; P < 0.001) and DBP (range -0.58 to -0.93; P ≤ 0.002). These findings suggest that exercise mode or the total exercise volume are major determinants of PEH magnitude in healthy men. Because of the running CPET, the PEH was primarily related to a decrease in SVR and to an increase in sympatho-vagal balance, which might be a reflex response to peripheral vasodilatation after exercise. PMID:25947649

  1. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  2. Glacier Surface Monitoring by Maximizing Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, E.; Rossi, C.; Hajnsek, I.

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images compared with the single-channel SAR in terms of temporal scene characterization has been found and described to add valuable information in the literature. However, despite a number of recent studies focusing on single polarized glacier monitoring, the potential of polarimetry to estimate the surface velocity of glaciers has not been explored due to the complex mechanism of polarization through glacier/snow. In this paper, a new approach to the problem of monitoring glacier surface velocity is proposed by means of temporal PolSAR images, using a basic concept from information theory: Mutual Information (MI). The proposed polarimetric tracking method applies the MI to measure the statistical dependence between temporal polarimetric images, which is assumed to be maximal if the images are geometrically aligned. Since the proposed polarimetric tracking method is very powerful and general, it can be implemented into any kind of multivariate remote sensing data such as multi-spectral optical and single-channel SAR images. The proposed polarimetric tracking is then used to retrieve surface velocity of Aletsch glacier located in Switzerland and of Inyltshik glacier in Kyrgyzstan with two different SAR sensors; Envisat C-band (single polarized) and DLR airborne L-band (fully polarimetric) systems, respectively. The effect of number of channel (polarimetry) into tracking investigations demonstrated that the presence of snow, as expected, effects the location of the phase center in different polarization, such as glacier tracking with temporal HH compared to temporal VV channels. Shortly, a change in polarimetric signature of the scatterer can change the phase center, causing a question of how much of what I am observing is motion then penetration. In this paper, it is shown that considering the multi-channel SAR statistics, it is possible to optimize the separate these contributions.

  3. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  4. Expectation maximization applied to GMTI convoy tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Wolfgang

    2002-08-01

    Collectively moving ground targets are typical of a military ground situation and have to be treated as separate aggregated entities. For a long-range ground surveillance application with airborne GMTI radar we inparticular address the task of track maintenance for ground moving convoys consisting of a small number of individual vehicles. In the proposed approach the identity of the individual vehicles within the convoy is no longer stressed. Their kinematical state vectors are rather treated as internal degrees of freedom characterizing the convoy, which is considered as a collective unit. In this context, the Expectation Maximization technique (EM), originally developed for incomplete data problems in statistical inference and first applied to tracking applications by STREIT et al. seems to be a promising approach. We suggest to embed the EM algorithm into a more traditional Bayesian tracking framework for dealing with false or unwanted sensor returns. The proposed distinction between external and internal data association conflicts (i.e. those among the convoy vehicles) should also enable the application of sequential track extraction techniques introduced by Van Keuk for aircraft formations, providing estimates of the number of the individual convoy vehicles involved. Even with sophisticated signal processing methods (STAP: Space-Time Adaptive Processing), ground moving vehicles can well be masked by the sensor specific clutter notch (Doppler blinding). This physical phenomenon results in interfering fading effects, which can well last over a longer series of sensor updates and therefore will seriously affect the track quality unless properly handled. Moreover, for ground moving convoys the phenomenon of Doppler blindness often superposes the effects induced by the finite resolution capability of the sensor. In many practical cases a separate modeling of resolution phenomena for convoy targets can therefore be omitted, provided the GMTI detection model is used

  5. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  6. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study The more you smoke and the ... Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart walls and reducing ...

  7. Heart rates of elementary physical education students during the dancing classrooms program.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-06-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4 bpm), in which 47% of class time was spent above a 60% maximal heart rate threshold. The swing dance in particular (M = 143.4 bpm) stimulated a much higher heart rate level than all other dances in the program, with a mean heart rate change of 52.6 bpm. Girls (127.3 bpm) achieved marginally higher heart rates (p = .059) than boys (121.1 bpm). PMID:21699105

  8. Smokeless tobacco, sport and the heart.

    PubMed

    Chagué, Frédéric; Guenancia, Charles; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Moreau, Daniel; Cottin, Yves; Zeller, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco (snuff) is a finely ground or shredded tobacco that is sniffed through the nose or placed between the cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is used by putting a wad of tobacco inside the cheek. Smokeless tobacco is widely used by young athletes to enhance performance because nicotine improves some aspects of physiology. However, smokeless tobacco has harmful health effects, including cardiovascular disorders, linked to nicotine physiological effects, mainly through catecholamine release. Nicotine decreases heart rate variability and the ventricular fibrillation threshold, and promotes the occurrence of various arrhythmias; it also impairs endothelial-dependent vasodilation and could therefore promote premature atherogenesis. At rest, heart rate, blood pressure, inotropism, cardiac output and myocardial oxygen consumption are increased by nicotine, leading to an imbalance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. The same occurs at submaximal levels of exercise. These increases are accompanied by a rise in systemic resistances. At maximal exercise, heart rate, cardiac output and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) are unaffected by nicotine. Because endothelial dysfunction is promoted by nicotine, paradoxical coronary vasoconstriction may occur during exercise and recovery. Nicotine induces a decrease in muscular strength and impairs anaerobic performance. However, nicotine is used in sports as it diminishes anxiety, enhances concentration and agility, improves aerobic performance and favours weight control. Importantly, smokeless tobacco, similar to cigarette smoking, leads to nicotine dependence through dopaminergic pathways. Smokeless tobacco has harmful cardiovascular effects and is addictive: it fulfils all the criteria for inclusion in the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list as a doping product. Smokeless tobacco use in sporting activities must be discouraged. PMID:25497687

  9. Heart Murmurs and Your Child (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Heart Murmurs and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Heart ... to know how the heart works. How the Heart Works The normal heart has four chambers and ...

  10. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  11. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves, Prosthetic valves ... place. The main types of new valves are: Mechanical -- made of man-made materials, such as metal ( ...

  12. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  13. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow this process down, including: Not smoking Eating a heart-healthy diet Getting regular exercise Treating high blood pressure Controlling high blood sugar (if you have diabetes) and high cholesterol

  14. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur, but this is rare. There is always a risk of infection. Talk to your doctor before having any type of medical procedure. The clicking of mechanical heart valves may be heard in the chest. This is normal.

  15. Heart, front view (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen ... carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen ...

  16. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    Dressler syndrome; Post-MI pericarditis; Post-cardiac injury syndrome; Postcardiotomy pericarditis ... Two types of pericarditis can occur after a heart attack . Early pericarditis: This form most occurs within ...

  17. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... of this great vein will be used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta and to the affected coronary artery past the blocked site. The internal mammary ...

  18. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  19. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  20. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  1. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ACE inhibitors (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) and ARBs (angiotensin II receptor blockers) work by opening blood vessels and lowering blood pressure. These medicines can: Reduce the work your heart has to do Help ...

  2. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  3. Alcohol and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  4. Protein and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  5. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  6. Meditation and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  7. Stress and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  8. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  9. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper chambers, the right and left atria (AY-tree-uh), are shown in purple. The heart's lower chambers, the right and left ventricles (VEN-trih-kuls), are shown in red. Some of the main blood vessels (arteries and ...

  10. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin or clopidogrel (Plavix) or another blood thinner Warfarin (Coumadin). If you are taking warfarin, you will need to have regular blood tests. ... Instructions Aspirin and heart disease Clopidogrel (Plavix) Taking warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) - what to ask your doctor Taking ...

  11. Picturing the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information You are here Home » SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Links for Students Glossary Picturing the Heart SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  12. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living Conditions Caregiver ...

  13. Stress and your heart

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  14. Heart Truth for Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... for about a fifth. Latinas also have high rates of some factors that increase the risk of developing heart disease, such as diabetes, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity. But there’s good news too: ...

  15. Effect of Selective Heart Rate Slowing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Nikhil; Sivaswamy, Nadiya; Mahmod, Masliza; Yavari, Arash; Rudd, Amelia; Singh, Satnam; Dawson, Dana K.; Francis, Jane M.; Dwight, Jeremy S.; Watkins, Hugh; Neubauer, Stefan; Frenneaux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background— Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality but is currently refractory to therapy. Despite limited evidence, heart rate reduction has been advocated, on the basis of physiological considerations, as a therapeutic strategy in HFpEF. We tested the hypothesis that heart rate reduction improves exercise capacity in HFpEF. Methods and Results— We conducted a randomized, crossover study comparing selective heart rate reduction with the If blocker ivabradine at 7.5 mg twice daily versus placebo for 2 weeks each in 22 symptomatic patients with HFpEF who had objective evidence of exercise limitation (peak oxygen consumption at maximal exercise [o2 peak] <80% predicted for age and sex). The result was compared with 22 similarly treated matched asymptomatic hypertensive volunteers. The primary end point was the change in o2 peak. Secondary outcomes included tissue Doppler–derived E/e′ at echocardiography, plasma brain natriuretic peptide, and quality-of-life scores. Ivabradine significantly reduced peak heart rate compared with placebo in the HFpEF (107 versus 129 bpm; P<0.0001) and hypertensive (127 versus 145 bpm; P=0.003) cohorts. Ivabradine compared with placebo significantly worsened the change in o2 peak in the HFpEF cohort (-2.1 versus 0.9 mL·kg−1·min−1; P=0.003) and significantly reduced submaximal exercise capacity, as determined by the oxygen uptake efficiency slope. No significant effects on the secondary end points were discernable. Conclusion— Our observations bring into question the value of heart rate reduction with ivabradine for improving symptoms in a HFpEF population characterized by exercise limitation. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02354573. PMID:26338956

  16. Is Heart Rate a Norepiphenomenon in Heart Failure?

    PubMed

    Hensey, Mark; O'Neill, James

    2016-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on heart rate as a target in the management of cardiovascular disease and more specifically in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in recent years with several studies showing the benefit of a lower resting heart rate on outcomes. This review paper examines the pathophysiology behind the benefits of lowering heart rate in heart failure and also the evidence for and against the pharmacological agents available to achieve this. PMID:27457085

  17. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. PMID:26354957

  18. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  19. Who are maximizers? Future oriented and highly numerate individuals.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Raffaella; Teuscher, Ursina; Carmeci, Floriana Antonella

    2016-08-01

    Two studies investigated cognitive mechanisms that may be associated with people's tendency to maximize. Maximizers are individuals who are spending a great amount of effort in order to find the very best option in a decision situation, rather than stopping the decision process when they encounter a satisfying option. These studies show that maximizers are more future oriented than other people, which may motivate them to invest the extra energy into optimal choices. Maximizers also have higher numerical skills, possibly facilitating the cognitive processes involved with decision trade-offs. PMID:25960435

  20. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart. Heart valves. These open and close to control blood flow to and from the heart. Arteries and veins. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart to the body. Veins are blood vessels that carry blood from ...

  1. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have surgery or as a long-term treatment. Heart transplant . A heart transplant is an operation in which a person’s diseased ... with a healthy heart from a deceased donor. Heart transplants are done as a life-saving measure for ...

  2. Dietary nitrate reduces maximal oxygen consumption while maintaining work performance in maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Filip J; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Ekblom, Björn

    2010-01-15

    The anion nitrate-abundant in our diet-has recently emerged as a major pool of nitric oxide (NO) synthase-independent NO production. Nitrate is reduced stepwise in vivo to nitrite and then NO and possibly other bioactive nitrogen oxides. This reductive pathway is enhanced during low oxygen tension and acidosis. A recent study shows a reduction in oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise attributable to dietary nitrate. We went on to study the effects of dietary nitrate on various physiological and biochemical parameters during maximal exercise. Nine healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age 30+/-2.3 years, VO(2max) 3.72+/-0.33 L/min) participated in this study, which had a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Subjects received dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg/day) or placebo (NaCl) for 2 days before the test. This dose corresponds to the amount found in 100-300 g of a nitrate-rich vegetable such as spinach or beetroot. The maximal exercise tests consisted of an incremental exercise to exhaustion with combined arm and leg cranking on two separate ergometers. Dietary nitrate reduced VO(2max) from 3.72+/-0.33 to 3.62+/-0.31 L/min, P<0.05. Despite the reduction in VO(2max) the time to exhaustion trended to an increase after nitrate supplementation (524+/-31 vs 563+/-30 s, P=0.13). There was a correlation between the change in time to exhaustion and the change in VO(2max) (R(2)=0.47, P=0.04). A moderate dietary dose of nitrate significantly reduces VO(2max) during maximal exercise using a large active muscle mass. This reduction occurred with a trend toward increased time to exhaustion implying that two separate mechanisms are involved: one that reduces VO(2max) and another that improves the energetic function of the working muscles. PMID:19913611

  3. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  4. Devices in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shahzeb M.; Bogaev, Roberta C.; Sobash, Ed; Shankar, K. J.; Gondi, Sreedevi; Stupin, Igor V.; Robertson, Jillian; Brewer, M. Alan; Casscells, S. Ward; Delgado, Reynolds M.; Ahmed, Amany

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure has long been one of the most serious medical conditions in the United States; in fact, in the United States alone, heart failure accounts for 6.5 million days of hospitalization each year. One important goal of heart-failure therapy is to inhibit the progression of congestive heart failure through pharmacologic and device-based therapies. Therefore, there have been efforts to develop device-based therapies aimed at improving cardiac reserve and optimizing pump function to meet metabolic requirements. The course of congestive heart failure is often worsened by other conditions, including new-onset arrhythmias, ischemia and infarction, valvulopathy, decompensation, end-organ damage, and therapeutic refractoriness, that have an impact on outcomes. The onset of such conditions is sometimes heralded by subtle pathophysiologic changes, and the timely identification of these changes may promote the use of preventive measures. Consequently, device-based methods could in the future have an important role in the timely identification of the subtle pathophysiologic changes associated with congestive heart failure. PMID:18612451

  5. Effects of thyroid state on respiration of perfused rat and guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Read, L.C.; Wallace, P.G.; Berry, M.N. )

    1987-09-01

    The effects of thyroid state on the respiration of the isolated heart were investigated using retrograde perfused rat and guinea pig hearts. In both species, hypothyroidism caused a marked depression in circulating thyroid hormone concentrations and in the respiration of the isolated, retrograde perfused heart. Hypothyroidism was caused by injecting animals with Na{sup 131}I. The effects on myocardial respiration could be attributed to changes in the contraction frequency and in the oxygen consumption per beat, with little contribution from basal respiration. Treatment of animals with thyroxine elevated plasma thyroid hormones to a similar extent in rats and guinea pigs. In the latter, thyroxine treatment was associated with substantial increases in the contraction frequency and the oxygen consumption per beat of the isolated heart. In contrast, only small changes were apparent in the retrograde perfused rat heart, observations that were confirmed in rat hearts perfused at near physiological work loads. It was concluded that rat hearts isolated from normal animals function at near maximal thyroid state, in contrast to the guinea pig heart, which requires higher circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones to attain maximal responses.

  6. Estimation of the Maximal Lactate Steady State in Junior Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Llodio, I; Garcia-Tabar, I; Sánchez-Medina, L; Ibáñez, J; Gorostiaga, E M

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to predict the velocity corresponding to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS(V)) from non-invasive variables obtained during an incremental maximal running test (University of Montreal Track Test, UMTT) and to determine whether a single constant velocity test (CVT), performed several days after the UMTT, could estimate the MLSS(V). During a period of 3 weeks, 20 male junior soccer players performed: (1) a UMTT, and (2) several 20-min CVTs to determine MLSS(V) to a precision of 0.35 km·h(-1). Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) and velocity at 80% of maximum heart rate (V80%HRmax) were strong predictors of MLSS(V). A regression equation was obtained: MLSS(V)=(1.106·MAV) - (0.309·V(80%HRmax)) - 3.024; R2=0.60. Running velocity during CVT (V(CVT)) and blood lactate at 10 (La10) and 20 (La20) minutes further improved the MLSS(V) prediction: MLSS(V)=V(CVT)+0.26 - (0.812·ΔLa(20-10)); R2=0.66. MLSS(V) can be estimated from MAV and V(80%HRmax) during a single incremental maximal running test among a homogeneous group of soccer players. This estimation can be improved by performing an additional CVT. In terms of accuracy, simplicity and cost-effectiveness, the reported regression equations can be used for the assessment and training prescription of endurance in team sport players. PMID:26332904

  7. Evaluation of anti-hyperglycemic effect of Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root extract.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuansheng; Cheng, Delin; Wang, Linbo; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Yuepeng; Li, Kejuan; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic effect of ethanol extract from Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root (AKE).An in vitro evaluation was performed by using rat intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase), the key enzymes linked with type 2 diabetes. And an in vivo evaluation was also performed by loading maltose, sucrose, glucose to normal rats. As a result, AKE showed concentration-dependent inhibition effects on rat intestinal maltase and rat intestinal sucrase with IC(50) values of 1.83 and 1.03mg/mL, respectively. In normal rats, after loaded with maltose, sucrose and glucose, administration of AKE significantly reduced postprandial hyperglycemia, which is similar to acarbose used as an anti-diabetic drug. High contents of total phenolics (80.49 ± 0.05mg GAE/g extract) and total flavonoids (430.69 ± 0.91mg RE/g extract) were detected in AKE. In conclusion, AKE possessed anti-hyperglycemic effects and the possible mechanisms were associated with its inhibition on α-glucosidase and the improvement on insulin release and/or insulin sensitivity as well. The anti-hyperglycemic activity possessed by AKE maybe attributable to its high contents of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. PMID:26051735

  8. D2-brane Chern-Simons theories: F -maximization = a-maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluder, Martin; Sparks, James

    2016-01-01

    We study a system of N D2-branes probing a generic Calabi-Yau three-fold singularity in the presence of a non-zero quantized Romans mass n. We argue that the low-energy effective c N=2 Chern-Simons quiver gauge theory flows to a superconformal fixed point in the IR, and construct the dual AdS4 solution in massive IIA supergravity. We compute the free energy F of the gauge theory on S 3 using localization. In the large N limit we find F = c ( nN )1/3 a 2/3, where c is a universal constant and a is the a-function of the "parent" four-dimensional N=1 theory on N D3-branes probing the same Calabi-Yau singularity. It follows that maximizing F over the space of admissible R-symmetries is equivalent to maximizing a for this class of theories. Moreover, we show that the gauge theory result precisely matches the holographic free energy of the supergravity solution, and provide a similar matching of the VEV of a BPS Wilson loop operator.

  9. Maximal and sub-maximal functional lifting performance at different platform heights.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Jaffrey, Mark A; Billing, Daniel C; Ham, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Introducing valid physical employment tests requires identifying and developing a small number of practical tests that provide broad coverage of physical performance across the full range of job tasks. This study investigated discrete lifting performance across various platform heights reflective of common military lifting tasks. Sixteen Australian Army personnel performed a discrete lifting assessment to maximal lifting capacity (MLC) and maximal acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) at four platform heights between 1.30 and 1.70 m. There were strong correlations between platform height and normalised lifting performance for MLC (R(2) = 0.76 ± 0.18, p < 0.05) and MAWL (R(2) = 0.73 ± 0.21, p < 0.05). The developed relationship allowed prediction of lifting capacity at one platform height based on lifting capacity at any of the three other heights, with a standard error of < 4.5 kg and < 2.0 kg for MLC and MAWL, respectively. PMID:25420678

  10. Anaerobic capacity: a maximal anaerobic running test versus the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, N S; Nimmo, M A

    1996-02-01

    The present investigation evaluates a maximal anaerobic running test (MART) against the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) for the determination of anaerobic capacity. Essentially, this involved comparing 18 male students performing two randomly assigned supramaximal runs to exhaustion on separate days. Post warm-up and 1, 3, and 6 min postexercise capillary blood samples were taken during both tests for plasma blood lactate (BLa) determination. In the MART only, blood ammonia (BNH3) concentration was measured, while capillary blood samples were additionally taken after every second sprint for BLa determination. Anaerobic capacity, measured as oxygen equivalents in the MART protocol, averaged 112.2 +/- 5.2 ml.kg-1.min-1. Oxygen deficit, representing the anaerobic capacity in the MAOD test, was an average of 74.6 +/- 7.3 ml.kg-1. There was a significant correlation between the MART and MAOD (r = .83, p < .001). BLa values obtained over time in the two tests showed no significant difference, nor was there any difference in the peak BLa recorded. Peak BNH3 concentration recorded was significantly increased from resting levels at exhaustion during the MART. PMID:8664845

  11. Note on maximally entangled Eisert-Lewenstein-Wilkens quantum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna; Kosiński, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Maximally entangled Eisert-Lewenstein-Wilkens games are analyzed. For a general class of gates defined in the previous papers of the first author, the general conditions are derived which allow to determine the form of gate leading to maximally entangled games. The construction becomes particularly simple provided one does distinguish between games differing by relabeling of strategies. Some examples are presented.

  12. Detrimental Relations of Maximization with Academic and Career Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahling, Jason J.; Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    Maximization refers to a decision-making style that involves seeking the single best option when making a choice, which is generally dysfunctional because people are limited in their ability to rationally evaluate all options and identify the single best outcome. The vocational consequences of maximization are examined in two samples, college…

  13. Pace's Maxims for Homegrown Library Projects. Coming Full Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses six maxims by which to run library automation. The following maxims are discussed: (1) Solve only known problems; (2) Avoid changing data to fix display problems; (3) Aut viam inveniam aut faciam; (4) If you cannot make it yourself, buy something; (5) Kill the alligator closest to the boat; and (6) Just because yours is…

  14. Minimal Length, Maximal Momentum and the Entropic Force Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Pedram, Pouria; Molkara, M.

    2012-04-01

    Different candidates of quantum gravity proposal such as string theory, noncommutative geometry, loop quantum gravity and doubly special relativity, all predict the existence of a minimum observable length and/or a maximal momentum which modify the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In this paper, we study the effects of minimal length and maximal momentum on the entropic force law formulated recently by E. Verlinde.

  15. A Method for Maximizing the Internal Consistency Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepin, Michel

    This paper presents three different ways of computing the internal consistency coefficient alpha for a same set of data. The main objective of the paper is the illustration of a method for maximizing coefficient alpha. The maximization of alpha can be achieved with the aid of a principal component analysis. The relation between alpha max. and the…

  16. Maximal entanglement versus entropy for mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T.-C.; Goldbart, Paul M.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J.; Verstraete, Frank

    2003-02-01

    Maximally entangled mixed states are those states that, for a given mixedness, achieve the greatest possible entanglement. For two-qubit systems and for various combinations of entanglement and mixedness measures, the form of the corresponding maximally entangled mixed states is determined primarily analytically. As measures of entanglement, we consider entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, and negativity; as measures of mixedness, we consider linear and von Neumann entropies. We show that the forms of the maximally entangled mixed states can vary with the combination of (entanglement and mixedness) measures chosen. Moreover, for certain combinations, the forms of the maximally entangled mixed states can change discontinuously at a specific value of the entropy. Along the way, we determine the states that, for a given value of entropy, achieve maximal violation of Bell's inequality.

  17. System performance evaluation of the MAXIM concept with integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Michael D.; Gallagher, Dennis J.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM (Mico-Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission) and MAXIM Pathfinder, a technology precursor mission, is considered by NASA as 'visionary missions' in space astronomy. Currently the MAXIM mission design would fly multiple spacecraft in formation, each carrying precision optics, to direct x-rays from an astronomical source to collector and imaging spacecrafts. The mission architecture is complex and provides technical challenges in formaiton flying and external metrology, and target acquisition. To further develop the concept, an integrated model (IM) of the MAXIM and MAXIM Pathfinder was developed. Individual subsystem models from disciplines in structural dynamics, optics, controls, signal processing, detector physics and disturbance modelign are seamlessly integrated into one cohesive model to efficiently support system level trades and analysis. The optical system design is a unique combination of optical concepts and therefore results from the IM were extensively compared with ASAP optical software.

  18. Circadian Variation of Heart Rate Variability Across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Philippe; Yeh, Wei-Hsien; Dumont, Guy A.; Boivin, Diane B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nocturnal cardiovascular events are more frequent at the beginning and end of the night. It was proposed that this pattern reflects the nocturnal distribution of sleep and sleep stages. Using heart rate variability (HRV), we recently showed an interaction between the circadian system and vigilance states on the regulation of cardiac rhythmicity. Here, we further investigate this interaction in order to clarify the specific effects of sleep stages on the regulation of the heart. Design: Participants underwent a 72-h ultradian sleep-wake cycle procedure in time isolation consisting of alternating 60-min wake episodes in dim light and 60-min nap opportunities in total darkness. Setting: Time isolation suite. Patients or participants: Fifteen healthy young participants; two were subsequently excluded. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The current study revealed that sleep onset and progression to deeper sleep stages was associated with a shift toward greater parasympathetic modulation, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was associated with a shift toward greater sympathetic modulation. We found a circadian rhythm of heart rate (HR) and high-frequency power during wakefulness and all non-REM sleep stages. A significant circadian rhythm of HR and sympathovagal balance of the heart was also observed during REM sleep. During slow wave sleep, maximal parasympathetic modulation was observed at ∼02:00, whereas during REM sleep, maximal sympathetic modulation occurred in the early morning. Conclusion: The circadian and sleep stage-specific effects on heart rate variability are clinically relevant and contribute to the understanding of the degree of cardiovascular vulnerability during sleep. Citation: Boudreau P; Yeh WH; Dumont GA; Boivin DB. Circadian variation of heart rate variability across sleep stages. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1919-1928. PMID:24293767

  19. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    PubMed

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens. PMID:26808842

  20. Heart rate response and perceived exertion in college students during riding a scooter.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Morio; Kijima, Akira; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the heart rate responses and the perceived exertion in college students during scootering, and to examine if scootering possibly makes heart rate increase up to the level that can contribute to maintaining or developing cardiorespiratory fitness. Five male students (20-23 yrs) participated in this research, mainly assigned to scooter on an official 400 m-tartan track. Each session of scootering was six minutes. Each subject did three sessions of scootering at different speeds, slow, ordinary, and very fast. During the scootering, heart rate was measured using a Polar Vantage XL. Immediately after each session, the subjects were questioned about their perceived exertion. To evaluate heart rate during scootering on the track, maximal heart rate was measured in advance with graded maximal tests. In each speed in the track trial, the mean heart rates and the standard deviations were 106 +/- 5.9, 129 +/- 4.2, and 179 +/- 13.7 beats/min respectively. They correspond to 54.0 +/- 4.2%, 65.8 +/- 4.2%, and 91.2 +/- 5.5% of the maximal heart rate respectively. The mean and standard deviation of perceived exertion based on Borg's scale in each scootering session were 7.2 +/- 0.45, 10.2 +/- 1.10, and 16.6 +/- 2.79 respectively. Conclusively, at ordinary speed, the heart rates of the college students on a tartan track were situated around the level of the lower boundary which the American College of Sports Medicine recommended to develop and maintain cardiorespiratory fitness for apparently healthy people. If people have places to ride a scooter briskly, their heart rate could rise above the minimum level. PMID:12407987

  1. Cardiovascular, ventilatory and catecholamine responses to maximal dynamic exercise in partially curarized man.

    PubMed Central

    Galbo, H; Kjaer, M; Secher, N H

    1987-01-01

    1. In ten young men the ventilatory, cardiovascular, catecholamine and metabolic responses to maximal dynamic leg exercise on a stationary bicycle were followed during partial neuromuscular blockade with tubocurarine. Maximal exercise was performed when the drug effect was at its maximum as well as during the subsequent reduction in the effect allowing a gradually increasing work intensity. The results were compared with those obtained during submaximal and maximal exercise performed without tubocurarine. Partial neuromuscular blockade decreased hand-grip strength to 41 +/- 1.1% (S.E. of mean) and the maximal work load to 27 +/- 2.4% of control values. Voluntary effort was maximal and the rate of perceived exertion was high at all levels of exercise with tubocurarine indicating a maintained intense central nervous motor command. 2. During maximal action of the drug oxygen uptake was 1.67 +/- 0.11 l/min while only 0.91 +/- 0.13 l/min (P less than 0.01) at the same work intensity without neuromuscular blockade. This difference may reflect a dominant reliance on fast-twitch muscle fibres when work was performed under the influence of tubocurarine. 3. Compared at a given oxygen uptake ventilation was higher during work with tubocurarine than during control exercise (e.g. 55 +/- 4.2 and 40 +/- 2.2 l/min, respectively (P less than 0.01), at a mean oxygen uptake of 1.9 l/min), while heart rate did not differ significantly (146 +/- 4.4 and 139 +/- 3.0 beats/min). With decreasing drug effect both variables increased towards the maximum values of 138 +/- 4.5 l/min and 183 +/- 3.9 beats/min, respectively, achieved in control experiments at an oxygen uptake of 3.8 +/- 0.2 l/min. Like heart rate the mean arterial blood pressure increased with increasing work load and was similar at a given oxygen uptake with and without tubocurarine. 4. During maximal exercise at peak tubocurarine effect plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations were smaller than during control maximum

  2. Estimation of maximal oxygen uptake via submaximal exercise testing in sports, clinical, and home settings.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Francesco; Vernillo, Gianluca; de Morree, Helma M; Bonomi, Alberto G; La Torre, Antonio; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Veicsteinas, Arsenio

    2013-09-01

    Assessment of the functional capacity of the cardiovascular system is essential in sports medicine. For athletes, the maximal oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] provides valuable information about their aerobic power. In the clinical setting, the (VO(2max)) provides important diagnostic and prognostic information in several clinical populations, such as patients with coronary artery disease or heart failure. Likewise, VO(2max) assessment can be very important to evaluate fitness in asymptomatic adults. Although direct determination of [VO(2max) is the most accurate method, it requires a maximal level of exertion, which brings a higher risk of adverse events in individuals with an intermediate to high risk of cardiovascular problems. Estimation of VO(2max) during submaximal exercise testing can offer a precious alternative. Over the past decades, many protocols have been developed for this purpose. The present review gives an overview of these submaximal protocols and aims to facilitate appropriate test selection in sports, clinical, and home settings. Several factors must be considered when selecting a protocol: (i) The population being tested and its specific needs in terms of safety, supervision, and accuracy and repeatability of the VO(2max) estimation. (ii) The parameters upon which the prediction is based (e.g. heart rate, power output, rating of perceived exertion [RPE]), as well as the need for additional clinically relevant parameters (e.g. blood pressure, ECG). (iii) The appropriate test modality that should meet the above-mentioned requirements should also be in line with the functional mobility of the target population, and depends on the available equipment. In the sports setting, high repeatability is crucial to track training-induced seasonal changes. In the clinical setting, special attention must be paid to the test modality, because multiple physiological parameters often need to be measured during test execution. When estimating VO(2max), one has

  3. Comparison between parameters from maximal cycle ergometer test first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with respiratory gas analysis among healthy prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo T; Lintu, Niina; Soininen, Sonja; Laitinen, Tomi; Lakka, Timo Antero

    2016-06-01

    It is important to distinguish true and clinically relevant changes and methodological noise from measure to measure. In the clinical practice, maximal cycle ergometer tests are typically performed first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter, if needed, with respiratory gas analysis. Therefore, we report a comparison of parameters from maximal cycle ergometer exercise tests that were done first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with it in 38 prepubertal and healthy children (20 girls, 18 boys). The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement in maximal workload (WMAX), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) between rest and maximum. Girls achieved higher WMAX in the exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis compared with exercise tests without respiratory gas analysis (p = 0.016), whereas WMAX was similar in the tests among boys. Maximal HR (proportional offset, -1%; coefficients of variation, 3.3%) and highest SBP (proportional offset, 3%; coefficients of variation, 10.6%) were similar in the tests among children. Precision and agreement for HR improved and precision for SBP worsened with increasing exercise intensity. Heteroscedasticity was not observed for WMAX, HR, or SBP. We conclude that maximal cycle ergometer tests without and with respiratory gas analysis can be used consecutively because measurement of respiratory gases did not impair performance or have a significant effect on the maximality of the exercise tests. Our results suggest that similar references can be used for children who accept or refuse using a mask during a maximal exercise test. PMID:27163556

  4. Characterizing potential heart agents with an isolated perfused heart system

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, D.B.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.; Camin, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used an isolated perfused heart system for characterizing potential myocardial perfusion radiopharamaceuticals. Rabbit or guinea pig (GP) hearts are removed and perfused through the aorta with a blood-free buffer. Heart rate and ventricular pressure are monitored as indices of viability. Tc-99m-MAA is 96-100% retained in these hearts, and Tc-99m human serum albumin shows less than 5% extraction. Tl-201 is 30-40% extracted. It is known that in-vivo, Tc-99m(dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2//sup +/ is taken up by rabbit heart but not by GP or human heart. Analogous results are obtained with the isolated perfused heart model, where the complex is extracted well by the isolated rabbit heart (24%) but not by the GP heart (<5%). Values are unchanged if human, rabbit or GP blood is mixed and co-injected with the complex. Tc-99m)dmpe)/sub 3//sup +/ is also taken up by rabbit but not by GP hearts in-vivo. However, isolated perfused hearts of both species extract this complex well (45-52%). Heart uptake is diminished to <7% if the complex is pre-equilibrated with human blood. GP blood produces a moderate inhibition (in GP hearts only) and rabbit blood has no effect. This suggests that a human or GP blood factor may have a significant effect on heart uptake of this complex. Tc-99m(CN-t-butyl)/sub 6//sup +/ is taken up well by both rabbit and GP hearts in-vivo, and is extracted 100% by both isolated perfused hearts. Heart retention remains high (73-75%) in the presence of human blood.

  5. Mechanical Circulatory Support and the Role of LVADs in Heart Failure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McLarty, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is epidemic in the United States with a prevalence of over 5 million. The diagnosis carries a mortality risk of 50% at 5 years rivaling many diagnoses of cancer. Heart transplantation, long the “gold standard” treatment for end stage heart failure unresponsive to maximal medical therapy falls way short of meeting the need with only about 2,000 transplants performed annually in the United States due to donor limitation. Left ventricular devices have emerged as a viable option for patients as both a “bridge to transplantation” and as a final “destination therapy”. PMID:25983564

  6. Changing Role of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Heart transplantation has become standard of care for end-stage heart failure. Challenges include the limited supply of donor organs and the increased complexity of heart transplant candidates who are at higher risk for poor outcomes. Recent advances may address these challenges, including proposed changes in heart transplant allocation policy, a better understanding of the definition and management of primary graft dysfunction, and advances in the management of sensitized heart transplant candidates. Developments in these areas may result in more equitable distribution and expansion of the donor pool and improved quality of life and survival for heart transplant recipients. PMID:27371517

  7. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  8. The heart sound preprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    Technology developed for signal and data processing was applied to diagnostic techniques in the area of phonocardiography (pcg), the graphic recording of the sounds of the heart generated by the functioning of the aortic and ventricular valves. The relatively broad bandwidth of the PCG signal (20 to 2000 Hz) was reduced to less than 100 Hz by the use of a heart sound envelope. The process involves full-wave rectification of the PCG signal, envelope detection of the rectified wave, and low pass filtering of the resultant envelope.

  9. Protect Your Heart: Plan and Cook Heart-Healthy Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audio CME Program Point of Care Searching and Learning Other Opportunities Protect Your Heart: Plan and Cook Heart-Healthy Meals - English Patient education library Open in new window Download ...

  10. Preschoolers can recognize violations of the Gricean maxims

    PubMed Central

    Eskritt, Michelle; Whalen, Juanita; Lee, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Grice (Syntax and semantics: Speech acts, 1975, pp. 41–58, Vol. 3) proposed that conversation is guided by a spirit of cooperation that involves adherence to several conversational maxims. Three types of maxims were explored in the current study: 1) Quality, to be truthful; 2) Relation, to say only what is relevant to a conversation; and 3) Quantity, to provide as much information as required. Three- to five-year-olds were tested to determine the age at which an awareness of these Gricean maxims emerges. Children requested the help of one of two puppets in finding a hidden sticker. One puppet always adhered to the maxim being tested, while the other always violated it. Consistently choosing the puppet that adhered to the maxim was considered indicative of an understanding of that maxim. The results indicate that children were initially only successful in the Relation condition. While in general, children performed better at first in the Quantity condition compared with the Quality condition, 3-year-olds never performed above chance in the Quantity condition. The findings of the present study indicate that preschool children are sensitive to the violation of the Relation, Quality, and Quantity maxims at least under some conditions. PMID:20953298

  11. A taxonomic approach to communicating maxims in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2011-02-01

    Previous discussions of interstellar messages that could be sent to extraterrestrial intelligence have focused on descriptions of mathematics, science, and aspects of human culture and civilization. Although some of these depictions of humanity have implicitly referred to our aspirations, this has not clearly been separated from descriptions of our actions and attitudes as they are. In this paper, a methodology is developed for constructing interstellar messages that convey information about our aspirations by developing a taxonomy of maxims that provide guidance for living. Sixty-six maxims providing guidance for living were judged for degree of similarity to each of other. Quantitative measures of the degree of similarity between all pairs of maxims were derived by aggregating similarity judgments across individual participants. These composite similarity ratings were subjected to a cluster analysis, which yielded a taxonomy that highlights perceived interrelationships between individual maxims and that identifies major classes of maxims. Such maxims can be encoded in interstellar messages through three-dimensional animation sequences conveying narratives that highlight interactions between individuals. In addition, verbal descriptions of these interactions in Basic English can be combined with these pictorial sequences to increase intelligibility. Online projects to collect messages such as the SETI Institute's Earth Speaks and La Tierra Habla, can be used to solicit maxims from participants around the world.

  12. Ischaemic heart disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bondagji, Nabeel S.

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in pregnancy, particularly myocardial infarction (MI), is a rare yet potentially fatal condition for the mother and the foetus. With delays in the age of conception, the changes in some social habits among females including cigarette and shisha smoking in addition to an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus, IHD may represent a real hazard among pregnant women in the near future. The difficulty in the diagnosis emerges from the similarity of the signs and symptoms of ischaemia and infarct to some of the physiological adaptations that occur in a normal pregnancy. The physiological changes that are normal in pregnancy may aggravate pre-existing disease and may unmask some underlying unrecognized coronary vascular changes; therefore, the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and careful assessment of the underlying risk factors. The management of IHD always requires a multidisciplinary team approach. The management of each patient should be individualized according to the clinical condition, the risk factors, and the availability of the necessary support. Pregnancy after MI may be an acceptable and reasonably safe option provided the cited criteria are met. A systematic PubMed search was performed to identify all published data including cases reports, small series and systematic reviews in the existing literature. These publications were comprised of both retrospective and cross sectional population studies to maximize the number of cases considered in order to reach conclusions and make recommendations based on the best available evidence considering the rare occurrence of this event. The epidemiology, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment, and prognosis of IHD in pregnancy are the subjects of the present review. PMID:23960678

  13. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  14. Heart Health: Learn the Truth About Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Learn the Truth About Your Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock February is American Heart Month. Now is the time to make sure ...

  15. Effect of training on maximal oxygen uptake and aerobic capacity of locomotory muscles in tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula.

    PubMed

    Butler, P J; Turner, D L

    1988-07-01

    1. The effects of artificial swim training on maximal oxygen consumption and heart rate, as well as on the capillarity and oxidative capacity of locomotory muscles, have been studied in the tufted duck, Aythya fuligula. 2. The artificial training programme resulted in a 27% increase in maximal oxygen consumption, mainly as a result of an increase in muscle capillarity (20% increase in capillary/fibre ratio). In addition, activity of an oxidative enzyme, citrate synthase, increased (by 42%) and there was a significant transformation of fibre types in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle. 3. Altering the duration and nature of the training stimulus, for example flying and diving, can bring about different degrees of muscular adaptation, particularly in oxidative capacity. PMID:3171990

  16. Effect of training on maximal oxygen uptake and aerobic capacity of locomotory muscles in tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, P J; Turner, D L

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of artificial swim training on maximal oxygen consumption and heart rate, as well as on the capillarity and oxidative capacity of locomotory muscles, have been studied in the tufted duck, Aythya fuligula. 2. The artificial training programme resulted in a 27% increase in maximal oxygen consumption, mainly as a result of an increase in muscle capillarity (20% increase in capillary/fibre ratio). In addition, activity of an oxidative enzyme, citrate synthase, increased (by 42%) and there was a significant transformation of fibre types in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle. 3. Altering the duration and nature of the training stimulus, for example flying and diving, can bring about different degrees of muscular adaptation, particularly in oxidative capacity. PMID:3171990

  17. Teaching from the Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apps, Jerold W.

    This book is designed to illustrate learning for the whole person, including attending to spiritual, biological, intellectual, and emotional dimensions. It is expected that learners will discover the meaning of learning from the heart and teachers will learn how to develop their own such learning and then to explore ways that they can teach from…

  18. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction: management. In Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA:Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 55. Cannon CP, Braunwald E. Unstable angina and non-ST elevation ...

  19. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  20. Sweet & Simple Clay Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Nothing pleases parents more than receiving handmade gifts from their children, especially if the gift is in the shape of a heart. Nothing pleases an art teacher more than having a lesson that is easy to follow, teaches basic skills, and enables students to be successful with the activity. In this article, the author describes how to create a…

  1. FRAMINGHAM HEART STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identify the common factors or characteristics that contribute to CVD by following its development over a long period of time in a large group of participants who had not yet developed overt symptoms of CVD or suffered a heart attack or stroke.

  2. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  3. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study. PMID:27532071

  4. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  5. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  6. Educating the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Japan's elementary and junior high schools have a formal, nationally mandated moral curriculum called Kokoro-no-kyoiku--education of the heart. Japanese educators include moral growth as an integral part of one's intellectual growth and believe that democratic societies must promote virtuous decision making. Moral education in Japan nurtures the…

  7. Polish artificial heart program.

    PubMed

    El Fray, Miroslawa; Czugala, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the development of artificial heart substitutes, anthrombogenic materials and surfaces remain to be the main challenge for implants, which can prevent thrombosis that leads to rejection. The goal of material engineering is essentially to design polymeric materials of high durability and optimal thrombogenicity in mechanical heart prosthesis, being developed recently in a frame of the polish artificial heart program. For these reasons, various surface modifications are being continuously developed for a 'gold standard' material, which is a polyurethane (PU) thermoplastic elastomer and they will be shortly reviewed. However, new polymeric materials can meet medical word's attention if they are able to provide similar or better characteristics in term of bulk and surface properties. Specifically, if they will show appropriate surface topography, which is the most influential in determining the response of live tissues toward biomaterials. Nanostructured polyester thermoplastic elastomers of high biodurability as an alternative to PU materials for artificial heart are challenging new materials, and they will be discussed briefly. PMID:22110047

  8. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart. When the tube is in place, dye is injected through it. The dye flows through the blood vessels, making them easier to see. X-rays are taken as the dye moves through the blood vessels. These x-ray ...

  9. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart muscle that are not moving well. This test uses x-ray contrast fluid to fill the ... BUN) and serum creatinine tests help monitor how well your kidneys are working. You will need these test regularly if: You are taking medicines called ACE ...

  10. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be. This includes advice on daily activities, work, leisure time, sex, and exercise. Your level of activity will depend on the stage of your heart failure (how severe it is). Keep all of your ... to get tests and lab work. Your doctor needs the results of these tests ...

  11. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... leading killer of women over age 25. It kills nearly twice as many women in the United States as all types of cancer. Men have a greater risk for heart disease earlier in life than women. Women's risk increases after menopause. EARLY ...

  12. Heart Ed 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lynne E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Risk factors and health behaviors combine over time to contribute to the disease process. College communities provide a unique environment for health promotion, risk reduction, and primary intervention. Heart health should be an integral part of college…

  13. Be Still My Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Betsy; Ball, Rhonda

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBLs) can be used to explore topics in physics and health sciences. The activities address such topics as respiration, heart rate, and the circulatory system. Teaching notes and calculator instructions are included as are blackline masters. (MM)

  14. Give your heart a workout

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise - heart workout ... Exercise helps your heart in a few ways. Burns calories. This can help you lose extra pounds ... blood pressure. Doing some type of moderate aerobic exercise, for 30 to 60 minutes on most days ...

  15. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Apr 19,2016 ... Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 How to Eat ...

  16. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  17. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Terms and Conditions Copyright © 2016 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2016 Board Review ... Membership Membership Information Membership in the Heart Failure Society is open to all health care professionals with ...

  18. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this page: ... stroke. [Top] What is the connection between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? If you have diabetes, you ...

  19. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch-long surgical cut in the left part of your chest between your ribs ...

  20. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  1. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  2. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart work harder and affect its ability to pump blood. Overview How the Heart Valves Work At the ... into the atria. As the ventricles contract, they pump blood through the pulmonary and aortic valves. The pulmonary ...

  3. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Education & Meetings Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ... Education & Meetings less Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ...

  4. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  5. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist ... is weakened, gets too large, and does not pump blood very well, you are at high risk ...

  6. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  7. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Short gut syndrome Living with Devices Artificial hearts LVADS ICDs Pacemakers Hemodialysis Peritoneal dialysis About Organ Allocation ... because the new heart can act as an assist device if complications occur. Your physician can explain ...

  8. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  9. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  10. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  11. Application of acute maximal exercise to protect orthostatic tolerance after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Crandall, C. G.; Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed at the conclusion of prolonged simulated microgravity would improve blood pressure stability during an orthostatic challenge. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cardiac output (Q), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and changes in leg volume were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope in seven subjects immediately prior to reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) under two experimental conditions: 1) after maximal supine cycle ergometry performed 24 h before returning to the upright posture (exercise) and 2) without exercise (control). After HDT, the reduction of LBNP tolerance time from pre-HDT levels was greater (P = 0.041) in the control condition (-2.0 +/- 0.2 min) compared with the exercise condition (-0.4 +/- 0.2 min). At presyncope after HDT, FVR and NE were higher (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with control, whereas MAP, HR, E, AVP, PRA, ANP, and leg volume were similar in both conditions. Plasma volume (PV) and carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were reduced after control HDT, but were restored by the exercise treatment. Maintenance of orthostatic tolerance by application of acute intense exercise after 16 days of simulated microgravity was associated with greater circulating levels of NE, vasoconstriction, Q, baroreflex sensitivity, and PV.

  12. Maximizing Your Investment in Building Automation System Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how organizational issues and system standardization can be important factors that determine an institution's ability to fully exploit contemporary building automation systems (BAS). Further presented is management strategy for maximizing BAS investments. (GR)

  13. Maximal slicing of D-dimensional spherically symmetric vacuum spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Shibata, Masaru

    2009-10-15

    We study the foliation of a D-dimensional spherically symmetric black-hole spacetime with D{>=}5 by two kinds of one-parameter families of maximal hypersurfaces: a reflection-symmetric foliation with respect to the wormhole slot and a stationary foliation that has an infinitely long trumpetlike shape. As in the four-dimensional case, the foliations by the maximal hypersurfaces avoid the singularity irrespective of the dimensionality. This indicates that the maximal slicing condition will be useful for simulating higher-dimensional black-hole spacetimes in numerical relativity. For the case of D=5, we present analytic solutions of the intrinsic metric, the extrinsic curvature, the lapse function, and the shift vector for the foliation by the stationary maximal hypersurfaces. These data will be useful for checking five-dimensional numerical-relativity codes based on the moving puncture approach.

  14. Carnot cycle at finite power: attainability of maximal efficiency.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Melkikh, Alexey V; Gevorkian, Sasun G

    2013-08-01

    We want to understand whether and to what extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power. To this end we generalize the Carnot cycle so that it is not restricted to slow processes. We show that for realistic (i.e., not purposefully designed) engine-bath interactions, the work-optimal engine performing the generalized cycle close to the maximal efficiency has a long cycle time and hence vanishing power. This aspect is shown to relate to the theory of computational complexity. A physical manifestation of the same effect is Levinthal's paradox in the protein folding problem. The resolution of this paradox for realistic proteins allows to construct engines that can extract at a finite power 40% of the maximally possible work reaching 90% of the maximal efficiency. For purposefully designed engine-bath interactions, the Carnot efficiency is achievable at a large power. PMID:23952379

  15. Sensitivity to conversational maxims in deaf and hearing children.

    PubMed

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegal, Michael

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist instruction. The performance of these children was compared to a group of hearing children aged 6 to 7 years on a test designed to assess sensitivity to violations of conversational maxims. Native signers with bimodal/bilingual instruction were as able as the hearing children to detect violations that concern truthfulness (Maxim of Quality) and relevance (Maxim of Relation). On items involving these maxims, they outperformed both the late signers and native signers attending oralist schools. These results dovetail with previous findings on mindreading in deaf children and underscore the role of early conversational experience and instructional setting in the development of pragmatics. PMID:19719886

  16. Interpreting Negative Results in an Angle Maximization Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David R.; Litwiller, Bonnie H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a situation in which differential calculus is used with inverse trigonometric tangent functions to maximize an angle measure. A negative distance measure ultimately results, requiring a reconsideration of assumptions inherent in the initial figure. (Author/MKR)

  17. Concurrent validity of the Armour39 heart rate monitor strap.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Dupont, William H; Sterczala, Adam R; Looney, Dave P; Dombrowski, Dylan H; McDermott, Danielle M; Bryce, Alexander; Maladouangdock, Jesse; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Luk, Hui-Ying; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Kraemer, William J

    2014-03-01

    New technology offers potential advantages in physically demanding environments where convenience and comfort are important and accurate and reliable data collection is challenging. Nevertheless, it is important to validate the accuracy and reliability of such biological monitoring systems (BMS) before they are adopted. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the concurrent validity of a new heart rate monitor across a range of exercise intensities and with a large and diverse group of male subjects in a large cohort with diverse physical fitness characteristics. Seventy-five men (age, 23 ± 4 years; height, 181 ± 8 cm; body mass, 83 ± 12 kg; estimated V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, 3.16 ± 0.63 [L·min]) volunteered and completed a graded cycle ergometer exercise protocol while heart rate was continuously monitored before, during, and after exercise with the new device (Armour39) and the gold standard (electrocardiogram). The 2-minute stages included sitting, standing, and cycling with 35 W increments until volitional fatigue. The coefficient of determination between mean heart rate values at each stage was R = 0.99, whereas Pearson correlations (r) at each stage were ≥ 0.99. Heart rates during exercise were typically within 1 beat of each other. The Armour39 BMS, therefore, is an acceptable means for the valid and reliable determination of heart rate under various bodily positions and levels of exertion, including maximal exercise intensity. PMID:23860286

  18. Heart rate detection from an electronic weighing scale.

    PubMed

    González-Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for heart rate detection on a subject that stands on a common electronic weighing scale. The detection relies on sensing force variations related to the blood acceleration in the aorta, works even if wearing footwear, and does not require any sensors attached to the body. We have applied our method to three different weighing scales, and estimated whether their sensitivity and frequency response suited heart rate detection. Scale sensitivities were from 490 nV/V/N to 1670 nV/V/N, all had an underdamped transient response and their dynamic gain error was below 19% at 10 Hz, which are acceptable values for heart rate estimation. We also designed a pulse detection system based on off-the-shelf integrated circuits, whose gain was about 70x10(3) and able to sense force variations about 240 mN. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the main peaks of the pulse signal detected was higher than 48 dB, which is large enough to estimate the heart rate by simple signal processing methods. To validate the method, the ECG and the force signal were simultaneously recorded on 12 volunteers. The maximal error obtained from heart rates determined from these two signals was +/-0.6 beats/minute. PMID:18003457

  19. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’ parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.

  20. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’more » parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.« less

  1. A New Augmentation Based Algorithm for Extracting Maximal Chordal Subgraphs

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-01-01

    A graph is chordal if every cycle of length greater than three contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’ parallelizability. In this paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. We experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph. PMID:25767331

  2. Common Types of Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... heart defect, treatment options and expected results. The descriptions and pictures of common heart defects that follow ...

  3. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes fluids to build up in your body. If you ... the amount of fluids you drink: When your heart failure is not very bad, you may not have ...

  4. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  6. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  7. HEART OF MYTH – HEART OF SCIENCE Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bound Alberti, Fay

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the history and meanings of the heart and its diseases as aspects of the histories of science and emotion. Analyzing the twofold meanings of the heart as both bodily object and cultural symbol, it explores the reasons for the apparent conflict in meanings of the heart of science and the heart of emotion in Western medical culture since the 19th century. In Part I, a case study of the writer, economist, and philosopher Harriet Martineau is used to demonstrate and trace that conflict, while Part II highlights the manifold meanings of the heart both in the past and in the present. PMID:26167117

  8. Relationship of maximal aerobic capacity with predictors of cardiovascular diseases in North Indian cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Shweta; Wagle, Surbhi Suresh; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh; Singh, H P

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), as determined by the Bruce protocol, and selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in an North Indian population. Design Cross-sectional design. Setting The study was carried out at Fortis Escorts Hospital, Amritsar, Punjab, India. Patients 105 CVD patients. Interventions All patients were subjected to a symptom-limited treadmill test and their fasting blood lipid parameters were measured. Main outcome measures (a) Body composition; (b) blood lipid parameters; (c) haemodynamic measurement (heart rate at rest and during exercise); (d) physical activity questionnaire (perceived functional ability, physical activity score and physical activity readiness). Results VO2max was found to be negatively associated with age (r=0.192), body mass index (r=0.163), waist circumference (r=0.197), hip circumference (r=0.208) and percentage of body fat (r=0.238); positively correlated with perceived functional ability (r=0.580), physical activity readiness (r=0.534), physical activity score (r=0.784), maximum heart rate (r=0.236) and metabolic equivalents (r=0.938); and showed no association with total cholesterol (r=0.102), triglycerides (r=0.079) and high-density lipoproteins (r=0.153). Conclusion VO2max was associated with body composition parameters but did not show any relation with blood lipid parameters. The most significant association was found between VO2max and the physical activity questionnaire. PMID:27326033

  9. What Is a Nuclear Heart Scan?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Nuclear Heart Scan? A nuclear heart scan is a test that provides important ... use it to create pictures of your heart. Nuclear heart scans are used for three main purposes: ...

  10. Fetal Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Young, American Heart Association Overview of congenital heart disease: Congenital heart disease is a problem that occurs with the baby's ... Find answers to common questions about children and heart disease. CHD Personal Stories ... and hope. Popular Articles ...

  11. What to Expect during a Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During a Heart Transplant Just before heart transplant surgery, the patient will ... are not replaced as part of the surgery. Heart Transplant Figure A shows where the diseased heart is ...

  12. Risk-benefit assessment of ivabradine in the treatment of chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Irmina; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Ptaszynski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate is not only a major risk marker in heart failure but also a general risk marker. Within the last few years, it has been demonstrated that reduction of resting heart rate to <70 bpm is of significant benefit for patients with heart failure, especially those with impaired left ventricular systolic function. Ivabradine is the first innovative drug synthesized to reduce heart rate. It selectively and specifically inhibits the pacemaker If ionic current, which reduces cardiac pacemaker activity. Therefore, the main effect of ivabradine therapy is a substantial lowering of heart rate. Ivabradine does not influence intracardiac conduction, contractility, or ventricular repolarization. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered in symptomatic patients (New York Heart Association functional class II–IV) with sinus rhythm, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, and heart rate ≥70 bpm despite optimal treatment with a beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. As shown in numerous clinical studies, ivabradine improves clinical outcomes and quality of life and reduces the risk of death from heart failure or cardiovascular causes. Treatment with ivabradine is very well tolerated and safe, even at maximal recommended doses. PMID:24855390

  13. Evolution of Shanghai STOCK Market Based on Maximal Spanning Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunxia; Shen, Ying; Xia, Bingying

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, using a moving window to scan through every stock price time series over a period from 2 January 2001 to 11 March 2011 and mutual information to measure the statistical interdependence between stock prices, we construct a corresponding weighted network for 501 Shanghai stocks in every given window. Next, we extract its maximal spanning tree and understand the structure variation of Shanghai stock market by analyzing the average path length, the influence of the center node and the p-value for every maximal spanning tree. A further analysis of the structure properties of maximal spanning trees over different periods of Shanghai stock market is carried out. All the obtained results indicate that the periods around 8 August 2005, 17 October 2007 and 25 December 2008 are turning points of Shanghai stock market, at turning points, the topology structure of the maximal spanning tree changes obviously: the degree of separation between nodes increases; the structure becomes looser; the influence of the center node gets smaller, and the degree distribution of the maximal spanning tree is no longer a power-law distribution. Lastly, we give an analysis of the variations of the single-step and multi-step survival ratios for all maximal spanning trees and find that two stocks are closely bonded and hard to be broken in a short term, on the contrary, no pair of stocks remains closely bonded for a long time.

  14. Maximal non-classicality in multi-setting Bell inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Zohren, Stefan; Pawlowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    The discrepancy between maximally entangled states and maximally non-classical quantum correlations is well-known but still not well understood. We aim to investigate the relation between quantum correlations and entanglement in a family of Bell inequalities with N-settings and d outcomes. Using analytical as well as numerical techniques, we derive both maximal quantum violations and violations obtained from maximally entangled states. Furthermore, we study the most non-classical quantum states in terms of their entanglement entropy for large values of d and many measurement settings. Interestingly, we find that the entanglement entropy behaves very differently depending on whether N = 2 or N\\gt 2: when N = 2 the entanglement entropy is a monotone function of d and the most non-classical state is far from maximally entangled, whereas when N\\gt 2 the entanglement entropy is a non-monotone function of d and converges to that of the maximally entangled state in the limit of large d.

  15. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  16. Beyond heart transplantation: potentials and problems of the shape memory alloy fibers in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kalogerakos, Paris D; Hassoulas, Jannie; Ladopoulos, Vlassis S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure can be treated with devices that mechanically support the circulation. The improvement of these devices would benefit many patients, especially those refractory to maximal pharmacological treatment and ineligible for heart transplantation. This study examined whether the shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers, which are fibers that contract when electric current flows through them and relax passively when that flow is interrupted, can be wrapped around the failing heart and assist in its pumping action. A band of SMA fibers was wrapped around a silicon cylindrical chamber which simulated a dilated heart and its pumping action was tested in a circulatory mockup. This rudimentary device was innovatively controlled by pulse width modulation. The band was made of only six fibers but yet produced the considerable pressure of 20 mm Hg and a stroke volume of 11.8 ml with modest energy demands. A SMA device could assist a severely failing heart, but there are limiting factors to overcome before designing highly effective devices. PMID:24469293

  17. Verification of the heart rate threshold.

    PubMed

    Bunc, V; Hofmann, P; Leitner, H; Gaisl, G

    1995-01-01

    Among the methods for determining anaerobic threshold (AT), the heart rate (HR) method seems to be the simplest. On the other hand, many conflicting results from comparing this method with others have been presented over the last 10 years. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the heart rate threshold (HRT) with the lactate turn point (LTP)-"second" break point of dependence of lactate (LA) to power output, ventilatory threshold (VT) and threshold determined by electromyography (EMGAT), all determined by the same exercise test and evaluated by the same computer algorithm. A group of 24 female students [mean age 20.5 (SD 1.6) years, maximal oxygen consumption 48.8 (SD 4.7) ml.kg-1.min-1] performed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer (modified Conconi test) starting with an initial power output (PO) of 40 W with intensity increments of 10 W.min-1 until the subjects were exhausted. The HRT, LTP and EMGAT determination was done by computer-aided break-point regression analysis from dependence of functional measures on PO. The same computer algorithm was used for VT determination from the relationship between ventilation (V) and oxygen uptake (VO2) or carbon dioxide output (VCO2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7607203

  18. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  19. Heart Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center's device to test astronauts' heart function in microgravity has led to the MultiWire Gamma Camera, which images heart conditions six times faster than conventional devices. Dr. Jeffrey Lacy, who developed the technology as a NASA researcher, later formed Proportional Technologies, Inc. to develop a commercially viable process that would enable use of Tantalum-178 (Ta-178), a radio-pharmaceutical. His company supplies the generator for the radioactive Ta-178 to Xenos Medical Systems, which markets the camera. Ta-178 can only be optimally imaged with the camera. Because the body is subjected to it for only nine minutes, the radiation dose is significantly reduced and the technique can be used more frequently. Ta-178 also enables the camera to be used on pediatric patients who are rarely studied with conventional isotopes because of the high radiation dosage.

  20. Malnutrition and the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, J G; Kiess, M C; Chan-Yan, C C

    1986-01-01

    Earlier concepts that the heart is spared in malnutrition have been shown to be incorrect. Inadequate intake of protein and energy results in proportional loss of skeletal and myocardial muscle. As myocardial mass decreases, so does the ability to generate cardiac output; however, various compensatory factors come into play. Nutritional supplementation for malnourished patients reverses the compensatory factors and may increase the short-term potential for heart failure. Severe cardiac debility results in poor nutrition, which may in turn produce unsuspected but clinically significant myocardial atrophy. Nutritional support may play a role in improving cardiac function in selected patients with cardiac cachexia who are being prepared for cardiac surgery and in patients with rapid weight loss who are at risk for sudden death due to arrhythmias. Malnutrition is common in hospitalized patients, and many patients in hospital now receive nutritional supplementation; both facts have important cardiac implications. PMID:3093042

  1. Lipotoxicity in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Adam R.; Abel, E. Dale

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with ectopic lipid deposition in multiple tissues, including the heart. Excess lipid may be stored as triglycerides, but are also shunted into non-oxidative pathways that disrupt normal cellular signaling leading to organ dysfunction and in some cases apoptosis, a process termed lipotoxicity. Various pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to lead to lipotoxic tissue injury, which might vary by cell type. Specific mechanisms by which lipotoxicity alters cardiac structure and function are incompletely understood, but are beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on mechanisms that have been proposed to lead to lipotoxic injury in the heart and will review the state of knowledge regarding potential causes and correlates of increased myocardial lipid content in animal models and humans. We will seek to highlight those areas where additional research is warranted. PMID:19818871

  2. Detection of skeletal muscle fatigue in patients with heart failure using electromyography.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J R; Mancini, D M; Simson, M

    1992-08-15

    Patients with heart failure frequently report that leg fatigue limits maximal exercise capacity. However, objective documentation of muscle fatigue has not been obtained in such patients. In normal subjects, muscle fatigue during constant work load exercise is associated with an increase in electrical activity generated per contraction due to use of additional muscle fibers to compensate for fiber fatigue. The present study was performed to determine if this approach can be used to document muscle fatigue in patients with heart failure. Vastus lateralis surface electromyograms were monitored in 8 ambulatory patients with nonedematous heart failure and 6 normal subjects during maximal bicycle exercise (20 W increments every 2 minutes). The electromyogram was stored on tape and subsequently analyzed for integrated root-mean-square voltage/contraction (iRMSV). At each work load, the iRMSV of the first and last 30 seconds of the work load were compared. The maximal work load achieved by patients with heart failure was significantly lower (73 +/- 22 W) than that by normal subjects (150 +/- 15 W; p less than 0.01). Both groups had no significant difference between the initial and final iRMSV at submaximal work loads. However, during the 2 highest work loads, both groups reported leg fatigue and had significant increases in iRMSV, consistent with muscle fiber fatigue (maximal work load: 259 +/- 59 to 279 +/- 58 mv.ms [normals] vs 258 +/- 94 to 283 +/- 93 mv.ms [heart failure]; p less than 0.03). The data indicate that the surface electromyogram can be used to detect skeletal muscle fatigue in patients with heart failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1642187

  3. Straight from the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonell, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Every adult who reads to a child has seen what happens when a book speaks. For a time, the book becomes the child's beloved friend. It is asked for repeatedly and learned by heart. But books do more than speak to a child. Children use books to speak to adults. If one wants to understand a child's deepest emotions, take a look at the books they…

  4. The isolated working heart model in infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Itter, G; Jung, W; Schoelkens, B A; Linz, W

    2005-04-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common causes of death in western countries. The aim of this study was to establish and validate the working heart model in rat hearts with CHF. In the rat model the animals show parameters and symptoms that can be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure. The focus of attention was the evaluation of cardiodynamics (e.g.contractility) in the isolated 'working heart' model. The geometric properties of the left ventricle were measured by planimetry (stereology). Formulae available in the past for determining certain parameters in the working heart model (e.g.external heart work) have to be fitted to the circumstances of the infarcted rat hearts with its different organ properties.CHF was induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY/NHsd) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR/NHsd) by creating a permanent (8 week) occlusion of the left coronary artery, 2 mm distal to the origin from the aorta, by a modified technique (Itter et al. 2004). This resulted in a large infarction of the free left ventricular wall. We were able to establish and adapt a new and predictive working heart model in spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts with myocardial infarction (MI) 8-12 weeks after coronary artery ligation. At this stage the WKY rat did not show any symptoms of CHF. The SHR rat represented characteristic parameters and symptoms that could be extrapolated to the clinical situation of patients with end-stage heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Upon inspection, severe clinical symptoms of CHF such as dyspnoea, subcutaneous oedema, palebluish limbs and impaired motion were prominent. On necropsy the SHR showed lung oedema, hydrothorax, large dilated left and right ventricular chambers and hypertrophy of the septum. In the working heart model the infarcted animals showed reduced heart power, diminished contractility and enhanced heart work, much more so in the SHR/NHsd than in the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY/NHsd). The

  5. Pharmacogenetics of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mestroni, Luisa; Begay, Rene; Graw, Sharon L; Taylor, Matthew RG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Novel medical approaches and personalized medicine seek to use genetic information to “individualize” and improve diagnosis, prevention, and therapy. The personalized management of cardiovascular disease involves a large spectrum of potential applications, from diagnostics of monogenic disorders, to prevention and management strategies based on modifier genes, to pharmacogenetics in which individual genetic information is used to optimize pharmacological treatments. Recent Findings Evidence suggests that common polymorphic variants of modifier genes could influence drug response in cardiovascular disease in a variety of areas including heart failure, arrhythmias, dyslipidemia and hypertension. In heart failure, common genetic variants of beta-adrenergic receptors, alpha-adrenergic receptors, and endothelin receptors (among others) have been associated with variable response to heart failure therapies. The challenge remains to develop strategies to leverage this information in ways that personalize and optimize cardiovascular therapy based on a patient's genetic profile. Summary While advances in technologies will continue to transition personalized medicine from the research to the clinical setting, health care providers will need to reshape clinical diagnostic paradigms. Ultimately, pharmacogenetics will give providers options for improving patient management on the basis of pharmacogenetic data. PMID:24717669

  6. Broken Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Therkleson, Tessa; Stronach, Shona

    2015-01-01

    This case describes a combination external treatment for “Broken Heart Syndrome” that includes a lavender footbath, massage using moor extract, and oxalis ointment to the abdomen applied by an Anthroposophic nurse for a specific personality type. Lavender footbaths have been used since ancient times for relaxation and calming, while moor extract has been used medicinally in Europe since the middle ages for warmth and environmental protection. Rhythmical massage using moor extract and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen are part of the tradition of Anthroposophic nursing when managing stress induced by emotional and physical trauma. An elderly lady with specific characteristics diagnosed as Broken Heart Syndrome received one treatment a week for 4 weeks given by an Anthroposophic nurse at an integrative medical center. Between treatments, education was given to enable self-treatment in the home. The nursing treatments, each using lavender footbaths, moor extract massage, and oxalis ointment poultice to the abdomen, proved very effect, and no negative effects were reported. External applications need to be considered by nurses caring for specific personality types with Broken Heart Syndrome. PMID:25673580

  7. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  8. Heart failure prognostic model

    PubMed Central

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. Methods and Results. Our lot included 101 non–consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49,5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5–65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (–0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (–0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). Discussion. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life–altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is

  9. Disk Density Tuning of a Maximal Random Packing

    PubMed Central

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Awad, Muhammad A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed H.; Yan, Dong-Ming; English, Shawn A.; Owens, John D.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Mitchell, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an algorithmic framework for tuning the spatial density of disks in a maximal random packing, without changing the sizing function or radii of disks. Starting from any maximal random packing such as a Maximal Poisson-disk Sampling (MPS), we iteratively relocate, inject (add), or eject (remove) disks, using a set of three successively more-aggressive local operations. We may achieve a user-defined density, either more dense or more sparse, almost up to the theoretical structured limits. The tuned samples are conflict-free, retain coverage maximality, and, except in the extremes, retain the blue noise randomness properties of the input. We change the density of the packing one disk at a time, maintaining the minimum disk separation distance and the maximum domain coverage distance required of any maximal packing. These properties are local, and we can handle spatially-varying sizing functions. Using fewer points to satisfy a sizing function improves the efficiency of some applications. We apply the framework to improve the quality of meshes, removing non-obtuse angles; and to more accurately model fiber reinforced polymers for elastic and failure simulations. PMID:27563162

  10. Molecular maximizing characterizes choice on Vaughan's (1981) procedure

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Alan; Ziriax, John M.

    1985-01-01

    Pigeons keypecked on a two-key procedure in which their choice ratios during one time period determined the reinforcement rates assigned to each key during the next period (Vaughan, 1981). During each of four phases, which differed in the reinforcement rates they provided for different choice ratios, the duration of these periods was four minutes, duplicating one condition from Vaughan's study. During the other four phases, these periods lasted six seconds. When these periods were long, the results were similar to Vaughan's and appeared compatible with melioration theory. But when these periods were short, the data were consistent with molecular maximizing (see Silberberg & Ziriax, 1982) and were incompatible with melioration, molar maximizing, and matching. In a simulation, stat birds following a molecular-maximizing algorithm responded on the short- and long-period conditions of this experiment. When the time periods lasted four minutes, the results were similar to Vaughan's and to the results of the four-minute conditions of this study; when the time periods lasted six seconds, the choice data were similar to the data from real subjects for the six-second conditions. Thus, a molecular-maximizing response rule generated choice data comparable to those from the short- and long-period conditions of this experiment. These data show that, among extant accounts, choice on the Vaughan procedure is most compatible with molecular maximizing. PMID:16812409

  11. Ventilatory patterns differ between maximal running and cycling.

    PubMed

    Tanner, David A; Duke, Joseph W; Stager, Joel M

    2014-01-15

    To determine the effect of exercise mode on ventilatory patterns, 22 trained men performed two maximal graded exercise tests; one running on a treadmill and one cycling on an ergometer. Tidal flow-volume (FV) loops were recorded during each minute of exercise with maximal loops measured pre and post exercise. Running resulted in a greater VO2peak than cycling (62.7±7.6 vs. 58.1±7.2mLkg(-1)min(-1)). Although maximal ventilation (VE) did not differ between modes, ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 were significantly larger during maximal cycling. Arterial oxygen saturation (estimated via ear oximeter) was also greater during maximal cycling, as were end-expiratory (EELV; 3.40±0.54 vs. 3.21±0.55L) and end-inspiratory lung volumes, (EILV; 6.24±0.88 vs. 5.90±0.74L). Based on these results we conclude that ventilatory patterns differ as a function of exercise mode and these observed differences are likely due to the differences in posture adopted during exercise in these modes. PMID:24211317

  12. Aging and loss decision making: increased risk aversion and decreased use of maximizing information, with correlated rationality and value maximization

    PubMed Central

    Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.; Mullette-Gillman, O’Dhaniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how adult aging specifically alters economic decision-making, focusing on examining alterations in uncertainty preferences (willingness to gamble) and choice strategies (what gamble information influences choices) within both the gains and losses domains. Within each domain, participants chose between certain monetary outcomes and gambles with uncertain outcomes. We examined preferences by quantifying how uncertainty modulates choice behavior as if altering the subjective valuation of gambles. We explored age-related preferences for two types of uncertainty, risk, and ambiguity. Additionally, we explored how aging may alter what information participants utilize to make their choices by comparing the relative utilization of maximizing and satisficing information types through a choice strategy metric. Maximizing information was the ratio of the expected value of the two options, while satisficing information was the probability of winning. We found age-related alterations of economic preferences within the losses domain, but no alterations within the gains domain. Older adults (OA; 61–80 years old) were significantly more uncertainty averse for both risky and ambiguous choices. OA also exhibited choice strategies with decreased use of maximizing information. Within OA, we found a significant correlation between risk preferences and choice strategy. This linkage between preferences and strategy appears to derive from a convergence to risk neutrality driven by greater use of the effortful maximizing strategy. As utility maximization and value maximization intersect at risk neutrality, this result suggests that OA are exhibiting a relationship between enhanced rationality and enhanced value maximization. While there was variability in economic decision-making measures within OA, these individual differences were unrelated to variability within examined measures of cognitive ability. Our results demonstrate that aging alters economic decision

  13. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  14. Column generation algorithms for exact modularity maximization in networks.

    PubMed

    Aloise, Daniel; Cafieri, Sonia; Caporossi, Gilles; Hansen, Pierre; Perron, Sylvain; Liberti, Leo

    2010-10-01

    Finding modules, or clusters, in networks currently attracts much attention in several domains. The most studied criterion for doing so, due to Newman and Girvan [Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)], is modularity maximization. Many heuristics have been proposed for maximizing modularity and yield rapidly near optimal solution or sometimes optimal ones but without a guarantee of optimality. There are few exact algorithms, prominent among which is a paper by Xu [Eur. Phys. J. B 60, 231 (2007)]. Modularity maximization can also be expressed as a clique partitioning problem and the row generation algorithm of Grötschel and Wakabayashi [Math. Program. 45, 59 (1989)] applied. We propose to extend both of these algorithms using the powerful column generation methods for linear and non linear integer programming. Performance of the four resulting algorithms is compared on problems from the literature. Instances with up to 512 entities are solved exactly. Moreover, the computing time of previously solved problems are reduced substantially. PMID:21230350

  15. Force Irregularity Following Maximal Effort: The After-Peak Reduction.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa; Spirduso, Waneen

    2016-08-01

    Irregularities in force output are present throughout human movement and can impair task performance. We investigated the presence of a large force discontinuity (after-peak reduction, APR) that appeared immediately following peak in maximal effort ramp contractions performed with the thumb adductor and ankle dorsiflexor muscles in 25 young adult participants (76% males, 24% females; M age 24.4 years, SD = 7.1). The after-peak reduction displayed similar parameters in both muscle groups with comparable drops in force during the after-peak reduction minima (thumb adductor: 27.5 ± 7.5% maximal voluntary contraction; ankle dorsiflexor: 25.8 ± 6.2% maximal voluntary contraction). A trend for the presence of fewer after-peak reductions with successive ramp trials was observed, suggesting a learning effect. Further investigation should explore underlying neural mechanisms contributing to the after-peak reduction. PMID:27502241

  16. Dietary Nitrate and Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Coggan, Andrew R; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from exercise intolerance that diminishes their ability to perform normal activities of daily living and hence compromises their quality of life. This is due largely to detrimental changes in skeletal muscle mass, structure, metabolism, and function. This includes an impairment of muscle contractile performance, i.e., a decline in the maximal force, speed, and power of muscle shortening. Although numerous mechanisms underlie this reduction in contractility, one contributing factor may be a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Consistent with this, recent data demonstrate that acute ingestion of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice, a source of NO via the NO synthase-independent enterosalivary pathway, markedly increases maximal muscle speed and power in HF patients. This review discusses the role of muscle contractile dysfunction in the exercise intolerance characteristic of HF, and the evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation may represent a novel and simple therapy for this currently underappreciated problem. PMID:27271563

  17. Recruitment of some respiratory muscles during three maximal inspiratory manoeuvres.

    PubMed Central

    Nava, S; Ambrosino, N; Crotti, P; Fracchia, C; Rampulla, C

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was undertaken to determine the level of recruitment of the muscles used in the generation of respiratory muscle force, and to ascertain whether maximal diaphragmatic force and maximal inspiratory muscle force need to be measured by separate tests. The level of activity of three inspiratory muscles and one expiratory muscle during three maximal respiratory manoeuvres was studied: (1) maximal inspiration against a closed airway (Muller manoeuvre or maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP)); (2) maximal inspired manoeuvre followed by a maximal expiratory effort (combined manoeuvre); and (3) maximal inspiratory sniff through the nose (sniff manoeuvre). METHODS--All the manoeuvres were performed from functional residual capacity. The gastric (PGA) and oesophageal (POES) pressures and their difference, transdiaphragmatic pressure (PDI), and the integrated EMG activity of the diaphragm (EDI), the sternomastoid (ESTR), the intercostal parasternals (ERIC), and the rectus abdominis muscles (ERA) were recorded. RESULTS--Mean (SD) PDI values for the Muller, combined, and sniff manoeuvres were: 127.6 (19.4), 162.7 (22.2), and 136.6 (24.8) cm H2O, respectively. The pattern of rib cage muscle recruitment (POES/PDI) was similar for the Muller and sniff manoeuvres (88% and 80% respectively), and was 58% in the combined manoeuvre, confirming data previously reported in the literature. Peak EDI amplitude was greater during the sniff manoeuvre in all subjects (100%) than during the combined (88.1%) and Muller (61.1%) manoeuvres. ESTR and EIC were more active in the Muller and the sniff manoeuvres. The contribution of the expiratory muscle (ERA) to the three manoeuvres was 100% in the combined, 26.1% for the sniff, and 11.5% for the Muller manoeuvre. CONCLUSIONS--Each of these three manoeuvres results in different mechanisms of inspiratory and expiratory muscle activation and the intrathoracic and intra-abdominal pressures generated are a reflection of the interaction

  18. Maximal expiratory flow volume curve in quarry workers.

    PubMed

    Subhashini, Arcot Sadagopa; Satchidhanandam, Natesa

    2002-01-01

    Maximal Expiratory Flow Volume (MEFV) curves were recorded with a computerized Spirometer (Med Spiror). Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volumes (FEV), mean and maximal flow rates were obtained in 25 quarry workers who were free from respiratory disorders and 20 healthy control subjects. All the functional values are lower in quarry workers than in the control subject, the largest reduction in quarry workers with a work duration of over 15 years, especially for FEF75. The effects are probably due to smoking rather than dust exposure. PMID:12024961

  19. Stability region maximization by decomposition-aggregation method. [Skylab stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Cuk, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    This work is to improve the estimates of the stability regions by formulating and resolving a proper maximization problem. The solution of the problem provides the best estimate of the maximal value of the structural parameter and at the same time yields the optimum comparison system, which can be used to determine the degree of stability of the Skylab. The analysis procedure is completely computerized, resulting in a flexible and powerful tool for stability considerations of large-scale linear as well as nonlinear systems.

  20. Projection of two biphoton qutrits onto a maximally entangled state.

    PubMed

    Halevy, A; Megidish, E; Shacham, T; Dovrat, L; Eisenberg, H S

    2011-04-01

    Bell state measurements, in which two quantum bits are projected onto a maximally entangled state, are an essential component of quantum information science. We propose and experimentally demonstrate the projection of two quantum systems with three states (qutrits) onto a generalized maximally entangled state. Each qutrit is represented by the polarization of a pair of indistinguishable photons-a biphoton. The projection is a joint measurement on both biphotons using standard linear optics elements. This demonstration enables the realization of quantum information protocols with qutrits, such as teleportation and entanglement swapping. PMID:21517363

  1. Fluid dynamics of heart development.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The morphology, muscle mechanics, fluid dynamics, conduction properties, and molecular biology of the developing embryonic heart have received much attention in recent years due to the importance of both fluid and elastic forces in shaping the heart as well as the striking relationship between the heart's evolution and development. Although few studies have directly addressed the connection between fluid dynamics and heart development, a number of studies suggest that fluids may play a key role in morphogenic signaling. For example, fluid shear stress may trigger biochemical cascades within the endothelial cells of the developing heart that regulate chamber and valve morphogenesis. Myocardial activity generates forces on the intracardiac blood, creating pressure gradients across the cardiac wall. These pressures may also serve as epigenetic signals. In this article, the fluid dynamics of the early stages of heart development is reviewed. The relevant work in cardiac morphology, muscle mechanics, regulatory networks, and electrophysiology is also reviewed in the context of intracardial fluid dynamics. PMID:21327946

  2. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Slaughter, M

    2011-09-01

    In the 1960s, cardiac surgeons and biomedical engineers pioneered the development of total artificial hearts (TAH) for the treatment of left and right heart failure. As we mark the 10th anniversary of the first implantation of the AbioCor device, the use of TAH has been limited, having failed to reach its envisioned potential and promise as an alternative therapy to heart transplantation. The Syncardia/CardioWest device, originally developed 30 years ago as the Jarvik TAH and later renamed the CardioWest TAH, continues to be used clinically in over 50 centers within the US and Europe having supported over 900 patients worldwide. Syncardia continues to develop TAH technology as evidenced by their recent introduction of a new portable pneumatic driver that enables patients to be discharged from the hospital. In contrast to TAH devices, continuous flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have made tremendous technological strides and are rapidly gaining widespread clinical acceptance. The VAD technology has demonstrated extraordinary safety and reliability records through evolving technologies, advanced biocompatible materials, and improved patient management. Subsequently, the number of TAH implantations remains low compared to the growth in LVAD implants. Nonetheless, the Syncardia/CardioWest TAH remains an important and viable option for patients with severe biventricular failure and end organ dysfunction. Overall, a 79% survival rate has been achieved in patients supported with a Syncardia/CardioWest TAH as bridge-to-transplantation. In this review article, a brief history on the evolution of TAH devices, their current use and emerging use of evolving continuous flow VAD technology as chronic biventricular and TAH device systems are presented. PMID:21775941

  3. Familial spontaneous complete heart block in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, E K; Maron, B J

    1986-01-01

    Two siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed spontaneous complete heart block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation at similar ages (29 and 33 years). The clinical, morphological, and haemodynamic expressions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy differed considerably in these two patients. The sister had severe functional limitation due to dyspnoea, pronounced and diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum ventricular septal thickness of 41 mm), and left ventricular outflow obstruction (peak subaortic gradient of 75 mm Hg under basal conditions). In contrast the brother was symptom free, had only modest left ventricular hypertrophy which was confined to the anterior ventricular septum (maximal thickness of 16 mm), and had no echocardiographic evidence of subaortic obstruction. These dissimilar findings in siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy suggest that the predisposition to develop complete heart block was probably genetically transmitted, although it was unrelated to the phenotypic and clinical expression of the disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3707787

  4. The precision and accuracy of a portable heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Seaward, B L; Sleamaker, R H; McAuliffe, T; Clapp, J F

    1990-01-01

    A device that would comfortably and accurately measure exercise heart rate during field performance could be valuable for athletes, fitness participants, and investigators in the field of exercise physiology. Such a device, a portable telemeterized microprocessor, was compared with direct EKG measurements in a laboratory setting under several conditions to assess its accuracy. Twenty-four subjects were studied at rest and during light-, moderate-, high-, and maximal-intensity endurance activities (walking, running, aerobic dancing, and Nordic Track simulated cross-country skiing. Differences between values obtained by the two measuring devices were not statistically significant, with correlation coefficient (r) values ranging from 0.998 to 0.999. The two methods proved equally reliable for measuring heart rate in a host of varied aerobic activities at varying intensities. PMID:2306564

  5. Income and heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the unadjusted and adjusted effects of income on heart disease; its main disease intermediary, high blood pressure; and its main behavioural risk factors, smoking and physical inactivity. Design Random-digit dialing telephone survey collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada. Setting Saskatchewan. Participants A total of 27 090 residents aged 20 years and older; each health region in Saskatchewan was represented. Main outcome measures Overall, 178 variables related to demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, behaviour, life stress, disease intermediaries, health outcomes, and access to health care were analyzed to determine their unadjusted and adjusted effects on heart disease. Results The mean age of the sample was 52.6 years. Women represented 55.9% of the sample. Most respondents were married (52.3%) and had some postsecondary or graduate education (52.5%). The mean personal income was $23 931 and the mean household income was $37 533. All models statistically controlled for age. Five covariates independently associated with heart disease included high blood pressure, household income of $29 999 or less per year, being a daily smoker, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure included being overweight or obese, being a daily smoker, household income of $29 999 or less per year, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with daily smoking included being a visible minority, household income of $29 999 or less per year, not being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, and male sex. Six covariates independently associated with physical inactivity included being a visible minority, being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, male sex, household income of $29 999 or less per year, and being a daily smoker. Conclusion Household

  6. Sleep and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly A; Trupp, Robin J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs for many reasons but, when chronic in nature, has many consequences for optimal health and performance. Despite its high prevalence, sleep-disordered breathing is underrecognized and undertreated. This is especially true in the setting of heart failure, where sleep-disordered breathing affects more than 50% of patients. Although the optimal strategy to best identify patients is currently unknown, concerted and consistent efforts to support early recognition, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment should be encouraged. Optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy and concurrent treatment of sleep-disordered breathing are necessary to improve outcomes in this complex high-risk population. PMID:26567495

  7. Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González S., A.; Acosta P., J. L.; Sandoval M., M.

    2004-09-01

    We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray-scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age, sex and electrolytic changes.

  8. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  9. New medications for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. PMID:27038558

  10. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  11. Effects of temperature, epinephrine and Ca(2+) on the hearts of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

    PubMed

    Blank, Jason M; Morrissette, Jeffery M; Davie, Peter S; Block, Barbara A

    2002-07-01

    Tuna are endothermic fish with high metabolic rates, cardiac outputs and aerobic capacities. While tuna warm their skeletal muscle, viscera, brain and eyes, their hearts remain near ambient temperature, raising the possibility that cardiac performance may limit their thermal niches. We used an in situ perfused heart preparation to investigate the effects of acute temperature change and the effects of epinephrine and extracellular Ca(2+) on cardiac function in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Heart rate showed a strong temperature-dependence, ranging from 20 beats min(-1) at 10 degrees C to 109 beats min(-1) at 25 degrees C. Maximal stroke volume showed an inverse temperature-dependence, ranging from 1.4 ml kg(-1) at 15 degrees C to 0.9 ml kg(-1) at 25 degrees C. Maximal cardiac outputs were 27 ml kg(-1) min(-1) at 10 degrees C and 98 ml kg(-1) min(-1) at 25 degrees C. There were no significant effects of perfusate epinephrine concentrations between 1 and 100 nmol l(-1) at 20 degrees C. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration from 1.84 to 7.36 mmol l(-1) at 20 degrees C produced significant increases in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output and myocardial power output. These data demonstrate that changes in heart rate and stroke volume are involved in maintaining cardiac output during temperature changes in tuna and support the hypothesis that cardiac performance may limit the thermal niches of yellowfin tuna. PMID:12077164

  12. Pathways for Ca2+ efflux in heart and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, R; Bernardi, P; Favaron, M; Azzone, G F

    1987-01-01

    1. Two processes of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ efflux exist in liver and in heart mitochondria: one Na+-independent, and another Na+-dependent. The processes attain maximal rates of 1.4 and 3.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 for the Na+-dependent and 1.2 and 2.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 for the Na+-independent, in liver and heart mitochondria, respectively. 2. The Na+-dependent pathway is inhibited, both in heart and in liver mitochondria, by the Ca2+ antagonist diltiazem with a Ki of 4 microM. The Na+-independent pathway is inhibited by diltiazem with a Ki of 250 microM in liver mitochondria, while it behaves as almost insensitive to diltiazem in heart mitochondria. 3. Stretching of the mitochondrial inner membrane in hypo-osmotic media results in activation of the Na+-independent pathway both in liver and in heart mitochondria. 4. Both in heart and liver mitochondria the Na+-independent pathway is insensitive to variations of medium pH around physiological values, while the Na+-dependent pathway is markedly stimulated parallel with acidification of the medium. The pH-activated, Na+-dependent pathway maintains the diltiazem sensitivity. 5. In heart mitochondria, the Na+-dependent pathway is non-competitively inhibited by Mg2+ with a Ki of 0.27 mM, while the Na+-independent pathway is less affected; similarly, in liver mitochondria Mg2+ inhibits the Na+-dependent pathway more than it does the Na+-independent pathway. In the presence of physiological concentrations of Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, the Na+-independent and the Na+-dependent pathways operate at rates, respectively, of 0.5 and 1.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 in heart mitochondria and 0.9 and 0.2 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 in liver mitochondria. It is concluded that both heart and liver mitochondria possess two independent pathways for Ca2+ efflux operating at comparable rates. PMID:3689311

  13. Effects of "kyushin", a drug containing toad venom, on experimental congestive heart failure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Morishita, S; Shoji, M; Oguni, Y; Ito, C; Noguchi, K; Sakanashi, M

    1992-01-01

    Effects of "Kyushin" (KY-2), a drug containing toad venom, on a low-output-type heart failure model produced in rabbits by protease treatment on the left ventricular anterior wall, were examined. Heart rate, aortic blood flow (AoF), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVP) and maximal rate of rise of LVP (max dP/dt) in this model were maintained at lower levels than those in normal rabbits, while left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were maintained at higher levels, and the mean blood pressure (MBP) was at a normal level. KY-2 was administered intraduodenally to the animal. KY-2 improved heart failure state by increasing the AoF, LVP and max dP/dt, and by decreasing the LVEDP and SVR without a significant change in MBP. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of KY-2 on this heart failure model originate from their cardiotonic activity. PMID:1605132

  14. Maximizing the Online Learning Experience: Suggestions for Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicco, Gina

    2011-01-01

    This article will discuss ways of maximizing the online course experience for teachers- and counselors-in-training. The widespread popularity of online instruction makes it a necessary learning experience for future teachers and counselors (Ash, 2011). New teachers and counselors take on the responsibility of preparing their students for real-life…

  15. How Managerial Ownership Affects Profit Maximization in Newspaper Firms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busterna, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Explores whether different levels of a manager's ownership of a newspaper affects the manager's profit maximizing attitudes and behavior. Finds that owner-managers tend to place less emphasis on profits than non-owner-controlled newspapers, contrary to economic theory and empirical evidence from other industries. (RS)

  16. Modifying Softball for Maximizing Learning Outcomes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Ward, Phillip; Goodway, Jacqueline D.; Sutherland, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Softball is taught in many physical education programs throughout the United States. This article describes modifications that maximize learning outcomes and that address the National Standards and safety recommendations. The modifications focus on tasks and equipment, developmentally appropriate motor-skill acquisition, increasing number of…

  17. Price of oil and OPEC behavior: a utility maximization model

    SciTech Connect

    Adeinat, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    There is growing evidence that OPEC has neither behaved as a cartel, at least in the last decade, nor maximized the discounted value of its profits as would be suggested by the theory of exhaustible resources. This dissertation attempts to find a way out of this dead end by proposing a utility maximization model. According to the utility maximization model, the decisions of how much crude oil each country produces is determined by a country's budgetary needs. The objective of each country is to choose present consumption and future consumption (which must be financed by its future income which can, in turn, be generated either by its investment out of current income or the proceeds of its oil reserves) at time t to maximize its utility function subject to its budget and absorptive capacity constraints. The model predicted that whenever the amount of savings is greater than the country's absorptive capacity as a result of higher prices of oil, it would respond by cutting back its production of oil. This prediction is supported by the following empirical findings: (1) that the marginal propensity to save (MPS) exceeded the marginal propensity to invest (MPI) during the period of study (1967-1981), implying that OPEC countries were facing an absorptive capacity constraint and (2) the quantity of oil production responded negatively to the permanent income in all three countries, the response being highly significant for those countries with the greatest budget surpluses.

  18. Bernoulli equation and the nonexistence of maximal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the idea of maximal jets introduced by Falcke & Biermann (1995, A&A, 293, 665). According to it, the maximum possible jet power in its internal energy equals the kinetic power in its rest mass. We show this result is incorrect because of an unfortunate algebraic mistake.

  19. Mentoring as Professional Development for Novice Entrepreneurs: Maximizing the Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Jean, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring can be seen as relevant if not essential in the continuing professional development of entrepreneurs. In the present study, we seek to understand how to maximize the learning that occurs through the mentoring process. To achieve this, we consider various elements that the literature suggested are associated with successful mentoring and…

  20. Fertilizer placement to maximize nitrogen use by fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The method of fertilizer nitrogen(N) application can affect N uptake in tall fescue and therefore its yield and quality. Subsurface-banding (knife) of fertilizer maximizes fescue N uptake in the poorly-drained clay–pan soils of southeastern Kansas. This study was conducted to determine if knifed N r...