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Sample records for age-predicted maximal hr

  1. Revisiting age-predicted maximal heart rate: Can it be used as a valid measure of effort?

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Ross; Myers, Jonathan; Kaminsky, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite high error ranges, age-predicted maximal heart rate (APMHR) is frequently used to gauge the achievement of adequate effort during an exercise test. The current analysis revisits this issue using the Fitness Registry and the Importance of Exercise: National Database (FRIEND Registry). Methods A total of 4,796 (63% male) apparently healthy subjects underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill. The mean age, maximal heart rate (HR), and maximal aerobic capacity of the cohort were 43 ± 12 years, 178 ± 15 beats per minute, and 36.1 ± 10.6 mlO2 · kg−1 · min−1, respectively. All subjects reached or surpassed a peak respiratory exchange ratio of 1.10. A linear regression equation using age to predict maximal HR was validated in 3,796 subjects and cross-validated in the remaining 1,000 (randomly assigned). Results The APMHR equation in the validation cohort was as follows: 209.3 – 0.72(age). The r value and standard error of estimate for this regression was 0.61 (P < .001) and 11.35 beats/min, respectively. A 1-sample t test revealed that the mean difference between actual maximal HR and APMHR was not significantly different from 0 (mean difference = 0.32, P = .43). However, Bland-Altman revealed high limits of agreement (upper 25.31 and lower −24.67) and a significant proportional bias. Discussion The APMHR equation derived from this analysis included a large cohort of apparently healthy individuals with maximal exercise effort validated by the criterion standard (ie, peak respiratory exchange ratio). Using APMHR in this capacity should be discouraged, and new approaches to gauging an individual's exercise effort should be explored. PMID:26920596

  2. Use of the HR index to predict maximal oxygen uptake during different exercise protocols

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jeannie M; Fehling, Patricia C; Barr, David A; Storer, Thomas W; Cooper, Christopher B; Smith, Denise L

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the ability of the HRindex model to accurately predict maximal oxygen uptake (O2max) across a variety of incremental exercise protocols. Ten men completed five incremental protocols to volitional exhaustion. Protocols included three treadmill (Bruce, UCLA running, Wellness Fitness Initiative [WFI]), one cycle, and one field (shuttle) test. The HRindex prediction equation (METs = 6 × HRindex − 5, where HRindex = HRmax/HRrest) was used to generate estimates of energy expenditure, which were converted to body mass-specific estimates of O2max. Estimated O2max was compared with measured O2max. Across all protocols, the HRindex model significantly underestimated O2max by 5.1 mL·kg−1·min−1 (95% CI: −7.4, −2.7) and the standard error of the estimate (SEE) was 6.7 mL·kg−1·min−1. Accuracy of the model was protocol-dependent, with O2max significantly underestimated for the Bruce and WFI protocols but not the UCLA, Cycle, or Shuttle protocols. Although no significant differences in O2max estimates were identified for these three protocols, predictive accuracy among them was not high, with root mean squared errors and SEEs ranging from 7.6 to 10.3 mL·kg−1·min−1 and from 4.5 to 8.0 mL·kg−1·min−1, respectively. Correlations between measured and predicted O2max were between 0.27 and 0.53. Individual prediction errors indicated that prediction accuracy varied considerably within protocols and among participants. In conclusion, across various protocols the HRindex model significantly underestimated O2max in a group of aerobically fit young men. Estimates generated using the model did not differ from measured O2max for three of the five protocols studied; nevertheless, some individual prediction errors were large. The lack of precision among estimates may limit the utility of the HRindex model; however, further investigation to establish the model's predictive accuracy is warranted. PMID:24303190

  3. HR, Streamlined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2008-01-01

    Human Resources (HR) administrators are finding that as software modules are installed to automate various processes, they have more time to focus on strategic objectives. And as compliance with affirmative action and other employment regulations comes under increasing scrutiny, HR staffers are finding that software can deliver and track data with…

  4. HR Structure and HR Knowledge Transfer between Subsidiaries in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang-Cowham, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper attempts to examine the issue concerning human resource (HR) structures and the transfer of HR knowledge to discover whether and how HR structure facilitates the transfer of HR knowledge between subsidiaries of an MNC in China. Design/methodology/approach: The investigation, being of an exploratory nature, follows the tradition…

  5. HR Public meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  6. HR Public meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-12

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  7. HR Public meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  8. HR Shared Services and the Realignment of HR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, P.

    This report examines how adopting the shared services model of human resources (HR) services delivery can help businesses achieve better alignment between their HR service and specific business needs. Chapter 1 provides background information on the research project underlying this report, which included the following data collection activities:…

  9. Age prediction on the basis of brain anatomical measures.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, S A; Hänggi, J; Mérillat, S; Jäncke, L

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we examined whether age can be predicted on the basis of different anatomical features obtained from a large sample of healthy subjects (n = 3,144). From this sample we obtained different anatomical feature sets: (1) 11 larger brain regions (including cortical volume, thickness, area, subcortical volume, cerebellar volume, etc.), (2) 148 cortical compartmental thickness measures, (3) 148 cortical compartmental area measures, (4) 148 cortical compartmental volume measures, and (5) a combination of the above-mentioned measures. With these anatomical feature sets, we predicted age using 6 statistical techniques (multiple linear regression, ridge regression, neural network, k-nearest neighbourhood, support vector machine, and random forest). We obtained very good age prediction accuracies, with the highest accuracy being R(2)  = 0.84 (prediction on the basis of a neural network and support vector machine approaches for the entire data set) and the lowest being R(2)  = 0.40 (prediction on the basis of a k-nearest neighborhood for cortical surface measures). Interestingly, the easy-to-calculate multiple linear regression approach with the 11 large brain compartments resulted in a very good prediction accuracy (R(2)  = 0.73), whereas the application of the neural network approach for this data set revealed very good age prediction accuracy (R(2)  = 0.83). Taken together, these results demonstrate that age can be predicted well on the basis of anatomical measures. The neural network approach turned out to be the approach with the best results. In addition, it was evident that good prediction accuracies can be achieved using a small but nevertheless age-representative dataset of brain features. Hum Brain Mapp 38:997-1008, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Alloy NASA-HR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Mitchell, Michael

    2005-01-01

    NASA-HR-1 is a high-strength Fe-Ni-base superalloy that resists high-pressure hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE), oxidation, and corrosion. Originally derived from JBK-75, NASA-HR-1 has exceptional HEE resistance that can be attributed to its gamma-matrix and eta-free (Ni3Ti) grain boundaries. The chemistry was formulated using a design approach capable of accounting for the simultaneous effects of several alloy additions. This approach included: (1) Systematically modifying gamma-matrix compositions based on JBK-75; (2) Increasing gamma (Ni3(Al,Ti)) volume fraction and adding gamma-matrix strengthening elements to obtain higher strength; and (3) Obtaining precipitate-free grain boundaries. The most outstanding attribute of NASA-HR-1 is its ability to resist HEE while showing much improved strength. NASA-HR-1 has approximately 25% higher yield strength than JXK-75 and exhibits tensile elongation of more than 20% with no ductility loss in a hydrogen environment at 5 ksi, an achievement unparalleled by any other commercially available alloy. Its Cr and Ni contents provide exceptional resistance to environments that promote oxidation and corrosion. Microstructural stability was maintained by improved solid solubility of the gamma-matrix, along with the addition of alloying elements to retard eta (Ni3Ti) precipitation. NASA-HR-1 represents a new system that greatly extends the compositional ranges of existing HEE-resistant Fe-Ni-base superalloys.

  11. The Mystery of HR 6815

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Raymond R.

    The catalogue data for HR 6815 (V669 Herculis) are very incomplete. A literature search was carried out in an attempt to find the missing parameters, and a possible source for the single catalogued datum was found. Further suggested elements are provided, based on 105 photoelectric observations made between 1991 and 1996.

  12. Putting HR outsourcing into practice.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Faced with the time-consuming responsibility of human resources (HR) management, a growing number of medical practices are outsourcing their HR to professional employer organizations (PEOs) so they can concentrate on their core business. A PEO functions as an HR department-minus the high overhead-managing daily administrative tasks such as payroll processing and related tax filings, employee benefits, and workers' compensation coverage and claims resolution. PEOs help physicians' offices keep up with the piles of paperwork that never seem to shrink, freeing doctors to focus on patient care and building their practice. Because of their volume buying power, PEOs are able to offer employees of small medical practices big-company benefits-everything from health, dental, and vision coverage to long-term disability insurance and tuition assistance. A fledgling industry only a decade ago, HR outsourcing has morphed into a blossoming industry. Enlisting the services of a PEO is now considered de rigueur in many small business circles.

  13. HR Positions on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coghill, Carey Cox; Kirk, James J.

    The question of whether the online job market reflects the trends predicted for the job market was examined in a study of a random sample of 690 Internet job postings over a 6-month period. Each listing was categorized by type of position, desired qualifications, salary, and job specifications. Of the human resources (HR) jobs posted, 7.2% were…

  14. Ultra-weak photon emission of hands in aging prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; van Wijk, Eduard; Yan, Yu; van Wijk, Roeland; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Aging has been one of the several topics intensely investigated during recent decades. More scientists have been scrutinizing mechanisms behind the human aging process. Ultra-weak photon emission is known as one type of spontaneous photon emission that can be detected with a highly sensitive single photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT) from the surface of human bodies. It may reflect the body's oxidative damage. Our aim was to examine whether ultra-weak photon emission from a human hand is able to predict one's chronological age. Sixty subjects were recruited and grouped by age. We examined four areas of each hand: palm side of fingers, palm side of hand, dorsum side of fingers, and dorsum side of hand. Left and right hand were measured synchronously with two independent PMTs. Mean strength and Fano factor values of photon counts were utilized to compare the UPE patterns of males and females of different age groups. Subsequently, we utilized UPE data from the most sensitive PMT to develop an age prediction model. We randomly picked 49 subjects to construct the model, whereas the remaining 11 subjects were utilized for validation. The results demonstrated that the model was a good regression compared to the observed values (Pearson's r=0.6, adjusted R square=0.4, p=9.4E-7, accuracy=49/60). Further analysis revealed that the average difference between the chronological age and predicted age was only 7.6±0.8years. It was concluded that this fast and non-invasive photon technology is sufficiently promising to be developed for the estimation of biological aging.

  15. eHR: An Introduction. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettley, P.; Reilly, P.

    This document introduces the concept of electronic human resources (eHR) and its application. Chapter 1 presents a brief overview of the guide's development, purpose, and structure. Chapter 2 defines the concept of eHR as "the application of conventional, Web, and voice technologies to improve HR administration, transactions, and process…

  16. FCAPT uvby Photometry of the mCP Stars HD 86592, HR 4330, HR 6958, and HR 7786

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    2008-04-01

    New differential Strömgren uvby Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope (FCAPT) observations of four magnetic CP stars HD 86592, HR 4330, HR 6958, and HR 7786 are presented. These observations are analyzed along with published FCAPT data to improve the periods and the light curves. The period of HD 86592 is that of Babel & North, 2.886669 days. The new periods of HR 4330, HR 6958, and HR 7786 are 3.152, 18.0642, and 8.5295 days, respectively, almost the same as their previous values from FCAPT data. The first three stars can be characterized as having constant light curves and periods. However, the small differences among the seasonal light curves of HR 7786 indicate it is a star whose rotational axis is precessing about its magnetic axis.

  17. Réunion publique HR

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-30

    Chers Collègues,Je me permets de vous rappeler qu'une réunion publique organisée par le Département HR se tiendra aujourd'hui:Vendredi 30 avril 2010 à 9h30 dans l'Amphithéâtre principal (café offert dès 9h00).Durant cette réunion, des informations générales seront données sur:le CERN Admin e-guide, qui est un nouveau guide des procédures administratives du CERN ayant pour but de faciliter la recherche d'informations pratiques et d'offrir un format de lecture convivial;le régime d'Assurance Maladie de l'Organisation (présentation effectuée par Philippe Charpentier, Président du CHIS Board) et;la Caisse de Pensions (présentation effectuée par Théodore Economou, Administrateur de la Caisse de Pensions du CERN).Une transmission simultanée de cette réunion sera assurée dans l'Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin et également disponible à l'adresse suivante: http://webcast.cern.chJe me réjouis de votre participation!Meilleures salutations,Anne-Sylvie CatherinChef du Département des Ressources humaines__________________________________________________________________________________Dear Colleagues,I should like to remind you that a plublic meeting organised by HR Department will be held today:Friday 30 April 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (coffee from 9:00 am).During this meeting, general information will be given about:the CERN Admin e-guide which is a new guide to the Organization's administrative procedures, drawn up to facilitate the retrieval of practical information and to offer a user-friendly format;the CERN Health Insurance System (presentation by Philippe Charpentier, President of the CHIS Board) and;the Pension Fund (presentation by Theodore Economou, Administrator of the CERN Pension Fund).A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast in the BE Auditorium at Prévessin and will also be available at the following address. http://webcast.cern.chI look forward to your participation!Best regards,Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  18. Asteroseismology Across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. J.; Cunha, M. S.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.

    2003-05-01

    Ground-based observations have detected solar-like oscillations on Sun-like stars, and diagnostics similar to those used in helioseismology are now being used to test and constrain the physics and evolutionary state of these stars. Multi-mode oscillations are being observed in an abundance of other stars, including slowly pulsating B stars (SPB stars), delta-Scuti stars, Ap stars and the pulsating white dwarfs. New classes of pulsators continue to be discovered across the Herzsprung-Russell diagram. Yet the chances still to be faced to make asteroseismology across the HR diagram a reality are formidable. Observation, data analysis and theory all pose hard problems to be overcome. This book, reflecting the goal of the meeting, aims to facilitate a cross-fertilisation of ideas and approaches between fields covering different pulsators and with different areas of expertise. The book successfully covers most known types of pulsators, reflecting a highly productive and far reaching interchange of ideas which we believe is conveyed by the papers and posters published, making it a reference for researchers and postgraduate students working on stellar structure and evolution. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1173-3

  19. Spatial shell structure of the novas DQ Her and HR Del

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyogin, L.S.

    1986-03-01

    This paper considers the formation of the spatial shell structure of the novas DQ Her (1934) and HR Del (1967). It is shown that the existence of polar caps is due to the influence of the second component of the system on the angular distribution of the mass shell depth of the mainshell. The ratio of the mass shell depth in the equatorial ring and in the polar caps is 1.13 for DQ Her and 2.7 for HR Del. The ratio of the maximal densities in the equatorial ring and the polar caps is of order 3 for DQ Her and of order 70 for HR Del.

  20. Classification of ischaemic episodes with ST/HR diagrams.

    PubMed

    Faganeli Pucer, Jana; Demšar, Janez; Kukar, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the developed world's premier cause of mortality and the most probable cause of myocardial ischaemia. More advanced diagnostic tests aside, in electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis it manifests itself as a ST segment deviation, targeted by both exercise ECG and ambulatory ECG. In ambulatory ECG, besides ischaemic ST segment deviation episodes there are also non-ischaemic heart rate related episodes which aggravate real ischaemia detection. We present methods to transform the features developed for the heart rate adjustment of ST segment depression in exercise ECG for use in ambulatory ECG. We use annotations provided by the Long-Term ST Database to plot the ST/HR diagrams and then estimate the overall and maximal slopes of the diagrams in the exercise and recovery phase for each ST segment deviation episode. We also estimate the angle at the extrema of the ST/HR diagrams. Statistical analysis shows that ischaemic ST segment deviation episodes have significantly steeper overall and maximal slopes than heart rate related episodes, which indicates the explored features' utility for distinguishing between the two types of episodes. This makes the proposed features very useful in automated ECG analysis.

  1. Building HR capability in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2006-01-01

    The current human resource (HR) management practices in health care are consistent with the industrial model of management. However, health care organizations are not factories. They are highly knowledge-intensive and service-oriented entities and thus require a different set of HR practices and systems to support them. Drawing from the resource-based theory, I argue that HRs are a potent weapon of competitive advantage for health care organizations and propose a five-dimensional conception of HR capability for harnessing HRs in health care organizations. The significant complementarities that exist between HRs and information technologies for delivering safer and better quality of patient care are also discussed.

  2. HR8844: a new hot Am star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Using one archival high dispersion high quality spectrum of HR8844 (A0V) obtained with the echelle spectrograph SOPHIE at Observatoire de Haute Provence, we show that this star is not a superficially normal A0V star as hitherto thought. The model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis modeling of the spectrum of HR8844 reveals large departures of its abundances from the solar composition. We report here on our first determinations of the elemental abundances of 41 elements in the atmosphere of HR8844. Most of the light elements are underabundant whereas the very heavy elements are overabundant in HR8844. This interesting new chemically peculiar star could be a hybrid object between the HgMn stars and the Am stars.

  3. A Maximal Graded Exercise Test to Accurately Predict VO2max in 18-65-Year-Old Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, James D.; Bradshaw, Danielle I.; Hyde, Annette; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ronald L.; Yanowitz, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an age-generalized regression model to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max) based on a maximal treadmill graded exercise test (GXT; George, 1996). Participants (N = 100), ages 18-65 years, reached a maximal level of exertion (mean plus or minus standard deviation [SD]; maximal heart rate [HR sub…

  4. Binarity of the LBV HR Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Boffin, H. M. J.; de Wit, W. J.; Mehner, A.; Martayan, Ch.; Guieu, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.

    2015-01-01

    VLTI/AMBER and VLTI/PIONIER observations of the LBV HR Car show an interferometric signature that could not possibly be explained by an extended wind, more or less symmetrically distributed around a single object. Instead, observations both in the Brγ line and the H-band continuum are best explained by two point sources (or alternatively one point source and one slightly extended source) at about 2 mas separation and a contrast ratio of about 1:5. These observations establish that HR Car is a binary, but further interpretation will only be possible with future observations to constrain the orbit. Under the assumption that the current separation is close to the maximum one, the orbital period can be estimated to be of the order of 5 years, similar as in the η Car system. This would make HR Car the second such LBV binary.

  5. The thymus of the hairless rhino-j (hr/hr-j) mice

    PubMed Central

    SAN JOSE, I.; GARCÍA-SUÁREZ, O.; HANNESTAD, J.; CABO, R.; GAUNA, L.; REPRESA, J.; VEGA, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The hairless (hr) gene is expressed in a large number of tissues, primarily the skin, and a mutation in the hr gene is responsible for the typical cutaneous phenotype of hairless mice. Mutant hr mouse strains show immune defects involving especially T cells and macrophages, as well as an age-related immunodeficiency and an accelerated atrophy of the thymus. These data suggest that the hr mutation causes a defect of this organ, although hr transcripts have not been detected in fetal or adult mice thymus. The present study analyses the thymus of young (3 mo) and adult (9 mo) homozygous hr-rh-j mice (a strain of hairless mice) by means of structural techniques and immunohistochemistry to selectively identify thymic epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. There were structural alterations in the thymus of both young and adult rh-rh-j mice, which were more severe in older animals. These alterations consisted of relative cortical atrophy, enlargement of blood vessels, proliferation of perivascular connective tissue, and the appearance of cysts. hr-rh-j mice also showed a decrease in the number of epithelial and dendritic cells, and macrophages. Taken together, present results strongly suggest degeneration and accelerated age-dependent regression of the thymus in hr-rh-j mice, which could explain at least in part the immune defects reported in hairless mouse strains. PMID:11327202

  6. Matching Effective HR Practices with Competitive Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuler, Randall S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines links between three competitive strategies (cost reduction, quality improvement, and innovation) and human resources (HR) practices. Describes a framework for ensuring that the two are made compatible and illustrates the process by showing how one $20 million business wrestled with these compatibility issues. (CH)

  7. Resting and maximal heart rates in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, H B; Zippel, K C; Farrell, A P

    1999-12-01

    Resting and maximal heart rates (HR) in ectothermic vertebrates are generally lower than those in endotherms and vary by more than an order of magnitude interspecifically. Variation of HR transcends phylogeny and is influenced by numerous factors including temperature, activity, gas exchange, intracardiac shunts, pH, posture, and reflexogenic regulation of blood pressure. The characteristic resting HR is rarely the intrinsic rate of the pacemaker, which is primarily modulated by cholinergic inhibition and adrenergic excitation in most species. Neuropeptides also appear to be involved in cardiac regulation, although their role is not well understood. The principal determinants of resting HR include temperature, metabolic rate and hemodynamic requirements. Maximal HRs generally do not exceed 120 b min-1, but notable exceptions include the heterothermic tuna and small reptiles having HRs in excess of 300 b min-1 at higher body temperatures. Temperature affects the intrinsic pacemaker rate as well as the relative influence of adrenergic and cholinergic modulation. It also influences the evolved capability to increase HR, with maximal cardiac responses matched to preferred body temperatures in some species. Additional factors either facilitate or limit the maximal level of HR, including: (1) characteristics of the pacemaker potential; (2) development of sarcoplasmic reticulum as a calcium store in excitation-contraction coupling; (3) low-resistance coupling of myocardial cells; (4) limitations of force development imposed by rate changes; (5) efficacy of sympathetic modulation; and (6) development of coronary circulation to enhance oxygen delivery to myocardium. In evolutionary terms, both hemodynamic and oxygen requirements appear to have been key selection pressures for rapid cardiac rates.

  8. Evaluating the Prediction of Maximal Heart Rate in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Anthony D.; Marjerrison, Andrea D.; Lee, Jonah D.; Woodruff, Megan E.; Hanna, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compared measured maximal heart rate (HRmax) to two different HRmax prediction equations [220-age and 208-0.7(age)] in 52 children ages 7-17 years. We determined the relationship of chronological age, maturational age, and resting HR to measured HRmax and assessed seated resting HR and HRmax during a graded exercise test.…

  9. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Su, K. Y. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Smith, P. S.; Misselt, K. A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bryden, G.; Moro-Martin, A.; Williams, J. P.

    2009-11-01

    We have obtained a full suite of Spitzer observations to characterize the debris disk around HR 8799 and to explore how its properties are related to the recently discovered set of three massive planets orbiting the star. We distinguish three components to the debris system: (1) warm dust (T approx 150 K) orbiting within the innermost planet; (2) a broad zone of cold dust (T approx 45 K) with a sharp inner edge orbiting just outside the outermost planet and presumably sculpted by it; and (3) a dramatic halo of small grains originating in the cold dust component. The high level of dynamical activity implied by this halo may arise due to enhanced gravitational stirring by the massive planets. The relatively young age of HR 8799 places it in an important early stage of development and may provide some help in understanding the interaction of planets and planetary debris, an important process in the evolution of our own solar system.

  10. HR 7275 - A new variable star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, R. E.; Lovell, L. P.; Krisciunas, K.; Chamblis, C. R.; Detterline, P. K.; Landis, H. J.; Louth, H.; Eaton, J. A.; Hall, D. S.; Henry, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Three years of photometry in V and B of the UBV system are presented to confirm the suspicion of Herbst (1973) that HR 7275 is a variable star. The photometry is used to derive the photometric period, which proves to be about 3% shorter than the spectroscopically determined optical period of 28.59 d. Total variation observed during the three years was 0.22 m in the V, and the light curve was always asymmetrical.

  11. Instability Regions in the Upper HR Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deJager, Cornelis; Lobel, Alex; Nieuwenhuijzen, Hans; Stothers, Richard; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The following instability regions for blueward evolving supergiants are outlined and compared: (1) Areas in the Hertzsprung-Russell(HR) diagram where stars are dynamically unstable. (2) Areas where the effective acceleration in the upper part of the photospheres is negative, hence directed outward. (3) Areas where the sonic points of the stellar wind (Where wind velocity = sound velocity) are situated inside the photospheres, at a level deeper than tau(sub Ross) = 0.01. We compare the results with the positions of actual stars in the HR diagram and we find evidence that the recent strong contraction of the yellow hypergiant HR8752 was initiated in a period during which (g(sub eff)) is less than 0, whereupon the star became dynamically unstable. The instability and extreme shells around IRC+10420 are suggested to be related to three factors: (g(sub eff)) is less than 0; the sonic point is situated inside the photosphere; and the star is dynamically unstable.

  12. Nonthermal Radio Emission and the HR Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Perhaps the most reliable indicator of non-radiative heating/momentum in a stellar atmosphere is the presence of nonthermal radio emission. To date, 77 normal stellar objects have been detected and identified as nonthermal sources. These stellar objects are tabulated herein. It is apparent that non-thermal radio emission is not ubiquitous across the HR diagram. This is clearly the case for the single stars; it is not as clear for the binaries unless the radio emission is associated with their late-type components. Choosing to make this association, the single stars and the late-type components are plotted together. The following picture emerges: (1) there are four locations on the HR diagram where non-thermal radio stars are found; (2) the peak incoherent 5 GHz luminosities show a suprisingly small range for stars within each class; (3) the fraction of stellar energy that escapes as radio emission can be estimated by comparing the integrated maximum radio luminosity to the bolometric luminosity; (4) there are no apparent differences in L sub R between binaries with two cool components, binaries with one hot and one cool component, and single stars for classes C and D; and (5) The late-type stars (classes B, C, and D) are located in parts of the HR diagram where there is reason to suspect that the surfaces of the stars are being braked with respect to their interiors.

  13. Enabling quaternion derivatives: the generalized HR calculus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongpo; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Took, Clive C.; Mandic, Danilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Quaternion derivatives exist only for a very restricted class of analytic (regular) functions; however, in many applications, functions of interest are real-valued and hence not analytic, a typical case being the standard real mean square error objective function. The recent HR calculus is a step forward and provides a way to calculate derivatives and gradients of both analytic and non-analytic functions of quaternion variables; however, the HR calculus can become cumbersome in complex optimization problems due to the lack of rigorous product and chain rules, a consequence of the non-commutativity of quaternion algebra. To address this issue, we introduce the generalized HR (GHR) derivatives which employ quaternion rotations in a general orthogonal system and provide the left- and right-hand versions of the quaternion derivative of general functions. The GHR calculus also solves the long-standing problems of product and chain rules, mean-value theorem and Taylor's theorem in the quaternion field. At the core of the proposed GHR calculus is quaternion rotation, which makes it possible to extend the principle to other functional calculi in non-commutative settings. Examples in statistical learning theory and adaptive signal processing support the analysis. PMID:26361555

  14. Enabling quaternion derivatives: the generalized HR calculus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongpo; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Took, Clive C; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-08-01

    Quaternion derivatives exist only for a very restricted class of analytic (regular) functions; however, in many applications, functions of interest are real-valued and hence not analytic, a typical case being the standard real mean square error objective function. The recent HR calculus is a step forward and provides a way to calculate derivatives and gradients of both analytic and non-analytic functions of quaternion variables; however, the HR calculus can become cumbersome in complex optimization problems due to the lack of rigorous product and chain rules, a consequence of the non-commutativity of quaternion algebra. To address this issue, we introduce the generalized HR (GHR) derivatives which employ quaternion rotations in a general orthogonal system and provide the left- and right-hand versions of the quaternion derivative of general functions. The GHR calculus also solves the long-standing problems of product and chain rules, mean-value theorem and Taylor's theorem in the quaternion field. At the core of the proposed GHR calculus is quaternion rotation, which makes it possible to extend the principle to other functional calculi in non-commutative settings. Examples in statistical learning theory and adaptive signal processing support the analysis.

  15. How To: Maximize Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Google is shaking out to be the leading Web search engine, with recent research from Nielsen NetRatings reporting about 40 percent of all U.S. households using the tool at least once in January 2004. This brief article discusses how teachers and students can maximize their use of Google.

  16. Effect of sonic driving on maximal aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Brilla, L.R.; Hatcher, Stefanie

    2000-07-01

    The study purpose was to evaluate antecedent binaural stimulation (ABS) on maximal aerobic physical performance. Twenty-two healthy, physically active subjects, 21-34 years, randomly received one of two preparations for each session: 15 min of quiet (BLANK) or percussive sonic driving at 200+ beats per minute (bpm) using a recorded compact disc (FSS, Mill Valley, CA) with headphones (ABS). Baseline HR, blood pressure (BP), and breathing frequency (f(br)) were obtained. During each condition, HR and f(br) were recorded at 3-min intervals. The graded maximal treadmill testing was administered immediately postpreparation session on separate days, with at least 48 h rest between sessions. There were significant differences in the antecedent period means between the two conditions, ABS (HR: 70.2 +/- 10.7 bpm; f(br): 18.5 +/- 3.3 br min(-1); BP: 134.5/87.9 +/- 13.6/9.2 mm Hg) and BLANK (HR: 64.6 +/- 7.9; f(br): 14.3 +/- 2.9; BP: 126.7/80.3 +/- 12.1/8.6). Differences were noted for each 3-min interval and pre- postantecedent period. The maximal graded exercise test (GXT) results showed that there was a small but significant (P < 0.05), increase in maximal VO(2) in the ABS (49.8 +/- 6.8 ml. kg(-1). min(-1)) vs. BLANK (46.7 +/- 8.7) conditions. Related to that finding was a slight increase (0.5 min) in time to exhaustion (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in HR or RPE (P > 0.05). There may be a latency to ABS related to entrainment or imagery-enhanced warm-up. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:558-565, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. DNA methylation-based forensic age prediction using artificial neural networks and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vidaki, Athina; Ballard, David; Aliferi, Anastasia; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Syndercombe Court, Denise

    2017-05-01

    The ability to estimate the age of the donor from recovered biological material at a crime scene can be of substantial value in forensic investigations. Aging can be complex and is associated with various molecular modifications in cells that accumulate over a person's lifetime including epigenetic patterns. The aim of this study was to use age-specific DNA methylation patterns to generate an accurate model for the prediction of chronological age using data from whole blood. In total, 45 age-associated CpG sites were selected based on their reported age coefficients in a previous extensive study and investigated using publicly available methylation data obtained from 1156 whole blood samples (aged 2-90 years) analysed with Illumina's genome-wide methylation platforms (27K/450K). Applying stepwise regression for variable selection, 23 of these CpG sites were identified that could significantly contribute to age prediction modelling and multiple regression analysis carried out with these markers provided an accurate prediction of age (R(2)=0.92, mean absolute error (MAE)=4.6 years). However, applying machine learning, and more specifically a generalised regression neural network model, the age prediction significantly improved (R(2)=0.96) with a MAE=3.3 years for the training set and 4.4 years for a blind test set of 231 cases. The machine learning approach used 16 CpG sites, located in 16 different genomic regions, with the top 3 predictors of age belonged to the genes NHLRC1, SCGN and CSNK1D. The proposed model was further tested using independent cohorts of 53 monozygotic twins (MAE=7.1 years) and a cohort of 1011 disease state individuals (MAE=7.2 years). Furthermore, we highlighted the age markers' potential applicability in samples other than blood by predicting age with similar accuracy in 265 saliva samples (R(2)=0.96) with a MAE=3.2 years (training set) and 4.0 years (blind test). In an attempt to create a sensitive and accurate age prediction test, a next

  18. Telomere dynamics rather than age predict life expectancy in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Bize, Pierre; Criscuolo, François; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Nasir, Lubna; Monaghan, Pat

    2009-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence from in vitro studies that cellular senescence is linked to telomere dynamics, how this relates to whole-organism senescence and longevity is poorly understood and controversial. Using data on telomere length in red blood cells and long-term survival from wild Alpine swifts of a range of ages, we report that the telomere length and the rate of telomere loss are predictive of life expectancy, and that slow erosion of relatively long telomeres is associated with the highest survival probabilities. Importantly, because telomere dynamics, rather than chronological age, predict life expectancy, our study provides good evidence for a mechanistic link between telomere erosion and reduced organism longevity under natural conditions, chronological age itself possibly not becoming a significant predictor until very old ages beyond those in our sample. PMID:19324831

  19. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  20. Characterizing HR 3549 B using SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Vigan, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Ginski, C.; Desidera, S.; Bonnefoy, M.; Gratton, R.; Langlois, M.; Marzari, F.; Messina, S.; Antichi, J.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Cascone, E.; Chauvin, G.; Claudi, R. U.; Curtis, I.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Garufi, A.; Galicher, R.; Henning, Th.; Incorvaia, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Millward, M.; Perrot, C.; Salasnich, B.; Scuderi, S.; Sissa, E.; Wahhaj, Z.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: In this work, we characterize the low-mass companion of the A0 field star HR 3549. Methods: We observed HR 3549B in imaging mode with the near-infrared branch (IFS and IRDIS) of SPHERE at the VLT, with IFS in YJ mode and IRDIS in the H band. We also acquired a medium-resolution spectrum with the IRDIS long-slit spectroscopy mode. The data were reduced using the dedicated SPHERE GTO pipeline, which is custom-designed for this instrument. We employed algorithms such as PCA and TLOCI to reduce the speckle noise. Results: The companion was clearly visible with both IRDIS and IFS. We obtained photometry in four different bands and also the astrometric position for the companion. Based on our astrometry, we confirm that it is a bound object and set constraints on its orbit. Although several uncertainties still remain, we estimate an age of ~100-150 Myr for this system, yielding a most probable mass for the companion of 40-50 MJup and Teff ~ 2300-2400 K. Compared with template spectra, this points to a spectral type between M9 and L0 for the companion, commensurate with its position on the color-magnitude diagram.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HR 8799e and HR 8799d spectra (Zurlo+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Galicher, R.; Maire, A.-L.; Mesa, D.; Gratton, R.; Chauvin, G.; Kasper, M.; Moutou, C.; Bonnefoy, M.; Desidera, S.; Abe, L.; Apai, D.; Baruffolo, A.; Baudoz, P.; Baudrand, J.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Blancard, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Cantalloube, F.; Carle, M.; Cascone, E.; Charton, J.; Claudi, R. U.; Costille, A.; de Caprio, V.; Dohlen, K.; Dominik, C.; Fantinel, D.; Feautrier, P.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Gigan, P.; Girard, J. H.; Gisler, D.; Gluck, L.; Gry, C.; Henning, T.; Hugot, E.; Janson, M.; Jaquet, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Llored, M.; Madec, F.; Magnard, Y.; Martinez, P.; Maurel, D.; Mawet, D.; Meyer, M. R.; Milli, J.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Origne, A.; Pavlov, A.; Petit, C.; Puget, P.; Quanz, S. P.; Rabou, P.; Ramos, J.; Rousset, G.; Roux, A.; Salasnich, B.; Salter, G.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Schmid, H. M.; Soenke, C.; Stadler, E.; Suarez, M.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Wahhaj, Z.; Wildi, F.; Antichi, J.

    2015-11-01

    The files contain the wavelength in micrometers in the first column, the flux in W/m2/mum in the second column and the corresponding error in the third. We refer to the text for more informations /Users/alice/paper_hr8799/readme.txt. Any further question can be addressed to alice.zurlo@mail.udp.cl (2 data files).

  2. Influence of immunologic status on age prediction using signal joint T cell receptor excision circles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sohee; Seo, Hee Jin; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Soong Deok

    2017-02-01

    Age estimation based on quantifying signal joint T cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) in T cells has been established to be a promising approach in forensic practice and demonstrated in different ethnic groups. Considering that the homeostasis of T cells carrying sjTRECs is closely related to the immunologic status of a person, it is important to investigate the influence of various immunologic statuses on the age estimation model. In this study, quantification of sjTREC contents was performed for groups of people with various immune system statuses, and the result showed less correlation with chronological age (r (2) = 0.424) than in the healthy group (r (2) = 0.648). The simulation model indicated that this influence could increase the range of prediction in the age estimation model, and the mean absolute deviation (MAD) between chronological age and predicted age. Through this study, it was demonstrated that immunologic status is a factor that affects the accuracy of age prediction using sjTREC quantification.

  3. A novel strategy for forensic age prediction by DNA methylation and support vector regression model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Qu, Hongzhu; Wang, Guangyu; Xie, Bingbing; Shi, Yi; Yang, Yaran; Zhao, Zhao; Hu, Lan; Fang, Xiangdong; Yan, Jiangwei; Feng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    High deviations resulting from prediction model, gender and population difference have limited age estimation application of DNA methylation markers. Here we identified 2,957 novel age-associated DNA methylation sites (P < 0.01 and R2 > 0.5) in blood of eight pairs of Chinese Han female monozygotic twins. Among them, nine novel sites (false discovery rate < 0.01), along with three other reported sites, were further validated in 49 unrelated female volunteers with ages of 20–80 years by Sequenom Massarray. A total of 95 CpGs were covered in the PCR products and 11 of them were built the age prediction models. After comparing four different models including, multivariate linear regression, multivariate nonlinear regression, back propagation neural network and support vector regression, SVR was identified as the most robust model with the least mean absolute deviation from real chronological age (2.8 years) and an average accuracy of 4.7 years predicted by only six loci from the 11 loci, as well as an less cross-validated error compared with linear regression model. Our novel strategy provides an accurate measurement that is highly useful in estimating the individual age in forensic practice as well as in tracking the aging process in other related applications. PMID:26635134

  4. Maximally Expressive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Richardson, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize tasks into a timeline or schedule. Tasks are logically grouped into containers called models. Models are a collection of related tasks, along with their dependencies and requirements, that when met will produce the desired result. One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed; the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor; and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a maximally expressive modeling schema.

  5. Role of the autonomic nervous system in the reduced maximal cardiac output at altitude.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Hopkins, Susan R; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2002-07-01

    After acclimatization to high altitude, maximal exercise cardiac output (QT) is reduced. Possible contributing factors include 1) blood volume depletion, 2) increased blood viscosity, 3) myocardial hypoxia, 4) altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) function affecting maximal heart rate (HR), and 5) reduced flow demand from reduced muscle work capability. We tested the role of the ANS reduction of HR in this phenomenon in five normal subjects by separately blocking the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the ANS during maximal exercise after 2-wk acclimatization at 3,800 m to alter maximal HR. We used intravenous doses of 8.0 mg of propranolol and 0.8 mg of glycopyrrolate, respectively. At altitude, peak HR was 170 +/- 6 beats/min, reduced from 186 +/- 3 beats/min (P = 0.012) at sea level. Propranolol further reduced peak HR to 139 +/- 2 beats/min (P = 0.001), whereas glycopyrrolate increased peak HR to sea level values, 184 +/- 3 beats/min, confirming adequate dosing with each drug. In contrast, peak O(2) consumption, work rate, and QT were similar at altitude under all drug treatments [peak QT = 16.2 +/- 1.2 (control), 15.5 +/- 1.3 (propranolol), and 16.2 +/- 1.1 l/min (glycopyrrolate)]. All QT results at altitude were lower than those at sea level (20.0 +/- 1.8 l/min in air). Therefore, this study suggests that, whereas the ANS may affect HR at altitude, peak QT is unaffected by ANS blockade. We conclude that the effect of altered ANS function on HR is not the cause of the reduced maximal QT at altitude.

  6. Maximally Expressive Task Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Japp, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Theresa G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiment activities for the Space Station. The equipment used in these experiments is some of the most complex hardware ever developed by mankind, the information sought by these experiments is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures for executing the experiments are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of space station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling space station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema. Modeling even the simplest of activities cannot be automated; no sensor can be attached to a piece of equipment that can discern how to use that piece of equipment; no camera can quantify how to operate a piece of equipment. Modeling is a human enterprise-both an art and a science. The modeling schema should allow the models to flow from the keyboard of the user as easily as works of literature flowed from the pen of Shakespeare. The Ground Systems Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center has embarked on an effort to develop a new scheduling engine that is highlighted by a maximally expressive modeling schema. This schema, presented in this paper, is a synergy of technological advances and domain-specific innovations.

  7. Réunion publique HR

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Chers Collègues,Je me permets de vous rappeler qu'une réunion publique organisée par le Département HR se tiendra aujourd'hui:Vendredi 30 avril 2010 à 9h30 dans l'Amphithéâtre principal (café offert dès 9h00).Durant cette réunion, des informations générales seront données sur:le CERN Admin e-guide, qui est un nouveau guide des procédures administratives du CERN ayant pour but de faciliter la recherche d'informations pratiques et d'offrir un format de lecture convivial;le régime d'Assurance Maladie de l'Organisation (présentation effectuée par Philippe Charpentier, Président du CHIS Board) et;la Caisse de Pensions (présentation effectuée par Théodore Economou, Administrateur de la Caisse de Pensions du CERN).Une transmission simultanée de cette réunion sera assurée dans l'Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin et également disponible à l'adresse suivante: http://webcast.cern.chJe me réjouis de votre participation!Meilleures salutations,Anne-Sylvie CatherinChef du Département des Ressources humaines__________________________________________________________________________________Dear Colleagues,I should like to remind you that a plublic meeting organised by HR Department will be held today:Friday 30 April 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (coffee from 9:00 am).During this meeting, general information will be given about:the CERN Admin e-guide which is a new guide to the Organization's administrative procedures, drawn up to facilitate the retrieval of practical information and to offer a user-friendly format;the CERN Health Insurance System (presentation by Philippe Charpentier, President of the CHIS Board) and;the Pension Fund (presentation by Theodore Economou, Administrator of the CERN Pension Fund).A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast in the BE Auditorium at Prévessin and will also be available at the following address. http://webcast.cern.chI look forward to your participation!Best regards,Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  8. The hot white-dwarf companions of HR 1608, HR 8210, and HD 15638

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne; Simon, Theodore; Bergeron, P.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained low-dispersion IUE spectra of the late-type stars HD 15638 (F3 V), HR 1608 (=63 Eridani, KO IV), and HR 8210 (A8m). Each of these stars had been detected as a strong EUV source with the Wide Field Camera aboard the ROSAT satellite. The short-wavelength IUE spectrum of each star reveals the presence of a hot white-dwarf companion. We have fit the Lyman-alpha profile and UV continuum of each white dwarf using pure hydrogen models. The excellent fit of the data to the models provides confirmation of the Finley and Koester absolute calibration of the SWP camera of IUE. The UV data alone are insufficient to constrain the model gravity, but an additional constraint is provided by the photometric distance to the late-type primary. The most interesting of the three white dwarfs is the companion to HR 8210 for which our results imply a mass of 1.15 +0.05/-0.15 solar mass. This result is in good agreement with the lower limit on the mass derived from the spectroscopic orbit (greater than 1.1 solar mass), provided that the inclination is close to 90 deg.

  9. Plasma Efavirenz Exposure, Sex, and Age Predict Virological Response in HIV-Infected African Children

    PubMed Central

    Bienczak, Andrzej; Denti, Paolo; Cook, Adrian; Wiesner, Lubbe; Mulenga, Veronica; Kityo, Cissy; Kekitiinwa, Addy; Gibb, Diana M.; Burger, David; Walker, A. Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to insufficient evidence in children, target plasma concentrations of efavirenz are based on studies in adults. Our analysis aimed to evaluate the pediatric therapeutic thresholds and characterize the determinants of virological suppression in African children. Methods: We analyzed data from 128 African children (aged 1.7–13.5 years) treated with efavirenz, lamivudine, and one among abacavir, stavudine, or zidovudine, and followed up to 36 months. Individual pharmacokinetic (PK) measures [plasma concentration 12 hours after dose (C12h), plasma concentration 24 hours after dose (C24h), and area under the curve (AUC0-24)] were estimated using population PK modeling. Cox multiple failure regression and multivariable fractional polynomials were used to investigate the risks of unsuppressed viral load associated with efavirenz exposure and other factors among 106 initially treatment-naive children, and likelihood profiling was used to identify the most predictive PK thresholds. Results: The risk of viral load >100 copies per milliliter decreased by 42% for every 2-fold increase in efavirenz mid-dose concentration [95% confidence interval (CI): 23% to 57%; P < 0.001]. The most predictive PK thresholds for increased risk of unsuppressed viral load were C12h 1.12 mg/L [hazard ratio (HR): 6.14; 95% CI: 2.64 to 14.27], C24h 0.65 mg/L (HR: 6.57; 95% CI: 2.86 to 15.10), and AUC0-24 28 mg·h/L (HR: 5.77; 95% CI: 2.28 to 14.58). Children older than 8 years had a more than 10-fold increased risk of virological nonsuppression (P = 0.005); among children younger than 8 years, boys had a 5.31 times higher risk than girls (P = 0.007). Central nervous system adverse events were infrequently reported. Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that the minimum target C24h and AUC0-24 could be lowered in children. Our findings should be confirmed in a prospective pediatric trial. PMID:27116047

  10. Ischemic preconditioning of the muscle improves maximal exercise performance but not maximal oxygen uptake in humans.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Tangianu, Flavio; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Mameli, Ombretta; Mulliri, Gabriele; Caria, Marcello A

    2011-08-01

    Brief episodes of nonlethal ischemia, commonly known as "ischemic preconditioning" (IP), are protective against cell injury induced by infarction. Moreover, muscle IP has been found capable of improving exercise performance. The aim of the study was the comparison of standard exercise performances carried out in normal conditions with those carried out following IP, achieved by brief muscle ischemia at rest (RIP) and after exercise (EIP). Seventeen physically active, healthy male subjects performed three incremental, randomly assigned maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer up to exhaustion. One was the reference (REF) test, whereas the others were performed after the RIP and EIP sessions. Total exercise time (TET), total work (TW), and maximal power output (W(max)), oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), and pulmonary ventilation (VE(max)) were assessed. Furthermore, impedance cardiography was used to measure maximal heart rate (HR(max)), stroke volume (SV(max)), and cardiac output (CO(max)). A subgroup of volunteers (n = 10) performed all-out tests to assess their anaerobic capacity. We found that both RIP and EIP protocols increased in a similar fashion TET, TW, W(max), VE(max), and HR(max) with respect to the REF test. In particular, W(max) increased by ∼ 4% in both preconditioning procedures. However, preconditioning sessions failed to increase traditionally measured variables such as VO(2max), SV(max,) CO(max), and anaerobic capacity(.) It was concluded that muscle IP improves performance without any difference between RIP and EIP procedures. The mechanism of this effect could be related to changes in fatigue perception.

  11. COPD: maximization of bronchodilation.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Stefano; Camiciottoli, Gianna; Locicero, Salvatore; Maselli, Rosario; Pasqua, Franco; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pela, Riccardo; Pesci, Alberto; Sebastiani, Alfredo; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The most recent guidelines define COPD in a multidimensional way, nevertheless the diagnosis is still linked to the limitation of airflow, usually measured by the reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio below 70%. However, the severity of obstruction is not directly correlated to symptoms or to invalidity determined by COPD. Thus, besides respiratory function, COPD should be evaluated based on symptoms, frequency and severity of exacerbations, patient's functional status and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Therapy is mainly aimed at increasing exercise tolerance and reducing dyspnea, with improvement of daily activities and HRQoL. This can be accomplished by a drug-induced reduction of pulmonary hyperinflation and exacerbations frequency and severity. All guidelines recommend bronchodilators as baseline therapy for all stages of COPD, and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, both beta-2 agonist (LABA) and antimuscarinic (LAMA) drugs, are the most effective in regular treatment in the clinically stable phase. The effectiveness of bronchodilators should be evaluated in terms of functional (relief of bronchial obstruction and pulmonary hyperinflation), symptomatic (exercise tolerance and HRQoL), and clinical improvement (reduction in number or severity of exacerbations), while the absence of a spirometric response is not a reason for interrupting treatment, if there is subjective improvement in symptoms. Because LABA and LAMA act via different mechanisms of action, when administered in combination they can exert additional effects, thus optimizing (i.e. maximizing) sustained bronchodilation in COPD patients with severe airflow limitation, who cannot benefit (or can get only partial benefit) by therapy with a single bronchodilator. Recently, a fixed combination of ultra LABA/LAMA (indacaterol/glycopyrronium) has shown that it is possible to get a stable and persistent bronchodilation, which can help in avoiding undesirable fluctuations of bronchial calibre.

  12. Starspots on V711 Tauri /HR 1099/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorren, J. D.; Siah, M. J.; Guinan, E. F.; McCook, G. P.

    1981-04-01

    Hα (λ6563) intermediate- and narrowband light curves of the RS CVn-type binary system V711 Tau (HR 1099) were obtained in 1977-1978 at Biruni Observatory and in 1977-1978 and late 1979 at Villanova Observatory, where a λ7790 light curve was also obtained in 1977-1978. The light curves are quasisinusoidal, with a period approximately equal to the spectroscopic period. A significant change in the λ6585 light curve occurred between the two observing seasons, with an increase in amplitude from 0.075 to 0.125 mag, a change of shape, and an advance in the phases of maximum and minimum light by 0.3 phase. Flaring activity in Hα was observed, on time scales from minutes to days. We fitted our light curves and V-band light curves obtained at the same time using the starspot model of Torres and Ferraz Mello. We the observed light variations are due to the synchronous rotation of spots on the heavier member of the binary system, which has been shown to be the chromospherically active star. The orbital inclination was assumed to be 35°. Radiant fluxes were taken from spectrophotometric tables. Owing to the broad wavelength coverage in 1977-1978, it was possible to determine the spot temperature to be ˜1800 K cooler than the photosphere, and hence to fix the spot area. A simple model with two circular spots of 26° radius at the same latitude, +48°, adequately reproduces the 1977-1978 light curves. The 1979 observations can be reproduced in detail by a model with two slightly larger circular spots of 31°.5 radius at latitude +15°. The spots cover about 14% of the total stellar surface in 1979. The fits also provide an explanation of the presence of an observed phase dependence in the Hα emission in 1979 but not in 1977-1978. There is a strong suggestion that a spot cycle is in progress in V711 Tau.

  13. Psychological approach to successful ageing predicts future quality of life in older adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Public policies aim to promote well-being, and ultimately the quality of later life. Positive perspectives of ageing are underpinned by a range of appraoches to successful ageing. This study aimed to investigate whether baseline biological, psychological and social aproaches to successful ageing predicted future QoL. Methods Postal follow-up in 2007/8 of a national random sample of 999 people aged 65 and over in 1999/2000. Of 496 valid addresses of survivors at follow-up, the follow-up response rate was 58% (287). Measures of the different concepts of successful ageing were constructed using baseline indicators. They were assessed for their ability to independently predict quality of life at follow-up. Results Few respondents achieved all good scores within each of the approaches to successful ageing. Each approach was associated with follow-up QoL when their scores were analysed continuously. The biomedical (health) approach failed to achieve significance when the traditional dichotomous cut-off point for successfully aged (full health), or not (less than full health), was used. In multiple regression analyses of the relative predictive ability of each approach, only the psychological approach (perceived self-efficacy and optimism) retained significance. Conclusion Only the psychological approach to successful ageing independently predicted QoL at follow-up. Successful ageing is not only about the maintenance of health, but about maximising one's psychological resources, namely self-efficacy and resilience. Increasing use of preventive care, better medical management of morbidity, and changing lifestyles in older people may have beneficial effects on health and longevity, but may not improve their QoL. Adding years to life and life to years may require two distinct and different approaches, one physical and the other psychological. Follow-up health status, number of supporters and social activities, and self-rated active ageing also significantly

  14. Reconnaissance of the HR 8799 Exosolar System. II. Astrometry and Orbital Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, L.; Soummer, R.; Hoffmann, J.; Oppenheimer, R.; Graham, J. R.; Zimmerman, N.; Zhai, C.; Wallace, J. K.; Vescelus, F.; Veicht, A.; Vasisht, G.; Truong, T.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Shao, M.; Roberts, L. C., Jr.; Roberts, J. E.; Rice, E.; Parry, I. R.; Nilsson, R.; Lockhart, T.; Ligon, E. R.; King, D.; Hinkley, S.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hale, D.; Dekany, R.; Crepp, J. R.; Cady, E.; Burruss, R.; Brenner, D.; Beichman, C.; Baranec, C.

    2015-04-01

    We present an analysis of the orbital motion of the four substellar objects orbiting HR 8799. Our study relies on the published astrometric history of this system augmented with an epoch obtained with the Project 1640 coronagraph with an integral field spectrograph (IFS) installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. We first focus on the intricacies associated with astrometric estimation using the combination of an extreme adaptive optics system (PALM-3000), a coronagraph, and an IFS. We introduce two new algorithms. The first one retrieves the stellar focal plane position when the star is occulted by a coronagraphic stop. The second one yields precise astrometric and spectrophotometric estimates of faint point sources even when they are initially buried in the speckle noise. The second part of our paper is devoted to studying orbital motion in this system. In order to complement the orbital architectures discussed in the literature, we determine an ensemble of likely Keplerian orbits for HR 8799bcde, using a Bayesian analysis with maximally vague priors regarding the overall configuration of the system. Although the astrometric history is currently too scarce to formally rule out coplanarity, HR 8799d appears to be misaligned with respect to the most likely planes of HR 8799bce orbits. This misalignment is sufficient to question the strictly coplanar assumption made by various authors when identifying a Laplace resonance as a potential architecture. Finally, we establish a high likelihood that HR 8799de have dynamical masses below 13 MJup, using a loose dynamical survival argument based on geometric close encounters. We illustrate how future dynamical analyses will further constrain dynamical masses in the entire system.

  15. Elemental abundances of the B and A stars Gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Philip, A. G. D.

    1992-01-01

    Fine analyses of the B and A stars, Gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780 are performed. Although the data cover rather limited spectral regions, still useful results were obtained. The data were mostly obtained at the KPNO coude feed telescope with CCD TI No. 3, camera 5, and grating A. The He/H ratio of HR 4817 confirms the similarity of many abundance values with those of the peculiar Mn star 53 Tauri. For the most part Gamma Gem, 7 Sex, and HR 5780 have derived abundances similar to those of other normal sharp-lined stars of similar effective temperature.

  16. Outsourcing HR Services: The Role of Human Resource Intermediaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Henrik; Wallo, Andreas; Nilsson, Barbro; Hoglund, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the area of interest is an emerging type of organisation called human resource intermediaries (HRIs), which focus on delivering human resource (HR) services to public sector organisations and private companies. The purpose of this article is, thus, to explore HRIs as deliverers of HR services. More specifically, the…

  17. African American Accounting Majors and the 150-hr Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Quinton; Hill, Cecil L.; Wright, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The study provides information on African American accounting majors' views regarding 150-hr issues. The authors collected data from 152 students at two schools. Students at one school supported the requirement while those at the other school did not. However, students believed that the 150-hr requirement enhances the quality of certified public…

  18. Examination of DNA methylation status of the ELOVL2 marker may be useful for human age prediction in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Zbieć-Piekarska, Renata; Spólnicka, Magdalena; Kupiec, Tomasz; Makowska, Żanetta; Spas, Anna; Parys-Proszek, Agnieszka; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Płoski, Rafał; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Age estimation in forensic investigations may complement the prediction of externally visible characteristics and the inference of biogeographical ancestry, thus allowing a better description of an unknown individual. Multiple CpG sites that show linear correlation between age and degree of DNA methylation have been identified in the human genome, providing a selection of candidates for age prediction. In this study, we optimized an assay based on bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing of 7 CpG sites located in the ELOVL2 gene. Examination of 303 blood samples collected from individuals aged 2-75 years allowed selection of the most informative site, explaining 83% of variation in age. The final linear regression model included two CpG sites in ELOVL2 and enabled age prediction with R(2)=0.859, prediction error=6.85 and mean absolute deviation MAD=5.03. Examination of a testing set of 124 blood samples (MAD=5.75) showed that 68.5% of samples were correctly predicted, assuming that chronological and predicted ages matched ± 7 years. It was found that the ELOVL2 methylation status in bloodstains had not changed significantly after 4 weeks of storage in room temperature conditions. Analysis of 45 bloodstains deposited on tissue paper after 5, 10 and 15 years of storage in room conditions indicated that although a gradual decrease of positive PCR results was observed, the general age prediction success rate remained similar and equaled 60-78%. The obtained results show that the ELOVL2 locus provides a very good source of information about human chronological age based on analysis of blood, including bloodstains, and it may constitute a powerful and reliable predictor in future forensic age estimation models.

  19. On entire f-maximal graphs in the Lorentzian product Gn ×R1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, H. V. Q.; Cuong, D. V.; Duyen, N. T. M.; Hieu, D. T.; Nam, T. L.

    2017-04-01

    In the Lorentzian product Gn ×R1, we give a comparison theorem between the f-volume of an entire f-maximal graph and the f-volume of the hyperbolic Hr+ under the condition that the gradient of the function defining the graph is bounded away from 1. This condition comes from an example of non-planar entire f-maximal graph in Gn ×R1 and is equivalent to the hyperbolic angle function of the graph being bounded. As a consequence, we obtain a Calabi-Bernstein type theorem for f-maximal graphs in Gn ×R1.

  20. Chemical abundance analysis of π Dra and HR 7545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaslı, Aslı; Nasolo, Yahya

    2017-02-01

    We carried out detailed abundance analysis of two A-type stars; π Dra and HR 7545. High resolution echelle spectra of these stars were obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory. We determined the fundamental parameters of each target star using traditional methods. We also plotted the stars on the H-R diagram and calculated the masses from evolutionary tracks and ages from isochrones.

  1. Elemental abundances of the B and A stars. 2: Gamma Geminorum, HD 60825, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Philip, A. G. Davis

    1994-01-01

    We extend fine analyses of the B and A stars, gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780 using additional spectroscopic data from the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) coude feed telescope with a TI CCD, camera 5, and grating A, and ATLAS9 model atmospheres. In addition we study HD 60825, which had colors similar to the FHB A stars, but was found to be a Population I star. HD 60825, as is gamma Gem, is a sharp-lined early-A star with nearly solar derived abundances. HR 5780 and 7 Sex are also examples of stars which for the most part have solar abundances. The newly derived abundances for HR 4817 reveal important differences with respect to 53 Tau, a somewhat similar HgMn star.

  2. Modelling the inner debris disc of HR 8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contro, B.; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Marshall, J. P.; Hinse, T. C.

    2016-11-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ˜6 and ˜8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 km s-1, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 km s-1, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a source for the warm dust detected in the system. Interior to the inner belt, test particles remain dynamically unstirred, aside from narrow bands excited by distant high-order resonances with HR 8799e. This lack of stirring is consistent with earlier thermal modelling of HR 8799's infrared excess, which predicted little dust inside 6 au. The inner system is sufficiently stable and unstirred that the formation of telluric planets is feasible, although such planets would doubtless be subject to a punitive impact regime, given the intense collisional grinding required in the inner belt to generate the observed infrared excess.

  3. Afghanistan and Pakistan Reconstruction Opportunity Zones (ROZs), H.R. 1318/H.R. 1886/H.R. 2410 and S. 496: Issues and Arguments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-09

    such they are self-contained islands of infrastructure necessary to support manufacturing , often located in relatively undeveloped geographic...President Obama in his March 27 announcement of a new U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan. Proponents of the legislation see it as a way of promoting...Figures Figure 1. Areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan Eligible for Designation of Reconstruction Opportunity Zones (ROZs) as Provided for in H.R. 1318

  4. HR 7355 - another rapidly braking He-strong CP star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulášek, Z.; Krtička, J.; Henry, G. W.; de Villiers, S. N.; Paunzen, E.; Zejda, M.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Strong meridional mixing induced by rapid rotation is one reason why all hot main-sequence stars are not chemically peculiar. However, the finding that the He-strong CP star HR 7355 is a rapid rotator complicates this concept. Aims: Our goal is to explain the observed behaviour of HR 7355 based on period analysis of all available photometry. Methods: Over two years, we acquired 114 new BV observations of HR 7355 at observatories in Arizona, U.S.A and Cape Town, South Africa. We performed period analyses of the new observations along with new analyses of 732 archival measurements from the Hipparcos and ASAS projects. Results: We find that the light curves of HR 7355gt; in various filters are quite similar, with amplitudes 0.035(4), 0.036(4), and 0.038(3) mag in B, Hp, and V, respectively. The light curves are double-peaked, with unevenly deep minima. We substantially refine the rotational period to be P = 0.5214410(4)d, indicating that HR 7355gt; is the most rapidly rotating CP star known. Our period analyses reveal a possible lengthening of the rotational period with dot{P}/P = 2.4(8)×10-6 yr-1. Conclusions: We conclude that the shape and amplitude of HR 7355gt; light curves are typical of magnetic He-strong CP stars, for which light variations are the result of photospheric spots on the surface of a rotating star. We hypothesise that the light variations are caused mainly by an uneven distribution of overabundant helium on the star's surface. We briefly describe and discuss the cause of the rapid rotational braking of the star. Photometric data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/511/L7

  5. The fate of the solid matter orbiting HR 4796A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Ghez, A. M.; White, Russell J.; Mccarthy, D. W.; Smith, R. C.; Martin, P. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained optical spectra, 2 micrometers speckle images, and an upper limit to the 800 micrometers flux for HR 4796A, and optical spectra for its physical companion separated by 7.7 arcsecs, HR 4796B. We detect H-beta, H-gamma, and the calcium H and K lines in emission from HR 4796B; these data are consistent with the hypothesis that it is later than spectral type M2 and lies substantially above the main-sequence. From the location of HR 4796B on the H-R diagram, the estimated age of this star is 3 x 10(exp 6) yr, and assuming this age for the entire system, we find from our 2 micrometers speckle data that there is no close stellar companion to HR 4796A (M greater than 0.125 solar mass) between 11 and 120 AU from the star. From the IRAS and ground-based photometry, it seems that there is a hole in the dust distribution around HR 4796A with an inner radius of between approximately 40 and approximately 200 AU. The observed circumstellar dust grains, which lie at D greater than 40 AU from the star, are likely to be at least 3 micrometers in radius in order to be gravitationally bound to HR 4796A, if the circumstellar dust cloud is optically thin. Since they are larger than almost all interstellar grains, the circumstellar dust grains probably grew by coalescence. Because the existing grains at D greater than 40 AU have undergone measurable coalescence, it is possible that particles that presumably once existed at D less than 40 AU, where the collision times were shorter than at D greater than 40 AU, grew into macroscopic objects. A likely explanation for the dust hole is that there is a companion located at about half the inner radius of the dust hole, or between 20 and 100 AU from the star. If such a companion exists, it must have a mass less than 0.125 solar mass. Since grain coalescence has occurred, this putative companion possibly could be a planet.

  6. Automated pediatric abdominal effective diameter measurements versus age-predicted body size for normalization of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M; Vachon, Linda A; Duddalwar, Vinay A

    2013-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in adjusting CT radiation dose data for patient body size. A method for automated computation of the abdominal effective diameter of a patient from a CT image has previously only been tested in adult patients. In this work, we tested the method on a set of 128 pediatric patients aged 0.8 to 12.9 years (average 8.0 years, SD = 3.7 years) who had CT abdomen/pelvis exams performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 scanner. For this set of patients, age-predicted abdominal effective diameter extrapolated based on data from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements was a relatively poor predictor of measured effective diameter. The mean absolute percentage error between the CTDI normalization coefficient calculated from a manually measured effective diameter and the coefficient determined by age-predicted effective diameter was 12.3 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-52.8 %, SD 8.7 %) and 12.9 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-56.4 %, SD 9.2 %). In contrast, there is a close correspondence between the automated and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 0.6 cm (error range 0.2-1.3 cm). This correspondence translates into a high degree of correspondence between normalization coefficients determined by automated and manual measurements; the mean absolute percentage error was 2.1 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-8.1 %, SD = 1.4 %) and 2.3 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-9.3 %, SD = 1.6 %).

  7. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E.

    2014-01-01

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  8. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E

    2014-07-22

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design.

  9. Teaching HR Professionals: The Classroom as a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlands, Kate; Avramenko, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative course design incorporating both communities of practice and reflective practice as a learning strategy for part-time learners in higher education. The new design has been applied to teaching HR practitioners in a UK-based business school. Findings indicate that the suggested way of organizing teaching and…

  10. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  11. An Ounce of Prevention: The Benefits of an HR Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    During her 13 years leading a school district human resources office, the author came to recognize that managing human capital is much more than recruiting, hiring, managing personnel records, and handling performance issues. In addition to implementing initiatives to increase the efficiency with which HR officers and staff perform those tasks,…

  12. DISCOVERY OF A LOW-MASS COMPANION AROUND HR 3549

    SciTech Connect

    Mawet, D.; David, T.; Bottom, M.; Hinkley, S.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Padgett, D.; Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Morales, F.; Kuhn, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion to HR 3549, an A0V star surrounded by a debris disk with a warm excess detected by WISE at 22 μm (10σ significance). We imaged HR 3549 B in the L band with NAOS-CONICA, the adaptive optics infrared camera of the Very Large Telescope, in January 2013 and confirmed its common proper motion in 2015 January. The companion is at a projected separation of ≃80 AU and position angle of ≃157°, so it is orbiting well beyond the warm disk inner edge of r > 10 AU. Our age estimate for this system corresponds to a companion mass in the range 15–80 M{sub J}, spanning the brown dwarf regime, and so HR 3549 B is another recent addition to the growing list of brown dwarf desert objects with extreme mass ratios. The simultaneous presence of a warm disk and a brown dwarf around HR 3549 provides interesting empirical constraints on models of the formation of substellar companions.

  13. HR Manager Leadership in Quality Improvement in a College Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharabi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the influence of the human resource (HR) manager on the quality of service in an academic college, and the human resource management (HRM) outcomes of the process. Design/methodology/approach: The paper relates to a customer satisfaction survey. More than 120 questionnaires were completed by the…

  14. Bumping HR: Giving Principals More Say over Staffing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In what may come as a surprise to many, principals have remarkably little control over who teaches in their schools. For the most part, the human resources (HR) department in a district's central office, not individual school principals, makes the final call about when to hire teachers, whom to hire and in which schools they are placed.…

  15. Multivariate residues and maximal unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søgaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2013-12-01

    We extend the maximal unitarity method to amplitude contributions whose cuts define multidimensional algebraic varieties. The technique is valid to all orders and is explicitly demonstrated at three loops in gauge theories with any number of fermions and scalars in the adjoint representation. Deca-cuts realized by replacement of real slice integration contours by higher-dimensional tori encircling the global poles are used to factorize the planar triple box onto a product of trees. We apply computational algebraic geometry and multivariate complex analysis to derive unique projectors for all master integral coefficients and obtain compact analytic formulae in terms of tree-level data.

  16. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  17. Abundance Analysis of the Silicon Star HR 6958

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ken-Ichi

    2003-12-01

    The elemental composition of the chemically peculiar star HR6958 has been studied with emphasis on doubly ionized rare earths. A visual region spectrum taken with the ELODIE spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory was analyzed. A total of 40 elements including Pr III, Nd III, Tb III, Dy III, Ho III, and Er III were identified and their abundances computed. He is deficient by over 1dex with respect to the Sun; the light elements (C-Ca), except for Si, have solar abundances; the iron group elements (Sc-Fe) are overabundant by 1 dex to 2dex, with Ti and Cr highly overabundant; and the lanthanide rare earths are overabundant by 3dex to 4dex. This abundance pattern with He deficient, Si, Ti, Cr, Sr, and Pr overabundant indicates that HR6958 is a member of Si stars.

  18. Augmented HR Repair Mediates Acquired Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gil Del Alcazar, Carlos Rodrigo; Todorova, Pavlina Krasimirova; Habib, Amyn A; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Burma, Sandeep

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is universally fatal. The DNA alkylating agent temozolomide is part of the standard-of-care for GBM. However, these tumors eventually develop therapy-driven resistance and inevitably recur. While loss of mismatch repair (MMR) and re-expression of MGMT have been shown to underlie chemoresistance in a fraction of GBMs, resistance mechanisms operating in the remaining GBMs are not well understood. To better understand the molecular basis for therapy-driven temozolomide resistance, mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts were subjected to protracted temozolomide treatment, and cell lines were generated from the primary (untreated) and recurrent (temozolomide-treated) tumors. As expected, the cells derived from primary tumors were sensitive to temozolomide, whereas the cells from the recurrent tumors were significantly resistant to the drug. Importantly, the acquired resistance to temozolomide in the recurrent lines was not driven by re-expression of MGMT or loss of MMR but was due to accelerated repair of temozolomide-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Temozolomide induces DNA replication-associated DSBs that are primarily repaired by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Augmented HR appears to underpin temozolomide resistance in the recurrent lines, as these cells were cross-resistant to other agents that induced replication-associated DSBs, exhibited faster resolution of damage-induced Rad51 foci, and displayed higher levels of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Furthermore, in light of recent studies demonstrating that CDK1 and CDK2 promote HR, it was found that CDK1/2 inhibitors countered the heightened HR in recurrent tumors and sensitized these therapy-resistant tumor cells to temozolomide.

  19. The Dynamical Structure of HR 8799's Inner Debris Disk.

    PubMed

    Contro, B; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Horner, J; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar system where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanetary dynamics and debris disk-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disk remains unknown. This leaves a significant question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using UNSW Australia's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disk comprising 300,298 particles for a period of 60 Ma. These simulations have enabled the characterisation of the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail, and will in future allow us to provide a first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet (s) in the inner system.

  20. PHF11 promotes DSB resection, ATR signaling, and HR.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Handa, Naofumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; de Lange, Titia

    2017-01-01

    Resection of double-strand breaks (DSBs) plays a critical role in their detection and appropriate repair. The 3' ssDNA protrusion formed through resection activates the ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) and is required for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). Here we report that PHF11 (plant homeodomain finger 11) encodes a previously unknown DDR factor involved in 5' end resection, ATR signaling, and HR. PHF11 was identified based on its association with deprotected telomeres and localized to sites of DNA damage in S phase. Depletion of PHF11 diminished the ATR signaling response to telomere dysfunction and genome-wide DNA damage, reduced end resection at sites of DNA damage, resulted in compromised HR and misrejoining of S-phase DSBs, and increased the sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. PHF11 interacted with the ssDNA-binding protein RPA and was found in a complex with several nucleases, including the 5' dsDNA exonuclease EXO1. Biochemical experiments demonstrated that PHF11 stimulates EXO1 by overcoming its inhibition by RPA, suggesting that PHF11 acts (in part) by promoting 5' end resection at RPA-bound sites of DNA damage. These findings reveal a role for PHF11 in DSB resection, DNA damage signaling, and DSB repair.

  1. PHF11 promotes DSB resection, ATR signaling, and HR

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Handa, Naofumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; de Lange, Titia

    2017-01-01

    Resection of double-strand breaks (DSBs) plays a critical role in their detection and appropriate repair. The 3′ ssDNA protrusion formed through resection activates the ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) and is required for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). Here we report that PHF11 (plant homeodomain finger 11) encodes a previously unknown DDR factor involved in 5′ end resection, ATR signaling, and HR. PHF11 was identified based on its association with deprotected telomeres and localized to sites of DNA damage in S phase. Depletion of PHF11 diminished the ATR signaling response to telomere dysfunction and genome-wide DNA damage, reduced end resection at sites of DNA damage, resulted in compromised HR and misrejoining of S-phase DSBs, and increased the sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. PHF11 interacted with the ssDNA-binding protein RPA and was found in a complex with several nucleases, including the 5′ dsDNA exonuclease EXO1. Biochemical experiments demonstrated that PHF11 stimulates EXO1 by overcoming its inhibition by RPA, suggesting that PHF11 acts (in part) by promoting 5′ end resection at RPA-bound sites of DNA damage. These findings reveal a role for PHF11 in DSB resection, DNA damage signaling, and DSB repair. PMID:28115467

  2. Natural selection maximizes Fisher information.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A

    2009-02-01

    In biology, information flows from the environment to the genome by the process of natural selection. However, it has not been clear precisely what sort of information metric properly describes natural selection. Here, I show that Fisher information arises as the intrinsic metric of natural selection and evolutionary dynamics. Maximizing the amount of Fisher information about the environment captured by the population leads to Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection, the most profound statement about how natural selection influences evolutionary dynamics. I also show a relation between Fisher information and Shannon information (entropy) that may help to unify the correspondence between information and dynamics. Finally, I discuss possible connections between the fundamental role of Fisher information in statistics, biology and other fields of science.

  3. HR4EU--A Web-Portal for E-Learning of Croatian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filko, Matea; Farkaš, Daša; Hriberski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the HR4EU--a web portal for e-learning of Croatian. HR4EU is the first portal that offers Croatian language courses which are free-of-charge and developed by language professionals. Moreover, HR4EU also integrates bidirectional interaction with some of the previously developed language resources for Croatian. The HR4EU…

  4. NEW PRECISION ORBITS OF BRIGHT DOUBLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES. IV. 66 ANDROMEDAE, HR 6979, AND HR 9059

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael H.; Tomkin, Jocelyn E-mail: jt@alexis.as.utexas.edu

    2010-04-15

    We have determined improved spectroscopic orbits for three double-lined binaries, 66 And (F4 V), HR 6979 (Am), and HR 9059 (F5 IV) using radial velocities from the 2.1 m telescope at McDonald Observatory, the coude feed telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 2 m telescope at Fairborn Observatory. The orbital periods range from 11.0 to 14.3 days, and all three systems have eccentric orbits. The new orbital dimensions (a {sub 1} sin i and a {sub 2} sin i) and minimum masses (m {sub 1} sin{sup 3} i and m {sub 2} sin{sup 3} i) have accuracies of 0.2% or better. All six components of the three binary systems are rotating more slowly than their predicted pseudosynchronous rotational velocities. Hipparcos photometry of HR 9059 shows that this system has partial eclipses. Its components are nearly identical in mass and are at the very end of their main-sequence lifetimes or perhaps have just begun to traverse the Hertsprung gap.

  5. Factors associated with the differential in actual gestational age and gestational age predicted from transrectal ultrasonography in pregnant dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A M; Ryan, D P; Berry, D P

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine (1) how gestational age predicted using transrectal ultrasonography related to actual gestational age derived as the number of days from the most recent artificial insemination date, (2) what factors, if any, were associated with the differential between the two measures, and (3) the association between this differential in gestational age and the likelihood of subsequent pregnancy loss, stillbirth, or calving dystocia. The data set contained 7340 ultrasound records from 6805 Holstein Friesian dairy cows in 175 herds. Ultrasonography assessment underestimated gestational age relative to days since last service by 0.51 days (standard error [SE]: 0.040), although the differential was less during embryonic development phase (i.e., ≤42 days of gestation; mean overestimation of 0.31 days) versus fetal development phase (i.e., >42 days of gestation; mean underestimation of 0.81 days). Predicted calving date calculated from ultrasonography was 1.41 days (SE: 0.040) later than the actual subsequent calving date and was, on average, 0.52 days later than predicted calving date, assuming a gestation length of 282 days. Parity of the dam (P < 0.05), stage of pregnancy (P < 0.001), and sex of the calf born (P < 0.001) were all associated with the differential in gestational age based on ultrasonography versus days since last service. No obvious trend among parities was evident in the difference between the methods in predicting gestational age. Ultrasonography underestimated gestational age by 0.83 (SE: 0.15) days in parity 5+ cows and underestimated gestational age by 0.41 (SE: 0.14) days in the first-parity cows. Relative to gestational age predicted from the most recent service, ultrasonography underestimated gestational age by 0.75 (SE: 0.13) days for heifer fetuses and underestimated gestational age by 0.36 (SE: 0.13) days for bull fetuses. The heritability of the differential in gestational age between the methods of

  6. A simplified approach to estimating the maximal lactate steady state.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A C; Woulfe, T; Welsh, R; Foster, C

    1994-01-01

    The exercise intensity associated with an elevated but stable blood lactate (HLa) concentration during constant load work (the maximal steady state, MSS) has received attention as a candidate for the "optimal" exercise intensity for endurance training. Identification of MSS ordinarily demands direct measurement of HLa or respiratory metabolism. The purpose of this study was to test the ability of heart rate (HR) to identify MSS during steady state exercise, similar to that used in conventional exercise prescription. Trained runners (n = 9) and cyclists (n = 12) performed incremental and steady state exercise. MSS was defined as the highest intensity in which blood lactate concentration increased < 1.0 mM from minutes 10 to 30. The next higher intensity workbout completed was defined as > MSS. HR models related to the presence or absence of steady state conditions were developed from the upper 95% confidence interval of MSS and the lower 95% confidence interval of > MSS. Cross validation of the model to predict MSS was performed using 21 running and 45 cycling exercise bouts in a separate group. Using the MSS upper 95% confidence interval model 84% and 76% of workbouts were correctly predicted in cyclists and runners, respectively. Using the > MSS lower 95% confidence interval model, 76% and 81% of workbouts were correctly predicted in cyclists and runners, respectively. Prediction errors tended to incorrectly predict non-steady state conditions when steady state had occurred (16/26) (62%). We conclude that use of these simple HR models may predict MSS with sufficient accuracy to be useful when direct HLa measurement is not available.

  7. Spatial-Sequential Working Memory in Younger and Older Adults: Age Predicts Backward Recall Performance within Both Age Groups.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Working memory is vulnerable to age-related decline, but there is debate regarding the age-sensitivity of different forms of spatial-sequential working memory task, depending on their passive or active nature. The functional architecture of spatial working memory was therefore explored in younger (18-40 years) and older (64-85 years) adults, using passive and active recall tasks. Spatial working memory was assessed using a modified version of the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1998). Across both age groups, the effects of interference (control, visual, or spatial), and recall type (forward and backward), were investigated. There was a clear effect of age group, with younger adults demonstrating a larger spatial working memory capacity than the older adults overall. There was also a specific effect of interference, with the spatial interference task (spatial tapping) reliably reducing performance relative to both the control and visual interference (dynamic visual noise) conditions in both age groups and both recall types. This suggests that younger and older adults have similar dependence upon active spatial rehearsal, and that both forward and backward recall require this processing capacity. Linear regression analyses were then carried out within each age group, to assess the predictors of performance in each recall format (forward and backward). Specifically the backward recall task was significantly predicted by age, within both the younger and older adult groups. This finding supports previous literature showing lifespan linear declines in spatial-sequential working memory, and in working memory tasks from other domains, but contrasts with previous evidence that backward spatial span is no more sensitive to aging than forward span. The study suggests that backward spatial span is indeed more processing-intensive than forward span, even when both tasks include a retention period, and that age predicts

  8. Spatial-Sequential Working Memory in Younger and Older Adults: Age Predicts Backward Recall Performance within Both Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louise A.

    2016-01-01

    Working memory is vulnerable to age-related decline, but there is debate regarding the age-sensitivity of different forms of spatial-sequential working memory task, depending on their passive or active nature. The functional architecture of spatial working memory was therefore explored in younger (18–40 years) and older (64–85 years) adults, using passive and active recall tasks. Spatial working memory was assessed using a modified version of the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale – Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1998). Across both age groups, the effects of interference (control, visual, or spatial), and recall type (forward and backward), were investigated. There was a clear effect of age group, with younger adults demonstrating a larger spatial working memory capacity than the older adults overall. There was also a specific effect of interference, with the spatial interference task (spatial tapping) reliably reducing performance relative to both the control and visual interference (dynamic visual noise) conditions in both age groups and both recall types. This suggests that younger and older adults have similar dependence upon active spatial rehearsal, and that both forward and backward recall require this processing capacity. Linear regression analyses were then carried out within each age group, to assess the predictors of performance in each recall format (forward and backward). Specifically the backward recall task was significantly predicted by age, within both the younger and older adult groups. This finding supports previous literature showing lifespan linear declines in spatial-sequential working memory, and in working memory tasks from other domains, but contrasts with previous evidence that backward spatial span is no more sensitive to aging than forward span. The study suggests that backward spatial span is indeed more processing-intensive than forward span, even when both tasks include a retention period, and that age predicts

  9. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined.

  10. 10 MMBt/Hr AFBC Commercial Demonstration Cedar Lane Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Harold M. Keener; Mary H. Wicks; Tom Machamer; Dave Hoecke; Don Bonk; Bob Brown

    2005-10-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate and promote the commercialization of coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) systems, with limestone addition for SO2 emissions control and a baghouse for particulate emissions control. This AFBC system was targeted for small scale industrial-commercial-institutional space and process heat applications in the 4-40 MMBtu/hr size range. A cost effective and environmentally acceptable AFBC technology in this size range could displace a considerable amount of heating gas and oil with coal, while resulting in significant total cost savings to the owner/operators.

  11. A maximally supersymmetric Kondo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N=4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  12. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  13. A Maximally Supersymmetric Kondo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  14. Maximal switchability of centralized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Morozov, Ivan; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous time Hopfield-like recurrent networks as dynamical models for gene regulation and neural networks. We are interested in networks that contain n high-degree nodes preferably connected to a large number of N s weakly connected satellites, a property that we call n/N s -centrality. If the hub dynamics is slow, we obtain that the large time network dynamics is completely defined by the hub dynamics. Moreover, such networks are maximally flexible and switchable, in the sense that they can switch from a globally attractive rest state to any structurally stable dynamics when the response time of a special controller hub is changed. In particular, we show that a decrease of the controller hub response time can lead to a sharp variation in the network attractor structure: we can obtain a set of new local attractors, whose number can increase exponentially with N, the total number of nodes of the nework. These new attractors can be periodic or even chaotic. We provide an algorithm, which allows us to design networks with the desired switching properties, or to learn them from time series, by adjusting the interactions between hubs and satellites. Such switchable networks could be used as models for context dependent adaptation in functional genetics or as models for cognitive functions in neuroscience.

  15. Effects of selective cooling of the facial area on physiological and metabolic output during graded maximal or prolonged submaximal exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, A.; Boisvert, P.; Brisson, G. R.; Decarufel, D.; Laurencelle, L.; Dulac, S.; Vogelaere, P.; Therminarias, A.

    1989-06-01

    Physiological and metabolic output responses to facial cooling during a graded maximal exercise and a prolonged submaximal exercise lasting 30 min at 65%dot VO_2 max were investigated in five male subjects. Pedalling on a cycle ergometer was performed both with and without facial cooling (10°C, 4.6 m s-1). Facial cooling at the end of graded maximal exercise apparently had no effect on plasma lactate (LA), maximal oxygen consumption (dot VO_2 max), maximal heart rate (HR max), rectal temperature ( T re), work-load, lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). However, the response to facial cooling after prolonged submaximal exercise is significantly different for heart rate and work-load. The results suggest that facial wind stimulation during maximal exercise does not produce a stress high enough to alter the metabolic and physiological responses.

  16. Is the HR8799 extrasolar system destined for planetary scattering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździewski, Krzysztof; Migaszewski, Cezary

    2009-07-01

    The recent discovery of a three-planet extrasolar system of HR8799 by Marois et al. is a breakthrough in the field of the direct imaging. This great achievement raises questions on the formation and dynamical stability of the system, because Keplerian fits to astrometric data disrupt during ~0.2Myr. We search for stable, self-consistent N-body orbits with the so-called GAMP (genetic algorithm with MEGNO penalty) method that incorporates stability constraints into the optimization algorithm. Our searches reveal only small regions of stable motions in the phase space of three-planet, coplanar configurations. Most likely, if the planetary masses are in 10MJ range, they may be stable only if the planets are involved in two- or three-body mean motion resonances (MMRs). We found that 80 per cent systems found by GAMP that survived 30Myr backwards integrations, eventually become unstable after 100Myr. It could mean that the HR8799 system undergo a phase of planet-planet scattering. We test a hypothesis that the less certain detection of the innermost object is due to a blending effect. In such a case, two-planet best-fitting systems are mostly stable, on quasi-circular orbits and close to the 5:2 MMR, resembling the Jupiter-Saturn pair.

  17. Images of a fourth planet orbiting HR 8799.

    PubMed

    Marois, Christian; Zuckerman, B; Konopacky, Quinn M; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis

    2010-12-23

    High-contrast near-infrared imaging of the nearby star HR 8799 has shown three giant planets. Such images were possible because of the wide orbits (>25 astronomical units, where 1 au is the Earth-Sun distance) and youth (<100 Myr) of the imaged planets, which are still hot and bright as they radiate away gravitational energy acquired during their formation. An important area of contention in the exoplanet community is whether outer planets (>10 au) more massive than Jupiter form by way of one-step gravitational instabilities or, rather, through a two-step process involving accretion of a core followed by accumulation of a massive outer envelope composed primarily of hydrogen and helium. Here we report the presence of a fourth planet, interior to and of about the same mass as the other three. The system, with this additional planet, represents a challenge for current planet formation models as none of them can explain the in situ formation of all four planets. With its four young giant planets and known cold/warm debris belts, the HR 8799 planetary system is a unique laboratory in which to study the formation and evolution of giant planets at wide (>10 au) separations.

  18. Modeling the Asteroseismic Surface Term across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Basu, Sarbani

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool that can precisely characterize the mass, radius, and other properties of field stars. However, our inability to properly model the near-surface layers of stars creates a frequency-dependent frequency difference between the observed and the modeled frequencies, usually referred to as the “surface term.” This surface term can add significant errors to the derived stellar properties unless removed properly. In this paper, we simulate surface terms across a significant portion of the HR diagram, exploring four different masses (M=0.8,1.0,1.2, and 1.5 {M}⊙ ) at five metallicities ([{Fe}/{{H}}]=0.5,0.0,-0.5,-1.0, and -1.5) from the main sequence to red giants for stars with {T}{eff}\\lt 6500 K and explore how well the most common ways of fitting and removing the surface term actually perform. We find that the two-term model proposed by Ball & Gizon works much better than other models across a large portion of the HR diagram, including the red giants, leading us to recommend its use for future asteroseismic analyses.

  19. The Dusty Environment of the Warm Hypergiant HR 5171A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta

    HR 5171A is one of a few stars that define the upper luminosity boundary in the HR Diagram for evolved stars. It is a high luminosity warm hypergiant with a peculiar visual and near-infrared light curve and a complex, asymmetric nebulosity in the near-infrared which has been attributed to the presence of a low mass companion. The proposed long wavelength imaging with SOFIA/FORCAST will be used to map the spatial distribution and extent of the cold dust to provide a more complete picture of its dusty environment and its mass loss history. We will use FORCAST at a range of wavelengths from 6.6 to 37 microns to map the spatial extent of the cold dust. We are also proposing spectroscopy with the grisms to investigate the nature of the grains producing its strong silicate emission features. The proposed imaging and spectroscopy will provide critical missing information on the role of dust formation and circumstellar extinction on its peculiar variability.

  20. Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is associated with acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hautala, Arto J; Rankinen, Tuomo; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V; Bouchard, Claude; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2006-07-01

    The determinants of heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise are not well known, although attenuated HR recovery is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Because acetylcholine receptor subtype M2 (CHRM2) plays a key role in the cardiac chronotropic response, we tested the hypothesis that, in healthy individuals, the CHRM2 gene polymorphisms might be associated with HR recovery 1 min after the termination of a maximal exercise test, both before and after endurance training. The study population consisted of sedentary men and women (n = 95, 42 +/- 5 yr) assigned to a training (n = 80) or control group (n = 15). The study subjects underwent a 2-wk laboratory-controlled endurance training program, which included five 40-min sessions/wk at 70-80% of maximal HR. HR recovery differed between the intron 5 rs324640 genotypes at baseline (C/C, -33 +/- 10; C/T, -33 +/- 7; and T/T, -40 +/- 11 beats/min, P = 0.008). Endurance training further strengthened the association: the less common C/C homozygotes showed 6 and 12 beats/min lower HR recovery than the C/T heterozygotes or the T/T homozygotes (P = 0.001), respectively. A similar association was found between A/T transversion at the 3'-untranslated region of the CHRM2 gene and HR recovery at baseline (P = 0.025) and after endurance training (P = 0.005). These data suggest that DNA sequence variation at the CHRM2 locus is a potential modifier of HR recovery in the sedentary state and after short-term endurance training in healthy individuals.

  1. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  2. Potential benefits of maximal exercise just prior to return from weightlessness

    SciTech Connect

    Convertino, V.A.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance of a single maximal bout of exercise during weightlessness within hours of return to earth would enhance recovery of aerobic fitness and physical work capacities under a 1G environment. Ten healthy men were subjected to a 10-d bedrest period in the 6-deg headdown position. A graded maximal supine cycle ergometer test was performed before and at the end of bedrest to simulate exercise during weightlessness. Following 3 h of resumption of the upright posture, a second maximal exercise test was performed on a treadmill to measure work capacity under conditions of 1G. Compared to before bedrest, peak oxygen consumption, V(O/sub 2/), decreased by 8.7 percent and peak heart rate (HR) increased by 5.6 percent in the supine cycle test at the end of bedrest. However, there were no significant changes in peak V(O/sub 2/) and peak HR in the upright treadmill test following bedrest. These data suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise prior to return from 10 d of weightlessness may be adequate to restore preflight aerobic fitness and physical work capacity. 26 references.

  3. Potential benefits of maximal exercise just prior to return from weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance of a single maximal bout of exercise during weightlessness within hours of return to earth would enhance recovery of aerobic fitness and physical work capacities under a 1G environment. Ten healthy men were subjected to a 10-d bedrest period in the 6-deg headdown position. A graded maximal supine cycle ergometer test was performed before and at the end of bedrest to simulate exercise during weightlessness. Following 3 h of resumption of the upright posture, a second maximal exercise test was performed on a treadmill to measure work capacity under conditions of 1G. Compared to before bedrest, peak oxygen consumption, V(O2), decreased by 8.7 percent and peak heart rate (HR) increased by 5.6 percent in the supine cycle test at the end of bedrest. However, there were no significant changes in peak V(O2) and peak HR in the upright treadmill test following bedrest. These data suggest that one bout of maximal leg exercise prior to return from 10 d of weightlessness may be adequate to restore preflight aerobic fitness and physical work capacity.

  4. Bringing human resources to the table: utilization of an HR balanced scorecard at Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fottler, Myron D; Erickson, Eric; Rivers, Patrick A

    2006-01-01

    Rather than viewing HR as a critical driver of organizational strategy and outcomes, most health care organizations see HR as a drain on the organization's bottom line. Only by aligning HR with the organizational strategy will HR leaders truly get a seat at the leadership table. HR professionals can overcome impediments and gain a seat at the table by learning the language of business and the ways in which organizational leaders use data to drive their decisions. This article shows how Mayo Clinic uses the popular Balanced Scorecard approach to align its measures of HR performance to the organization's strategic plan.

  5. Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?

    PubMed Central

    Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

  6. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  7. Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors.

    PubMed

    Best, Stuart A; Bivens, Tiffany B; Dean Palmer, M; Boyd, Kara N; Melyn Galbreath, M; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Fujimoto, Naoki; Shibata, Shigeki; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Spencer, Matthew D; Tarumi, Takashi; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Abnormal heart rate recovery (HRR) after maximal exercise may indicate autonomic dysfunction and is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. HRR is attenuated with aging and in middle-age hypertensive patients, but it is unknown whether HRR is attenuated in older-age adults with hypertension. This study compared HRR among 16 unmedicated stage 1 hypertensive (HTN) participants [nine men/seven women; 68 ± 5 (SD) yr; awake ambulatory blood pressure (BP) 149 ± 10/87 ± 7 mmHg] and 16 normotensive [control (CON)] participants (nine men/seven women; 67 ± 5 yr; 122 ± 4/72 ± 5 mmHg). HR, BP, oxygen uptake (V̇o2), cardiac output (Qc), and stroke volume (SV) were measured at rest, at two steady-state work rates, and graded exercise to peak during maximal treadmill exercise. During 6 min of seated recovery, the change in HRHR) was obtained every minute and BP every 2 min. In addition, HRR and R-R interval (RRI) recovery kinetics were analyzed using a monoexponential function, and the indexes (HRRI and RRII) were calculated. Maximum V̇o2, HR, Qc, and SV responses during exercise were not different between groups. ΔHR was significantly different (P < 0.001) between the HTN group (26 ± 8) and the CON group (36 ± 12 beats/min) after 1 min of recovery but less convincing at 2 min (P = 0.055). BP recovery was similar between groups. HRRI was significantly lower (P = 0.016), and there was a trend of lower RRII (P = 0.066) in the HTN group compared with the CON group. These results show that in older-age adults, HRR is attenuated further with the presence of hypertension, which may be attributable to an impairment of autonomic function.

  8. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  9. RADIO ASTROMETRY OF THE CLOSE ACTIVE BINARY HR 5110

    SciTech Connect

    Abbuhl, E.; Mutel, R. L.; Lynch, C.; Güedel, M.

    2015-09-20

    The close active binary HR 5110 was observed at six epochs over 26 days using a global very long baseline interferometry array at 15.4 GHz. We used phase referencing to determine the position of the radio centroid at each epoch with an uncertainty significantly smaller than the component separation. After correcting for proper motion and parallax, we find that the centroid locations of all six epochs have barycenter separations consistent with an emission source located on the KIV secondary, and not in an interaction region between the stars or on the F primary. We used a homogeneous power-law gyrosynchrotron emission model to reproduce the observed flux densities and fractional circular polarization. The resulting ranges of mean magnetic field strength and relativistic electron densities are of the order of 10 G and 10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}, respectively, in the source region.

  10. Improved practices, synthetic mud drive record 24-hr drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.J.; White, W.W.

    1995-05-01

    Revised and improved drilling practices resulted in increased rate of penetration (ROP), improved hole cleaning, decreased circulating time, fewer instances of stuck pipe and reduced total drilling days. Rig equipment modifications and optimized techniques, combined with olefin-based synthetic fluid, produced significant efficiency improvements and cost reductions. Total-project strategy allows best technologies to be used, even if they are not low bid. In the Gulf of Mexico, a total-project concept helped Marathon drill back-to-back record 24-hr footages. Methods and philosophy described in this article allow drillers to choose optimum technologies, tools, materials and service performance for achieving optimum or lowest cost per foot rather than always using low bid.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR(100)).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Schüler, Esther; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-28

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H(2) and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO(2), for growth. The type strain HR(100) (T) was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Computing Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankowicz, James Michael, Jr.

    This dissertation reviews work in computing N = 4 super-Yang--Mills (sYM) and N = 8 maximally supersymmetric gravity (mSUGRA) scattering amplitudes in D = 4 spacetime dimensions in novel ways. After a brief introduction and overview in Ch. 1, the various techniques used to construct amplitudes in the remainder of the dissertation are discussed in Ch. 2. This includes several new concepts such as d log and pure integrand bases, as well as how to construct the amplitude using exactly one kinematic point where it vanishes. Also included in this chapter is an outline of the Mathematica package on shell diagrams and numerics.m (osdn) that was developed for the computations herein. The rest of the dissertation is devoted to explicit examples. In Ch. 3, the starting point is tree-level sYM amplitudes that have integral representations with residues that obey amplitude relations. These residues are shown to have corresponding residue numerators that allow a double copy prescription that results in mSUGRA residues. In Ch. 4, the two-loop four-point sYM amplitude is constructed in several ways, showcasing many of the techniques of Ch. 2; this includes an example of how to use osdn. The two-loop five-point amplitude is also presented in a pure integrand representation with comments on how it was constructed from one homogeneous cut of the amplitude. On-going work on the two-loop n-point amplitude is presented at the end of Ch. 4. In Ch. 5, the three-loop four-point amplitude is presented in the d log representation and in the pure integrand representation. In Ch. 6, there are several examples of four- through seven-loop planar diagrams that illustrate how considerations of the singularity structure of the amplitude underpin dual-conformal invariance. Taken with the previous examples, this is additional evidence that the structure known to exist in the planar sector extends to the full theory. At the end of this chapter is a proof that all mSUGRA amplitudes have a pole at

  13. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    was therefore the key to achieving this goal. This goal was eventually realized through development of an Excel spreadsheet tool called EMMIE (Excel Mean Motion Interactive Estimation). EMMIE utilizes ground ephemeris nodal data to perform a least-squares fit to inferred mean anomaly as a function of time, thus generating an initial estimate for mean motion. This mean motion in turn drives a plot of estimated downtrack position difference versus time. The user can then manually iterate the mean motion, and determine an optimal value that will maximize command load lifetime. Once this optimal value is determined, the mean motion initially calculated by the command builder tool is overwritten with the new optimal value, and the command load is built for uplink to ISS. EMMIE also provides the capability for command load lifetime to be tracked through multiple TORS ephemeris updates. Using EMMIE, TORS command load lifetimes of approximately 30 days have been achieved.

  14. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  15. Diurnal Variations in Maximal Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Powell D.

    A study attempted to determine if diurnal (daily cyclical) variations were present during maximal exercise. The subjects' (30 female undergraduate physical education majors) oxygen consumption and heart rates were monitored while they walked on a treadmill on which the grade was raised every minute. Each subject was tested for maximal oxygen…

  16. Employee Returns: Linking HR Performance Indicators to Business Strategy. IES Report 365.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alison; Robinson, Dilys

    This document is a practical guide that demonstrates how human resource (HR) professionals can use performance measurement to link HR to organizational strategy and business objectives, and thereby raise the profile of HR within their organization. The following are among the topics examined: (1) the strategic context of measurement (the role…

  17. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  18. Design of a desipramine dosing regimen for the rapid induction and maintenance of maximal cortical beta-adrenoceptor downregulation.

    PubMed

    Argenti, D; D'Mello, A P

    1994-09-01

    Chronic administration of desipramine to rats causes a gradual reduction in cortical beta-adrenoceptor density. We examined the relationship between the duration of treatment with desipramine, and the rate and intensity of cortical beta-adrenoceptor downregulation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a 3.75 mg/kg/12 hr dose of desipramine for 4, 8 or 16 days. After 4 and 8 days of treatment, cortical beta-adrenoceptor density was reduced by 14 and 26% respectively. After 16 days of treatment, cortical beta-adrenoceptor density was maximally reduced by 36%. In our next series of experiments, we tested the hypothesis that the dose of desipramine required to rapidly induce maximal beta-adrenoceptor downregulation was higher than the dose required to maintain maximal beta-adrenoceptor downregulation. Initially, cortical beta-adrenoceptors were rapidly, and maximally downregulated with a four day, 10 mg/kg/12 hr induction regimen of desipramine. Trough, steady-state brain/cortical concentrations of desipramine plus desmethyldesipramine at the end of this regimen were approx 4000 ng/gm. Subsequently, maintenance desipramine regimens of 3.75 mg/kg/12 hr and 1.87 mg/kg/12 hr or vehicle were initiated for the next four days. Inspite of a 20-fold drop in brain/cortical concentrations of desipramine plus its metabolite, the 3.75 mg/kg maintenance regimen sustained maximal cortical beta-adrenoceptor downregulation. The 1.87 mg/kg maintenance regimen did result in a marked (25%) but non-significant recovery in the density of beta-adrenoceptors. Animals administered a vehicle maintenance regimen showed a large (50%) and statistically significant recovery of cortical beta-adrenoceptor density.

  19. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  20. Resolving the planetesimal belt of HR 8799 with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Mark; Jordán, Andrés; Casassus, Simon; Hales, Antonio S.; Dent, William R. F.; Faramaz, Virginie; Matrà, Luca; Barkats, Denis; Brahm, Rafael; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    The star HR 8799 hosts one of the largest known debris discs and at least four giant planets. Previous observations have found evidence for a warm belt within the orbits of the planets, a cold planetesimal belt beyond their orbits and a halo of small grains. With the infrared data, it is hard to distinguish the planetesimal belt emission from that of the grains in the halo. With this in mind, the system has been observed with ALMA in band 6 (1.34 mm) using a compact array format. These observations allow the inner edge of the planetesimal belt to be resolved for the first time. A radial distribution of dust grains is fitted to the data using an MCMC method. The disc is best fitted by a broad ring between 145^{+12}_{-12} au and 429^{+37}_{-32} au at an inclination of 40^{+5}_{-6}° and a position angle of 51^{+8}_{-8}°. A disc edge at ˜145 au is too far out to be explained simply by interactions with planet b, requiring either a more complicated dynamical history or an extra planet beyond the orbit of planet b.

  1. HR 1362 - A test case for stellar dynamo theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Hall, Douglas S.; Barksdale, William S.; Jusick, Anthony T.; Henry, Gregory W.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of 11 yr of photometry of HR 1362 = EK Eri has shown a well-established photometric period of 335 days. This confirms an earlier period determination of about 310 days from 3 yr of APT data and is consistent with a new v sin i determination of 2 + or - 2 km/s. Recent Ca II H and K observations show moderately strong H and K emission lines at a flux level of log F prime (K) of about 6.5 ergs sq m/s. If the photometric period is interpreted as the rotation period, this surface flux is more than one order of magnitude larger than what can be expected from empirical activity versus rotation relationships. The spectrum and the U-B and B-V colors are consistent with a single G8 III-IV spectral classification, while the V-R and V-I values indicate a small color excess, typical of chromospherically active stars.

  2. Copper Bronze Powder Surface Studied by XPS and HR SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvab, R.; Hryha, E.; Tahir, A. M.; Nyborg, L.

    2016-10-01

    The state of the powder surface represents one of the main interests in the whole cycle of components' production using powder metallurgy (PM) route. Large specific surface area of the powder in combination with often alloying with oxygen sensitive elements results in oxidation of the powder surface in most of the cases. The information about surface chemistry of the powder is of vital importance for further consolidation and sintering steps. Surface sensitive analytical techniques - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (HR SEM+EDX) were used for surface chemical analysis of the 60Cu-40Sn bronze powder. Determination of the compositional profiles and estimation of the surface oxide layer thickness was done by altering of ion etching and XPS analysis. The results showed tin oxide enrichment and presence of copper hydroxide on the surface of the powder particles. The impurities of P, Zn and Ca were also detected on the top surface of the powder in trace amounts.

  3. Neuromagnetic imaging of movement-related cortical oscillations in children and adults: age predicts post-movement beta rebound.

    PubMed

    Gaetz, W; Macdonald, M; Cheyne, D; Snead, O C

    2010-06-01

    We measured visually-cued motor responses in two developmentally separate groups of children and compared these responses to a group of adults. We hypothesized that if post-movement beta rebound (PMBR) depends on developmentally sensitive processes, PMBR will be greatest in adults and progressively decrease in children performing a basic motor task as a function of age. Twenty children (10 young children 4-6 years; 10 adolescent children 11-13 years) and 10 adults all had MEG recorded during separate recordings of right and left index finger movements. Beta band (15-30 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) of bi-lateral sensorimotor areas was observed to increase significantly from both contralateral and ipsilateral MI with age. Movement-related gamma synchrony (60-90 Hz) was also observed from contralateral MI for each age group. However, PMBR was significantly reduced in the 4-6 year group and, while more prominent, remained significantly diminished in the adolescent (11-13 year) age group as compared to adults. PMBR measures were weak or absent in the youngest children tested and appear maximally from bilateral MI in adults. Thus PMBR may reflect an age-dependent inhibitory process of the primary motor cortex which comes on-line with normal development. Previous studies have shown PMBR may be observed from MI following a variety of movement-related tasks in adult participants - however, the origin and purpose of the PMBR is unclear. The current study shows that the expected PMBR from MI observed from adults is increasingly diminished in adolescent and young children respectively. A reduction in PMBR from children may reflect reduced motor cortical inhibition. Relatively less motor inhibition may facilitate neuronal plasticity and promote motor learning in children.

  4. A new era of improving progression-free survival with dual blockade in postmenopausal HR(+), HER2(-) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jerusalem, Guy; Bachelot, Thomas; Barrios, Carlos; Neven, Patrick; Di Leo, Angelo; Janni, Wolfgang; de Boer, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Disease progression despite existing endocrine therapies remains a major challenge to the effective management of hormone-receptor-positive (HR(+)), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative (HER2(-)), advanced breast cancer. Recent advances in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of disease progression have identified the existence of adaptive "cross-talk" between the estrogen receptor (ER) and various growth factor receptor and intracellular signaling pathways, allowing breast cancer cells to escape the inhibitory effects of endocrine therapy. These findings provide the clinical rationale for enhancing or extending endocrine sensitivity by combining endocrine therapy with a targeted agent against a compensatory pathway. In BOLERO-2, adding the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to endocrine therapy significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with HR(+) advanced breast cancer previously treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy. Notably, PFS benefits were comparable in subgroup analyses of first- and later-line settings. These results contrast with those of the large first-line HORIZON study, wherein adding the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus to endocrine therapy did not improve PFS. Therefore, it is unclear whether a targeted agent should only be combined with endocrine therapy to restore endocrine sensitivity or whether it may also prevent or delay resistance in hormone-sensitive advanced breast cancer. Numerous additional targeted agents are currently being evaluated in combination with endocrine therapies, including PI3K, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6, SRC, and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Appropriate patient selection based on prior treatment history will become increasingly important in maximizing the incremental benefit derived from these new agents combined with existing endocrine therapies in HR(+) advanced breast cancer.

  5. Resolved imaging of the HR 8799 Debris disk with Herschel

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda; Booth, Mark; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Marois, Christian; Kennedy, Grant; Wyatt, Mark; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Macintosh, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter maps of the debris disk associated with the HR 8799 planetary system. We resolve the outer disk emission at 70, 100, 160, and 250 μm and detect the disk at 350 and 500 μm. A smooth model explains the observed disk emission well. We observe no obvious clumps or asymmetries associated with the trapping of planetesimals that is a potential consequence of planetary migration in the system. We estimate that the disk eccentricity must be <0.1. As in previous work by Su et al., we find a disk with three components: a warm inner component and two outer components, a planetesimal belt extending from 100 to 310 AU, with some flexibility (±10 AU) on the inner edge, and the external halo that extends to ∼2000 AU. We measure the disk inclination to be 26° ± 3° from face-on at a position angle of 64° E of N, establishing that the disk is coplanar with the star and planets. The spectral energy distribution of the disk is well fit by blackbody grains whose semi-major axes lie within the planetesimal belt, suggesting an absence of small grains. The wavelength at which the spectrum steepens from blackbody, 47 ± 30 μm, however, is short compared with other A star debris disks, suggesting that there are atypically small grains likely populating the halo. The PACS longer wavelength data yield a lower disk color temperature than do MIPS data (24 and 70 μm), implying two distinct halo dust-grain populations.

  6. Prediction of heart rate and oxygen uptake during incremental and maximal exercise in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Fairbarn, M S; Blackie, S P; McElvaney, N G; Wiggs, B R; Paré, P D; Pardy, R L

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of heart rate and oxygen uptake during incremental exercise and at maximal exercise is useful in evaluating mechanisms responsible for exercise limitation in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. Presently used prediction equations are based on relatively small groups of subjects in whom there was an uneven distribution of subjects with regard to age and sex or based on equations that were from extrapolated data. Our prediction equations are based on data from 231 men and women equally divided within decades between 20 and 80 years. Patients exercised to a symptom-limited maximum on a cycle ergometer while measurements of heart rate and oxygen uptake were recorded. The relationship between heart rate and oxygen uptake throughout exercise (HR:VO2) was determined using a statistical technique that included each data point from each subject. The HR:VO2 throughout incremental exercise was best described by separate equations for women younger than 50 years and older than 50 years and for men younger than 70 years and older than 70 years. Prediction equations for maximal heart rate (HRmax) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were developed by linear regression and were selected from all possible combinations of parameters. The HRmax was most accurately predicted by age alone for both sexes. Unlike the HR:VO2 relationship, the slope of the line relating heart rate to age was not different for the older women compared with the younger women so that a single equation was derived to predict HRmax. A single equation for the men was also sufficient since the slope of heart rate to age was the same for all ages. To most accurately predict VO2max, a separate equation was required for both the women and men that included age, height, and weight.

  7. Maximizing Complementary Quantities by Projective Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Souza, Leonardo A.; Bernardes, Nadja K.; Rossi, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study the so-called quantitative complementarity quantities. We focus in the following physical situation: two qubits ( q A and q B ) are initially in a maximally entangled state. One of them ( q B ) interacts with a N-qubit system ( R). After the interaction, projective measurements are performed on each of the qubits of R, in a basis that is chosen after independent optimization procedures: maximization of the visibility, the concurrence, and the predictability. For a specific maximization procedure, we study in detail how each of the complementary quantities behave, conditioned on the intensity of the coupling between q B and the N qubits. We show that, if the coupling is sufficiently "strong," independent of the maximization procedure, the concurrence tends to decay quickly. Interestingly enough, the behavior of the concurrence in this model is similar to the entanglement dynamics of a two qubit system subjected to a thermal reservoir, despite that we consider finite N. However, the visibility shows a different behavior: its maximization is more efficient for stronger coupling constants. Moreover, we investigate how the distinguishability, or the information stored in different parts of the system, is distributed for different couplings.

  8. Studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23B

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Samiksha; Lennarz, William J. . E-mail: wlennarz@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-12-02

    Yeast Rad23, originally identified as a DNA repair protein, has been proposed to participate in other cellular functions, i.e., the proteasome-degradation pathway, the process of spindle pole body duplication and as a component of the anaphase checkpoint. Two human homologs of yeast Rad23, hHR23A and hHR23B, exhibit high sequence homology with yRad23 and also have been shown to be involved in DNA repair and proteasome-dependent degradation. Previous studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23A and hHR23B revealed their predominant localization in the nucleus during interphase and in the cytoplasm during mitosis. We have analyzed the localization of hHR23B during all the phases of the cell cycle using immunofluorescence. Unlike previous studies, our results suggest localization of hHR23B in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. The nuclear levels of hHR23B decrease during S-phase of the cell cycle. When the cell enters mitosis, hHR23B relocalizes in the cytoplasm without association with chromatin. These results indicate that the intracellular distribution hHR23B is cell cycle dependent.

  9. Lipidome determinants of maximal lifespan in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Reznick, Jane; Omerbašić, Damir; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R; Azpurua, Jorge; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Regnard, Pierrick; Wanert, Fanelie; Marchal, Julia; Pifferi, Fabien; Aujard, Fabienne; Liu, Zhen; Shi, Peng; Pääbo, Svante; Schroeder, Florian; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    Maximal lifespan of mammalian species, even if closely related, may differ more than 10-fold, however the nature of the mechanisms that determine this variability is unresolved. Here, we assess the relationship between maximal lifespan duration and concentrations of more than 20,000 lipid compounds, measured in 669 tissue samples from 6 tissues of 35 species representing three mammalian clades: primates, rodents and bats. We identify lipids associated with species' longevity across the three clades, uncoupled from other parameters, such as basal metabolic rate, body size, or body temperature. These lipids clustered in specific lipid classes and pathways, and enzymes linked to them display signatures of greater stabilizing selection in long-living species, and cluster in functional groups related to signaling and protein-modification processes. These findings point towards the existence of defined molecular mechanisms underlying variation in maximal lifespan among mammals.

  10. An information maximization model of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  11. Singularity structure of maximally supersymmetric scattering amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L; Cachazo, Freddy; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2014-12-31

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic singularities and is free of any poles at infinity--properties closely related to uniform transcendentality and the UV finiteness of the theory. We also briefly comment on implications for maximal (N=8) supergravity theory (SUGRA).

  12. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults

    PubMed Central

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  13. How to Generate Good Profit Maximization Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author considers the merits of two classes of profit maximization problems: those involving perfectly competitive firms with quadratic and cubic cost functions. While relatively easy to develop and solve, problems based on quadratic cost functions are too simple to address a number of important issues, such as the use of…

  14. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  15. Maximizing the Spectacle of Water Fountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    For a given initial speed of water from a spigot or jet, what angle of the jet will maximize the visual impact of the water spray in the fountain? This paper focuses on fountains whose spigots are arranged in circular fashion, and couches the measurement of the visual impact in terms of the surface area and the volume under the fountain's natural…

  16. Maximizing the Effective Use of Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    In the current age of accountability, teachers must be able to produce tangible evidence of students' concept mastery. This article focuses on implementation of formative assessments before, during, and after instruction in order to maximize teachers' ability to effectively monitor student achievement. Suggested strategies are included to help…

  17. Maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-01-21

    The problem of retrieval and maintenance of the correct reading frame plays a significant role in RNA transcription. Circular codes, and especially comma-free codes, can help to understand the underlying mechanisms of error-detection in this process. In recent years much attention has been paid to the investigation of trinucleotide circular codes (see, for instance, Fimmel et al., 2014; Fimmel and Strüngmann, 2015a; Michel and Pirillo, 2012; Michel et al., 2012, 2008), while dinucleotide codes had been touched on only marginally, even though dinucleotides are associated to important biological functions. Recently, all maximal dinucleotide circular codes were classified (Fimmel et al., 2015; Michel and Pirillo, 2013). The present paper studies maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes and their close connection to maximal dinucleotide circular codes. We give a construction principle for such codes and provide a graphical representation that allows them to be visualized geometrically. Moreover, we compare the results for dinucleotide codes with the corresponding situation for trinucleotide maximal self-complementary C(3)-codes. Finally, the results obtained are discussed with respect to Crick׳s hypothesis about frame-shift-detecting codes without commas.

  18. DNA solution of the maximal clique problem.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Q; Kaplan, P D; Liu, S; Libchaber, A

    1997-10-17

    The maximal clique problem has been solved by means of molecular biology techniques. A pool of DNA molecules corresponding to the total ensemble of six-vertex cliques was built, followed by a series of selection processes. The algorithm is highly parallel and has satisfactory fidelity. This work represents further evidence for the ability of DNA computing to solve NP-complete search problems.

  19. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  20. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  1. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  2. Maximizing the Motivated Mind for Emergent Giftedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Dan

    2001-01-01

    This article explains how the theory of the motivated mind conceptualizes the productive interaction of intelligence, creativity, and achievement motivation and how this theory can help educators to maximize students' emergent potential for giftedness. It discusses the integration of cold-order thinking and hot-chaotic thinking into fluid-adaptive…

  3. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  4. Formation Control for the Maxim Mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the spacebased scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today's technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. The Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the same order of those for MAXIM. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; (2) the formation control architecture devised for such missions; (3) the design of the formation control laws to maintain very high precision relative positions; and (4) the levels of fuel usage required in the duration of these missions. Specific preliminary results are presented for two spacecraft within the MAXIM mission.

  5. Policy, Professionalism, Professionality and the Development of HR Practitioners in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Moira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore the role of relevant policies in the professional development of HR practitioners in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: A review of literature was carried out on the subject of the role of relevant policies in the professional development of HR practitioners in the UK. In doing so, the issues of…

  6. From Admin to Strategy: The Changing Face of the HR Function. IES Report 332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamkin, Penny; And Others

    Evidence from academic research and management experts in the United Kingdom and elsewhere confirms that the recent focus in work organizations on cost reductions through downsizing has changed the roles and structures of many human resources (HR) units. HR units have had to prove their contribution to the organization's bottom line, raise their…

  7. The HR96 activator, atrazine, reduces sensitivity of D. magna to triclosan and DHA

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Namrata; Litoff, Elizabeth J.; Baldwin, William S.

    2015-01-01

    HR96 is a CAR/PXR/VDR ortholog in invertebrates, and a promiscuous endo- and xenobiotic nuclear receptor involved in acclimation to toxicants. Daphnia HR96 is activated by chemicals such as atrazine and linoleic acid (LA) (n-6 fatty acid), and inhibited by triclosan and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)(n-3 fatty acid). We hypothesized that inhibitors of HR96 may block the protective responses of HR96 based on previously performed luciferase assays. Therefore, we performed acute toxicity tests with two-chemical mixtures containing a HR96 inhibitor (DHA or triclosan) and a HR96 activator (LA or atrazine). Surprisingly, results demonstrate that triclosan and DHA are less toxic when co-treated with 20–80 μM atrazine. Atrazine provides concentration-dependent protection as lower concentrations have no effect and higher concentrations cause toxicity. LA, a weaker HR96 activator, did not provide protection from triclosan or DHA. Atrazine’s protective effects are presumably due to its ability to activate HR96 or other toxicologically relevant transcription factors and induce protective enzymes. Atrazine did not significantly induce glucosyltransferase, a crucial enzyme in triclosan detoxification. However, atrazine did increase antioxidant activities, crucial pathways in triclosan’s toxicity, as measured through GST activity and the TROLOX equivalence assay. The increase in antioxidant capacity is consistent with atrazine providing protection from a wide range of toxicants that induce ROS, including triclosan and unsaturated fatty acids predisposed to lipid peroxidation. PMID:25747156

  8. The HR96 activator, atrazine, reduces sensitivity of D. magna to triclosan and DHA.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Namrata; Litoff, Elizabeth J; Baldwin, William S

    2015-06-01

    HR96 is a CAR/PXR/VDR ortholog in invertebrates, and a promiscuous endo- and xenobiotic nuclear receptor involved in acclimation to toxicants. Daphnia HR96 is activated by chemicals such as atrazine and linoleic acid (LA) (n-6 fatty acid), and inhibited by triclosan and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (n-3 fatty acid). We hypothesized that inhibitors of HR96 may block the protective responses of HR96 based on previously performed luciferase assays. Therefore, we performed acute toxicity tests with two-chemical mixtures containing a HR96 inhibitor (DHA or triclosan) and a HR96 activator (LA or atrazine). Surprisingly, results demonstrate that triclosan and DHA are less toxic when co-treated with 20-80 μM atrazine. Atrazine provides concentration-dependent protection as lower concentrations have no effect and higher concentrations cause toxicity. LA, a weaker HR96 activator, did not provide protection from triclosan or DHA. Atrazine's protective effects are presumably due to its ability to activate HR96 or other toxicologically relevant transcription factors and induce protective enzymes. Atrazine did not significantly induce glucosyltransferase, a crucial enzyme in triclosan detoxification. However, atrazine did increase antioxidant activities, crucial pathways in triclosan's toxicity, as measured through GST activity and the TROLOX equivalence assay. The increase in antioxidant capacity is consistent with atrazine providing protection from a wide range of toxicants that induce ROS, including triclosan and unsaturated fatty acids predisposed to lipid peroxidation.

  9. Legislative Hearing: Regulations on the Solomon Amendment to the Defense Act of 1983. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on H.R. 1286 and H.R. 1567, and H.R. 1622 and H.R. 2145 (February 23, 24; March 23, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Hearings on the Solomon amendment regulations proposed by the U.S. Department of Education are presented. The Solomon amendment requires that any student be registered under the military's Selective Service Act in order to receive Title IV federal student assistance. H.R. 1286 and H.R. 1567 would repeal the provision of the Military Selective…

  10. Multi-wavelength observations of the peculiar red giant HR 3126

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesce, Joseph E.; Stencel, Robert E.; Walter, Frederick M.; Doggett, Jesse; Dachs, Joachim; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Mundt, Reinhard

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the red giant HR 3126 are combined with multi-wavelength data in order to provide a firmer basis for explaining the arc-minute sized nebula surrounding the object. Possibilities as to the location of HR 3126 on the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, and to the formation mechanisms of the reflection nebula IC 2220 associated with it, are summarized.

  11. Heritability of HR and BP Response To Exercise Training in the HERITAGE Family Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Treva; Gagnon, Jacques; Leon, Arthur S.; Skinner, James S.; Wilmore, Jack H.; Bouchard, Claude; Rao, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Assessed the heritability of response to exercise training in resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) among sedentary Caucasians comprising 98 families who completed an exercise training program. Results indicated that the trainability of systolic BP and HR in families with elevated BP was partially determined by genetic factors. Diastolic…

  12. H-BAND IMAGE OF A PLANETARY COMPANION AROUND HR 8799 IN 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Fukagawa, Misato; Fujita, Yutaka; Shibai, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko; Tamura, Motohide; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-05-01

    The discovery of three planetary companions around HR 8799 marked a significant epoch in direct imaging of extrasolar planets. Given the importance of this system, we re-analyzed H-band images of HR 8799 obtained with the Subaru 36-elements adaptive optics (AO) in 2002 July. The low-order AO imaging combined with the classical point-spread function (PSF) subtractions even revealed the extrasolar planet, HR 8799b. Our observations in 2002 confirmed that it has been orbiting HR 8799 in a counterclockwise direction. The flux of HR 8799b was consistent with those in the later epochs within the uncertainty of 0.25 mag, further supporting the planetary mass estimate by Marois et al.

  13. Application of acute maximal exercise to protect orthostatic tolerance after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Crandall, C. G.; Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed at the conclusion of prolonged simulated microgravity would improve blood pressure stability during an orthostatic challenge. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cardiac output (Q), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and changes in leg volume were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope in seven subjects immediately prior to reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) under two experimental conditions: 1) after maximal supine cycle ergometry performed 24 h before returning to the upright posture (exercise) and 2) without exercise (control). After HDT, the reduction of LBNP tolerance time from pre-HDT levels was greater (P = 0.041) in the control condition (-2.0 +/- 0.2 min) compared with the exercise condition (-0.4 +/- 0.2 min). At presyncope after HDT, FVR and NE were higher (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with control, whereas MAP, HR, E, AVP, PRA, ANP, and leg volume were similar in both conditions. Plasma volume (PV) and carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were reduced after control HDT, but were restored by the exercise treatment. Maintenance of orthostatic tolerance by application of acute intense exercise after 16 days of simulated microgravity was associated with greater circulating levels of NE, vasoconstriction, Q, baroreflex sensitivity, and PV.

  14. How Accurate Is the Prediction of Maximal Oxygen Uptake with Treadmill Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, John R.; Oldridge, Neil B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorespiratory fitness measured by treadmill testing has prognostic significance in determining mortality with cardiovascular and other chronic disease states. The accuracy of a recently developed method for estimating maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak), the heart rate index (HRI), is dependent only on heart rate (HR) and was tested against oxygen uptake (VO2), either measured or predicted from conventional treadmill parameters (speed, incline, protocol time). Methods The HRI equation, METs = 6 x HRI– 5, where HRI = maximal HR/resting HR, provides a surrogate measure of VO2peak. Forty large scale treadmill studies were identified through a systematic search using MEDLINE, Google Scholar and Web of Science in which VO2peak was either measured (TM-VO2meas; n = 20) or predicted (TM-VO2pred; n = 20) based on treadmill parameters. All studies were required to have reported group mean data of both resting and maximal HRs for determination of HR index-derived oxygen uptake (HRI-VO2). Results The 20 studies with measured VO2 (TM-VO2meas), involved 11,477 participants (median 337) with a total of 105,044 participants (median 3,736) in the 20 studies with predicted VO2 (TM-VO2pred). A difference of only 0.4% was seen between mean (±SD) VO2peak for TM- VO2meas and HRI-VO2 (6.51±2.25 METs and 6.54±2.28, respectively; p = 0.84). In contrast, there was a highly significant 21.1% difference between mean (±SD) TM-VO2pred and HRI-VO2 (8.12±1.85 METs and 6.71±1.92, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusion Although mean TM-VO2meas and HRI-VO2 were almost identical, mean TM-VO2pred was more than 20% greater than mean HRI-VO2. PMID:27875547

  15. Modularity maximization using completely positive programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanparast, Sakineh; Havens, Timothy C.

    2017-04-01

    Community detection is one of the most prominent problems of social network analysis. In this paper, a novel method for Modularity Maximization (MM) for community detection is presented which exploits the Alternating Direction Augmented Lagrangian (ADAL) method for maximizing a generalized form of Newman's modularity function. We first transform Newman's modularity function into a quadratic program and then use Completely Positive Programming (CPP) to map the quadratic program to a linear program, which provides the globally optimal maximum modularity partition. In order to solve the proposed CPP problem, a closed form solution using the ADAL merged with a rank minimization approach is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on several real-world data sets used for benchmarks community detection. Simulation results shows the proposed technique provides outstanding results in terms of modularity value for crisp partitions.

  16. Maximally discordant mixed states of two qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Galve, Fernando; Giorgi, Gian Luca; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-01-15

    We study the relative strength of classical and quantum correlations, as measured by discord, for two-qubit states. Quantum correlations appear only in the presence of classical correlations, while the reverse is not always true. We identify the family of states that maximize the discord for a given value of the classical correlations and show that the largest attainable discord for mixed states is greater than for pure states. The difference between discord and entanglement is emphasized by the remarkable fact that these states do not maximize entanglement and are, in some cases, even separable. Finally, by random generation of density matrices uniformly distributed over the whole Hilbert space, we quantify the frequency of the appearance of quantum and classical correlations for different ranks.

  17. Hamiltonian formalism and path entropy maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; González, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Maximization of the path information entropy is a clear prescription for constructing models in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here it is shown that, following this prescription under the assumption of arbitrary instantaneous constraints on position and velocity, a Lagrangian emerges which determines the most probable trajectory. Deviations from the probability maximum can be consistently described as slices in time by a Hamiltonian, according to a nonlinear Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation. The connections unveiled between the maximization of path entropy and the Langevin/Fokker-Planck equations imply that missing information about the phase space coordinate never decreases in time, a purely information-theoretical version of the second law of thermodynamics. All of these results are independent of any physical assumptions, and thus valid for any generalized coordinate as a function of time, or any other parameter. This reinforces the view that the second law is a fundamental property of plausible inference.

  18. Nondecoupling of maximal supergravity from the superstring.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael B; Ooguri, Hirosi; Schwarz, John H

    2007-07-27

    We consider the conditions necessary for obtaining perturbative maximal supergravity in d dimensions as a decoupling limit of type II superstring theory compactified on a (10-d) torus. For dimensions d=2 and d=3, it is possible to define a limit in which the only finite-mass states are the 256 massless states of maximal supergravity. However, in dimensions d>or=4, there are infinite towers of additional massless and finite-mass states. These correspond to Kaluza-Klein charges, wound strings, Kaluza-Klein monopoles, or branes wrapping around cycles of the toroidal extra dimensions. We conclude that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in dimensions>or=4. In particular, we conjecture that pure N=8 supergravity in four dimensions is in the Swampland.

  19. Experimental implementation of maximally synchronizable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Buldú, J. M.; Boccaletti, S.; Papo, D.; Hwang, D.-U.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Gutiérrez, R.

    2016-04-01

    Maximally synchronizable networks (MSNs) are acyclic directed networks that maximize synchronizability. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of transforming networks of coupled oscillators into their corresponding MSNs. By tuning the weights of any given network so as to reach the lowest possible eigenratio λN /λ2, the synchronized state is guaranteed to be maintained across the longest possible range of coupling strengths. We check the robustness of the resulting MSNs with an experimental implementation of a network of nonlinear electronic oscillators and study the propagation of the synchronization errors through the network. Importantly, a method to study the effects of topological uncertainties on the synchronizability is proposed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  20. Profit Maximization Models for Exponential Decay Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    assumptions could easily be analyzed in similar fashion. References [1] Bensoussan, A., Hurst , E.G. and Nislund, B., Management Applications of Modern...TVIPe OF r 04PORNT A i M0 CiH O .V9RAE PROFIT MAXIMIZATION .ODELS FOR EXPONENT IAL Technical Report DECAY PROCESSES August 1990 ~~~I. PtA’OR~idNG ONqG

  1. Maximal respiratory pressures among adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Rocha Crispino Santos, M A; Pinto, M L; Couto Sant'Anna, C; Bernhoeft, M

    2011-01-01

    Maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressures (MEP) are useful indices of respiratory muscle strength in athletes. The aims of this study were: to describe the strength of the respiratory muscles of Olympic junior swim team, at baseline and after a standard physical training; and to determine if there is a differential inspiratory and expiratory pressure response to the physical training. A cross-sectional study evaluated 28 international-level swimmers with ages ranging from 15 to 17 years, 19 (61 %) being males. At baseline, MIP was found to be lower in females (P = .001). The mean values reached by males and females were: MIP(cmH2O) = M: 100.4 (± 26.5)/F: 67.8 (± 23.2); MEP (cmH2O) = M: 87.4 (± 20.7)/F: 73.9 (± 17.3). After the physical training they reached: MIP (cmH2O) = M: 95.3 (± 30.3)/F: 71.8 (± 35.6); MEP (cmH2O) = M: 82.8 (± 26.2)/F: 70.4 (± 8.3). No differential pressure responses were observed in either males or females. These results suggest that swimmers can sustain the magnitude of the initial maximal pressures. Other studies should be developed to clarify if MIP and MEP could be used as a marker of an athlete's performance.

  2. Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the space-based scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today s technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. MAXIM formation flying requirements are on the order of microns, while Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the order of nanometers. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; and (2) the development of linearized equations of relative motion for a formation operating in an n-body gravitational field. Linearized equations of motion provide the ground work for linear formation control designs.

  3. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females

    PubMed Central

    CONNAHAN, LAURA E.; OTT, CHRISTOPHER A.; BARRY, VAUGHN W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m2): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg−1 of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1–2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population. PMID:28344739

  4. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females.

    PubMed

    Connahan, Laura E; Ott, Christopher A; Barry, Vaughn W

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m(2)): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1-2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population.

  5. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer.

  6. The Dust and Gas Content of a Disk Around Young Star HR 4796A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannings, V.; Greaves, J.; Holland, W.

    1999-01-01

    We have used the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii to search at submillimeter wavelengths for continuum emission from dust, and spectral line emission from carbon monoxide (CO) gas, in the neighborhood of HR 4796A.

  7. Determination of the light ion abundances in the strong-helium star HR 3089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Using line blanketed model stellar atmospheres and a spectrum synthesis approach, a differential abundance study of the ultraviolet spectrum of HR 3089 relative to the normal star lambda Sco was performed. Both stars were found to have the same abundances of carbon and silicon, but the helium and nitrogen are significantly enhanced in HR 3089. The atmospheric parameters and the distribution of abundances found for HR 3089 agree well with the results of Osmer and Peterson on sharp-lined helium-rich stars. The rotational velocity of 160 km/sec found for HR 3089 places a constraint on the role of diffusion in producing the abundance anomalies. Examination of the resonance lines of C II, N II, Si III and Si IV shows no evidence for mass loss in either star.

  8. STIRLING BOILER BY BABCOCK & WILCOX CO. (45,000 LB/HR CAPACITY), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STIRLING BOILER BY BABCOCK & WILCOX CO. (45,000 LB/HR CAPACITY), INSIDE BOILER HOUSE NO. 2. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Open Hearth Plant, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. IUE spectra of a flare in HR 5110: A flaring RS CVn or Algol system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the RS CVn type binary system HR 5110 were obtained with IUE on May 31, 1979 during a period of intense radio flaring of this star. High temperature transition region lines are present, but are not enhanced above observed quiescent strengths. The similarities of HR 5110 to the Algol system, As Eri, suggest that the 1979 May to June flare may involve mass exchange rather than annihilation of coronal magnetic fields.

  10. Spectroscopy and photometry of HR Lyr (Nova Lyr 1919) during one of its mysterious dimming episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Ochner, P.; Dallaporta, S.

    2016-08-01

    An alert posted to the BAA-VSS newsgroup on Aug 24 by J. Shears informs about a new excursion down to V~17 of old nova HR Lyr (Nova Lyr 1919). A few other such episodes were catch by Honeycutt et al (2014, AJ 147, 105) in their intensive 1991-2012 V-band monitoring of HR Lyr, usually between V=15.5 and 16.0.

  11. Maximizing versus satisficing: happiness is a matter of choice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Barry; Ward, Andrew; Monterosso, John; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; White, Katherine; Lehman, Darrin R

    2002-11-01

    Can people feel worse off as the options they face increase? The present studies suggest that some people--maximizers--can. Study 1 reported a Maximization Scale, which measures individual differences in desire to maximize. Seven samples revealed negative correlations between maximization and happiness, optimism, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, and positive correlations between maximization and depression, perfectionism, and regret. Study 2 found maximizers less satisfied than nonmaximizers (satisficers) with consumer decisions, and more likely to engage in social comparison. Study 3 found maximizers more adversely affected by upward social comparison. Study 4 found maximizers more sensitive to regret and less satisfied in an ultimatum bargaining game. The interaction between maximizing and choice is discussed in terms of regret, adaptation, and self-blame.

  12. Postactivation Potentiation Biases Maximal Isometric Strength Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Oliveira, Thiago Pires; Assumpção, Claudio de Oliveira; Greco, Camila Coelho; Cardozo, Adalgiso Croscato; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is known to enhance force production. Maximal isometric strength assessment protocols usually consist of two or more maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs). The objective of this study was to determine if PAP would influence isometric strength assessment. Healthy male volunteers (n = 23) performed two five-second MVCs separated by a 180-seconds interval. Changes in isometric peak torque (IPT), time to achieve it (tPTI), contractile impulse (CI), root mean square of the electromyographic signal during PTI (RMS), and rate of torque development (RTD), in different intervals, were measured. Significant increases in IPT (240.6 ± 55.7 N·m versus 248.9 ± 55.1 N·m), RTD (746 ± 152 N·m·s−1versus 727 ± 158 N·m·s−1), and RMS (59.1 ± 12.2% RMSMAX  versus 54.8 ± 9.4% RMSMAX) were found on the second MVC. tPTI decreased significantly on the second MVC (2373 ± 1200 ms versus 2784 ± 1226 ms). We conclude that a first MVC leads to PAP that elicits significant enhancements in strength-related variables of a second MVC performed 180 seconds later. If disconsidered, this phenomenon might bias maximal isometric strength assessment, overestimating some of these variables. PMID:25133157

  13. Electromagnetically induced grating with maximal atomic coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Silvania A.; Araujo, Luis E. E. de

    2011-10-15

    We describe theoretically an atomic diffraction grating that combines an electromagnetically induced grating with a coherence grating in a double-{Lambda} atomic system. With the atom in a condition of maximal coherence between its lower levels, the combined gratings simultaneously diffract both the incident probe beam as well as the signal beam generated through four-wave mixing. A special feature of the atomic grating is that it will diffract any beam resonantly tuned to any excited state of the atom accessible by a dipole transition from its ground state.

  14. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in air transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng

    In air transportation networks the robustness of a network regarding node and link failures is a key factor for its design. An experiment based on the real air transportation network is performed to show that the algebraic connectivity is a good measure for network robustness. Three optimization problems of algebraic connectivity maximization are then formulated in order to find the most robust network design under different constraints. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem with flight routes addition or deletion is first formulated. Three methods to optimize and analyze the network algebraic connectivity are proposed. The Modified Greedy Perturbation Algorithm (MGP) provides a sub-optimal solution in a fast iterative manner. The Weighted Tabu Search (WTS) is designed to offer a near optimal solution with longer running time. The relaxed semi-definite programming (SDP) is used to set a performance upper bound and three rounding techniques are discussed to find the feasible solution. The simulation results present the trade-off among the three methods. The case study on two air transportation networks of Virgin America and Southwest Airlines show that the developed methods can be applied in real world large scale networks. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem is extended by adding the leg number constraint, which considers the traveler's tolerance for the total connecting stops. The Binary Semi-Definite Programming (BSDP) with cutting plane method provides the optimal solution. The tabu search and 2-opt search heuristics can find the optimal solution in small scale networks and the near optimal solution in large scale networks. The third algebraic connectivity maximization problem with operating cost constraint is formulated. When the total operating cost budget is given, the number of the edges to be added is not fixed. Each edge weight needs to be calculated instead of being pre-determined. It is illustrated that the edge addition and the

  15. Approximation Algorithms for Free-Label Maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Mark; Gerrits, Dirk H. P.

    Inspired by air traffic control and other applications where moving objects have to be labeled, we consider the following (static) point labeling problem: given a set P of n points in the plane and labels that are unit squares, place a label with each point in P in such a way that the number of free labels (labels not intersecting any other label) is maximized. We develop efficient constant-factor approximation algorithms for this problem, as well as PTASs, for various label-placement models.

  16. Maximizing results in reconstruction of cheek defects.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Marc A M; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2009-07-01

    The face is exceedingly important, as it is the medium through which individuals interact with the rest of society. Reconstruction of cheek defects after trauma or surgery is a continuing challenge for surgeons who wish to reliably restore facial function and appearance. Important in aesthetic facial reconstruction are the aesthetic unit principles, by which the face can be divided in central facial units (nose, lips, eyelids) and peripheral facial units (cheeks, forehead, chin). This article summarizes established options for reconstruction of cheek defects and provides an overview of several modifications as well as tips and tricks to avoid complications and maximize aesthetic results.

  17. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  18. International Child Abduction Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Administrative Law and Governmental Relations of the Committee on the Judiciary. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 2673 and H.R. 3971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document contains witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to consider enactment of H.R. 2673, a bill to facilitate implementation of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. The text of H.R. 2673 is included in the document as is the text of H.R. 3971, a bill…

  19. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the “right mix” of individuals in a population. PMID:26650247

  20. Fractional stereo matching using expectation-maximization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Chung, Hin Shun; Jia, Jiaya

    2009-03-01

    In our fractional stereo matching problem, a foreground object with a fractional boundary is blended with a background scene using unknown transparencies. Due to the spatially varying disparities in different layers, one foreground pixel may be blended with different background pixels in stereo images, making the color constancy commonly assumed in traditional stereo matching not hold any more. To tackle this problem, in this paper, we introduce a probabilistic framework constraining the matching of pixel colors, disparities, and alpha values in different layers, and propose an automatic optimization method to solve a Maximizing a Posterior (MAP) problem using Expectation-Maximization (EM), given only a short-baseline stereo input image pair. Our method encodes the effect of background occlusion by layer blending without requiring a special detection process. The alpha computation process in our unified framework can be regarded as a new approach by natural image matting, which handles appropriately the situation when the background color is similar to that of the foreground object. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method by experimenting with challenging stereo images and making comparisons with state-of-the-art methods.

  1. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E; Neufeld, Jerome A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  2. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  3. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  4. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  5. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit.

    PubMed

    Izu, Leighton T; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the "right mix" of individuals in a population.

  6. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  7. Maximal coherence in a generic basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Ge, Li; Li, Mo; Sun, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Since quantum coherence is an undoubted characteristic trait of quantum physics, the quantification and application of quantum coherence has been one of the long-standing central topics in quantum information science. Within the framework of a resource theory of quantum coherence proposed recently, a fiducial basis should be preselected for characterizing the quantum coherence in specific circumstances, namely, the quantum coherence is a basis-dependent quantity. Therefore, a natural question is raised: what are the maximum and minimum coherences contained in a certain quantum state with respect to a generic basis? While the minimum case is trivial, it is not so intuitive to verify in which basis the quantum coherence is maximal. Based on the coherence measure of relative entropy, we indicate the particular basis in which the quantum coherence is maximal for a given state, where the Fourier matrix (or more generally, complex Hadamard matrices) plays a critical role in determining the basis. Intriguingly, though we can prove that the basis associated with the Fourier matrix is a stationary point for optimizing the l1 norm of coherence, numerical simulation shows that it is not a global optimal choice.

  8. A SEARCH FOR WIDE COMPANIONS TO THE EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEM HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.

    2010-01-20

    The extrasolar planetary system around HR 8799 is the first multiplanet system ever imaged. It is also, by a wide margin, the highest mass system with >27 Jupiters of planetary mass past 25 AU. This is a remarkable system with no analog in any other known planetary system. In the first part of this paper, we investigated the nature of two faint objects imaged near the system. These objects are considerably fainter (H = 20.4 and 21.6 mag) and more distant (projected separations of 612 and 534 AU) than the three known planetary companions b, c, and d (68-24 AU). It is possible that these two objects could be lower mass planets (of mass approx5M{sub Jup} and approx3M{sub Jup}) that have been scattered to wider orbits. We make the first direct comparison of newly reduced archival Gemini adaptive optics images to archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS images. With nearly a decade between these epochs, we can accurately assess the proper motion nature of each candidate companion. We find that both objects are unbound to HR 8799 and are background. We estimate that HR 8799 has no companions of H < 22 from approx5'' to 15''. Any scattered giant planets in the HR 8799 system are >600 AU or less than 3 M{sub Jup} in mass. In the second part of this paper, we search for any sign of a 'reverse parallax signature' in the astrometric residuals of HR 8799b. No such signal was found and we conclude, as expected, that HR 8799b has the same parallax as HR 8799A. In the third part of this paper, we carry out a search for wider common proper motion objects. We found one object within 1 deg{sup 2} in the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey-Digitized Sky Survey images with similar (<2sigma) proper motions to HR 8799 at a separation of 4.'0. We conclude that it is not likely a bound companion to HR 8799 based on available photometry.

  9. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  10. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-01

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  11. Multipartite maximally entangled states in symmetric scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Guillén, Carlos E.

    2012-08-01

    We consider the class of (N+1)-partite states suitable for protocols where there is a powerful party, the authority, and the other N parties play the same role, namely, the state of their system lies in the symmetric Hilbert space. We show that, within this scenario, there is a “maximally entangled state” that can be transform by a local operations and classical communication protocol into any other state. In addition, we show how to use the protocol efficiently, including the construction of the state, and discuss security issues for possible applications to cryptographic protocols. As an immediate consequence we recover a sequential protocol that implements the 1-to-N symmetric cloning.

  12. Polycrystalline configurations that maximize electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Vincenzo; Milton, Graeme W.

    A lower bound on the effective conductivity tensor of polycrystalline aggregates formed from a single basic crystal of conductivity σ was recently established by Avellaneda. Cherkaev, Lurie and Milton. The bound holds for any basic crystal, but for isotropic aggregates of a uniaxial crystal, the bound is achieved by a sphere assemblage model of Schulgasser. This left open the question of attainability of the bound when the crystal is not uniaxial. The present work establishes that the bound is always attained by a rather large class of polycrystalline materials. These polycrystalline materials, with maximal electrical resistivity, are constructed by sequential lamination of the basic crystal and rotations of itself on widely separated length scales. The analysis is facilitated by introducing a tensor S = 0( 0I + σ) -1 where 0 > 0 is chosen so that Tr S = 1. This tensor s is related to the electric field in the optimal polycrystalline configurations.

  13. Dispatch Scheduling to Maximize Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Samson; McCrady, Nate; MINERVA

    2016-01-01

    MINERVA is a dedicated exoplanet detection telescope array using radial velocity measurements of nearby stars to detect planets. MINERVA will be a completely robotic facility, with a goal of maximizing the number of exoplanets detected. MINERVA requires a unique application of queue scheduling due to its automated nature and the requirement of high cadence observations. A dispatch scheduling algorithm is employed to create a dynamic and flexible selector of targets to observe, in which stars are chosen by assigning values through a weighting function. I designed and have begun testing a simulation which implements the functions of a dispatch scheduler and records observations based on target selections through the same principles that will be used at the commissioned site. These results will be used in a larger simulation that incorporates weather, planet occurrence statistics, and stellar noise to test the planet detection capabilities of MINERVA. This will be used to heuristically determine an optimal observing strategy for the MINERVA project.

  14. Characterizing maximally singular phase-space distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, J.

    2016-07-01

    Phase-space distributions are widely applied in quantum optics to access the nonclassical features of radiations fields. In particular, the inability to interpret the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution in terms of a classical probability density is the fundamental benchmark for quantum light. However, this phase-space distribution cannot be directly reconstructed for arbitrary states, because of its singular behavior. In this work, we perform a characterization of the Glauber-Sudarshan representation in terms of distribution theory. We address important features of such distributions: (i) the maximal degree of their singularities is studied, (ii) the ambiguity of representation is shown, and (iii) their dual space for nonclassicality tests is specified. In this view, we reconsider the methods for regularizing the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution for verifying its nonclassicality. This treatment is supported with comprehensive examples and counterexamples.

  15. Robust determination of maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, Éric; Levitt, Antoine; Panati, Gianluca; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    We propose an algorithm to determine maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs). This algorithm, based on recent theoretical developments, does not require any physical input such as initial guesses for the Wannier functions, unlike popular schemes based on the projection method. We discuss how the projection method can fail on fine grids when the initial guesses are too far from MLWFs. We demonstrate that our algorithm is able to find localized Wannier functions through tests on two-dimensional systems, simplified models of semiconductors, and realistic DFT systems by interfacing with the wannier90 code. We also test our algorithm on the Haldane and Kane-Mele models to examine how it fails in the presence of topological obstructions.

  16. Maximally reliable Markov chains under energy constraints.

    PubMed

    Escola, Sean; Eisele, Michael; Miller, Kenneth; Paninski, Liam

    2009-07-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios in physical systems can be significantly degraded if the outputs of the systems are highly variable. Biological processes for which highly stereotyped signal generations are necessary features appear to have reduced their signal variabilities by employing multiple processing steps. To better understand why this multistep cascade structure might be desirable, we prove that the reliability of a signal generated by a multistate system with no memory (i.e., a Markov chain) is maximal if and only if the system topology is such that the process steps irreversibly through each state, with transition rates chosen such that an equal fraction of the total signal is generated in each state. Furthermore, our result indicates that by increasing the number of states, it is possible to arbitrarily increase the reliability of the system. In a physical system, however, an energy cost is associated with maintaining irreversible transitions, and this cost increases with the number of such transitions (i.e., the number of states). Thus, an infinite-length chain, which would be perfectly reliable, is infeasible. To model the effects of energy demands on the maximally reliable solution, we numerically optimize the topology under two distinct energy functions that penalize either irreversible transitions or incommunicability between states, respectively. In both cases, the solutions are essentially irreversible linear chains, but with upper bounds on the number of states set by the amount of available energy. We therefore conclude that a physical system for which signal reliability is important should employ a linear architecture, with the number of states (and thus the reliability) determined by the intrinsic energy constraints of the system.

  17. Does Maximizing Information at the Cut Score Always Maximize Classification Accuracy and Consistency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Babcock, Ben

    2016-01-01

    A common suggestion made in the psychometric literature for fixed-length classification tests is that one should design tests so that they have maximum information at the cut score. Designing tests in this way is believed to maximize the classification accuracy and consistency of the assessment. This article uses simulated examples to illustrate…

  18. Anaerobic contribution during maximal anaerobic running test: correlation with maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A; Redkva, P; Loures, J; Kalva Filho, C; Franco, V; Kaminagakura, E; Papoti, M

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to measure energy system contributions in maximal anaerobic running test (MART); and (ii) to verify any correlation between MART and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Eleven members of the armed forces were recruited for this study. Participants performed MART and MAOD, both accomplished on a treadmill. MART consisted of intermittent exercise, 20 s effort with 100 s recovery, after each spell of effort exercise. Energy system contributions by MART were also determined by excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, lactate response, and oxygen uptake measurements. MAOD was determined by five submaximal intensities and one supramaximal intensity exercises corresponding to 120% at maximal oxygen uptake intensity. Energy system contributions were 65.4±1.1% to aerobic; 29.5±1.1% to anaerobic a-lactic; and 5.1±0.5% to anaerobic lactic system throughout the whole test, while only during effort periods the anaerobic contribution corresponded to 73.5±1.0%. Maximal power found in MART corresponded to 111.25±1.33 mL/kg/min but did not significantly correlate with MAOD (4.69±0.30 L and 70.85±4.73 mL/kg). We concluded that the anaerobic a-lactic system is the main energy system in MART efforts and this test did not significantly correlate to MAOD.

  19. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  20. Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko V.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Grignon, David J.; McGowan, David G.; Roach, Mack; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Sandler, Howard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

  1. The design and performance of a 200 A-hr lithium-metal sulfide cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askew, B. A.; Dand, P. V.

    The near-term performance goals of 90-100 W-hr/kg specific energy (C/4 rate) and 90-100 W/kg peak specific power are achieved in five-plate 200 A-hr cells using a boron nitride felt separator and wire screen or photoetched electrode constraint systems. Specific energy values greater than 100 W-hr/kg are attained at lower rates (C/6) in cells of similar design using a magnesia powder separator. A marked dependence of temperature on cell capacity is found in cells using lithium chloride-potassium chloride electrolyte over the temperature range 445-470 C. It is thought that an alternative electrolyte composition may be necessary to reduce this effect in the battery.

  2. Heavy-element abundances in the classical barium star HR 774

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkin, J.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-10-01

    Low-noise high-resolution Digicon and Reticon spectra of HR 774 are analyzed to determine abundances for all accessible heavy elements in the visual and near-infrared. The authors find evidence of departures from LTE as large as 0.5 dex affecting the low-excitation neutral lines of heavy elements in HR 774 and the standard star (β Gem). These severe effects cancel in a comparison of HR 774 with β Gem. Abundances of 19 heavy elements (Z ≥ 37) are determined and used to derive s-process overabundances. The predicted s-process abundances fit the derived s-process abundances remarkably well. The pattern of s-process abundances is consistent with the 13C(α, n)16O reaction as the neutron source and excludes the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction.

  3. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Vukelich, S.E.

    1994-09-22

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  4. Reproducibility of incremental maximal cycle ergometer testing in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniuk, D. D.; Watts, R. E.; Gallagher, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Exercise testing has become an important tool in the diagnosis and treatment of restrictive lung disease. The reproducibility of variables measured during exercise testing was examined in subjects with stable restrictive lung disease. METHODS--Six subjects, who had never previously undergone exercise testing, each underwent three maximal incremental exercise studies on a bicycle ergometer conducted during a 28 day period. RESULTS--Data collected at rest, before exercise, were not significantly different during the three study days. Comparison of results at the end of the exercise tests from the three studies also revealed no evidence of a significant learning effect. Reproducibility of exercise performance by subjects was assessed by the coefficient of variation. The mean within subject coefficient of variation at the end of the exercise tests was 5.6% for work rate, 7.9% for exercise duration, and 9.5% for dyspnoea. The mean within subject coefficient of variation obtained at the end of the exercise tests was 5.3% for oxygen uptake (VO2), 2.5% for oxygen saturation (SaO2), 4.0% for heart rate (HR), 5.5% for minute ventilation (VE), 5.8% for respiratory frequency (f), and 4.6% for tidal volume (VT). The mean within subject coefficient of variation at 40% and 70% of maximal work rates for VO2 was 5.7% and 5.6% respectively, for SaO2 1.3% and 1.5%, for HR 4.8% and 4.0%, for VE 6.3% and 6.6%, for f 10.1% and 7.8%, and for VT 6.0% and 4.5%. CONCLUSIONS--Variables measured during clinical exercise testing in subjects with restrictive lung disease are highly reproducible. No significant learning effect was found on repeated testing in subjects who had never previously undergone exercise testing. PMID:8236071

  5. Twin-sibling study and meta-analysis on the heritability of maximal oxygen consumption

    PubMed Central

    Nederend, Ineke; Hudziak, James J.; Bartels, Meike; de Geus, Eco J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Large individual differences exist in aerobic fitness in childhood and adolescence, but the relative contribution of genetic factors to this variation remains to be established. In a sample of adolescent twins and siblings (n = 479), heart rate (HR) and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) were recorded during the climax of a graded maximal exercise test. In addition, V̇o2max was predicted in two graded submaximal exercise tests on the cycle ergometer and the treadmill, using extrapolation of the HR/V̇o2 curve to the predicted HRmax. Heritability estimates for measured V̇o2max were 60% in ml/min and 55% for V̇o2max in ml·min−1·kg−1. Phenotypic correlations between measured V̇o2max and predicted V̇o2max from either submaximal treadmill or cycle ergometer tests were modest (0.57 < r < 0.70), in part because of the poor agreement between predicted and actual HRmax. The majority of this correlation was explained by genetic factors; therefore, the submaximal exercise tests still led to very comparable estimates of heritability of V̇o2max. To arrive at a robust estimate for the heritability of V̇o2max in children to young adults, a sample size weighted meta-analysis was performed on all extant twin and sibling studies in this age range. Eight studies, including the current study, were meta-analyzed and resulted in a weighted heritability estimate of 59% (ml/min) and 72% (ml·min−1·kg−1) for V̇o2max. Taken together, the twin-sibling study and meta-analyses showed that from childhood to early adulthood genetic factors determine more than half of the individual differences in V̇o2max. PMID:26787216

  6. Increase in maximal oxygen uptake following 2-week walk training with blood flow occlusion in athletes.

    PubMed

    Park, Saejong; Kim, Jong Kyung; Choi, Hyun Min; Kim, Hyun Gook; Beekley, Matthew D; Nho, Hosung

    2010-07-01

    Walk training with blood flow occlusion (OCC-walk) leads to muscle hypertrophy; however, cardiorespiratory endurance in response to OCC-walk is unknown. Ischemia enhances the adaptation to endurance training such as increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂(max)) and muscle glycogen content. Thus, we investigated the effects of an OCC-walk on cardiorespiratory endurance, anaerobic power, and muscle strength in elite athletes. College basketball players participated in walk training with (n = 7) and without (n = 5) blood flow occlusion. Five sets of a 3-min walk (4-6 km/h at 5% grade) and a 1-min rest between the walks were performed twice a day, 6 days a week for 2 weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures (groups x time) was utilized (P < 0.05). Interactions were found in VO₂(max) (P = 0.011) and maximal minute ventilation (VE(max); P = 0.019). VO₂(max) (11.6%) and VE(max) (10.6%) were increased following the OCC-walk. For the cardiovascular adaptations of the OCC-walk, hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) at rest and during OCC-walk were compared between the first and the last OCC-walk sessions. Although no change in hemodynamics was found at rest, during the last OCC-walk session SV was increased in all five sets (21.4%) and HR was decreased in the third (12.3%) and fifth (15.0%) sets. With anaerobic power an interaction was found in anaerobic capacity (P = 0.038) but not in peak power. Anaerobic capacity (2.5%) was increased following the OCC-walk. No interaction was found in muscle strength. In conclusion, the 2-week OCC-walk significantly increases VO₂(max) and VE(max) in athletes. The OCC-walk training might be used in the rehabilitation for athletes who intend to maintain or improve endurance.

  7. Twin-sibling study and meta-analysis on the heritability of maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Nienke M; Nederend, Ineke; Hudziak, James J; Bartels, Meike; de Geus, Eco J C

    2016-03-01

    Large individual differences exist in aerobic fitness in childhood and adolescence, but the relative contribution of genetic factors to this variation remains to be established. In a sample of adolescent twins and siblings (n = 479), heart rate (HR) and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) were recorded during the climax of a graded maximal exercise test. In addition, V̇o2max was predicted in two graded submaximal exercise tests on the cycle ergometer and the treadmill, using extrapolation of the HR/V̇o2 curve to the predicted HRmax. Heritability estimates for measured V̇o2max were 60% in ml/min and 55% for V̇o2max in ml·min(-1)·kg(-1). Phenotypic correlations between measured V̇o2max and predicted V̇o2max from either submaximal treadmill or cycle ergometer tests were modest (0.57 < r < 0.70), in part because of the poor agreement between predicted and actual HRmax. The majority of this correlation was explained by genetic factors; therefore, the submaximal exercise tests still led to very comparable estimates of heritability of V̇o2max. To arrive at a robust estimate for the heritability of V̇o2max in children to young adults, a sample size weighted meta-analysis was performed on all extant twin and sibling studies in this age range. Eight studies, including the current study, were meta-analyzed and resulted in a weighted heritability estimate of 59% (ml/min) and 72% (ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) for V̇o2max. Taken together, the twin-sibling study and meta-analyses showed that from childhood to early adulthood genetic factors determine more than half of the individual differences in V̇o2max.

  8. Does the incremental shuttle walk test require maximal effort in young obese women?

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, S P; Trimer, R; Di Thommazo-Luporini, L; Dourado, V Z; Bonjorno-Junior, J C; Oliveira, C R; Arena, R; Borghi-Silva, A

    2016-07-11

    Obesity is a chronic disease with a multifaceted treatment approach that includes nutritional counseling, structured exercise training, and increased daily physical activity. Increased body mass elicits higher cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic demands to varying degrees during exercise. With functional capacity assessment, this variability can be evaluated so individualized guidance for exercise training and daily physical activity can be provided. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic responses obtained during a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX) on a treadmill to responses obtained by the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) in obese women and to propose a peak oxygen consumption (VO2) prediction equation through variables obtained during the ISWT. Forty obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) performed one treadmill CPX and two ISWTs. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP) and perceived exertion by the Borg scale were measured at rest, during each stage of the exercise protocol, and throughout the recovery period. The predicted maximal heart rate (HRmax) was calculated (210 - age in years) (16) and compared to the HR response during the CPX. Peak VO2 obtained during CPX correlated significantly (P<0.05) with ISWT peak VO2 (r=0.79) as well as ISWT distance (r=0.65). The predictive model for CPX peak VO2, using age and ISWT distance explained 67% of the variability. The current study indicates the ISWT may be used to predict aerobic capacity in obese women when CPX is not a viable option.

  9. Low-frequency GMRT observations of the magnetic Bp star HR Lup (HD 133880)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Samuel J.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2012-06-01

    We present radio observations of the magnetic chemically peculiar Bp star HR Lup (HD 133880) at 647 and 277 MHz with the GMRT. At both frequencies the source is not detected but we are able to determine upper limits to the emission. The 647 MHz limits are particularly useful, with a 5σ value of 0.45 mJy. Also, no large enhancements of the emission were seen. The non-detections, along with previously published higher frequency detections, provide evidence that an optically thick gyrosynchrotron model is the correct mechanism for the radio emission of HR Lup.

  10. Stability boundaries for massive stars in the sHR diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Georgy, Cyril; Meynet, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Stability boundaries of radial pulsations in massive stars are compared with positions of variable and non-variable blue-supergiants in the spectroscopic HR (sHR) diagram (Langer & Kudritzki 2014), whose vertical axis is 4 log T eff - log g(= log L/M). Observational data indicate that variables tend to have higher L/M than non-variables in agreement with the theoretical prediction. However, many variable blue-supergiants are found to have values of L/M below the theoretical stability boundary; i.e., surface gravities seem to be too high by around 0.2-0.3 dex.

  11. Maximal and sub-maximal functional lifting performance at different platform heights.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Jaffrey, Mark A; Billing, Daniel C; Ham, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Introducing valid physical employment tests requires identifying and developing a small number of practical tests that provide broad coverage of physical performance across the full range of job tasks. This study investigated discrete lifting performance across various platform heights reflective of common military lifting tasks. Sixteen Australian Army personnel performed a discrete lifting assessment to maximal lifting capacity (MLC) and maximal acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) at four platform heights between 1.30 and 1.70 m. There were strong correlations between platform height and normalised lifting performance for MLC (R(2) = 0.76 ± 0.18, p < 0.05) and MAWL (R(2) = 0.73 ± 0.21, p < 0.05). The developed relationship allowed prediction of lifting capacity at one platform height based on lifting capacity at any of the three other heights, with a standard error of < 4.5 kg and < 2.0 kg for MLC and MAWL, respectively.

  12. Maximally Expressive Modeling of Operations Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Richardson, Lea; Davis, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed, the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema.

  13. Maximizing exosome colloidal stability following electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2014-03-01

    Development of exosome-based semisynthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum-derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label-free means of enriching exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI-driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo.

  14. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3-12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3-6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7-9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10-12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity.

  15. Maximally localized Wannier functions: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Nicola; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Souza, Ivo; Vanderbilt, David

    2012-10-01

    The electronic ground state of a periodic system is usually described in terms of extended Bloch orbitals, but an alternative representation in terms of localized “Wannier functions” was introduced by Gregory Wannier in 1937. The connection between the Bloch and Wannier representations is realized by families of transformations in a continuous space of unitary matrices, carrying a large degree of arbitrariness. Since 1997, methods have been developed that allow one to iteratively transform the extended Bloch orbitals of a first-principles calculation into a unique set of maximally localized Wannier functions, accomplishing the solid-state equivalent of constructing localized molecular orbitals, or “Boys orbitals” as previously known from the chemistry literature. These developments are reviewed here, and a survey of the applications of these methods is presented. This latter includes a description of their use in analyzing the nature of chemical bonding, or as a local probe of phenomena related to electric polarization and orbital magnetization. Wannier interpolation schemes are also reviewed, by which quantities computed on a coarse reciprocal-space mesh can be used to interpolate onto much finer meshes at low cost, and applications in which Wannier functions are used as efficient basis functions are discussed. Finally the construction and use of Wannier functions outside the context of electronic-structure theory is presented, for cases that include phonon excitations, photonic crystals, and cold-atom optical lattices.

  16. Inverting Monotonic Nonlinearities by Entropy Maximization

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Ipiña Pena, Karmele; Caiafa, Cesar F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for blind inversion of a monotonic nonlinear map applied to a sum of random variables. Such kinds of mixtures of random variables are found in source separation and Wiener system inversion problems, for example. The importance of our proposed method is based on the fact that it permits to decouple the estimation of the nonlinear part (nonlinear compensation) from the estimation of the linear one (source separation matrix or deconvolution filter), which can be solved by applying any convenient linear algorithm. Our new nonlinear compensation algorithm, the MaxEnt algorithm, generalizes the idea of Gaussianization of the observation by maximizing its entropy instead. We developed two versions of our algorithm based either in a polynomial or a neural network parameterization of the nonlinear function. We provide a sufficient condition on the nonlinear function and the probability distribution that gives a guarantee for the MaxEnt method to succeed compensating the distortion. Through an extensive set of simulations, MaxEnt is compared with existing algorithms for blind approximation of nonlinear maps. Experiments show that MaxEnt is able to successfully compensate monotonic distortions outperforming other methods in terms of the obtained Signal to Noise Ratio in many important cases, for example when the number of variables in a mixture is small. Besides its ability for compensating nonlinearities, MaxEnt is very robust, i.e. showing small variability in the results. PMID:27780261

  17. Viral quasispecies assembly via maximal clique enumeration.

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Armin; Marschall, Tobias; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Schönhuth, Alexander; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the structure of a viral quasispecies from next-generation sequencing data as obtained from bulk sequencing of mixed virus samples. We develop a statistical model for paired-end reads accounting for mutations, insertions, and deletions. Using an iterative maximal clique enumeration approach, read pairs are assembled into haplotypes of increasing length, eventually enabling global haplotype assembly. The performance of our quasispecies assembly method is assessed on simulated data for varying population characteristics and sequencing technology parameters. Owing to its paired-end handling, HaploClique compares favorably to state-of-the-art haplotype inference methods. It can reconstruct error-free full-length haplotypes from low coverage samples and detect large insertions and deletions at low frequencies. We applied HaploClique to sequencing data derived from a clinical hepatitis C virus population of an infected patient and discovered a novel deletion of length 357±167 bp that was validated by two independent long-read sequencing experiments. HaploClique is available at https://github.com/armintoepfer/haploclique. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  18. Network channel allocation and revenue maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamalainen, Timo; Joutsensalo, Jyrki

    2002-09-01

    This paper introduces a model that can be used to share link capacity among customers under different kind of traffic conditions. This model is suitable for different kind of networks like the 4G networks (fast wireless access to wired network) to support connections of given duration that requires a certain quality of service. We study different types of network traffic mixed in a same communication link. A single link is considered as a bottleneck and the goal is to find customer traffic profiles that maximizes the revenue of the link. Presented allocation system accepts every calls and there is not absolute blocking, but the offered data rate/user depends on the network load. Data arrival rate depends on the current link utilization, user's payment (selected CoS class) and delay. The arrival rate is (i) increasing with respect to the offered data rate, (ii) decreasing with respect to the price, (iii) decreasing with respect to the network load, and (iv) decreasing with respect to the delay. As an example, explicit formula obeying these conditions is given and analyzed.

  19. Evolution of correlated multiplexity through stability maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2017-02-01

    Investigating the relation between various structural patterns found in real-world networks and the stability of underlying systems is crucial to understand the importance and evolutionary origin of such patterns. We evolve multiplex networks, comprising antisymmetric couplings in one layer depicting predator-prey relationship and symmetric couplings in the other depicting mutualistic (or competitive) relationship, based on stability maximization through the largest eigenvalue of the corresponding adjacency matrices. We find that there is an emergence of the correlated multiplexity between the mirror nodes as the evolution progresses. Importantly, evolved values of the correlated multiplexity exhibit a dependence on the interlayer coupling strength. Additionally, the interlayer coupling strength governs the evolution of the disassortativity property in the individual layers. We provide analytical understanding to these findings by considering starlike networks representing both the layers. The framework discussed here is useful for understanding principles governing the stability as well as the importance of various patterns in the underlying networks of real-world systems ranging from the brain to ecology which consist of multiple types of interaction behavior.

  20. Maximizing Exosome Colloidal Stability Following Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Joshua L.; Scott, Michael J.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Development of exosome based semi-synthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label free means to enrich exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo. PMID:24333249

  1. Predicting maximal grip strength using hand circumference.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlations between anthropometric data and maximal grip strength (MGS) in order to establish a simple model to predict "normal" MGS. Randomized bilateral measurement of MGS was performed on a homogeneous population of 100 subjects. MGS was measured according to a standardized protocol with three dynamometers (Jamar, Myogrip and Martin Vigorimeter) for both dominant and non-dominant sides. Several anthropometric data were also measured: height; weight; hand, wrist and forearm circumference; hand and palm length. Among these data, hand circumference had the strongest correlation with MGS for all three dynamometers and for both hands (0.789 and 0.782 for Jamar; 0.829 and 0.824 for Myogrip; 0.663 and 0.730 for Vigorimeter). In addition, the only anthropometric variable systematically selected by a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was also hand circumference. Based on this parameter alone, a predictive regression model presented good results (r(2) = 0.624 for Jamar; r(2) = 0.683 for Myogrip and r(2) = 0.473 for Vigorimeter; all adjusted r(2)). Moreover a single equation was predictive of MGS for both men and women and for both non-dominant and dominant hands. "Normal" MGS can be predicted using hand circumference alone.

  2. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children

    PubMed Central

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3–12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3–6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7–9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10–12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity. PMID:28356644

  3. Reflection quasilattices and the maximal quasilattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Latham; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce the concept of a reflection quasilattice, the quasiperiodic generalization of a Bravais lattice with irreducible reflection symmetry. Among their applications, reflection quasilattices are the reciprocal (i.e., Bragg diffraction) lattices for quasicrystals and quasicrystal tilings, such as Penrose tilings, with irreducible reflection symmetry and discrete scale invariance. In a follow-up paper, we will show that reflection quasilattices can be used to generate tilings in real space with properties analogous to those in Penrose tilings, but with different symmetries and in various dimensions. Here we explain that reflection quasilattices only exist in dimensions two, three, and four, and we prove that there is a unique reflection quasilattice in dimension four: the "maximal reflection quasilattice" in terms of dimensionality and symmetry. Unlike crystallographic Bravais lattices, all reflection quasilattices are invariant under rescaling by certain discrete scale factors. We tabulate the complete set of scale factors for all reflection quasilattices in dimension d >2 , and for all those with quadratic irrational scale factors in d =2 .

  4. Rewarding and Developing Staff in Higher Education: Good Practice in Setting HR Strategies. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This guide aims to help universities and colleges in England think strategically about the contribution of human resources to their organization and then to turn this thinking into an agreed strategy document to manage their human resources (HR) effectively. In November 2000, the British government announced an additional 330 million pounds over 3…

  5. Searching for the HR 8799 Debris Disk with HST/STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, B.; Lawler, S.; Marois, C.; Tannock, M.; Matthews, B.; Venn, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for space telescope high contrast imaging of close-to-face-on planetary disks called Optimized Spatially Filtered (OSFi) normalization. This algorithm is used on HR 8799 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) coronagraphic archival data, showing an over-luminosity after reference star point-spread function (PSF) subtraction that may be from the inner disk and/or planetesimal belt components of this system. The PSF-subtracted radial profiles in two separate epochs from 2011 and 2012 are consistent with one another, and self-subtraction shows no residual in both epochs. We explore a number of possible false-positive scenarios that could explain this residual flux, including telescope breathing, spectral differences between HR 8799 and the reference star, imaging of the known warm inner disk component, OSFi algorithm throughput and consistency with the standard spider normalization HST PSF subtraction technique, and coronagraph misalignment from pointing accuracy. In comparison to another similar STIS data set, we find that the over-luminosity is likely a result of telescope breathing and spectral difference between HR 8799 and the reference star. Thus, assuming a non-detection, we derive upper limits on the HR 8799 dust belt mass in small grains. In this scenario, we find that the flux of these micron-sized dust grains leaving the system due to radiation pressure is small enough to be consistent with measurements of other debris disk halos.

  6. Linking educational leadership styles to the HR architecture for new teachers in primary education.

    PubMed

    Vekeman, Eva; Devos, Geert; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to gain insight in the relationship between principals' leadership styles and the configuration of different HR practices for new teachers in primary education. Besides the longstanding interest in educational leadership as a key element in teacher and student performance, there is a growing interest in strategic human resource management (SHRM) in the educational sector. However, few educational studies link educational leadership to SHRM. In particular, this study examines the relationship between principals' instructional and transformational leadership style and principals' strategic and HR orientation in configuring HR practices for new teachers. Data were gathered using a mixed methods approach, including interviews with 75 principals as well as an online survey of 1058 teachers in Flemish primary education. Qualitative interview data were transformed and analysed together with the quantitative survey data using logistic regression and ANOVA analyses. The results indicate that both instructional and transformational leadership is associated with the strategic orientation of principals. The HR orientation, on the other hand, is not reflected in the principals' leadership style. Recommendations for further research in this area are discussed.

  7. HR Technology Tools: Less Time on Paper and More on People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Many human resource managers face a dilemma. They would like to spend more time improving the overall work environment for employees. They want to help their executives save on workforce-related expenses, find and hire better talent, and improve existing talent through training and development. Unfortunately, most days, HR managers are stuck doing…

  8. XAS and HR-TEM Analyses of the Nakhlite Hydrothermal Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2012-09-01

    We use Fe-K XANES and EXAFS, with HR-TEM observations, to show that the phyllosilicate minerals found in the Lafayette nakhlite are saponite and serpentine. An increase in ferric/ferrous ratio is identified as part of the hydrothermal activity.

  9. Homozygosity for the HR2 Haplotype: Is It a Risk Factor for Thrombosis?

    PubMed

    Ulu, Arzu; Yılmaz, Erkan; Akar, Ece; Akar, Nejat

    2003-12-05

    A4070G (His 1299 Arg) polymorphism in exon 13 of factor V gene can influence factor V levels and contribute to the activated protein C resistance. We are presenting our data concerning Turkish population and postulate that homozygosity for the HR2 haplotype may be an important risk factor for thrombosis.

  10. An infrared study of the remarkable dusty M star HR 3126

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Aitken, D. K.; Roche, P. F.; Smith, C. H.; Walker, H. J.; Whitelock, P. A.; Wright, C.

    1993-01-01

    HR 3126 is a unique M giant star embedded in the bipolar reflection nebula IC 2220. In this paper we present new photometric and spectroscopic observations of HR 3126 and combine them with existing data from the literature in an extensive reappraisal of the star's properties at infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distribution is consistent with an optical classification of M0-3 II with infrared excess. The dust shell cannot be fitted by a single-temperature blackbody: at least three components are required, with temperatures in the range 35-1300 K. On the basis of spectroscopy at 1-4 and 7-25 microns, combined with an assessment of various color-color diagrams, we are able to reject the hypothesis that HR 3126 is carbon-rich. Weak silicate emission features are detected at 10 and 19 microns, and a previous report of silicon carbide emission at 11.2 microns is not substantiated. It seems likely that HR 2136 is in a phase of advanced and rapid postmain-sequence evolution, possibly beginning its ascent of the asymptotic giant branch.

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE HR8799 PLANETS WITH HST/WFC3

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, Abhijith; Patience, Jennifer; Barman, Travis; Soummer, Rémi; Hagan, J. Brendan; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Konopacky, Quinn; Macintosh, Bruce; Marois, Christian

    2015-08-20

    We present results from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program characterizing the atmospheres of the outer two planets in the HR8799 system. The images were taken over 15 orbits in three near-infrared (near-IR) medium-band filters—F098M, F127M, and F139M—using the Wide Field Camera 3. One of the three filters is sensitive to a water absorption band inaccessible from ground-based observations, providing a unique probe of the thermal emission from the atmospheres of these young giant planets. The observations were taken at 30 different spacecraft rolls to enable angular differential imaging (ADI), and the full data set was analyzed with the Karhunen–Loéve Image Projection routine, an advanced image processing algorithm adapted to work with HST data. To achieve the required high contrast at subarcsecond resolution, we utilized the pointing accuracy of HST in combination with an improved pipeline designed to combine the dithered ADI data with an algorithm designed to both improve the image resolution and accurately measure the photometry. The results include F127M (J) detections of the outer planets, HR8799b and c, and the first detection of HR8799b in the water-band (F139M) filter. The F127M photometry for HR8799c agrees well with fitted atmospheric models, resolving the longstanding difficulty in consistently modeling the near-IR flux of the planet.

  12. Getting People Involved: The Benefit of Intellectual Capital Management for Addressing HR Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pook, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the benefits of intellectual capital assessment for facing current challenges of human resources work and organizational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes findings of studies on challenges in HR work and maps them with features of intellectual capital assessment methods. It is thus a…

  13. GFZ HR/LL GPS Ground station networks and their use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigber, C.; Galas, R.; Koehler, W.; Forberg, M.; Ramatschi, M.

    2003-12-01

    The contribution presents GFZ's global and local High-Rate and Low-Latency GPS networks. The global HR/LL network was established, in collaboration with JPL, to support the CHAMP and GRACE POD activities and the radio occultation experiment on both missions. The GFZ sub-network is composed of 13 continuously tracking stations, generating 15-min 1 Hz GPS data files and transmitting them to GFZ every 15 minutes. Eight stations contribute to the Galileo mission preparations. Since early 2003 eight HR sites are streaming GPS data in real time. Three of them take part in the IGS Real-Time Prototype Network. GPS HR/LL network for deformation monitoring is an example of local HR/LL GPS array. This 1 Hz network was installed on Popocapetel volcano end of 1999. For the calibration of satellite altimetry, an autonomous 10 Hz GPS-Buoy was developed by GFZ and is operating in the North Sea. The presentation describes shortly the three systems and discusses issues such as: data performance, real-time data aspects and quality monitoring. Application results from ultra-rapid CHAMP/GRACE orbit processing, radio-occultation routine processing, buoy monitoring and volcano monitoring in geodesy, geophysics and meteorology will be presented.

  14. The postobstructive kidney. Observations on nephron function after the relief of 24 hr of ureteral ligation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Bercovitch, D. Danny; Kasen, Leonard; Blann, Laurence; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1971-01-01

    After the relief of 24 hr of complete unilateral ureteral obstruction in the dog, the experimental kidney is characterized by a decrease in filtration rate and an increase in fractional and often absolute excretion of sodium before and after the administration of mannitol. In the hydrated state, the failure to conserve sodium is associated with increases in fractional free water clearance and fractional sodium supply to water-freeing sites signifying that the augmented sodium excretion is derived from a proximal source. In the hydropenic state there is decreased fractional free water reabsorption, and sometimes free water excretion, in the postobstructive kidney. An early plateau in free water reabsorption is associated with an increased fractional excretion of sodium. These findings are attributed to the early development of distal nephron impermeability to water as a result of enhanced distal tubular supply and transport of sodium. There is a decrease in maximal tubular reabsorptive capacity (Tm) of glucose in the post-obstructive kidney which is, however, less marked than the decrease in filtration rate. The fall in filtration rate is to some extent likely due to a dropping out of nephrons from the circulation while the remaining nephrons are hypoperfused. The magnitude of the sodium reabsorptive defect is markedly exaggerated as the concentration of nonreabsorbable solute (mannitol) in the glomerular perfusate is increased. It is concluded that the postobstructive increase in sodium excretion during mannitol administration is in part due to a limit in the capacity to reabsorb sodium against a concentration gradient in the proximal tubule. PMID:5552413

  15. Discovery of a Substellar Companion to the Nearby Debris Disk Host HR 2562

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacky, Quinn M.; Rameau, Julien; Duchêne, Gaspard; Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Giorla Godfrey, Paige A.; Marois, Christian; Nielsen, Eric L.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rafikov, Roman R.; Rice, Emily L.; Wang, Jason J.; Ammons, S. Mark; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Barman, Travis S.; Bulger, Joanna; Bruzzone, Sebastian; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; Cotten, Tara; Dawson, Rebekah I.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Doyon, René; Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Follette, Katherine B.; Goodsell, Stephen; Graham, James R.; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Hibon, Pascale; Hung, Li-Wei; Ingraham, Patrick; Kalas, Paul; Lafrenière, David; Larkin, James E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; Matthews, Brenda C.; Metchev, Stanimir; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, David W.; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Rajan, Abhijith; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Savransky, Dmitry; Schneider, Adam C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Soummer, Remi; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the discovery of a brown dwarf companion to the debris disk host star HR 2562. This object, discovered with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), has a projected separation of 20.3 ± 0.3 au (0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 618+/- 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 004) from the star. With the high astrometric precision afforded by GPI, we have confirmed, to more than 5σ, the common proper motion of HR 2562B with the star, with only a month-long time baseline between observations. Spectral data in the J-, H-, and K-bands show a morphological similarity to L/T transition objects. We assign a spectral type of L7 ± 3 to HR 2562B and derive a luminosity of log(L {}{bol}/{L}⊙ )=-4.62+/- 0.12, corresponding to a mass of 30 ± 15 {M}{Jup} from evolutionary models at an estimated age of the system of 300-900 Myr. Although the uncertainty in the age of the host star is significant, the spectra and photometry exhibit several indications of youth for HR 2562B. The source has a position angle that is consistent with an orbit in the same plane as the debris disk recently resolved with Herschel. Additionally, it appears to be interior to the debris disk. Though the extent of the inner hole is currently too uncertain to place limits on the mass of HR 2562B, future observations of the disk with higher spatial resolution may be able to provide mass constraints. This is the first brown-dwarf-mass object found to reside in the inner hole of a debris disk, offering the opportunity to search for evidence of formation above the deuterium burning limit in a circumstellar disk.

  16. UV spectral variability in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. 11: The accretion interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report recent IUE high- and low-dispersion observations with the IUE long wavelength camera (LWP) and short wavelength camera (SWP) of the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. We have found a dramatic change in the structure of the Mg II h and k lines (2795.5, 2802.7 A) along with some continuum flux excesses especially at the short end of the SWP camera. LWP high dispersion observations of HR 5999 obtained between 1979 and 1990, at times of comparatively low UV continuum fluxes, exhibit P Cygni type m profiles in the Mg II resonance doublet. In contrast, observations made from September 1990 through March 16-18, 1992, with high W continuum fluxes, present Mg II lines with reverse P Cygni profiles indicative of some active episodic accretion. Accreting gas can also be detected in the additional red wings of the various Fe II and Mn II absorption lines, with velocities up to +300-350 km/s (September 1990). By September 10, 1992 the Mg II profile had returned to the type III P Cygni profile similar to those from earlier spectra. The correlation between the presence of large column densities of accreting gas and the continuum light variations supports suggestions by several authors that HR 5999 is surrounded by an optically thick, viscously heated accretion disk. Detection of accreting gas in the line of sight to HR 5999 permits us to place constraints on our viewing geometry for this system. A discussion is included comparing the spectral and physical similarities between HR 5999 and the more evolved proto-planetary candidate system, beta Pictoris.

  17. THE CHARA ARRAY ANGULAR DIAMETER OF HR 8799 FAVORS PLANETARY MASSES FOR ITS IMAGED COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; White, Russel J.; Jones, Jeremy; Boyajian, Tabetha; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, Christopher D.; Riedel, Adric R.; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Michael; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2012-12-10

    HR 8799 is an hF0 mA5 {gamma} Doradus-, {lambda} Bootis-, Vega-type star best known for hosting four directly imaged candidate planetary companions. Using the CHARA Array interferometer, we measure HR 8799's limb-darkened angular diameter to be 0.342 {+-} 0.008 mas (an error of only 2%). By combining our measurement with the star's parallax and photometry from the literature, we greatly improve upon previous estimates of its fundamental parameters, including stellar radius (1.44 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Sun }), effective temperature (7193 {+-} 87 K, consistent with F0), luminosity (5.05 {+-} 0.29 L{sub Sun }), and the extent of the habitable zone (HZ; 1.62-3.32 AU). These improved stellar properties permit much more precise comparisons with stellar evolutionary models, from which a mass and age can be determined, once the metallicity of the star is known. Considering the observational properties of other {lambda} Bootis stars and the indirect evidence for youth of HR 8799, we argue that the internal abundance, and what we refer to as the effective abundance, is most likely near solar. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models with uniformly scaled solar-like abundances, we estimate HR 8799's mass and age considering two possibilities: 1.516{sup +0.038}{sub -0.024} M{sub Sun} and 33{sup +7}{sub -13.2} Myr if the star is contracting toward the zero-age main sequence or 1.513{sup +0.023}{sub -0.024} M{sub Sun} and 90{sup +381}{sub -50} Myr if it is expanding from it. This improved estimate of HR 8799's age with realistic uncertainties provides the best constraints to date on the masses of its orbiting companions, and strongly suggests they are indeed planets. They nevertheless all appear to orbit well outside the HZ of this young star.

  18. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  19. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  20. Maximality-Based Structural Operational Semantics for Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saīdouni, Djamel Eddine; Belala, Nabil; Bouneb, Messaouda

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this work is to exploit an implementable model, namely the maximality-based labeled transition system, which permits to express true-concurrency in a natural way without splitting actions on their start and end events. One can do this by giving a maximality-based structural operational semantics for the model of Place/Transition Petri nets in terms of maximality-based labeled transition systems structures.

  1. Structural analysis of cortical porosity applied to HR-pQCT data

    PubMed Central

    Tjong, Willy; Nirody, Jasmine; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Kazakia, Galateia J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The investigation of cortical porosity is an important aspect of understanding biological, pathoetiological, and biomechanical processes occurring within the skeleton. With the emergence of HR-pQCT as a noninvasive tool suitable for clinical use, cortical porosity at appendicular sites can be directly visualized in vivo. The aim of this study was to introduce a novel topological analysis of the cortical pore network for HR-pQCT data and determine the influence of resolution on measures of cortical pore network microstructure and topology. Methods: Cadaveric radii were scanned using HR-pQCT at two different voxel sizes (41 and 82 μm) and also using μCT at a voxel size of 18 μm. HR-pQCT and μCT image sets were spatially coregistered. Segmentation and quantification of cortical porosity (Ct.Po) and mean pore diameter (Ct.Po.Dm) were achieved using an established extended cortical analysis technique. Topological classification of individual pores was performed using topology-preserving skeletonization and multicolor dilation algorithms. Based on the pore skeleton topological classification, the following parameters were quantified: total number of planar surface-skeleton canals (N.Slabs), tubular curve-skeleton canals (N.Tubes), and junction elements (N.Junctions), mean slab volume (Slab.Vol), mean tube volume (Tube.Vol), mean slab orientation (Slab.θ), mean tube orientation (Tube.θ), N.Slabs/N.Tubes, and integral (total) slab volume/integral tube volume (iSlab.Vol/iTube.Vol). An in vivo reproducibility study was also conducted to assess short-term precision of the topology parameters. Precision error was characterized using root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV%). Results: Correlations to μCT values for Ct.Po were significant for both the 41 and 82 μm HR-pQCT data (41: r2 = 0.82, p < 0.001, 82: r2 = 0.75, p < 0.001). For Ct.Po.Dm, only the 41 μm data were significantly predictive of μCT values (r2 = 0.72, p < 0.01) Data at both HR

  2. The Effects of Vibration During Maximal Graded Cycling Exercise: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Filingeri, Davide; Jemni, Monèm; Bianco, Antonino; Zeinstra, Edzard; Jimenez, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Whole Body Vibration training is studied and used in different areas, related to sport performance and rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated the effects of Vibration (Vib) exposure on aerobic performance through the application of this concept to cycling exercise. A specifically designed vibrating cycloergometer, the powerBIKE™, was used to compare the effects of Vib cycling exercise and normal cycling on different physiological parameters during maximal graded exercise test. Twelve recreationally active male adults (25 ± 4.8 yrs; 181.33 ± 5.47 cm; 80.66 ± 11.91 kg) performed two maximal incremental cycling tests with and without Vib in a block-randomized order. The protocol consisted of a 4 min warm up at 70 rev·min-1 followed by incremental steps of 3 min each. Cycling cadence was increased at each step by 10 rev·min-1 until participants reached their volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gases (VO2, VCO2), Heart Rate, Blood Lactate and RPE were collected during the test. Paired t-tests and Cor-relation Coefficients were used for statistical analysis. A significantly greater (P<0.05) response in the VO2, HR, BLa and RPE was observed during the Vib trial compare to normal cycling. No significant differences were found in the maximal aerobic power (Vib 34.32 ± 9.70 ml·kg-1·min-1; no Vib 40.11 ± 9.49 ml·kg-1·min-1). Adding Vib to cycling exercise seems eliciting a quicker energetic demand during maximal exercise. However, mechanical limitations of the vibrating prototype could have affected the final outcomes. Future studies with more comparative setting are recommended to deeply appraise this concept. Key points There is strong evidence to suggest that acute indirect vibrations act on muscle to enhance force, power, flexibility, balance and proprioception. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the effects of applying Vib to dynamic aerobic exercise. Added vibrations to cycling exercise seem producing a quicker energetic demand during

  3. Developmental interplay between children's biobehavioral risk and the parenting environment from toddler to early school age: Prediction of socialization outcomes in preadolescence.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Boldt, Lea J; Kim, Sanghag; Yoon, Jeung Eun; Philibert, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    We followed 100 community families from toddler age to preadolescence. Each mother- and father-child dyad was observed at 25, 38, 52, 67, and 80 months (10 hr/child) to assess positive and power-assertive parenting. At age 10 (N = 82), we obtained parent- and child-reported outcome measures of children's acceptance of parental socialization: cooperation with parental monitoring, negative attitude toward substance use, internalization of adult values, and callous-unemotional tendencies. Children who carried a short serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region gene (5-HTTLPR) allele and were highly anger prone, based on anger observed in laboratory from 25 to 80 months, were classified as high in biobehavioral risk. The remaining children were classified as low in biobehavioral risk. Biobehavioral risk moderated links between parenting history and outcomes. For low-risk children, parenting measures were unrelated to outcomes. For children high in biobehavioral risk, variations in positive parenting predicted cooperation with monitoring and negative attitude toward substance use, and variations in power-assertive parenting predicted internalization of adult values and callous-unemotional tendencies. Suboptimal parenting combined with high biobehavioral risk resulted in the poorest outcomes. The effect for attitude toward substance use supported differential susceptibility: children high in biobehavioral risk who received optimal parenting had a more adaptive outcome than their low-risk peers. The remaining effects were consistent with diathesis-stress.

  4. Neuromuscular adaptations during combined strength and endurance training in endurance runners: maximal versus explosive strength training or a mix of both.

    PubMed

    Taipale, R S; Mikkola, J; Vesterinen, V; Nummela, A; Häkkinen, K

    2013-02-01

    This study compared the effects of mixed maximal strength and explosive strength training with maximal strength training and explosive strength training combined with endurance training over an 8-week training intervention. Male subjects (age 21-45 years) were divided into three strength training groups, maximal (MAX, n = 11), explosive (EXP, 10) and mixed maximal and explosive (MIX, 9), and a circuit training control group, (CON, 7). Strength training one to two times a week was performed concurrently with endurance training three to four times a week. Significant increases in maximal dynamic strength (1RM), countermovement jump (CMJ), maximal muscle activation during 1RM in MAX and during CMJ in EXP, peak running speed (S (peak)) and running speed at respiratory compensation threshold (RCT(speed)) were observed in MAX, EXP and MIX. Maximal isometric strength and muscle activation, rate of force development (RFD), maximal oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and running economy (RE) at 10 and 12 km hr(-1) did not change significantly. No significant changes were observed in CON in maximal isometric strength, RFD, CMJ or muscle activation, and a significant decrease in 1RM was observed in the final 4 weeks of training. RE in CON did not change significantly, but significant increases were observed in S (peak), RCT(speed) and [Formula: see text] Low volume MAX, EXP and MIX strength training combined with higher volume endurance training over an 8-week intervention produced significant gains in strength, power and endurance performance measures of S (peak) and RCT(speed), but no significant changes were observed between groups.

  5. The LEECH Exoplanet Imaging Survey. Further constraints on the planet architecture of the HR 8799 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, A.-L.; Skemer, A. J.; Hinz, P. M.; Desidera, S.; Esposito, S.; Gratton, R.; Marzari, F.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Biller, B. A.; Defrère, D.; Bailey, V. P.; Leisenring, J. M.; Apai, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Brandner, W.; Buenzli, E.; Claudi, R. U.; Close, L. M.; Crepp, J. R.; De Rosa, R. J.; Eisner, J. A.; Fortney, J. J.; Henning, T.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Kopytova, T. G.; Males, J. R.; Mesa, D.; Morzinski, K. M.; Oza, A.; Patience, J.; Pinna, E.; Rajan, A.; Schertl, D.; Schlieder, J. E.; Su, K. Y. L.; Vaz, A.; Ward-Duong, K.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Astrometric monitoring of directly imaged exoplanets allows the study of their orbital parameters and system architectures. Because most directly imaged planets have long orbital periods (>20 AU), accurate astrometry is challenging when based on data acquired on timescales of a few years and usually with different instruments. The LMIRCam camera on the Large Binocular Telescope is being used for the LBT Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) survey to search for and characterize young and adolescent exoplanets in L' band (3.8 μm), including their system architectures. Aims: We first aim to provide a good astrometric calibration of LMIRCam. Then, we derive new astrometry, test the predictions of the orbital model of 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance proposed for the system, and perform new orbital fitting of the HR 8799 bcde planets. We also present deep limits on a putative fifth planet inside the known planets. Methods: We use observations of HR 8799 and the Θ1 Ori C field obtained during the same run in October 2013. Results: We first characterize the distortion of LMIRCam. We determine a platescale and a true north orientation for the images of 10.707 ± 0.012 mas/pix and -0.430 ± 0.076°, respectively. The errors on the platescale and true north orientation translate into astrometric accuracies at a separation of 1'' of 1.1 mas and 1.3 mas, respectively. The measurements for all planets agree within 3σ with a predicted ephemeris. The orbital fitting based on the new astrometric measurements favors an architecture for the planetary system based on 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance. The detection limits allow us to exclude a fifth planet slightly brighter or more massive than HR 8799 b at the location of the 2:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~9.5 AU) and about twice as bright as HR 8799 cde at the location of the 3:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~7.5 AU). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT

  6. Early-Phase Recovery of Cardiorespiratory Measurements after Maximal Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bellefleur, Marie; Debeaumont, David; Boutry, Alain; Netchitailo, Marie; Cuvelier, Antoine; Muir, Jean-François; Tardif, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study investigated respiratory gas exchanges and heart rate (HR) kinetics during early-phase recovery after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) grouped according to airflow limitation. Methods. Thirty control individuals (control group: CG) and 81 COPD patients (45 with “mild” or “moderate” airflow limitation, COPDI-II, versus 36 with “severe” or “very severe” COPD, COPDIII-IV) performed a maximal CPET. The first 3 min of recovery kinetics was investigated for oxygen uptake (V˙O2), minute ventilation (V˙E), respiratory equivalence, and HR. The time for V˙O2 to reach 25% (T1/4V˙O2) of peak value was also determined and compared. Results. The V˙O2, V˙E, and HR recovery kinetics were significantly slower in both COPD groups than CG (p < 0.05). Moreover, COPDIII-IV group had significantly higher V˙O2 and V˙E during recovery than COPDI-II group (p < 0.05). T1/4V˙O2 significantly differed between groups (p < 0.01; 58 ± 18 s in CG, 79 ± 26 s in COPDI-II group, and 121 ± 34 s in COPDIII-IV) and was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in one second in COPD patients (p < 0.001, r = 0.53) and with peak power output (p < 0.001, r = 0.59). Conclusion. The COPD groups showed slower kinetics in the early recovery period than CG, and the kinetics varied with severity of airflow obstruction. PMID:28018674

  7. Early-Phase Recovery of Cardiorespiratory Measurements after Maximal Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Bellefleur, Marie; Debeaumont, David; Boutry, Alain; Netchitailo, Marie; Cuvelier, Antoine; Muir, Jean-François; Tardif, Catherine; Coquart, Jérémy

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study investigated respiratory gas exchanges and heart rate (HR) kinetics during early-phase recovery after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) grouped according to airflow limitation. Methods. Thirty control individuals (control group: CG) and 81 COPD patients (45 with "mild" or "moderate" airflow limitation, COPDI-II, versus 36 with "severe" or "very severe" COPD, COPDIII-IV) performed a maximal CPET. The first 3 min of recovery kinetics was investigated for oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2), minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), respiratory equivalence, and HR. The time for [Formula: see text]O2 to reach 25% (T1/4[Formula: see text]O2) of peak value was also determined and compared. Results. The [Formula: see text]O2, [Formula: see text], and HR recovery kinetics were significantly slower in both COPD groups than CG (p < 0.05). Moreover, COPDIII-IV group had significantly higher [Formula: see text]O2 and [Formula: see text] during recovery than COPDI-II group (p < 0.05). T1/4[Formula: see text]O2 significantly differed between groups (p < 0.01; 58 ± 18 s in CG, 79 ± 26 s in COPDI-II group, and 121 ± 34 s in COPDIII-IV) and was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in one second in COPD patients (p < 0.001, r = 0.53) and with peak power output (p < 0.001, r = 0.59). Conclusion. The COPD groups showed slower kinetics in the early recovery period than CG, and the kinetics varied with severity of airflow obstruction.

  8. The Near Naked Hairless (HrN) Mutation Disrupts Hair Formation but is not Due to a Mutation in the Hairless Coding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert Edward; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Carpenter, D A; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Michaud III, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-01-01

    Near naked hairless (HrN) is a semi-dominant mutation that arose spontaneously and was suggested by allelism testing to be an allele of mouse Hairless (Hr). HrN mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, as opposed to failure to initiate the first postnatal hair cycle, and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in HrN/HrN mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. HrN/HrN mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to consistently emerge from the hair follicle, while HrN/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in HrN/HrN mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'- UTR and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore HrN does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  9. The near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) mutation disrupts hair formation but is not due to a mutation in the Hairless coding region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert E; Carpenter, Donald A; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Michaud, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-07-01

    Near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) is a semi-dominant, spontaneous mutation that was suggested by allelism testing to be allelic with mouse Hairless (Hr). Hr(N) mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, rather than as an inability to regrow hair after the first catagen and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to emerge consistently from the hair follicle, whereas Hr(N)/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr-coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'-untranslated region, and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore, Hr(N) does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  10. Long-Term Durability Analysis of a 100,000+ Hr Stirling Power Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Bowman, Randy R.; Krause, David L.; Halford, Gary R.

    2000-01-01

    DOE and NASA have identified Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (SRPS) as the power supply for deep space exploration missions the Europa Orbiter and Solar Probe. As a part of this effort, NASA has initiated a long-term durability project for critical hot section components of the Stirling power convertor to qualify flight hardware. This project will develop a life prediction methodology that utilizes short-term (t < 20,000 hr) test data to verify long-term (t > 100,000 hr) design life. The project consists of generating a materials database for the specific heat of alloy, evaluation of critical hermetic sealed joints, life model characterization, and model verification. This paper will describe the qualification methodology being developed and provide a status for this effort.

  11. Human performance and physiological function during a 24-hr exposure to 1 percent bromotrifluoromethane (Halon 1301)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkins, D. S.; Degioanni, J. J.; Tan, M. N.; Davis, J. R.; Pierson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Performance and physiological measurements were obtained from four pairs of men exposed for 24 hr to 1 percent (10,000 ppm) Halon 1301 (CBrF3) and to air with order counterbalanced using a double-blind protocol. Cognitive and motor performance was assessed before, during, and after the exposures, using seven scales of the Automated Portable Testing System, which produced 13 measures of performance. Halon inhalation induced decrements in 2 of the 13 measures, but actual and estimated magnitudes of the decrements were no greater than 5 percent of baseline values. Physiological data obtained before, during, and after the exposures revealed significant changes during Halon inhalation for 6 of the 52 variables assessed; however, all physiological values remained within clinically acceptable limits. No cardiovascular effects were noted. This study demonstrated that exposure to 1 percent Halon 1301 for 24 hr can produce minor disturbance of central nervous system function as assessed by cognitive tasks.

  12. Radio continuum observations of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. A.; Perez, M. R.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    1993-01-01

    Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the two bright Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999 have been carried out at lambda 3.6 and 20 cm. We report the detection of a radio source at lambda 3.6 cm that may be associated with HD 163296. From the peak flux density of 0.39 mJy/beam area, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 1.8 x 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr if the flux is due to free-free emission in an ionized wind with spherical symmetry, assuming a terminal wind velocity of 200 km/s. HR 5999 was not detected at either wavelength. We discuss the results in terms of the stellar-driven and accretion-driven scenarios for line and wind formation in Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  13. Global well-posedness for Schrödinger equation with derivative in H(R)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Changxing; Wu, Yifei; Xu, Guixiang

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation with derivative in H(R). This equation was known to be the local well-posedness for s⩾1/2 > (Takaoka, 1999 [27]), ill-posedness for s<1/2 > (Biagioni and Linares, 2001 [1], etc.) and global well-posedness for s>1/2 > (I-team, 2002 [10]). In this paper, we show that it is global well-posedness in the endpoint space H(R), which remained open previously. The main approach is the third generation I-method combined with a new resonant decomposition technique. The resonant decomposition is applied to control the singularity coming from the resonant interaction.

  14. Frequency analysis of the rapidly oscillating AP star HR 1217 (HD 24712)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.; Seeman, J.

    1983-10-01

    High speed photometric observations of HR 1217 have been obtained during 119 hr on 18 nights in 1981. On five of those nights, contemporaneous observations were obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory which greatly reduce the severe daily aliasing problem in the frequency analysis of this star. A frequency analysis of three nights of data at the phase of pulsation amplitude maximum reveals six nearly uniformly spaced frequencies which are thought to be associated with six consecutive overtones of pulsation. From the frequency ratios, the overtones of the pulsations are estimated at 76 to 81. Pulsation amplitude maximum coincides with magnetic maximum again for these data which, with previous data obtained in 1980 for this star, sets an upper limit of Ck, l at less than or equal to 0.002 at the 3-sigma level of confidence.

  15. Development of 1 L hr-1 scale hydrogen liquefier using Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, J. H.; Karng, S. W.; Garceau, N.; Jang, Y. H.; Lim, C. M.; Kim, S. Y.; Oh, I. H.

    2014-01-01

    Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) have collaborated to develop a demonstration-scale hydrogen liquefier for future liquid hydrogen research in Korea. A 1 L hr-1 liquefaction rate, direct-cooling type hydrogen liquefier using a commercially available GM cryocooler has been designed, fabricated, and tested at KIST. The liquefier consists of a GM cryocooler, finned heat pipe, liquid nitrogen precooler, ortho-para hydrogen converter, and vacuum jacketed internal storage tank. The system successfully demonstrated more than 1 L hr-1 of hydrogen liquefaction rate from ambient temperature gas. A detailed design method, loss analysis, overview of component fabrication, and experimental results are discussed in this paper.

  16. Inspection results of advanced (sub-50nm design rule) reticles using the TeraScanHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sier, Jean-Paul; Broadbent, William; Yu, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Results from the recently available TeraScanHR reticle inspection system were published in early 2007. These results showed excellent inspection capability for 45nm logic and 5xnm half-pitch memory advanced production reticles, thus meeting the industry need for the mid-2007 start of production. The system has been in production use since that time. In early 2007, some evidence was shown of capability to inspect reticles for 32nm logic and sub-50nm half-pitch memory, but the results were incomplete due to the limited availability of such reticles. However, more of these advanced reticles have become available since that time. In this paper, inspection results of these advanced reticles from various leading-edge reticle manufacturers using the TeraScanHR are shown. These results indicate that the system has the capability to provide the needed inspection sensitivity for continued development work to support the industry roadmap.

  17. Trabecular bone class mapping across resolutions: translating methods from HR-pQCT to clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentinitsch, Alexander; Fischer, Lukas; Patsch, Janina M.; Bauer, Jan; Kainberger, Franz; Langs, Georg; DiFranco, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of 3D bone microarchitecture in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has shown promise in fracture risk assessment and biomechanics, but is limited to the distal radius and tibia. Trabecular microarchitecture classes (TMACs), based on voxel-wise clustering texture and structure tensor features in HRpQCT, is extended in this paper to quantify trabecular bone classes in clinical multi-detector CT (MDCT) images. Our comparison of TMACs in 12 cadaver radii imaged using both HRpQCT and MDCT yields a mean Dice score of up to 0.717+/-0.40 and visually concordant bone quality maps. Further work to develop clinically viable bone quantitative imaging using HR-pQCT validation could have a significant impact on overall bone health assessment.

  18. Probing Covalency in the UO3 Polymorphs by U M4 edge HR- XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podkovyrina, Y.; Pidchenko, I.; Prüßmann, T.; Bahl, S.; Göttlicher, J.; Soldatov, A.; Vitova, T.

    2016-05-01

    Local atomic and electronic structure investigations of uranium trioxide (UO3) crystalline phases performed by the U M4 edge HR-XANES technique is presented. The experimental U M4 edge HR-XANES spectra of α-UO3, β-UO3 and γ-UO3 polymorphic phases are compared with spectra of uranate (CaU2O7) and uranyl (UO3•1-2(H2O)) compounds. We describe a finger print approach valuable for characterization of variations of U-O axial bond lengths. Theoretical calculations of spectra using full-multiple-scattering theory (FEFF9.6 code) are performed. We have tested and selected input parameters, which provide best agreement between experimental and calculated spectra.

  19. HR 7920: a very bright new Delta Scuti star with possible Gamma Doradus variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, C.; van Wyk, F.; Laney, C. D.; Kilkenny, D.

    2017-04-01

    We present photometric and high-dispersion spectroscopic measurements that show HR 7920 is a periodic variable. The photometry reveals at least four frequencies higher that 10 d-1, two of which are also probably present in the radial velocity variations. The frequencies are in a range typical of δ Scuti star pulsations. A further low frequency of about 2.8 d-1 may be present in both radial velocities and photometry; if real, this points to γ Doradus variability, which would make HR 7920 a hybrid pulsator. An attempt is made to identify the modes of the δ Scuti pulsations, which include both radial and non-radial modes. A new rotational velocity of 75 km s-1 is derived from co-added spectra, contrasting with published values in the range 128-150 km s-1.

  20. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of the Extrasolar Planet HR 8799 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Cushing, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We present 2.12-2.23 μm high contrast integral field spectroscopy of the extrasolar planet HR 8799 b. Our observations were obtained with OSIRIS on the Keck II telescope and sample the 2.2 μm CH4 feature, which is useful for spectral classification and as a temperature diagnostic for ultracool objects. The spectrum of HR 8799 b is relatively featureless, with little or no methane absorption, and does not exhibit the strong CH4 seen in T dwarfs of similar absolute magnitudes. The spectrum is consistent with field objects from early-L to T4 (3σ confidence level), with a best-fitting type of T2. A similar analysis of the published 1-4 μm photometry shows the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) matches L5-L8 field dwarfs, especially the reddest known objects which are believed to be young and/or very dusty. Overall, we find that HR 8799 b has a spectral type consistent with L5-T2, although its SED is atypical compared to most field objects. We fit the 2.2 μm spectrum and the infrared SED using the Hubeny & Burrows, Burrows et al., and Ames-Dusty model atmosphere grids, which incorporate non-equilibrium chemistry, non-solar metallicities, and clear and cloudy variants. No models agree with all of the data, but those with intermediate clouds produce significantly better fits. The largest discrepancy occurs in the J band, which is highly suppressed in HR 8799 b. Models with high eddy diffusion coefficients and high metallicities are somewhat preferred over those with equilibrium chemistry and solar metallicity. The best-fitting effective temperatures range from 1300 to 1700 K with radii between ~0.3 and 0.5 R Jup. These values are inconsistent with evolutionary model-derived values of 800-900 K and 1.1-1.3 R Jup based on the luminosity of HR 8799 b and the age of HR 8799, a discrepancy that probably results from imperfect atmospheric models or the limited range of physical parameters covered by the models. The low temperature inferred from evolutionary models

  1. Impacts of Modeled Provisions of H.R. 6 EH: The Energy Policy Act of 2005

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This report responds to a May 2, 2005, request by Chairman Pete Domenici and Ranking Member Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for an assessment of the energy supply, consumption, import, price, and macroeconomic impacts of H.R. 6 EH, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on April 21, 2005.

  2. Sensitivity of mouse Skh:HR-2 to ultraviolet radiation: melanocyte inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.; Gardner, P.A.; Reed, J.C.

    1987-03-01

    The hairless mouse, Skh:HR-2, was exposed to doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation known to induce skin pigmentation. Three parameters associated with perturbations in skin pigmentation were monitored following UV exposure. These include spectroscopy (skin darkness), histology (melanocyte density), and biochemistry (melanin). Within 90 min of UV exposure, the skin became lighter. This was associated with a reduction of quantifiable melanin and the inactivation of epidermal melanocytes.

  3. Hearing on National Youth Corps, H.R. 18 and H.R. 460. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document contains transcripts of oral and written testimony from witnesses at a hearing on H.R. 18 and H.R. 460, which would create a National Youth Corps. The National Youth Corps proposal links two other proposals, the Conservation Corps bill and the National Youth Service bill, into a comprehensive bill to provide alternatives for youth in…

  4. Redundant ecdysis regulatory functions of three nuclear receptor HR3 isoforms in the direct-developing insect Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josefa; Martín, David; Bellés, Xavier

    2007-03-01

    In hemimetabolous insects, the molecular basis of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-triggered genetic hierarchy is practically unknown. In the cockroach Blattella germanica, we had previously characterized one isoform of the ecdysone receptor, BgEcR-A, and two isoforms of its heterodimeric partner, BgRXR-S and BgRXR-L. One of the early-late genes of the 20E-triggered genetic hierarchy, is HR3. In the present paper, we report the discovery of three isoforms of HR3 in B. germanica, that were named BgHR3-A, BgHR3-B(1) and BgHR3-B(2). Expression studies in prothoracic gland, epidermis and fat body indicate that the expression of the three isoforms coincides with the peak of circulating ecdysteroids at each nymphal instar. Experiments in vitro with fat body tissue have shown that 20E induces the expression of BgHR3 isoforms, and that incubation with 20E and the protein inhibitor cycloheximide does not inhibit the induction, which indicates that the effect of 20E on BgHR3 activation is direct. This has been further confirmed by RNAi in vivo of BgEcR-A, which has shown that this nuclear receptor is required to fully activate the expression of BgHR3. RNAi has been also used to demonstrate the functions of BgHR3 in ecdysis. Nymphs with silenced BgHR3 completed the apolysis but were unable to ecdyse (they had duplicated and superimposed the mouth parts, the hypopharinge, the tracheal system and the cuticle layers). This indicates that BgHR3 is directly involved in ecdysis. Finally, RNAi of specific isoforms has showed that they are functionally redundant, at least regarding the ecdysis process.

  5. A possible T Tauri companion to the long-term photometric variable HR 6000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ancker, M. E.; de Winter, D.; The, P. S.

    1996-09-01

    From Stroemgren uvby photometry, obtained during the last 14 years, we demonstrate that HR 6000 shows long-term photometric variations with a small (about 0.03mag in u, 0.02mag in v and 0.01mag in b) amplitude. Whereas previous authors classified HR 6000 spectroscopically as A0/3 IIIp and photometrically as B7, we conclude that the observed properties of this system may be explained by inferring that HR 6000 is in fact a binary system, consisting of a B6 V star and a T Tauri companion. The combined spectrum of these two components may easily have been mistaken for a chemically peculiar early A-type star. This scenario also explains the observed small amount of infrared excess and the observed ROSAT X-ray flux of this system as arising from a T Tauri companion. Other traces of this companion have not been detected in our studies. Detection of the T Tauri companion with near-IR spectroscopy may be possible due to the significant contribution of the companion to the total flux at these wavelengths.

  6. A search for circumstellar dust around HR 10, a proposed Beta Pictoris star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Grady, C. A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.

    1991-01-01

    Archival IRAS data and recent IUE observations of the A shell star HR 10 (HD 256) are presented. HR 10 is detected in the IRAS Faint Source Survey and ADDSCAN data at 12 and 25 microns and marginally detected at 60 microns. The IUE data indicate a spectral type of A2 with 0.1 mag of UV selective extinction following a galactic average extinction law. HR 10 shows an infrared excess, compared to normal A stars of the same spectral type, beginning at 12 microns and extending to longer wavelengths. The IR excess is consistent with free-free emission and a suggestion of CS dust. The IR colors for this star differ significantly from those of Beta Pic and are closer to those of Vega. The absence of circumstellar selective extinction shortward of 3200 A suggests that the circumstellar grain size distribution does not resemble that of the interstellar medium, but may be more like the grains around Vega and Beta Pic.

  7. P/2006 HR30 (Siding Spring): A Low-activity Comet in Near-Earth Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael D.; Bauer, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The low cometary activity of P/2006 HR30 (Siding Spring) allowed a unique opportunity to study the nucleus of a periodic comet while near perihelion. P/2006 HR30 was originally targeted as a potential extinct comet, and we measured spectral reflectance and dust production using long-slit CCD spectroscopy and wide-field imaging obtained at the Palomar Mountain 200 inch telescope on 2006 August 3 and 4. The dust production Afp = 19.7 +/- 0.4 cm and mass-loss rate Q(dust) 4.1 +/- 0.1 kg/sec of the comet were approximately 2 orders of magnitude dust less than 1P/Halley at similar heliocentric distance. The VRI colors derived from the spectral reflectance were compared to Kuiper Belt objects, Centaurs, and other cometary nuclei. We found that the spectrum of P/2006 HR30 was consistent with other comets. However, the outer solar system bodies have a color distribution statistically distinct from cometary nuclei. It is our conjecture that cometary activity, most likely the reaccretion of ejected cometary dust, tends to moderate and mute the visible colors of the surface of cometary nuclei.

  8. Pace's Maxims for Homegrown Library Projects. Coming Full Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses six maxims by which to run library automation. The following maxims are discussed: (1) Solve only known problems; (2) Avoid changing data to fix display problems; (3) Aut viam inveniam aut faciam; (4) If you cannot make it yourself, buy something; (5) Kill the alligator closest to the boat; and (6) Just because yours is…

  9. The Negative Consequences of Maximizing in Friendship Selection.

    PubMed

    Newman, David B; Schug, Joanna; Yuki, Masaki; Yamada, Junko; Nezlek, John B

    2017-02-27

    Previous studies have shown that the maximizing orientation, reflecting a motivation to select the best option among a given set of choices, is associated with various negative psychological outcomes. In the present studies, we examined whether these relationships extend to friendship selection and how the number of options for friends moderated these effects. Across 5 studies, maximizing in selecting friends was negatively related to life satisfaction, positive affect, and self-esteem, and was positively related to negative affect and regret. In Study 1, a maximizing in selecting friends scale was created, and regret mediated the relationships between maximizing and well-being. In a naturalistic setting in Studies 2a and 2b, the tendency to maximize among those who participated in the fraternity and sorority recruitment process was negatively related to satisfaction with their selection, and positively related to regret and negative affect. In Study 3, daily levels of maximizing were negatively related to daily well-being, and these relationships were mediated by daily regret. In Study 4, we extended the findings to samples from the U.S. and Japan. When participants who tended to maximize were faced with many choices, operationalized as the daily number of friends met (Study 3) and relational mobility (Study 4), the opportunities to regret a decision increased and further diminished well-being. These findings imply that, paradoxically, attempts to maximize when selecting potential friends is detrimental to one's well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Detrimental Relations of Maximization with Academic and Career Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahling, Jason J.; Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    Maximization refers to a decision-making style that involves seeking the single best option when making a choice, which is generally dysfunctional because people are limited in their ability to rationally evaluate all options and identify the single best outcome. The vocational consequences of maximization are examined in two samples, college…

  11. Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph Observations of Procyon and HR1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Harper, Graham M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Dempsey, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) observations have revealed the presence of broad wings in the transition-region lines of AU Mic and Capella. It has been proposed that these wings are signatures of microflares in the transition regions of these stars and that the solar analog for this phenomenon might be the 'transition region explosive events' discussed by Dere, Bartoe, & Brueckner. We have analyzed GHRS observations of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and HR 1099 (K1 IV + G5 IV) to search for broad wings in the UV emission lines of these stars. We find that the transition-region lines of HR 1099, which are emitted almost entirely by the K1 star, do indeed have broad wings that are even more prominent than those of AU Mic and Capella. This is consistent with the association of the broad wings with microflaring since HR 1099 is a very active binary system. In contrast, the transition-region lines of Procyon, a relatively inactive star, do not show evidence for broad wings, with the possible exception of N v lambda1239. However, Procyon's lines do appear to have excess emission in their blue wings. Linsky et al. found no evidence for broad wings in Capella's chromospheric lines, but we find that the Mg II resonance lines of HR 1099 do have broad wings. The striking resemblance between HR 1099's Mg II and C iv lines suggests that the Mg II line profiles may be regulated by turbulent processes similar to those that control the transition-region line profiles. If this is the case, microflaring may be occurring in the K1 star's chromosphere as well as in its transition region. However, radiative transfer calculations suggest that the broad wings of the Mg II lines can also result from normal chromospheric opacity effects rather than pure turbulence. The prominence of broad wings in the transition region and perhaps even chromospheric lines of active stars suggests that microflaring is very prevalent in the outer atmospheres of active stars.

  12. Multi-element abundance Doppler imaging of the rapidly oscillating Ap star HR 3831

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochukhov, O.; Drake, N. A.; Piskunov, N.; de la Reza, R.

    2004-09-01

    We investigate magnetic field geometry and surface distribution of chemical elements in the rapidly oscillating Ap star HR 3831. Results of the model atmosphere analysis of the spectra of this star are combined with the Hipparcos parallax and evolutionary models to obtain new accurate estimates of the fundamental stellar parameters: Teffv{7650}, log L/L⊙=1.09, M/M⊙= 1.77 and an inclination angle i=68° of the stellar axis of rotation. We find that the variation of the longitudinal magnetic field of HR 3831 and the results of our analysis of the magnetic intensification of Fe I lines in the spectrum of this star are consistent with a dipolar magnetic topology with a magnetic obliquity β=87° and a polar strength Bp=2.5 kG. We apply a multi-element abundance Doppler imaging inversion code for the analysis of the spectrum variability of HR 3831, and recover surface distributions of 17 chemical elements, including Li, C, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ba, Y, Pr, Nd, Eu. Our study represents the most thorough examination of the surface chemical structure in a magnetic Ap star and provides important observational constraints for modelling radiative diffusion in magnetic stars. The exceedingly high quality of some of our spectroscopic data allowed us to reconstruct unprecedented details of abundance distributions, demonstrating a high level of complexity in the surface structure down to the resolution limit of the Doppler maps. The Doppler imaging analysis of HR 3831 forms a basis for subsequent detailed observational investigations and theoretical modelling of non-radial oscillations in this star. We discuss the compound effect of the chemical nonuniformities and pulsational velocity field on the rapid line profile variations, and assess the possibility of identifying pulsation modes by using spatial filtering produced by an inhomogeneous abundance distribution. The results of our study of the surface chemical structure suggest that differences in

  13. Understanding the effectiveness of precursor reductions in lowering 8-hr ozone concentrations--Part II. The eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Steven D; Blanchard, Charles L; Ziman, Stephen D

    2004-11-01

    Analyses of ozone (O3) measurements in conjunction with photochemical modeling were used to assess the feasibility of attaining the federal 8-hr O3 standard in the eastern United States. Various combinations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission reductions were effective in lowering modeled peak 1-hr O3 concentrations. VOC emissions reductions alone had only a modest impact on modeled peak 8-hr O3 concentrations. Anthropogenic NOx emissions reductions of 46-86% of 1996 base case values were needed to reach the level of the 8-hr standard in some areas. As NOx emissions are reduced, O3 production efficiency increases, which accounts for the less than proportional response of calculated 8-hr O3 levels. Such increases in O3 production efficiency also were noted in previous modeling work for central California. O3 production in some urban core areas, such as New York City and Chicago, IL, was found to be VOC-limited. In these areas, moderate NOx emissions reductions may be accompanied by increases in peak 8-hr O3 levels. The findings help to explain differences in historical trends in 1- and 8-hr O3 levels and have serious implications for the feasibility of attaining the 8-hr O3 standard in several areas of the eastern United States.

  14. Molecular basis for hair loss in mice carrying a novel nonsense mutation (Hrrh-R ) in the hairless gene (Hr).

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sundberg, J P; Das, S; Carpenter, D; Cain, K T; Michaud, E J; Voy, B H

    2010-01-01

    Animal models carrying mutations in the hairless (Hr) gene provide a rich resource for study of hair follicle biology. A spontaneous mouse mutant with a phenotype strikingly similar to rhino mutants of Hr arose spontaneously in the mouse facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sequence analysis of Hr in these mutants uncovered a nonsense mutation in exon 12, designated as Hr(rh-R) (rhino, Oak Ridge). The mutation led to significant reduction in Hr mRNA levels, predicted to be due to nonsense-mediated decay. Histological analysis indicated dilated hair follicle infundibula at 14 days of age that rapidly became filled with cornified material. Microarray analyses revealed that expression levels of many genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal regeneration, and wound healing were significantly upregulated before morphological detection of the phenotype, suggesting their role in onset of the Hr(rh-R) phenotype. Identification of this new Hr allele and the underlying molecular alterations allows further understanding of the role of Hr in hair follicle biology.

  15. General review of maximal aerobic velocity measurement at laboratory. Proposition of a new simplified protocol for maximal aerobic velocity assessment.

    PubMed

    Berthon, P; Fellmann, N

    2002-09-01

    The maximal aerobic velocity concept developed since eighties is considered as either the minimal velocity which elicits the maximal aerobic consumption or as the "velocity associated to maximal oxygen consumption". Different methods for measuring maximal aerobic velocity on treadmill in laboratory conditions have been elaborated, but all these specific protocols measure V(amax) either during a maximal oxygen consumption test or with an association of such a test. An inaccurate method presents a certain number of problems in the subsequent use of the results, for example in the elaboration of training programs, in the study of repeatability or in the determination of individual limit time. This study analyzes 14 different methods to understand their interests and limits in view to propose a general methodology for measuring V(amax). In brief, the test should be progressive and maximal without any rest period and of 17 to 20 min total duration. It should begin with a five min warm-up at 60-70% of the maximal aerobic power of the subjects. The beginning of the trial should be fixed so that four or five steps have to be run. The duration of the steps should be three min with a 1% slope and an increasing speed of 1.5 km x h(-1) until complete exhaustion. The last steps could be reduced at two min for a 1 km x h(-1) increment. The maximal aerobic velocity is adjusted in relation to duration of the last step.

  16. Effects of exercise training on acclimatization to hypoxia: systemic O2 transport during maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Favret, Fabrice; Henderson, Kyle K; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Gonzalez, Norberto C

    2003-10-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxia has minimal effect on maximal O2 uptake (Vo2 max). Prolonged hypoxia shows reductions in cardiac output (Q), maximal heart rate (HR-max), myocardial beta-adrenoceptor (beta-AR) density, and chronotropic response to isoproterenol. This study tested the hypothesis that exercise training (ET), which attenuates beta-AR downregulation, would increase HRmax and Q of acclimatization and result in higher Vo2 max. After 3 wk of ET, rats lived at an inspired Po2 of 70 Torr for 10 days (acclimatized trained rats) or remained in normoxia, while both groups continued to train in normoxia. Controls were sedentary acclimatized and nonacclimatized rats. All rats exercised maximally in normoxia and hypoxia (inspired Po2 of 70 Torr). Myocardial beta-AR density and the chronotropic response to isoproterenol were reduced, and myocardial cholinergic receptor density was increased after acclimatization; all of these receptor changes were reversed by ET. Normoxic Vo2 max (in ml.min-1.kg-1) was 95.8 +/- 1.0 in acclimatized trained (n = 6), 87.7 +/- 1.7 in nonacclimatized trained (P < 0.05, n = 6), 74.2 +/- 1.4 in acclimatized sedentary (n = 6, P < 0.05), and 72.5 +/- 1.2 in nonacclimatized sedentary (n = 8; P > 0.05 acclimatized sedentary vs. nonacclimatized sedentary). A similar distribution of Vo2 max values occurred in hypoxic exercise. Q was highest in trained acclimatized and nonacclimatized, intermediate in nonacclimatized sedentary, and lowest in acclimatized sedentary groups. ET preserved Q in acclimatized rats thanks to maintenance of HRmax as well as of maximal stroke volume. Q preservation, coupled with a higher arterial O2 content, resulted in the acclimatized trained rats having the highest convective O2 transport and Vo2 max. These results show that ET attenuates beta-AR downregulation and preserves Q and Vo2 max after acclimatization, and support the idea that beta-AR downregulation partially contributes to the limitation of Vo2 max after

  17. Can monkeys make investments based on maximized pay-off?

    PubMed

    Steelandt, Sophie; Dufour, Valérie; Broihanne, Marie-Hélène; Thierry, Bernard

    2011-03-10

    Animals can maximize benefits but it is not known if they adjust their investment according to expected pay-offs. We investigated whether monkeys can use different investment strategies in an exchange task. We tested eight capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and thirteen macaques (Macaca fascicularis, Macaca tonkeana) in an experiment where they could adapt their investment to the food amounts proposed by two different experimenters. One, the doubling partner, returned a reward that was twice the amount given by the subject, whereas the other, the fixed partner, always returned a constant amount regardless of the amount given. To maximize pay-offs, subjects should invest a maximal amount with the first partner and a minimal amount with the second. When tested with the fixed partner only, one third of monkeys learned to remove a maximal amount of food for immediate consumption before investing a minimal one. With both partners, most subjects failed to maximize pay-offs by using different decision rules with each partner' quality. A single Tonkean macaque succeeded in investing a maximal amount to one experimenter and a minimal amount to the other. The fact that only one of over 21 subjects learned to maximize benefits in adapting investment according to experimenters' quality indicates that such a task is difficult for monkeys, albeit not impossible.

  18. Oxygen uptake in maximal effort constant rate and interval running.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Daniel; O'Brien, Brendan J; Clark, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in average VO2 of maximal effort interval running to maximal effort constant rate running at lactate threshold matched for time. The average VO2 and distance covered of 10 recreational male runners (VO2max: 4158 ± 390 mL · min(-1)) were compared between a maximal effort constant-rate run at lactate threshold (CRLT), a maximal effort interval run (INT) consisting of 2 min at VO2max speed with 2 minutes at 50% of VO2 repeated 5 times, and a run at the average speed sustained during the interval run (CR submax). Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence intervals. The average VO2 for INT, 3451 (3269-3633) mL · min(-1), 83% VO2max, was not significantly different to CRLT, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 84% VO2max, but both were significantly higher than CR sub-max, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 76% VO2max. The distance covered was significantly greater in CLRT, 4431 (4202-3731) metres, compared to INT and CR sub-max, 4070 (3831-4309) metres. The novel finding was that a 20-minute maximal effort constant rate run uses similar amounts of oxygen as a 20-minute maximal effort interval run despite the greater distance covered in the maximal effort constant-rate run.

  19. Does the incremental shuttle walk test require maximal effort in young obese women?

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, S.P.; Trimer, R.; Di Thommazo-Luporini, L.; Dourado, V.Z.; Bonjorno-Junior, J.C.; Oliveira, C.R.; Arena, R.; Borghi-Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with a multifaceted treatment approach that includes nutritional counseling, structured exercise training, and increased daily physical activity. Increased body mass elicits higher cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic demands to varying degrees during exercise. With functional capacity assessment, this variability can be evaluated so individualized guidance for exercise training and daily physical activity can be provided. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic responses obtained during a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX) on a treadmill to responses obtained by the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) in obese women and to propose a peak oxygen consumption (VO2) prediction equation through variables obtained during the ISWT. Forty obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) performed one treadmill CPX and two ISWTs. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP) and perceived exertion by the Borg scale were measured at rest, during each stage of the exercise protocol, and throughout the recovery period. The predicted maximal heart rate (HRmax) was calculated (210 – age in years) (16) and compared to the HR response during the CPX. Peak VO2 obtained during CPX correlated significantly (P<0.05) with ISWT peak VO2 (r=0.79) as well as ISWT distance (r=0.65). The predictive model for CPX peak VO2, using age and ISWT distance explained 67% of the variability. The current study indicates the ISWT may be used to predict aerobic capacity in obese women when CPX is not a viable option. PMID:27409333

  20. On the Ribosomal Density that Maximizes Protein Translation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    During mRNA translation, several ribosomes attach to the same mRNA molecule simultaneously translating it into a protein. This pipelining increases the protein translation rate. A natural and important question is what ribosomal density maximizes the protein translation rate. Using mathematical models of ribosome flow along both a linear and a circular mRNA molecules we prove that typically the steady-state protein translation rate is maximized when the ribosomal density is one half of the maximal possible density. We discuss the implications of our results to endogenous genes under natural cellular conditions and also to synthetic biology. PMID:27861564

  1. Building hospital TQM teams: effective polarity analysis and maximization.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J B

    1996-09-01

    Building and maintaining teams require careful attention to and maximization of such polar opposites (¿polarities¿) as individual and team, directive and participatory leadership, task and process, and stability and change. Analyzing systematic elements of any polarity and listing blocks, supports, and flexible ways to maximize it will prevent the negative consequences that occur when treating a polarity like a solvable problem. Flexible, well-timed shifts from pole to pole result in the maximization of upside and minimization of downside consequences.

  2. Atmospheric retrieval analysis of the directly imaged exoplanet HR 8799b

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Min; Heng, Kevin; Irwin, Patrick G. J. E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch

    2013-12-01

    Directly imaged exoplanets are unexplored laboratories for the application of the spectral and temperature retrieval method, where the chemistry and composition of their atmospheres are inferred from inverse modeling of the available data. As a pilot study, we focus on the extrasolar gas giant HR 8799b, for which more than 50 data points are available. We upgrade our non-linear optimal estimation retrieval method to include a phenomenological model of clouds that requires the cloud optical depth and monodisperse particle size to be specified. Previous studies have focused on forward models with assumed values of the exoplanetary properties; there is no consensus on the best-fit values of the radius, mass, surface gravity, and effective temperature of HR 8799b. We show that cloud-free models produce reasonable fits to the data if the atmosphere is of super-solar metallicity and non-solar elemental abundances. Intermediate cloudy models with moderate values of the cloud optical depth and micron-sized particles provide an equally reasonable fit to the data and require a lower mean molecular weight. We report our best-fit values for the radius, mass, surface gravity, and effective temperature of HR 8799b. The mean molecular weight is about 3.8, while the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is about unity due to the prevalence of carbon monoxide. Our study emphasizes the need for robust claims about the nature of an exoplanetary atmosphere to be based on analyses involving both photometry and spectroscopy and inferred from beyond a few photometric data points, such as are typically reported for hot Jupiters.

  3. The luminous blue variable HR Carinae has a partner. Discovery of a companion with the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, Henri M. J.; Rivinius, Thomas; Mérand, Antoine; Mehner, Andrea; LeBouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Pourbaix, Dimitri; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Martayan, Christophe; Guieu, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    Luminous blue variables (LBVs) are massive stars caught in a post-main sequence phase, during which they lose a significant amount of mass. Since, on one hand, it is thought that the majority of massive stars are close binaries that will interact during their lifetime, and on the other, the most dramatic example of an LBV, η Car, is a binary, it would be useful to find other binary LBVs. We present here interferometric observations of the LBV HR Car done with the AMBER and PIONIER instruments attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our observations, spanning two years, clearly reveal that HR Car is a binary star. It is not yet possible to fully constrain the orbit, and the orbital period may lie between a few years and several hundred years. We derive a radius for the primary in the system and possibly also resolve the companion. The luminosity ratio in the H-band between the two components is changing with time, going from about 6 to 9. We also tentatively detect the presence of some background flux which remained at the 2% level until January 2016, but then increased to 6% in April 2016. Our AMBER results show that the emission line-forming region of Brγ is more extended than the continuum-emitting region as seen by PIONIER and may indicate some wind-wind interaction. Most importantly, we constrain the total masses of both components, with the most likely range being 33.6 M⊙ and 45 M⊙. Our results show that the LBV HR Car is possibly an η Car analog binary system with smaller masses, with variable components, and further monitoring of this object is definitively called for. Based on data obtained with ESO programmes 092.C-0243, 092.D-0289, 092.D-0296, 094.D-0069, and 596.D-0335.

  4. The Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign: The Offset Ring of HR 4796 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Close, Laird M.; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Toomey, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    We present J, H, CH4 short (1.578 micrometers), CH4 long (1.652 micrometers) and K(sub s)-band images of the dust ring around the 10 Myr old star HR 4796 A obtained using the Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the Gemini-South 8.1 m Telescope. Our images clearly show for the first time the position of the star relative to its circumstellar ring thanks to NICI's translucent focal plane occulting mask. We employ a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method to constrain the offset vector between the two. The resulting probability distribution shows that the ring center is offset from the star by 16.7 +/- 1.3 milliarcseconds along a position angle of 26 +/- 3deg, along the PA of the ring, 26.47 +/- 0.04deg. We find that the size of this offset is not large enough to explain the brightness asymmetry of the ring. The ring is measured to have mostly red reflectivity across the JHKs filters, which seems to indicate micron-sized grains. Just like Neptune's 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances delineate the inner and outer edges of the classical Kuiper belt, we find that the radial extent of the HR 4796 A and the Fomalhaut rings could correspond to the 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances of hypothetical planets at 54.7 AU and 97.7 AU in the two systems, respectively. A planet orbiting HR 4796 A at 54.7 AU would have to be less massive than 1.6 Jup mass so as not to widen the ring too much by stirring.

  5. Dufulin Activates HrBP1 to Produce Antiviral Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Zeng, Mengjiao; Song, Baoan; Hou, Chengrui; Hu, Deyu; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Zhenchao; Fan, Huitao; Bi, Liang; Liu, Jiaju; Yu, Dandan; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Dufulin is a new antiviral agent that is highly effective against plant viruses and acts by activating systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. In recent years, it has been used widely to prevent and control tobacco and rice viral diseases in China. However, its targets and mechanism of action are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) techniques were combined with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the target of Dufulin. More than 40 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5 fold or ≤1.5 fold) upon Dufulin treatment in Nicotiana tabacum K326. Based on annotations in the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, these proteins were found to be related to disease resistance. Directed acyclic graph (DAG) analysis of the various pathways demonstrated harpin binding protein-1 (HrBP1) as the target of action of Dufulin. Additionally, western blotting, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and real time PCR analyses were also conducted to identify the specific mechanism of action of Dufulin. Our results show that activation of HrBP1 triggers the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and thereby produces antiviral responses in the plant host. A protective assay based on lesion counting further confirmed the antiviral activity of Dufulin. Conclusion This study identified HrBP1 as a target protein of Dufulin and that Dufulin can activate the SA signaling pathway to induce host plants to generate antiviral responses. PMID:22662252

  6. RECORD processing - A robust pathway to component-resolved HR-PGSE NMR diffusometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilbs, Peter

    2010-12-01

    It is demonstrated that very robust spectral component separation can be achieved through global least-squares CORE data analysis of automatically or manually selected spectral regions in complex NMR spectra in a high-resolution situation. This procedure (acronym RECORD) only takes a few seconds and quite significantly improves the effective signal/noise of the experiment as compared to individual frequency channel fitting, like in the generic HR-DOSY approach or when using basic peak height or integral fitting. Results from RECORD processing can be further used as starting value estimates for subsequent CORE analysis of spectral data with higher degree of spectral overlap.

  7. COMPASS Final Report: Lunar Network Satellite-High Rate (LNS-HR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    Two design options were explored to address the requirement to provide lunar piloted missions with continuous communications for outpost and sortie missions. Two unique orbits were assessed, along with the appropriate spacecraft (S/C) to address these requirements. Both constellations (with only two S/C each) provide full time coverage (24 hr/7 d) for a south polar base and also provide continuous 7 day coverage for sorties for specified sites and periodic windows. Thus a two-satellite system can provide full coverage for sorties for selected windows of opportunity without reconfiguring the constellation.

  8. Structural analysis of cortical porosity applied to HR-pQCT data

    SciTech Connect

    Tjong, Willy Nirody, Jasmine Burghardt, Andrew J. Carballido-Gamio, Julio Kazakia, Galateia J.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The investigation of cortical porosity is an important aspect of understanding biological, pathoetiological, and biomechanical processes occurring within the skeleton. With the emergence of HR-pQCT as a noninvasive tool suitable for clinical use, cortical porosity at appendicular sites can be directly visualizedin vivo. The aim of this study was to introduce a novel topological analysis of the cortical pore network for HR-pQCT data and determine the influence of resolution on measures of cortical pore network microstructure and topology. Methods: Cadaveric radii were scanned using HR-pQCT at two different voxel sizes (41 and 82μm) and also using μCT at a voxel size of 18 μm. HR-pQCT and μCT image sets were spatially coregistered. Segmentation and quantification of cortical porosity (Ct.Po) and mean pore diameter (Ct.Po.Dm) were achieved using an established extended cortical analysis technique. Topological classification of individual pores was performed using topology-preserving skeletonization and multicolor dilation algorithms. Based on the pore skeleton topological classification, the following parameters were quantified: total number of planar surface-skeleton canals (N.Slabs), tubular curve-skeleton canals (N.Tubes), and junction elements (N.Junctions), mean slab volume (Slab.Vol), mean tube volume (Tube.Vol), mean slab orientation (Slab.θ), mean tube orientation (Tube.θ), N.Slabs/N.Tubes, and integral (total) slab volume/integral tube volume (iSlab.Vol/iTube.Vol). An in vivo reproducibility study was also conducted to assess short-term precision of the topology parameters. Precision error was characterized using root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV%). Results: Correlations toμCT values for Ct.Po were significant for both the 41 and 82 μm HR-pQCT data (41: r{sup 2} = 0.82, p < 0.001, 82: r{sup 2} = 0.75, p < 0.001). For Ct.Po.Dm, only the 41 μm data were significantly predictive of μCT values (r{sup 2} = 0.72, p < 0.01) Data at

  9. MULTI-CENTER PRECISION OF CORTICAL AND TRABECULAR BONE QUALITY MEASURES ASSESSED BY HR-PQCT

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Andrew J.; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Kazakia, Galateia J.; Boutroy, Stephanie; Engelke, Klaus; Patsch, Janina M.; Valentinitsch, Alexander; Liu, Danmei; Szabo, Eva; Bogado, Cesar E.; Zanchetta, Maria Belen; McKay, Heather A.; Shane, Elizabeth; Boyd, Steven K.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Chapurlat, Roland; Khosla, Sundeep; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has recently been introduced as a clinical research tool for in vivo assessment of bone quality. The utility of this technique to address important skeletal health questions requires translation to standardized multi-center data pools. Our goal was to evaluate the feasibility of pooling data in multi-center HR-pQCT imaging trials. Reproducibility imaging experiments were performed using structure and composition-realistic phantoms constructed from cadaveric radii. Single-center precision was determined by repeat scanning over short (<72hrs), intermediate (3–5mo), and long-term intervals (28mo). Multi-center precision was determined by imaging the phantoms at nine different HR-pQCT centers. Least significant change (LSC) and root mean squared coefficient of variation (RMSCV) for each interval and across centers was calculated for bone density, geometry, microstructure, and biomechanical parameters. Single-center short-term RMSCVs were <1% for all parameters except Ct.Th (1.1%), Ct.Th.SD (2.6%), Tb.Sp.SD (1.8%), and porosity measures (6–8%). Intermediate-term RMSCVs were generally not statistically different from short-term values. Long-term variability was significantly greater for all density measures (0.7–2.0%; p < 0.05 vs. short-term) and several structure measures: Ct.Th (3.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), Ct.Po (15.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), and Tb.Th (2.2%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term). Multi-center RMSCVs were also significantly higher than short-term values: 2–4% for density and µFE measures (p < 0.0001), 2.6–5.3% for morphometric measures (p < 0.001), while Ct.Po was 16.2% (p < 0.001). In the absence of subject motion, multi-center precision errors for HR-pQCT parameters were generally less than 5%. Phantom-based multi-center precision was comparable to previously reported in vivo single-center precision errors, although this was approximately 2–5 times worse than ex vivo short

  10. C9ORF72 poly(GA) aggregates sequester and impair HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Gendron, Tania F; Grima, Jonathan C; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Katzman, Rebecca B; Gass, Jennifer; Murray, Melissa E; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Lin, Wen-Lang; Garrett, Aliesha; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Daughrity, Lillian; Tong, Jimei; Perkerson, Emilie A; Yue, Mei; Chew, Jeannie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Kurti, Aishe; Wang, Zizhao S; Liesinger, Amanda M; Baker, Jeremy D; Jiang, Jie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Bu, Guojun; Link, Christopher D; Dickey, Chad A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal inclusions of poly(GA), a protein unconventionally translated from G4C2 repeat expansions in C9ORF72, are abundant in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by this mutation. To investigate poly(GA) toxicity, we generated mice that exhibit poly(GA) pathology, neurodegeneration and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of FTD and ALS. These phenotypes occurred in the absence of TDP-43 pathology and required poly(GA) aggregation. HR23 proteins involved in proteasomal degradation and proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport were sequestered by poly(GA) in these mice. HR23A and HR23B similarly colocalized to poly(GA) inclusions in C9ORF72 expansion carriers. Sequestration was accompanied by an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and decreased xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) levels in mice, indicative of HR23A and HR23B dysfunction. Restoring HR23B levels attenuated poly(GA) aggregation and rescued poly(GA)-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures. These data demonstrate that sequestration and impairment of nuclear HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins is an outcome of, and a contributor to, poly(GA) pathology. PMID:26998601

  11. C9ORF72 poly(GA) aggregates sequester and impair HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Gendron, Tania F; Grima, Jonathan C; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Katzman, Rebecca B; Gass, Jennifer; Murray, Melissa E; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Lin, Wen-Lang; Garrett, Aliesha; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Daughrity, Lillian; Tong, Jimei; Perkerson, Emilie A; Yue, Mei; Chew, Jeannie; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Kurti, Aishe; Wang, Zizhao S; Liesinger, Amanda M; Baker, Jeremy D; Jiang, Jie; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Edbauer, Dieter; Cleveland, Don W; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Bu, Guojun; Link, Christopher D; Dickey, Chad A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Dickson, Dennis W; Fryer, John D; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal inclusions of poly(GA), a protein unconventionally translated from G4C2 repeat expansions in C9ORF72, are abundant in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by this mutation. To investigate poly(GA) toxicity, we generated mice that exhibit poly(GA) pathology, neurodegeneration and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of FTD and ALS. These phenotypes occurred in the absence of TDP-43 pathology and required poly(GA) aggregation. HR23 proteins involved in proteasomal degradation and proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport were sequestered by poly(GA) in these mice. HR23A and HR23B similarly colocalized to poly(GA) inclusions in C9ORF72 expansion carriers. Sequestration was accompanied by an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and decreased xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) levels in mice, indicative of HR23A and HR23B dysfunction. Restoring HR23B levels attenuated poly(GA) aggregation and rescued poly(GA)-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures. These data demonstrate that sequestration and impairment of nuclear HR23 and nucleocytoplasmic transport proteins is an outcome of, and a contributor to, poly(GA) pathology.

  12. Direct Detection and Orbit Analysis of the Exoplanets HR 8799 bcd from Archival 2005 Keck/NIRC2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Fukagawa, Misato; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Plavchan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present previously unpublished July 2005 H-band coronagraphic data of the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 from the newly-released Keck/NIRC2 archive. Despite poor observing conditions, we detect three of the planets (HR 8799 bcd), two of them (HR 8799 bc) without advanced image processing. Comparing these data with previously published 1998-2011 astrometry and that from re-reduced October 2010 Keck data constrains the orbits of the planets. Analyzing the planets' astrometry separately, HR 8799 d's orbit is likely inclined at least 25 deg from face-on and the others may be on in inclined orbits. For semimajor axis ratios consistent with a 4:2:1 mean-motion resonance our analysis yields precise values for HR 8799 bcd's orbital parameters and strictly constrains the planets' eccentricities to be less than 0.18-0.3. However, we find no acceptable orbital solutions with this resonance that place the planets in face-on orbits; HR 8799 d shows the largest deviation from such orbits. Moreover, few orbits make HR 8799 d coplanar with b and c, whereas dynamical stability analyses used to constrain the planets' masses typically assume coplanar and/or fare.on orbits. This paper illustrates the significant science gain enabled with the release of the NIRC2 archive.

  13. Spinal cord transection inhibits HR reduction in anesthetized rats immersed in an artificial CO2-hot spring bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    Like humans, the heart rate (HR) of anesthetized rats immersed in CO2-water is lower than that when immersed in tap water at the same temperature. To investigate the afferent signal pathway in the mechanism of HR reduction, Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and then the spinal cord was transected between T4 and T5. The animals were immersed up to the axilla in a bathtub of tap-water (CO2 contents: 10 20 mg·l-1) or of CO2-water (965 1,400 mg·l-1) at 35°C while recording HR, arterial blood pressure, and arterial blood gas parameters ( PaCO2, PaO2, pH). Arterial blood gas parameters did not change during immersion, irrespective of CO2 concentration of the bath water, whereas the HR was reduced in the CO2-water bath. The inhalation of CO2-mixed gas (5 % CO2, 20 % O2, 75 % N2) resulted in increased levels of blood gases and an increased HR during immersion in all types of water tested. The HR reduction observed in sham transected control animals immersed in CO2-water disappeared after subsequent spinal cord transection. These results show that the dominant afferent signal pathway to the brain, which is involved in inducing the reduced HR during immersion in CO2-water, is located in the neuronal route and not in the bloodstream.

  14. Maximal oxygen uptake, ventilatory thresholds and mechanical power during cycling in tropical climate in Guadeloupean elite cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hue, O; Antoine-Jonville, S; Galy, O; Blonc, S

    2010-11-01

    The Tropical climate imposes a high level of physiological stress, which could modify the target heart rate in training load prescription, as the recommendations are often determined by maximal oxygen uptake testing in temperature-neutral laboratories. To test this hypothesis, 7 high-level cyclists performed two randomised maximal tests in neutral (19.2±0.9°C; 51.7±1.3% RH) and Tropical environment (25.8±1.1°C; 63.7±2.3% RH). Neither maximal oxygen uptake nor ventilatory threshold was influenced by the environmental conditions. However, ventilation (p<0.005) and the respiratory equivalent in O(2) (p<0.05) were significantly higher in the Tropical environment, whereas maximal power output and the time to attain maximal oxygen uptake were significantly lower (p<0.05 for both). Moreover, the ventilatory cost of cycling (expressed in LW(-1)) was significantly greater in the Tropical condition (0.40±0.03LW(-1) vs. 0.32±0.05LW(-1), in Tropical vs. Neutral; condition effect: p<0.005; condition × time: p<0.001). Rectal temperature was influenced by neither the environmental conditions nor exercise (36.7±0.1 and 37.0±0.1°C vs. 36.8±0.1 and 37.1±0.2°C, in Tropical vs. Neutral, before and after exercise) but was influenced by condition × time (p<0.05). The heart rate (HR) values usually used for training prescription were not significantly different (154±5bpm vs. 156±4bpm and 172±4bpm vs. 167±4bpm in Tropical vs. Neutral climate, for the first and second thresholds, respectively). We concluded that the usual parameters measured during maximal exercise to establish training programs are not impaired in moderate Tropical environment. Nevertheless, the thermal stress attested by the increased ventilatory cost of cycling could have prevented the cyclists from performing a true maximal test in Tropical conditions.

  15. Sensitivity to conversational maxims in deaf and hearing children.

    PubMed

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegal, Michael

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist instruction. The performance of these children was compared to a group of hearing children aged 6 to 7 years on a test designed to assess sensitivity to violations of conversational maxims. Native signers with bimodal/bilingual instruction were as able as the hearing children to detect violations that concern truthfulness (Maxim of Quality) and relevance (Maxim of Relation). On items involving these maxims, they outperformed both the late signers and native signers attending oralist schools. These results dovetail with previous findings on mindreading in deaf children and underscore the role of early conversational experience and instructional setting in the development of pragmatics.

  16. Optimizing Air Force Depot Programming to Maximize Operational Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    34 vii LINGO Component... LINGO Code with Notional Data by Model .................................. 45 RAND Formulation to Maximize Operational Capability...Minimize Cost ...................................................................................... 49 Appendix B –Final LINGO Code by Model

  17. Interpreting Negative Results in an Angle Maximization Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David R.; Litwiller, Bonnie H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a situation in which differential calculus is used with inverse trigonometric tangent functions to maximize an angle measure. A negative distance measure ultimately results, requiring a reconsideration of assumptions inherent in the initial figure. (Author/MKR)

  18. A bacterial hemerythrin-like protein MsmHr inhibits the SigF-dependent hydrogen peroxide response in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Tao, Jun; Hu, Xinling; Chan, John; Xiao, Jing; Mi, Kaixia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of a variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by aerobic organisms. Host production of toxic H2O2 in response to pathogen infection is an important classical innate defense mechanism against invading microbes. Understanding the mechanisms by which pathogens, in response to oxidative stress, mediate defense against toxic ROS, can reveal anti-microbial targets and shed light on pathogenic mechanisms. In this study, we provide evidence that a Mycobacterium smegmatis hemerythrin-like protein MSMEG_2415, designated MsmHr, is a H2O2-modulated repressor of the SigF-mediated response to H2O2. Circular dichroism and spectrophotometric analysis of MsmHr revealed properties characteristic of a typical hemerythrin-like protein. An msmHr knockout strain of M. smegmatis mc2155 (ΔmsmHr) was more resistant to H2O2 than its parental strain, and overexpression of MsmHr increased mycobacterial susceptibility to H2O2. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the hemerythrin domain of MsmHr is required for the regulation of the H2O2 response observed in the overexpression study. We show that MsmHr inhibits the expression of SigF (MSMEG_1804), an alternative sigma factor that plays an important role in bacterial oxidative stress responses, including those elicited by H2O2, thus providing a mechanistic link between ΔmsmHr and its enhanced resistance to H2O2. Together, these results strongly suggest that MsmHr is involved in the response of mycobacteria to H2O2 by negatively regulating a sigma factor, a function not previously described for hemerythrins. PMID:25642228

  19. Deep thermal infrared imaging of HR 8799 bcde: new atmospheric constraints and limits on a fifth planet

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Cloutier, Ryan; Jayawardhana, Ray; Burrows, Adam; Girard, Julien H.; Fukagawa, Misato; Sorahana, Satoko; Kuchner, Marc; Kenyon, Scott J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Itoh, Yoichi; Matsumura, Soko; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2014-11-10

    We present new L' (3.8 μm) and Brα (4.05 μm) data and reprocessed archival L' data for the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 obtained with Keck/NIRC2, VLT/NaCo, and Subaru/IRCS. We detect all four HR 8799 planets in each data set at a moderate to high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≳ 6-15). We fail to identify a fifth planet, 'HR 8799 f', at r < 15 AU at a 5σ confidence level: one suggestive, marginally significant residual at 0.''2 is most likely a point-spread function artifact. Assuming companion ages of 30 Myr and the Baraffe planet cooling models, we rule out an HR 8799 f with a mass of 5 M{sub J} (7 M{sub J} ), 7 M{sub J} (10 M{sub J} ), or 12 M{sub J} (13 M{sub J} ) at r {sub proj} ∼ 12 AU, 9 AU, and 5 AU, respectively. All four HR 8799 planets have red early T dwarf-like L' – [4.05] colors, suggesting that their spectral energy distributions peak in between the L' and M' broadband filters. We find no statistically significant difference in HR 8799 cde's color. Atmosphere models assuming thick, patchy clouds appear to better match HR 8799 bcde's photometry than models assuming a uniform cloud layer. While non-equilibrium carbon chemistry is required to explain HR 8799 b and c's photometry/spectra, evidence for it from HR 8799 d and e's photometry is weaker. Future, deep-IR spectroscopy/spectrophotometry with the Gemini Planet Imager, SCExAO/CHARIS, and other facilities may clarify whether the planets are chemically similar or heterogeneous.

  20. ST/HR hysteresis: exercise and recovery phase ST depression/heart rate analysis of the exercise ECG.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, R

    1999-01-01

    ST segment depression/heart rate (ST/HR) hysteresis is a recently introduced novel computer method for integrating the exercise and recovery phase ST/HR analysis for improved detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). It is a continuous diagnostic variable that extracts the prevailing direction and average magnitude of the hysteresis in ST depression against HR during the first 3 consecutive minutes of postexercise recovery. This article reviews the development and evaluation of this new method in a clinical population of 347 patients referred for a routine bicycle exercise electrocardiographic (ECG) test at Tampere University Hospital, Finland. Of these patients, 127 had angiographically proven CAD, whereas 13 had no CAD according to angiography, 18 had no perfusion defect according to Tc-99m-sestamibi myocardial imaging and single photon emission computed tomography, and 189 were clinically normal with respect to cardiac diseases. For each patient, the values for ST/HR hysteresis, ST/HR index, end-exercise ST depression, and recovery ST depression were determined for each lead of the Mason-Likar modification of the standard 12-lead exercise ECG and maximum value from the lead system (aVL, aVR, and V1 excluded). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (ie, the discriminative capacity) of the ST/HR hysteresis was 89%, which was significantly larger than that of the end-exercise ST depression (76%, P < .0001), recovery ST depression (84%, P = .0063) or ST/HR index (83%, P = .0023), indicating the best diagnostic performance of the ST/HR hysteresis in detection of CAD regardless of the partition value selection. Furthermore, the superior diagnostic performance of the method was relatively insensitive to the ST segment measurement point or to the ECG lead selection. These results suggest that the ST/HR hysteresis improves the clinical utility of the exercise ECG test in detection of CAD.

  1. On maximal parabolic regularity for non-autonomous parabolic operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disser, Karoline; ter Elst, A. F. M.; Rehberg, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    We consider linear inhomogeneous non-autonomous parabolic problems associated to sesquilinear forms, with discontinuous dependence of time. We show that for these problems, the property of maximal parabolic regularity can be extrapolated to time integrability exponents r ≠ 2. This allows us to prove maximal parabolic Lr-regularity for discontinuous non-autonomous second-order divergence form operators in very general geometric settings and to prove existence results for related quasilinear equations.

  2. Power Converters Maximize Outputs Of Solar Cell Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Martin E.; Jermakian, Joel B.

    1993-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled dc-to-dc power converters devised to maximize power transferred from solar photovoltaic strings to storage batteries and other electrical loads. Converters help in utilizing large solar photovoltaic arrays most effectively with respect to cost, size, and weight. Main points of invention are: single controller used to control and optimize any number of "dumb" tracker units and strings independently; power maximized out of converters; and controller in system is microprocessor.

  3. [Maximal anaerobic capacity of man in a modified Wingate test].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, B B; Chelnokova, E V

    1992-01-01

    We studied the possibility of using a 380B Siemens-Elema (Sweden) bicycle ergometer to determine the maximal anaerobic capacity of healthy subjects during a modified Wingate test. Exercise was performed under stable moment conditions, with calculation of braking resistance on the basis of the subjects lean body mass. The values of total work performed and maximal power may be used for comparative evaluation of physical work capacity in participants of training and rehabilitation programs.

  4. Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-20

    Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II Marten Lohstroh Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...addresses the problem of handling dynamic data, in the statically typed, actor-oriented modeling environment called Ptolemy II. It explores the possibilities

  5. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’ parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.

  6. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    DOE PAGES

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’more » parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.« less

  7. Dynamics of blood flow: modeling of the Fåhræus-Lindqvist effect.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Rachid

    2015-06-01

    To model the Fåhræus-Lindqvist effect, Haynes' marginal zone theory is used, following previous works, i.e., a core layer of uniform red blood cells (RBCs) is assumed to be surrounded by an annular plasma layer in which no RBCs are present. A simplified trial-and-error solution procedure is provided to determine the size of the core region and the hematocrit level in that zone in addition to the apparent viscosity, given the (upstream) large vessel hematocrit level and the average hematocrit level in the (downstream) small vessel. To test the model, a set of experimental data is selected to provide not only apparent viscosity data but also the average hematocrit levels in small tubes of different diameters. The results are found to support Haynes' marginal theory, with no fitting parameters used in the computations. Viscous dissipation is determined. The use of the mechanical energy balance is found to lead to results that are consistent with those based on the momentum balance, while leaving the average hematocrit level undetermined and required by either experimental data or an additional equation based on further theoretical work. The present analysis is used to model bifurcation using published empirical correlations quantifying the Fåhræus effect and phase separation. The model equations are extended to microvascular networks with repeated bifurcations.

  8. Characterization of the Red Giant HR 2582 Using the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Farrington, Christopher D.; Vargas, Norm; van Belle, Gerard T.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2013-07-01

    We present the fundamental parameters of HR 2582, a high-mass red giant star whose evolutionary state is a mystery. We used the CHARA Array interferometer to directly measure the star's limb-darkened angular diameter (1.006 ± 0.020 mas) and combined our measurement with parallax and photometry from the literature to calculate its physical radius (35.76 ± 5.31 R ⊙), luminosity (517.8 ± 17.5 L ⊙), bolometric flux (14.8 ± 0.5 × 10-8 erg s-1 cm-2), and effective temperature (4577 ± 60 K). We then determined the star's mass (5.6 ± 1.7 M ⊙) using our new values with stellar oscillation results from Baudin et al. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models, we estimated HR 2582's age to be 165^{+20}_{-15} Myr. While our measurements do not provide the precision required to definitively state where the star is in its evolution, it remains an excellent test case for evaluating stellar interior models.

  9. Operating characteristics of a 0.87 kW-hr flywheel energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion is given of the design and loss characteristics of 0.87 kW-hr (peak) flywheel energy storage module suitable for aerospace and automotive applications. The maraging steel flywheel rotor, a 46-cm-(18-in-) diameter, 58-kg (128-lb) tapered disk, delivers 0.65 kW-hr of usable energy between operating speeds of 10,000 and 20,000 rpm. The rotor is supported by 20- and 25-mm bore diameter, deep-groove ball bearings, lubricated by a self-replenishing wick type lubrication system. To reduce aerodynamic losses, the rotor housing was evacuated to vacuum levels from 40 to 200 millitorr. Dynamic rotor instabilities uncovered during testing necessitated the use of an elastometric-bearing damper to limit shaft excursions. Spindown losses from bearing, seal, and aerodynamic drag at 50 millitorr typically ranged from 64 to 193 W at 10,000 and 20,000 rpm, respectively. Discharge efficiency of the flywheel system exceeded 96 percent at torque levels greater than 21 percent of rated torque.

  10. UVBY photometry of the magnetic CP stars HD 36668, 36 Lyncis, HD 86592, and HR 8861

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    2000-05-01

    Differential Strömgren uvby photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope (FCAPT) are presented for the magnetic CP stars HD 36668, 36 Lyn, HD 86592, and HR 8861. Using the FCAPT values, North's period for HD 36668 is refined to 2.11884 days. The 3.834 day period of Shore et al. for 36 Lyn, which was found from magnetic field measurements, is confirmed by photometry. The FCAPT observations also support the 2.8867 day period of Babel & North for HD 86592, demonstrate that this star is a large amplitude variable in v (0.13 mag.), and show that y varies crudely out of phase from u, v, and b which are in phase with one another. The variability of HR 8861 appears to be correlated with the meridional passages of regions of Si over- and underabundance as found by Piskunov et al. Tables~2, 3, 4 and 5 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  11. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY IN THE A0 SUPERGIANT HR 1040

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, David J.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2015-12-15

    A time-series analysis of spectroscopic and photometric observables of the A0 Ia supergiant HR 1040 has been performed, including equivalent widths, radial velocities, and Strömgren photometric indices. The data, obtained from 1993 through 2007, include 152 spectroscopic observations from the Ritter Observatory 1 m telescope and 269 Strömgren photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope. Typical of late B- and early A-type supergiants, HR 1040 has a highly variable Hα profile. The star was found to have an intermittent active phase marked by correlation between the Hα absorption equivalent width and blue-edge radial velocity and by photospheric connections observed in correlations to equivalent width, second moment and radial velocity in Si ii λλ6347, 6371. High-velocity absorption (HVA) events were observed only during this active phase. HVA events in the wind were preceded by photospheric activity, including Si ii radial velocity oscillations 19–42 days prior to onset of an HVA event and correlated increases in Si ii W{sub λ} and second moment from 13 to 23 days before the start of the HVA event. While increases in various line equivalent widths in the wind prior to HVA events have been reported in the past in other stars, our finding of precursors in enhanced radial velocity variations in the wind and at the photosphere is a new result.

  12. UVBY photometry of the chemically peculiar stars HD 15980, HR 1094, 33 Gem, and HD 115708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1999-01-01

    Differential Strömgren uvby photometry obtained with the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope shows that the hot HgMn star 33 Gem is photometrically constant. The Si star HD 15980 is found to be a variable whose period is significantly greater than 2 years. The unusual magnetic chemically peculiar Co star HR 1094 is discovered to be a low amplitude photometric variable with the magnetic field period of Hill & Blake, 2.9761 days. The ephemeris for the magnetic chemically peculiar star HD 115708 of Wade et al. is confirmed with the error in its period of 5.07622 days being greatly reduced. The {u}, {v}, {b}, and {y} light curves for both HR 1094 and HD 115708 exhibit differences which indicate complex elemental photospheric abundance distributions. Tables 3-6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  13. Human performance and physiological function during a 24-hr exposure to 1% bromotrifluoromethane (Halon 1301)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkins, D. S.; Degioanni, J. J.; Tan, M. N.; Davis, J. R.; Pierson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Performance and physiological measurements were obtained from four pairs of men exposed for 24 hr to 1% (10,000 ppm) Halon 1301 (bromotrifluoromethane, CBrF3) and to air with order counterbalanced using a double-blind protocol. Cognitive and motor performance was assessed before, during, and after the exposures using seven scales of the Automated Portable Testing System, which produced 13 measures of performance. Halon inhalation induced decrements in 2 of the 13 measures, but actual and estimated magnitudes of the decrements were no greater than 5% of baseline values. Physiological data were obtained before, during, and after the exposures from clinical chemistry analyses of blood and urine samples, pulmonary function tests, and monitoring of vital signs. Significant change during Halon inhalation was observed for 6 of the 52 variables assessed; however, all physiological values remained within clinically acceptable limits. No cardiovascular effects were noted. This study demonstrated that exposure to 1% Halon 1301 for 24 hr can produce minor disturbance of central nervous system function as assessed by cognitive tasks.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RED GIANT HR 2582 USING THE CHARA ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Farrington, Christopher D.; Vargas, Norm; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2013-07-20

    We present the fundamental parameters of HR 2582, a high-mass red giant star whose evolutionary state is a mystery. We used the CHARA Array interferometer to directly measure the star's limb-darkened angular diameter (1.006 {+-} 0.020 mas) and combined our measurement with parallax and photometry from the literature to calculate its physical radius (35.76 {+-} 5.31 R{sub Sun }), luminosity (517.8 {+-} 17.5 L{sub Sun }), bolometric flux (14.8 {+-} 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), and effective temperature (4577 {+-} 60 K). We then determined the star's mass (5.6 {+-} 1.7 M{sub Sun }) using our new values with stellar oscillation results from Baudin et al. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models, we estimated HR 2582's age to be 165{sup +20}{sub -15} Myr. While our measurements do not provide the precision required to definitively state where the star is in its evolution, it remains an excellent test case for evaluating stellar interior models.

  15. Astrometric Monitoring of the HR 8799 Planets: Orbit Constraints from Self-consistent Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacky, Q. M.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B. A.; Galicher, R.; Barman, T. S.; Metchev, S. A.; Zuckerman, B.

    2016-08-01

    We present new astrometric measurements from our ongoing monitoring campaign of the HR 8799 directly imaged planetary system. These new data points were obtained with NIRC2 on the W.M. Keck II 10 m telescope between 2009 and 2014. In addition, we present updated astrometry from previously published observations in 2007 and 2008. All data were reduced using the SOSIE algorithm, which accounts for systematic biases present in previously published observations. This allows us to construct a self-consistent data set derived entirely from NIRC2 data alone. From this data set, we detect acceleration for two of the planets (HR 8799b and e) at >3σ. We also assess possible orbital parameters for each of the four planets independently. We find no statistically significant difference in the allowed inclinations of the planets. Fitting the astrometry while forcing coplanarity also returns χ 2 consistent to within 1σ of the best fit values, suggesting that if inclination offsets of ≲20° are present, they are not detectable with current data. Our orbital fits also favor low eccentricities, consistent with predictions from dynamical modeling. We also find period distributions consistent to within 1σ with a 1:2:4:8 resonance between all planets. This analysis demonstrates the importance of minimizing astrometric systematics when fitting for solutions to highly undersampled orbits.

  16. The 1991-2012 light curve of the old nova HR Lyrae

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Shears, J.; Kafka, S.; Robertson, J. W.; Henden, A. A. E-mail: bunburyobservatory@hotmail.com E-mail: Jeff.Robertson@atu.edu

    2014-05-01

    The 22 yr light curve of HR Lyr, acquired with a typical cadence of 2-6 days, is examined for periodic and quasi-periodic variations. No persistent periodicities are revealed. Rather, the light curve variations often take the form of nearly linear rises and falls having typical e-folding times of about 100 days. Occasional ∼0.6 mag outbursts are also seen, with properties similar to those of small outbursts found in some nova-like cataclysmic variables. When the photometry is formed into yearly averages, a decline of 0.012 ± 0.005 mag yr{sup –1} is apparent, consistent with the fading of irradiation-induced M-dot following the nova. The equivalent width of Hα is tabulated at three epochs over the interval 1986-2008 in order to compare with a recent result for DK Lac in which Hα was found to be fading 50 yr after the nova. However, our results for such a fading in HR Lyr are inconclusive.

  17. Repeatability and reproducibility of the Tekscan HR-Walkway system in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Coda, Andrea; Carline, Tom; Santos, Derek

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the repeatability and reproducibility of the HR Walkway system with regards to peak pressure values (PP) and pressure time integral (PTI) in healthy children, ranging between 5 and 18 years of age. Subjects recruited took part in two non-invasive clinical assessments, at baseline and 1 week later. Gait analysis was carried out using the PP box approach, and plantar foot recording was divided into 10 anatomical areas. The PP and PTI was investigated for the left, right and both feet accounted together. Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) test was adopted for statistical analysis. Overall, 30 healthy patients were recruited and 60 appointments were completed, 53.3% (n=16) were female and 46.7% (n=14) were male. Mean age was 13.3 years (SD=4.5), with an age-range of 5-18.6 years old. Results indicated that for all variables tested the repeatability data were 'good' ICC for 73.8% (n=121) and 'moderate' ICC for 26.2% (n=43). For all variables tested, the reproducibility data showed that 'good' ICC for 70.7% (n=58) and 'moderate' ICC for 29.3% (n=24). In conclusion, the HR Walkway system is able to provide repeatable and reproducible data.

  18. Operating characteristics of a 0.87 kW-hr flywheel energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Scibbe, H. W.; Parker, R. D.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion is given of the design and loss characteristics of 0.87 kW-hr (peak) flywheel energy storage module suitable for aerospace and automotive applications. The maraging steel flywheel rotor, a 46-cm- (18-in-) diameter, 58-kg (128-lb) tapered disk, delivers 0.65 kW-hr of usable energy between operating speeds of 10,000 and 20,000 rpm. The rotor is supported by 20- and 25-mm bore diameter, deep-groove ball bearings, lubricated by a self-replenishing wick type lubrication system. To reduce aerodynamic losses, the rotor housing was evacuated to vacuum levels from 40 to 200 millitorr. Dynamic rotor instabilities uncovered during testing necessitated the use of an elastometric-bearing damper to limit shaft excursions. Spindown losses from bearing, seal, and aerodynamic drag at 50 millitorr typically ranged from 64 to 193 W at 10,000 and 20,000 rpm, respectively. Discharge efficiency of the flywheel system exceeded 96 percent at torque levels greater than 21 percent of rated torque.

  19. [The thickness/radius ratio (h/r) of the left ventricle in pure mitral insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Alexánderson, E; Monobe, F; Nieto, S; Huerta, D

    1992-01-01

    We studied 11 patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). With 2-D echocardiogram we could obtain the septal and posterior wall thickness, left ventricular internal dimensions and ventricular function. With parasternal short axis view we calculate the h/r ratio (left ventricular thickness/radius). The results were compared with normal values: we found important left atrial and ventricle dilatation with significative difference from the normal values (P < 0.001), the diastolic and systolic h/r ratio was significative lower than the normal values (P < 0.005): the systolic wall stress was significative higher in relation to normal values (P < 0.001). We conclude that patients with severe (MR) initially have an important ventricular dilatation but no hypertrophy despite volume overload. The possible explanation is that in early stages of the disease, the afterload of the left ventricle is low and does not trigger the development of hypertrophy. The hypertrophy appears only when the systolic stress is high secondary to myocardial failure. The excessive dilatation of the left ventricle probably damages the myocardial fibers by excessive stretch. This mechanism probably explains the poor late surgical evolution of patients with mitral prosthesis. This we propose that the optimal surgical timing for such patients is when the systolic wall stress elevates over the normal limits, because this is an early sign of myocardial failure.

  20. Human trabecular bone microarchitecture can be assessed independently of density with second generation HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Manske, Sarah L; Zhu, Ying; Sandino, Clara; Boyd, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    The second generation HR-pQCT scanner (XtremeCTII, Scanco Medical) can assess human bone microarchitecture of peripheral limbs with a 61 μm nominal isotropic voxel size. This is a marked improvement from the first generation HR-pQCT that had a nominal isotropic voxel size of 82 μm, which is at the limit to accurately determine the thickness of individual human trabeculae. We sought to determine the accuracy of a direct morphometric approach to measure trabecular bone microarchitecture with three-dimensional morphological techniques using second generation HR-pQCT, and to compare this with the approach currently applied by the first generation HR-pQCT scanner based on derived indices using ex vivo scans of human cadaveric radii. We also compared images acquired and resampled to mimic the first generation HR-pQCT with those obtained directly from the first generation HR-pQCT. We evaluated 20 human cadaveric radii and a micro-CT performance phantom using the first (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical) and second generation HR-pQCT scanner (XtremeCTII) and compared a patient evaluation (XCTII, 61 μm) with a high resolution ex vivo protocol (HR, 30μm). We generated 82 μm scans of the same specimens to mimic a first-generation HR-pQCT evaluation (XCTIM, 82 μm) and compared these with a first-generation patient evaluation (XCTI, 82 μm). A standard structural extraction approach was applied to both XCTII and HR evaluations for assessment of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), and a distance transform was used to assess trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). For XCTI and XCTIM evaluations we followed the manufacturer's standard procedure and assessed bone mineral density (BMD), Tb.N with a distance transform, and then derived bone volume ratio (BV/TV(d)), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th(d)) and separation (Tb.Sp(d)). The spatial resolution (10% MTF) was 142.2 μm for XCTI, 108.9 μm for XCTIM, 95.2μm for XCTII, and 55.9 μm for HR. XCTI

  1. Make Win-Win a Reality: Delighting the Customer be Implementing Oracle HR - Integration Update to Fall 1997 Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, J.; Shope, S.

    1998-01-01

    Implementing Oracle Human Resources Management System (HRMS) using a customer and integration approach provides the organization an enormous oppurtunity to create a win-win situation for customers, the HR department and the enterprise.

  2. Cyclic bisdesmosides from Actinostemma lobatum MAXIM (Cucurbitaceae) and their in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cao, Jiaqing; Tang, Yun; Zhang, Linhui; Xie, Qiangmin; Shen, Huijuan; Zhao, Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Two new cyclic bisdesmosides elucidated as lobatoside L (1) and lobatoside M (2) and four known cyclic bisdesmosides (3-6) were isolated from Actinostemma lobatum MAXIM (Cucurbitaceae). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including IR, HR-FAB-MS, TOCSY, 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments and chemical reactions. The inhibitory effects of the six compounds on human cancer cell growth (including esophageal squamous carcinoma cell line ECA109, lung cancer cell line A549 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803) were determined using the MTT assay. The results revealed that the six compounds exhibited cytotoxicity against all the cell lines tested, and compounds 1, 3 and 5 showed significant activities in a dose dependent manner against all the cell lines, especially for compound 1 and 5, the IC(50) values for ECA-109 cells were 8.25 μM and 3.71 μM. The results demonstrated that compounds 1 and 5's activities are 2- and 4-fold that of cisplatin.

  3. The Gemini NICI planet-finding campaign: The offset ring of HR 4796 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Kuchner, Marc; Close, Laird M.; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Toomey, Douglas W.

    2014-07-01

    We present J,H, CH4 short (1.578 μm), CH4 long (1.652 μm) and Ks-band images of the dust ring around the 10 Myr old star HR 4796 A obtained using the Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) on the Gemini-South 8.1 m Telescope. Our images clearly show for the first time the position of the star relative to its circumstellar ring thanks to NICI's translucent focal plane occulting mask. We employ a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method to constrain the offset vector between the two. The resulting probability distribution shows that the ring center is offset from the star by 16.7 ± 1.3 milliarcseconds along a position angle of 26 ± 3°, along the PA of the ring, 26.47 ± 0.04°. We find that the size of this offset is not large enough to explain the brightness asymmetry of the ring. The ring is measured to have mostly red reflectivity across the JHKs filters, which seems to indicate micron-sized grains. Just like Neptune's 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances delineate the inner and outer edges of the classical Kuiper belt, we find that the radial extent of the HR 4796 A and the Fomalhaut rings could correspond to the 3:2 and 2:1 mean-motion resonances of hypothetical planets at 54.7 AU and 97.7 AU in the two systems, respectively. A planet orbiting HR 4796 A at 54.7 AU would have to be less massive than 1.6 MJup so as not to widen the ring too much by stirring. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Tables 5 and 6 are available in electronic form at

  4. The WHO construct of health-related functioning (HrF) and its implications for health policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Functioning (ICF) has acquired a central role in the WHO Family of International Classifications and it has been extensively adopted as the reference framework for health-related functioning (HrF). This review aims to provide a description of the ICF/HrF to contextualise ICF/HrF in relation to other approaches to health functioning and to describe its application in policy and legislation with a special focus on Spain. Methods Narrative review based on the scientific literature and prior expert knowledge. Results ICF is both a coding system and a conceptual framework of HrF, which is framed as a unidimensional, bipolar and asymmetric construct with a negative pole (disability) and a positive pole (good functioning) with higher complexity. Other models of HrF include health promotion, quality of life and activities of daily living (ADL). The curtailed taxonomy of ICF and its unclear distinction from other approaches have had significant implications for research, policy and legislation, as illustrated by the case of the legislation and services for functional dependency in Spain and other examples. Conclusions The ICF model of functioning is more comprehensive and usable than previous alternatives, but a full taxonomy of the HrF construct is needed to avoid further confusions in this field. This should also comprise harmonisation with other classifications of the WHO Family of International Classifications and other models of health functioning. PMID:21624195

  5. Determinants of maximal oxygen uptake in moderate acute hypoxia in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Pascal; Woorons, Xavier; Letournel, Muriel; Lamberto, Christine; Favret, Fabrice; Pichon, Aurélien; Beaudry, Michèle; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2007-08-01

    The factors determining maximal oxygen consumption were explored in eight endurance trained subjects (TS) and eight untrained subjects (US) exposed to moderate acute normobaric hypoxia. Subjects performed maximal incremental tests at sea level and simulated altitudes (1,000, 2,500, 4,500 m). Heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (.Q), arterialized oxygen saturation (Sa'O2), oxygen uptake (.VO2max), ventilation (.VE, expressed in normobaric conditions) were measured. At maximal exercise, ventilatory equivalent (.VE/.VO2max), O2 transport (.QaO2max) and O2 extraction (O2ERmax) were calculated. In TS, .Qmax remained unchanged despite a significant reduction in HRmax at 4,500 m. SVmax remained unchanged. .VEmax decreased in TS at 4,500 m, .VE/.VO2max was lower in TS and greater at 4,500 m vs. sea level in both groups. Sa'O2max decreased at and above 1,000 m in TS and 2,500 m in US, O2ERmax increased at 4,500 m in both groups. .QaO2max decreased with altitude and was greater in TS than US up to 2,500 m but not at 4,500 m. .VO2max decreased with altitude but the decrement (Delta.VO2max) was larger in TS at 4,500 m. In both groups Delta.VO2max in moderate hypoxia was correlated with Delta.QaO2max. Several differences between the two groups are probably responsible for the greater Delta.VO2max in TS at 4,500 m : (1) the relative hypoventilation in TS as shown by the decrement in .VEmax at 4,500 m (2) the greater.QaO2max decrement in TS due to a lower Sa'O2max and unchanged .Qmax 3) the smaller increase in O2ERmax in TS, insufficient to compensate the decrease in .QaO2max.

  6. Disk Density Tuning of a Maximal Random Packing

    PubMed Central

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Awad, Muhammad A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed H.; Yan, Dong-Ming; English, Shawn A.; Owens, John D.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Mitchell, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an algorithmic framework for tuning the spatial density of disks in a maximal random packing, without changing the sizing function or radii of disks. Starting from any maximal random packing such as a Maximal Poisson-disk Sampling (MPS), we iteratively relocate, inject (add), or eject (remove) disks, using a set of three successively more-aggressive local operations. We may achieve a user-defined density, either more dense or more sparse, almost up to the theoretical structured limits. The tuned samples are conflict-free, retain coverage maximality, and, except in the extremes, retain the blue noise randomness properties of the input. We change the density of the packing one disk at a time, maintaining the minimum disk separation distance and the maximum domain coverage distance required of any maximal packing. These properties are local, and we can handle spatially-varying sizing functions. Using fewer points to satisfy a sizing function improves the efficiency of some applications. We apply the framework to improve the quality of meshes, removing non-obtuse angles; and to more accurately model fiber reinforced polymers for elastic and failure simulations. PMID:27563162

  7. Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Rebecca L; Rogers, Daniel K; Howe, Peter R C; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was related to reductions in exercise performance resulting from acute fatigue. Fourteen triathletes completed testing before and after a 2-h run. rHRI was assessed during 5 min of 100-W cycling and a sigmoidal (rHRIsig) and exponential (rHRIexp) model were applied. Exercise performance was assessed using a 5-min cycling time-trial. The run elicited reductions in time-trial performance (1.34 ± 0.19 to 1.25 ± 0.18 kJ · kg(-1), P < 0.001), rHRIsig (2.25 ± 1.0 to 1.14 ± 0.7 beats · min(-1) · s(-1), P < 0.001) and rHRIexp (3.79 ± 2.07 to 1.98 ± 1.05 beats · min(-1) · s(-1), P = 0.001), and increased pre-exercise HR (73.0 ± 8.4 to 90.5 ± 11.4 beats · min(-1), P < 0.001). Pre-post run difference in time-trial performance was related to difference in rHRIsig (r = 0.58, P = 0.04 and r = 0.75, P = 0.003) but not rHRIexp (r = -0.04, P = 0.9 and r = 0.27, P = 0.4) when controlling for differences in pre-exercise and steady-state HR. rHRIsig was reduced following acute exercise-induced fatigue, and correlated with difference in performance.

  8. A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-12-20

    Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

  9. Observations of the gas stream in the mass transfer binary HR 2142 prime 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The mass transfer binary system HR 2142 was observed at selected phases with the high resolution spectrograph on IUE. The observations were scheduled throughout the interval 0.91 phi 0.00 in order to allow viewing of the light of the primary star through the gas stream as it presents different orientations to the line of sight. Numerous UV lines formed in the gas stream were identified. The strengths and velocity variations displayed by these lines are compared with those observed in the ground based spectral region. As part of a preliminary analysis of the IUE data, column densities and velocities from Si III (4), Si IV (1), and Ti III (1) are used to deduce electron densities in the gas stream as well as its thickness. Possible evidence for stratification in the gas stream is presented.

  10. Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tavel, Laurette; Fontana, Francesca; Garcia Manteiga, Josè Manuel; Mari, Silvia; Mariani, Elisabetta; Caneva, Enrico; Sitia, Roberto; Camnasio, Francesco; Marcatti, Magda; Cenci, Simone; Musco, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions. PMID:27809247

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HR 7355 differential BV light curves (Mikulasek+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulasek, Z.; Krticka, J.; Henry, G. W.; de Villiers, S. N.; Paunzen, E.; Zejda, M.

    2010-02-01

    Differential BV photometry of the He strong CP star HR 5153=HD 182180 versus the comparison star HD 179520. Most of data was acquired by G.W.Henry (GWH) with the T3 0.4-m automatic photoelectric telescope (APT) at Fairborn Observatory in southern Arizona during 2008 May and June. The T3 APT uses a temperature-stabilised EMI 9924B photomultiplier tube to measure photon count rates sequentially through B and V filters. We acquired there 43 B and 38 V measurements. We also obtained 7 continuous hours of BV photometry with a photoelectric photometer attached to a 0.28-m reflector on the night of 2009 July 26 UT at the private observatory of S.N. de Villiers (SNV) in Cape Town, South Africa. We acquired 16 and 17 measurements in B and V. (1 data file).

  12. HR 7578 - A K dwarf double-lined spectroscopic binary with peculiar abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, F. C., Jr.; Beavers, W. I.

    1983-01-01

    The number of double-lined K and M dwarf binaries which is currently known is quite small, only a dozen or less of each type. The HR 7578 system was classified as dK5 on the Mount Wilson system and as K2 V on the MK ystem. A summary of radial-velocity measurements including the observatory and weight of each observation is given in a table. The star with the stronger lines has been called component A. The final orbital element solution with all observations appropriately weighted was computed with a differential corrections computer program described by Barker et al. (1967). The program had been modified for the double-lined case. Of particular interest are the very large eccentricity of the system and the large minimum masses for each component. These large minimum masses suggest that eclipses may be detectable despite the relatively long period and small radii of the stars.

  13. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    DOE PAGES

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; ...

    2014-09-30

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets’ spectral energy distributions.When combined with the 3 to 4μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. Lastly, the data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts mustmore » include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.« less

  14. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Graham, James R.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul G.; Konopacky, Quinn; Larkin, James A.; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie M.; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, Dave W.; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2014-10-01

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets' spectral energy distributions. When combined with the 3 to 4 μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. The data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts must include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.

  15. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Graham, James R.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul G.; Konopacky, Quinn; Larkin, James A.; Marchis, Franck; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie M.; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, Dave W.; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Kent Wallace, J.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2014-09-30

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets’ spectral energy distributions.When combined with the 3 to 4μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. Lastly, the data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts must include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.

  16. GEMINI PLANET IMAGER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS c AND d

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, Patrick; Macintosh, Bruce; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Doyon, René; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Graham, James R.; and others

    2014-10-10

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets' spectral energy distributions. When combined with the 3 to 4 μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. The data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts must include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.

  17. HR-HSBC: Measuring heteronuclear one-bond couplings with enhanced resolution.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2012-12-01

    Heteronuclear one-bond couplings have a variety of applications, and their accurate determination is the basis for obtaining specific structural information of mostly small organic compounds. In this context, it is of utmost importance to reduce signal overlap to a minimum, and a number of techniques has been introduced during the last decades. Here, we introduce a modified version of the HR-HMBC (Magn. Reson. Chem. 2010, 48, 179-183) for heteronuclear one-bond coupling measurements with improved resolution because of the J-resolved-like tilt of corresponding multiplet patterns. The pulse sequence is introduced, and its performance is compared with a standard ω(2)-coupled HSQC experiment. Example spectra on glucose and maltose demonstrate that signals can be resolved that overlap otherwise. The approach is discussed in detail.

  18. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance. PMID:24104201

  19. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Schüler, Esther; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304676

  20. The RS Canum Venaticorum phenomena. I - H-alpha emission in HR 1099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraquelli, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic H-alpha spectrophotometry of the active chromosphere star HR 1099 is presented. The data were obtained during both radio-quiescent periods and radio flares during the years 1976-1979. This paper presents the data and data reduction techniques. In particular, the method used to correct the observed H-alpha profiles for the distortion introduced by the irregular 'continuum,' due to the underlying absorption lines, is presented and discussed. The techniques for measuring the equivalent widths and estimating the errors are presented. In addition to the major results presented earlier, it is found that the line widths of the H-alpha emission are broader than can be accounted for by rotation and orbital motion.

  1. Studies on the fracture of HR-2 steel and LY12 aluminum cylinders under explosive imploding

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Tiegang; Hu Haibo; Li Qingzhong; Sun Xueling; Wang Desheng

    2007-12-12

    Experimental studies were conducted on the fracture phenomena of HR-2 steel and LY12 aluminum alloy cylinder under explosive imploding. Optical and flash X-ray photography showed that thermo-plastic instability in the form of shear fracture occurs during the imploding process. Shear initiation and propagation processes on the inner wall was directly observed by high-speed photography. The two kinds of experimental records and examination of recovered fragments showed that shear cracks initiate from the inner surface of the cylinder at a very early stage and propagate along the maximum shear stress paths radically outward and longitudinal along the detonation direction to form shear fracture surfaces. Under imploding conditions there is a strong tendency to form self-organized shear fractures in comparison to exploding fracture of identical cylinder material and loading intensity.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam L; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Schuler, Esther; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Cardiopulmonary response to exercise in COPD and overweight patients: relationship between unloaded cycling and maximal oxygen uptake profiles.

    PubMed

    Ba, Abdoulaye; Brégeon, Fabienne; Delliaux, Stéphane; Cissé, Fallou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Jammes, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary response to unloaded cycling may be related to higher workloads. This was assessed in male subjects: 18 healthy sedentary subjects (controls), 14 hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 31 overweight individuals (twelve were hypoxemic). They underwent an incremental exercise up to the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), preceded by a 2 min unloaded cycling period. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and respiratory frequency (fR) were averaged every 10 s. At the end of unloaded cycling period, HR increase was significantly accentuated in COPD and hypoxemic overweight subjects (resp., +14 ± 2 and +13 ± 1.5 min(-1), compared to +7.5 ± 1.5 min(-1) in normoxemic overweight subjects and +8 ± 1.8 min(-1) in controls). The fR increase was accentuated in all overweight subjects (hypoxemic: +4.5 ± 0.8; normoxemic: +3.9 ± 0.7 min(-1)) compared to controls (+2.5 ± 0.8 min(-1)) and COPDs (+2.0 ± 0.7 min(-1)). The plateau VE increase during unloaded cycling was positively correlated with VE values measured at the ventilatory threshold and VO2max. Measurement of ventilation during unloaded cycling may serve to predict the ventilatory performance of COPD patients and overweight subjects during an exercise rehabilitation program.

  4. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced.

  5. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  6. The Hot Companion and Circumbinary Disk of the Be Star HR 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Wang, Luqian; Gies, Douglas R.; Grundstrom, Erika D.

    2016-09-01

    We present a spectroscopic investigation of the Be+sdO binary system HR 2142 that is based upon large sets of ultraviolet observations from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and ground-based Hα observations. We measured radial velocities for the Be star component from these spectra and computed a revised orbit. In order to search for the spectral signature of the hot subdwarf, we cross-correlated the short wavelength end of each IUE spectrum with a model hot star spectrum, and then we used the predicted Doppler shifts of the subdwarf to shift-and-add all the cross-correlation functions to the frame of the subdwarf. This merged function shows the weak signal from the spectral lines of the hot star, and a best fit is obtained with a mass ratio {M}2/{M}1=0.07+/- 0.02, companion temperature {T}{{eff}}≥slant 43+/- 5 kK, projected rotational velocity V\\sin i\\lt 30 km s-1, and a monochromatic flux ratio near 1170 Å of {f}2/{f}1\\gt 0.009+/- 0.001. This hot subdwarf creates a one-armed spiral, tidal wake in the disk of the Be star, and we present a circumbinary disk model that can explain the occurrence of shell absorption lines by gas enhancements that occur where gas crossing the gap created by the subdwarf strikes the disk boundaries. The faint companion of HR 2142 may be representative of a significant fraction of Be stars with undetected former mass donor companion stars.

  7. Generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary HR InSAR image pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    Land cover classification of remote sensing imagery is an important topic of research. For example, different applications require precise and fast information about the land cover of the imaged scenery (e.g., disaster management and change detection). Focusing on high resolution (HR) spaceborne remote sensing imagery, the user has the choice between passive and active sensor systems. Passive systems, such as multispectral sensors, have the disadvantage of being dependent from weather influences (fog, dust, clouds, etc.) and time of day, since they work in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, active systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provide improved capabilities. As an interactive method analyzing HR InSAR image pairs, the CovAmCohTM method was introduced in former studies. CovAmCoh represents the joint analysis of locality (coefficient of variation - Cov), backscatter (amplitude - Am) and temporal stability (coherence - Coh). It delivers information on physical backscatter characteristics of imaged scene objects or structures and provides the opportunity to detect different classes of land cover (e.g., urban, rural, infrastructure and activity areas). As example, railway tracks are easily distinguishable from other infrastructure due to their characteristic bluish coloring caused by the gravel between the sleepers. In consequence, imaged objects or structures have a characteristic appearance in CovAmCoh images which allows the development of classification rules. In this paper, a generalized interpretation scheme for arbitrary InSAR image pairs using the CovAmCoh method is proposed. This scheme bases on analyzing the information content of typical CovAmCoh imagery using the semisupervised k-means clustering. It is shown that eight classes model the main local information content of CovAmCoh images sufficiently and can be used as basis for a classification scheme.

  8. On the Morphology and Chemical Composition of the HR 4796A Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Stark, Christopher C.; Weinberger, Alycia; Debes, John H.; Hinz, Philip M.; Close, Laird; Chen, Christine; Smith, Paul S.; Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Puglisi, Alfio; Follette, Katherine B.; Morzinski, Katie; Wu, Ya-Lin; Briguglio, Runa; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Riccardi, Armando; Schneider, Glenn; Xompero, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present resolved images of the HR 4796A debris disk using the Magellan adaptive optics system paired with Clio-2 and VisAO. We detect the disk at 0.77 μm, 0.91 μm, 0.99 μm, 2.15 μm, 3.1 μm, 3.3 μm, and 3.8 μm. We find that the deprojected center of the ring is offset from the star by 4.76 ± 1.6 AU and that the deprojected eccentricity is 0.06 ± 0.02, in general agreement with previous studies. We find that the average width of the ring is 14+3-2% (11.1+2.4-1.6 AU), also comparable to previous measurements. Combining our new scattered light data with archival Hubble Space Telescope images at ~0.5-2 μm, along with previously unpublished Spitzer/MIPS thermal emission data and all other literature thermal data, we set out to constrain the chemical composition of the dust grains. After testing 19 individual root compositions and more than 8400 unique mixtures of these compositions, we find that good fits to the scattered light alone and thermal emission alone are discrepant, suggesting that caution should be exercised if fitting to only one or the other. When we fit to both data sets simultaneously, we find that silicates and organics are generally the most favored, while large abundances of water ice are usually not favored. These results suggest the HR 4796A dust grains are similar to interstellar dust and solar system comets, though improved modeling is necessary to place better constraints on the exact chemical composition of the dust. This paper includes data obtained at the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. Evaluation of the management of Hr-HPV+/PapTest- women: results at 1-year recall.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Caterina; Puggioni, Chiara; Lendaro, Eugenio; Cacciotti, Jessica; Zaralli, Roberto; Migliore, Giovanna; Bellardini, Paola; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Di Cristofano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    With cervical cancer screening the choice of 1-year as a period of follow-up in positive high-risk HPV women without cytological lesions is still under discussion. We evaluated the management of these women and the role of HPV genotyping test. We did a cervical cancer screening study of women aged 35-64 with primary high-risk HPV test. Women positive for high-risk HPV with negative cytology were followed-up after 1 year. In this study we selected women with high-risk HPV+/PapTest- resulted high-risk HPV+ at recall and performed the PapTest and HPV genotyping test. The detection rate of squamous high grade (CIN2+) relative to the total screened cohort was 2.1‰, and it was 0.2‰ at the 1-year recall. The colposcopy performed in women referred at the 1-year recall accounted for 48.8% of the total (baseline + 1-year recall), and 84.3% of these women had no cytological lesions. The most frequent hr-HPV genotype detected was HPV16 and 66.7% of co-infections were due to HPV16 and HPV18. 54.5% of women presented a persistent infection at 1-year recall with the same HPV subtype, 50% of persistent infections was due to HPV16 and 16.7% of these were determined to be CIN2+ histological lesions. Our data show that it may be useful to extend the period of follow-up for women hr-HPV+/PapTest- so as to reduce the number of unnecessary colposcopies due to the transitory infections and that the genotyping test could help to identify the persistent infections in which HPV16 is involved.

  10. Assessment of volume fraction and fabric in the distal radius using HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Varga, P; Zysset, P K

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the state of the art HR-pQCT technique to predict mineral content, volume fraction and fabric of trabecular bone structure compared to the gold standard microCT. Four cadaveric human forearms were scanned with HR-pQCT and the dissected radius epiphyses with microCT. After registering the images, bone mineral density (BMD), volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric were computed on corresponding cubical regions of interest for both image sources. In particular, the effect of the segmentation procedure on BV/TV was analyzed. Assessment of fabric was performed with three different methods comparing their efficiency and robustness against resolution change. The results showed that in order to achieve optimal results at the lower image resolution, different filtering and thresholding approaches needed to be selected for different tasks. Therefore, to preserve BV/TV, the BMD-based volume fraction provided best match with the reference values of microCT, while in case of Mean Intercept Length (MIL) fabric a Gaussian filter and a histogram-based threshold were optimal. Using the latter, MIL was found to be more robust against resolution change than the other approaches. Additionally, we proposed a linear model for describing the mathematical transformation that the second order fabric tensor undergoes when the resolution of the input images changes. As a conclusion, we found that the investigated properties of trabecular bone structure can be adequately predicted from the lower resolution technique that is available in vivo for peripheral bones, when proper image processing and corrections are applied.

  11. DEBRIS DISTRIBUTION IN HD 95086—A YOUNG ANALOG OF HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Smith, Paul S.; Rieke, George H.; Morrison, Sarah; Malhotra, Renu; Balog, Zoltan

    2015-02-01

    HD 95086 is a young early-type star that hosts (1) a 5 M{sub J} planet at the projected distance of 56 AU revealed by direct imaging, and (2) a prominent debris disk. Here we report the detection of 69 μm crystalline olivine feature from the disk using the Spitzer/MIPS-SED data covering 55-95 μm. Due to the low resolution of the MIPS-SED mode, this feature is not spectrally resolved, but is consistent with the emission from crystalline forsterite contributing ∼5% of the total dust mass. We also present detailed analysis of the disk spectral energy distribution and re-analysis of resolved images obtained by Herschel. Our results suggest that the debris structure around HD 95086 consists of a warm (∼175 K) belt, a cold (∼55 K) disk, and an extended disk halo (up to ∼800 AU), and is very similar to that of HR 8799. We compare the properties of the three debris components, and suggest that HD 95086 is a young analog of HR 8799. We further investigate and constrain single-planet, two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet architectures that can account for the observed debris structure and are compatible with dynamical stability constraints. We find that equal-mass four-planet configurations of geometrically spaced orbits, with each planet of mass ∼ 5 M{sub J} , could maintain the gap between the warm and cold debris belts, and also be just marginally stable for timescales comparable to the age of the system.

  12. SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF WATER, METHANE, AND CARBON MONOXIDE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF EXOPLANET HR 8799 b

    SciTech Connect

    Barman, Travis S.; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Macintosh, Bruce; Marois, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Absorption lines from water, methane, and carbon monoxide are detected in the atmosphere of exoplanet HR 8799 b. A medium-resolution spectrum presented here shows well-resolved and easily identified spectral features from all three molecules across the K band. The majority of the lines are produced by CO and H{sub 2}O, but several lines clearly belong to CH{sub 4}. Comparisons between these data and atmosphere models covering a range of temperatures and gravities yield log mole fractions of H{sub 2}O between −3.09 and −3.91, CO between −3.30 and −3.72, and CH{sub 4} between −5.06 and −5.85. More precise mole fractions are obtained for each temperature and gravity studied. A reanalysis of H-band data, previously obtained at a similar spectral resolution, results in a nearly identical water abundance as determined from the K-band spectrum. The methane abundance is shown to be sensitive to vertical mixing and indicates an eddy diffusion coefficient in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 8} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, comparable to mixing in the deep troposphere of Jupiter. The model comparisons also indicate a carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) between ∼0.58 and 0.7, encompassing previous estimates for a second planet in the same system, HR 8799 c. Super-stellar C/O could indicate planet formation by core-accretion; however, the range of possible C/O for these planets (and the star) is currently too large to comment strongly on planet formation. More precise values of the bulk properties (e.g., effective temperature and surface gravity) are needed for improved abundance estimates.

  13. Effect of Intermittent Sub-Maximal Exercise on Percent Body Fat Using Leg-To-Leg Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis in Children

    PubMed Central

    L. Andreacci, Joseph; B. Dixon, Curt; Ledezma, Christina; L. Goss, Fredric

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of intermittent sub-maximal exercise on percent body fat (%BF) estimated by leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (LBIA) in children. Fifty-nine children (29 girls; 30 boys) mean age 9.0 ± 1.3 years participated in this study. LBIA measured %BF values were obtained immediately before and within five minutes after completing an intermittent exercise protocol consisting of three 8-minute sub-maximal exercise bouts (2.74 km·hr-1, 0% grade; 4.03 km·hr-1, 0% grade; and 5.47 km·hr-1, 0% grade) each separated by a 5-min seated rest period. The three exercise bouts corresponded to 56%, 61% and 71% of maximal heart rate. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed for fat mass, fat free mass, total body water, and body weight, post-exercise in both groups. Significant reductions (p < 0.001) in %BF were observed post-exercise in the female (23.1 ± 9.9 vs. 21.8 ± 9. 9 %) and male (23.3 ± 10.5 vs. 21.8 ± 10.2 %) children when compared to pre-exercise values. However, for the majority of the subjects (females = 86%; males = 73%) the decrease in %BF post- exercise was less than 2.0 %BF. These data indicate that sub-maximal intermittent exercise, that may be representative of daily free-form activities in children, will most likely have a limited impact on %BF estimates when the assessment is performed immediately post-exercise. Key Points LBIA measures of body weight, percent body fat, fat mass, fat free mass and total body water were significantly lower after the intermittent sub-maximal exercise. The reductions in percent body fat for girls (1.4%) and boys (1.5%) compare favorably to previous investigations. Intermittent exercise, that may be representative of daily free-form activities in children, will most likely have a limited impact on LBIA percent body fat estimates PMID:24353460

  14. Effect of intermittent sub-maximal exercise on percent body fat using leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis in children.

    PubMed

    L Andreacci, Joseph; B Dixon, Curt; Ledezma, Christina; L Goss, Fredric

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of intermittent sub-maximal exercise on percent body fat (%BF) estimated by leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (LBIA) in children. Fifty-nine children (29 girls; 30 boys) mean age 9.0 ± 1.3 years participated in this study. LBIA measured %BF values were obtained immediately before and within five minutes after completing an intermittent exercise protocol consisting of three 8-minute sub-maximal exercise bouts (2.74 km·hr(-1), 0% grade; 4.03 km·hr(-1), 0% grade; and 5.47 km·hr(-1), 0% grade) each separated by a 5-min seated rest period. The three exercise bouts corresponded to 56%, 61% and 71% of maximal heart rate. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed for fat mass, fat free mass, total body water, and body weight, post-exercise in both groups. Significant reductions (p < 0.001) in %BF were observed post-exercise in the female (23.1 ± 9.9 vs. 21.8 ± 9. 9 %) and male (23.3 ± 10.5 vs. 21.8 ± 10.2 %) children when compared to pre-exercise values. However, for the majority of the subjects (females = 86%; males = 73%) the decrease in %BF post- exercise was less than 2.0 %BF. These data indicate that sub-maximal intermittent exercise, that may be representative of daily free-form activities in children, will most likely have a limited impact on %BF estimates when the assessment is performed immediately post-exercise. Key PointsLBIA measures of body weight, percent body fat, fat mass, fat free mass and total body water were significantly lower after the intermittent sub-maximal exercise.The reductions in percent body fat for girls (1.4%) and boys (1.5%) compare favorably to previous investigations.Intermittent exercise, that may be representative of daily free-form activities in children, will most likely have a limited impact on LBIA percent body fat estimates.

  15. Ventromedial frontal lobe damage disrupts value maximization in humans.

    PubMed

    Camille, Nathalie; Griffiths, Cathryn A; Vo, Khoi; Fellows, Lesley K; Kable, Joseph W

    2011-05-18

    Recent work in neuroeconomics has shown that regions in orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex encode the subjective value of different options during choice. However, these electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies cannot demonstrate whether such signals are necessary for value-maximizing choices. Here we used a paradigm developed in experimental economics to empirically measure and quantify violations of utility theory in humans with damage to the ventromedial frontal lobe (VMF). We show that people with such damage are more likely to make choices that violate the generalized axiom of revealed preference, which is the one necessary and sufficient condition for choices to be consistent with value maximization. These results demonstrate that the VMF plays a critical role in value-maximizing choice.

  16. Maximally symmetric stabilizer MUBs in even prime-power dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    One way to construct a maximal set of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space is by means of finite phase-space methods. MUBs obtained in this way are covariant with respect to some subgroup of the group of all affine symplectic phase-space transformations. However, this construction is not canonical: as a consequence, many different choices of covariance subgroups are possible. In particular, when the Hilbert space is 2n dimensional, it is known that covariance with respect to the full group of affine symplectic phase-space transformations can never be achieved. Here we show that in this case there exist two essentially different choices of maximal subgroups admitting covariant MUBs. For both of them, we explicitly construct a family of 2n covariant MUBs. We thus prove that, contrary to the odd dimensional case, maximally covariant MUBs are very far from being unique in even prime-power dimensions.

  17. Evaluation of maximal respiratory pressures in myasthenia gravis. Prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Fernández, Carmen; Díez Tejedor, Exuperio; Frank Garcia, Ana; Pino, Jose María; Pérez Conde, Concepción; Barreiro Tella, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    We assess the prognosis of mild forms of myasthenia gravis (MG) by maximal respiratory pressures (MRP) and single fiber electromyography (SFEMG). Fifty MG patients (12 form I, 21 form IIa and 17 form IIb) are valued by MRP [maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP)] and SFEMG, and are followed-up clinically. We have found in form I patients developing form IIa and form IIa worsening to form IIb, MEP and MIP mean relative values significantly lower than the rest. Inversely, IIb form patients improving to IIa form display MIP mean relative values higher than the rest; no difference appears with MEP. A reduction under 50% of fifth-percentile implies clinical deterioration in forms I and IIa, while its surpassing in IIb form suggests a tendency to improvement. No evident differences are found by SFEMG. MRP allow the follow-up of MG patients and could warn us of a clinical prognosis.

  18. Viscosity and density dependence during maximal flow in man.

    PubMed

    Staats, B A; Wilson, T A; Lai-Fook, S J; Rodarte, J R; Hyatt, R E

    1980-02-01

    Maximal expiratory flow curves were obtained from ten healthy subjects white breathing air and three other gas mixtures with different densities and viscosities. From these data, the magnitudes of the dependence of maximal flow on gas density and viscosity were obtained. The scaling laws of fluid mechanics, together with a model for the flow-limiting mechanism, were used to obtain a prediction of the relationship between the density dependence and the viscosity dependence of maximal flow. Although the data for individual subjects were too variable to allow a precise comparison with this prediction, the relationship between the mean density dependence and the mean viscosity dependence of all usbjects agreed with the theoretic prediction. This agreement supports the assumption, which is frequently made, that flow resistance rather than tissue visoelasticity is the dominant contributor to peripheral resistance. Information on the relationships between the pressure drop to the flow-limiting segment and flow, gas density and viscosity, and lung volume were also obtained.

  19. Matching and maximizing with variable-time schedules.

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, L T

    1985-01-01

    Pigeons were offered choices between a variable-time schedule that arranged reinforcers throughout the session and a variable-time schedule that arranged reinforcers only when the pigeon was spending time on it. The subjects could maximize the overall rate of reinforcement in this situation by biasing their time allocation towards the latter schedule. This arrangement provides an alternative to concurrent variable-interval variable-ratio schedules for testing whether animals maximize overall rates or match relative rates, and has the advantage of being free of the asymmetrical response requirements present with those schedules. The results were contrary to those predicted by maximizing: The bias it predicts did not appear. PMID:3981085

  20. Influence of central obesity in estimating maximal oxygen uptake

    PubMed Central

    de Souza e Silva, Christina Grüne; Franklin, Barry A.; de Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of central obesity on the magnitude of the error of estimate of maximal oxygen uptake in maximal cycling exercise testing. METHOD: A total of 1,715 adults (68% men) between 18-91 years of age underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using a progressive protocol to volitional fatigue. Subjects were stratified by central obesity into three quartile ranges: Q1, Q2-3 and Q4. Maximal oxygen uptake [mL.(kg.min)-1] was estimated by the attained maximal workload and body weight using gender- and population-specific equations. The error of estimate [mL.(kg.min)-1] and percent error between measured and estimated maximal oxygen uptake values were compared among obesity quartile ranges. RESULTS: The error of estimate and percent error differed (mean ± SD) for men (Q1=1.3±3.7 and 2.0±10.4; Q2-3=0.5±3.1 and -0.5±13.0; and Q4=-0.3±2.8 and -4.5±15.8 (p<0.05)) and for women (Q1=1.6±3.3 and 3.6±10.2; Q2-3=0.4±2.7 and -0.4±11.8; and Q4=-0.9±2.3 and -10.0±22.7 (p<0.05)). CONCLUSION: Central obesity directly influences the magnitude of the error of estimate of maximal oxygen uptake and should be considered when direct expired gas analysis is unavailable. PMID:27982162

  1. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  2. Classification of maximally supersymmetric backgrounds in supergravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Jan; Lüst, Severin

    2017-02-01

    We study maximally supersymmetric solutions of all gauged or deformed supergravity theories in D ≥ 3 space-time dimensions. For vanishing background fluxes the space-time background has to be either Minkowski or anti-de Sitter. We derive a simple criterion for the existence of solutions with non-trivial fluxes and determine all supergravities that satisfy it. We show that their solutions coincide with those of the corresponding ungauged theories and conclude that the known list of maximally supersymmetric solutions is exhaustive.

  3. Maximizing the Divergence from a Hierarchical Model of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Stephan; Knauf, Andreas; Ay, Nihat; Zhao, Ming-Jing

    2015-03-01

    We study many-party correlations quantified in terms of the Umegaki relative entropy (divergence) from a Gibbs family known as a hierarchical model. We derive these quantities from the maximum-entropy principle which was used earlier to define the closely related irreducible correlation. We point out the differences between quantum states and probability vectors which exist in hierarchical models, in the divergence from a hierarchical model and in local maximizers of this divergence. The differences are, respectively, missing factorization, discontinuity and reduction of uncertainty. We discuss global maximizers of the mutual information of separable qubit states.

  4. Remarks on the information entropy maximization method and extended thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eu, Byung Chan

    1998-04-01

    The information entropy maximization method was applied by Jou et al. [J. Phys. A 17, 2799 (1984)] to heat conduction in the past. Advancing this method one more step, Nettleton [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 10311 (1997)] combined the method with a projection operator technique to derive a set of evolution equations for macroscopic variables from the Liouville equation for a simple liquid, and a claim was made that the method provides a statistical mechanical theory basis of irreversible processes and, in particular, of extended thermodynamics which is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. This line of information entropy maximization method is analyzed from the viewpoint of the laws of thermodynamics in this paper.

  5. Different types of compression clothing do not increase sub-maximal and maximal endurance performance in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Haegele, Matthias; Achtzehn, Silvia; Linville, John; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Mester, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Three textiles with increasing compressive surface were compared with non-compressive conventional clothing on physiological and perceptual variables during sub-maximal and maximal running. Fifteen well-trained endurance athletes (mean+/-s: age 27.1+/-4.8 years, VO(2max) 63.7+/-4.9 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)) performed four sub-maximal (approximately 70% VO(2max)) and maximal tests with and without different compression stockings, tights, and whole-body compression suits. Arterial lactate concentration, oxygen saturation and partial pressure, pH, oxygen uptake, and ratings of muscle soreness were recorded before, during, and after all tests. In addition, we assessed time to exhaustion. Sub-maximal (P=0.22) and maximal oxygen uptake (P=0.26), arterial lactate concentration (P=0.16; 0.20), pH (P=0.23; 0.46), oxygen saturation (P=0.13; 0.26), and oxygen partial pressure (P=0.09; 0.20) did not differ between the types of clothing (effect sizes=0.00-0.45). Ratings of perceived exertion (P=0.10; 0.15), muscle soreness (P=0.09; 0.10) and time to exhaustion (P=0.16) were also unaffected by the different clothing (effect sizes=0.28-0.85). This was the first study to evaluate the effect on endurance performance of different types of compression clothing with increasing amounts of compressive surface. Overall, there were no performance benefits when using the compression garments.

  6. Recombinant protein of heptad-repeat HR212, a stable fusion inhibitor with potent anti-HIV action in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Liu Changmei; Tien Po Zheng Yongtang

    2008-07-20

    HR212, a recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, has been previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 membrane fusion at low nanomolar level. Here we report that HR212 is effective in blocking laboratory strain HIV-1{sub IIIB} entry and replication with EC{sub 50} values of 3.92 {+-} 0.62 and 6.59 {+-} 1.74 nM, respectively, and inhibiting infection by clinic isolate HIV-1{sub KM018} with EC{sub 50} values of 44.44 {+-} 10.20 nM, as well as suppressing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect with an EC{sub 50} value of 3.04 {+-} 1.20 nM. It also inhibited HIV-2{sub ROD} and HIV-2{sub CBL-20} entry and replication in the {mu}M range. Notably, HR212 was highly effective against T20-resistant strains with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 5.09 to 7.75 nM. Unlike T20, HR212 showed stability sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation in a time-of-addition assay, and was insensitive to proteinase K digestion. These results suggest that HR212 has great potential to be further developed as novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly for those infected by T20-resistant variants.

  7. The Nuclear Receptor Genes HR3 and E75 Are Required for the Circadian Rhythm in a Primitive Insect

    PubMed Central

    Kamae, Yuichi; Uryu, Outa; Miki, Taiki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Insect circadian rhythms are generated by a circadian clock consisting of transcriptional/translational feedback loops, in which CYCLE and CLOCK are the key elements in activating the transcription of various clock genes such as timeless (tim) and period (per). Although the transcriptional regulation of Clock (Clk) has been profoundly studied, little is known about the regulation of cycle (cyc). Here, we identify the orphan nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75, which are orthologs of mammalian clock genes, Rorα and Rev-erbα, respectively, as factors involved in the rhythmic expression of the cyc gene in a primitive insect, the firebrat Thermobia domestica. Our results show that HR3 and E75 are rhythmically expressed, and their normal, rhythmic expression is required for the persistence of locomotor rhythms. Their RNAi considerably altered the rhythmic transcription of not only cyc but also tim. Surprisingly, the RNAi of HR3 revealed the rhythmic expression of Clk, suggesting that this ancestral insect species possesses the mechanisms for rhythmic expression of both cyc and Clk genes. When either HR3 or E75 was knocked down, tim, cyc, and Clk or tim and cyc, respectively, oscillated in phase, suggesting that the two genes play an important role in the regulation of the phase relationship among the clock genes. Interestingly, HR3 and E75 were also found to be involved in the regulation of ecdysis, suggesting that they interconnect the circadian clock and developmental processes. PMID:25502221

  8. THE 5 hr PULSE PERIOD AND BROADBAND SPECTRUM OF THE SYMBIOTIC X-RAY BINARY 3A 1954+319

    SciTech Connect

    Marcu, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Fuerst, Felix; Grinberg, Victoria; Mueller, Sebastian; Wilms, Joern; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Cadolle Bel, Marion

    2011-11-20

    We present an analysis of the highly variable accreting X-ray pulsar 3A 1954+319 using 2005-2009 monitoring data obtained with INTEGRAL and Swift. This considerably extends the pulse period history and covers flaring episodes in 2005 and 2008. In 2006 the source was identified as one of only a few known symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs), i.e., systems composed of a neutron star accreting from the inhomogeneous medium around an M-giant star. The extremely long pulse period of {approx}5.3 hr is directly visible in the 2008 INTEGRAL-ISGRI outburst light curve. The pulse profile is double peaked and generally not significantly energy dependent although there is an indication of possible softening during the main pulse. During the outburst a strong spin-up of -1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} hr hr{sup -1} occurred. Between 2005 and 2008 a long-term spin-down trend of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} hr hr{sup -1} was observed for the first time for this source. The 3-80 keV pulse peak spectrum of 3A 1954+319 during the 2008 flare could be well described by a thermal Comptonization model. We interpret the results within the framework of a recently developed quasi-spherical accretion model for SyXBs.

  9. The nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75 are required for the circadian rhythm in a primitive insect.

    PubMed

    Kamae, Yuichi; Uryu, Outa; Miki, Taiki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Insect circadian rhythms are generated by a circadian clock consisting of transcriptional/translational feedback loops, in which CYCLE and CLOCK are the key elements in activating the transcription of various clock genes such as timeless (tim) and period (per). Although the transcriptional regulation of Clock (Clk) has been profoundly studied, little is known about the regulation of cycle (cyc). Here, we identify the orphan nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75, which are orthologs of mammalian clock genes, Rorα and Rev-erbα, respectively, as factors involved in the rhythmic expression of the cyc gene in a primitive insect, the firebrat Thermobia domestica. Our results show that HR3 and E75 are rhythmically expressed, and their normal, rhythmic expression is required for the persistence of locomotor rhythms. Their RNAi considerably altered the rhythmic transcription of not only cyc but also tim. Surprisingly, the RNAi of HR3 revealed the rhythmic expression of Clk, suggesting that this ancestral insect species possesses the mechanisms for rhythmic expression of both cyc and Clk genes. When either HR3 or E75 was knocked down, tim, cyc, and Clk or tim and cyc, respectively, oscillated in phase, suggesting that the two genes play an important role in the regulation of the phase relationship among the clock genes. Interestingly, HR3 and E75 were also found to be involved in the regulation of ecdysis, suggesting that they interconnect the circadian clock and developmental processes.

  10. Estimation of vitamin B1 excretion in 24-hr urine by assay of first-morning urine.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kakinoki, Takashi; Shino, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Reiko; Hashizume, Naotaka

    2008-01-01

    Urinary B1 (vitamin B1) excretion is commonly determined in 24-hr urine specimens to obtain an estimate of nutritional status. The aim of our study was to investigate whether B1 in random urine specimens, corrected for the urine creatinine (Cr), can be substituted for B1 in 24-hr urines. Collection of such hour urines is often fraught with errors; an alternative method is described here. All urine specimens voided over 24 hr were collected from 32 healthy adults as were the first-morning urines from 30 healthy Japanese women. The B1 excretion was expressed as the ratio of B1 to Cr. Although the B1 excretion was expressed as the B1/Cr ratio, the B1 excretion varied with the urine volume and the time of urine collection. The B1/Cr ratio in random urine specimens not collected at a fixed time may mislead the evaluation of the nutritional status. We found that the B1/Cr ratio in the first-morning urine correlated significantly with the ratio in 24-hr urines (r=0.970, P<0.001) and also with the concentration of total B1 (B1 plus its phosphate esters) in whole blood (r=0.733, P<0.001). We conclude that the B1/Cr ratio in 24-hr urines could be estimated by measuring the ratio in the first-morning urine.

  11. E2F1 interactions with hHR23A inhibit its degradation and promote DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Randeep K.; Dagnino, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major mechanism for removal of DNA lesions induced by exposure to UV radiation in the epidermis. Recognition of damaged DNA sites is the initial step in their repair, and requires multiprotein complexes that contain XPC and hHR23 proteins, or their orthologues. A variety of transcription factors are also involved in NER, including E2F1. In epidermal keratinocytes, UV exposure induces E2F1 phosphorylation, which allows it to recruit various NER factors to sites of DNA damage. However, the relationship between E2F1 and hHR23 proteins vis-à-vis NER has remained unexplored. We now show that E2F1 and hHR23 proteins can interact, and this interaction stabilizes E2F1, inhibiting its proteasomal degradation. Reciprocally, E2F1 regulates hHR23A subcellular localization, recruiting it to sites of DNA photodamage. As a result, E2F1 and hHR23A enhance DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation, contributing to genomic stability in the epidermis. PMID:27028861

  12. Maximizing the Online Learning Experience: Suggestions for Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicco, Gina

    2011-01-01

    This article will discuss ways of maximizing the online course experience for teachers- and counselors-in-training. The widespread popularity of online instruction makes it a necessary learning experience for future teachers and counselors (Ash, 2011). New teachers and counselors take on the responsibility of preparing their students for real-life…

  13. Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

  14. Matching Pupils and Teachers to Maximize Expected Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Joe H., Jr.; And Others

    To achieve a good teacher-pupil match, it is necessary (1) to predict the learning outcomes that will result when each student is instructed by each teacher, (2) to use the predicted performance to compute an Optimality Index for each teacher-pupil combination to indicate the quality of each combination toward maximizing learning for all students,…

  15. On Adaptation, Maximization, and Reinforcement Learning among Cognitive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erev, Ido; Barron, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of binary choice behavior in iterated tasks with immediate feedback reveals robust deviations from maximization that can be described as indications of 3 effects: (a) a payoff variability effect, in which high payoff variability seems to move choice behavior toward random choice; (b) underweighting of rare events, in which alternatives…

  16. Optoelectronic plethysmography compared to spirometry during maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Layton, Aimee M; Moran, Sienna L; Garber, Carol Ewing; Armstrong, Hilary F; Basner, Robert C; Thomashow, Byron M; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare simultaneous measurements of tidal volume (Vt) by optoelectronic plethysmography (OEP) and spirometry during a maximal cycling exercise test to quantify possible differences between methods. Vt measured simultaneously by OEP and spirometry was collected during a maximal exercise test in thirty healthy participants. The two methods were compared by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis at submaximal and maximal exercise. The average difference between the two methods and the mean percentage discrepancy were calculated. Submaximal exercise (SM) and maximal exercise (M) Vt measured by OEP and spirometry had very good correlation, SM R=0.963 (p<0.001), M R=0.982 (p<0.001) and high degree of common variance, SM R(2)=0.928, M R(2)=0.983. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that during SM, OEP could measure exercise Vt as much as 0.134 L above and -0.025 L below that of spirometry. OEP could measure exercise Vt as much as 0.188 L above and -0.017 L below that of spirometry. The discrepancy between measurements was -2.0 ± 7.2% at SM and -2.4 ± 3.9% at M. In conclusion, Vt measurements at during exercise by OEP and spirometry are closely correlated and the difference between measurements was insignificant.

  17. Fertilizer placement to maximize nitrogen use by fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The method of fertilizer nitrogen(N) application can affect N uptake in tall fescue and therefore its yield and quality. Subsurface-banding (knife) of fertilizer maximizes fescue N uptake in the poorly-drained clay–pan soils of southeastern Kansas. This study was conducted to determine if knifed N r...

  18. Curriculum and Testing Strategies to Maximize Special Education STAAR Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    This document is from a presentation at the 2015 annual conference of the Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT). The two sessions (each listed as feature sessions at the state conference) examined classroom strategies the presenter used in his chemistry classes to maximize Texas end-of-course chemistry test scores for his special population…

  19. Using Debate to Maximize Learning Potential: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Vaughn, Aaron; Dye, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Following a review of the literature, an educational case study is provided for the benefit of faculty preparing college courses. In particular, we provide a transcribed debate utilized in a General Psychology course as a best practice example of how to craft a debate which maximizes student learning. The work is presented as a model for the…

  20. Modifying Softball for Maximizing Learning Outcomes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Ward, Phillip; Goodway, Jacqueline D.; Sutherland, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Softball is taught in many physical education programs throughout the United States. This article describes modifications that maximize learning outcomes and that address the National Standards and safety recommendations. The modifications focus on tasks and equipment, developmentally appropriate motor-skill acquisition, increasing number of…

  1. Maximal regularity for perturbed integral equations on periodic Lebesgue spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizama, Carlos; Poblete, Verónica

    2008-12-01

    We characterize the maximal regularity of periodic solutions for an additive perturbed integral equation with infinite delay in the vector-valued Lebesgue spaces. Our method is based on operator-valued Fourier multipliers. We also study resonances, characterizing the existence of solutions in terms of a compatibility condition on the forcing term.

  2. Apportioning Program Evaluation Resources to Maximize Information Yield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, D. Royce

    1982-01-01

    Not all data for a program evaluation may be equally valuable, and costs of collection may vary when using several methods to obtain data from several sources. An approach to maximize information yield for a fixed, limited budget using a mathematical technique known as linear programming is described and generalized. (Author/CM)

  3. Formulation of Maximized Weighted Averages in URTURIP Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Formulation of Maximized Weighted Averages in URTURIP Technique Bruno Migeon, Philippe Deforge, Pierre Marché Laboratoire Vision et Robotique ...Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Laboratoire Vision et Robotique 63, avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges Cedex - France Performing Organization

  4. A Maximal Flow Approach to Dynamic Routing in Communication Networks,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    of nodes. In Appendix B we provide a computer program in Fortran for finding the maximal flow in these networks, based on the algorithm of Edmons and... Edmons and Karp is implemented by a Fortran Subroutine called MAXFL. The algorithm finds the shortest path between source and destination on which an

  5. Maximizing the Benefits of an Administrative Internship: Some Practical Advice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldfield, Kenneth; Ayers, Nancy

    Recommendations to help student interns in administrative positions maximize their educational opportunities vis-a-vis the "real world" and to also help them avoid certain placement-associated problems. The suggestions may be helpful to both new and established internship directors as well. Attention is focused on governmental administrative…

  6. Maximizing grain sorghum water use efficiency under deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development and evaluation of sustainable and efficient irrigation strategies is a priority for producers faced with water shortages resulting from aquifer depletion, reduced base flows, and reallocation of water to non-agricultural sectors. Under a limited water supply, yield maximization may not b...

  7. Maximizing Access, Equity, and Inclusion in General and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obiakor, Festus E.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of any educational program is to help its students to maximize their fullest potential in inclusive environments. For many students with disabilities, having an inclusive environment seems to be an ideal policy. Ironically, this policy continues to be debatable and controversial. Sometimes, the controversy or debate dominates the real…

  8. Optimal technique for maximal forward rotating vaults in men's gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Jackson, Monique I; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2015-08-01

    In vaulting a gymnast must generate sufficient linear and angular momentum during the approach and table contact to complete the rotational requirements in the post-flight phase. This study investigated the optimization of table touchdown conditions and table contact technique for the maximization of rotation potential for forwards rotating vaults. A planar seven-segment torque-driven computer simulation model of the contact phase in vaulting was evaluated by varying joint torque activation time histories to match three performances of a handspring double somersault vault by an elite gymnast. The closest matching simulation was used as a starting point to maximize post-flight rotation potential (the product of angular momentum and flight time) for a forwards rotating vault. It was found that the maximized rotation potential was sufficient to produce a handspring double piked somersault vault. The corresponding optimal touchdown configuration exhibited hip flexion in contrast to the hyperextended configuration required for maximal height. Increasing touchdown velocity and angular momentum lead to additional post-flight rotation potential. By increasing the horizontal velocity at table touchdown, within limits obtained from recorded performances, the handspring double somersault tucked with one and a half twists, and the handspring triple somersault tucked became theoretically possible.

  9. Maximizing plant density affects broccoli yield and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased demand for fresh market bunch broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) has led to increased production along the United States east coast. Maximizing broccoli yields is a primary concern for quickly expanding southeastern commercial markets. This broccoli plant density study was carr...

  10. Mentoring as Professional Development for Novice Entrepreneurs: Maximizing the Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Jean, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring can be seen as relevant if not essential in the continuing professional development of entrepreneurs. In the present study, we seek to understand how to maximize the learning that occurs through the mentoring process. To achieve this, we consider various elements that the literature suggested are associated with successful mentoring and…

  11. Emotional Control and Instructional Effectiveness: Maximizing a Timeout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Staci R.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for best practices for basketball coaches to maximize the instructional effectiveness of a timeout during competition. Practical applications are derived from research findings linking emotional intelligence to effective coaching behaviors. Additionally, recommendations are based on the implications of the…

  12. How to Maximize Learning for Gifted Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Having a gifted math or science student in the family or classroom is a fascination as well as a significant challenge and responsibility for many parents and teachers. In order to help maximize student learning, several questions need to be asked. What should be the role of technology? How well do traditional schools serve gifted students? What…

  13. Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Linda Riggs

    2012-01-01

    This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

  14. The Profit-Maximizing Firm: Old Wine in New Bottles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Explains and illustrates a simplified use of graphical analysis for analyzing the profit-maximizing firm. Believes that graphical analysis helps college students gain a deeper understanding of marginalism and an increased ability to formulate economic problems in marginalist terms. (DB)

  15. Maximally entangled mixed-state generation via local operations

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; Puentes, G.; Voigt, D.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2007-06-15

    We present a general theoretical method to generate maximally entangled mixed states of a pair of photons initially prepared in the singlet polarization state. This method requires only local operations upon a single photon of the pair and exploits spatial degrees of freedom to induce decoherence. We report also experimental confirmation of these theoretical results.

  16. A Method for Maximizing Split-Half Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, John C.; Osburn, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for maximizing split-half reliability coefficients is described. Coefficients derived by the algorithm were found to be generally larger than odd-even split-half coefficients or other internal consistency measures and nearly as large as the largest split half coefficients. MSPLIT, Odd-Even, and Kuder-Richardson-20…

  17. [Normal or high maximal oxygen uptake: a target in health].

    PubMed

    Ben-Dov, Issahar; Segel, Michael

    2012-02-01

    To achieve the predicted maximal oxygen consumption, many organs need to increase their output in a synchronized fashion. Therefore, maximal oxygen consumption is the single most reliable parameter predicting fitness, morbidity and mortality. Peak O2 uptake can be measured from noninvasive ventilatory parameters during short, incremental, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on a cycle ergometer or on a treadmill. Commercial systems are available and all enable breath by breath measurement of ventilation, exhaled gas concentration, oxygen saturation and additional cardiorespiratory parameters. Performance of the test requires adherence to strict guidelines and experienced technicians and physicians, although their qualification has not yet been defined by the national health authorities. There are well defined indications and benefits from CPET, among them are, determination of the anaerobic threshold, defining the cause of dyspnea, the timing for heart transplantation, exercise prescription for training and rehabilitation purposes and follow-up on disease progression or response to pharmacological or other modes of therapy. Measuring maximal oxygen consumption should be encouraged in health and disease and normal maximal oxygen consumption should be defined as a health target.

  18. Hardy-Littlewood maximal operator in generalized grand Lebesgue spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarkhadzhiev, Salaudin M.

    2014-12-01

    We obtain sufficient conditions and necessary conditions for the maximal operator to be bounded in the generalized grand Lebesgue space on an open set Ω ∈ Rn which is not necessarily bounded. The sufficient conditions coincide with necessary conditions for instance in the case where Ω is bounded and the standard definition of the grand space is used.

  19. Teacher Praise: Maximizing the Motivational Impact. Teaching Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVey, Mary D.

    2001-01-01

    Recognizes the influence of praise on human behavior, and provides specific suggestions on how to maximize the positive effects of praise when intended as positive reinforcement. Examines contingency, specificity, and selectivity aspects of praise. Cautions teachers to avoid the controlling effects of praise and the possibility that praise may…

  20. Quantum state space as a maximal consistent set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabia, Gelo Noel

    2012-02-01

    Measurement statistics in quantum theory are obtained from the Born rule and the uniqueness of the probability measure it assigns through quantum states is guaranteed by Gleason's theorem. Thus, a possible systematic way of exploring the geometry of quantum state space expresses quantum states in terms of outcome probabilities of a symmetric informationally complete measurement. This specific choice for representing quantum states is motivated by how the associated probability space provides a natural venue for characterizing the set of quantum states as a geometric construct called a maximal consistent set. We define the conditions for consistency and maximality of a set, provide some examples of maximal consistent sets and attempt to deduce the steps for building up a maximal consistent set of probability distributions equivalent to Hilbert space. In particular, we demonstrate how the reconstruction procedure works for qutrits and observe how it reveals an elegant underlying symmetry among five SIC-POVMs and a complete set of mutually unbiased bases, known in finite affine geometry as the Hesse configuration.

  1. Reliability of Maximal Strength Testing in Novice Weightlifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehr, James A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    The one repetition maximum (1RM) is a criterion measure of muscle strength. However, the reliability of 1RM testing in novice subjects has received little attention. Understanding this information is crucial to accurately interpret changes in muscle strength. To evaluate the test-retest reliability of a squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift (DL) 1RM in novice subjects. Twenty healthy males (31 plus or minus 5 y, 179.1 plus or minus 6.1 cm, 81.4 plus or minus 10.6 kg) with no weight training experience in the previous six months participated in four 1RM testing sessions, with each session separated by 5-7 days. SQ and HR 1RM were conducted using a smith machine; DL 1RM was assessed using free weights. Session 1 was considered a familiarization and was not included in the statistical analyses. Repeated measures analysis of variance with Tukey fs post-hoc tests were used to detect between-session differences in 1RM (p.0.05). Test-retest reliability was evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). During Session 2, the SQ and DL 1RM (SQ: 90.2 }4.3, DL: 75.9 }3.3 kg) were less than Session 3 (SQ: 95.3 }4.1, DL: 81.5 plus or minus 3.5 kg) and Session 4 (SQ: 96.6 }4.0, DL: 82.4 }3.9 kg), but there were no differences between Session 3 and Session 4. HR 1RM measured during Session 2 (150.1 }3.7 kg) and Session 3 (152.5 }3.9 kg) were not different from one another, but both were less than Session 4 (157.5 }3.8 kg). The reliability (ICC) of 1RM measures for Sessions 2-4 were 0.88, 0.83, and 0.87, for SQ, HR, and DL, respectively. When considering only Sessions 3 and 4, the reliability was 0.93, 0.91, and 0.86 for SQ, HR, and DL, respectively. One familiarization session and 2 test sessions (for SQ and DL) were required to obtain excellent reliability (ICC greater than or equal to 0.90) in 1RM values with novice subjects. We were unable to attain this level of reliability following 3 HR testing sessions therefore additional sessions may be required to obtain an

  2. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  3. A ∼ 3.8 hr PERIODICITY FROM AN ULTRASOFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS CANDIDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Godet, Olivier; Webb, Natalie A.; Barret, Didier

    2013-10-10

    Very few galactic nuclei are found to show significant X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). After carefully modeling the noise continuum, we find that the ∼3.8 hr QPO in the ultrasoft active galactic nucleus candidate 2XMM J123103.2+110648 was significantly detected (∼5σ) in two XMM-Newton observations in 2005, but not in the one in 2003. The QPO root mean square (rms) is very high and increases from ∼25% in 0.2-0.5 keV to ∼50% in 1-2 keV. The QPO probably corresponds to the low-frequency type in Galactic black hole X-ray binaries, considering its large rms and the probably low mass (∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}) of the black hole in the nucleus. We also fit the soft X-ray spectra from the three XMM-Newton observations and find that they can be described with either pure thermal disk emission or optically thick low-temperature Comptonization. We see no clear X-ray emission from the two Swift observations in 2013, indicating lower source fluxes than those in XMM-Newton observations.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HR8752 evolving through the void (Nieuwenhuijzen+ 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; de Jager, C.; Kolka, I.; Israelian, G.; Lobel, A.; Zsoldos, E.; Maeder, A.; Meynet, G.

    2012-06-01

    The main paper on the hypergiant HR8752 evolving through the void combines observational data from various sources: new spectral data, new and already published (B-V), V data. it also describes a new three-dimensional chebychev interpolating code, and gives information on the temperature calibration for hypergiants, and adds some extra Tables on colour excess and historical context (cf. below). The electronic appendix contains a number of tables, too large for publishing in the paper. In the text and in the appendix, they are referred to as Table Axx, resp. Cxx. We note, however, that tables A1.1 to A1.6 in Section 2 of the main paper are here referred to as tables appena11 to appena16. The observational tables appena11 to appena16, appena2, appena3, appena4 all refer to Section 2 in the main paper, while tables appena5, appena6, appena7, appena8 are used in Section 3 of the main paper. The technical table appenc1 describes the three-dimensional chebychev interpolation method used in Section 2 of the main paper. The second technical table appenc2 describes the (hypergiant) temperature calibration and transformation codes between Mk, Teff, and (B-V) data, used in Section 3 of the main paper. Table appena9 discusses some measured colour excesses (Section 3.3 of the main paper). Table appena10 discusses the possibility of historical context (Section 5.11 of the main paper). (20 data files).

  5. Exploring the multifaceted circumstellar environment of the luminous blue variable HR Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cavallaro, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Riggi, S.; Molinari, S.; Schillirò, F.

    2017-03-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic luminous blue variable HR Carinae, based on new high-resolution mid-infrared (IR) and radio images obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), which have been complemented by far-infrared Herschel-Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations and ATCA archive data. The Herschel images reveal the large-scale distribution of the dusty emitting nebula, which extends mainly to the north-east direction, up to 70 arcsec from the central star, and is oriented along the direction of the space motion of the star. In the mid-infrared images, the brightness distribution is characterized by two arc-shaped structures, tracing an inner envelope surrounding the central star more closely. At radio wavelengths, the ionized gas emission lies on the opposite side of the cold dust with respect to the position of the star, as if the ionized front were confined by the surrounding medium in the north-south direction. Comparison with previous data indicates significant changes in the radio nebula morphology and in the mass-loss rate from the central star, which has increased from 6.1 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 in 1994-1995 to 1.17 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 in 2014. We investigate possible scenarios that could have generated the complex circumstellar environment revealed by our multiwavelength data.

  6. Urban Area Extent Extraction in Spaceborne HR and VHR Data Using Multi-Resolution Features

    PubMed Central

    Iannelli, Gianni Cristian; Lisini, Gianni; Dell'Acqua, Fabio; Feitosa, Raul Queiroz; da Costa, Gilson Alexandre Ostwald Pedro; Gamba, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Detection of urban area extents by means of remotely sensed data is a difficult task, especially because of the multiple, diverse definitions of what an “urban area” is. The models of urban areas listed in technical literature are based on the combination of spectral information with spatial patterns, possibly at different spatial resolutions. Starting from the same data set, “urban area” extraction may thus lead to multiple outputs. If this is done in a well-structured framework, however, this may be considered as an advantage rather than an issue. This paper proposes a novel framework for urban area extent extraction from multispectral Earth Observation (EO) data. The key is to compute and combine spectral and multi-scale spatial features. By selecting the most adequate features, and combining them with proper logical rules, the approach allows matching multiple urban area models. Experimental results for different locations in Brazil and Kenya using High-Resolution (HR) data prove the usefulness and flexibility of the framework. PMID:25271564

  7. 1H HR-MAS NMR of carotenoids in aqueous samples and raw vegetables.

    PubMed

    Miglietta, M L; Lamanna, R

    2006-07-01

    Carotenoids are linear C40 tetraterpenoid hydrocarbons and represent a wide category of natural pigments. They are components of the pigment system of chloroplasts and are involved in the primary light absorption and the photon canalization of photosynthesis. Moreover, they also behave as quenchers of singlet oxygen, protecting cells and organisms against lipid peroxidation. Carotenoids have a strong lipophilic character and are usually analyzed in organic solvents. However, because of their biological activity, the characterization of these compounds in an aqueous environment or in the natural matrix is very important. One of the most important dietary carotenoids is beta-carotene, which has been extensively studied both in vivo and in model systems, but because of the low concentration and strong interaction with the biological matrix, beta-carotene has never been observed by NMR in solid aqueous samples.In the present work, a model system has been developed for the detection and identification of beta-carotene in solid aqueous samples by 1H HR-MAS NMR. The efficiency of the model has led to the identification of beta-carotene in a raw vegetable matrix.

  8. PDK1 and HR46 Gene Homologs Tie Social Behavior to Ovary Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Amdam, Gro V.; Rueppell, Olav; Wallrichs, Megan A.; Fondrk, M. Kim; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of division of labor in social insects is a central question in evolutionary and behavioral biology. The honey bee is a model for studying evolutionary behavioral genetics because of its well characterized age-correlated division of labor. After an initial period of within-nest tasks, 2–3 week-old worker bees begin foraging outside the nest. Individuals often specialize by biasing their foraging efforts toward collecting pollen or nectar. Efforts to explain the origins of foraging specialization suggest that division of labor between nectar and pollen foraging specialists is influenced by genes with effects on reproductive physiology. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of foraging behavior also reveals candidate genes for reproductive traits. Here, we address the linkage of reproductive anatomy to behavior, using backcross QTL analysis, behavioral and anatomical phenotyping, candidate gene expression studies, and backcross confirmation of gene-to-anatomical trait associations. Our data show for the first time that the activity of two positional candidate genes for behavior, PDK1 and HR46, have direct genetic relationships to ovary size, a central reproductive trait that correlates with the nectar and pollen foraging bias of workers. These findings implicate two genes that were not known previously to influence complex social behavior. Also, they outline how selection may have acted on gene networks that affect reproductive resource allocation and behavior to facilitate the evolution of social foraging in honey bees. PMID:19340296

  9. Ascertaining serum levels of trace elements in melanoma patients using PIXE and HR-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, S.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Santos, I. D. A. O.; Oliveira, A. F.; Shie, J. N.; Sarkis, J. E. S.; Oliveira, T.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a serious and deadly form of skin cancer. However, patients' chances of survival and recovery are considerably increased when it is diagnosed and treated in its early stages. In this study, trace element concentrations in serum samples from patients with melanoma were measured using PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and HR-ICPMS (High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), with the purpose of correlating these concentrations with the disease. Blood samples from 30 melanoma patients and 116 healthy donors were collected at São Paulo Hospital (protocol CEP 1036/08 UNIFESP). Relevant clinical information on the patients has also been included in the statistical analysis. Analysis of the control group showed different P and Mg concentrations in individuals above and below 40 years of age. P, S, Ca, Cu and Zn concentrations in healthy individuals differed according to gender, highlighting the necessity to include age and gender variables in the case-control analysis. There were also differences in K, S, Ca and Se concentrations between the control and melanoma groups.

  10. TRMM Science Highlights and 3-hr Quasi-global Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has completed more than four years in orbit. A summary of research highlights will be presented focusing on application of TRMM data to topics ranging over climate analysis, improving forecasts, precipitation processes and non-precipitation applications. One focus of the talk will be the quasi-global TRMM real-time merged rainfall analysis with 3-hr resolution, which uses TRMM to calibrate estimates from other polar-orbit and geosynchronous satellites. These rainfall estimates provide useful information for applications for assimilation into numerical models and for hydrological studies. The status of precipitation estimates from different TRMM instruments and algorithms will be described. Monthly surface rainfall estimates over the ocean based on different instruments on TRMM currently differ by 20% in overall mean. In addition, time changes in global ocean rainfall between El Nino and La Nina conditions show differences between the active and passive microwave products. Improved versions of algorithms will shortly resolve most of these differences. The TRMM rainfall estimates are intercompared among themselves and with other estimates, including those of the standard, monthly Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) analysis. A four-year TRMM rainfall climatology is presented, including anomaly fields related to the changing ENSO situation during the mission. The evolution of precipitation analysis incorporating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) data on AQUA and ADEOS II and eventually data from the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) will also be described.

  11. Conceptual Design of a Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with 24-HR Endurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design study for a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that is able to carry a 25-lb science payload for 24 hr and is able to land and take off at elevations as high as 15,000 ft without human intervention. In addition to the science payload, this vehicle must be able to carry a satellite communication system, and the vehicle must be able to be transported in a standard full-size pickup truck and assembled by only two operators. This project started with a brainstorming phase to devise possible vehicle configurations that might satisfy the requirements. A down select was performed to select a near-term solution and two advanced vehicle concepts that are better suited to the intent of the mission. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the requirements and the technology levels to obtain a better understanding of the design space. This study found that within the study assumptions the mission is feasible; the selected concepts are recommended for further development.

  12. Laser damage of HR, AR-coatings, monolayers and bare surfaces at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Said, A. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced damage thresholds and morphologies were investigated in a variety of uncoated and coated surfaces, including monolayers and multi-layers of different chemical compositions. Both antireflective (AR) and highly reflective (HR) were tested. Testing was done at 1064 nm with 25 picosecond and 8 nanosecond YAG/Nd laser single pulses. Spot diameter in the experiments varied from 0.09 to 0.22 mm. The laser damage measurement procedure consisted of 1-on-1 (single laser pulse in the selected site) and N-on-1 experiments including repeated irradiation by pulses of the same fluence and subsequently raised from pulse to pulse fluence until damage occurred. The highest picosecond damage thresholds of commercially available coatings averaged 12 - 14 J/sq cm, 50 percent less than thresholds obtained in bare fused silica. Some coatings and bare surfaces revealed a palpable preconditioning effect (an increase in threshold of 1.2 to 1.8 times). Picosecond and nanosecond data were compared to draw conclusions about pulse width dependence. An attempt was made to classify damage morphologies according to the type of coating, class of irradiating, and damage level.

  13. The variable Herbig Ae Star HR 5999. X - Its photometric 'pulse-shaped' variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Webb, J. R.; The, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    We present additional photometric observations (Stromgren y filter) of the Herbig Ae Star HR 5999. This new set of data, composed of 282 data points covering April 1983 to August 1989, was used in conjunction with the 362 data points compiled by Baade and Stahl (1989). Our aim was to detect single or multiple periods in the integrated set of data spanning nearly 20 yr. Through the use of series analysis techniques, and by removing any linear component present in the raw data, we were able to detect weak peaks in the power spectra (in the order of intensity the strongest peaks are at 301 and 113 d) which were not self-evident in the phase diagrams. The overall picture of the data shows a small linear component, which is more noticeable in the new set of data, indicating that the recent maxima appear brighter. By a detailed analysis of the full light curve we were able to detect the presence of well-defined 'pulses' or bursts. Further Gaussian fits of these bursts indicated that the pulses are relatively rapid, of the order of 10 d, with some of them being closely spaced. No periodicity was found for the pulses. A possible explanation of these aperiodic outbursts is that they detect a flow of matter accompanied by magnetic field disturbances originated from the interior of the star, unlike those originating externally such as binary perturbations, which tend to be periodic.

  14. TRANSITS AND OCCULTATIONS OF AN EARTH-SIZED PLANET IN AN 8.5 hr ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Rappaport, Saul; Winn, Joshua N.; Levine, Alan; Kotson, Michael C.; Latham, David W.; Buchhave, Lars A. E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: aml@space.mit.edu

    2013-09-01

    We report the discovery of an Earth-sized planet (1.16 {+-} 0.19 R{sub Circled-Plus }) in an 8.5 hr orbit around a late G-type star (KIC 8435766, Kepler-xx). The object was identified in a search for short-period planets in the Kepler database and confirmed to be a transiting planet (as opposed to an eclipsing stellar system) through the absence of ellipsoidal light variations or substantial radial-velocity variations. The unusually short orbital period and the relative brightness of the host star (m{sub Kep} = 11.5) enable robust detections of the changing illumination of the visible hemisphere of the planet, as well as the occultations of the planet by the star. We interpret these signals as representing a combination of reflected and reprocessed light, with the highest planet dayside temperature in the range of 2300 K-3100 K. Follow-up spectroscopy combined with finer sampling photometric observations will further pin down the system parameters and may even yield the mass of the planet.

  15. Images of the Extended Outer Regions of the Debris Ring around HR 4796 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, C.; Janson, M.; Buenzli, E.; Brandt, T. D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Moro-Martín, A.; Usuda, T.; Schneider, G.; Carson, J.; McElwain, M. W.; Grady, C. A.; Goto, M.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Dominik, C.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Fukue, T.; Golota, T.; Guyon, O.; Hashimoto, J.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K. W.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G. R.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Kuzuhara, M.; Matsuo, T.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takami, M.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Tamura, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present high-contrast images of HR 4796 A taken with Subaru/HiCIAO in the H band, resolving the debris disk in scattered light. The application of specialized angular differential imaging methods allows us to trace the inner edge of the disk with high precision and reveals a pair of "streamers" extending radially outward from the ansae. Using a simple disk model with a power-law surface brightness profile, we demonstrate that the observed streamers can be understood as part of the smoothly tapered outer boundary of the debris disk, which is most visible at the ansae. Our observations are consistent with the expected result of a narrow planetesimal ring being ground up in a collisional cascade, yielding dust with a wide range of grain sizes. Radiation forces leave large grains in the ring and push smaller grains onto elliptical or even hyperbolic trajectories. We measure and characterize the disk's surface brightness profile, and confirm the previously suspected offset of the disk's center from the star's position along the ring's major axis. Furthermore, we present first evidence for an offset along the minor axis. Such offsets are commonly viewed as signposts for the presence of unseen planets within a disk's cavity. Our images also offer new constraints on the presence of companions down to the planetary mass regime (~9 M Jup at 0farcs5, ~3 M Jup at 1''). Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  16. Images of the Extended Outer Regions of the Debris Ring around HR 4796 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thalmann, C.; Janson, M.; Buenzli, E.; Brandt, T. D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Moro-Martin, A.; Usuda, T.; Schneider, G.; Carson, J.; McElwain, M. W.; Grady, C. A.; Goto, M.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Dominik, C.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Fukue, T.; Golota, T.; Guyon, O.; Hashimoto, J.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Serabyn, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-contrast images of HR 4796 A taken with Subaru/HiCIAO in H-band, resolving the debris disk in scattered light. The application of specialized angular differential imaging methods (ADI) allows us to trace the inner edge of the disk with high precision, and reveals a pair of "streamers" extending radially outwards from the ansae. Using a simple disk model with a power-law surface brightness profile, we demonstrate that the observed streamers can be understood as part of the smoothly tapered outer boundary of the debris disk, which is most visible at the ansae. Our observations are consistent with the expected result of a narrow planetesimal ring being ground up in a collisional cascade, yielding dust with a wide range of grain sizes. Radiation forces leave large grains in the ring and push smaller grains onto elliptical, or even hyperbolic trajectories. We measure and characterize the disk's surface brightness profile, and confirm the previously suspected offset of the disk's center from the star's position along the ring's major axis. Furthermore, we present first evidence for an offset along the minor axis. Such offsets are commonly viewed as signposts for the presence of unseen planets within a disk's cavity. Our images also offer new constraints on the presence of companions down to the planetary mass regime (approx 9 M(sub Jup) at 0".5, approx 3 M(sub Jup) at 1").

  17. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A. A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J.; Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I.; Vigani, L.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Kanisauskas, K.; Maneuski, D.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Grenier, P.; Kenney, C.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Turchetta, R.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Ehrler, F.; Peric, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Stanitzki, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Wang, R.; Zhang, J.; Warren, M.; Song, W.; Xiu, Q.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  18. Evidence for cross-linking in tomato cutin using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ashish P; Simpson, André J; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2003-11-01

    Cutin is a polyester biopolymer component of plant leaf and fruit cuticles, most often associated with waxes and cuticular polysaccharides, and sometimes with another aliphatic biopolymer called cutan. Insolubility of these cuticular biopolymers has made it difficult to apply traditional analytical techniques for structure determination, because most techniques providing molecular level details require solubility. By using the relatively new technique of one and two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, with added information from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, detailed through-bond connectivities and assignments are made for cutin from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) fruit. Based on the data obtained, tomato cutin is found to be predominantly an aliphatic polyester with some olefinic and aromatic moieties, consistent with previous studies that employed various degradative approaches. Aside from esters, there are free primary and secondary alcohol groups, as well as free fatty acids. A significant finding is the presence of alpha-branched fatty acids/esters. Mid-chain hydroxyls appear to be generally unesterified, but esters of mid-chain hydroxyls have been identified. The alpha-branched fatty acids/esters and esters of mid-chain hydroxyls could point towards cross-linking.

  19. Maximal oxygen uptake in Chilean workers of normal nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Donoso, H

    1988-01-01

    Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) was measured directly and predicted from cardiac frequency measurements in 54 healthy Chilean industrial workers aged 20 to 55 years, together with assessment of their dietary intake, body composition and blood chemistry. Measurement of VO2 was performed on a motor-driven treadmill. The predicted VO2max was obtained using a cycle ergometer by two methods: 1) the Astrand-Ryhming nomogram and 2) the linear relationship between "steady state" heart rate (HR) and submaximum work, with subsequent extrapolation to "maximum" heart rate. Extrapolation of the HR/load regression line to 170 bpm permitted determination of the physical working capacity at 170 bpm (W170). VO2max for the 20-29 year group (Group I) averaged 3624 ml.min-1 and decreased to 3066 ml.min-1 in the 50-55 year group (Group IV). Lower values were obtained using the Astrand-Ryhming nomogram and HR/load regression (-15% and -9% respectively). W170 was also affected by age (Group I: 190.6 W and Group IV: 158.5 W). No significant correlation were found between VO2max and plasma variables, with the exception of cholesterol (r = 0.59). On the contrary, anthropometric variables showed significant correlations with VO2max, which permitted the prediction of VO2max using multiple regression equations. The two best correlations were: 1. VO2max = 0.800 - 0.0225.(A) +0.0189.(W)+1.26.(H) (r = 0.87; p less than 0.001) 2. VO2max = 0.996 - 0.0176.(A) + 0.025.(W) + 0.838.(H) + 0.0255.(LBM) (r = 0.88; p less than 0.001) where A = years of age; W = body weight in kg; H = height in m and LBM = lean body mass in kg.

  20. A wearable ECG-HR detector and its application to automatic assist-mode selection of an electrically assisted bicycle.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Akinori; Miyashita, Osamu; Yoshida, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Lataire, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an electrically assisted bicycle has been widely used in daily life and becomes very popular. The user selects the stepwise assist-mode to determine the assistive torque for pleasurable running. From the viewpoint of improvement of health by exercise, the electrically assisted bicycle can be an exercise machine like a treadmill. The heart rate (HR) is regarded as an indication of exercise load. This paper presents an automatic assist-mode selection system based on the HR of the bicycle user. The HR is obtained from the R-waves measured by the proposed wearable electrocardiograph on the user. The mode-selection system is simply implemented by a personal computer, USB-connected interface, and some electronic switching circuits. The running experiments confirm that the proposed assist-mode selection method has practicability.

  1. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  2. Niobium in R And (S6, 6e) and HR 1105 (S5, 3). [S star abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Lines of the first multiplet of niobium are strong in R And and HR 1105. These lines are also present in other S stars: HR 8714, R Cam, V Cnc, R CMi, and T Sgr. They are also visible in the M stars, Beta-Peg and Mu-UMa. An approximation to the abundance ratio, Nb/Fe, has been deduced from pairs of lines having nearly equal intensity. In R And, the ratio is about 200 times the solar value. It is hoped that good plates will soon be obtained for the near infrared region, so that the significant Nb/Rb abundance ratio may be determined.

  3. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  4. Comparison of Anterior Segment Biometric Measurements between Pentacam HR and IOLMaster in Normal and High Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqin; Jia, Yading; Zhang, Haining; Jia, Zhijie; Wang, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the anterior chamber depth (ACD), keratometry (K) and astigmatism measurements taken by IOLMaster and Pentacam HR in normal and high myopic (HM) eyes. Design A prospective observational case series. Methods Sixty-six normal eyes and 59 HM eyes underwent ACD, keratometry and astigmatism measurements with both devices. Axial length (AL) was measured on IOLMaster. The interdevice agreement was evaluated using the Bland-Altman analysis and paired t-test. The correlations between age and AL & ACD were analyzed. Vector analysis was used to compare astigmatism measurements. Results The ACD from IOLMaster and Pentacam HR was different for the normal group (P = 0.003) but not for the HM group (P = 0.280). IOLMaster demonstrated higher steep K and mean K values than Pentacam HR for both normal and HM groups (P<0.001 for all). IOLMaster also have higher flat K values for the HM groups (P<0.001) but were statistically equivalent with Pentacam HR for the normal group (P = 0.119) IOLMaster and Pentacam HR were different in astigmatism measurements for the normal group but were statistically equivalent for the HM group. For the normal group, age was negatively correlated with AL, IOLMaster ACD and Pentacam HR ACD (r = -0.395, P = 0.001; r = -0.715, P < 0.001; r = -0.643, P < 0.001). For the HM group, age was positively correlated with AL but negatively correlated with IOLMaster ACD and Pentacam HR ACD (r = 0.377, P = 0.003; r = -0.392, P = 0.002; r = -0.616, P < 0.001). Conclusions The IOLMaster and Pentacam HR have significant difference in corneal power measurements for both normal and HM groups. The two instruments also differ in ACD and astigmatism measurement for the normal group. Therefore, a single instrument is recommended for studying longitudinal changes in anterior segment biometric measurements. Age should be considered as an influencing factor for both AL and ACD values in the normal and HM group. PMID:26575265

  5. Assessment of maximal cardiorespiratory performance and muscle power in the Italian Olympic judoka.

    PubMed

    Sbriccoli, Paola; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Di Mario, Alberto; Marzattinocci, Giulia; Felici, Francesco

    2007-08-01

    The main purposes of this study were to describe the cardiorespiratory fitness and lower limbs maximal muscle power of a selected group of Olympic Italian male (M) and female (F) judokas. Eleven subjects (6 M, 5 F) underwent 3 different tests. The VO(2)max and ventilatory threshold (VT; V-slope method) were assessed during a graded maximal treadmill test. Lower limbs muscle peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) were determined during a 30-second Wingate test (WIN). Post-WIN blood lactate peak was also measured. Subjects were tested also during a 5-minute combat test (CT), during which blood lactate and heart rate (HR) were monitored. VO(2)max (mean +/- SD) was 47.3 +/- 10.9 and 52.9 +/- 4.4 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) for M and F judokas, respectively. The VT corresponded to 80.8% (M) and 86.5% (F) of VO(2)max. Both PP and MP, measured during the WIN, were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in M than in F judokas (PP: 12.1 +/- 2.4 vs. 9.5 +/- 1.1 W x kg(-1); MP: 5.4 +/- 1.1 W x kg(-1); F: 4.3 +/- 0.5 W x kg(-1)). Post WIN blood lactate peak was 6.9 +/- 2.8 mmol x l(-1) and 6.1 +/- 1.8 mmol x l(-1) for M and F judokas, respectively (not significant). During the CT blood lactate peak was 9.9 +/- 3.0 mmol x l(-1) (M) and 9.2 +/- 2.0 mmol x l(-1) (F); these values being significantly higher than those obtained after the WIN (p < 0.05). In conclusion, Italian Olympic judokas showed high levels of muscle power but accompanied by a moderate engagement of the aerobic metabolic pathway, which is well in accordance with the characteristics of judo. Having these results in top-level athletes may represent a useful contribution to the work of coaches and trainers in optimizing training programs for the achievement of the best performance of the judoka.

  6. [Chemical constituents from the roots of Angelica polymorpha Maxim].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Yang; Ren, Feng-Xia; Yu, Neng-Jiang; Xu, Rui; Zhao, Yi-Min

    2013-05-01

    Angelica polymorpha Maxim. is a plant of the Angelica genus (Umbelliferae). The root and stem of this plant is a folk medicine known to have the actions of relieving rheumatism and cold and subsiding swelling and pains. To investigate the chemical constituents in the root of A. polymorpha Maxim., seven compounds were isolated from an 80% ethanol extract by column chromatography. Their structures were elucidated according to the spectroscopic analysis. Compound 1 is a new sesquiterpene, named as bisabolactone. Its absolute configuration was determined by 1D NOESY and CD analysis. The others were identified as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (2), hycandinic acid ester 1 (3), ferulic acid (4), isooxypeucedanin (5), noreugenin (6) and cimifugin (7). Compound 2 and 3 were isolated from this genus for the first time and compound 4 was isolated from this plant for the first time.

  7. Maximally entangled mixed states for qubit-qutrit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Paulo E. M. F.; Marchiolli, Marcelo A.; Hedemann, Samuel R.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the problems of maximizing the entanglement negativity of X-form qubit-qutrit density matrices with (i) a fixed spectrum and (ii) a fixed purity. In the first case, the problem is solved in full generality whereas, in the latter, partial solutions are obtained by imposing extra spectral constraints such as rank deficiency and degeneracy, which enable a semidefinite programming treatment for the optimization problem at hand. Despite the technically motivated assumptions, we provide strong numerical evidence that threefold degenerate X states of purity P reach the highest entanglement negativity accessible to arbitrary qubit-qutrit density matrices of the same purity, hence characterizing a sparse family of likely qubit-qutrit maximally entangled mixed states.

  8. Exactly maximally convergent multipoint Padé approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacheva, Ralitza K.

    2016-12-01

    Given a regular compact set E in the complex plane C, a unit measure µ supported by ∂E, a triangular point set β := {βn,kk=1nn=1∞, β ⊂ ∂E and a function f, holomorphic on E, let πn,m β ,f be the associated multipoint β- Padé approximant of order (n, m). We show that if the sequence πn,m β ,f , n ∈ Λ, m- fixed, converges exact maximally to f relatively to the measure µ, then the points βn,k are uniformly distributed on ∂E with respect to µ as n ∈ Λ. Furthermore, a result about the zeros behavior of the exact maximally convergent sequence Λ is provided, under the condition that Λ is "dense enough."

  9. Maximal aerobic power measurement in runners and swimmers.

    PubMed Central

    Corry, I.; Powers, N.

    1982-01-01

    Five cross-country runners and five competitive swimmers performed a pulling exercise with elastic shock cords and a treadmill run to exhaustion. The mean VO2 max related to lean body mass of the runners was significantly higher than the swimmers on the treadmill (p less than 0.05) while, on the pulling test, the mean VO2 max of the swimmers was significantly higher than the runners (p less 0.01). The maximum heart rates achieved pulling were 95% of the running maximum by runners and 96% by swimmers with no significant difference between them. Their mean oxygen pulse was almost the same for maximal running but the swimmers had a significantly higher oxygen pulse than the runners for maximal pulling (p less than 0.01). The swimmers could reach about 79% of their running VO2 max by pulling while the runners used 53% of their running VO2 max. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7139226

  10. High Intensity Interval Training For Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-04-03

    Regular physical activity or exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT.

  11. Likelihood maximization for list-mode emission tomographic image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C

    2001-10-01

    The maximum a posteriori (MAP) Bayesian iterative algorithm using priors that are gamma distributed, due to Lange, Bahn and Little, is extended to include parameter choices that fall outside the gamma distribution model. Special cases of the resulting iterative method include the expectation maximization maximum likelihood (EMML) method based on the Poisson model in emission tomography, as well as algorithms obtained by Parra and Barrett and by Huesman et al. that converge to maximum likelihood and maximum conditional likelihood estimates of radionuclide intensities for list-mode emission tomography. The approach taken here is optimization-theoretic and does not rely on the usual expectation maximization (EM) formalism. Block-iterative variants of the algorithms are presented. A self-contained, elementary proof of convergence of the algorithm is included.

  12. Momentary maximizing in concurrent schedules with a minimum interchangeover interval

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, João Claudio; Souza, Deisy G.; Bori, Carolina M.

    1993-01-01

    Eight pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval variable-interval schedules with a minimum interchangeover time programmed as a consequence of changeovers. In Experiment 1 the reinforcement schedules remained constant while the minimum interchangeover time varied from 0 to 200 s. Relative response rates and relative time deviated from relative reinforcement rates toward indifference with long minimum interchangeover times. In Experiment 2 different reinforcement ratios were scheduled in successive experimental conditions with the minimum interchangeover time constant at 0, 2, 10, or 120 s. The exponent of the generalized matching equation was close to 1.0 when the minimum interchangeover time was 0 s (the typical procedure for concurrent schedules without a changeover delay) and decreased as that duration was increased. The data support the momentary maximizing theory and contradict molar maximizing theories and the melioration theory. PMID:16812704

  13. Resistance maximization principle for defending networks against virus attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the defending of networks against virus attack. We define the resistance of a network to be the maximum number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible from random walk, from which random walk cannot escape. We show that for any network G, R(G) =H1(G) -H2(G) , where R(G) is the resistance of G, H1(G) and H2(G) are the one- and two-dimensional structural information of G, respectively, and that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attack. By using the theory, we investigate the defending of real world networks and of the networks generated by the preferential attachment and the security models. We show that there exist networks that are defensible by a small number of controllers from cascading failure of any virus attack. Our theory demonstrates that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attacks.

  14. Dynamically Disordered Quantum Walk as a Maximal Entanglement Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Rafael; Amorim, Edgard P. M.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2013-11-01

    We show that the entanglement between the internal (spin) and external (position) degrees of freedom of a qubit in a random (dynamically disordered) one-dimensional discrete time quantum random walk (QRW) achieves its maximal possible value asymptotically in the number of steps, outperforming the entanglement attained by using ordered QRW. The disorder is modeled by introducing an extra random aspect to QRW, a classical coin that randomly dictates which quantum coin drives the system’s time evolution. We also show that maximal entanglement is achieved independently of the initial state of the walker, study the number of steps the system must move to be within a small fixed neighborhood of its asymptotic limit, and propose two experiments where these ideas can be tested.

  15. Runners greatly underestimate sweat losses before and after a 1-hr summer run.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Eric K; Davis, Brett A; Thigpen, Lauren K; Caufield, Christina R; Horton, Anthony D; McIntosh, Joyce R

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how accurately runners estimate their sweat losses. Male (n = 19) and female (n = 20) runners (41 ± 10 yr, VO2max 57 ± 9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) from the southeastern U.S. completed an ~1-hr run during late summer on a challenging outdoor road course (wet bulb globe temperature 24.1 ± 1.5 °C). Runs began at ~6:45 a.m. or p.m. Before and after running, participants filled race-aid-station paper cups with a volume of fluid they felt would be equivalent to their sweat losses. Total sweat losses and losses by percent body weight differed (p < .01) between men (1,797 ± 449 ml, 2.3% ± 0.6%) and women (1,155 ± 258 ml, 1.9% ± 0.4%). Postrun estimates (738 ± 470 ml) were lower (p < .001) than sweat losses (1,468 ± 484 ml), equaling underestimations of 50% ± 23%, with no differences in estimation accuracy by percentage between genders. Runners who reported measuring changes in pre- and postrun weight to assess sweat losses within the previous month (n = 9, -54% ± 18%) were no more accurate (p = .55) than runners who had not (n = 30, -48% ± 24%). These results suggest that inadequate fluid intake during runs or between runs may stem from underestimations of sweat losses and that runners who do assess sweat-loss changes may be making sweat-loss calculation errors or do not accurately translate changes in body weight to physical volumes of water.

  16. Clouds and Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Extrasolar Planet HR8799b

    SciTech Connect

    Barman, T S; Macintosh, B A; Konopacky, Q M; Marois, C

    2011-03-21

    Using the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS, on the Keck II telescope, broad near-infrared H and K-band spectra of the young exoplanet HR8799b have been obtained. In addition, six new narrow-band photometric measurements have been taken across the H and K bands. These data are combined with previously published photometry for an analysis of the planet's atmospheric properties. Thick photospheric dust cloud opacity is invoked to explain the planet's red near-IR colors and relatively smooth near-IR spectrum. Strong water absorption is detected, indicating a Hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Only weak CH{sub 4} absorption is detected at K band, indicating efficient vertical mixing and a disequilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} ratio at photospheric depths. The H-band spectrum has a distinct triangular shape consistent with low surface gravity. New giant planet atmosphere models are compared to these data with best fitting bulk parameters, T{sub eff} = 1100K {+-} 100 and log(g) = 3.5 {+-} 0.5 (for solar composition). Given the observed luminosity (log L{sub obs}/L{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} -5.1), these values correspond to a radius of 0.75 R{sub Jup{sub 0.12}{sup +0.17}} and mass {approx} 0.72 M{sub Jup{sub -0.6}{sup +2.6}} - strikingly inconsistent with interior/evolution models. Enhanced metallicity (up to {approx} 10 x that of the Sun) along with thick clouds and non-equilibrium chemistry are likely required to reproduce the complete ensemble of spectroscopic and photometric data and the low effective temperatures (< 1000K) required by the evolution models.

  17. The warm circumstellar envelope and wind of the G9 IIb star HR 6902

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, T.; Baade, R.; Reimers, D.

    2001-12-01

    IUE observations of the eclipsing binary system HR 6902 obtained at various epochs spread over four years indicate the presence of warm circumstellar material enveloping the G9 IIb primary. The spectra show Si Iv and C Iv absorption up to a distance of 3.3 giant radii (Rg). Line ratio diagnostics yields an electron temperature of ~ 78 000 K which appears to be constant over the observed height range. Applying a least square fit absorption line analysis we derive column densities as a function of height. We find that the inner envelope (< 3;Rg) of the bright giant is consistent with a hydrostatic density distribution. The derived line broadening velocity of ~ 70 km s-1 is sufficient to provide turbulent pressure support for the required scale height. However, an improved agreement with observations over the whole height regime including the emission line region is obtained with an outflow model. We demonstrate that the common β power-law as well as a P ∝ ρ wind yield appropriate fit models. Adopting a continuous mass outflow we obtain a mass-loss rate of M⊙=0.8 - 3.4 × 10-11 Msolar yr-1 depending on the particular wind model. The emission lines observed during total eclipse are attributed mostly to resonance scattering of B star photons in the extended envelope of the giant. By means of a multi-dimensional line formation study we show that the global envelope properties are consistent with the wind models derived from the absorption line analysis. We argue that future high resolution UV spectroscopy will resolve the large-scale velocity structure of the circumstellar shell. As an illustration we present theoretical Si Iv and C Iv emission profiles showing model-dependent line shifts and asymmetries.

  18. Aquatic studies at the 100-HR-3 and 100-NR-1 operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.

    1993-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a program to characterize selected aquatic biological populations to determine (1) existing levels of inorganic chemical and radionuclide contamination, and (2) the populations` suitability as indicators of chemical releases during cleanup activities at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Following work plans for the ground-water operable units, lower trophic levels in the aquatic habitat (periphyton and caddisfly larvae) were evaluated for contaminants at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit and 100-NR-1 Operable Unit. The results were evaluated to determine the need for further sampling. If the results showed no significant contamination compared to upriver levels, sampling would be discontinued. The periphyton community appears to be suitable for determining contamination levels. Baseline concentrations for stable chromium were established and will be useful for comparing samples collected when contaminant release is expected. Concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs in periphyton were essentially below detectable limits, which will also make this community useful in detecting potential releases of radionuclides during cleanup activities. Levels for both stable chromium and radionuclides were essentially below detection limits for caddisfly larvae. Thus, these organisms may be used to monitor suspected contaminant releases from cleanup activities; if concentrations exceed detection limits, they may be related to these activities. Two candidate threatened and endangered species of molluscs occur in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These are the shortface lanx (Fisherola nuttalli), which is a Washington State candidate species, and the Columbia pebblesnail (Fluminicola columbiana), which is both a state and federal candidate species. Specimens of the shortface lanx were observed in the vicinity of N Springs (100-NR-1 Operable Unit); they likely occur throughout this area.

  19. Aquatic studies at the 100-HR-3 and 100-NR-1 operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.

    1993-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a program to characterize selected aquatic biological populations to determine (1) existing levels of inorganic chemical and radionuclide contamination, and (2) the populations' suitability as indicators of chemical releases during cleanup activities at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Following work plans for the ground-water operable units, lower trophic levels in the aquatic habitat (periphyton and caddisfly larvae) were evaluated for contaminants at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit and 100-NR-1 Operable Unit. The results were evaluated to determine the need for further sampling. If the results showed no significant contamination compared to upriver levels, sampling would be discontinued. The periphyton community appears to be suitable for determining contamination levels. Baseline concentrations for stable chromium were established and will be useful for comparing samples collected when contaminant release is expected. Concentrations of [sup 60]Co, [sup 90]Sr, and [sup 137]Cs in periphyton were essentially below detectable limits, which will also make this community useful in detecting potential releases of radionuclides during cleanup activities. Levels for both stable chromium and radionuclides were essentially below detection limits for caddisfly larvae. Thus, these organisms may be used to monitor suspected contaminant releases from cleanup activities; if concentrations exceed detection limits, they may be related to these activities. Two candidate threatened and endangered species of molluscs occur in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These are the shortface lanx (Fisherola nuttalli), which is a Washington State candidate species, and the Columbia pebblesnail (Fluminicola columbiana), which is both a state and federal candidate species. Specimens of the shortface lanx were observed in the vicinity of N Springs (100-NR-1 Operable Unit); they likely occur throughout this area.

  20. Determination of B/Ca of natural carbonates by HR-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sambuddha; Greaves, Mervyn; Owen, Robert; Kerr, Joanna; Elmore, Aurora C.; Elderfield, Henry

    2014-04-01

    report a new method for HR-ICP-MS based accurate and precise B/Ca determination from low mass natural carbonates (≤5 µg CaCO3), utilizing a mixed acid matrix (0.1 M HNO3 and 0.3 M HF) and accurate matrix matching technique. Our procedural B/Ca blank of 2.0 ± 1.0 µmol/mol, internal precision ≤1.0%, average within run external precision ≤4.0% (2σ), and rapid sample analysis (60 samples/day) make the method well suited for routine measurements. Established methods of B/Ca determination require ≥65 µg CaCO3 to achieve a comparable external precision of 3.5% (2σ). We report a B/Ca detection limit of 2 µmol/mol compared to ≥10 µmol/mol for previous methods, a fivefold improvement. The method presented here can determine a wide range of B/Ca (9.0-250 µmol/mol) in mass limited samples with considerable tolerance for matrix matching efficiency (≤±30%). The long-term reproducibility of B/Ca measured on Cambridge in-house consistency standards containing <20, ˜85, and ˜200 µmol/mol of B/Ca are ±3.7% (2σ, n = 100), ±3.9% (2σ, n = 150), and ±3.2% (2 s, n =180), respectively. A host of other trace element to Ca ratios can also be determined at comparable external precision from samples containing ≤5 µg CaCO3. This method is suitable for trace element analysis of single foraminifera shells.

  1. GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507

    SciTech Connect

    SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

    2011-01-12

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

  2. RECONNAISSANCE OF THE HR 8799 EXOSOLAR SYSTEM. I. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, B. R.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Nilsson, R.; Parry, I. R.; Rice, E.; Baranec, C.; Dekany, R.; Hale, D.; Burruss, R.; Cady, E.; Ligon, E. R.; Lockhart, T.; Crepp, J. R.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hinkley, S.; Fergus, R.; Hogg, David W.; King, D.; Pueyo, L.; and others

    2013-05-01

    We obtained spectra in the wavelength range {lambda} = 995-1769 nm of all four known planets orbiting the star HR 8799. Using the suite of instrumentation known as Project 1640 on the Palomar 5 m Hale Telescope, we acquired data at two epochs. This allowed for multiple imaging detections of the companions and multiple extractions of low-resolution (R {approx} 35) spectra. Data reduction employed two different methods of speckle suppression and spectrum extraction, both yielding results that agree. The spectra do not directly correspond to those of any known objects, although similarities with L and T dwarfs are present, as well as some characteristics similar to planets such as Saturn. We tentatively identify the presence of CH{sub 4} along with NH{sub 3} and/or C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and possibly CO{sub 2} or HCN in varying amounts in each component of the system. Other studies suggested red colors for these faint companions, and our data confirm those observations. Cloudy models, based on previous photometric observations, may provide the best explanation for the new data presented here. Notable in our data is that these presumably co-eval objects of similar luminosity have significantly different spectra; the diversity of planets may be greater than previously thought. The techniques and methods employed in this paper represent a new capability to observe and rapidly characterize exoplanetary systems in a routine manner over a broad range of planet masses and separations. These are the first simultaneous spectroscopic observations of multiple planets in a planetary system other than our own.

  3. The Planet in the HR 7162 Binary System Discovered by PHASES Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, B. F.; Konacki, M.; Burke, B. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Boss, A. P.; O'Connell, J.; Fekel, F. C.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The now-completed Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) used phase-referenced long-baseline interferometry to monitor 51 binary systems with 35 micro-arcsecond measurement precision, resulting in the high-confidence detection of a planet in the HR 7162 system. The 1.5 Jupiter mass planet is in a 2 AU orbit around one of the stars, whereas the binary itself has a separation of only 19 AU. Despite the close stellar companion, this configuration is expected to be stable, based on dynamic simulations. In the context of our solar system, this is analogous to a Jovian planet just outside of Mars' orbit, with a second star at the distance of Uranus. If this configuration were present during the period of planet formation, the complex gravitational environment created by the stars would seem to disrupt planet formation mechanisms that require long times to complete (thousands of years or more). While it is possible the arrangement resulted from the planet being formed in another environment (a single star or wider binary) after which the system reached its current state via dynamic interactions (star-planet exchange with a binary, or the binary orbit shrinking by interacting with a passing star), the frequency of such interactions is very low. Because the PHASES search only had the sensitivity to rule out Jovian mass companions in 11 of our 51 systems, yet one such system was found, the result indicates either extreme luck or that there is a high frequency of 20 AU binaries hosting planets. The latter interpretation is supported by previous detections of planets in 5-6 additional 20 AU binaries in other surveys (though with less control over the statistics for determining frequency of occurrence). Thus, there is observational support suggesting that a mechanism for rapid Jovian planet formation occurs in nature.

  4. [Research advance in rare and endemic plant Tetraena mongolica Maxim].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Jiang-Hong; Liu, Guo-Hou

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the research advance in rare and endemic plant Tetraena mongolica Maxim. was summarized from the aspects of morphology, anatomy, palynology, cytology, seed-coat micro-morphology, embryology, physiology, biology, ecology, genetic diversity, chemical constituents, endangered causes, and conservation approaches, and the further research directions were prospected. It was considered that population viability, idioplasm conservation and artificial renewal, molecular biology of ecological adaptability, and assessment of habitat suitability should be the main aspects for the future study of T. mongolica.

  5. Project Scheduling to Maximize Positive Impacts of Reconstruction Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    require intervention — military or otherwise — by concerned states, and the frequency with which these interventions occur is increasing. To meet...this new op- erational challenge, the US military must adapt its planning procedures to account for Security, Stabilization, Transition, and...reconstruction activities in such a way as to maximize the positive impacts during the initial phase of SSTRO. Specifically, this research proposes to

  6. Mixed maximal and explosive strength training in recreational endurance runners.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Ritva S; Mikkola, Jussi; Salo, Tiina; Hokka, Laura; Vesterinen, Ville; Kraemer, William J; Nummela, Ari; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2014-03-01

    Supervised periodized mixed maximal and explosive strength training added to endurance training in recreational endurance runners was examined during an 8-week intervention preceded by an 8-week preparatory strength training period. Thirty-four subjects (21-45 years) were divided into experimental groups: men (M, n = 9), women (W, n = 9), and control groups: men (MC, n = 7), women (WC, n = 9). The experimental groups performed mixed maximal and explosive exercises, whereas control subjects performed circuit training with body weight. Endurance training included running at an intensity below lactate threshold. Strength, power, endurance performance characteristics, and hormones were monitored throughout the study. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Increases were observed in both experimental groups that were more systematic than in the control groups in explosive strength (12 and 13% in men and women, respectively), muscle activation, maximal strength (6 and 13%), and peak running speed (14.9 ± 1.2 to 15.6 ± 1.2 and 12.9 ± 0.9 to 13.5 ± 0.8 km Ł h). The control groups showed significant improvements in maximal and explosive strength, but Speak increased only in MC. Submaximal running characteristics (blood lactate and heart rate) improved in all groups. Serum hormones fluctuated significantly in men (testosterone) and in women (thyroid stimulating hormone) but returned to baseline by the end of the study. Mixed strength training combined with endurance training may be more effective than circuit training in recreational endurance runners to benefit overall fitness that may be important for other adaptive processes and larger training loads associated with, e.g., marathon training.

  7. Balanced crossmodal excitation and inhibition essential for maximizing multisensory gain.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    We examined whether and how the balancing of crossmodal excitation and inhibition affects intersensory facilitation. A neural network model, comprising lower-order unimodal networks (X, Y) and a higher-order multimodal network (M), was simulated. Crossmodal excitation was made by direct activation of principal cells of the X network by the Y network. Crossmodal inhibition was made in an indirect manner: the Y network activated glial cells of the X network. This let glial plasma membrane transporters export GABA molecules into the extracellular space and increased the level of ambient GABA. The ambient GABA molecules were accepted by extrasynaptic GABAa receptors and tonically inhibited principal cells of the X network. Namely, crossmodal inhibition was made through GABAergic gliotransmission. Intersensory facilitation was assessed in terms of multisensory gain: the difference between the numbers of spikes evoked by multisensory (XY) stimulation and unisensory (X-alone) stimulation. The maximal multisensory gain (XY-X) could be achieved at an intermediate noise level by balancing crossmodal excitation and inhibition. This result supports an experimentally derived conclusion: intersensory facilitation under noisy environmental conditions is not necessarily in accord with the principle of inverse effectiveness; rather, multisensory gain is maximal at intermediate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. The maximal multisensory gain was available at the weakest signal if noise was not present, indicating that the principle of inverse effectiveness is a special case of the intersensory facilitation model proposed here. We suggest that the balancing of crossmodal excitation and inhibition may be crucial for intersensory facilitation. The GABAergic glio-transmission-mediated crossmodal inhibitory mechanism effectively works for intersensory facilitation and on determining the maximal multisensory gain in the entire SNR range between the two extremes: low and high SNRs.

  8. Planning for partnerships: Maximizing surge capacity resources through service learning.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lavonne M; Reams, Paula K; Canclini, Sharon B

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks and natural or human-caused disasters can strain the community's surge capacity through sudden demand on healthcare activities. Collaborative partnerships between communities and schools of nursing have the potential to maximize resource availability to meet community needs following a disaster. This article explores how communities can work with schools of nursing to enhance surge capacity through systems thinking, integrated planning, and cooperative efforts.

  9. Polarity related influence maximization in signed social networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  10. The assessment of maximal respiratory mouth pressures in adults.

    PubMed

    Evans, John A; Whitelaw, William A

    2009-10-01

    Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) are simple, convenient, and noninvasive indices of respiratory muscle strength at the mouth, but standards are not clearly established. We review recent literature, update the 2002 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement, and propose as the best choice using a flanged mouthpiece for reference values and lower limit of normal (LLN) values as a function of age for adults age up to about 70 years. Because male pressures are higher than female and MEP exceeds MIP, we present 4 linear regression reference equations as a function of age for adults age up to approximately 70 years: Male MIP=120-(0.41xage), and male MIP LLN=62-(0.15xage). Male MEP=174-(0.83xage), and male MEP LLN=117-(0.83xage). Female MIP=108-(0.61xage), and female MIP LLN=62-(0.50xage). Female MEP=131-(0.86xage), and female MEP LLN=95-(0.57xage). (Pressure in cm H2O and age in years.) We discuss normal values in older subjects, estimation of LLN values, and the relationship between vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength, and offer a guide to interpretation of maximal pressure measurements. The approach should allow direct implementation of MIP and MEP in a pulmonary function laboratory.

  11. Maximally reliable spatial filtering of steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Greaves, Alex S; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and robustness to artifacts, steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are a popular technique for studying neural processing in the human visual system. SSVEPs are conventionally analyzed at individual electrodes or linear combinations of electrodes which maximize some variant of the SNR. Here we exploit the fundamental assumption of evoked responses--reproducibility across trials--to develop a technique that extracts a small number of high SNR, maximally reliable SSVEP components. This novel spatial filtering method operates on an array of Fourier coefficients and projects the data into a low-dimensional space in which the trial-to-trial spectral covariance is maximized. When applied to two sample data sets, the resulting technique recovers physiologically plausible components (i.e., the recovered topographies match the lead fields of the underlying sources) while drastically reducing the dimensionality of the data (i.e., more than 90% of the trial-to-trial reliability is captured in the first four components). Moreover, the proposed technique achieves a higher SNR than that of the single-best electrode or the Principal Components. We provide a freely-available MATLAB implementation of the proposed technique, herein termed "Reliable Components Analysis".

  12. Maximal anaerobic power: relationship to anthropometric characteristics during growth.

    PubMed

    Mercier, B; Mercier, J; Granier, P; Le Gallais, D; Préfaut, C

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age in relation to anthropometric characteristics upon maximal anaerobic power of legs in sixty-nine young boys aged 11 to 19 years. Maximal anaerobic power (Wmax) was measured by the force-velocity test. Lean body mass (LBM) was determined from all four skin-fold thickness measurements, leg volume (LV) was estimated by anthropometric method, and anthropometric measurements were used to determine total muscular mass (TMM). Wmax increased significantly (F = 44.1, p less than 0.001) between 11 and 19 years and was correlated with LV (r = 0.84) and TMM (r = 0.88). It was most highly correlated with LBM (r = 0.94), which best explained the percentage of the total variance of Wmax (88%). Normalized Wmax (Wmax/LBM) also increased significantly between 11 and 19 years (F = 21.9, p less than 0.001). In conclusion, Wmax determined by the force-velocity test was closely related to anthropometric characteristics, especially LBM, during the growth period. Furthermore, even when corrected for lean body mass, maximal anaerobic power was always found to increase. This suggests that other undetermined factors, in addition to the amount of lean tissue mass, may explain the increase of Wmax during the force-velocity test.

  13. Formation Control of the MAXIM L2 Libration Orbit Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Hartman, Kate; Howell, Kathleen; Marchand, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    The Micro-Arcsecond Imaging Mission (MAXIM), a proposed concept for the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) Black Hole Imaging mission, is designed to make a ten million-fold improvement in X-ray image clarity of celestial objects by providing better than 0.1 microarcsecond imaging. To achieve mission requirements, MAXIM will have to improve on pointing by orders of magnitude. This pointing requirement impacts the control and design of the formation. Currently the architecture is comprised of 25 spacecraft, which will form the sparse apertures of a grazing incidence X-ray interferometer covering the 0.3-10 keV bandpass. This configuration will deploy 24 spacecraft as optics modules and one as the detector. The formation must allow for long duration continuous science observations and also for reconfiguration that permits re-pointing of the formation. In this paper, we provide analysis and trades of several control efforts that are dependent upon the pointing requirements and the configuration and dimensions of the MAXIM formation. We emphasize the utilization of natural motions in the Lagrangian regions that minimize the control efforts and we address both continuous and discrete control via LQR and feedback linearization. Results provide control cost, configuration options, and capabilities as guidelines for the development of this complex mission.

  14. Formation Control of the MAXIM L2 Libration Orbit Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Hartman, Kate; Howell, Kathleen; Marchand, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    The Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), a proposed concept for the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) Black Hole Imager mission, is designed to make a ten million-fold improvement in X-ray image clarity of celestial objects by providing better than 0.1 micro-arcsecond imaging. Currently the mission architecture comprises 25 spacecraft, 24 as optics modules and one as the detector, which will form sparse sub-apertures of a grazing incidence X-ray interferometer covering the 0.3-10 keV bandpass. This formation must allow for long duration continuous science observations and also for reconfiguration that permits re-pointing of the formation. To achieve these mission goals, the formation is required to cooperatively point at desired targets. Once pointed, the individual elements of the MAXIM formation must remain stable, maintaining their relative positions and attitudes below a critical threshold. These pointing and formation stability requirements impact the control and design of the formation. In this paper, we provide analysis of control efforts that are dependent upon the stability and the configuration and dimensions of the MAXIM formation. We emphasize the utilization of natural motions in the Lagrangian regions to minimize the control efforts and we address continuous control via input feedback linearization (IFL). Results provide control cost, configuration options, and capabilities as guidelines for the development of this complex mission.

  15. MADMX: a strategy for maximal dense motif extraction.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Roberto; Pietracaprina, Andrea; Pisanti, Nadia; Pucci, Geppino; Upfal, Eli; Vandin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    We develop, analyze, and experiment with a new tool, called MADMX, which extracts frequent motifs from biological sequences. We introduce the notion of density to single out the "significant" motifs. The density is a simple and flexible measure for bounding the number of don't cares in a motif, defined as the fraction of solid (i.e., different from don't care) characters in the motif. A maximal dense motif has density above a certain threshold, and any further specialization of a don't care symbol in it or any extension of its boundaries decreases its number of occurrences in the input sequence. By extracting only maximal dense motifs, MADMX reduces the output size and improves performance, while enhancing the quality of the discoveries. The efficiency of our approach relies on a newly defined combining operation, dubbed fusion, which allows for the construction of maximal dense motifs in a bottom-up fashion, while avoiding the generation of nonmaximal ones. We provide experimental evidence of the efficiency and the quality of the motifs returned by MADMX.

  16. Column generation algorithms for exact modularity maximization in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloise, Daniel; Cafieri, Sonia; Caporossi, Gilles; Hansen, Pierre; Perron, Sylvain; Liberti, Leo

    2010-10-01

    Finding modules, or clusters, in networks currently attracts much attention in several domains. The most studied criterion for doing so, due to Newman and Girvan [Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)]10.1103/PhysRevE.69.026113, is modularity maximization. Many heuristics have been proposed for maximizing modularity and yield rapidly near optimal solution or sometimes optimal ones but without a guarantee of optimality. There are few exact algorithms, prominent among which is a paper by Xu [Eur. Phys. J. B 60, 231 (2007)]10.1140/epjb/e2007-00331-0. Modularity maximization can also be expressed as a clique partitioning problem and the row generation algorithm of Grötschel and Wakabayashi [Math. Program. 45, 59 (1989)]10.1007/BF01589097 applied. We propose to extend both of these algorithms using the powerful column generation methods for linear and non linear integer programming. Performance of the four resulting algorithms is compared on problems from the literature. Instances with up to 512 entities are solved exactly. Moreover, the computing time of previously solved problems are reduced substantially.

  17. Random effects structure for confirmatory hypothesis testing: Keep it maximal

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Dale J.; Levy, Roger; Scheepers, Christoph; Tily, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMEMs) have become increasingly prominent in psycholinguistics and related areas. However, many researchers do not seem to appreciate how random effects structures affect the generalizability of an analysis. Here, we argue that researchers using LMEMs for confirmatory hypothesis testing should minimally adhere to the standards that have been in place for many decades. Through theoretical arguments and Monte Carlo simulation, we show that LMEMs generalize best when they include the maximal random effects structure justified by the design. The generalization performance of LMEMs including data-driven random effects structures strongly depends upon modeling criteria and sample size, yielding reasonable results on moderately-sized samples when conservative criteria are used, but with little or no power advantage over maximal models. Finally, random-intercepts-only LMEMs used on within-subjects and/or within-items data from populations where subjects and/or items vary in their sensitivity to experimental manipulations always generalize worse than separate F1 and F2 tests, and in many cases, even worse than F1 alone. Maximal LMEMs should be the ‘gold standard’ for confirmatory hypothesis testing in psycholinguistics and beyond. PMID:24403724

  18. Maximal likelihood correspondence estimation for face recognition across pose.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Liu, Xin; Chai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Haihong; Lao, Shihong; Shan, Shiguang

    2014-10-01

    Due to the misalignment of image features, the performance of many conventional face recognition methods degrades considerably in across pose scenario. To address this problem, many image matching-based methods are proposed to estimate semantic correspondence between faces in different poses. In this paper, we aim to solve two critical problems in previous image matching-based correspondence learning methods: 1) fail to fully exploit face specific structure information in correspondence estimation and 2) fail to learn personalized correspondence for each probe image. To this end, we first build a model, termed as morphable displacement field (MDF), to encode face specific structure information of semantic correspondence from a set of real samples of correspondences calculated from 3D face models. Then, we propose a maximal likelihood correspondence estimation (MLCE) method to learn personalized correspondence based on maximal likelihood frontal face assumption. After obtaining the semantic correspondence encoded in the learned displacement, we can synthesize virtual frontal images of the profile faces for subsequent recognition. Using linear discriminant analysis method with pixel-intensity features, state-of-the-art performance is achieved on three multipose benchmarks, i.e., CMU-PIE, FERET, and MultiPIE databases. Owe to the rational MDF regularization and the usage of novel maximal likelihood objective, the proposed MLCE method can reliably learn correspondence between faces in different poses even in complex wild environment, i.e., labeled face in the wild database.

  19. Polarity Related Influence Maximization in Signed Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

  20. Reference values of maximal oxygen uptake for polish rowers.

    PubMed

    Klusiewicz, Andrzej; Starczewski, Michał; Ładyga, Maria; Długołęcka, Barbara; Braksator, Wojciech; Mamcarz, Artur; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2014-12-09

    The aim of this study was to characterize changes in maximal oxygen uptake over several years and to elaborate current reference values of this index based on determinations carried out in large and representative groups of top Polish rowers. For this study 81 female and 159 male rowers from the sub-junior to senior categories were recruited from the Polish National Team and its direct backup. All the subjects performed an incremental exercise test on a rowing ergometer. During the test maximal oxygen uptake was measured with the BxB method. The calculated reference values for elite Polish junior and U23 rowers allowed to evaluate the athletes' fitness level against the respective reference group and may aid the coach in controlling the training process. Mean values of VO2max achieved by members of the top Polish rowing crews who over the last five years competed in the Olympic Games or World Championships were also presented. The results of the research on the "trainability" of the maximal oxygen uptake may lead to a conclusion that the growth rate of the index is larger in case of high-level athletes and that the index (in absolute values) increases significantly between the age of 19-22 years (U23 category).

  1. Cognition and motor impairment correlates with exercise test performance after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ada; Eng, Janice J; Tsang, Teresa SM; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Exercise not only benefits physical and cardiovascular function in older adults with multiple chronic conditions, but may also improve cognitive function. Peak heart rate (HR), a physiological indicator for maximal effort, is the most common and practical means of establishing and monitoring exercise intensity. In particular, in the absence of graded maximal exercise tests (GXT) results, age-predicted maximal HR values are typically used. Using individuals with stroke as a model for examining older adults with co-existing cardiovascular and neuromotor conditions, the purpose of this paper was to examine the determinants associated with achieving age-predicted maximal HR on a GXT, with respect to neurological, cognitive and lower limb function. Methods Forty-seven participants with stroke (mean±SD age 67±7 years, 4±3 years post-stroke) performed GXTs. Peak values for gas exchange, HR and ratings of perceived exertion were noted. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine determinants (neurological impairment, leg motor impairment, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score, walking ability) associated with the ability to achieve age-predicted maximal HR on the GXT. Results VO2peak was 16.5±6 ml•kg−1•min−1. Fourteen (30%) participants achieved ≥ 100% of age-predicted maximal HR. Logistic regression modeling revealed that the ability to achieve this threshold was associated with less leg motor impairment (P=0.02, OR 2.3) and higher cognitive scores (P=0.048, OR 1.3). Conclusions These results suggest that non-cardiopulmonary factors such as leg motor impairment and cognitive function are important contributors to achieving maximal effort during exercise tests. This study has important implications for post-stroke exercise prescription whereby training intensities that are based on peak HR from GXTs may be underestimated among individuals with cognitive and physical impairments. PMID:23135375

  2. Object Permanence After a 24-Hr Delay and Leaving the Locale of Disappearance: The Role of Memory, Space, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, M. Keith; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen-month-old infants saw an object hidden inside a container and were removed from the disappearance locale for 24 hr. Upon their return, they searched correctly for the hidden object, demonstrating object permanence and long-term memory. Control infants who saw no disappearance did not search. In Experiment 2, infants returned to see the…

  3. H.R. 3221: Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congressional Budget Office, 2009

    2009-01-01

    H.R. 3221 would amend the Higher Education Act of 1965, which authorizes most federal postsecondary education programs. It would prohibit new federally guaranteed loans from being made under the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program and would increase direct spending for the Federal Pell Grant Program and other programs. The elimination of…

  4. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Chairman Henry Waxman and Chairman Edward Markey for an analysis of H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACESA). ACESA, as passed by the House of Representatives on June 26, 2009, is a complex bill that regulates emissions of greenhouse gases through market-based mechanisms, efficiency programs, and economic incentives.

  5. HR Practices Perceptions, Emotional Exhaustion, and Work Outcomes: A Conservation-of-Resources Theory in the Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Li-Yun; Pan, Wen

    2008-01-01

    The conservation-of-resources theory provided the theoretical underpinning for the relationship among HR practices perceived by employees, emotional exhaustion, and work outcomes (job satisfaction and job performance). To fully understand the underlying mechanism of the relationship, the study examined (1) the main and interactive effects of HR…

  6. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity.

  7. New precision orbits of bright double-lined spectroscopic binaries. IX. HD 54371, HR 2692, and 16 ursa majoris

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael H.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Willmarth, Daryl; Tomkin, Jocelyn E-mail: michael.h.williamson@gmail.com E-mail: pourbaix@astro.ulb.ac.be

    2015-02-01

    With extensive sets of new radial velocities we have determined orbital elements for three previously known spectroscopic binaries, HD 54371, HR 2692, and 16 UMa. All three systems have had the lines of their secondaries detected for the first time. The orbital periods range from 16.24 to 113.23 days, and the three binaries have modestly or moderately eccentric orbits. The secondary to primary mass ratios range from 0.50 to 0.64. The orbital dimensions (a{sub 1} sin i and a{sub 2} sin i) and minimum masses (m{sub 1} sin{sup 3} i and m{sub 2} sin{sup 3} i) of the binary components all have accuracies of ⩽1%. With our spectroscopic results and the Hipparcos data, we also have determined astrometric orbits for two of the three systems, HR 2692 and 16 UMa. The primaries of HD 54371 and 16 UMa are solar-type stars, and their secondaries are likely K or M dwarfs. The primary of HR 2692 is a late-type subgiant and its secondary is a G or K dwarf. The primaries of both HR 2692 and 16 UMa may be pseudosynchronously rotating, while that of HD 54371 is rotating faster than its pseudosynchronous velocity.

  8. Nurturing the H in HR: Using Action Learning to Build Organisation Development Capability in the UK Civil Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Richard; Saville, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In the UK, the Civil Service Reform Plan is being implemented with urgency. This requires Civil Service departments and agencies to reform their structures and ways of working in order to deliver effective services in a climate of economic austerity and rapid social and technological change. Historically, Human Resource (HR) professionals have…

  9. Screening for high risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) subtypes, among Sudanese patients with oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Ali Yousif; Eltom, Faris Margani; Abdalaziz, Mohamed S; Rahmani, Arshad; Abusail, Saadalnour; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkareem

    2013-01-01

    HR-HPV subtypes are strongly linked to etiology of many human cancers including oral cancer. The epidemiology of infection with different HPV genotypes greatly varies in different countries. The aim of this study was to identify and genotype the HR-HPV subtypes in oral tissues obtained from Sudanese patients with oral lesions. In this retrospective study 200 patients with oral lesions were screened by molecular methods (PCR) for the presence of HR-HPV subtypes. Of the 200 patients, 100/200 were patients with oral cancer (ascertained as case group) and 100/200 were patients with non-neoplastic oral lesions (ascertained as control group). Out of the 200 patients, 12/200 (6%) were found with HR-HPV infection. Of the 12 positive patients, 8/12 (66.7%) were among cases and the remaining 4/12 (33.3%) were among control group. The distribution of different genotypes was: type HPV 16 6/12 (50%), HPV18 4/12 (34%), HPV 31 1/12 (8%) and HPV 33 1/12 (8%). In view of these findings, HPV particularly subtypes 16 and 18 play a role in the etiology of oral cancer in the Sudan. PMID:23641304

  10. [Children's Initiative,] H.R. 5600. 102D Congress, 2D Session in the House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    This publication is the text of the House of Representatives bill, H.R. 5600 introduced to the U.S. Congress and titled "Children's Initiative." This legislation is designed to promote family preservation and the prevention of foster care with emphasis on families where abuse of alcohol or drugs is present, to improve the quality and…

  11. M-BAND IMAGING OF THE HR 8799 PLANETARY SYSTEM USING AN INNOVATIVE LOCI-BASED BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Galicher, Raphael; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Konopacky, Quinn; Barman, Travis

    2011-10-01

    Multi-wavelength observations/spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres are the basis of the emerging exciting field of comparative exoplanetology. The HR 8799 planetary system is an ideal laboratory to study our current knowledge gap between massive field brown dwarfs and the cold 5 Gyr old solar system planets. The HR 8799 planets have so far been imaged at J- to L-band, with only upper limits available at M-band. We present here deep high-contrast Keck II adaptive optics M-band observations that show the imaging detection of three of the four currently known HR 8799 planets. Such detections were made possible due to the development of an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction scheme that is three times more efficient than a classical median background subtraction for Keck II AO data, representing a gain in telescope time of up to a factor of nine. These M-band detections extend the broadband photometric coverage out to {approx}5 {mu}m and provide access to the strong CO fundamental absorption band at 4.5 {mu}m. The new M-band photometry shows that the HR 8799 planets are located near the L/T-type dwarf transition, similar to what was found by other studies. We also confirm that the best atmospheric fits are consistent with low surface gravity, dusty, and non-equilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} chemistry models.

  12. Degradation of the seaweed wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) by a composting process with the inoculation of Bacillus sp. HR6.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing-Chun; Wei, Jian-He; Maeda, Kenji; Kawai, Hiroshi; Zhou, Qixing; Hosoi-Tanabe, Shoko; Nagata, Shinichi

    2007-06-01

    Disposal of the seaweed wakame (Undaria pinnatifida) by inoculating the halotolerant bacterium Bacillus sp. HR6 was examined in an experimental scale composting system. Strain HR6 was effective in initiating the composting process of wakame, and there was a rapid increase in temperature to over 54.9-55.7 degrees C after 18-20 h. The composting process of wakame could be carried out despite a high NaCl content, 28.2 mg/g, although lower salinity resulted in a shorter lag time and higher weight reduction. In a larger scale composting process with aeration, two peaks of temperature change were found which corresponded well to oxygen consumption and CO2 emission during the process. The pH increased to 8.83 and organic materials were reduced to 93.4% after 72 h. The initial N and C contents were 3.9 and 34.0%, respectively, both of which decreased during the composting process. The changes in the viable cell numbers suggested that strain HR6 predominated before 24 h and other microorganisms including HR6 were present in a mixed state during the later period of composting. The total content of alginate (TA), 32.2% in the initial stage, decreased to 29.2% after 72 h, while water soluble alginate (WSA) increased, indicating that the solubilization and decomposition of alginate had occurred during the composting process.

  13. M-band imaging of the HR 8799 planetary system using an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction technique

    DOE PAGES

    Galicher, Raphael; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; ...

    2011-09-02

    Multi-wavelength observations/spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres are the basis of the emerging exciting field of comparative exoplanetology. The HR 8799 planetary system is an ideal laboratory to study our current knowledge gap between massive field brown dwarfs and the cold 5 Gyr old solar system planets. The HR 8799 planets have so far been imaged at J- to L-band, with only upper limits available at M-band. We present here deep high-contrast Keck II adaptive optics M-band observations that show the imaging detection of three of the four currently known HR 8799 planets. Such detections were made possible due to the developmentmore » of an innovative LOCI-based background subtraction scheme that is three times more efficient than a classical median background subtraction for Keck II AO data, representing a gain in telescope time of up to a factor of nine. These M-band detections extend the broadband photometric coverage out to ~5 μm and provide access to the strong CO fundamental absorption band at 4.5 μm. The new M-band photometry shows that the HR 8799 planets are located near the L/T-type dwarf transition, similar to what was found by other studies. Finally, we also confirm that the best atmospheric fits are consistent with low surface gravity, dusty, and non-equilibrium CO/CH4 chemistry models.« less

  14. Maximal oxygen uptake validation in children with expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Robben, Katherine E; Poole, David C; Harms, Craig A

    2013-02-01

    A two-test protocol (incremental/ramp (IWT) + supramaximal constant-load (CWR)) to affirm max and obviate reliance on secondary criteria has only been validated in highly fit children. In girls (n = 15) and boys (n = 12) with a wide range of VO2max (17-47 ml/kg/min), we hypothesized that this procedure would evince a VO2-WR plateau and unambiguous VO2max even in the presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL). A plateau in the VO2-work rate relationship occurred in 75% of subjects irrespective of EFL There was a range in RER at max exercise for girls (0.97-1.14; mean 1.06 ± 0.04) and boys (0.98-1.09; mean 1.03 ± 0.03) such that 3/15 girls and 2/12 boys did not achieve the criterion RER. Moreover, in girls with RER > 1.0 it would have been possible to achieve this criterion at 78% VO2max. Boys achieved 92% VO2max at RER = 1.0. This was true also for HRmax where 8/15 girls' and 6/12 boys' VO2max would have been rejected based on HRmax being < 90% of age-predicted HRmax. In those who achieved the HRmax criterion, it represented a VO2 of 86% (girls) and 87% (boys) VO2max. We conclude that this two-test protocol confirms VO2max in children across a threefold range of VO2max irrespective of EFL and circumvents reliance on secondary criteria.

  15. Developing new VO2max prediction models from maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables using support vector machines combined with feature selection.

    PubMed

    Abut, Fatih; Akay, Mehmet Fatih; George, James

    2016-12-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is an essential part of health and physical fitness, and refers to the highest rate of oxygen consumption an individual can attain during exhaustive exercise. In this study, for the first time in the literature, we combine the triple of maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables to propose new VO2max prediction models using Support Vector Machines (SVM's) combined with the Relief-F feature selector to predict and reveal the distinct predictors of VO2max. For comparison purposes, hybrid models based on double combinations of maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables have also been developed. By utilizing 10-fold cross-validation, the performance of the models has been calculated using multiple correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE). The results show that the best values of R and RMSE, with 0.94 and 2.92mLkg(-1)min(-1) respectively, have been obtained by combining the triple of relevantly identified maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables. Compared with the results of the rest of hybrid models in this study and the other prediction models in literature, the reported values of R and RMSE have been found to be considerably more accurate. The predictor variables gender, age, maximal heart rate (MX-HR), submaximal ending speed (SM-ES) of the treadmill and Perceived Functional Ability (Q-PFA) questionnaire have been found to be the most relevant variables in predicting VO2max. The results have also been compared with that of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and Tree Boost (TB), and it is seen that SVM significantly outperforms other regression methods for prediction of VO2max.

  16. Comparison of EMG activity between maximal manual muscle testing and cybex maximal isometric testing of the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Chang, Jia-Hao; Chien, Chi-Sheng; Chang, Guan-Liang

    2008-02-01

    Two methods have been used to produce a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles for normalization of electromyographic (EMG) data. The purposes of this study were to compare the myoelectic activity of MVIC of manual muscle testing (MMT) versus Cybex maximal isometric testing. Eighteen normal subjects were recruited. MMT and Cybex testing for MVIC of the dominant leg were performed. EMG activities of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were recorded during MMT and Cybex trials. EMG amplitude and median frequency obtained from the two methods (MMT and Cybex testing) were used for statistical analysis of these three muscles. Statistically, the difference in the mean of the EMG signal amplitude and median frequency between MMT and Cybex testing were not significant. Considering cost and time, MMT for MVIC technique appears to be reliable and highly valuable.

  17. Athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic pulse shape: effect of maximal oxygen uptake and maximal muscular voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anran; Yang, Lin; Liu, Chengyu; Cui, Jingxuan; Li, Yao; Yang, Xingxing; Zhang, Song; Zheng, Dingchang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulse shape. 304 athletes were enrolled and divided into three subgroups according to a typical sport classification in terms of the maximal oxygen uptake (MaxO2_low, MaxO2_middle and MaxO2_high groups) or the maximal muscular voluntary contraction (MMVC_low, MMVC_middle, and MMVC_high groups). Finger PPG pulses were digitally recorded and then normalized to derive the pulse area, pulse peak time T p , dicrotic notch time T n , and pulse reflection index (RI). The four parameters were finally compared between the three subgroups categorized by MaxO2 or by MMVC. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated by quantifying the characteristics of the PPG pulses in different athletes that MaxO2, but not MMVC, had significant effect on the arterial properties.

  18. Structure-function relationship between the tobamovirus TMV-Cg coat protein and the HR-like response.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, Nicole; Gonzalez, Angel; Cañón, Paola; Medina, Consuelo; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2008-03-01

    The tobamovirus TMV-Cg induces an HR-like response in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nn sensitive plants lacking the N or N' resistance genes. This response has been characterized by the appearance of necrotic lesions in the inoculated leaf and viral systemic spread, although the defence pathways are activated in the plant. A previous study demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of TMV-Cg (CPCg) was the elicitor of this HR-like response. We examined the influence of four specific amino acid substitutions on the structure of CPCg, as well as on the development of the host response. To gain insights into the structural implications of these substitutions, a set of molecular dynamic experiments was performed using comparative models of wild-type and mutant CPCg as well as the CP of the U1 strain of TMV (CPU1), which is not recognized by the plants. A P21L mutation produces severe changes in the three-dimensional structure of CPCg and is more unstable when this subunit is laterally associated in silico. This result may explain the observed incapacity of this mutant to assemble virions. Two other CPCg mutations (R46G and S54K) overcome recognition by the plant and do not induce an HR-like response. A double CPCg mutant P21L-S54K recovered its capacity to form virions and to induce an HR-like response. Our results suggest that the structural integrity of the CP proteins is important for triggering the HR-like response.

  19. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR MASSIVE GAS GIANTS WITH THICK CLOUDS: APPLICATION TO THE HR 8799 PLANETS AND PREDICTIONS FOR FUTURE DETECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam; Currie, Thayne E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have generated an extensive new suite of massive giant planet atmosphere models and used it to obtain fits to photometric data for the planets HR 8799b, c, and d. We consider a wide range of cloudy and cloud-free models. The cloudy models incorporate different geometrical and optical thicknesses, modal particle sizes, and metallicities. For each planet and set of cloud parameters, we explore grids in gravity and effective temperature, with which we determine constraints on the planet's mass and age. Our new models yield statistically significant fits to the data, and conclusively confirm that the HR 8799 planets have much thicker clouds than those required to explain data for typical L and T dwarfs. Both models with (1) physically thick forsterite clouds and a 60 {mu}m modal particle size and (2) clouds made of 1 {mu}m sized pure iron droplets and 1% supersaturation fit the data. Current data are insufficient to accurately constrain the microscopic cloud properties, such as composition and particle size. The range of best-estimated masses for HR 8799b, HR 8799c, and HR 8799d conservatively span 2-12 M{sub J} , 6-13 M{sub J} , and 3-11 M{sub J} , respectively, and imply coeval ages between {approx}10 and {approx}150 Myr, consistent with previously reported stellar ages. The best-fit temperatures and gravities are slightly lower than values obtained by Currie et al. using even thicker cloud models. Finally, we use these models to predict the near-to-mid-IR colors of soon-to-be imaged planets. Our models predict that planet-mass objects follow a locus in some near-to-mid-IR color-magnitude diagrams that is clearly separable from the standard L/T dwarf locus for field brown dwarfs.

  20. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  1. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P; Aramendi, José F; Gorostiaga, Esteban M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  2. KOI-2700b—a planet candidate with dusty effluents on a 22 hr orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, Saul; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin; Rowe, Jason E-mail: rsanchis86@gmail.com E-mail: martin.d.still@nasa.gov E-mail: jasonfrowe@gmail.com

    2014-03-20

    Kepler planet candidate KOI-2700b (KIC 8639908b), with an orbital period of 21.84 hr, exhibits a distinctly asymmetric transit profile, likely indicative of the emission of dusty effluents, and reminiscent of KIC 1255b. The host star has T {sub eff} = 4435 K, M ≅ 0.63 M {sub ☉}, and R ≅ 0.57 R {sub ☉}, comparable to the parameters ascribed to KIC 12557548. The transit egress can be followed for ∼25% of the orbital period and, if interpreted as extinction from a dusty comet-like tail, indicates a long lifetime for the dust grains of more than a day. We present a semiphysical model for the dust tail attenuation and fit for the physical parameters contained in that expression. The transit is not sufficiently deep to allow for a study of the transit-to-transit variations, as is the case for KIC 1255b; however, it is clear that the transit depth is slowly monotonically decreasing by a factor of ∼2 over the duration of the Kepler mission. We infer a mass-loss rate in dust from the planet of ∼2 lunar masses per Gyr. The existence of a second star hosting a planet with a dusty comet-like tail would help to show that such objects may be more common and less exotic than originally thought. According to current models, only quite small planets with M{sub p} ≲ 0.03 M {sub ⊕} are likely to release a detectable quantity of dust. Thus, any 'normal-looking' transit that is inferred to arise from a rocky planet of radius greater than ∼1/2 R {sub ⊕} should not exhibit any hint of a dusty tail. Conversely, if one detects an asymmetric transit due to a dusty tail, then it will be very difficult to detect the hard body of the planet within the transit because, by necessity, the planet must be quite small (i.e., ≲ 0.3 R {sub ⊕}).

  3. Pleiades HR in Flight Geometrical Calibration : Location and Mapping of the Focal Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lussy, F.; Greslou, D.; Dechoz, C.; Amberg, V.; Delvit, J. M.; Lebegue, L.; Blanchet, G.; Fourest, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Pleiades system, ORFEO system optical component (Optical and Radar Federated Earth Observation) consists of a constellation of two satellites for very High Resolution panchromatic and multispectral optical observation of the Earth. Its mission is to cover all European civilian needs (mapping, tracking floods and fires) and defence in the category of metric resolution: 0.7m Nadir. The first Pleiades satellite was launched at the end of last year. One of the key objectives of the Pleiades HR (PHR) project is to achieve a location accuracy that will allow the use of images in GIS (Geographical Information System) without geometrical model improvement by refining on ground control points. The image location without refined model was specified with the precision of the most commonly used tool ie the civil GPS. So the location accuracy has been specified at less than 12m for 90% of the images on a nominal satellite configuration. Very special care has been taken all along the PHR project realization to achieve this very good location accuracy. The final touch is given during the in-orbit commissioning phase which lasts until June 2012. The geometric quality implies to tune the parameters involved in the geolocation model (geometric calibration): besides attitude and orbit restitution tuning (not considered here), it consists in estimating the biases between the instrument orientation and the AOCS reference frame, and also the sight line of each detector in the focal plane. This is called static geometrical model. The analysis of dynamic perturbations outside of the model are the second most important image quality objective of in-flight commissioning, not described in this paper. Finally "image quality assessment" consists in evaluating the image quality obtained in the final products. For geolocation model, it is quantified by the absolute geolocation and the pointing accuracies, and it is a main contributor in length alteration and planimetric and altimetric

  4. HR-COSMOS: Kinematics of star-forming galaxies at z 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, D.; Tresse, L.; Epinat, B.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N.; Amram, P.; Lemaux, B. C.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-02-01

    We present the kinematic analysis of a sub-sample of 82 galaxies at 0.75 < z < 1.2 from our new survey HR-COSMOS aimed to obtain the first statistical sample to study the kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the treasury COSMOS field at 0 < z < 1.2. We observed 766 emission line galaxies using the multi-slit spectrograph ESO-VLT/VIMOS in high-resolution mode (R = 2500). To better extract galaxy kinematics, VIMOS spectral slits have been carefully tilted along the major axis orientation of the galaxies, making use of the position angle measurements from the high spatial resolution HST/ACS COSMOS images. We constrained the kinematics of the sub-sample at 0.75 < z < 1.2 by creating high-resolution semi-analytical models. We established the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation at z ≃ 0.9 with high-quality stellar mass measurements derived using the latest COSMOS photometric catalog, which includes the latest data releases of UltraVISTA and Spitzer. In doubling the sample at these redshifts compared with the literature, we estimated the relation without setting its slope, and found it consistent with previous studies in other deep extragalactic fields assuming no significant evolution of the relation with redshift at z ≲ 1. We computed dynamical masses within the radius R2.2 and found a median stellar-to-dynamical mass fraction equal to 0.2 (assuming Chabrier IMF), which implies a contribution of gas and dark matter masses of 80% of the total mass within R2.2, in agreement with recent integral field spectroscopy surveys. We find no dependence of the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation with environment probing up to group scale masses. This study shows that multi-slit galaxy surveys remain a powerful tool to derive kinematics for large numbers of galaxies at both high and low redshift. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 083.A-0935.

  5. The evidence for clumpy accretion in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of IUE high- and low-dispersion spectra of the young Herbig Ae star HR 5999 (HD 144668) covering 1978-1992 revealed dramatic changes in the Mg II h and k (2795.5, 2802.7 A) emission profiles, changes in the column density and distribution in radial velocity of accreting gas, and flux in the Ly(alpha), O I, and C IV emission lines, which are correlated with the UV excess luminosity. Variability in the spectral type inferred from the UV spectral energy distribution, ranging from A5 IV-III in high state to A7 III in the low state, was also observed. The trend of earlier inferred spectral type with decreasing wavelength and with increasing UV continuum flux has previously been noted as a signature of accretion disks in lower mass pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and in systems undergoing FU Orionis-type outbursts. Our data represent the first detection of similar phenomena in an intermediate mass (M greater than or equal to 2 solar mass) PMS star. Recent IUE spectra show gas accreting toward the star with velocities as high as plus 300 km/s, much as is seen toward beta Pic, and suggest that we also view this system through the debris disk. The absence of UV lines with the rotational broadening expected given the optical data (A7 IV, V sini=180 plus or minus 20 km/s for this system) also suggests that most of the UV light originates in the disk, even in the low continuum state. The dramatic variability in the column density of accreting gas, is consistent with clumpy accretion, such as has been observed toward beta Pic, is a hallmark of accretion onto young stars, and is not restricted to the clearing phase, since detectable amounts of accretion are present for stars with 0.5 Myr less than t(sub age) less than 2.8 Myr. The implications for models of beta Pic and similar systems are briefly discussed.

  6. Comparative evaluation of two commercial PET scanners, ECAT EXACT HR+ and Biograph 2, using GATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, N.; Sakellios, N.; Tsantilas, N. X.; Dikaios, N.; Tsoumpas, C.; Lazaro, D.; Loudos, G.; Schmidtlein, C. R.; Louizi, K.; Valais, J.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Malamitsi, J.; Kandarakis, J.; Nikita, K.

    2006-12-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) is a generic Monte Carlo simulation platform based on a general-purpose code GEANT4 and designed to simulate positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography systems. Monte Carlo simulations are used in nuclear medicine to model imaging systems and develop and assess tomographic reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for improved image quantification. The purpose of this study is to validate two GATE models of the commercial available PET scanner HR+ and the PET/CT Biograph 2. The geometry of the system components has been described in GATE, including detector ring, crystal blocks, PMTs etc. The energy and spatial resolution of the scanners as given by the manufacturers have been taken into account. The GATE simulated results are compared directly to experimental data obtained using a number of NEMA NU-2-2001 performance protocols, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and scatter fraction. All the respective phantoms are precisely modeled. Furthermore, an approximate dead-time model both at the level of single and coincidence events was developed so that the simulated count rate curve can satisfactorily match the experimental count rate performance curve for each scanner In addition a software tool was developed to build the sinograms from the simulated data and import them into the software for tomographic image reconstruction where the reconstruction algorithm of FBP3DRP was applied. An agreement of less than 0.8 mm was obtained between the spatial resolution of the simulated system and the experimental results. Also the simulated scatter fraction for the NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom matched the experimental results to within 3% of measured values. Finally the ratio of the simulated sensitivities with sources radially offset 0 and 10 cm from the central axis of each of the two scanners reaches an agreement of less than 1% between the simulated and experimental values. This

  7. Biomedical Research and Research Training Amendments of 1978. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session, on H.R. 10908, H.R. 10062, and H.R. 10190. March 1,2, and 3, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

    Hearings before the House Subcommittee on Health and the Environment on biomedical research and research training authorities that expire on September 30, 1978 are presented. H.R. 10908 is a bill to amend the Public Health Service Act to revise and extend the programs of assistance for libraries of medicine and the programs of the National Heart,…

  8. Grants for Certain Purposes to 1890 Land-Grant Colleges. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Department Investigations, Oversight, and Research of the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety Sixth Congress, Second Session, on H.R. 7557 and H.R. 7757.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Agriculture.

    Congressional hearings concerning H.R. 7557 and H.R. 7757, which pertain to grants to 1890 land-grant colleges, are presented. H.R. 7557 provides for grants to the states for the purposes of assisting eligible colleges, including Tuskegee Institute, to receive funds under the act of August 30, 1890, in the purchase of equipment and land and the…

  9. Reduced fitness and abnormal cardiopulmonary responses to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Robert I; Reddy, Madhuri; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Savant, Adrienne P; Fernhall, Bo; Rodeghier, Mark; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-01-01

    Physiologic contributors to reduced exercise capacity in individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the cardiopulmonary response to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and determine factors associated with reduced exercise capacity among children and young adults with SCA. A cross-sectional cohort of 60 children and young adults (mean 15.1 ± 3.4 years) with hemoglobin SS or S/β0 thalassemia and 30 matched controls (mean 14.6 ± 3.5 years) without SCA or sickle cell trait underwent maximal CPET by a graded, symptom-limited cycle ergometry protocol with breath-by-breath, gas exchange analysis. Compared to controls without SCA, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly lower peak VO2 (26.9 ± 6.9 vs. 37.0 ± 9.2 mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). Subjects demonstrated slower oxygen uptake (ΔVO2/ΔWR, 9 ± 2 vs. 12 ± 2 mL/min/watt, P < 0.001) and lower oxygen pulse (ΔVO2/ΔHR, 12 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 7 mL/beat, P < 0.001) as well as reduced oxygen uptake efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVO2, 42 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 5, P < 0.001) and ventilation efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVCO2, 30.3 ± 3.7 vs. 27.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.001) during CPET. Peak VO2 remained significantly lower in subjects with SCA after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin, which were independent predictors of peak VO2 for subjects with SCA. In the largest study to date using maximal CPET in SCA, we demonstrate that children and young adults with SCA have reduced exercise capacity attributable to factors independent of anemia. Complex derangements in gas exchange and oxygen uptake during maximal exercise are common in this population. PMID:25847915

  10. Reduced fitness and abnormal cardiopulmonary responses to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Reddy, Madhuri; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Savant, Adrienne P; Fernhall, Bo; Rodeghier, Mark; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-04-01

    Physiologic contributors to reduced exercise capacity in individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the cardiopulmonary response to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and determine factors associated with reduced exercise capacity among children and young adults with SCA. A cross-sectional cohort of 60 children and young adults (mean 15.1 ± 3.4 years) with hemoglobin SS or S/β(0) thalassemia and 30 matched controls (mean 14.6 ± 3.5 years) without SCA or sickle cell trait underwent maximal CPET by a graded, symptom-limited cycle ergometry protocol with breath-by-breath, gas exchange analysis. Compared to controls without SCA, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly lower peak VO2 (26.9 ± 6.9 vs. 37.0 ± 9.2 mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). Subjects demonstrated slower oxygen uptake (ΔVO2/ΔWR, 9 ± 2 vs. 12 ± 2 mL/min/watt, P < 0.001) and lower oxygen pulse (ΔVO2/ΔHR, 12 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 7 mL/beat, P < 0.001) as well as reduced oxygen uptake efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVO2, 42 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 5, P < 0.001) and ventilation efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVCO2, 30.3 ± 3.7 vs. 27.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.001) during CPET. Peak VO2 remained significantly lower in subjects with SCA after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin, which were independent predictors of peak VO2 for subjects with SCA. In the largest study to date using maximal CPET in SCA, we demonstrate that children and young adults with SCA have reduced exercise capacity attributable to factors independent of anemia. Complex derangements in gas exchange and oxygen uptake during maximal exercise are common in this population.

  11. Follicle cell trypsin-like protease HrOvochymase: Its cDNA cloning, localization, and involvement in the late stage of oogenesis in the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Mino, Masako; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that the sperm trypsin-like protease HrAcrosin and its precursor HrProacrosin participate in fertilization of the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi. The HrProacrosin gene is annotated in the H. roretzi genome database as Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383; our previously reported sequence of HrProacrosin gene appeared to include four nucleotides inserted near the 3'-end of HrProacrosin, resulting in a frame-shift mutation and a premature termination codon. The gene architecture of HrProacrosin and Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383 resembles that of Xenopus laevis ovochymase-1/OVCH1 and ovochymase-2/OVCH2, which encode egg extracellular polyproteases. Considering these new observations, we evaluated the cDNA cloning, expression, localization, and function of Harore.CG.MTP2014.S89.g15383, herein designated as HrOvochymase/HrOVCH. We found that HrOVCH cDNA consists of a single open reading frame of 1,575 amino acids, containing a signal peptide, three trypsin-like protease domains, and six CUB domains. HrOVCH was transcribed by the testis and ovary, but the majority of protein exists in ovarian follicle cells surrounding eggs. An anti-HrOVCH antibody inhibited elevation of the vitelline coat at a late stage of oogenesis, during the period when self-sterility is acquired. As trypsin inhibitors are reported to block the acquisition of self-sterility during oogenesis, whereas trypsin induces the acquisition of self-sterility and elevation of the vitelline coat in defolliculated ovarian eggs, we propose that HrOVCH may play a role in the acquisition of self-sterility by late-stage H. roretzi oocytes.

  12. In Situ Manufacturing of Plastics and Composites to Support H&R Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon

    2006-01-01

    With the new direction of NASA to emphasize the exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond, quick development and demonstration of efficient systems for In Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) is more critical and timely than ever before. Beyond the production of life support consumables or propellants, long term missions will require much greater levels of utilization of indigenous resources, including fabrication of habitats, radiation shielding, and replacement parts and tools. This paper reports the development of a reactor system for the synthesis of polyethylene from carbon dioxide and water. One technology commonly found in most NASA In Situ Resources Utilization scenarios is the use of the Sabatier reaction and water electrolysis to produce methane and oxygen. The system presented uses methane and oxygen to produce ethylene, and subsequently ethylene is polymerized to produce polyethylene. The process selected enables the synthesis of high-density polyethylene suitable for the fabrication of many products for space exploration, including sheets, films, channels, etc, which can be used to construct extraterrestrial habitats, tools, replacement parts, etc. Conventional fabrication processes, such as extrusion and injection molding, which are used in the fabrication of polyethylene parts, can be adapted for space operation, making polyethylene a versatile feedstock for future in-situ manufacturing plants. Studies show that polyethylene is a very good radiation shield material, making it very suitable for construction of habitats, as well as incorporation in space suits. For the fabrication of massive structures, polyethylene can be combined with indigenous soil to maximize the use of unprocessed resources, either enclosed in channels, bags, etc., or compounded in varying proportions. The focus of this paper is to present current progress in the development of manufacturing systems and processes for the production of plastics and composites utilizing indigenous

  13. Metabolic heterogeneity in human calf muscle during maximal exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenborne, K. Free Univ. of Brussels ); McCully, K.; Kakihira, H.; Prammer. M.; Bolinger, L.; Detre, J.A.; Walter, G.; Chance, B.; Leigh. J.S. ); De Meirleir, K. )

    1991-07-01

    Human skeletal muscle is composed of various muscle fiber types. The authors hypothesized that differences in metabolism between fiber types could be detected noninvasively with {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy during maximal exercise. This assumes that during maximal exercise all fiber types are recruited and all vary in the amount of acidosis. The calf muscles of seven subjects were studied. Two different coils were applied: an 11-cm-diameter surface coil and a five-segment meander coil. The meander coil was used to localize the {sup 31}P signal to either the medial or the lateral gastrocnemius. Maximal exercise, consisting of rapid plantar flexions, resulted in an 83.7% {plus minus} 7.8% decrease of the phosphocreatine pool and an 8-fold increase of the inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) pool. At rest the P{sub i} pool was observed as a single resonance (pH 7.0). Toward the end of the first minute of exercise, three subjects showed three distinct P{sub i} peaks. During the second minute of exercise the pH values stabilized. The same pattern was seen when the signal was collected from the medial or lateral gastrocnemius. In four subjects only two distinct P{sub i} peaks were observed. The P{sub i} peaks had differing relative areas in different subjects, but they were reproducible in each individual. This method allowed is to study the appearance and disappearance of the different P{sub i} peaks, together with the changes in pH. Because multiple P{sub i} peaks were seen in single muscles they most likely identify different muscle fiber types.

  14. Expectation maximization for hard X-ray count modulation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, F.; Schwartz, R.; Piana, M.; Massone, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    Context. This paper is concerned with the image reconstruction problem when the measured data are solar hard X-ray modulation profiles obtained from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) instrument. Aims: Our goal is to demonstrate that a statistical iterative method classically applied to the image deconvolution problem is very effective when utilized to analyze count modulation profiles in solar hard X-ray imaging based on rotating modulation collimators. Methods: The algorithm described in this paper solves the maximum likelihood problem iteratively and encodes a positivity constraint into the iterative optimization scheme. The result is therefore a classical expectation maximization method this time applied not to an image deconvolution problem but to image reconstruction from count modulation profiles. The technical reason that makes our implementation particularly effective in this application is the use of a very reliable stopping rule which is able to regularize the solution providing, at the same time, a very satisfactory Cash-statistic (C-statistic). Results: The method is applied to both reproduce synthetic flaring configurations and reconstruct images from experimental data corresponding to three real events. In this second case, the performance of expectation maximization, when compared to Pixon image reconstruction, shows a comparable accuracy and a notably reduced computational burden; when compared to CLEAN, shows a better fidelity with respect to the measurements with a comparable computational effectiveness. Conclusions: If optimally stopped, expectation maximization represents a very reliable method for image reconstruction in the RHESSI context when count modulation profiles are used as input data.

  15. Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption with oral and nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Morton, A R; King, K; Papalia, S; Goodman, C; Turley, K R; Wilmore, J H

    1995-09-01

    The major cause of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is thought to be the drying and cooling of the airways during the 'conditioning' of the inspired air. Nasal breathing increases the respiratory system's ability to warm and humidity the inspired air compared to oral breathing and reduces the drying and cooling effects of the increased ventilation during exercise. This will reduce the severity of EIA provoked by a given intensity and duration of exercise. The purpose of the study was to determine the exercise intensity (%VO2 max) at which healthy subjects, free from respiratory disease, could perform while breathing through the nose-only and to compare this with mouth-only and mouth plus nose breathing. Twenty subjects (11 males and 9 females) ranging from 18-55 years acted as subjects in this study. They were all non-smokers and non-asthmatic. At the time of the study, all subjects were involved in regular physical activity and were classified, by a physician, as free from nasal polyps or other nasal obstruction. The percentage decrease in maximal ventilation with nose-only breathing compare to mouth and mouth plus nose breathing was three times the percentage decrease in maximal oxygen consumption. The pattern of nose-only breathing at maximal work showed a small reduction in tidal volume and large reduction in breathing frequency. Nasal breathing resulted in a reduction in FEO2 and an increase in FECO2. While breathing through the nose-only, all subjects could attain a work intensity great enough to produce an aerobic training effect (based on heart rate and percentage of VO2 max).

  16. Synthetic-aperture radar autofocus by maximizing sharpness.

    PubMed

    Fienup, J R

    2000-02-15

    To focus a synthetic-aperture radar image that is suffering from phase errors, a phase-error estimate is found that, when it is applied, maximizes the sharpness of the image. Closed-form expressions are derived for the gradients of a sharpness metric with respect to phase-error parameters, including both a point-by-point (nonparametric) phase function and coefficients of a polynomial expansion. Use of these expressions allows for a highly efficient gradient-search algorithm for high-order phase errors. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with an example.

  17. Maximizing Team Performance: The Critical Role of the Nurse Leader.

    PubMed

    Manges, Kirstin; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Ward, Marcia M

    2017-01-01

    Facilitating team development is challenging, yet critical for ongoing improvement across healthcare settings. The purpose of this exemplary case study is to examine the role of nurse leaders in facilitating the development of a high-performing Change Team in implementing a patient safety initiative (TeamSTEPPs) using the Tuckman Model of Group Development as a guiding framework. The case study is the synthesis of 2.5 years of critical access hospital key informant interviews (n = 50). Critical juncture points related to team development and key nurse leader actions are analyzed, suggesting that nurse leaders are essential to maximize clinical teams' performance.

  18. A new solution for maximal clique problem based sticker model.

    PubMed

    Darehmiraki, Majid

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we use stickers to construct a solution space of DNA for the maximal clique problem (MCP). Simultaneously, we also apply the DNA operation in the sticker-based model to develop a DNA algorithm. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the MCP is resolved with biological operations in the sticker-based model for the solution space of the sticker. Moreover, this work presents clear evidence of the ability of DNA computing to solve the NP-complete problem. The potential of DNA computing for the MCP is promising given the operational time complexity of O(nxk).

  19. Testing sequential quantum measurements: how can maximal knowledge be extracted?

    PubMed Central

    Nagali, Eleonora; Felicetti, Simone; de Assis, Pierre-Louis; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Filip, Radim; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of information from a quantum system unavoidably implies a modification of the measured system itself. In this framework partial measurements can be carried out in order to extract only a portion of the information encoded in a quantum system, at the cost of inducing a limited amount of disturbance. Here we analyze experimentally the dynamics of sequential partial measurements carried out on a quantum system, focusing on the trade-off between the maximal information extractable and the disturbance. In particular we implement two sequential measurements observing that, by exploiting an adaptive strategy, is possible to find an optimal trade-off between the two quantities. PMID:22720131

  20. Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation

    DOEpatents

    Sisemore, Clyde J.

    1980-01-01

    A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.