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Sample records for age-related cognitive impairments

  1. Epigenetic modification of PKMζ rescues aging-related cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xue, Yan-Xue; Han, Ying; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Deng, Jia-Hui; Chen, Na; Bao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cao, Lin-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Shi, Jie; Song, Wei-Hong; Lu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Cognition is impacted by aging. However, the mechanisms that underlie aging-associated cognitive impairment are unclear. Here we showed that cognitive decline in aged rats was associated with changes in DNA methylation of protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) in the prelimbic cortex (PrL). PKMζ is a crucial molecule involved in the maintenance of long-term memory. Using different behavioral models, we confirmed that aged rats exhibited cognitive impairment in memory retention test 24 h after training, and overexpression of PKMζ in the PrL rescued cognitive impairment in aged rats. After fear conditioning, the protein levels of PKMζ and the membrane expression of GluR2 increased in the PrL in young and adult rats but not in aged rats, and the levels of methylated PKMζ DNA in the PrL decreased in all age groups, whereas the levels of unmethylated PKMζ DNA increased only in young and adult rats. We also found that environmentally enriched housing reversed the hypermethylation of PKMζ and restored cognitive performance in aged rats. Inactivation of PKMζ prevented the potentiating effects of environmental enrichment on memory retention in aged rats. These results indicated that PKMζ might be a potential target for the treatment of aging-related cognitive impairment, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue.

  2. Epigenetic modification of PKMζ rescues aging-related cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xue, Yan-Xue; Han, Ying; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Deng, Jia-Hui; Chen, Na; Bao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cao, Lin-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Shi, Jie; Song, Wei-Hong; Lu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cognition is impacted by aging. However, the mechanisms that underlie aging-associated cognitive impairment are unclear. Here we showed that cognitive decline in aged rats was associated with changes in DNA methylation of protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) in the prelimbic cortex (PrL). PKMζ is a crucial molecule involved in the maintenance of long-term memory. Using different behavioral models, we confirmed that aged rats exhibited cognitive impairment in memory retention test 24 h after training, and overexpression of PKMζ in the PrL rescued cognitive impairment in aged rats. After fear conditioning, the protein levels of PKMζ and the membrane expression of GluR2 increased in the PrL in young and adult rats but not in aged rats, and the levels of methylated PKMζ DNA in the PrL decreased in all age groups, whereas the levels of unmethylated PKMζ DNA increased only in young and adult rats. We also found that environmentally enriched housing reversed the hypermethylation of PKMζ and restored cognitive performance in aged rats. Inactivation of PKMζ prevented the potentiating effects of environmental enrichment on memory retention in aged rats. These results indicated that PKMζ might be a potential target for the treatment of aging-related cognitive impairment, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue. PMID:26926225

  3. Anthropological contributions to the understanding of age-related cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Peter J; Gaines, Atwood D; Lindstrom, Heather; Graham, Janice E

    2005-05-01

    Medical anthropology has not only helped us to understand the social, political, and ethical foundations of modern biomedicine, but also improved the identification and treatment of patients in various geographic, sociological, and medical contexts. In this article, we present an anthropological perspective on the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment. The ubiquity of cognitive changes in the growing number of elderly people around the world, and the many diverse responses that human communities have taken to such challenges, require biocultural approaches. Anthropology can serve as an ally in accomplishing the goal of improving the quality of life of those with cognitive impairment by highlighting the role of sociocultural processes that influence the development, meaning, and experience of dementia. So too can it serve as a framework for criticism of biomedical research, theory, and practice. PMID:15847845

  4. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Ngwenya, Laura B.; Heyworth, Nadine C.; Shwe, Yamin; Moore, Tara L.; Rosene, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well-established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the DG of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested) ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the DG over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment. PMID:26236203

  5. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Laura B; Heyworth, Nadine C; Shwe, Yamin; Moore, Tara L; Rosene, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well-established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the DG of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested) ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the DG over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment. PMID:26236203

  6. Jumping Stand Apparatus Reveals Rapidly Specific Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mouse Lemur Primates.

    PubMed

    Picq, Jean-Luc; Villain, Nicolas; Gary, Charlotte; Pifferi, Fabien; Dhenain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a promising primate model for investigating normal and pathological cerebral aging. The locomotor behavior of this arboreal primate is characterized by jumps to and from trunks and branches. Many reports indicate insufficient adaptation of the mouse lemur to experimental devices used to evaluate its cognition, which is an impediment to the efficient use of this animal in research. In order to develop cognitive testing methods appropriate to the behavioral and biological traits of this species, we adapted the Lashley jumping stand apparatus, initially designed for rats, to the mouse lemur. We used this jumping stand apparatus to compare performances of young (n = 12) and aged (n = 8) adults in acquisition and long-term retention of visual discriminations. All mouse lemurs completed the tasks and only 25 trials, on average, were needed to master the first discrimination problem with no age-related differences. A month later, all mouse lemurs made progress for acquiring the second discrimination problem but only the young group reached immediately the criterion in the retention test of the first discrimination problem. This study shows that the jumping stand apparatus allows rapid and efficient evaluation of cognition in mouse lemurs and demonstrates that about half of the old mouse lemurs display a specific deficit in long-term retention but not in acquisition of visual discrimination.

  7. Jumping Stand Apparatus Reveals Rapidly Specific Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mouse Lemur Primates

    PubMed Central

    Picq, Jean-Luc; Villain, Nicolas; Gary, Charlotte; Pifferi, Fabien; Dhenain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a promising primate model for investigating normal and pathological cerebral aging. The locomotor behavior of this arboreal primate is characterized by jumps to and from trunks and branches. Many reports indicate insufficient adaptation of the mouse lemur to experimental devices used to evaluate its cognition, which is an impediment to the efficient use of this animal in research. In order to develop cognitive testing methods appropriate to the behavioral and biological traits of this species, we adapted the Lashley jumping stand apparatus, initially designed for rats, to the mouse lemur. We used this jumping stand apparatus to compare performances of young (n = 12) and aged (n = 8) adults in acquisition and long-term retention of visual discriminations. All mouse lemurs completed the tasks and only 25 trials, on average, were needed to master the first discrimination problem with no age-related differences. A month later, all mouse lemurs made progress for acquiring the second discrimination problem but only the young group reached immediately the criterion in the retention test of the first discrimination problem. This study shows that the jumping stand apparatus allows rapid and efficient evaluation of cognition in mouse lemurs and demonstrates that about half of the old mouse lemurs display a specific deficit in long-term retention but not in acquisition of visual discrimination. PMID:26716699

  8. Jumping Stand Apparatus Reveals Rapidly Specific Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mouse Lemur Primates.

    PubMed

    Picq, Jean-Luc; Villain, Nicolas; Gary, Charlotte; Pifferi, Fabien; Dhenain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is a promising primate model for investigating normal and pathological cerebral aging. The locomotor behavior of this arboreal primate is characterized by jumps to and from trunks and branches. Many reports indicate insufficient adaptation of the mouse lemur to experimental devices used to evaluate its cognition, which is an impediment to the efficient use of this animal in research. In order to develop cognitive testing methods appropriate to the behavioral and biological traits of this species, we adapted the Lashley jumping stand apparatus, initially designed for rats, to the mouse lemur. We used this jumping stand apparatus to compare performances of young (n = 12) and aged (n = 8) adults in acquisition and long-term retention of visual discriminations. All mouse lemurs completed the tasks and only 25 trials, on average, were needed to master the first discrimination problem with no age-related differences. A month later, all mouse lemurs made progress for acquiring the second discrimination problem but only the young group reached immediately the criterion in the retention test of the first discrimination problem. This study shows that the jumping stand apparatus allows rapid and efficient evaluation of cognition in mouse lemurs and demonstrates that about half of the old mouse lemurs display a specific deficit in long-term retention but not in acquisition of visual discrimination. PMID:26716699

  9. Formaldehyde as a trigger for protein aggregation and potential target for mitigation of age-related, progressive cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Su, Tao; Monte, Woodrow C; Hu, Xintian; He, Yingge; He, Rongqiao

    2016-01-01

    Recently, formaldehyde (FA), existing in a number of different cells including neural cells, was found to affect age-related cognitive impairment. Oral administration of methanol (the metabolic precursor of FA) triggers formation of senile plaques (SPs) and Tau hyperphosphorylation in the brains of monkeys with memory decline. Intraperitoneal injection of FA leads to hyperphosphorylation of Tau in wild-type mouse brains and N2a cells through activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Furthermore, formaldehyde at low concentrations can directly induce Tau aggregation and amyloid β (Aβ) peptide deposits in vitro. Formaldehyde-induced Tau aggregation is implicated in cytotoxicity and neural cell apoptosis. Clarifying how FA triggers Aβ deposits and Tau hyperphosphorlyation will not only improve our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of age-related cognitive impairment but will also contribute to the ongoing investigation of alternate targets for new drugs. Here, we review the role of FA, particularly that of endogenous origin, in protein aggregation and as a potential drug intervention in the development of agerelated cognitive impairment.

  10. Age-related cognitive impairments in mice with a conditional ablation of the neural cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However, whether aging is associated with NCAM alterations that might contribute to age-related cognitive decline is not currently known. In this study, we determined whether conditional NCAM-deficient mice display increased vulnerability to age-related cognitive and emotional alterations. We assessed the NCAM expression levels in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and characterized the performance of adult and aged conditional NCAM-deficient mice and their age-matched wild-type littermates in a delayed matching-to-place test in the Morris water maze and a delayed reinforced alternation test in the T-maze. Although aging in wild-type mice is associated with an isoform-specific reduction of NCAM expression levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, these mice exhibited only mild impairments in working/episodic-like memory performance. However, aged conditional NCAM-deficient mice displayed pronounced impairments in both the delayed matching-to-place and the delayed reinforced alternation tests. Importantly, the deficits of aged NCAM-deficient mice in these working/episodic-like memory tasks could not be attributed to increased anxiety-like behaviors or to differences in locomotor activity. Taken together, these data indicate that reduced NCAM expression in the forebrain might be a critical factor for the occurrence of cognitive impairments during aging.

  11. The effectiveness of unitization in mitigating age-related relational learning impairments depends on existing cognitive status

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria C.; Smith, Victoria M.; Kacollja, Arber; Zhang, Felicia; Binns, Malcolm A.; Barense, Morgan D.; Ryan, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Binding relations among items in the transverse patterning (TP) task is dependent on the integrity of the hippocampus and its extended network. Older adults have impaired TP learning, corresponding to age-related reductions in hippocampal volumes. Unitization is a training strategy that can mitigate TP impairments in amnesia by reducing reliance on hippocampal-dependent relational binding and increasing reliance on fused representations. Here we examined whether healthy older adults and those showing early signs of cognitive decline would also benefit from unitization. Although both groups of older adults had neuropsychological performance within the healthy range, their TP learning differed both under standard and unitized training conditions. Healthy older adults with impaired TP learning under standard training benefited from unitized training. Older adults who failed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) showed greater impairments under standard conditions, and showed no evidence of improvement with unitization. These individuals’ failures to benefit from unitization may be a consequence of early deficits not seen in older adults who pass the MoCA. PMID:27049878

  12. The effectiveness of unitization in mitigating age-related relational learning impairments depends on existing cognitive status.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Maria C; Smith, Victoria M; Kacollja, Arber; Zhang, Felicia; Binns, Malcolm A; Barense, Morgan D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2016-11-01

    Binding relations among items in the transverse patterning (TP) task is dependent on the integrity of the hippocampus and its extended network. Older adults have impaired TP learning, corresponding to age-related reductions in hippocampal volumes. Unitization is a training strategy that can mitigate TP impairments in amnesia by reducing reliance on hippocampal-dependent relational binding and increasing reliance on fused representations. Here we examined whether healthy older adults and those showing early signs of cognitive decline would also benefit from unitization. Although both groups of older adults had neuropsychological performance within the healthy range, their TP learning differed both under standard and unitized training conditions. Healthy older adults with impaired TP learning under standard training benefited from unitized training. Older adults who failed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) showed greater impairments under standard conditions, and showed no evidence of improvement with unitization. These individuals' failures to benefit from unitization may be a consequence of early deficits not seen in older adults who pass the MoCA.

  13. Age-related decline in verbal learning is moderated by demographic factors, working memory capacity, and presence of amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Constantinidou, Fofi; Zaganas, Ioannis; Papastefanakis, Emmanouil; Kasselimis, Dimitrios; Nidos, Andreas; Simos, Panagiotis G

    2014-09-01

    Age-related memory changes are highly varied and heterogeneous. The study examined the rate of decline in verbal episodic memory as a function of education level, auditory attention span and verbal working memory capacity, and diagnosis of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI). Data were available on a community sample of 653 adults aged 17-86 years and 70 patients with a-MCI recruited from eight broad geographic areas in Greece and Cyprus. Measures of auditory attention span and working memory capacity (digits forward and backward) and verbal episodic memory (Auditory Verbal Learning Test [AVLT]) were used. Moderated mediation regressions on data from the community sample did not reveal significant effects of education level on the rate of age-related decline in AVLT indices. The presence of a-MCI was a significant moderator of the direct effect of Age on both immediate and delayed episodic memory indices. The rate of age-related decline in verbal episodic memory is normally mediated by working memory capacity. Moreover, in persons who display poor episodic memory capacity (a-MCI group), age-related memory decline is expected to advance more rapidly for those who also display relatively poor verbal working memory capacity.

  14. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  15. Age-Related Cognitive Impairment as a Sign of Geriatric Neurocardiovascular Interactions: May Polyphenols Play a Protective Role?

    PubMed Central

    Jagla, Fedor; Pechanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    It is known that endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases implicated also in cognitive decline. Experimental studies pointed to the fact that the modification of NO levels via NOS activity may affect the blood pressure level as well as several higher nervous functions—for example, learning and memory. There are emerging evidences from in vitro and animal studies suggesting that polyphenols may potentially have a protective effect on the development of neurodegenerative diseases and may improve cognitive function as well as positively affecting the blood pressure regulatory mechanisms. This review accentuates the need for precisely defined clinically controlled studies as well as for use of adequate experimental procedures discriminating between the human higher brain functions and the only overall activation of the brain cortex. The physiological neurocardiovascular interactions are implicated in the increased healthy life span as well. PMID:26180593

  16. Consequences of Age-Related Cognitive Declines

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adult age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities are well documented, and many of those abilities have been found to be related to success in the workplace and in everyday life. However, increased age is seldom associated with lower levels of real-world functioning, and the reasons for this lab-life discrepancy are not well understood. This article briefly reviews research concerned with relations of age to cognition, relations of cognition to successful functioning outside the laboratory, and relations of age to measures of work performance and achievement. The final section discusses several possible explanations for why there are often little or no consequences of age-related cognitive declines in everyday functioning. PMID:21740223

  17. Later developments: molecular keys to age-related memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Barad, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment, a cognitive decline not clearly related to any gross pathology, is progressive and widespread in the population, although not universal. While the mechanisms of learning and memory remain incompletely understood, the study of their molecular mechanisms is already yielding promising approaches toward therapy for such "normal" declines in the efficiency of learning. This review presents the rationale and results for two such approaches. One approach, partial inhibition of the type IV cAMP specific phosphodiesterase, appears to act indirectly. Although little evidence supports an age-related decline in this system, considerable evidence indicates that this approach can facilitate the transition from short-term to long-term memory and thus counterbalance defects in long-term memory, which may be due to other causes. A second approach, inhibition of l-type voltage gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) may be a specific corrective for a molecular pathology of aging, as substantial evidence indicates that an ongoing increase occurs throughout the lifespan in the density of these channels in hippocampal pyramidal cells, with a concomitant reduction in cellular excitability. Because LVGCCs are also crucial to extinction, a paradigm of inhibitory learning, age-related memory impairment may be an unfortunate side effect of a developmental process necessary to the maturation of the ability to suppress inappropriate behavior, an interpretation consistent with the antagonistic pleiotropy theory of aging.

  18. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  19. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Tohru; Shibata, Rei; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Katahira, Nobuyuki; Kambara, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoko; Nonoyama, Hiroshi; Horibe, Yuichiro; Ueda, Hiromi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG), one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months) were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV), which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  20. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  1. Cognitive Impairment and Age-Related Vision Disorders: Their Possible Relationship and the Evaluation of the Use of Aspirin and Statins in a 65 Years-and-Over Sardinian Population

    PubMed Central

    Mandas, Antonella; Mereu, Rosa Maria; Catte, Olga; Saba, Antonio; Serchisu, Luca; Costaggiu, Diego; Peiretti, Enrico; Caminiti, Giulia; Vinci, Michela; Casu, Maura; Piludu, Stefania; Fossarello, Maurizio; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Dessí, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer’s disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging, which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly, and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurological problems. However, clinical studies have produced contradictory results. Thus, the intent of the present study was to reliably establish whether a relationship exist between various types of dementia and age-related vision disorders, and to establish whether statins and aspirin may or may not have beneficial effects on these two types of disorders. We found that participants with dementia and/or vision problems were more likely to be depressed and displayed worse functional ability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living than controls. Mini mental state examination scores were significantly lower in patients with vision disorders compared to subjects without vision disorders. A closer association with macular degeneration was found in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease than in subjects without dementia or with vascular dementia, mixed dementia, or other types of age-related vision disorders. When we considered the associations between different types of dementia and vision disorders and the use of statins and aspirin, we found a significant positive association between Alzheimer’s disease and statins on their own or in combination with aspirin, indicating that these two drugs do not appear to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease or improve its clinical evolution and may, on the contrary, favor its development. No significant association in statin use alone, aspirin use alone, or the combination of these was found in subjects without vision

  2. Cognitive Impairment and Age-Related Vision Disorders: Their Possible Relationship and the Evaluation of the Use of Aspirin and Statins in a 65 Years-and-Over Sardinian Population.

    PubMed

    Mandas, Antonella; Mereu, Rosa Maria; Catte, Olga; Saba, Antonio; Serchisu, Luca; Costaggiu, Diego; Peiretti, Enrico; Caminiti, Giulia; Vinci, Michela; Casu, Maura; Piludu, Stefania; Fossarello, Maurizio; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Dessí, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging, which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly, and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurological problems. However, clinical studies have produced contradictory results. Thus, the intent of the present study was to reliably establish whether a relationship exist between various types of dementia and age-related vision disorders, and to establish whether statins and aspirin may or may not have beneficial effects on these two types of disorders. We found that participants with dementia and/or vision problems were more likely to be depressed and displayed worse functional ability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living than controls. Mini mental state examination scores were significantly lower in patients with vision disorders compared to subjects without vision disorders. A closer association with macular degeneration was found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease than in subjects without dementia or with vascular dementia, mixed dementia, or other types of age-related vision disorders. When we considered the associations between different types of dementia and vision disorders and the use of statins and aspirin, we found a significant positive association between Alzheimer's disease and statins on their own or in combination with aspirin, indicating that these two drugs do not appear to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease or improve its clinical evolution and may, on the contrary, favor its development. No significant association in statin use alone, aspirin use alone, or the combination of these was found in subjects without vision disorders but

  3. Cognitive performance and age-related changes in the hippocampal proteome

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Willard M.; VanGuilder, Heather D.; Bennett, Colleen; Sonntag, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Declining cognitive performance is associated with increasing age, even in the absence of overt pathological processes. We and others have reported that declining cognitive performance is associated with age-related changes in brain glucose utilization, long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation, protein expression, neurotransmitter levels, and trophic factors. However, it is unclear whether these changes are causes or symptoms of the underlying alterations in dendritic and synaptic morphology that occur with age. In this study, we examined the hippocampal proteome for age- and cognition-associated changes in behaviorally stratified young and old rats, using 2-DIGE and MS/MS-MS. Comparison of old cognitively intact with old cognitively impaired animals revealed additional changes that would not have been detected otherwise. Interestingly, not all age-related changes in protein expression were associated with cognitive decline, and distinct differences in protein expression were found when comparing old cognitively intact with old cognitively impaired rats. A large number of protein changes with age were related to the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway. In total, the proteomic changes suggest that age-related alterations act synergistically with other perturbations to result in cognitive decline. This study also demonstrates the importance of examining behaviorally-defined animals in proteomic studies, as comparison of young to old animals regardless of behavioral performance would have failed to detect many cognitive impairment-specific protein expression changes evident when behavioral stratification data was used. PMID:19135133

  4. Abnormal differentiation of newborn granule cells in age-related working memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Nyffeler, Myriel; Yee, Benjamin K; Feldon, Joram; Knuesel, Irene

    2010-11-01

    Age-related declines in spatial memory have been linked to abnormal functional properties and connectivity of newborn granule cells. However, the relationship between adult neurogenesis, aging, and cognitive performance seems more complex than previously anticipated, likely due to the difficulty of disentangling alterations related to training as such and those associated with cognitive performance. Here, we investigated how different aspects of adult neurogenesis might be related to training, age and cognitive performance amongst aged subjects by comparing behaviourally naïve and tested rats of 3, 6, 24mo of age. We separated aged rats into learning-impaired and -unimpaired groups based on their performance in the Morris water maze to investigate neurogenesis-related morphological and neurochemical changes. We report an age-related decline in cell proliferation and maturation independent of cognitive performance and testing. We confirm an age-related altered differentiation of newborn neurons which was particularly prominent in learning-impaired rats. This was associated with an abnormally prolonged expression of the early progenitor marker Nestin, potentially also affecting maturation, survival/integration of newborn neurons into existing neuronal networks, which might underlie the individual differences in cognitive performance during aging.

  5. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Shibata, R; Ouchi, N; Kondo, K; Ishii, M; Katahira, N; Kambara, T; Inoue, Y; Takahashi, R; Ikeda, N; Kihara, S; Ueda, H; Murohara, T

    2014-04-24

    Obesity-related disorders are closely associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Adiponectin (APN) exerts protective effects against obesity-related conditions including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the impact of APN on ARHI. APN-knockout (APN-KO) mice developed exacerbation of hearing impairment, particularly in the high frequency range, compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Supplementation with APN prevented the hearing impairment in APN-KO mice. At 2 months of age, the cochlear blood flow and capillary density of the stria vascularis (SV) were significantly reduced in APN-KO mice as compared with WT mice. APN-KO mice also showed a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells in the organ of Corti in the cochlea at 2 months of age. At the age of 6 months, hair cells were lost at the organ of Corti in APN-KO mice. In cultured auditory HEI-OC1 cells, APN reduced apoptotic activity under hypoxic conditions. Clinically, plasma APN levels were significantly lower in humans with ARHI. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified APN as a significant and independent predictor of ARHI. Our observations indicate that APN has an important role in preventing ARHI.

  6. Veterans have less age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    McLay, R N; Lyketsos, C G

    2000-08-01

    Military service involves exposure to a number of stresses, both psychological and physical. On the other hand, military personnel generally maintain excellent fitness, and veterans have increased access to education and health care. The overall effect on age-related cognitive decline, whether for good or ill, of having served in the armed forces has not been investigated previously. In this study, we examined a diverse population of 208 veterans and 1,216 civilians followed as part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study in 1981, 1982, and 1993 to 1996. We examined change in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score after a median of 11.5 years. Veterans were found to have significantly less decrease in MMSE scores at follow-up even after sex, race, and education were taken into account. These results suggest an overall positive effect of military service on the rate of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:10957857

  7. A novel radial water tread maze tracks age-related cognitive decline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Touch, Dylan V.; Wiley, Jesse C.; Hopkins, Heather C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Ladiges, Warren C.

    2013-01-01

    There is currently no treatment and cure for age-related dementia and cognitive impairment in humans. Mice suffer from age-related cognitive decline just as people do, but assessment is challenging because of cumbersome and at times stressful performance tasks. We developed a novel radial water tread (RWT) maze and tested male C57BL/6 (B6) and C57BL/6 x Balb/c F1 (CB6F1) mice at ages 4, 12, 20, and 28 months. B6 mice showed a consistent learning experience and memory retention that gradually decreased with age. CB6F1 mice showed a moderate learning experience in the 4 and 12 month groups, which was not evident in the 20 and 28 month groups. In conclusion, CB6F1 mice showed more severe age-related cognitive impairment compared to B6 mice and might be a suitable model for intervention studies. In addition, the RWT maze has a number of operational advantages compared to currently accepted tasks and can be used to assess age-related cognition impairment in B6 and CB6F1 mice as early as 12 months of age. PMID:24106580

  8. Age-related differences in cognition across the adult lifespan in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lever, Anne G; Geurts, Hilde M

    2016-06-01

    It is largely unknown how age impacts cognition in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated whether age-related cognitive differences are similar, reduced or increased across the adult lifespan, examined cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and explored whether objective test performance is related to subjective cognitive challenges. Neuropsychological tests assessing visual and verbal memory, generativity, and theory of mind (ToM), and a self-report measure assessing cognitive failures were administered to 236 matched participants with and without ASD, aged 20-79 years (IQ > 80). Group comparisons revealed that individuals with ASD had higher scores on visual memory, lower scores on generativity and ToM, and similar performance on verbal memory. However, ToM impairments were no longer present in older (50+ years) adults with ASD. Across adulthood, individuals with ASD demonstrated similar age-related effects on verbal memory, generativity, and ToM, while age-related differences were reduced on visual memory. Although adults with ASD reported many cognitive failures, those were not associated with neuropsychological test performance. Hence, while some cognitive abilities (visual and verbal memory) and difficulties (generativity and semantic memory) persist across adulthood in ASD, others become less apparent in old age (ToM). Age-related differences characteristic of typical aging are reduced or parallel, but not increased in individuals with ASD, suggesting that ASD may partially protect against an age-related decrease in cognitive functioning. Despite these findings, adults with ASD experience many cognitive daily challenges, which highlights the need for adequate social support and the importance of further research into this topic, including longitudinal studies. Autism Res 2016, 9: 666-676. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  10. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  11. Genetic and Environmental Factors in Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Momi, Sukhleen K; Wolber, Lisa E; Fabiane, Stella Maris; MacGregor, Alex J; Williams, Frances M K

    2015-08-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a common condition with complex etiology but a recognized genetic component. Heritability estimates for pure tone audiogram-determined hearing ability lie in the range 26-75%. The speech-in-noise (SIN) auditory test, however, may be better at encapsulating ARHI symptoms, particularly the diminished ability to segregate environmental sounds into comprehendible auditory streams. As heritability of SIN has not previously been reported, we explored the genetic and environmental contributions to ARHI determined by SIN in 2,076 twins (87.8% female) aged 18-87 (mean age 54.4). SIN was found to be significantly heritable (A, unadjusted for age=40%; 95% confidence intervals, CI=32%-47%). With age adjustment, heritability fell (A=25%; 95% CI=16-33%), and a relatively strong influence of environmental exposure unshared within twin siblings was identified (E=75%). To explore the environmental aspects further, we assessed the influence of diet (through the Food Frequency Questionnaire, FFQ), smoking (through self-report and cotinine metabolite levels) and alcohol intake (through the FFQ). A negative influence of high cholesterol diet was observed after adjustment (p=.037). A protective effect of raised serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels was observed after adjustment (p=.004). This study is the first assessment of the genetic and environmental influence on SIN perception. The findings suggest SIN is less heritable than pure tone audiogram (PTA) ability and highly influenced by the environment unique to each twin. Furthermore, a possible role of dietary fat in the etiology of ARHI is highlighted.

  12. Factors Associated With Age-related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Il Joon; Byun, Hayoung; Woo, Sook-young; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a complex degenerative disease in the elderly. As multiple factors interact during the development of ARHI, it is important to elucidate the major influencing factors to understand and prevent ARHI. We aimed to identify risk factors associated with the development of ARHI with a retrospective cohort from 2001 to 2010. The records of the adult subjects over 40 years of age who consecutively underwent a comprehensive health checkup including pure-tone audiometry at the Health Promotion Center were reviewed. During this period, 1560 subjects who underwent pure-tone audiometry more than twice, had no other otologic diseases, and were followed-up more than 2 years were included. A pure-tone average (PTA: 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was calculated. Development of ARHI was defined as a PTA at follow-up more than 10 dB greater than the baseline PTA. Times to the first development of ARHI were investigated. Overall, 12.7% of subjects developed ARHI within the first 4 years. High blood ionized calcium (hazard ratio [HR] 0.084), albumin (HR 0.239), systolic blood pressure (HR 0.577), thyroid hormone (T3) (HR 0.593), and alpha fetoprotein levels (HR 0.883) were associated with decreased hazard for the development of ARHI. In contrast, high blood high-density lipoprotein (HR 2.105), uric acid (HR 1.684), total protein (HR 1.423), and total bilirubin levels (HR 1.220) were potential risk factors for the development of ARHI. Development of ARHI is common among the aged population, and a variety of factors may interact during this process. The results of this study can be used for counseling of adults at high-risk of developing ARHI with regard to regular audiological check-up. PMID:26512592

  13. Complexity in caring for an ageing heart failure population: concomitant chronic conditions and age related impairments.

    PubMed

    De Geest, Sabina; Steeman, Els; Leventhal, Marcia E; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Hengartner-Kopp, Beatrice; Conca, Antoinette; Bernasconi, Arlette T; Petry, Heidi; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2004-12-01

    The complexity of caring for the ageing heart failure (HF) population is further complicated by concomitant chronic conditions (i.e., polypharmacy, depression), age related impairments (i.e., hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, impairments in activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), and other issues (e.g., health illiteracy, lack of social support). This paper provides an overview of these risk factors, outlines how they individually and in interplay endanger favourable outcome by putting patients at risk for poor self-management. Moreover, suggestions are made on how these issues could be addressed and integrated in heart failure management by applying gerontological care principles in caring for the ageing heart failure population.

  14. Glutamatergic regulation prevents hippocampal-dependent age-related cognitive decline through dendritic spine clustering

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana C.; Lambert, Hilary K.; Grossman, Yael S.; Dumitriu, Dani; Waldman, Rachel; Jannetty, Sophia K.; Calakos, Katina; Janssen, William G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The dementia of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) results primarily from degeneration of neurons that furnish glutamatergic corticocortical connections that subserve cognition. Although neuron death is minimal in the absence of AD, age-related cognitive decline does occur in animals as well as humans, and it decreases quality of life for elderly people. Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to synapse loss and/or alterations of synaptic proteins that impair function in regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These synaptic alterations are likely reversible, such that maintenance of synaptic health in the face of aging is a critically important therapeutic goal. Here, we show that riluzole can protect against some of the synaptic alterations in hippocampus that are linked to age-related memory loss in rats. Riluzole increases glutamate uptake through glial transporters and is thought to decrease glutamate spillover to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors while increasing synaptic glutamatergic activity. Treated aged rats were protected against age-related cognitive decline displayed in nontreated aged animals. Memory performance correlated with density of thin spines on apical dendrites in CA1, although not with mushroom spines. Furthermore, riluzole-treated rats had an increase in clustering of thin spines that correlated with memory performance and was specific to the apical, but not the basilar, dendrites of CA1. Clustering of synaptic inputs is thought to allow nonlinear summation of synaptic strength. These findings further elucidate neuroplastic changes in glutamatergic circuits with aging and advance therapeutic development to prevent and treat age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25512503

  15. Cognitive Reserve Modifies Age-Related Alterations in CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo P.; Schultz, Stephanie A.; Austin, Benjamin P.; Boots, Elizabeth A.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Sager, Mark; Hermann, Bruce P.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlsson, Cindy; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although advancing age is the strongest risk factor for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent studies have shown that there are individual differences in susceptibility to age-related alterations in the biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. Objective In this study, we investigated whether cognitive reserve modifies the adverse influence of age on key cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional cohort of 268 individuals (211 cognitively normal and 57 cognitively impaired) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention and the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center participated in this study. They underwent lumbar puncture for collection of CSF samples, from which amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) were immunoassayed. Additionally, we computed t-tau/Aβ42 and p-tau/Aβ42 ratios. Cognitive reserve was indexed by years of education, with ≥16 years taken to confer high reserve. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the effect of age on CSF biomarkers was modified by cognitive reserve. Main outcome measures CSF levels of Aβ42, t-tau, p-tau, t-tau/Aβ42, and p-tau/Aβ42. Results There were significant age*cognitive reserve interactions for CSF t-tau (p=.019), p-tau (p=.009), t-tau/Aβ42 (p=.021), and p-tau/Aβ42 (p=.004). Specifically, with advancing age, individuals with high cognitive reserve exhibited attenuated adverse alterations in these CSF biomarkers compared with individuals with low cognitive reserve. This attenuation of age effects by cognitive reserve tended to be more pronounced in the cognitively-impaired group compared with the cognitively-normal group. Lastly, there was modest evidence of a dose response relationship such that the effect of age on the biomarkers was progressively attenuated given additional years of schooling. Conclusions and Relevance In a sample comprised of both cognitively

  16. Depression in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Laurel D.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Marano, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common in the elderly. Depression is also a common feature of cognitive impairment although the symptoms of depression in cognitive impairment differ from depression without cognitive impairment. Pre-morbid depression approximately doubles the risk of subsequent dementia. There are two predominant, though not mutually exclusive, constructs linking pre-morbid depression to subsequent cognitive impairment: Alzheimer’s pathology and the vascular depression hypothesis. When evaluating a patient with depression and cognitive impairment, it is important to obtain caregiver input and to evaluate for alternative etiologies for depressive symptoms such as delirium. We recommend a sequential approach to the treatment of depression in dementia patients: (1) a period of watchful waiting for milder symptoms, (2) psychosocial treatment program, (3) a medication trial for more severe symptoms or failure of psychosocial interventions, and (4) possible ECT for refractory symptoms. PMID:23933974

  17. Age-related impairment of mesenchymal progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Stolzing, Alexandra; Scutt, Andrew

    2006-06-01

    In most mesenchymal tissues a subcompartment of multipotent progenitor cells is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the tissue following trauma. With increasing age, the ability of tissues to repair themselves is diminished, which may be due to reduced functional capacity of the progenitor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on rat mesenchymal progenitor cells. Mesenchymal progenitor cells were isolated from Wistar rats aged 3, 7, 12 and 56 weeks. Viability, capacity for differentiation and cellular aging were examined. Cells from the oldest group accumulated raised levels of oxidized proteins and lipids and showed decreased levels of antioxidative enzyme activity. This was reflected in decreased fibroblast colony-forming unit (CFU-f) numbers, increased levels of apoptosis and reduced proliferation and potential for differentiation. These data suggest that the reduced ability to maintain mesenchymal tissue homeostasis in aged mammals is not purely due to a decline in progenitor cells numbers but also to a loss of progenitor functionality due to the accumulation of oxidative damage, which may in turn be a causative factor in a number of age-related pathologies such as arthritis, tendinosis and osteoporosis.

  18. Age-Related Cognitive Deficits In Rhesus Monkeys Mirror Human Deficits on an Automated Test Battery

    PubMed Central

    Nagahara, Alan H.; Bernot, Tim; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Aged non-human primates are a valuable model for gaining insight into mechanisms underlying neural decline with aging and during the course of neurodegenerative disorders. Behavioral studies are a valuable component of aged primate models, but are difficult to perform, time consuming, and often of uncertain relevance to human cognitive measures. We now report findings from an automated cognitive test battery in aged primates using equipment that is identical, and tasks that are similar, to those employed in human aging and Alzheimer’s disease studies. Young (7.1 ± 0.8 years) and aged (23.0 ± 0.5 years) rhesus monkeys underwent testing on a modified version of the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB), examining cognitive performance on separate tasks that sample features of visuospatial learning, spatial working memory, discrimination learning, and skilled motor performance. We find selective cognitive impairments among aged subjects in visuospatial learning and spatial working memory, but not in delayed recall of previously learned discriminations. Aged monkeys also exhibit slower speed in skilled motor function. Thus, aged monkeys behaviorally characterized on a battery of automated tests reveal patterns of age-related cognitive impairment that mirror in quality and severity those of aged humans, and differ fundamentally from more severe patterns of deficits observed in Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:18760505

  19. Cognitive aging explains age-related differences in face-based recognition of basic emotions except for anger and disgust.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsunobu; Akiyama, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at a detailed understanding of the possible dissociable influences of cognitive aging on the recognition of facial expressions of basic emotions (happiness, surprise, fear, anger, disgust, and sadness). The participants were 36 older and 36 young adults. They viewed 96 pictures of facial expressions and were asked to choose one emotion that best described each. Four cognitive tasks measuring the speed of processing and fluid intelligence were also administered, the scores of which were used to compute a composite measure of general cognitive ability. A series of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that age-related deficits in identifying happiness, surprise, fear, and sadness were statistically explained by general cognitive ability, while the differences in anger and disgust were not. This provides clear evidence that age-related cognitive impairment remarkably and differentially affects the recognition of basic emotions, contrary to the common view that cognitive aging has a uniformly minor effect.

  20. Prefrontal Cortical GABAergic Dysfunction Contributes to Age-Related Working Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B. Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Frazier, Charles J.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions. PMID:24599447

  1. From mind wandering to involuntary retrieval: Age-related differences in spontaneous cognitive processes.

    PubMed

    Maillet, David; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies that have investigated the effects of healthy aging on cognition have focused on age-related differences in voluntary and deliberately engaged cognitive processes. Yet many forms of cognition occur spontaneously, without any deliberate attempt at engaging them. In this article we review studies that have assessed age-related differences in four such types of spontaneous thought processes: mind-wandering, involuntary autobiographical memory, intrusive thoughts, and spontaneous prospective memory retrieval. These studies suggest that older adults exhibit a reduction in frequency of both mind-wandering and involuntary autobiographical memory, whereas findings regarding intrusive thoughts have been more mixed. Additionally, there is some preliminary evidence that spontaneous prospective memory retrieval may be relatively preserved in aging. We consider the roles of age-related differences in cognitive resources, motivation, current concerns and emotional regulation in accounting for these findings. We also consider age-related differences in the neural correlates of spontaneous cognitive processes.

  2. Closed-loop rehabilitation of age-related cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Jyoti; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive deficits are common in older adults, as a result of both the natural aging process and neurodegenerative disease. Although medical advancements have successfully prolonged the human lifespan, the challenge of remediating cognitive aging remains. The authors discuss the current state of cognitive therapeutic interventions and then present the need for development and validation of more powerful neurocognitive therapeutics. They propose that the next generation of interventions be implemented as closed-loop systems that target specific neural processing deficits, incorporate quantitative feedback to the individual and clinician, and are personalized to the individual's neurocognitive capacities using real-time performance-adaptive algorithms. This approach should be multimodal and seamlessly integrate other treatment approaches, including neurofeedback and transcranial electrical stimulation. This novel approach will involve the generation of software that engages the individual in an immersive and enjoyable game-based interface, integrated with advanced biosensing hardware, to maximally harness plasticity and assure adherence. Introducing such next-generation closed-loop neurocognitive therapeutics into the mainstream of our mental health care system will require the combined efforts of clinicians, neuroscientists, bioengineers, software game developers, and industry and policy makers working together to meet the challenges and opportunities of translational neuroscience in the 21st century. PMID:25520029

  3. ROLE OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE IN AGE-RELATED VASCULAR COGNITIVE DECLINE

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Young, Jennifer M.; Borkar, Rohan; Woltjer, Randy L.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Silbert, Lisa C.; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2014-01-01

    P450 eicosanoids are important regulators of the cerebral microcirculation, but their role in cerebral small vessel disease is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is linked to reduced cerebral microvascular eicosanoid signaling. We analyzed human brain tissue from individuals formerly enrolled in the Oregon Brain Aging Study, who had a history of cognitive impairment histopathological evidence of microvascular disease. VCI subjects had significantly higher lesion burden both on premortem MRI and postmortem histopathology compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Mass spectrometry-based eicosanoid analysis revealed that 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DHET) was elevated in cortical brain tissue from VCI subjects. Immunoreactivity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the enzyme responsible for 14,15-DHET formation, was localized to cerebral microvascular endothelium, and was enhanced in microvessels of affected tissue. Finally, we evaluated the genotype frequency of two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of sEH gene EPHX2 in VCI and control groups. Our findings support a role for sEH and a potential benefit from sEH inhibitors in age-related VCI. PMID:25277097

  4. Shared and Unique Genetic and Environmental Influences on Aging-Related Changes in Multiple Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Finkel, Deborah; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related declines occur in many different domains of cognitive function during middle and late adulthood. However, whether a global dimension underlies individual differences in changes in different domains of cognition and whether global genetic influences on cognitive changes exist is less clear. We addressed these issues by applying…

  5. Cognitive impairment and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to provide a brief review of the link between diabetes mellitus with cognitive impairment, the possible pathophysiology linking the two, and some possible therapeutic interventions for the treatment of this condition. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, so also dementia increases in later life. As the population ages, type 2 diabetes and AD are increasing. Both diseases are chronic and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies showed that older people with type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of cognitive decline. The precise mechanism linking the two remains to be found out. Several hypothetical mechanisms have been postulated. Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for AD and vascular dementia. The association between diabetes and AD is particularly strong among carriers of the APOE ε4. Several studies have linked dementia to diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance have also been associated with poor cognitive performance and at risk of developing cognitive impairment. Studies have suggested that metabolic syndrome may be linked to vascular dementia, while contrasting findings showed the role of metabolic syndrome to AD. In this review, how diabetes and cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease are mutually linked, possible mechanism linking the two and some possible therapeutic interventions with some patents that seem to be good therapeutic targets in future are discussed.

  6. The potential effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gard, Tim; Hölzel, Britta K; Lazar, Sara W

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults. In this paper, we review studies investigating the effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline. We searched the Web of Science (1900 to present), PsycINFO (1597 to present), MEDLINE (1950 to present), and CABI (1910 to present) to identify original studies investigating the effects of meditation on cognition and cognitive decline in the context of aging. Twelve studies were included in the review, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Studies involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and reported preliminary positive effects on attention, memory, executive function, processing speed, and general cognition. However, most studies had a high risk of bias and small sample sizes. Reported dropout rates were low and compliance rates high. We conclude that meditation interventions for older adults are feasible, and preliminary evidence suggests that meditation can offset age-related cognitive decline.

  7. The potential effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Tim; Hölzel, Britta K.; Lazar, Sara W.

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults. In this paper, we review studies investigating the effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline. We searched the Web of Science (1900 to present), PsycINFO (1597 to present), MEDLINE (1950 to present), and CABI (1910 to present) to identify original studies investigating the effects of meditation on cognition and cognitive decline in the context of aging. Twelve studies were included in the review, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Studies involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and reported preliminary positive effects on attention, memory, executive function, processing speed, and general cognition. However, most studies had a high risk of bias and small sample sizes. Reported dropout rates were low and compliance rates high. We conclude that meditation interventions for older adults are feasible, and preliminary evidence suggests that meditation can offset age-related cognitive decline. PMID:24571182

  8. Stress Constellations and Coping Styles of Older Adults with Age-Related Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyoung Othelia; Brennan, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Narrative data from two earlier studies of adaptation to age-related visual impairment were examined for constellations of stressors and coping styles. In the course of previous qualitative analyses, the researchers identified stress and coping codes according to behavioral, psychological, and social domains using a grounded theory approach. In…

  9. Lower cognitive function in patients with age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-Xiao; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Wei, Li-Juan; Gu, Zhi-Min; Lv, Liang; Dang, Yalong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cognitive impairment in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Relevant articles were identified through a search of the following electronic databases through October 2015, without language restriction: 1) PubMed; 2) the Cochrane Library; 3) EMBASE; 4) ScienceDirect. Meta-analysis was conducted using STATA 12.0 software. Standardized mean differences with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All of the included studies met the following four criteria: 1) the study design was a case–control or randomized controlled trial (RCT) study; 2) the study investigated cognitive function in the patient with AMD; 3) the diagnoses of AMD must be provided; 4) there were sufficient scores data to extract for evaluating cognitive function between cases and controls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale criteria were used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Results Of the initial 278 literatures, only six case–control and one RCT studies met all of the inclusion criteria. A total of 794 AMD patients and 1,227 controls were included in this study. Five studies were performed with mini-mental state examination (MMSE), two studies with animal fluency, two studies with trail making test (TMT)-A and -B, one study with Mini-Cog. Results of the meta-analysis revealed lower cognitive function test scores in patients with AMD, especially with MMSE and Mini-Cog test (P≤0.001 for all). The results also showed that differences in the TMT-A (except AMD [total] vs controls) and TMT-B test had no statistical significance (P>0.01). The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale score was ≥5 for all of the included studies. Based on the sensitivity analysis, no single study influenced the overall pooled estimates. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests lower cognitive function test scores in patients with AMD, especially with MMSE and Mini-Cog test. The other cognitive impairment screening tests, such as animal fluency test and

  10. Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Zilliox, Lindsay A; Chadrasekaran, Krish; Kwan, Justin Y; Russell, James W

    2016-09-01

    Both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with reduced performance on multiple domains of cognitive function and with evidence of abnormal structural and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cognitive deficits may occur at the very earliest stages of diabetes and are further exacerbated by the metabolic syndrome. The duration of diabetes and glycemic control may have an impact on the type and severity of cognitive impairment, but as yet we cannot predict who is at greatest risk of developing cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of cognitive impairment is multifactorial, although dysfunction in each interconnecting pathway ultimately leads to discordance in metabolic signaling. The pathophysiology includes defects in insulin signaling, autonomic function, neuroinflammatory pathways, mitochondrial (Mt) metabolism, the sirtuin-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (SIRT-PGC-1α) axis, and Tau signaling. Several promising therapies have been identified in pre-clinical studies, but remain to be validated in clinical trials. PMID:27491830

  11. Complex maze learning in rodents as a model of age-related memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D K

    1988-01-01

    Research is reviewed concerning the age-related learning deficit observed in a 14-unit T-maze (Stone maze). Rats and mice of several strains representing different adult age groups are first trained to criterion in one-way active avoidance in a straight runway. Then training in the Stone maze is conducted which involves negotiation of five maze segments to avoid footshock. Results indicate a robust age-related impairment in acquisition observed in males and females, and in outbred, inbred, and hybrid strains. Pharmacological studies using the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, in young and aged rats indicate cholinergic involvement for accurate encoding during acquisition of this task. Retention aspects of storage and retrieval do not appear to be affected by scopolamine treatment. Bilateral electrolytic lesions to the fimbria-fornix of young rats also produce an acquisition deficit to implicate involvement of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic system in Stone maze learning. A salient feature of Stone maze performance is the tendency to demonstrate an alternation strategy in solving the maze. This strategy is exacerbated by impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission with either scopolamine treatment or fimbria-fornix lesions. Various models of hippocampal function are applied toward the psychological characterization of the Stone maze task without complete success. Future research is outlined to provide more thorough psychological characterization of maze performance, to analyze the specificity of cholinergic involvement in the task, and to test possible therapeutic interventions for alleviating the age-related impairments observed.

  12. Olfactory dysfunction and cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegeneration: prevalence related to patient selection, diagnostic criteria and therapeutic treatment of aged clients receiving clinical neurology and community-based care.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-11-01

    A decrease in olfactory function with age has been attributed to a variety of factors including normal anatomical and physiological changes in aging, surgery, trauma, environmental factors, medications and disease. Olfactory impairment has also been associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease. Deficits in these chemical senses cannot only reduce the pleasure and comfort from food, but represent risk factors for nutritional and immune deficiencies as well as adherence to specific dietary regimens. Therapy is limited, but one should be aware of the existing medical and surgical treatment modalities. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, copper and zinc ions, glycating agents and reactive aldehydes, protein cross-linking and proteolytic dysfunction may all contribute to neurodegeneration, olfactory dysfunction, AD. Carnosine (beta-alanyl- L-histidine) is a naturally-occurring, pluripotent, homeostatic transglycating agent. The olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc. Loss of olfactory function and oxidative damage to olfactory tissue are early symptoms of AD. Protein and lipid oxidation and glycation are integral components of the AD pathophysiology. Carnosine can suppress amyloidbeta peptide toxicity, inhibit production of oxygen free-radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and reactive aldehydes, and suppresses protein glycation. The observations suggest that patented non-hydrolyzed carnosine lubricant drug delivery or perfume toilet water formulations combined with related moiety amino acid structures, such as beta-alanine, should be explored for therapeutic potential towards olfactory dysfunction, AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. "The olfactory system, anatomically, is right in the middle of the part of the brain that's very important for memory. There are strong neural connections between the two." ~ Donald Wilson.

  13. Age-related decline in cognitive control: the role of fluid intelligence and processing speed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on cognitive control suggests an age-related decline in proactive control abilities whereas reactive control seems to remain intact. However, the reason of the differential age effect on cognitive control efficiency is still unclear. This study investigated the potential influence of fluid intelligence and processing speed on the selective age-related decline in proactive control. Eighty young and 80 healthy older adults were included in this study. The participants were submitted to a working memory recognition paradigm, assessing proactive and reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. Results Repeated measures ANOVAs and hierarchical linear regressions indicated that the ability to appropriately use cognitive control processes during aging seems to be at least partially affected by the amount of available cognitive resources (assessed by fluid intelligence and processing speed abilities). Conclusions This study highlights the potential role of cognitive resources on the selective age-related decline in proactive control, suggesting the importance of a more exhaustive approach considering the confounding variables during cognitive control assessment. PMID:24401034

  14. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  15. Cognitive Abilities Explaining Age-Related Changes in Time Perception of Short and Long Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelanti, Pierre S.; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated how the development of cognitive abilities explains the age-related changes in temporal judgment over short and long duration ranges from 0.5 to 30 s. Children (5- and 9-year-olds) as well as adults were given a temporal bisection task with four different duration ranges: a duration range shorter than 1 s, two…

  16. Myelin Breakdown Mediates Age-Related Slowing in Cognitive Processing Speed in Healthy Elderly Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Po H.; Lee, Grace J.; Tishler, Todd A.; Meghpara, Michael; Thompson, Paul M.; Bartzokis, George

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the hypothesis that in a sample of very healthy elderly men selected to minimize risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease, myelin breakdown in late-myelinating regions mediates age-related slowing in cognitive processing speed (CPS). Materials and methods: The prefrontal lobe white matter and the genu of…

  17. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  18. [Age-related cognitive impairment: conceptual changes and diagnostic strategies].

    PubMed

    Annoni, Jean-Marie; Chouiter, Leila; Démonet, Jean-François

    2016-04-20

    The actual field of dementia encompasses also the pre-symptomatic phase, which may evolve for decades. Early detection and appropriate diagnosis decrease patient's and family's anxiety, improve patient's global care and allow better legal patient's protection. General Practitioners have at hand several available tools to screen a neurocognitive disorder, with up to 80% of sensitivity and specificity, to complete their clinical evaluation. An accurate diagnosis requires then a complete medical, neurological neuropsychological and neuroradiological evaluation in a Memory Clinic. Other investigations, such as functional cerebral imagery and spinal tap can be critical in unusual situations. Despite mood improvement after diagnostic announcement, increased suicidal risk in the 3 first months should be screened. PMID:27276719

  19. Age-Related Impairment of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function: Pathophysiological and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes significantly increases with age. The relevance of this association is dramatically magnified by the concomitant global aging of the population, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, some recent advances in this field are reviewed at the level of both the pathophysiology of glucose homeostasis and the cellular senescence of pancreatic islets. Overall, recent results highlight the crucial role of beta-cell dysfunction in the age-related impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and delineate the possibility of new original therapeutic interventions. PMID:25232350

  20. Age-related impairments in the revision of syntactic misanalyses: effects of prosody.

    PubMed

    Titone, Debra A; Koh, Christine K; Kjelgaard, Margaret M; Bruce, Stephanie; Speer, Shari R; Wingfield, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether young and older adults differ in comprehending sentences that contain temporary syntactic closure ambiguities. Experiment 1 examined age-related differences using the Auditory Moving Window (AMW) task, in which sentences were presented in a segment-by-segment self-paced fashion. Experiment 2 examined age-related differences using a sentence recall task, in which sentences were presented in their entirety. Sentences were constructed to have cooperating prosody (i.e., where prosody is consistent with the syntactic boundaries), baseline prosody (i.e., where prosody is ambiguous in the syntactically ambiguous region), and conflicting prosody (i.e., where cross-splicing relocates the prosodic phrase break at a misleading point in syntactic structure). The results showed that both young and older adults make comparable use of prosodic information to interpret temporary syntactic ambiguities, although younger adults may make use of this information more quickly than older adults. In addition, older adults appeared to be less able than young adults to revise initial syntactic misinterpretations caused by conflicting prosodic information. These results are interpreted with respect to age-related impairments in the allocation of working memory resources and inefficient inhibitory function during spoken language processing.

  1. Foreign language training as cognitive therapy for age-related cognitive decline: A hypothesis for future research

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Mark; Gunasekera, Geshri; Wong, Patrick C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the next fifty years, the number of older adults is set to reach record levels. Protecting older adults from the age-related effects of cognitive decline is one of the greatest challenges of the next few decades as it places increasing pressure on families, health systems, and economies on a global scale. The disease-state of age-related cognitive decline—Alzheimer's disease and other dementias—hijacks our consciousness and intellectual autonomy. However, there is evidence that cognitively stimulating activities protect against the adverse effects of cognitive decline. Similarly, bilingualism is also considered to be a safeguard. We propose that foreign language learning programs aimed at older populations are an optimal solution for building cognitive reserve because language learning engages an extensive brain network that is known to overlap with the regions negatively affected by the aging process. It is recommended that future research should test this potentially fruitful hypothesis. PMID:24051310

  2. Foreign language training as cognitive therapy for age-related cognitive decline: a hypothesis for future research.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Mark; Gunasekera, Geshri M; Wong, Patrick C M

    2013-12-01

    Over the next fifty years, the number of older adults is set to reach record levels. Protecting older adults from the age-related effects of cognitive decline is one of the greatest challenges of the next few decades as it places increasing pressure on families, health systems, and economies on a global scale. The disease-state of age-related cognitive decline-Alzheimer's disease and other dementias-hijacks our consciousness and intellectual autonomy. However, there is evidence that cognitively stimulating activities protect against the adverse effects of cognitive decline. Similarly, bilingualism is also considered to be a safeguard. We propose that foreign language learning programs aimed at older populations are an optimal solution for building cognitive reserve because language learning engages an extensive brain network that is known to overlap with the regions negatively affected by the aging process. It is recommended that future research should test this potentially fruitful hypothesis. PMID:24051310

  3. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S.; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes. PMID:27616985

  4. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S.; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes.

  5. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes. PMID:27616985

  6. Progress and prospects in human genetic research into age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasue; Sugiura, Saiko; Sone, Michihiko; Ueda, Hiromi; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a complex, multifactorial disorder that is attributable to confounding intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The degree of impairment shows substantial variation between individuals, as is also observed in the senescence of other functions. This individual variation would seem to refute the stereotypical view that hearing deterioration with age is inevitable and may indicate that there is ample scope for preventive intervention. Genetic predisposition could account for a sizable proportion of interindividual variation. Over the past decade or so, tremendous progress has been made through research into the genetics of various forms of hearing impairment, including ARHI and our knowledge of the complex mechanisms of auditory function has increased substantially. Here, we give an overview of recent investigations aimed at identifying the genetic risk factors involved in ARHI and of what we currently know about its pathophysiology. This review is divided into the following sections: (i) genes causing monogenic hearing impairment with phenotypic similarities to ARHI; (ii) genes involved in oxidative stress, biologic stress responses, and mitochondrial dysfunction; and (iii) candidate genes for senescence, other geriatric diseases, and neurodegeneration. Progress and prospects in genetic research are discussed.

  7. Intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Reijmer, Yael D; Charidimou, Andreas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia are composed of cognitive deficits resulted from a range of vascular lesions and pathologies, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic. However the contribution of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presumed due to small vessel diseases on cognitive impairment is underestimated, in contrast to the numerous studies about the role of ischemic vascular disorders on cognition. In this review we summarize recent findings from clinical studies and appropriate basic science research to better elucidate the role and possible mechanisms of intracerebral hemorrhage in cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  8. [Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2016-04-01

    While cognitive impairment is a major symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is commonly overlooked. This may be explained by the fact that it is difficult to evaluate cognitive function in patients with MS using screening batteries for the detection of dementia such as the mini-mental state examination. Further more, cognitive impairment in MS typically involves domain-specific deficits such as imparement of sustained attention and information processing speed rather than global cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment may influence the daily living and social lines of affected patients. This review discusses the characteristics of cognitive impairment, appropreate tests to evaluate its symptoms, and the current status of clinical trials for the treatment of MS. PMID:27056855

  9. Superficial white matter as a novel substrate of age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Arash; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Rajji, Tarek K; Felsky, Daniel; Rotenberg, David J; Mason, Mikko; Xu, Li N; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Mulsant, Benoit H; Voineskos, Aristotle N

    2015-06-01

    Studies of diffusion tensor imaging have focused mainly on the role of deep white matter tract microstructural abnormalities associated with aging and age-related cognitive decline. However, the potential role of superficial white matter (SWM) in aging and, by extension, cognitive-aging, is less clear. Healthy individuals (n = 141; F/M: 66/75 years) across the adult lifespan (18-86 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a battery of cognitive testing. SWM was assessed via a combination of probabilistic tractography and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). A widespread inverse relationship of fractional anisotropy (FA) values in SWM with age was observed. SWM-FA adjacent to the precentral gyri was associated with fine-motor-speed, whereas performance in visuomotor-attention/processing speed correlated with SWM-FA in all 4 lobes of the left-hemisphere and in right parieto-occipital SWM-FA (family-wise error corrected p < 0.05). Independent of deep white matter-FA, right frontal and right occipital SWM-FA-mediated age effects on motor-speed and visuomotor-attention/processing speed, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that SWM-FA contributes uniquely to age-related cognitive performance, and should be considered as a novel biomarker of cognitive-aging. PMID:25834938

  10. Prevention of Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Which Strategies, When, and for Whom?

    PubMed

    Shatenstein, Bryna; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by the progressive and gradual accumulation of detrimental changes in structure and function, which increase risk of age-related cognitive decline and dementia. This devastating chronic condition generates a huge social and economic burden and accounts for 11.2% of years of disability. The increase in lifespan has contributed to the increase in dementia prevalence; however, there is currently no curative treatment for most causes of dementias. This paper reviews evidence-based strategies to build, enhance, and preserve cognition over the lifespan by examining approaches that work best, proposing when in the life course they should be implemented, and in which population group(s). Recent work shows a tendency to decreased age-specific prevalence and incidence of cognitive problems and dementia among people born later in the first half of the 20th century, citing higher educational levels, improvements in lifestyle, and better handling of vascular risk factors. This implies that we can target modifiable environmental, lifestyle, and health risk factors to modify the trajectory of cognitive decline before the onset of irreversible dementia. Because building cognitive reserve and prevention of cognitive decline are of critical importance, interventions are needed at every stage of the life course to foster cognitive stimulation, and enable healthy eating habits and physical activity throughout the lifespan. Preventive interventions to decrease and delay cognitive decline and its consequences in old age will also require collaboration and action on the part of policy-makers at the political and social level.

  11. Can psychosocial work conditions protect against age-related cognitive decline? Results from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nexø, Mette Andersen; Meng, Annette; Borg, Vilhelm

    2016-07-01

    According to the use it or lose it hypothesis, intellectually stimulating activities postpone age-related cognitive decline. A previous systematic review concluded that a high level of mental work demands and job control protected against cognitive decline. However, it did not distinguish between outcomes that were measured as cognitive function at one point in time or as cognitive decline. Our study aimed to systematically review which psychosocial working conditions were prospectively associated with high levels of cognitive function and/or changes in cognitive function over time. Articles were identified by a systematic literature search (MEDLINE, Web of Science (WOS), PsycNET, Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)). We included only studies with longitudinal designs examining the impact of psychosocial work conditions on outcomes defined as cognitive function or changes in cognitive function. Two independent reviewers compared title-abstract screenings, full-text screenings and quality assessment ratings. Eleven studies were included in the final synthesis and showed that high levels of mental work demands, occupational complexity or job control at one point in time were prospectively associated with higher levels of cognitive function in midlife or late life. However, the evidence to clarify whether these psychosocial factors also affected cognitive decline was insufficient, conflicting or weak. It remains speculative whether job control, job demands or occupational complexity can protect against cognitive decline. Future studies using methodological advancements can reveal whether workers gain more cognitive reserve in midlife and late life than the available evidence currently suggests. The public health implications of a previous review should thereby be redefined accordingly. PMID:27178844

  12. Can psychosocial work conditions protect against age-related cognitive decline? Results from a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nexø, Mette Andersen; Meng, Annette; Borg, Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    According to the use it or lose it hypothesis, intellectually stimulating activities postpone age-related cognitive decline. A previous systematic review concluded that a high level of mental work demands and job control protected against cognitive decline. However, it did not distinguish between outcomes that were measured as cognitive function at one point in time or as cognitive decline. Our study aimed to systematically review which psychosocial working conditions were prospectively associated with high levels of cognitive function and/or changes in cognitive function over time. Articles were identified by a systematic literature search (MEDLINE, Web of Science (WOS), PsycNET, Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)). We included only studies with longitudinal designs examining the impact of psychosocial work conditions on outcomes defined as cognitive function or changes in cognitive function. Two independent reviewers compared title-abstract screenings, full-text screenings and quality assessment ratings. Eleven studies were included in the final synthesis and showed that high levels of mental work demands, occupational complexity or job control at one point in time were prospectively associated with higher levels of cognitive function in midlife or late life. However, the evidence to clarify whether these psychosocial factors also affected cognitive decline was insufficient, conflicting or weak. It remains speculative whether job control, job demands or occupational complexity can protect against cognitive decline. Future studies using methodological advancements can reveal whether workers gain more cognitive reserve in midlife and late life than the available evidence currently suggests. The public health implications of a previous review should thereby be redefined accordingly. PMID:27178844

  13. Effects of glucocorticoids on age-related impairments of hippocampal structure and function in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Jun-Long; Hu, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Yun; Machida, Takeo; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2008-02-01

    Effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on maze-learning performances and hippocampal morphology were observed in male C57BL/6Cr mice. Correlations between aging, GCs and maze-learning performances were also studied. (2) Eight-arm radial maze was used in maze-learning tests. Learning performance was assessed by the parameters of time of getting all the bait, number of reentry errors into the already-entered arm with bait, and number of missed entries into an unbaited arm. Brain sections, 8 mum thick, were Nissl-stained with cresyl violet or stained immunocytochemically with antibodies against neurofilaments. (3) With aging, normal pyramidal cells decreased gradually in amount, and degenerating cells increased since the age of 18 months, accompanied with the maze-learning deficit. Here we have suggested that these changes were associated with the age-related deficits in adaptation tolerance of neurons to stress. In addition, the age-related deficits in plasticity of hippocampal neurons to GCs in young mice (3 months of age) resulted in an increase in plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations, degeneration of hippocampal pyramidal cells, as well as maze-learning deficits. (4) In conclusion, our data indicated that CORT caused the degeneration of hippocampal pyramidal cells and the impairment of memory.

  14. Moringa oleifera Mitigates Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Age-Related Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sutalangka, Chatchada; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s) are still required. PMID:24454988

  15. Moringa oleifera mitigates memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of age-related dementia.

    PubMed

    Sutalangka, Chatchada; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s) are still required. PMID:24454988

  16. Age-related impairment in a complex object discrimination task that engages perirhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L; Cardoza, J A; Barense, M D; Kawa, K H; Wallentin-Flores, J; Arnold, W T; Alexander, G E

    2012-10-01

    Previous lesion studies have shown compromised complex object discrimination in rats, monkeys, and human patients with damage to the perirhinal cortical region (PRC) of the medial temporal lobe. These findings support the notion that the PRC is involved in object discrimination when pairs of objects have a high degree of overlapping features but not when object discrimination can be resolved on the basis of a single feature (e.g., size or color). Recent studies have demonstrated age-related functional changes to the PRC in animals (rats and monkeys) resulting in impaired complex object discrimination and object recognition. To date, no studies have compared younger and older humans using paradigms previously shown to engage the PRC. To investigate the influence of age on complex object discrimination in humans, the present study used an object matching paradigm for blob-like objects that have previously been shown to recruit the PRC. Difficulty was manipulated by varying the number of overlapping features between objects. Functional MRI data was acquired to determine the involvement of the PRC in the two groups during complex object discrimination. Results indicated that while young and older adults performed similarly on the easy version of the task, most older adults were impaired relative to young participants when the number of overlapping features increased. fMRI results suggest that older adults do not engage bilateral anterior PRC to the same extent as young adults. Specifically, complex object matching performance in older adults was predicted by the degree to which they engage left anterior PRC. These results provide evidence for human age-related changes in PRC function that impact complex object discrimination.

  17. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jongen, P J; Ter Horst, A T; Brands, A M

    2012-04-01

    Cognitive impairment occurs in 40-65% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, typically involving complex attention, information processing speed, (episodic) memory and executive functions. It is seen in the subclinical radiologically isolated syndrome, clinically isolated syndrome, and all phases of clinical MS. In pediatric-onset MS cognition is frequently impaired and worsens relatively rapidly. Cognitive impairment often affects personal life and vocational status. Depression, anxiety and fatigue aggravate symptoms, whereas cognitive reserve partially protects. Cognitive dysfunction correlates to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion volumes and (regional) atrophy, and degree of and increase in MRI abnormalities predict further worsening. Experimental MRI indicates a crucial role for (focal) cortical lesions and atrophy, abnormal cortical integrity, and early changes in normal appearing brain tissue. Functional MRI suggests compensatory reorganization and adaptation changes in neural activities. Screening tools are the Brief Repeatable Neuropsychological Battery, Symbol Digit Modalities Test and Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen. The Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is used for formal neuropsychological evaluation. What constitutes a clinically relevant change and how to optimally monitor cognition are issues to be settled. In relapsing-remitting MS timely and adequate disease modifying drug treatment may stabilize or possibly improve cognition. There is no evidence-based symptomatic drug treatment, nor are there optimal non-pharmacological approaches. Leisure activities enhance cognitive reserve. Cognitive rehabilitation in MS patients is still in its infancy. Cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and education programs are promising psychosocial interventions to improve coping and lessen cognitive symptoms.

  18. fMRI and sleep correlates of the age-related impairment in motor memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Stuart M; Albouy, Genevieve; Vien, Catherine; Popovicci, Romana; King, Bradley R; Hoge, Rick; Jbabdi, Saad; Benali, Habib; Karni, Avi; Maquet, Pierre; Carrier, Julie; Doyon, Julien

    2014-08-01

    Behavioral studies indicate that older adults exhibit normal motor sequence learning (MSL), but paradoxically, show impaired consolidation of the new memory trace. However, the neural and physiological mechanisms underlying this impairment are entirely unknown. Here, we sought to identify, through functional magnetic resonance imaging during MSL and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during daytime sleep, the functional correlates and physiological characteristics of this age-related motor memory deficit. As predicted, older subjects did not exhibit sleep-dependent gains in performance (i.e., behavioral changes that reflect consolidation) and had reduced sleep spindles compared with young subjects. Brain imaging analyses also revealed that changes in activity across the retention interval in the putamen and related brain regions were associated with sleep spindles. This change in striatal activity was increased in young subjects, but reduced by comparison in older subjects. These findings suggest that the deficit in sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in elderly individuals is related to a reduction in sleep spindle oscillations and to an associated decrease of activity in the cortico-striatal network.

  19. fMRI and sleep correlates of the age-related impairment in motor memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Stuart M; Albouy, Genevieve; Vien, Catherine; Popovicci, Romana; King, Bradley R; Hoge, Rick; Jbabdi, Saad; Benali, Habib; Karni, Avi; Maquet, Pierre; Carrier, Julie; Doyon, Julien

    2014-08-01

    Behavioral studies indicate that older adults exhibit normal motor sequence learning (MSL), but paradoxically, show impaired consolidation of the new memory trace. However, the neural and physiological mechanisms underlying this impairment are entirely unknown. Here, we sought to identify, through functional magnetic resonance imaging during MSL and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during daytime sleep, the functional correlates and physiological characteristics of this age-related motor memory deficit. As predicted, older subjects did not exhibit sleep-dependent gains in performance (i.e., behavioral changes that reflect consolidation) and had reduced sleep spindles compared with young subjects. Brain imaging analyses also revealed that changes in activity across the retention interval in the putamen and related brain regions were associated with sleep spindles. This change in striatal activity was increased in young subjects, but reduced by comparison in older subjects. These findings suggest that the deficit in sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in elderly individuals is related to a reduction in sleep spindle oscillations and to an associated decrease of activity in the cortico-striatal network. PMID:24302373

  20. Genome-wide association analysis demonstrates the highly polygenic character of age-related hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, Erik; Bonneux, Sarah; Corneveaux, Jason J; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Di Berardino, Federica; White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Van de Heyning, Paul; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy; Friedman, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify the genes responsible for age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), the most common form of hearing impairment in the elderly. Analysis of common variants, with and without adjustment for stratification and environmental covariates, rare variants and interactions, as well as gene-set enrichment analysis, showed no variants with genome-wide significance. No evidence for replication of any previously reported genes was found. A study of the genetic architecture indicates for the first time that ARHI is highly polygenic in nature, with probably no major genes involved. The phenotype depends on the aggregated effect of a large number of SNPs, of which the individual effects are undetectable in a modestly powered GWAS. We estimated that 22% of the variance in our data set can be explained by the collective effect of all genotyped SNPs. A score analysis showed a modest enrichment in causative SNPs among the SNPs with a P-value below 0.01. PMID:24939585

  1. High cognitive reserve is associated with a reduced age-related deficit in spatial conflict resolution

    PubMed Central

    Puccioni, Olga; Vallesi, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Several studies support the existence of a specific age-related difficulty in suppressing potentially distracting information. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether spatial conflict resolution is selectively affected by aging. The way aging affects individuals could be modulated by many factors determined by the socieconomic status: we investigated whether factors such as cognitive reserve (CR) and years of education may play a compensatory role against age-related deficits in the spatial domain. A spatial Stroop task with no feature repetitions was administered to a sample of 17 non-demented older adults (69–79 years-old) and 18 younger controls (18–34 years-old) matched for gender and years of education. The two age groups were also administered with measures of intelligence and CR. The overall spatial Stroop effect did not differ according to age, neither for speed nor for accuracy. The two age groups equally showed sequential effects for congruent trials: reduced response times (RTs) if another congruent trial preceded them, and accuracy at ceiling. For incongruent trials, older adults, but not younger controls, were influenced by congruency of trialn−1, since RTs increased with preceding congruent trials. Interestingly, such an age-related modulation negatively correlated with CR. These findings suggest that spatial conflict resolution in aging is predominantly affected by general slowing, rather than by a more specific deficit. However, a high level of CR seems to play a compensatory role for both factors. PMID:23248595

  2. [Primary age-related tauopathy (PART): a novel term to describe age-related tangle pathology encompassing a wide range from cognitively normal condition to senile dementia of the neurofibrillary tangle type].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are commonly observed in older people, and that some of older individuals with dementia have a large amount of NFTs in the medial temporal lobe without amyloid(Aβ) plaques, which have been referred to as senile dementia of the NFT type (SD-NFT), tangle-predominant senile dementia (TPSD), or tangle-only dementia. In 2014, our international collaborative group proposed a new term, "primary age-related tauopathy(PART)", to describe such age-related tangle pathology, clinically encompassing a wide range from normal to cognitive impairment/ dementia (SD-NFT). This nomenclature would provide a conceptual foundation for future studies leading to development of clinical diagnosis for this condition. PMID:27025089

  3. Age-related differences in gap detection: Effects of task difficulty and cognitive ability

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelly C.; Eckert, Mark A.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2009-01-01

    Differences in gap detection for younger and older adults have been shown to vary with the complexity of the task or stimuli, but the factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. To address this question, we examined the extent to which age-related differences in processing speed and workload predicted age-related differences in gap detection. Gap detection thresholds were measured for 10 younger and 11 older adults in two conditions that varied in task complexity but used identical stimuli: (1) gap location fixed at the beginning, middle, or end of a noise burst and (2) gap location varied randomly from trial to trial from the beginning, middle, or end of the noise. We hypothesized that gap location uncertainty would place increased demands on cognitive and attentional resources and result in significantly higher gap detection thresholds for older but not younger adults. Overall, gap detection thresholds were lower for the middle location as compared to beginning and end locations and were lower for the fixed than the random condition. In general, larger age-related differences in gap detection were observed for more challenging conditions. That is, gap detection thresholds for older adults were significantly larger for the random condition than for the fixed condition when the gap was at the beginning and end locations but not the middle. In contrast, gap detection thresholds for younger adults were not significantly different for the random and fixed condition at any location. Subjective ratings of workload indicated that older adults found the gap-detection task more mentally demanding than younger adults. Consistent with these findings, results of the Purdue Pegboard and Connections tests revealed age-related slowing of processing speed. Moreover, age group differences in workload and processing speed predicted gap detection in younger and older adults when gap location varied from trial to trial; these associations were not observed when gap

  4. [Drug-induced Cognitive Impairment].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Elderly people are more likely than young people to develop cognitive impairments associated with medication use. One of the reasons for this is that renal and liver functions are often impaired in elderly people. Dementia and delirium (an acute confused state) are known to be associated with drug toxicity. Anticholinergic medications are common causes of both acute and chronic cognitive impairment. Psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants can cause dementia and delirium. In addition, non-psychoactive drugs such as histamine H2 receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and cardiac medications, may cause acute or chronic cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are essential for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. PMID:27056860

  5. Inspection Time and Cognitive Abilities in Twins Aged 7 to 17 Years: Age-Related Changes, Heritability and Genetic Covariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Caroline J.; Isaacs, Elizabeth B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Rogers, Mary; Lanigan, Julie; Singhal, Atul; Lucas, Alan; Gringras, Paul; Denton, Jane; Deary, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the age-related differences in inspection time and multiple cognitive domains in a group of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 7 to 17 years. Data from 111 twin pairs and 19 singleton siblings were included. We found clear age-related trends towards more efficient visual information processing in older participants. There…

  6. Age-related cognitive decline during normal aging: the complex effect of education.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Ostrosky-Solis, F; Rosselli, M; Gómez, C

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to further analyze the effects of education on cognitive decline during normal aging. An 806-subject sample was taken from five different Mexican regions. Participants ranged in age from 16 to 85 years. Subjects were grouped into four educational levels: illiterate, 1-4, 5-9, and 10 or more years of education, and four age ranges: 16-30, 31-50, 51-65, and 66-85 years. A brief neuropsychological test battery (NEUROPSI), standardized and normalized in Spanish, was administered. The NEUROPSI test battery includes assessment of orientation, attention, memory, language, visuoperceptual abilities, motor skills, and executive functions. In general, test scores were strongly associated with level of educational, and differences among age groups were smaller than differences among education groups. However, there was an interaction between age and education such as that among illiterate individuals scores of participants 31-50 years old were higher than scores of participants 16-30 years old for over 50% of the tests. Different patterns of interaction among educational groups were distinguished. It was concluded that: (a) The course of life-span changes in cognition are affected by education. Among individuals with a low level of education, best neuropsychological test performance is observed at an older age than among higher-educated subjects; and (b) there is not a single relationship between age-related cognitive decline and education, but different patterns may be found, depending upon the specific cognitive domain. PMID:14590204

  7. Longitudinal Attentional Engagement Rescues Mice from Age-Related Cognitive Declines and Cognitive Inflexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzel, Louis D.; Light, Kenneth R.; Wass, Christopher; Colas-Zelin, Danielle; Denman-Brice, Alexander; Waddel, Adam C.; Kolata, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Learning, attentional, and perseverative deficits are characteristic of cognitive aging. In this study, genetically diverse CD-1 mice underwent longitudinal training in a task asserted to tax working memory capacity and its dependence on selective attention. Beginning at 3 mo of age, animals were trained for 12 d to perform in a dual radial-arm…

  8. Effects of a computer-based cognitive exercise program on age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Bozoki, Andrea; Radovanovic, Mirjana; Winn, Brian; Heeter, Carrie; Anthony, James C

    2013-01-01

    We developed a 'senior friendly' suite of online 'games for learning' with interactive calibration for increasing difficulty, and evaluated the feasibility of a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that seniors aged 60-80 can improve key aspects of cognitive ability with the aid of such games. Sixty community-dwelling senior volunteers were randomized to either an online game suite designed to train multiple cognitive abilities, or to a control arm with online activities that simulated the look and feel of the games but with low level interactivity and no calibration of difficulty. Study assessment included measures of recruitment, retention and play-time. Cognitive change was measured with a computerized assessment battery administered just before and within two weeks after completion of the six-week intervention. Impediments to feasibility included: limited access to in-home high-speed internet, large variations in the amount of time devoted to game play, and a reluctance to pursue more challenging levels. Overall analysis was negative for assessed performance (transference effects) even though subjects improved on the games themselves. Post hoc analyses suggest that some types of games may have more value than others, but these effects would need to be replicated in a study designed for that purpose. We conclude that a six-week, moderate-intensity computer game-based cognitive intervention can be implemented with high-functioning seniors, but the effect size is relatively small. Our findings are consistent with Owen et al. (2010), but there are open questions about whether more structured, longer duration or more intensive 'games for learning' interventions might yield more substantial cognitive improvement in seniors.

  9. A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami.

    PubMed

    Van Laer, Lut; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Hannula, Samuli; Van Eyken, Els; Stephan, Dietrich A; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Aikio, Pekka; Fransen, Erik; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed at contributing to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small, ancient, genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher extent of LD, potentially offering a substantial power advantage for association mapping. DNA samples and audiometric measurements were collected from 352 Finnish Saami individuals, aged between 50 and 75 years. To reduce the burden of multiple testing, we applied principal component (PC) analysis to the multivariate audiometric phenotype. The first three PCs captured 80% of the variation in hearing thresholds, while maintaining biologically important audiometric features. All subjects were genotyped with the Affymetrix 100 K chip. To account for multiple levels of relatedness among subjects, as well as for population stratification, association testing was performed using a mixed model. We summarised the top-ranking association signals for the three traits under study. The top-ranked SNP, rs457717 (P-value 3.55 x 10(-7)), was associated with PC3 and was localised in an intron of the IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP2). Intriguingly, the SNP rs161927 (P-value 0.000149), seventh-ranked for PC1, was positioned immediately downstream from the metabotropic glutamate receptor-7 gene (GRM7). As a previous GWAS of a European and Finnish sample set already suggested a role for GRM7 in ARHI, this study provides further evidence for the involvement of this gene.

  10. Factors Associated With Age-related Hearing Impairment: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Il Joon; Byun, Hayoung; Woo, Sook-Young; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a complex degenerative disease in the elderly. As multiple factors interact during the development of ARHI, it is important to elucidate the major influencing factors to understand and prevent ARHI. We aimed to identify risk factors associated with the development of ARHI with a retrospective cohort from 2001 to 2010. The records of the adult subjects over 40 years of age who consecutively underwent a comprehensive health checkup including pure-tone audiometry at the Health Promotion Center were reviewed. During this period, 1560 subjects who underwent pure-tone audiometry more than twice, had no other otologic diseases, and were followed-up more than 2 years were included. A pure-tone average (PTA: 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was calculated. Development of ARHI was defined as a PTA at follow-up more than 10 dB greater than the baseline PTA. Times to the first development of ARHI were investigated. Overall, 12.7% of subjects developed ARHI within the first 4 years. High blood ionized calcium (hazard ratio [HR] 0.084), albumin (HR 0.239), systolic blood pressure (HR 0.577), thyroid hormone (T3) (HR 0.593), and alpha fetoprotein levels (HR 0.883) were associated with decreased hazard for the development of ARHI. In contrast, high blood high-density lipoprotein (HR 2.105), uric acid (HR 1.684), total protein (HR 1.423), and total bilirubin levels (HR 1.220) were potential risk factors for the development of ARHI. Development of ARHI is common among the aged population, and a variety of factors may interact during this process. The results of this study can be used for counseling of adults at high-risk of developing ARHI with regard to regular audiological check-up.

  11. Epigenetic alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus contribute to age-related cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Deibel, Scott H.; Zelinski, Erin L.; Keeley, Robin J.; Kovalchuk, Olga; McDonald, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction and cognitive decline, specifically memory loss, frequently accompany natural aging. Circadian rhythms and memory are intertwined, as circadian rhythms influence memory formation and recall in young and old rodents. Although, the precise relationship between circadian rhythms and memory is still largely unknown, it is hypothesized that circadian rhythm disruption, which occurs during aging, contributes to age-associated cognitive decline, specifically memory loss. While there are a variety of mechanisms that could mediate this effect, changes in the epigenome that occur during aging has been proposed as a potential candidate. Interestingly, epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and sirtuin1 (SIRT1) are necessary for both circadian rhythms and memory. During aging, similar alterations of epigenetic mechanisms occur in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and hippocampus, which are necessary for circadian rhythm generation and memory, respectively. Recently, circadian rhythms have been linked to epigenetic function in the hippocampus, as some of these epigenetic mechanisms oscillate in the hippocampus and are disrupted by clock gene deletion. The current paper will review how circadian rhythms and memory change with age, and will suggest how epigenetic changes in these processes might contribute to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:26252151

  12. Epigenetic alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus contribute to age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Deibel, Scott H; Zelinski, Erin L; Keeley, Robin J; Kovalchuk, Olga; McDonald, Robert J

    2015-09-15

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction and cognitive decline, specifically memory loss, frequently accompany natural aging. Circadian rhythms and memory are intertwined, as circadian rhythms influence memory formation and recall in young and old rodents. Although, the precise relationship between circadian rhythms and memory is still largely unknown, it is hypothesized that circadian rhythm disruption, which occurs during aging, contributes to age-associated cognitive decline, specifically memory loss. While there are a variety of mechanisms that could mediate this effect, changes in the epigenome that occur during aging has been proposed as a potential candidate. Interestingly, epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and sirtuin1 (SIRT1) are necessary for both circadian rhythms and memory. During aging, similar alterations of epigenetic mechanisms occur in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and hippocampus, which are necessary for circadian rhythm generation and memory, respectively. Recently, circadian rhythms have been linked to epigenetic function in the hippocampus, as some of these epigenetic mechanisms oscillate in the hippocampus and are disrupted by clock gene deletion. The current paper will review how circadian rhythms and memory change with age, and will suggest how epigenetic changes in these processes might contribute to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:26252151

  13. Retinal Vascular Fractals and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Yi-Ting; Hilal, Saima; Cheung, Carol Yim-lui; Xu, Xin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Wong, Tien Yin; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinal microvascular network changes have been found in patients with age-related brain diseases such as stroke and dementia including Alzheimer's disease. We examine whether retinal microvascular network changes are also present in preclinical stages of dementia. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 300 Chinese participants (age: ≥60 years) from the ongoing Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study who underwent detailed clinical examinations including retinal photography, brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Retinal vascular parameters were assessed from optic disc-centered photographs using a semiautomated program. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered, and cognitive function was summarized as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) and dementia were diagnosed according to standard diagnostic criteria. Results Among 268 eligible nondemented participants, 78 subjects were categorized as CIND-mild and 69 as CIND-moderate. In multivariable adjusted models, reduced retinal arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions were associated with an increased risk of CIND-mild and CIND-moderate. Reduced fractal dimensions were associated with poorer cognitive performance globally and in the specific domains of verbal memory, visuoconstruction and visuomotor speed. Conclusion A sparser retinal microvascular network, represented by reduced arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions, was associated with cognitive impairment, suggesting that early microvascular damage may be present in preclinical stages of dementia. PMID:25298774

  14. Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Megan J; Saucier, Deborah M; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover, it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increased neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks.

  15. Enriched childhood experiences moderate age-related motor and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Megan J.; Saucier, Deborah M.; Metz, Gerlinde A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover, it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increased neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks. PMID:23423702

  16. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike many neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, vascular damage is preventable. Despite the heterogeneity of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and the complexity of its clinical presentations, the potential for limiting progression and changing the trajectory of damage makes it all the more important for physicians to be educated about the syndrome and to remain vigilant when taking care of patients. In this review, we outline an approach to patients with possible VCI, summarize current treatment and prevention guidelines, and provide an overview with case examples. PMID:26124978

  17. Age-Related Impairments in Object-Place Associations Are Not Due to Hippocampal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Abigail R.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Reasor, Jordan E.; Turner, Sean M.; Barthle, Sarah E.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline can reduce an individual’s quality of life. As no single neurobiological deficit can account for the wide spectrum of behavioral impairments observed in old age, it is critical to develop an understanding of how interactions between different brain regions change over the life span. The performance of young and aged animals on behaviors that require the hippocampus and cortical regions to interact, however, has not been well characterized. Specifically, the ability to link a spatial location with specific features of a stimulus, such as object identity, relies on the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices. Although aging is associated with dysfunction in each of these brain regions, behavioral measures of functional change within the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices in individual animals are often not correlated. Thus, how dysfunction of a single brain region within this circuit, such as the hippocampus, impacts behaviors that require communication with the perirhinal and prefrontal cortices remains unknown. To address this question, young and aged rats were tested on the interregion dependent object-place paired association task, as well as a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial reference memory. This particular cohort of aged rats did not show deficits on the hippocampal-dependent task, but were significantly impaired at acquiring object-place associations relative to young. These data suggest that behaviors requiring functional connectivity across different regions of the memory network may be particularly sensitive to aging, and can be used to develop models that will clarify the impact of systems-level dysfunction in the elderly. PMID:26413723

  18. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-15

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  20. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-15

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  2. Age-Related Differences in Functional Connectivity During Cognitive Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Successful emotion regulation partly depends on our capacity to modulate emotional responses through the use of cognitive strategies. Age may affect the strategies employed most often; thus, we examined younger and older adults’ neural network connectivity when employing two different strategies: cognitive reappraisal and selective attention. Method. The current study used psychophysiological interaction analyses to examine functional connectivity with a region of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) because it is a core part of an emotion regulation network showing relative structural preservation with age. Results. Functional connectivity between ACC and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was greater for reappraisal relative to selective attention and passive viewing conditions for both age groups. For younger adults, ACC was more strongly connected with lateral dorsolateral PFC, ventrolateral PFC, dorsomedial PFC, and posterior cingulate regions during reappraisal. For older adults, stronger connectivity during reappraisal was observed primarily in ventromedial PFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Discussion. Our results suggest that although young and older adults engage PFC networks during regulation, and particularly during reappraisal, the regions within these networks might differ. Additionally, these results clarify that, despite prior evidence for age-related declines in the structure and function of those regions, older adults are able to recruit ACC and PFC regions as part of coherent network during emotion regulation. PMID:25209373

  3. Estimated cases of blindness and visual impairment from neovascular age-related macular degeneration avoided in Australia by ranibizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Paul; Bressler, Neil; Doan, Quan V; Dolan, Chantal; Ferreira, Alberto; Osborne, Aaron; Rochtchina, Elena; Danese, Mark; Colman, Shoshana; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, such as ranibizumab, have significantly improved the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This study used patient-level simulation modelling to estimate the number of individuals in Australia who would have been likely to avoid legal blindness or visual impairment due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration over a 2-year period as a result of intravitreal ranibizumab injections. The modelling approach used existing data for the incidence of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Australia and outcomes from ranibizumab trials. Blindness and visual impairment were defined as visual acuity in the better-seeing eye of worse than 6/60 or 6/12, respectively. In 2010, 14,634 individuals in Australia were estimated to develop neovascular age-related macular degeneration who would be eligible for ranibizumab therapy. Without treatment, 2246 individuals would become legally blind over 2 years. Monthly 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab would reduce incident blindness by 72% (95% simulation interval, 70-74%). Ranibizumab given as needed would reduce incident blindness by 68% (64-71%). Without treatment, 4846 individuals would become visually impaired over 2 years; this proportion would be reduced by 37% (34-39%) with monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, and by 28% (23-33%) with ranibizumab given as needed. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, given either monthly or as needed, can substantially lower the number of cases of blindness and visual impairment over 2 years after the diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  4. Interest of active posturography to detect age-related and early Parkinson's disease-related impairments in mediolateral postural control.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Cédrick T; Delval, Arnaud; Defebvre, Luc

    2014-11-15

    Patients with Parkinson's disease display impairments of postural control most particularly in active, challenging conditions. The objective of the present study was to analyze early signs of disease-related and also age-related impairments in mediolateral body extension and postural control. Fifty-five participants (18 Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 patients in the off-drug condition, 18 healthy elderly control subjects, and 19 young adults) were included in the study. The participants performed a quiet stance task and two active tasks that analyzed the performance in mediolateral body motion: a limit of stability and a rhythmic weight shift task. As expected, the patients displayed significantly lower and slower body displacement (head, neck, lower back, center of pressure) than elderly control subjects when performing the two body excursion tasks. However, the behavioral variability in both tasks was similar between the groups. Under these active conditions, the patients showed significantly lower contribution of the hip postural control mechanisms compared with the elderly control subjects. Overall, the patients seemed to lower their performance in order to prevent a mediolateral postural instability. However, these patients, at an early stage of their disease, were not unstable in quiet stance. Complementarily, elderly control subjects displayed slower body performance than young adults, which therefore showed an additional age-related impairment in mediolateral postural control. Overall, the study illustrated markers of age-related and Parkinson's disease impairments in mediolateral postural control that may constrain everyday activities in elderly adults and even more in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  5. Age-Related Impairment in the 250-Millisecond Delay Eyeblink Classical Conditioning Procedure in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Richard W.; Ewers, Michael; Ross, Charlene; Gould, Thomas J.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we tested 4-, 9-, 12-, and 18-month-old C57BL/6 mice in the 250-msec delay eyeblink classical conditioning procedure to study age-related changes in a form of associative learning. The short life expectancy of mice, complete knowledge about the mouse genome, and the availability of transgenic and knock-out mouse models of age-related impairments make the mouse an excellent species for expanding knowledge on the neurobiologically and behaviorally well-characterized eyeblink classical conditioning paradigm. Based on previous research with delay eyeblink conditioning in rabbits and humans, we predicted that mice would be impaired on this cerebellar-dependent associative learning task in middle-age, at ∼9 months. To fully examine age differences in behavior in mice, we used a battery of additional behavioral measures with which to compare young and older mice. These behaviors included the acoustic startle response, prepulse inhibition, rotorod, and the Morris water maze. Mice began to show impairment in cerebellar-dependent tasks such as rotorod and eyeblink conditioning at 9 to 12 months of age. Performance in hippocampally dependent tasks was not impaired in any group, including 18-month-old mice. These results in mice support results in other species, indicating that cerebellar-dependent tasks show age-related deficits earlier in adulthood than do hippocampally dependent tasks. PMID:12359840

  6. Age-Related Impairments in the Revision of Syntactic Misanalyses: Effects of Prosody

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titone, Debra A.; Koh, Christine K.; Kjelgaard, Margaret M.; Bruce, Stephanie; Speer, Shari R.; Wingfield, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether young and older adults differ in comprehending sentences that contain temporary syntactic closure ambiguities. Experiment 1 examined age-related differences using the Auditory Moving Window (AMW) task, in which sentences were presented in a segment-by-segment self-paced fashion. Experiment 2 examined age-related…

  7. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Jeremy; Alty, Jane Elizabeth; Jamieson, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is a significant non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Longitudinal cohort studies have demonstrated that approximately 50% of those with PD develop dementia after 10 years, increasing to over 80% after 20 years. Deficits in cognition can be identified at the time of PD diagnosis in some patients and this mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) has been studied extensively over the last decade. Although PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease dementia there is evidence to suggest that PD-MCI might consist of distinct subtypes with different pathophysiologies and prognoses. The major pathological correlate of Parkinson's disease dementia is Lewy body deposition in the limbic system and neocortex although Alzheimer's related pathology is also an important contributor. Pathological damage causes alteration to neurotransmitter systems within the brain, producing behavioural change. Management of cognitive impairment in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach and accurate communication with patients and relatives is essential. PMID:25814509

  8. Ex vivo T2 relaxation: associations with age-related neuropathology and cognition.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Robert J; Bennett, David A; Schneider, Julie A; Leurgans, Sue E; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-01

    The transverse relaxation time constant, T(2), is sensitive to brain tissue's free water content and the presence of paramagnetic materials such as iron. In this study, ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate alterations in T(2) related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and other types of neuropathology common in old age, as well as the relationship between T(2) alterations and cognition. Cerebral hemispheres were obtained from 371 deceased older adults. Using fast spin-echo imaging with multiple echo times, T(2) maps were produced and warped to a study-specific template. Hemispheres underwent neuropathologic examination for identification of AD pathology and other common age-related neuropathologies. Voxelwise linear regression was carried out to detect regions of pathology-related T(2) alterations and, in separate analyses, regions in which T(2) alterations were linked to antemortem cognitive performance. AD pathology was associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes and T(2) shortening in the basal ganglia and insula. Gross infarcts were associated with T(2) prolongation in white matter of all lobes, and in the thalamus and basal ganglia. Hippocampal sclerosis was associated with T(2) prolongation in the hippocampus and white matter of the temporal lobe. After controlling for neuropathology, T(2) prolongation in the frontal lobe white matter was associated with lower performance in the episodic, semantic, and working memory domains. In addition, voxelwise analysis of in vivo and ex vivo T(2) values indicated a positive relationship between the two, though further investigation is necessary to accurately translate findings of the present study to the in vivo case.

  9. [Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD was recently formalized with diagnosis being reached after impairments in neuropsychological tasks become significant in at least one domain. The brain profile of cognitive deficits involves executive functions (e. g., planning, set shifting, set maintenance, problem solving), attention and memory function. Memory deficits are characterized by impairments in delayed recall, temporal ordering and conditional associate learning. PD patients demonstrate relatively preserved recognition. Visuospatial dysfunctions have also been reported, while language is largely preserved. The existence of two distinct mild cognitive syndromes has also been suggested. One of these affects mainly the frontostriatal executive deficits that are modulated by dopaminergic medications and by a genetically determined level of prefrontal cortex dopamine release. The other affects the more-posterior cortical abilities, such as visuospatial and memory functions, and is suggested to be associated with an increased risk for conversion to dementia. Cross-sectional studies have commonly reported dementia in 20-30% of PD patients, although the 8-year cumulative incidence of dementia may be as high as 78%. Factors associated with dementia in PD are age at onset, age at the time of examination, akinetic-rigid form PD, depression, hallucination, rapid eye movement sleep behavioral disorder and severe olfactory deficits. Clinical features generally involve the same type of deficits as those found in MCI patients, which are more severe and more extensive. The phenomenology of the dementia syndrome is similar to that seen in dementia with Lewy bodies, and clinicopathological correlation studies have revealed varying results with regard to neurochemical deficits and the pathological substrate underlying cognitive impairment and dementia. Early cognitive

  10. Impaired Verb Fluency: A Sign of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostberg, Per; Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Hellstrom, Ake; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Wahlund, Lars Olof

    2005-01-01

    We assessed verb fluency vs. noun and letter-based fluency in 199 subjects referred for cognitive complaints including Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. ANCOVAs and factor analyses identified verb, noun, and letter-based fluency as distinct tasks. Verb fluency performance in Mild Cognitive…

  11. Epinephrine and glucose modulate training-related CREB phosphorylation in old rats: relationships to age-related memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Gold, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation.

  12. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Jesus; Kovner, Blake

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive Impairment (CI) is a serious complication of MS, and the domains affected are well established but new affected domains such as theory of mind are still being identified. The evidence that some disease modifying therapies (DMTs) may improve and prevent the development of CI in MS is not solid. Recent studies on the prevalence CI in MS, although not as solid as studies completed prior to DMT introduction, suggest that CI remains a problem even among people on DMTs and even at the very earliest stages of MS. Functional MRI studies and studies using diffusion tractography show that the impact of lesions on cognition depends on the particular cortical networks affected and their plasticity. Cognitive rehabilitation and L-amphetamine appear promising treatments, cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have failed, and data on Ginkgo and exercise are limited. We need more work to understand and develop treatment for CI in MS. PMID:22791241

  13. Processing Speed, Inhibitory Control, and Working Memory: Three Important Factors to Account for Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereiro Rozas, Arturo X.; Juncos-Rabadan, Onesimo; Gonzalez, Maria Soledad Rodriguez

    2008-01-01

    Processing speed, inhibitory control and working memory have been identified as the main possible culprits of age-related cognitive decline. This article describes a study of their interrelationships and dependence on age, including exploration of whether any of them mediates between age and the others. We carried out a LISREL analysis of the…

  14. Long-term caloric restriction in mice may prevent age-related learning impairment via suppression of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Wang, Rong; Dong, Wen; Li, Yun; Xu, Baolei; Zhang, Jingshuang; Zhao, Zhiwei

    2016-12-15

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the most reliable intervention to extend lifespan and prevent age-related disorders in various species from yeast to rodents. However, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clearly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the underlying mechanisms of long-term CR on age-related learning impairment in C57/BL mice. Thirty six-week-old male C57/BL mice were randomly divided into three groups: normal control group (NC group, n=10), high energy group (HE group, n=10), and CR group (n=10). After 10 months, the Morris water maze test was performed to monitor learning abilities. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to monitor changes in protein and mRNA levels associated with apoptosis-related proteins in the hippocampus. The average escape latency was lower in the CR group compared with the NC group, and the average time taken to first cross the platform in the CR group was significantly shorter than the HE group. Both Bcl-2 protein and mRNA expression levels in the CR group were significantly higher than those of the NC group and HE group. The expression of Bax, Caspase-3 and PARP protein in the CR group was significantly lower than the NC group. Our findings demonstrate that long-term CR may prevent age-related learning impairments via suppressing apoptosis in mice. PMID:27452805

  15. Do Age-Related Increases in Tip-of-the-Tongue Experiences Signify Episodic Memory Impairments?

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Mandell, Arielle R.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TOTs across different types of materials, and additional analyses suggested that these relations between age and TOT frequency were not attributable to the use of different response criteria or to different amounts of knowledge. Because statistical control of a measure of episodic memory had little effect on the relation between age and TOT frequency, age-related increases in TOTs and age-related decreases in episodic memory appear to be at least partially independent phenomena. PMID:24104505

  16. Is It Possible to Delay or Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Already in the 90s, Khachaturian stated that postponing dementia onset by five years would decrease the prevalence of the late onset dementia by 50%. After two decades of lack of success in dementia drug discovery and development, and knowing that worldwide, currently 36 million patients have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a number that will double by 2030 and triple by 2050, the World Health Organization and the Alzheimer's Disease International declared that prevention of cognitive decline was a 'public health priority.' Numerous longitudinal studies and meta-analyses were conducted to analyze the risk and protective factors for dementia. Among the 93 identified risk factors, seven major modifiable ones should be considered: low education, sedentary lifestyle, midlife obesity, midlife smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and midlife depression. Three other important modifiable risk factors should also be added to this list: midlife hypercholesterolemia, late life atrial fibrillation, and chronic kidney disease. After their identification, numerous authors attempted to establish dementia risk scores; however, the proposed values were not convincing. Identifying the possible interventions, able to either postpone or delay dementia has been an important challenge. Observational studies focused on a single life-style intervention increased the global optimism concerning these possibilities. However, a recent extensive literature review of the randomized control trials (RCTs) conducted before 2014 yielded negative results. The first results of RCTs of multimodal interventions (Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability, Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention Study, and Prediva) brought more optimism. Lastly, interventions targeting compounds of beta amyloid started in 2012 and no results have yet been published.

  17. Is It Possible to Delay or Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Already in the 90s, Khachaturian stated that postponing dementia onset by five years would decrease the prevalence of the late onset dementia by 50%. After two decades of lack of success in dementia drug discovery and development, and knowing that worldwide, currently 36 million patients have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a number that will double by 2030 and triple by 2050, the World Health Organization and the Alzheimer's Disease International declared that prevention of cognitive decline was a 'public health priority.' Numerous longitudinal studies and meta-analyses were conducted to analyze the risk and protective factors for dementia. Among the 93 identified risk factors, seven major modifiable ones should be considered: low education, sedentary lifestyle, midlife obesity, midlife smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and midlife depression. Three other important modifiable risk factors should also be added to this list: midlife hypercholesterolemia, late life atrial fibrillation, and chronic kidney disease. After their identification, numerous authors attempted to establish dementia risk scores; however, the proposed values were not convincing. Identifying the possible interventions, able to either postpone or delay dementia has been an important challenge. Observational studies focused on a single life-style intervention increased the global optimism concerning these possibilities. However, a recent extensive literature review of the randomized control trials (RCTs) conducted before 2014 yielded negative results. The first results of RCTs of multimodal interventions (Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability, Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention Study, and Prediva) brought more optimism. Lastly, interventions targeting compounds of beta amyloid started in 2012 and no results have yet been published. PMID:27688858

  18. Is It Possible to Delay or Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Already in the 90s, Khachaturian stated that postponing dementia onset by five years would decrease the prevalence of the late onset dementia by 50%. After two decades of lack of success in dementia drug discovery and development, and knowing that worldwide, currently 36 million patients have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a number that will double by 2030 and triple by 2050, the World Health Organization and the Alzheimer's Disease International declared that prevention of cognitive decline was a 'public health priority.' Numerous longitudinal studies and meta-analyses were conducted to analyze the risk and protective factors for dementia. Among the 93 identified risk factors, seven major modifiable ones should be considered: low education, sedentary lifestyle, midlife obesity, midlife smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and midlife depression. Three other important modifiable risk factors should also be added to this list: midlife hypercholesterolemia, late life atrial fibrillation, and chronic kidney disease. After their identification, numerous authors attempted to establish dementia risk scores; however, the proposed values were not convincing. Identifying the possible interventions, able to either postpone or delay dementia has been an important challenge. Observational studies focused on a single life-style intervention increased the global optimism concerning these possibilities. However, a recent extensive literature review of the randomized control trials (RCTs) conducted before 2014 yielded negative results. The first results of RCTs of multimodal interventions (Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability, Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention Study, and Prediva) brought more optimism. Lastly, interventions targeting compounds of beta amyloid started in 2012 and no results have yet been published. PMID:27688858

  19. Is It Possible to Delay or Prevent Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Already in the 90s, Khachaturian stated that postponing dementia onset by five years would decrease the prevalence of the late onset dementia by 50%. After two decades of lack of success in dementia drug discovery and development, and knowing that worldwide, currently 36 million patients have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a number that will double by 2030 and triple by 2050, the World Health Organization and the Alzheimer's Disease International declared that prevention of cognitive decline was a 'public health priority.' Numerous longitudinal studies and meta-analyses were conducted to analyze the risk and protective factors for dementia. Among the 93 identified risk factors, seven major modifiable ones should be considered: low education, sedentary lifestyle, midlife obesity, midlife smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and midlife depression. Three other important modifiable risk factors should also be added to this list: midlife hypercholesterolemia, late life atrial fibrillation, and chronic kidney disease. After their identification, numerous authors attempted to establish dementia risk scores; however, the proposed values were not convincing. Identifying the possible interventions, able to either postpone or delay dementia has been an important challenge. Observational studies focused on a single life-style intervention increased the global optimism concerning these possibilities. However, a recent extensive literature review of the randomized control trials (RCTs) conducted before 2014 yielded negative results. The first results of RCTs of multimodal interventions (Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability, Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention Study, and Prediva) brought more optimism. Lastly, interventions targeting compounds of beta amyloid started in 2012 and no results have yet been published.

  20. Acute ozone (O3) -induced impairment of glucose regulation: Age-related and temporal changes

    EPA Science Inventory

    O3 is associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects in humans and is thought to produce metabolic effects, such as insulin resistance. Recently, we showed that episodic O3 exposure increased insulin levels in aged rats. We hypothesized that O3 exposure could impair gluc...

  1. News of cognitive cure for age-related brain shrinkage is premature: a comment on Burgmans et al. (2009).

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2010-03-01

    The extant longitudinal literature consistently supports the notion of age-related declines in human brain volume. In a report on a longitudinal cognitive follow-up with cross-sectional brain measurements, Burgmans and colleagues (2009) claim that the extant studies overestimate brain volume declines, presumably due to inclusion of participants with preclinical cognitive pathology. Moreover, the authors of the article assert that such declines are absent among optimally healthy adults who maintain cognitive stability for several years. In this comment accompanied by reanalysis of previously published data, we argue that these claims are incorrect on logical, methodological, and empirical grounds. PMID:20230118

  2. Decrease in age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive improvement following vitamin D supplementation are associated with modulation of brain energy metabolism and redox state.

    PubMed

    Briones, T L; Darwish, H

    2014-03-14

    In the present study we examined whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive impairment by enhancing brain energy homeostasis and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and modulating the redox state. Male F344 rats aged 20 months (aged) and 6 months (young) were randomly assigned to either vitamin D supplementation or no supplementation (control). Rats were housed in pairs and the supplementation group (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received subcutaneous injections of vitamin D (1, α25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) for 21 days. Control animals (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received equal volume of normal saline and behavioral testing in the water maze started on day 14 after the initiation of vitamin D supplementation. Tau phosphorylation, markers of brain energy metabolism (ADP/ATP ratio and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) and redox state (levels of reactive oxygen species, activity of superoxide dismutase, and glutathione levels) as well as PP2A activity were measured in hippocampal tissues. Our results extended previous findings that: (1) tau phosphorylation significantly increased during aging; (2) markers of brain energy metabolism and redox state are significantly decreased in aging; and (3) aged rats demonstrated significant learning and memory impairment. More importantly, we found that age-related changes in brain energy metabolism, redox state, and cognitive function were attenuated by vitamin D supplementation. No significant differences were seen in tau hyperphosphorylation, markers of energy metabolism and redox state in the young animal groups. Our data suggest that vitamin D ameliorated the age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive decline by enhancing brain energy metabolism, redox state, and PP2A activity making it a potentially useful therapeutic option to alleviate the effects of aging.

  3. Contesting the dogma of an age-related heat shock response impairment: implications for cardiac-specific age-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Carnemolla, Alisia; Labbadia, John P; Lazell, Hayley; Neueder, Andreas; Moussaoui, Saliha; Bates, Gillian P

    2014-07-15

    Ageing is associated with the reduced performance of physiological processes and has been proposed as a major risk factor for disease. An age-related decline in stress response pathways has been widely documented in lower organisms. In particular, the heat shock response (HSR) becomes severely compromised with age in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, a comprehensive analysis of the consequences of ageing on the HSR in higher organisms has not been documented. We used both HS and inhibition of HSP90 to induce the HSR in wild-type mice at 3 and 22 months of age to investigate the extent to which different brain regions, and peripheral tissues can sustain HSF1 activity and HS protein (HSP) expression with age. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we were unable to detect a difference in the level or kinetics of HSP expression between young and old mice in all brain regions. In contrast, we did observe an age-related reduction in chaperone levels and HSR-related proteins in the heart. This could result in a decrease in the protein folding capacity of old hearts with implications for age-related cardiac disorders.

  4. Age-related impairment of visual recognition memory correlates with impaired synaptic distribution of GluA2 and protein kinase Mζ in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Aicardi, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    Age-related functional alterations in the perforant path projection from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus play a major role in age-related memory impairments, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes. In a recent study, young and aged monkeys were tested on the visual recognition memory test "delayed nonmatching-to-sample"; then, electron microscopic immunocytochemistry was performed in the hippocampal DG to determine the subcellular localization of the GluA2 subunit of the glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazole-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) and protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ), which promotes memory storage by regulating GluA2-containing AMPAR trafficking. The results obtained suggest that age-related deficits in visual recognition memory are coupled with impairment in PKMζ-dependent maintenance of GluA2 at the synapse. Together with previous evidences of the critical role of PKMζ in memory consolidation, these data render this enzyme an attractive potential therapeutic target for treating age-related memory decline, and support the view that the pharmacological manipulation of AMPAR trafficking in the synapses may provide new insights in the search of memory enhancers for aged individuals, including those affected by Alzheimer disease.

  5. Age-related impairment of visual recognition memory correlates with impaired synaptic distribution of GluA2 and protein kinase Mζ in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Aicardi, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    Age-related functional alterations in the perforant path projection from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus play a major role in age-related memory impairments, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes. In a recent study, young and aged monkeys were tested on the visual recognition memory test "delayed nonmatching-to-sample"; then, electron microscopic immunocytochemistry was performed in the hippocampal DG to determine the subcellular localization of the GluA2 subunit of the glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazole-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) and protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ), which promotes memory storage by regulating GluA2-containing AMPAR trafficking. The results obtained suggest that age-related deficits in visual recognition memory are coupled with impairment in PKMζ-dependent maintenance of GluA2 at the synapse. Together with previous evidences of the critical role of PKMζ in memory consolidation, these data render this enzyme an attractive potential therapeutic target for treating age-related memory decline, and support the view that the pharmacological manipulation of AMPAR trafficking in the synapses may provide new insights in the search of memory enhancers for aged individuals, including those affected by Alzheimer disease. PMID:22985047

  6. Guidelines for the Evaluation of Dementia and Age-Related Cognitive Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Dementia in its many forms is a leading cause of functional limitation among older adults worldwide and will continue to ascend in global health importance as populations continue to age and effective cures remain elusive. The following guidelines were developed for psychologists who perform evaluations of dementia and age-related cognitive…

  7. Cognitive impairment in COPD: a systematic review*

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Rodríguez-Alzueta, Elisabeth; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; López-Torres, Isabel; Moreno-Ramírez, Maria Paz; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize and clarify the relationships between the various cognitive domains affected in COPD patients and the disease itself, as well as to determine the prevalence of impairment in the various cognitive domains in such patients. To that end, we performed a systematic review using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. We included articles that provided information on cognitive impairment in COPD patients. The review of the findings of the articles showed a significant relationship between COPD and cognitive impairment. The most widely studied cognitive domains are memory and attention. Verbal memory and learning constitute the second most commonly impaired cognitive domain in patients with COPD. The prevalence of impairment in visuospatial memory and intermediate visual memory is 26.9% and 19.2%, respectively. We found that cognitive impairment is associated with the profile of COPD severity and its comorbidities. The articles reviewed demonstrated that there is considerable impairment of the cognitive domains memory and attention in patients with COPD. Future studies should address impairments in different cognitive domains according to the disease stage in patients with COPD. PMID:25909154

  8. Age-Related Decline in Brain Resources Modulates Genetic Effects on Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Nagel, Irene E.; Chicherio, Christian; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Bäckman, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging. Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008), who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed. (150 of 150 words) PMID:19225597

  9. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  10. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. There is significantly elevated risk of cognitive decline and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. Dementia may develop insidiously several years after manifestation of Parkinson motor symptoms (dementia associated with Parkinson's disease; Parkinson's disease dementia) or in close temporal relationship (within one year) after onset of motor symptoms (Dementia with Lewy bodies). There are clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic similarities between these two conditions. Men are more frequently affected than women. Risk factor or indicators are advanced age at disease onset, disease duration, rigidity, akinesia and posture and gait impairment and falls as opposed to tremor dominance, and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms (depression, apathy, hallucinosis, delirium). Dementia is treatable with cholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, donepezil), memantine, and adjustment of the pharmacological regimen of parkinsonian motor symptoms. Concomitant autonomic nervous system symptoms and neuropsychiatric complications warrant early clinical awareness and are accessible to pharmacological therapy. PMID:26609664

  11. Dimensions of Ambiguous Loss in Couples Coping with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.; Wilcox, Karen L.; Barham, Elizabeth J.; Winston, Brianne L.

    2007-01-01

    We applied the theory of ambiguous loss to couples with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an age-related decline in memory and other cognitive processes assumed not to interfere with daily activities or the maintenance of personal relationships. Face-to-face interviews with 67 older married couples revealed that lack of understanding about the…

  12. Pedophilia occurring after onset of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Q R; Reich, P

    1978-11-01

    Four married patients are reported who first manifested pedophilia and other signs of disinhibition after sustaining illnesses that led to cognitive impairments. Although pedophilia may often be related to a long-standing inadequacy of sexual functioning, the onset of pedophilia in an individual without a previous histroy of sexual perversion may indicate the presence of recently sustained cognitive impairments.

  13. [Cognitive impairments in psychoactive drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Chukhlovina, M T

    2015-01-01

    This short literature review addresses common features of the pathogenesis and treatment of cognitive impairment in people with drug addiction (cocaine, opioids, hashish, amphetamine, benzodiazepines). A role of cholinergic deficit in the development of cognitive impairment and possibilities of its treatment with acetylcholineesterase inhibitions are analyzed. PMID:26438897

  14. Cognitive Impairment in Acute Cocaine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Yeager, Kenneth R.; Pepper, Tom H.; Beversdorf, David Q.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To perform a pilot study to examine a range of cognitive flexibility tasks early in cocaine withdrawal. Background Previous neuropsychological investigations of cocaine withdrawal have conflicted regarding whether impaired cognitive flexibility occurs. However, most studies have examined patients later in withdrawal. Anxiety and yohimbine-induced panic are greatest early in withdrawal, and both anxiety and increased noradrenergic tone can impair cognitive flexibility. Method Twelve patients acutely withdrawing from cocaine were compared with gender-, age-, and estimated premorbid intelligence–matched control subjects on tests of cognitive flexibility as well as verbal fluency, verbal memory, spatial memory, and attention. Results As predicted, impairments were found on the cognitive flexibility tasks. Impairments also were present in verbal fluency and verbal memory but not spatial memory or attention. Conclusions We propose that the cognitive flexibility impairment may relate to the increased noradrenergic activation recently described in cocaine withdrawal. Impairments on verbal tasks may also relate to an impaired flexibility in the search of semantic networks. Further research will explore the effects of pharmacologic manipulation of the noradrenergic system on cognition in acute withdrawal. Recently, propranolol has been shown to benefit patients in cocaine withdrawal. Further research will explore whether impaired cognitive flexibility related to altered noradrenergic tone could serve as a mechanism for this treatment response. PMID:15970730

  15. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed. PMID:27118278

  16. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed.

  17. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed. PMID:27118278

  18. Age-related changes in the cerebral substrates of cognitive procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Valérie; Beaunieux, Hélène; Chételat, Gaël; Platel, Hervé; Landeau, Brigitte; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis

    2009-04-01

    Cognitive procedural learning occurs in three qualitatively different phases (cognitive, associative, and autonomous). At the beginning of this process, numerous cognitive functions are involved, subtended by distinct brain structures such as the prefrontal and parietal cortex and the cerebellum. As the learning progresses, these cognitive components are gradually replaced by psychomotor abilities, reflected by the increasing involvement of the cerebellum, thalamus, and occipital regions. In elderly subjects, although cognitive studies have revealed a learning effect, performance levels differ during the acquisition of a procedure. The effects of age on the learning of a cognitive procedure have not yet been examined using functional imaging. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize the cerebral substrates involved in the learning of a cognitive procedure, comparing a group of older subjects with young controls. For this purpose, we performed a positron emission tomography activation study using the Tower of Toronto task. A direct comparison of the two groups revealed the involvement of a similar network of brain regions at the beginning of learning (cognitive phase). However, the engagement of frontal and cingulate regions persisted in the older group as learning continued, whereas it ceased in the younger controls. We assume that this additional activation in the older group during the associative and autonomous phases reflected compensatory processes and the fact that some older subjects failed to fully automate the procedure. PMID:18537110

  19. Nutraceuticals in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Mecocci, P.; Tinarelli, C.; Schulz, R. J.; Polidori, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Several chemical substances belonging to classes of natural dietary origin display protective properties against some age-related diseases including neurodegenerative ones, particularly Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These compounds, known as nutraceuticals, differ structurally, act therefore at different biochemical and metabolic levels and have shown different types of neuroprotective properties. The aim of this review is to summarize data from observational studies, clinical trials, and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in humans on the effects of selected nutraceuticals against age-related cognitive impairment and dementia. We report results from studies on flavonoids, some vitamins and other natural substances that have been studied in AD and that might be beneficial for the maintenance of a good cognitive performance. Due to the substantial lack of high-level evidence studies there is no possibility for recommendation of nutraceuticals in dementia-related therapeutic guidelines. Nevertheless, the strong potential for their neuroprotective action warrants further studies in the field. PMID:25002849

  20. Video games as a means to reduce age-related cognitive decline: attitudes, compliance, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Boot, Walter R; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a "brain fitness" game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants' ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why. PMID:23378841

  1. Video games as a means to reduce age-related cognitive decline: attitudes, compliance, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Boot, Walter R; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a "brain fitness" game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants' ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  2. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Walter R.; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P.; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J.; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a “brain fitness” game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants’ ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why. PMID:23378841

  3. Computer Simulations of Loss of Organization of Neurons as a Model for Age-related Cognitive Decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Luis; Fengometidis, Elene; Jones, Frank; Jampani, Srinivas

    2011-03-01

    In normal aging, brains suffer from progressive cognitive decline not linked with loss of neurons common in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. However, in some brain areas neurons have lost positional organization specifically within microcolumns: arrays of interconnected neurons which may constitute fundamental computational units in the brain. This age-related loss of organization, likely a result of micron-sized random displacements in neuronal positions, is hypothesized to be a by-product of the loss of support from the surrounding medium, including dendrites. Using a dynamical model applied to virtual 3D representation of neuronal arrangements, that previously showed loss of organization in brains of cognitively tested rhesus monkeys, the relationship between these displacements and changes to the surrounding dendrite network are presented. The consequences of these displacements on the structure of the dendritic network, with possible disruptions in signal synchrony important to cognitive function, are discussed. NIH R01AG021133.

  4. Obesity and hypertriglyceridemia produce cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Susan A; Yamada, Kelvin A; Butterfield, D Allan; Abdul, H Mohammad; Xu, Lin; Miller, Nicole E; Banks, William A; Morley, John E

    2008-05-01

    Obesity is associated with cognitive impairments. Long-term mechanisms for this association include consequences of hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, or other factors comprising metabolic syndrome X. We found that hypertriglyceridemia, the main dyslipidemia of metabolic syndrome X, is in part responsible for the leptin resistance seen in obesity. Here we determined whether triglycerides have an immediate and direct effect on cognition. Obese mice showed impaired acquisition in three different cognitive paradigms: the active avoidance T-maze, the Morris water maze, and a food reward lever press. These impairments were not attributable to differences in foot shock sensitivity, swim speed, swimming distance, or voluntary milk consumption. Impaired cognition in obese mice was improved by selectively lowering triglycerides with gemfibrozil. Injection into the brain of the triglyceride triolein, but not of the free fatty acid palmitate, impaired acquisition in normal body weight mice. Triolein or milk (97% of fats are triglycerides), but not skim milk (no triglycerides), impaired maintenance of the N-methyl-d-aspartate component of the hippocampal long-term synaptic potential. Measures of oxidative stress in whole brain were reduced by gemfibrozil. We conclude that triglycerides mediate cognitive impairment as seen in obesity, possibly by impairing maintenance of the N-methyl-d-aspartate component of hippocampal long-term potentiation, and that lowering triglycerides can reverse the cognitive impairment and improve oxidative stress in the brain.

  5. Working memory in middle-aged males: age-related brain activation changes and cognitive fatigue effects.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Elissa B; Evers, Elisabeth A T; de Groot, Renate H M; Backes, Walter H; Veltman, Dick J; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effects of aging and cognitive fatigue on working memory (WM) related brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Age-related differences were investigated in 13 young and 16 middle-aged male school teachers. Cognitive fatigue was induced by sustained performance on cognitively demanding tasks (compared to a control condition). Results showed a main effect of age on left dorsolateral prefrontal and superior parietal cortex activation during WM encoding; greater activation was evident in middle-aged than young adults regardless of WM load or fatigue condition. An interaction effect was found in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC); WM load-dependent activation was elevated in middle-aged compared to young in the control condition, but did not differ in the fatigue condition due to a reduction in activation in middle-aged in contrast to an increase in activation in the young group. These findings demonstrate age-related activation differences and differential effects of fatigue on activation in young and middle-aged adults.

  6. Cognitive Impairments in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bernardin, Florent; Maheut-Bosser, Anne; Paille, François

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption induces cognitive impairments mainly affecting executive functions, episodic memory, and visuospatial capacities related to multiple brain lesions. These cognitive impairments not only determine everyday management of these patients, but also impact on the efficacy of management and may compromise the abstinence prognosis. Maintenance of lasting abstinence is associated with cognitive recovery in these patients, but some impairments may persist and interfere with the good conduct and the efficacy of management. It therefore appears essential to clearly define neuropsychological management designed to identify and evaluate the type and severity of alcohol-related cognitive impairments. It is also essential to develop cognitive remediation therapy so that the patient can fully benefit from the management proposed in addiction medicine units. PMID:25076914

  7. Long-term ginsenoside Rg1 supplementation improves age-related cognitive decline by promoting synaptic plasticity associated protein expression in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lumeng; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Kunmu; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiaochun

    2014-03-01

    In aging individuals, age-related cognitive decline is the most common cause of memory impairment. Among the remedies, ginsenoside Rg1, a major active component of ginseng, is often recommended for its antiaging effects. However, its role in improving cognitive decline during normal aging remains unknown and its molecular mechanism partially understood. This study employed a scheme of Rg1 supplementation for female C57BL/6J mice, which started at the age of 12 months and ended at 24 months, to investigate the effects of Rg1 supplementation on the cognitive performance. We found that Rg1 supplementation improved the performance of aged mice in behavior test and significantly upregulated the expression of synaptic plasticity-associated proteins in hippocampus, including synaptophysin, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1, postsynaptic density-95, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha, via promoting mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activation. These data provide further support for Rg1 treatment of cognitive degeneration during aging.

  8. Age-Related Changes in Cognitive Processing of Moral and Social Conventional Violations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahat, Ayelet; Helwig, Charles C.; Zelazo, Philip David

    2012-01-01

    Moral and conventional violations are usually judged differently: Only moral violations are treated as independent of social rules. To investigate the cognitive processing involved in the development of this distinction, undergraduates (N = 34), adolescents (N = 34), and children (N = 14) read scenarios presented on a computer that had 1 of 3…

  9. Prospective memory impairment in mild cognitive impairment: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2011-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by the presence in an otherwise healthy elderly individual of cognitive deficits involving specific domains in the absence of significant functional impairments. Reports indicate that prospective memory (PM), that is, the ability to remember to execute delayed intentions, is impaired in individuals with MCI. The present review discusses the current debate in the literature on PM functioning in MCI by focusing on the relationship between prospective retrieval and retrospective memory functioning. Analysis of the reported evidence revealed that both the prospective component and the retrospective component of PM can be impaired in MCI. Declarative memory dysfunction may account for the retrospective memory impairment, while either reduced executive abilities or a deficit of reflexive mechanisms could explain the prospective component impairment.

  10. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  11. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers.

  12. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  13. Cognitive impairments associated with CFS and POTS

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Lindzi; Jason, Leonard A.; Evans, Meredyth; Brown, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by fatigue, sleep dysfunction, and cognitive deficits (Fukuda et al., 1994). Research surrounding cognitive functioning among patients with CFS has found difficulty with memory, attention, and information processing. A similar disorder, postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), is characterized by increased heart rate, fatigue, and mental cloudiness (Raj et al., 2009). Potential implications of cognitive deficits for patients with CFS and/or POTS are discussed, including difficulties with school and/or employment. A few biological theories (i.e., kindling, impairments in the central nervous system, and difficulty with blood flow) have emerged as potential explanations for the cognitive deficits reported in both CFS and POTS Future research should continue to examine possible explanations for cognitive impairments in CFS and POTS, and ultimately use this information to try and reduce cognitive impairments for these patients. PMID:23720636

  14. Impact of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/gonadal axes on trajectory of age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Cheryl D; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2010-01-01

    Life expectancies have increased substantially in the last century, dramatically amplifying the proportion of individuals who will reach old age. As individuals age, cognitive ability declines, although the rate of decline differs amongst the forms of memory domains and for different individuals. Memory domains especially impacted by aging are declarative and spatial memories. The hippocampus facilitates the formation of declarative and spatial memories. Notably, the hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to aging. Genetic predisposition and lifetime experiences and exposures contribute to the aging process, brain changes and subsequent cognitive outcomes. In this review, two factors to which an individual is exposed, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, will be considered regarding the impact of age on hippocampal-dependent function. Spatial memory can be affected by cumulative exposure to chronic stress via glucocorticoids, released from the HPA axis, and from gonadal steroids (estrogens, progesterone and androgens) and gonadotrophins, released from the HPG axis. Additionally, this review will discuss how these hormones impact age-related hippocampal function. We hypothesize that lifetime experiences and exposure to these hormones contribute to the cognitive makeup of the aged individual, and contribute to the heterogeneous aged population that includes individuals with cognitive abilities as astute as their younger counterparts, as well as individuals with severe cognitive decline or neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Neuropsychology of cognitive ageing, minimal cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Jaap; Weinstein, Henry

    2004-04-19

    In this review, the neuropsychological symptoms of different diseases in the elderly are described. After a brief explanation of relevant principles in the neuropsychological assessment of older individuals, a summary of the complex relation between ageing and cognition is presented. It may be concluded that cognitive decline is not an inevitable outcome of ageing, and may well be the result of unrecognised pathology. The term mild cognitive impairment is reserved for patients whose impairment is objectively demonstrable but is not pronounced in more than one domain of cognition and does not seriously affect activities of daily living. The initial phase of Alzheimer's disease is marked by a progressive deterioration of episodic memory. When the process advances, the impairment spreads to other functions, such as semantic memory, language and visuo-spatial ability. Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia; however, it is increasingly being recognised that vascular dementia is actually a heterogeneous syndrome and that several vascular pathologies can lead to cognitive deterioration. In contrast to the striking deficits produced by cortical infarcts, lesions of the subcortical white matter are mainly associated with a non-specific slowing of behaviour. Cerebrovascular disease also plays an important role in forms of cognitive decline other than dementia, and as such, it appears to be no less prevalent in old age than Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychology is an important asset to the study and treatment of cognitive decline, but must be embedded in a multi-disciplinary context.

  16. Evaluation and Management of Posttraumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Arciniegas, David B.; Frey, Kimberly L.; Newman, Jody; Wortzel, Hal S.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatrists are increasingly called upon to care for individuals with cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disturbances after TBI, especially in settings serving military service personnel and Veterans. In both the early and late post-injury periods, cognitive impairments contribute to disability among persons with TBI and are potentially substantial sources of suffering for persons with TBI and their families. In this article, the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management of posttraumatic cognitive complaints is reviewed. The importance of pre-treatment evaluation as well as consideration of non-cognitive contributors to cognitive problems and functional limitations is emphasized first. The course of recovery after TBI, framed as a progression through posttraumatic encephalopathy, is reviewed next and used to anchor the evaluation and treatment of posttraumatic cognitive impairments in relation to injury severity as well as time post-injury. Finally, pharmacologic and rehabilitative interventions that may facilitate cognitive and functional recovery at each stage of posttraumatic encephalopathy are presented. PMID:21270968

  17. Age-Related Decline in Cognitive Pain Modulation Induced by Distraction: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shu; Després, Olivier; Pebayle, Thierry; Dufour, André

    2015-09-01

    Distraction is known to reduce perceived pain but not always efficiently. Overlapping cognitive resources play a role in both pain processing and executive functions. We hypothesized that with aging, the analgesic effects of cognitive modulation induced by distraction would be reduced as a result of functional decline of frontal networks. Twenty-eight elderly and 28 young participants performed a tonic heat pain test with and without distraction (P + D vs P condition), and 2 executive tasks involving the frontal network (1-back [working memory] and go/no-go [response inhibition]), during which event-related potentials were recorded. A significant age-related difference in modulatory effect was observed during the pain-distraction test, with the older group reporting higher pain perception than the younger group during the P + D than during the P condition. Greater brain activity of early processes (P2 component) in both go/no-go and 1-back tasks correlated with less perceived pain during distraction in younger participants. For later processes, more cognitive control and attentional resources (increased N2 and P3 amplitude) needed for working memory processes were associated with greater pain perception in the older group. Inhibition processes were related to conscious distraction estimation in both groups. These findings indicate that cognitive processes subtended by resources in the frontal network, particularly working memory processes, are elicited more in elderly than in younger individuals for pain tolerance when an irrelevant task is performed simultaneously. Perspective: This study suggests that age-related declines in pain modulation are caused by functional degeneration of frontal cerebral networks, which may contribute to a higher prevalence of chronic pain. Analyzing the impact of frontal network function on pain modulation may assist in the development of more effective targeted treatment plans. PMID:26080043

  18. Impaired Cognitive Flexibility in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jessica; Olm, Christopher; McCluskey, Leo; Elman, Lauren; Boller, Ashley; Moran, Eileen; Rascovsky, Katya; Bisbing, Teagan; McMillan, Corey T.; Grossman, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Objective Up to half of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may have cognitive difficulty, but most cognitive measures are confounded by a motor component. Rare studies have related impaired cognition in ALS to disease in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). We evaluated a simple, untimed measure of executive functioning with minimal motor demands in ALS, and relate performance to structural disease. Methods Fifty-six patients with ALS and 29 matched healthy controls were assessed with the Visual-Verbal Test (VVT). This brief measure of cognitive flexibility first assesses an individual's ability to identify a shared feature in three of four simple geometric designs. Cognitive flexibility is challenged when individuals are next asked to identify a different shared feature in another three of the same four geometric designs. Regression analyses related performance to GM atrophy and reduced WM fractional anisotropy (FA) in a subset of patients. Results ALS patients were significantly impaired on this simple measure of cognitive flexibility (p<0.01). An error in cognitive flexibility was present in 48.2% of individual ALS patients. Regression analyses related impaired cognitive flexibility to GM atrophy in inferior frontal and insula regions, and to reduced FA in WM projections in inferior frontal-occipital and uncinate fasciculi and corpus callosum. Conclusion Patients with ALS have impaired cognitive flexibility on an untimed measure with minimal motor demands, and this is related in part to a large-scale frontal network that is degraded in ALS. PMID:25812127

  19. Cognitive impairment in MS: rehabilitation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, P; Rosti-Otajärvi, E

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive deficits have been reported in 45%-70% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Like other symptoms of MS, cognitive deficits are highly variable. Slowed information processing and memory and learning dysfunction are regarded as the most frequent cognitive deficits in MS. Both white and gray matter damages have been suggested to contribute to cognitive impairments in MS. There is no direct relationship between cognitive deficits and physical disability, disease duration or course of the disease. In addition to cognitive impairments, neuropsychiatric symptoms are observed in MS, the most common being alterations in mood state. Neurobehavioral deficits have multidimensional effects on the activities of daily living and quality of life. Consequently, attention should be paid to early diagnosis and treatment. Based on studies on cognitive retraining and more multimodal neuropsychological rehabilitation, both approaches show promise in the treatment of cognitive impairments and their harmful effects. This review introduces the frequency and characteristics of cognitive impairments, as well as main findings on the effects of neuropsychological rehabilitation in MS. PMID:27580900

  20. Examining age-related shared variance between face cognition, vision, and self-reported physical health: a test of the common cause hypothesis for social cognition

    PubMed Central

    Olderbak, Sally; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The shared decline in cognitive abilities, sensory functions (e.g., vision and hearing), and physical health with increasing age is well documented with some research attributing this shared age-related decline to a single common cause (e.g., aging brain). We evaluate the extent to which the common cause hypothesis predicts associations between vision and physical health with social cognition abilities specifically face perception and face memory. Based on a sample of 443 adults (17–88 years old), we test a series of structural equation models, including Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause (MIMIC) models, and estimate the extent to which vision and self-reported physical health are related to face perception and face memory through a common factor, before and after controlling for their fluid cognitive component and the linear effects of age. Results suggest significant shared variance amongst these constructs, with a common factor explaining some, but not all, of the shared age-related variance. Also, we found that the relations of face perception, but not face memory, with vision and physical health could be completely explained by fluid cognition. Overall, results suggest that a single common cause explains most, but not all age-related shared variance with domain specific aging mechanisms evident. PMID:26321998

  1. Examining age-related shared variance between face cognition, vision, and self-reported physical health: a test of the common cause hypothesis for social cognition.

    PubMed

    Olderbak, Sally; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The shared decline in cognitive abilities, sensory functions (e.g., vision and hearing), and physical health with increasing age is well documented with some research attributing this shared age-related decline to a single common cause (e.g., aging brain). We evaluate the extent to which the common cause hypothesis predicts associations between vision and physical health with social cognition abilities specifically face perception and face memory. Based on a sample of 443 adults (17-88 years old), we test a series of structural equation models, including Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause (MIMIC) models, and estimate the extent to which vision and self-reported physical health are related to face perception and face memory through a common factor, before and after controlling for their fluid cognitive component and the linear effects of age. Results suggest significant shared variance amongst these constructs, with a common factor explaining some, but not all, of the shared age-related variance. Also, we found that the relations of face perception, but not face memory, with vision and physical health could be completely explained by fluid cognition. Overall, results suggest that a single common cause explains most, but not all age-related shared variance with domain specific aging mechanisms evident.

  2. Examining age-related shared variance between face cognition, vision, and self-reported physical health: a test of the common cause hypothesis for social cognition.

    PubMed

    Olderbak, Sally; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The shared decline in cognitive abilities, sensory functions (e.g., vision and hearing), and physical health with increasing age is well documented with some research attributing this shared age-related decline to a single common cause (e.g., aging brain). We evaluate the extent to which the common cause hypothesis predicts associations between vision and physical health with social cognition abilities specifically face perception and face memory. Based on a sample of 443 adults (17-88 years old), we test a series of structural equation models, including Multiple Indicator Multiple Cause (MIMIC) models, and estimate the extent to which vision and self-reported physical health are related to face perception and face memory through a common factor, before and after controlling for their fluid cognitive component and the linear effects of age. Results suggest significant shared variance amongst these constructs, with a common factor explaining some, but not all, of the shared age-related variance. Also, we found that the relations of face perception, but not face memory, with vision and physical health could be completely explained by fluid cognition. Overall, results suggest that a single common cause explains most, but not all age-related shared variance with domain specific aging mechanisms evident. PMID:26321998

  3. A mutation in APP protects against Alzheimer's disease and age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Thorlakur; Atwal, Jasvinder K; Steinberg, Stacy; Snaedal, Jon; Jonsson, Palmi V; Bjornsson, Sigurbjorn; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Maloney, Janice; Hoyte, Kwame; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; Lu, Yanmei; Bhangale, Tushar; Graham, Robert R; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Andreassen, Ole A; Jönsson, Erik G; Palotie, Aarno; Behrens, Timothy W; Magnusson, Olafur T; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Watts, Ryan J; Stefansson, Kari

    2012-08-01

    The prevalence of dementia in the Western world in people over the age of 60 has been estimated to be greater than 5%, about two-thirds of which are due to Alzheimer's disease. The age-specific prevalence of Alzheimer's disease nearly doubles every 5 years after age 65, leading to a prevalence of greater than 25% in those over the age of 90 (ref. 3). Here, to search for low-frequency variants in the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) gene with a significant effect on the risk of Alzheimer's disease, we studied coding variants in APP in a set of whole-genome sequence data from 1,795 Icelanders. We found a coding mutation (A673T) in the APP gene that protects against Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline in the elderly without Alzheimer's disease. This substitution is adjacent to the aspartyl protease β-site in APP, and results in an approximately 40% reduction in the formation of amyloidogenic peptides in vitro. The strong protective effect of the A673T substitution against Alzheimer's disease provides proof of principle for the hypothesis that reducing the β-cleavage of APP may protect against the disease. Furthermore, as the A673T allele also protects against cognitive decline in the elderly without Alzheimer's disease, the two may be mediated through the same or similar mechanisms.

  4. Nutritional status and cognitive impairment in elderly.

    PubMed

    Daradkeh, Ghazi; Essa, Musthafa M; Al-Adawi, S Samir; Koshy, Roopa P; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Waly, Mostafa I

    2014-10-01

    The elderly population is increasing worldwide and it has been suggested that senior citizens will continue to constitute the bulk of the population in many countries. Nutritional status of senior citizens are adversely affected by their frailty, chronic condition and declining cognitive functioning. Conversely, malnourished elderly further deteriorate their frailty, chronic disease and cognitive functioning. The aim of this review article is to recognize the importance of nutritional assessment of elderly population particularly those with cognitive impairment. First part is to highlight characteristic cognitive impairment among senior citizens and the second one highlight t he background in which malnutrition is a factor that leads to increased risk of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. This review also highlight salgorithms for safeguarding nutritional status among senior citizen and focuses on importance of nutritional screening, assessment and early intervention for safeguarding further deterioration of elderly who are likely to prone to cognitive impairment.

  5. Impaired increases in skin sympathetic nerve activity contribute to age-related decrements in reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction is impaired in older adults; however, the relative roles of altered skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and end-organ peripheral vascular responsiveness are unclear. We hypothesized that in older adults whole-body cooling would elicit a blunted SSNA response and cutaneous adrenergic responsiveness would be reduced. Twelve young adults (Y; 24 ± 1 years) and 12 older adults (O; 57 ± 2 years) participated in two protocols. In Protocol 1, SSNA (peroneal microneurography) and red cell flux in the affected dermatome (laser Doppler flowmetry; dorsum of foot) were measured during whole-body cooling (mean skin temperature (Tsk) 30.5°C; water-perfused suit). Mental stress was performed at mean Tsk 34.0°C (thermoneutral) and at 30.5°C. In Protocol 2, an intradermal microdialysis fibre was placed in the skin of the lateral calf for graded infusions of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) (NA; 10−12 to 10−2 m). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as a change from baseline (ΔCVCbase). Vasoconstriction was attenuated in O. SSNA increased significantly during cooling in Y (+184 ± 37%; P < 0.05) but not O (+51 ± 12%; P > 0.05). Mental stress at Tsk 30.5°C further increased SSNA in both groups. There was no age-related difference in adrenergic responsiveness to exogenous NA (logEC50: −6.41 ± 0.24 in Y, −6.37 ± 0.25 in O; P > 0.05). While the SSNA response to whole-body cooling is impaired with ageing, SSNA can be further increased by a non-thermoregulatory stimulus. Cutaneous adrenergic sensitivity is not reduced in O. These findings suggest that alterations in afferent signalling or central processing likely contribute to blunted SSNA responses to cooling and subsequent impairments in reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in ageing. Key points The reduction in skin blood flow during whole-body cooling is impaired in healthy older adults. However, the

  6. Age-related impairment of GM-CSF-induced signalling in neutrophils: role of SHP-1 and SOCS proteins.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Cosimo; Simone, Olivia; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Stella, Isabella; Antonaci, Salvatore

    2007-08-01

    Functional activities of mature human neutrophils are strongly influenced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Accordingly, a defective response to GM-CSF might have dramatic consequences for neutrophil functions and the host defence against infections. Such an event is most likely to occur in senescence. A number of studies have, in fact, reported an impairment of the GM-CSF capacity to prime and/or to activate respiratory burst, as well as to delay apoptotic events, in neutrophils from elderly individuals. In the last 2 decades many efforts have been made to explore at molecular levels the mechanism underlying these defects. Recent studies let us depict a scenario in which an increased activity of inhibitory molecules, such as Src homology domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS), is responsible for the age-related failure of GM-CSF to stimulate neutrophil functions via inhibition of Lyn-, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-dependent pathways. The control of SHP-1 and/or SOCS activity might therefore be an important therapeutic target for the restoration of normal immune responses during senescence.

  7. Aging-related anatomical and biochemical changes in lymphatic collectors impair lymph transport, fluid homeostasis, and pathogen clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zolla, Valerio; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Scharf, Brian; Clement, Cristina C; Maejima, Daisuke; Akl, Tony; Nagai, Takashi; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Halin, Cornelia; Stukes, Sabriya; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Casadevall, Arturo; Jacobs, William R; Entenberg, David; Zawieja, David C; Condeelis, John; Fooksman, David R; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Santambrogio, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The role of lymphatic vessels is to transport fluid, soluble molecules, and immune cells to the draining lymph nodes. Here, we analyze how the aging process affects the functionality of the lymphatic collectors and the dynamics of lymph flow. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and proteomic analysis indicates a loss of matrix proteins, and smooth muscle cells in aged collectors resulting in a decrease in contraction frequency, systolic lymph flow velocity, and pumping activity, as measured in vivo in lymphatic collectors. Functionally, this impairment also translated into a reduced ability for in vivo bacterial transport as determined by time-lapse microscopy. Ultrastructural and proteomic analysis also indicates a decrease in the thickness of the endothelial cell glycocalyx and loss of gap junction proteins in aged lymph collectors. Redox proteomic analysis mapped an aging-related increase in the glycation and carboxylation of lymphatic’s endothelial cell and matrix proteins. Functionally, these modifications translate into apparent hyperpermeability of the lymphatics with pathogen escaping from the collectors into the surrounding tissue and a decreased ability to control tissue fluid homeostasis. Altogether, our data provide a mechanistic analysis of how the anatomical and biochemical changes, occurring in aged lymphatic vessels, compromise lymph flow, tissue fluid homeostasis, and pathogen transport. PMID:25982749

  8. Cognitive impairments at high altitudes and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaodan

    2014-06-01

    High altitude hypoxia has been shown to have significant impact on cognitive performance. This article reviews the aspects in which, and the conditions under which, decreased cognitive performance has been observed at high altitudes. Neural changes related to high altitude hypoxia are also reviewed with respect to their possible contributions to cognitive impairments. In addition, potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed among indigenous high altitude residents and long-term immigrant residents, with discussions about methodological concerns related to these studies.

  9. Frailty and the risk of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Searle, Samuel D; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Aging occurs as a series of small steps, first causing cellular damage and then affecting tissues and organs. This is also true in the brain. Frailty, a state of increased risk due to accelerated deficit accumulation, is robustly a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Community-based autopsy studies show that frail individuals have brains that show multiple deficits without necessarily demonstrating cognitive impairment. These facts cast a new light on the growing number of risk factors for cognitive impairment, suggesting that, on a population basis, most health deficits can be associated with late-life cognitive impairment. The systems mechanism by which things that are bad for the body are likely to be bad for the brain can be understood like this: the burden of health deficits anywhere indicates impaired ability to withstand or repair endogenous and environmental damage. This in turn makes additional damage more likely. If true, this suggests that a life course approach to preventing cognitive impairment is desirable. Furthermore, conducting studies in highly selected, younger, healthier individuals to provide 'proof of concept' information is now common. This strategy might exclude the very circumstances that are required for disease expression in the people in whom dementia chiefly occurs (that is, older adults who are often in poor health). PMID:26240611

  10. [Pain management of cognitively impaired patients].

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, K; Brauer, H; Köberlein, J

    2014-04-01

    Pain is a significant problem in clinical practice and its control is one of the most important challenging aspects as pain has a major impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Particularly vulnerable persons, like cognitively impaired patients are challenging for pain management and underline its increasing relevance.National and international studies showed significant differences concerning pain therapy between cognitively impaired and cognitively intact patients. A possible cause of this may be that patients who are cognitively impaired are only in a restricted way able to express their pain. Furthermore, knowledge gaps and reservations concerning the effect and dosage of analgesics among cognitively impaired patients could be identified on the involved professions.Further investigations in Germany are needed as deficient treatment remains a persistent problem and evidence-based data are missing. These investigations should describe the status quo of pain management for cognitively impaired patients and provide information which processes have to be adapted to the needs of these vulnerable patients. PMID:24668438

  11. Combined effects of physical exercise and education on age-related cortical thinning in cognitively normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin San; Shin, Hee Young; Kim, Hee Jin; Jang, Young Kyoung; Jung, Na-Yeon; Lee, Juyoun; Kim, Yeo Jin; Chun, Phillip; Yang, Jin-Ju; Lee, Jong-Min; Kang, Mira; Park, Key-Chung; Na, Duk L.; Seo, Sang Won

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the association between self-reported physical exercise and cortical thickness in a large sample of cognitively normal individuals. We also determined whether a combination of physical exercise and education had more protective effects on age-related cortical thinning than either parameter alone. A total of 1,842 participants were included in this analysis. Physical exercise was assessed using a questionnaire regarding intensity, frequency, and duration. Cortical thickness was measured using a surface-based method. Longer duration of exercise (≥1 hr/day), but not intensity or frequency, was associated with increased mean cortical thickness globally (P-value = 0.013) and in the frontal regions (P-value = 0.007). In particular, the association of exercise with cortical thinning had regional specificity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal, precuneus, left postcentral, and inferior parietal regions. The combination of higher exercise level and higher education level showed greater global and frontal mean thickness than either parameter alone. Testing for a trend with the combination of high exercise level and high education level confirmed this finding (P-value = 0.001–0.003). Our findings suggest that combined exercise and education have important implications for brain health, especially considering the paucity of known protective factors for age-related cortical thinning. PMID:27063336

  12. Litter size, age-related memory impairments, and microglial changes in rat dentate gyrus: stereological analysis and three dimensional morphometry.

    PubMed

    Viana, L C; Lima, C M; Oliveira, M A; Borges, R P; Cardoso, T T; Almeida, I N F; Diniz, D G; Bento-Torres, J; Pereira, A; Batista-de-Oliveira, M; Lopes, A A C; Silva, R F M; Abadie-Guedes, R; Amâncio Dos Santos, A; Lima, D S C; Vasconcelos, P F C; Cunningham, C; Guedes, R C A; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2013-05-15

    It has been demonstrated that rat litter size affects the immune cell response, but it is not known whether the long-term effects aggravate age-related memory impairments or microglial-associated changes. To that end, we raised sedentary Wistar rats that were first suckled in small or large litters (6 or 12pups/dam, respectively), then separated into groups of 2-3 rats from the 21st post-natal day to study end. At 4months (young adult) or 23months (aged), all individual rats were submitted to spatial memory and object identity recognition tests, and then sacrificed. Brain sections were immunolabeled with anti-IBA-1 antibodies to selectively identify microglia/macrophages. Microglial morphological changes in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus were estimated based on three-dimensional reconstructions. The cell number and laminar distribution in the dentate gyrus was estimated with the stereological optical fractionator method. We found that, compared to young rat groups, aged rats from large litters showed significant increases in the number of microglia in all layers of the dentate gyrus. Compared to the microglia in all other groups, microglia in aged individuals from large litters showed a significantly higher degree of tree volume expansion, branch base diameter thickening, and cell soma enlargement. These morphological changes were correlated with an increase in the number of microglia in the molecular layer. Young adult individuals from small litters exhibited preserved intact object identity recognition memory and all other groups showed reduced performance in both spatial and object identity recognition tasks. We found that, in large litters, brain development was, on average, associated with permanent changes in the innate immune system in the brain, with a significant impact on the microglial homeostasis of aged rats.

  13. Cognitive Impairment in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalirao, Paramjit; Pederson, Sarah; Foley, Robert N.; Kolste, Ali; Tupper, David; Zaun, David; Buot, Vanessa; Murray, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prevalence of moderate to severe cognitive impairment among hemodialysis patients is more than double the prevalence in the general population. This study describes cognitive impairment occurrence in a peritoneal dialysis cohort compared with a cohort without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting and Participants 51 English-speaking peritoneal dialysis patients from two urban dialysis units, compared with 338 hemodialysis patients from 16 urban dialysis units and 101voluntary controls without CKD from urban general medicine clinics. Predictor A 45-minute battery of nine validated neuropsychological tests (cognitive domains memory, executive function, language). Outcomes Mild, moderate, or severe cognitive impairment, classified according to a previously designed algorithm. Results Of the peritoneal dialysis cohort, 33.3% had no or mild, 35.3% moderate, and 31.4% severe cognitive impairment; corresponding values were 60.4%, 26.7%, and 12.9% of the non-CKD cohort, and 26.6%, 36.4%, and 37.0% of the hemodialysis cohort. A logistic regression model including age, sex, race, education, hemoglobin, diabetes, and stroke showed that only non-white race (P = 0.002) and education (P = 0.002) were associated with moderate to severe cognitive impairment in the peritoneal dialysis cohort. Compared with hemodialysis patients, more peritoneal dialysis patients had moderate to severe memory impairment (60% vs. 52%), but fewer had impaired executive function (one-third vs. one-half). Peritoneal dialysis was associated with a more than 2.5-fold increased risk of moderate to severe cognitive impairment compared with no CKD (OR, 2.58; 95% confidence interval 1.02-6.53), as was hemodialysis (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.91-5.24), in an adjusted logistic regression model. Limitations Small sample size, participation rate somewhat low. Conclusions Similar to hemodialysis patients, two-thirds of peritoneal dialysis patients had moderate to severe

  14. [Cognitive functions impairment in diabetes mellitus patient].

    PubMed

    Prikryl, R

    2007-01-01

    An increased research interest in the relation between diabetes mellitus and dementia or deterioration of cognitive functions has been recently noticed. The relatively rich scientific literature in this topic shows that diabetes mellitus itself can cause an impairment of cognitive functions regardless patient's age or the fact whether he has type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes mellitus leads to a psychomotor retardation while type 2 diabetes mellitus tends to be associated with impaired storage of new information. The exact mechanism through which diabetes impairs cognition has not been explained sufficiently yet, but several hypothetical mechanisms which might explain the relation between diabetes and impaired cognition have been proposed. To explain the etiopathogenetic mechanisms underlying the relation between diabetes and dementia, further research, especially research focused on process clinical-imaging studies or clinical-pathological studies is necessary. As far as clinical practice is concerned, it is important to bear in mind that prevention, timely diagnosis and optimum treatment of diabetes may help to reduce incidence of dementia or cognitive functions' impairment.

  15. Vascular cognitive impairment, a cardiovascular complication.

    PubMed

    Frances, Adiukwu; Sandra, Ofori; Lucy, Ugbomah

    2016-06-22

    Over the past two decades, the term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) has been used to refer to a spectrum of cognitive decline characterized by executive dysfunction, associated with vascular pathology. With 30% of stroke survivors showing cognitive impairments, it is regarded as the most common cause of cognitive impairment. This is a narrative review of available literature citing sources from PubMed, MEDLINE and Google Scholar. VCI has a high prevalence both before and after a stroke and is associated with great economic and caregiver burden. Despite this, there is no standardized diagnostic criteria for VCI. Hypertension has been identified as a risk factor for VCI and causes changes in cerebral vessel structure and function predisposing to lacuna infarcts and small vessel haemorrhages in the frontostriatal loop leading to executive dysfunction and other cognitive impairments. Current trials have shown promising results in the use of antihypertensive medications in the management of VCI and prevention of disease progression to vascular dementia. Prevention of VCI is necessary in light of the looming dementia pandemic. All patients with cardiovascular risk factors would therefore benefit from cognitive screening with screening instruments sensitive to executive dysfunction as well as prompt and adequate control of hypertension. PMID:27354961

  16. Vascular cognitive impairment, a cardiovascular complication

    PubMed Central

    Frances, Adiukwu; Sandra, Ofori; Lucy, Ugbomah

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) has been used to refer to a spectrum of cognitive decline characterized by executive dysfunction, associated with vascular pathology. With 30% of stroke survivors showing cognitive impairments, it is regarded as the most common cause of cognitive impairment. This is a narrative review of available literature citing sources from PubMed, MEDLINE and Google Scholar. VCI has a high prevalence both before and after a stroke and is associated with great economic and caregiver burden. Despite this, there is no standardized diagnostic criteria for VCI. Hypertension has been identified as a risk factor for VCI and causes changes in cerebral vessel structure and function predisposing to lacuna infarcts and small vessel haemorrhages in the frontostriatal loop leading to executive dysfunction and other cognitive impairments. Current trials have shown promising results in the use of antihypertensive medications in the management of VCI and prevention of disease progression to vascular dementia. Prevention of VCI is necessary in light of the looming dementia pandemic. All patients with cardiovascular risk factors would therefore benefit from cognitive screening with screening instruments sensitive to executive dysfunction as well as prompt and adequate control of hypertension. PMID:27354961

  17. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions

    PubMed Central

    De Oliveira, Thaís Cristina Galdino; Soares, Fernanda Cabral; De Macedo, Liliane Dias E Dias; Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço; Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on improving cognition in elderly persons living in long-term-care institutions (institutionalized [I]) or in communities with their families (noninstitutionalized [NI]). We compared neuropsychological performance using language and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test scores before and after 24 and 48 stimulation sessions. The two groups were matched by age and years of schooling. Small groups of ten or fewer volunteers underwent the stimulation program, twice a week, over 6 months (48 sessions in total). Sessions were based on language and memory exercises, as well as visual, olfactory, auditory, and ludic stimulation, including music, singing, and dance. Both groups were assessed at the beginning (before stimulation), in the middle (after 24 sessions), and at the end (after 48 sessions) of the stimulation program. Although the NI group showed higher performance in all tasks in all time windows compared with I subjects, both groups improved their performance after stimulation. In addition, the improvement was significantly higher in the I group than the NI group. Language tests seem to be more efficient than the MMSE to detect early changes in cognitive status. The results suggest the impoverished environment of long-term-care institutions may contribute to lower cognitive scores before stimulation and the higher improvement rate of this group after stimulation. In conclusion, language tests should be routinely adopted in the neuropsychological assessment of elderly subjects, and long-term-care institutions need to include regular sensorimotor, social, and cognitive stimulation as a public health policy for elderly persons. PMID:24600211

  18. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Thaís Cristina Galdino; Soares, Fernanda Cabral; De Macedo, Liliane Dias E Dias; Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço; Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on improving cognition in elderly persons living in long-term-care institutions (institutionalized [I]) or in communities with their families (noninstitutionalized [NI]). We compared neuropsychological performance using language and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test scores before and after 24 and 48 stimulation sessions. The two groups were matched by age and years of schooling. Small groups of ten or fewer volunteers underwent the stimulation program, twice a week, over 6 months (48 sessions in total). Sessions were based on language and memory exercises, as well as visual, olfactory, auditory, and ludic stimulation, including music, singing, and dance. Both groups were assessed at the beginning (before stimulation), in the middle (after 24 sessions), and at the end (after 48 sessions) of the stimulation program. Although the NI group showed higher performance in all tasks in all time windows compared with I subjects, both groups improved their performance after stimulation. In addition, the improvement was significantly higher in the I group than the NI group. Language tests seem to be more efficient than the MMSE to detect early changes in cognitive status. The results suggest the impoverished environment of long-term-care institutions may contribute to lower cognitive scores before stimulation and the higher improvement rate of this group after stimulation. In conclusion, language tests should be routinely adopted in the neuropsychological assessment of elderly subjects, and long-term-care institutions need to include regular sensorimotor, social, and cognitive stimulation as a public health policy for elderly persons. PMID:24600211

  19. Age-Related Declines in General Cognitive Abilities of Balb/C Mice and General Activity Are Associated with Disparities in Working Memory, Body Weight, and General Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matzel, Louis D.; Grossman, Henya; Light, Kenneth; Townsend, David; Kolata, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A defining characteristic of age-related cognitive decline is a deficit in general cognitive performance. Here we use a testing and analysis regimen that allows us to characterize the general learning abilities of young (3-5 mo old) and aged (19-21 mo old) male and female Balb/C mice. Animals' performance was assessed on a battery of seven diverse…

  20. A critical review of Vitamin C for the prevention of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidants in the diet have long been thought to confer some level of protection against the oxidative damage that is involved in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease as well as general cognitive decline in normal aging. Nevertheless, support for this hypothesis in the literature is equivocal. In the case of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in particular, lack of consideration of some of the specific features of vitamin C metabolism has led to studies in which classification of participants according to vitamin C status is inaccurate, and the absence of critical information precludes the drawing of appropriate conclusions. Vitamin C levels in plasma are not always reported, and estimated daily intake from food diaries may not be accurate or reflect actual plasma values. The ability to transport ingested vitamin C from the intestines into blood is limited by the saturable sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT1) and thus very high intakes, and the use of supplements are often erroneously considered to be of greater benefit that they really are. The current review documents differences among the studies in terms of vitamin C status of participants. Overall, there is a large body of evidence that maintaining healthy vitamin C levels can have a protective function against age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, but avoiding vitamin C deficiency is likely to be more beneficial than taking supplements on top of a normal, healthy diet. PMID:22366772

  1. Subjective cognitive complaints contribute to misdiagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Emily C; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Galasko, Douglas R; Salmon, David P; Bondi, Mark W

    2014-09-01

    Subjective cognitive complaints are a criterion for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), despite their uncertain relationship to objective memory performance in MCI. We aimed to examine self-reported cognitive complaints in subgroups of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) MCI cohort to determine whether they are a valuable inclusion in the diagnosis of MCI or, alternatively, if they contribute to misdiagnosis. Subgroups of MCI were derived using cluster analysis of baseline neuropsychological test data from 448 ADNI MCI participants. Cognitive complaints were assessed via the Everyday Cognition (ECog) questionnaire, and discrepancy scores were calculated between self- and informant-report. Cluster analysis revealed Amnestic and Mixed cognitive phenotypes as well as a third Cluster-Derived Normal subgroup (41.3%), whose neuropsychological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker profiles did not differ from a "robust" normal control group. This cognitively intact phenotype of MCI participants overestimated their cognitive problems relative to their informant, whereas Amnestic MCI participants with objective memory impairment underestimated their cognitive problems. Underestimation of cognitive problems was associated with positive CSF AD biomarkers and progression to dementia. Overall, there was no relationship between self-reported cognitive complaints and objective cognitive functioning, but significant correlations were observed with depressive symptoms. The inclusion of self-reported complaints in MCI diagnostic criteria may cloud rather than clarify diagnosis and result in high rates of misclassification of MCI. Discrepancies between self- and informant-report demonstrate that overestimation of cognitive problems is characteristic of normal aging while underestimation may reflect greater risk for cognitive decline.

  2. Screening for Cognitive Impairments in Primary Blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Song, Wei; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Cao, Bei; Liu, Wanglin; Shao, Na; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Studies have reported that non-motor symptoms are an important component of primary dystonia. However, evidence supporting cognitive impairment in primary dystonia is limited and contradictory. Methods We applied the Chinese version of the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) to screen for cognitive impairment in patients with primary blepharospasm. In addition, we investigated the relationship between performance on the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised and quality of life as measured by the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form (SF36). Results The study included 68 primary blepharospasm patients and 68 controls matched by age, sex and education. The prevalence of cognitive deficits was 22.0% and 32.3% in primary blepharospasm patients group, as measured by the MMSE and the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised, respectively. Primary blepharospasm patents had a broad range of cognitive deficits, with the most frequently affected domains being visuospatial function (30.9%) and language (30.9%), followed by memory (27.9%), orientation/attention (26.4%) and verbal fluency (22.0%). Patients with cognitive deficits had lower total SF36 scores, especially in the subdomains of physical functioning, role-physical and social functioning, compared to those without cognitive deficits. Scores on the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised were significantly correlated with both the SF36 scores and the scores on the subdomains of physical functioning and social functioning. Conclusions Some patients with primary blepharospasm have cognitive deficits. Poor performance on the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised is related to poorer quality of life. PMID:27526026

  3. Pain assessment and cognitive impairment: part 1.

    PubMed

    Davies, Elizabeth; Male, Margaret; Reimer, Valerie; Turner, Margaret; Wylie, Kim

    People with cognitive impairment are often unable to inform others of their pain. Nurses need to be able to assess pain in cognitively impaired adults so that appropriate pain management strategies can be implemented. Evidence suggests that certain verbal, facial and behavioural signs may be indicative of pain. This article describes the process undertaken in developing a specific tool to facilitate pain assessment. The tool was developed after extensive analysis of pain research literature, input from experienced nurses and critical review by a panel of experts in dementia care. The research study will be published in next week's Nursing Standard.

  4. THE OLDER ADULT DRIVER WITH COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David B.; Ott, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Although automobiles remain the transportation of choice for older adults, late life cognitive impairment and dementia often impair the ability to drive safely. There is, however, no commonly utilized method of assessing dementia severity in relation to driving, no consensus on the assessment of older drivers with cognitive impairment, and no gold standard for determining driving fitness. Yet, clinicians are called upon by patients, their families, other health professionals, and often the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to assess their patients' fitness-to-drive and to make recommendations about driving privileges. Using the case of Mr W, we describe the challenges of driving with cognitive impairment for both the patient and caregiver, summarize the literature on dementia and driving, discuss evidenced-based assessment of fitness-to-drive, and address important ethical and legal issues. We describe the role of physician assessment, referral to neuropsychology, functional screens, dementia severity tools, driving evaluation clinics, and DMV referrals that may assist with evaluation. Finally, we discuss mobility counseling (eg, exploration of transportation alternatives) since health professionals need to address this important issue for older adults who lose the ability to drive. The application of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the older driver with cognitive impairment will have the best opportunity to enhance our patients' social connectedness and quality of life, while meeting their psychological and medical needs and maintaining personal and public safety. PMID:20424254

  5. A Large Genome-Wide Association Study of Age-Related Hearing Impairment Using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Keats, Bronya J.; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Risch, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), one of the most common sensory disorders, can be mitigated, but not cured or eliminated. To identify genetic influences underlying ARHI, we conducted a genome-wide association study of ARHI in 6,527 cases and 45,882 controls among the non-Hispanic whites from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort. We identified two novel genome-wide significant SNPs: rs4932196 (odds ratio = 1.185, p = 4.0x10-11), 52Kb 3’ of ISG20, which replicated in a meta-analysis of the other GERA race/ethnicity groups (1,025 cases, 12,388 controls, p = 0.00094) and in a UK Biobank case-control analysis (30,802 self-reported cases, 78,586 controls, p = 0.015); and rs58389158 (odds ratio = 1.132, p = 1.8x10-9), which replicated in the UK Biobank (p = 0.00021). The latter SNP lies just outside exon 8 and is highly correlated (r2 = 0.96) with the missense SNP rs5756795 in exon 7 of TRIOBP, a gene previously associated with prelingual nonsyndromic hearing loss. We further tested these SNPs in phenotypes from audiologist notes available on a subset of GERA (4,903 individuals), stratified by case/control status, to construct an independent replication test, and found a significant effect of rs58389158 on speech reception threshold (SRT; overall GERA meta-analysis p = 1.9x10-6). We also tested variants within exons of 132 other previously-identified hearing loss genes, and identified two common additional significant SNPs: rs2877561 (synonymous change in ILDR1, p = 6.2x10-5), which replicated in the UK Biobank (p = 0.00057), and had a significant GERA SRT (p = 0.00019) and speech discrimination score (SDS; p = 0.0019); and rs9493627 (missense change in EYA4, p = 0.00011) which replicated in the UK Biobank (p = 0.0095), other GERA groups (p = 0.0080), and had a consistent significant result for SRT (p = 0.041) and suggestive result for SDS (p = 0.081). Large cohorts with GWAS data and electronic health records may be a useful

  6. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  7. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  8. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  9. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  10. Hearing, Cognition, and Healthy Aging: Social and Public Health Implications of the Links between Age-Related Declines in Hearing and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen; Mick, Paul; Reed, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Sensory input provides the signals used by the brain when listeners understand speech and participate in social activities with other people in a range of everyday situations. When sensory inputs are diminished, there can be short-term consequences to brain functioning, and long-term deprivation can affect brain neuroplasticity. Indeed, the association between hearing loss and cognitive declines in older adults is supported by experimental and epidemiologic evidence, although the causal mechanisms remain unknown. These interactions of auditory and cognitive aging play out in the challenges confronted by people with age-related hearing problems when understanding speech and engaging in social interactions. In the present article, we use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Selective Optimization with Compensation models to highlight the importance of adopting a healthy aging perspective that focuses on facilitating active social participation by older adults. First, we examine epidemiologic evidence linking ARHL to cognitive declines and other health issues. Next, we examine how social factors influence and are influenced by auditory and cognitive aging and if they may provide a possible explanation for the association between ARHL and cognitive decline. Finally, we outline how audiologists could reposition hearing health care within the broader context of healthy aging. PMID:27516713

  11. Hearing, Cognition, and Healthy Aging: Social and Public Health Implications of the Links between Age-Related Declines in Hearing and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen; Mick, Paul; Reed, Marilyn

    2015-08-01

    Sensory input provides the signals used by the brain when listeners understand speech and participate in social activities with other people in a range of everyday situations. When sensory inputs are diminished, there can be short-term consequences to brain functioning, and long-term deprivation can affect brain neuroplasticity. Indeed, the association between hearing loss and cognitive declines in older adults is supported by experimental and epidemiologic evidence, although the causal mechanisms remain unknown. These interactions of auditory and cognitive aging play out in the challenges confronted by people with age-related hearing problems when understanding speech and engaging in social interactions. In the present article, we use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Selective Optimization with Compensation models to highlight the importance of adopting a healthy aging perspective that focuses on facilitating active social participation by older adults. First, we examine epidemiologic evidence linking ARHL to cognitive declines and other health issues. Next, we examine how social factors influence and are influenced by auditory and cognitive aging and if they may provide a possible explanation for the association between ARHL and cognitive decline. Finally, we outline how audiologists could reposition hearing health care within the broader context of healthy aging. PMID:27516713

  12. Hearing, Cognition, and Healthy Aging: Social and Public Health Implications of the Links between Age-Related Declines in Hearing and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen; Mick, Paul; Reed, Marilyn

    2015-08-01

    Sensory input provides the signals used by the brain when listeners understand speech and participate in social activities with other people in a range of everyday situations. When sensory inputs are diminished, there can be short-term consequences to brain functioning, and long-term deprivation can affect brain neuroplasticity. Indeed, the association between hearing loss and cognitive declines in older adults is supported by experimental and epidemiologic evidence, although the causal mechanisms remain unknown. These interactions of auditory and cognitive aging play out in the challenges confronted by people with age-related hearing problems when understanding speech and engaging in social interactions. In the present article, we use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Selective Optimization with Compensation models to highlight the importance of adopting a healthy aging perspective that focuses on facilitating active social participation by older adults. First, we examine epidemiologic evidence linking ARHL to cognitive declines and other health issues. Next, we examine how social factors influence and are influenced by auditory and cognitive aging and if they may provide a possible explanation for the association between ARHL and cognitive decline. Finally, we outline how audiologists could reposition hearing health care within the broader context of healthy aging.

  13. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2013-11-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors-hypertension and stroke-could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin-angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  14. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen AHR

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors—hypertension and stroke—could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin–angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  15. Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761® in the context of current developments in the diagnosis and treatment of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease: a research perspective.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Ihl, Ralf; Müller, Walter E

    2012-08-01

    In June 2011 a two-day expert meeting "The Ageing Brain" took place in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The main aim was to discuss the available preclinical and clinical data on Ginkgo biloba special extract EGb 761® in the context of current developments in the diagnosis and treatment of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. 19 dementia experts covering the disciplines bio- and neurochemistry, gerontology, neurology, pharmacology, and psychiatry from Australia, Asia, Europe and North America reviewed available preclinical and clinical data for EGb 761® and identified core topics for future research. Based on a wide range of preclinical effects demonstrated for Ginkgo biloba, EGb 761® can be conceptualized as a multi-target compound with activity on distinct pathophysiological pathways in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related cognitive decline. While symptomatic efficacy in dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been demonstrated, interpretation of data from dementia prevention trials is complicated by important methodological issues. Bridging pre-clinical research and clinical research as well as deciding on suitable study designs for future trials with EGb 761® remain important questions. The participants of the "Ageing Brain" meeting on Ginkgo biloba special extract EGb 761® concluded that there is plenty of promising data, both pre-clinical and clinical, to consider future research with the compound targeting cognitive impairment in old age as a worthwhile activity.

  16. Over the hill at 24: persistent age-related cognitive-motor decline in reaction times in an ecologically valid video game task begins in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph J; Blair, Mark R; Henrey, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Typically studies of the effects of aging on cognitive-motor performance emphasize changes in elderly populations. Although some research is directly concerned with when age-related decline actually begins, studies are often based on relatively simple reaction time tasks, making it impossible to gauge the impact of experience in compensating for this decline in a real world task. The present study investigates age-related changes in cognitive motor performance through adolescence and adulthood in a complex real world task, the real-time strategy video game StarCraft 2. In this paper we analyze the influence of age on performance using a dataset of 3,305 players, aged 16-44, collected by Thompson, Blair, Chen & Henrey [1]. Using a piecewise regression analysis, we find that age-related slowing of within-game, self-initiated response times begins at 24 years of age. We find no evidence for the common belief expertise should attenuate domain-specific cognitive decline. Domain-specific response time declines appear to persist regardless of skill level. A second analysis of dual-task performance finds no evidence of a corresponding age-related decline. Finally, an exploratory analyses of other age-related differences suggests that older participants may have been compensating for a loss in response speed through the use of game mechanics that reduce cognitive load.

  17. Over the Hill at 24: Persistent Age-Related Cognitive-Motor Decline in Reaction Times in an Ecologically Valid Video Game Task Begins in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph J.; Blair, Mark R.; Henrey, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Typically studies of the effects of aging on cognitive-motor performance emphasize changes in elderly populations. Although some research is directly concerned with when age-related decline actually begins, studies are often based on relatively simple reaction time tasks, making it impossible to gauge the impact of experience in compensating for this decline in a real world task. The present study investigates age-related changes in cognitive motor performance through adolescence and adulthood in a complex real world task, the real-time strategy video game StarCraft 2. In this paper we analyze the influence of age on performance using a dataset of 3,305 players, aged 16-44, collected by Thompson, Blair, Chen & Henrey [1]. Using a piecewise regression analysis, we find that age-related slowing of within-game, self-initiated response times begins at 24 years of age. We find no evidence for the common belief expertise should attenuate domain-specific cognitive decline. Domain-specific response time declines appear to persist regardless of skill level. A second analysis of dual-task performance finds no evidence of a corresponding age-related decline. Finally, an exploratory analyses of other age-related differences suggests that older participants may have been compensating for a loss in response speed through the use of game mechanics that reduce cognitive load. PMID:24718593

  18. Over the hill at 24: persistent age-related cognitive-motor decline in reaction times in an ecologically valid video game task begins in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph J; Blair, Mark R; Henrey, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Typically studies of the effects of aging on cognitive-motor performance emphasize changes in elderly populations. Although some research is directly concerned with when age-related decline actually begins, studies are often based on relatively simple reaction time tasks, making it impossible to gauge the impact of experience in compensating for this decline in a real world task. The present study investigates age-related changes in cognitive motor performance through adolescence and adulthood in a complex real world task, the real-time strategy video game StarCraft 2. In this paper we analyze the influence of age on performance using a dataset of 3,305 players, aged 16-44, collected by Thompson, Blair, Chen & Henrey [1]. Using a piecewise regression analysis, we find that age-related slowing of within-game, self-initiated response times begins at 24 years of age. We find no evidence for the common belief expertise should attenuate domain-specific cognitive decline. Domain-specific response time declines appear to persist regardless of skill level. A second analysis of dual-task performance finds no evidence of a corresponding age-related decline. Finally, an exploratory analyses of other age-related differences suggests that older participants may have been compensating for a loss in response speed through the use of game mechanics that reduce cognitive load. PMID:24718593

  19. Psychosocial Adaptation to Visual Impairment and Its Relationship to Depressive Affect in Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Jennifer; Hill, Robert D.; Kleinschmidt, Julia J.; Gregg, Charles H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examined psychosocial adaptation to vision loss and its relationship to depressive symptomatology in legally blind older adults with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Design and Methods: The 144 study participants were outpatients of a large regional vision clinic that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of…

  20. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Oh, M Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  1. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  2. Age-related changes in synaptic markers and monocyte subsets link the cognitive decline of APPSwe/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Naert, Gaëlle; Rivest, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive memory decline and numerous pathological abnormalities, including amyloid β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain and synaptic dysfunction. Here we wanted to study whether these brain changes were associated with alteration in the population of monocyte subsets since accumulating evidence supports the concept that the innate immune system plays a role in the etiology of this disease. We then determined the immune profile together with expression of genes encoding synaptic proteins and neurotrophins in APPSwe/PS1 mice and their age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates. We found that the progressive cognitive decline and the dramatic decrease in the expression of numerous synaptic markers and neurotrophins correlated with a major defect in the subset of circulating inflammatory monocytes. Indeed the number of CX3CR1lowLy6-ChighCCR2+Gr1+ monocytes remained essentially similar between 5 weeks and 6 months of age in APPSwe/PS1 mice, while these cells significantly increased in 6-month-old WT littermates. Of great interest is that the onset of cognitive decline was closely associated with the accumulation of soluble Aβ, disruption of synaptic activity, alteration in the BDNF system, and a defective production in the subset of CX3CR1lowLy6-ChighCCR2+Gr1+ monocytes. However, these memory impairments can be prevented or restored by boosting the monocytic production, using a short treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). In conclusion, low CCR2+ monocyte production by the hematopoietic system may be a direct biomarker of the cognitive decline in a context of AD. PMID:23125823

  3. Autophagy involving age-related cognitive behavior and hippocampus injury is modulated by different caloric intake in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Wang, Rong; Ma, Li-Na; Xu, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that different caloric intake may influence neuronal function. Excessive caloric intake associated with accelerated aging of the brain and increased the risk of neurodegenerative disorders. And low caloric intake (caloric restriction, CR) could delay aging, and protect the central nervous system from neurodegenerative disorders. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, thirty six-week-old male C57/BL male mice were randomly divided into three different dietary groups: normal control (NC) group (fed standard diet), CR group (fed low-caloric diet) and high-calorie (HC) group (fed high-caloric diet). After 10 months, spatial memory ability was determined by Morris water maze. Pathological changes of the hippocampus cells were detected with HE and Nissl staining. The expression of proteins involved in autophagy in the hippocampus was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The result of Morris water maze showed that the learning and memory capacity significantly increased in the CR group, and significantly decreased in the HC group. HE and Nissl staining showed cells damaged obviously in the HC group. The expression of mTOR and p62 was increased in the HC group, and decreased in the CR group. The expression of Beclin1, LC3 and cathepsin B was decreased in the HC group, and increased in the CR group. Our findings demonstrate that long-term high caloric intake is a risk factor that can significantly contribute to the development of neurological disease via suppressing autophagy, and CR may prevent age-related learning ability impairment via activating autophagy in mice. PMID:26380026

  4. Electronic reminding technology for cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mason, Sarah; Craig, David; O'Neill, Sonia; Donnelly, Mark; Nugent, Chris

    Demographic changes highlight the need to address disabilities associated with the costly morbidities of old age, such as dementia. Memory impairment associated with dementia represents a significant challenge for many older people. Difficulties occur in carrying out activities in their entirety or in commencing them at all. Technology has the potential to help individuals overcome the barriers created by cognitive disability in terms of performing activities of daily living and therefore help to maintain independence and enhance quality of life (Czaja, 2005). This literature review examines the current reported research, which employs electronic reminding technology to support individuals with cognitive impairment. These devices range from everyday technologies, such as phones, to sophisticated interactive devices with specifically designed software. A summary of the current evidence base is presented and recommendations for future practice are made.

  5. The concept of vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Bowler, J V

    2002-11-15

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is increasingly recognised to reflect an outmoded concept in that it identifies cases too late for preventive therapy to have an opportunity to prevent the development of dementia and uses a cognitive paradigm inappropriately based on Alzheimer's disease. A replacement is urgently required and a new concept, that of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), has been proposed to meet this need. It is imperative that criteria for VCI are developed on the basis of knowledge and data rather than supposition and assumption, as was the case for VaD. This review details the state of knowledge that we have now reached concerning the fundamental points of severity and cognitive paradigm and also covers a number of other imaging-related essential points embracing atrophy, leukoaraiosis, infarct volume and infarct location. Finally, the increasingly important concept of mixed dementia (co-existent Alzheimer's disease and VCI) is discussed.

  6. Neuropsychiatric impairments as predictors of mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Janet; Ritchie, Lesley J; Tuokko, Holly

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the relations between cognitive status and neuropsychiatric impairments in nondemented older adults in cross section and over time is examined. Using data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA), a longitudinal, nation-wide study in which data were collected 3 times (ie, CSHA-1, CSHA-2, CSHA-3) at 5-year intervals, individuals were classified with (n = 240) and without (n = 386) cognitive impairment at CSHA-2. Loss of interest, changes in personality and mood, and depression were reported by a knowledgeable informant (ie, family or friends) more frequently for those with cognitive impairment than for those without cognitive impairment. After controlling for initial cognitive status, loss of interest and depression contributed significantly to the prediction of mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease over time. These findings suggest that these neuropsychiatric impairments play significant roles throughout the course of cognitive decline and should be taken into consideration even before cognitive impairment is evident.

  7. Memory, executive, and multidomain subtle cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Bjerke, Maria; Chen, Kewei; Rozycki, Martin; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Arnold, Steven E.; Reiman, Eric M.; Davatzikos, Christos; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We studied the biomarker signatures and prognoses of 3 different subtle cognitive impairment (SCI) groups (executive, memory, and multidomain) as well as the subjective memory complaints (SMC) group. Methods: We studied 522 healthy controls in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Cutoffs for executive, memory, and multidomain SCI were defined using participants who remained cognitively normal (CN) for 7 years. CSF Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers, composite and region-of-interest (ROI) MRI, and fluorodeoxyglucose-PET measures were compared in these participants. Results: Using a stringent cutoff (fifth percentile), 27.6% of the ADNI participants were classified as SCI. Most single ROI or global-based measures were not sensitive to detect differences between groups. Only MRI-SPARE-AD (Spatial Pattern of Abnormalities for Recognition of Early AD), a quantitative MRI pattern-based global index, showed differences between all groups, excluding the executive SCI group. Atrophy patterns differed in memory SCI and SMC. The CN and the SMC groups presented a similar distribution of preclinical dementia stages. Fifty percent of the participants with executive, memory, and multidomain SCI progressed to mild cognitive impairment or dementia at 7, 5, and 2 years, respectively. Conclusions: Our results indicate that (1) the different SCI categories have different clinical prognoses and biomarker signatures, (2) longitudinally followed CN subjects are needed to establish clinical cutoffs, (3) subjects with SMC show a frontal pattern of brain atrophy, and (4) pattern-based analyses outperform commonly used single ROI-based neuroimaging biomarkers and are needed to detect initial stages of cognitive impairment. PMID:26085606

  8. Age-related changes in brain activity are specific for high order cognitive processes during successful encoding of information in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Pinal, Diego; Zurrón, Montserrat; Díaz, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Memory capacity suffers an age-related decline, which is supposed to be due to a generalized slowing of processing speed and to a reduced availability of processing resources. Information encoding in memory has been demonstrated to be very sensitive to age-related changes, especially when carried out through self-initiated strategies or under high cognitive demands. However, most event-related potentials (ERP) research on age-related changes in working memory (WM) has used tasks that preclude distinction between age-related changes in encoding and retrieval processes. Here, we used ERP recording and a delayed match to sample (DMS) task with two levels of memory load to assess age-related changes in electrical brain activity in young and old adults during successful information encoding in WM. Age-related decline was reflected in lower accuracy rates and longer reaction times in the DMS task. Beside, only old adults presented lower accuracy rates under high than low memory load conditions. However, effects of memory load on brain activity were independent of age and may indicate an increased need of processing after stimulus classification as reflected in larger mean voltages in high than low load conditions between 550 and 1000 ms post-stimulus for young and old adults. Regarding age-related effects on brain activity, results also revealed smaller P2 and P300 amplitudes that may signal the existence of an age dependent reduction in the processing resources available for stimulus evaluation and categorization. Additionally, P2 and N2 latencies were longer in old than in young participants. Furthermore, longer N2 latencies were related to greater accuracy rates on the DMS task, especially in old adults. These results suggest that age-related slowing of processing speed may be specific for target stimulus analysis and evaluation processes. Thus, old adults seem to improve their performance the longer they take to evaluate the stimulus they encode in visual WM. PMID

  9. Cognitive Impairment Involving Social Cognition in SPG4 Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Chamard, Ludivine; Ferreira, Sabrina; Pijoff, Alexa; Silvestre, Manon; Berger, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe cognitive assessment including social cognition in SPG4 patients. Methods. We reported a series of nine patients with SPG4 mutation with an extensive neuropsychological examination including social cognition assessment. Results. None of our patients presented with mental retardation or dementia. All presented with mild cognitive impairment with a high frequency of attention deficit (100%), executive disorders (89%), and social cognition impairment (78%). An asymptomatic patient for motor skills presented with the same cognitive profile. No correlation was found in this small sample between cognitive impairment and motor impairment, age at disease onset, or disease duration. Conclusions. SPG4 phenotypes share some cognitive features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cognitive disorders including executive disorders and social cognition impairment are frequent in SPG4 patients and might sometimes occur before motor disorders. Therefore, cognitive functions including social cognition should be systematically assessed in order to improve the clinical management of this population.

  10. Cognitive Impairment Involving Social Cognition in SPG4 Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Chamard, Ludivine; Ferreira, Sabrina; Pijoff, Alexa; Silvestre, Manon; Berger, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe cognitive assessment including social cognition in SPG4 patients. Methods. We reported a series of nine patients with SPG4 mutation with an extensive neuropsychological examination including social cognition assessment. Results. None of our patients presented with mental retardation or dementia. All presented with mild cognitive impairment with a high frequency of attention deficit (100%), executive disorders (89%), and social cognition impairment (78%). An asymptomatic patient for motor skills presented with the same cognitive profile. No correlation was found in this small sample between cognitive impairment and motor impairment, age at disease onset, or disease duration. Conclusions. SPG4 phenotypes share some cognitive features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cognitive disorders including executive disorders and social cognition impairment are frequent in SPG4 patients and might sometimes occur before motor disorders. Therefore, cognitive functions including social cognition should be systematically assessed in order to improve the clinical management of this population. PMID:27688599

  11. Cognitive impairment in methadone maintenance patients.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2002-06-01

    Few well-controlled studies have examined psychomotor and cognitive performance in methadone maintenance patients (MMP). In the present study, performance of 18 opioid-dependent MMP was evaluated relative to that of 21 control participants without substance abuse histories. The MMP and control groups were balanced with respect to gender, race, age, years of education, current employment status, current reading level, and estimated IQ score. Recent drug abstinence was verified by urine testing. Participants with a urine screen positive for benzodiazepines or a breathalyzer test positive for alcohol prior to performance testing were excluded. To avoid testing under conditions of acute heroin or cocaine intoxication, but without testing under conditions of acute withdrawal, participants with current use of heroin or cocaine were only required to abstain for 24 h prior to performance testing. MMP exhibited impairment relative to controls in psychomotor speed (digit symbol substitution and trail-making tests), working memory (two-back task), decision making (gambling task), and metamemory (confidence ratings on a recognition memory test); results also suggested possible impairment in inhibitory mechanisms (Stroop color-word paradigm). MMP did not exhibit impairment in time estimation, conceptual flexibility or long-term memory. The wide range of impaired functions is striking, and may have important implications for daily functioning in MMP. Further research is necessary to determine the clinical significance of the impairments in laboratory-based tests for daily performance in the natural environment, as well as to differentiate impairments due to acute methadone dosing, chronic methadone maintenance, chronic poly-drug abuse, and other factors. PMID:12062778

  12. Cognitive impairment in methadone maintenance patients.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2002-06-01

    Few well-controlled studies have examined psychomotor and cognitive performance in methadone maintenance patients (MMP). In the present study, performance of 18 opioid-dependent MMP was evaluated relative to that of 21 control participants without substance abuse histories. The MMP and control groups were balanced with respect to gender, race, age, years of education, current employment status, current reading level, and estimated IQ score. Recent drug abstinence was verified by urine testing. Participants with a urine screen positive for benzodiazepines or a breathalyzer test positive for alcohol prior to performance testing were excluded. To avoid testing under conditions of acute heroin or cocaine intoxication, but without testing under conditions of acute withdrawal, participants with current use of heroin or cocaine were only required to abstain for 24 h prior to performance testing. MMP exhibited impairment relative to controls in psychomotor speed (digit symbol substitution and trail-making tests), working memory (two-back task), decision making (gambling task), and metamemory (confidence ratings on a recognition memory test); results also suggested possible impairment in inhibitory mechanisms (Stroop color-word paradigm). MMP did not exhibit impairment in time estimation, conceptual flexibility or long-term memory. The wide range of impaired functions is striking, and may have important implications for daily functioning in MMP. Further research is necessary to determine the clinical significance of the impairments in laboratory-based tests for daily performance in the natural environment, as well as to differentiate impairments due to acute methadone dosing, chronic methadone maintenance, chronic poly-drug abuse, and other factors.

  13. Stress impairs cognitive flexibility in infants

    PubMed Central

    Seehagen, Sabine; Schneider, Silvia; Rudolph, Julia; Ernst, Stephanie; Zmyj, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    In human adults, learning and memory under acute stress are characterized by an increased use of rigid habitual response strategies at the cost of flexible cognitive strategies. The immediate effects of stress on cognitive functioning early in life are not well understood. Here we show experimentally that acute stress leads human infants to perform habitual behavior rigidly. We found that 15-mo-old infants exposed to stress thereafter kept performing a previously effective action, even after the action suddenly became ineffective. Infants in a no-stress control group flexibly adjusted their behavior by disengaging from the newly ineffective action in favor of exploring an alternative action. This finding demonstrates that stress impairs infants’ ability to adjust their behavior to changing circumstances. PMID:26417100

  14. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  15. Assessment of cognition in mild cognitive impairment: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J.; Jackson, Colleen E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Albert, Marilyn S.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer’s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come. PMID:21575877

  16. Serial position effects in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Diane B; Mattek, Nora; Seeyle, Adriana M; Dodge, Hiroko H; Wasserman, Dara; Zitzelberger, Tracy; Jeffrey, Kaye

    2011-03-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is often associated with the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Special scoring of word-list recall data for serial position has been suggested to improve discrimination of normal aging from dementia. We examined serial position effects in word-list recall for MCI participants compared to Alzheimer patients and controls. Individuals with MCI, like Alzheimer patients, had a diminished primacy effect in recalling words from a list. No alternative scoring system was better than standard scoring of word-list recall in distinguishing MCI patients from controls. Retention weighted scoring improved the discrimination of MCI and AD groups.

  17. Critical Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Age-Related Impairment in Ischemia-Induced Neovascularization by Regulating Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Yuen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate bone marrow microenvironment for stem and progenitor cells functions including self-renewal, differentiation, and cell senescence. In response to ischemia, ROS also play a critical role in mediating the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow to the sites of ischemic injury, which contributes to postnatal neovascularization. Aging is an unavoidable biological deteriorative process with a progressive decline in physiological functions. It is associated with increased oxidative stress and impaired ischemia-induced neovascularization. This review discusses the roles of ROS in regulating stem and progenitor cell function, highlighting the impact of unbalanced ROS levels on EPC dysfunction and the association with age-related impairment in ischemia-induced neovascularization. Furthermore, it discusses strategies that modulate the oxidative levels of stem and progenitor cells to enhance the therapeutic potential for elderly patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26697140

  18. Mild cognitive impairment: a concept in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ronald C.; Caracciolo, Barbara; Brayne, Carol; Gauthier, Serge; Jelic, Vesna; Fratiglioni, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The construct of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has evolved over the past 10 years since the publication of the new MCI definition at the Key Symposium in 2003, but the core criteria have remained unchanged. The construct has been extensively used worldwide, both in clinical and research settings, to define the grey area between intact cognitive functioning and clinical dementia. A rich set of data regarding occurrence, risk factors, and progression of MCI has been generated. Discrepancies between studies can be mostly explained by differences in the operationalization of the criteria, differences in the setting where the criteria have been applied, selection of subjects, and length of follow-up in longitudinal studies. Major controversial issues that remain to be further explored are: algorithmic versus clinical classification, reliability of clinical judgment, temporal changes in cognitive performances, and predictivity of putative biomarkers. Some suggestions to further develop the MCI construct include the tailoring of the clinical criteria to specific populations and to specific contexts. The addition of biomarkers to the clinical phenotypes is promising but requires deeper investigation. Translation of findings from the specialty clinic to the population setting, although challenging, will enhance uniformity of outcomes. More longitudinal population-based studies on cognitive aging and MCI need to be performed to clarify all these issues. PMID:24605806

  19. Isoflurane exposure during mid-adulthood attenuates age-related spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Diansan; Zhao, Yanxing; Xu, Huan; Wang, Beilei; Chen, Xuemei; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xiangrui

    2012-01-01

    Many in vitro findings suggest that isoflurane exposure might accelerate the process of Alzheimer Disease (AD); however, no behavioral evidence exists to support this theory. In the present study, we hypothesized that exposure of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to isoflurane during mid-adulthood, which is the pre-symptomatic phase of amyloid beta (Abeta) deposition, would alter the progression of AD. Seven-month-old Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed to 1.1% isoflurane for 2 hours per day for 5 days. Learning and memory ability was tested 48 hours and 5 months following isoflurane exposure using the Morris Water Maze and Y maze, respectively. Abeta deposition and oligomers in the hippocampus were measured by immunohistochemistry or Elisa 5 months following isoflurane exposure. We found that the performance of both the transgenic and wild-type mice in the Morris Water Maze significantly improved 48 hours following isoflurane exposure. The transgenic mice made significantly fewer discrimination errors in the Y maze following isoflurane exposure, and no differences were found between wild-type littermates 5 months following isoflurane exposure. For the transgenic mice, the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in the 5 months following isoflurane exposure. In summary, repeated isoflurane exposure during the pre-symptomatic phase not only improved spatial memory in both the APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice shortly after the exposure but also prevented age-related decline in learning and memory and attenuated the Abeta plaque and oligomers in the hippocampus of transgenic mice.

  20. Environmental enrichment improves age-related immune system impairment: long-term exposure since adulthood increases life span in mice.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Lorena; De Castro, Nuria M; Baeza, Isabel; Maté, Ianire; Viveros, Maria Paz; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2010-08-01

    Age-related changes in immunity have been shown to highly influence morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) (8-16 weeks) on several functions and oxidative stress parameters of peritoneal leukocytes, previously described as health and longevity markers, in mice at different ages, namely adult (44 +/- 4 weeks), old (69 +/- 4 weeks), and very old (92 +/- 4 weeks). Mortality rates were monitored in control and enriched animals, and effects on survival of long-term exposure to EE until natural death were determined. The results showed that exposure to EE was efficient in improving the function (i.e., macrophage chemotaxis and phagocytosis, lymphocyte chemotaxis and proliferation, natural killer cell activity, interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels) and decreasing the oxidative-inflammatory stress (i.e., lowered oxidized glutathione content, xanthine oxidase activity, expression of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 on CD4 and CD8 cells, and increased reduced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities) of immune cells. These positive effects of EE were especially remarkable in animals at older ages. Importantly, long-term exposure to EE from adult age and until natural death stands out as a useful strategy to extend longevity. Thus, the present work confirms the importance of maintaining active mental and/or physical activity aiming to improve quality of life in terms of immunity, and demonstrates that this active life must be initiated at early stages of the aging process and preserved until death to improve life span.

  1. Biological, psychological and clinical markers of caregiver's stress in impaired elderly with dementia and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bonati, P A; Pinelli, M; Borella, P; Tolve, I; Nigro, N

    2007-01-01

    Stress refers to the experience, produced through a person-environment transaction, that results in psychological or physiological distress. Everyday stress or hassles have a larger impact on health, in this frame caring for elderly disabled and/or demented persons have been shown to be a chronic role strain. The concept of stress and strain encompasses different levels of individual functioning (physiological, cognitive, affective, social). We studied whether 3 different distressing conditions show (i) different profiles in biological, psychological and clinical indices of stress, and (ii) different response to temporary environmental manipulation. A sample of 29 caregivers of elderly subjects temporarily institutionalized for (i) respite program, (ii) behavioral psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in dementia-control and, (iii) a rehabilitation program after hip fracture, was assessed with clinical, psychological and biological measures. The BPSD appear to be the most powerful distressing factor, both at the beginning and at the end of the study. On the whole, to an improvement of patient's clinical picture, it corresponds only a partial improvement in stress indices of the caregiver. The slope of biological indices don not parallel those of psychological ones. Among psychometric indices, the pattern of recovery differentiate affective and cognitive domains. The "respite" care condition seems to be the less effective in reducing stress in the caregivers. The stress process should be considered in its different domains to allow a tailored intervention.

  2. Neural correlates of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Eric; Perani, Daniela; Herholz, Karl; Marique, Patricia; Kalbe, Elke; Holthoff, Vjera; Delbeuck, Xavier; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Pelati, Oriana; Lespagnard, Solange; Collette, Fabienne; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2006-07-01

    We explored the neural substrate of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hundred nine patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers assessed patients' cognitive impairment by answering a structured questionnaire. Subjects rated 13 cognitive domains as not impaired or associated with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe difficulties, and a sum score was calculated. Two measures of anosognosia were derived. A patient's self assessment, unconfounded by objective measurements of cognitive deficits such as dementia severity and episodic memory impairment, provided an estimate of impaired self-evaluative judgment about cognition in AD. Impaired self-evaluation was related to a decrease in brain metabolism measured with 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in orbital prefrontal cortex and in medial temporal structures. In a cognitive model of anosognosia, medial temporal dysfunction might impair a comparison mechanism between current information on cognition and personal knowledge. Hypoactivity in orbitofrontal cortex may not allow AD patients to update the qualitative judgment associated with their impaired cognitive abilities. Caregivers perceived greater cognitive impairments than patients did. The discrepancy score between caregiver's and patient's evaluations, an other measure of anosognosia, was negatively related to metabolic activity located in the temporoparietal junction, consistent with an impairment of self-referential processes and perspective taking in AD. PMID:16247783

  3. The Experience of Cognitive Impairment in People with Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wood, Helen; Cupitt, Caroline; Lavender, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment has been widely studied in people with psychosis. However, research is lacking into the subjective experience of cognitive impairment, its impact and ways in which individuals cope. This study aimed to provide an account of the experience of cognitive impairment in people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, including what difficulties people experience, how these difficulties are understood, how people respond to these difficulties and how they perceive others' views of these difficulties. A semi-structured interview was carried out with eight participants with a diagnosis of schizophrenia focusing on participants' experiences of difficulties with cognitive functioning. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. Experience of cognitive impairment was understood in terms of six master themes: impaired controlled thinking, physical sensations and impaired movement, explanations for the impairment and comparisons to the past, managing the impairment, how others see the impairment and anticipating the future. This study is the first rigorous qualitative study of the subjective experience of cognitive impairment in people with psychosis, and it provides greater context for empirical findings. The results have significant implications for clinical psychology, including education about cognitive difficulties and the importance of cognitive functioning to formulation. New areas for research include coping strategies in relation to functioning and future perspectives, ascertaining staff understanding of cognitive impairment, and reflective conversation style as an intervention for metacognitive difficulties. Key Practitioner Message Difficulties with cognitive functioning should be considered in clinical practitioners' formulations of clients' difficulties in the context of psychosis. Services should consider providing service user and carer education about cognitive impairment in psychosis. Staff may need further

  4. Behavioral symptoms related to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Carol; Serrano, Cecilia M; Castro, Diego; Leguizamón, Patricio Perez; Heisecke, Silvina L; Taragano, Fernando E

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are core features of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. On one hand, behavioral symptoms in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can indicate an increased risk of progressing to dementia. On the other hand, mild behavioral impairment (MBI) in patients who usually have normal cognition indicates an increased risk of developing dementia. Whatever the cause, all dementias carry a high rate of NPI. These symptoms can be observed at any stage of the disease, may fluctuate over its course, are a leading cause of stress and overload for caregivers, and increase rates of hospitalization and early institutionalization for patients with dementia. The clinician should be able to promptly recognize NPI through the use of instruments capable of measuring their frequency and severity to support diagnosis, and to help monitor the treatment of behavioral symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe and update the construct ‘MBI’ and to revise the reported NPS related to prodromal stages of dementia (MCI and MBI) and dementia stages of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PMID:24092982

  5. Cognitive complaint in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Clément, Francis; Belleville, Sylvie; Gauthier, Serge

    2008-03-01

    Whereas the presence of a subjective memory complaint is a central criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), little work has been done to empirically measure its nature and severity. The Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (QAM) assessed memory complaints relative to 10 domains of concrete activities of daily life in 68 persons with MCI, 26 persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 81 healthy older adults. In addition, a neuropsychological battery was administered to assess whether subjective complaints were linked to actual cognitive performance. The findings indicate that individuals with MCI report more memory complaints than controls for a range of specific materials/circumstances. MCI and AD individuals did not differ in their level of memory complaints. Correlational analyses indicated that a higher level of memory complaints relative to conversations and to movies and books were associated with a higher level of objective cognitive deficits in persons with MCI but not in AD. Furthermore, complaints increased in parallel with global cognitive deficits in MCI. These results suggest that persons with MCI report more memory complaints than healthy older controls, but only in specific domains and circumstances, and that anosognosia is more characteristic of the demented than of the MCI phase of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. At what level of heat load are age-related impairments in the ability to dissipate heat evident in females?

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jill M; Poirier, Martin P; Flouris, Andreas D; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Malcolm, Janine; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Studies have reported that older females have impaired heat loss responses during work in the heat compared to young females. However, it remains unclear at what level of heat stress these differences occur. Therefore, we examined whole-body heat loss [evaporative (HE) and dry heat loss, via direct calorimetry] and changes in body heat storage (∆Hb, via direct and indirect calorimetry) in 10 young (23±4 years) and 10 older (58±5 years) females matched for body surface area and aerobic fitness (VO2peak) during three 30-min exercise bouts performed at incremental rates of metabolic heat production of 250 (Ex1), 325 (Ex2) and 400 (Ex3) W in the heat (40°C, 15% relative humidity). Exercise bouts were separated by 15 min of recovery. Since dry heat gain was similar between young and older females during exercise (p=0.52) and recovery (p=0.42), differences in whole-body heat loss were solely due to HE. Our results show that older females had a significantly lower HE at the end of Ex2 (young: 383±34 W; older: 343±39 W, p=0.04) and Ex3 (young: 437±36 W; older: 389±29 W, p=0.008), however no difference was measured at the end of Ex1 (p=0.24). Also, the magnitude of difference in the maximal level of HE achieved between the young and older females became greater with increasing heat loads (Ex1=10.2%, Ex2=11.6% and Ex3=12.4%). Furthermore, a significantly greater ∆Hb was measured for all heat loads for the older females (Ex1: 178±44 kJ; Ex2: 151±38 kJ; Ex3: 216±25 kJ, p=0.002) relative to the younger females (Ex1: 127±35 kJ; Ex2: 96±45 kJ; Ex3: 146±46 kJ). In contrast, no differences in HE or ∆Hb were observed during recovery (p>0.05). We show that older habitually active females have an impaired capacity to dissipate heat compared to young females during exercise-induced heat loads of ≥325 W when performed in the heat.

  7. Impaired Transcriptional Activity of Nrf2 in Age-Related Myocardial Oxidative Stress Is Reversible by Moderate Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Sellamuthu S.; Kannan, Sankaranarayanan; Devadoss, Dinesh; Miller, Corey J.; Whitehead, Kevin S.; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Paine, Robert; Hoidal, John R.; Abel, E. Dale; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.

    2012-01-01

    Aging promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in cardiomyocytes, which leads to contractile dysfunction and cardiac abnormalities. These changes may contribute to increased cardiovascular disease in the elderly. Inducible antioxidant pathways are regulated by nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) through antioxidant response cis-elements (AREs) and are impaired in the aging heart. Whereas acute exercise stress (AES) activates Nrf2 signaling and promotes myocardial antioxidant function in young mice (∼2 months), aging mouse (>23 months) hearts exhibit significant oxidative stress as compared to those of the young. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-dependent regulation of Nrf2-antioxidant mechanisms and redox homeostasis in mouse hearts and the impact of exercise. Old mice were highly susceptible to oxidative stress following high endurance exercise stress (EES), but demonstrated increased adaptive redox homeostasis after moderate exercise training (MET; 10m/min, for 45 min/day) for ∼6 weeks. Following EES, transcription and protein levels for most of the ARE-antioxidants were increased in young mice but their induction was blunted in aging mice. In contrast, 6-weeks of chronic MET promoted nuclear levels of Nrf2 along with its target antioxidants in the aging heart to near normal levels as seen in young mice. These observations suggest that enhancing Nrf2 function and endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms by MET, may combat age-induced ROS/RNS and protect the myocardium from oxidative stress diseases. PMID:23029187

  8. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Pathology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, Elliott J.; Binder, Lester; Counts, Scott E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; deTolledo-Morrell, Leyla; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Perez, Sylvia E.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is rapidly becoming one of the most common clinical manifestations affecting the elderly. The pathologic and molecular substrate of people diagnosed with MCI is not well established. Since MCI is a human specific disorder and neither the clinical nor the neuropathological course appears to follows a direct linear path, it is imperative to characterize neuropathology changes in the brains of people who came to autopsy with a well-characterized clinical diagnosis of MCI. Herein, we discuss findings derived from clinical pathologic studies of autopsy cases with various subtypes of MCI antemortem. The heterogeneity of clinical MCI imparts significant challenges to any review of this subject. The pathologic substrate of MCI is equally complex and must take into account not only conventional plaque and tangle pathology but also a wide range of cellular biochemical and molecular deficits many of which relate to cognitive decline as well as compensatory responses to the progressive disease process. The multifaceted nature of the neuronal disconnection syndrome associated with MCI, suggests that there is no single event, which precipitates this prodromal stage of AD. In fact, it can be argued that neuronal degeneration initiated at different levels of the central nervous system drive cognitive decline as a final common pathway at this stage of the dementing disease process. PMID:22101321

  9. Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) Associated with GJB2 Single Mutation IVS1+1G>A in the Yakut Population Isolate in Eastern Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Pshennikova, Vera G.; Solovyev, Aisen V.; Klarov, Leonid A.; Solovyeva, Natalya A.; Kozhevnikov, Andrei A.; Vasilyeva, Lena M.; Fedotova, Elvira E.; Pak, Maria V.; Lekhanova, Sargylana N.; Zakharova, Elena V.; Savvinova, Kyunney E.; Gotovtsev, Nyurgun N.; Rafailo, Adyum M.; Luginov, Nikolay V.; Alexeev, Anatoliy N.; Posukh, Olga L.; Dzhemileva, Lilya U.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Fedorova, Sardana A.

    2014-01-01

    Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) is one of the frequent sensory disorders registered in 50% of individuals over 80 years. ARHI is a multifactorial disorder due to environmental and poor-known genetic components. In this study, we present the data on age-related hearing impairment of 48 heterozygous carriers of mutation IVS1+1G>A (GJB2 gene) and 97 subjects with GJB2 genotype wt/wt in the Republic of Sakha/Yakutia (Eastern Siberia, Russia). This subarctic territory was found as the region with the most extensive accumulation of mutation IVS1+1G>A in the world as a result of founder effect in the unique Yakut population isolate. The GJB2 gene resequencing and detailed audiological analysis in the frequency range 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 kHz were performed in all examined subjects that allowed to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations between the presence of single mutation IVS1+1G>A and hearing of subjects from examined groups. We revealed the linear correlation between increase of average hearing thresholds at speech frequencies (PTA0.5,1.0,2.0,4.0 kHz) and age of individuals with GJB2 genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (rs = 0.499, p = 0.006860 for males and rs = 0.427, p = 0.000277 for females). Moreover, the average hearing thresholds on high frequency (8.0 kHz) in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (both sexes) were significantly worse than in individuals with genotype wt/wt (p<0.05). Age of hearing loss manifestation in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt was estimated to be ∼40 years (rs = 0.504, p = 0.003). These findings demonstrate that the single IVS1+1G>A mutation (GJB2) is associated with age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) of the IVS1+1G>A carriers in the Yakuts. PMID:24959830

  10. Thalamic Shape and Cognitive Performance in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Lee, Chang-Uk; Won, Wang Yeon; Joo, Soo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate thalamic shape alterations and their relationships with various episodic memory impairments in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Methods We compared volumes and morphological alterations of the thalamus between aMCI subjects and healthy controls. In addition, we investigated the correlation between thalamic deformations and various memory impairments in aMCI subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results The normalized left thalamic volumes of the aMCI group were significantly smaller than those of the healthy control group (p<0.0001). aMCI subjects exhibited significant thalamic deformations in the left thalamic dorso-medial and antero-medial areas compared with healthy individuals. CERAD-K Word List Memory scores were significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in aMCI subjects. There were no significant correlations between verbal fluency, Boston naming test, constructional praxis, Word List Recognition, and Visuospatial Recall scores and thalamic shape in aMCI subjects. Verbal delayed recall scores were also significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in the aMCI group. Conclusion Structural alterations in the thalamic deformations in the left dorso-medial and antero-medial areas might be core underlying neurobiological mechanisms of thalamic dysfunction related to Word List Memory and delayed verbal recall in individuals with aMCI. PMID:27757128

  11. Neuropsychological evidence of impaired cognitive empathy in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Harari, Hagai; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    The empathic abilities have never been examined in bipolar disorder patients, despite frequent observations of impaired social behavior. To examine the neuropsychological processes that underlie the affective and cognitive empathic ability in bipolar disorder, the authors compared affective and cognitive empathic abilities, as well as theory of mind and executive functions, of euthymic bipolar disorder patients and healthy comparison subjects. Significant deficits in cognitive empathy and theory of mind were observed, while affective empathy was elevated in bipolar disorder. Patients showed impaired cognitive flexibility (shifting and reversal learning) but intact planning behavior. Impaired cognitive empathy was related with performance in neurocognitive tasks of cognitive flexibility, suggesting that prefrontal cortical dysfunction may account for impaired cognitive empathy in bipolar disorder. PMID:19359453

  12. Chronic social stress during adolescence induces cognitive impairment in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Sterlemann, Vera; Rammes, Gerhard; Wolf, Miriam; Liebl, Claudia; Ganea, Karin; Müller, Marianne B; Schmidt, Mathias V

    2010-04-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is one of the major aspects that impede successful aging in humans. Environmental factors, such as chronic stress, can accelerate or aggravate cognitive deficits during aging. While there is abundant evidence that chronic stress directly affects cognitive performance, the lasting consequences of stress exposures during vulnerable developmental time windows are largely unknown. This is especially true for the adolescent period, which is critical in terms of physical, sexual, and behavioral maturation. Here we used chronic social stress during adolescence in male mice and investigated the consequences of this treatment on cognitive performance during aging. We observed a substantial impairment of spatial memory, but not other memory domains, 12 months after the end of the stress period. This hippocampus-dependent cognitive dysfunction was supported by concomitant impairment in LTP induction in CA1 neurons in 15-month-old animals. Further, we observed a decrease of hippocampal BDNF mRNA and synaptophysin immunoreactivity, suggesting plasticity and structural alterations in formerly stressed mice. Finally, we identified expression changes of specific neurotransmitter subunits critically involved in learning and memory, specifically the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B. Taken together, our results identify possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment during aging, demonstrating the detrimental impact of stress during adolescence on hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in aged mice. PMID:19489003

  13. Religiosity is negatively associated with later-life intelligence, but not with age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Stuart J; Gow, Alan J; Deary, Ian J

    2014-09-01

    A well-replicated finding in the psychological literature is the negative correlation between religiosity and intelligence. However, several studies also conclude that one form of religiosity, church attendance, is protective against later-life cognitive decline. No effects of religious belief per se on cognitive decline have been found, potentially due to the restricted measures of belief used in previous studies. Here, we examined the associations between religiosity, intelligence, and cognitive change in a cohort of individuals (initial n = 550) with high-quality measures of religious belief taken at age 83 and multiple cognitive measures taken in childhood and at four waves between age 79 and 90. We found that religious belief, but not attendance, was negatively related to intelligence. The effect size was smaller than in previous studies of younger participants. Longitudinal analyses showed no effect of either religious belief or attendance on cognitive change either from childhood to old age, or across the ninth decade of life. We discuss differences between our cohort and those in previous studies - including in age and location - that may have led to our non-replication of the association between religious attendance and cognitive decline.

  14. Pain reporting in older adults: the influence of cognitive impairment – results from the Cambridge City >75 Cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Docking, Rachael E; Fleming, Jane; Brayne, Carol; Zhao, Jun; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Evidence suggests that while disabling back pain (BP), and rheumatic diseases associated with pain, continues to increase with age, the prevalence of non-disabling BP reaches a plateau, or even decreases, in the oldest old. This study aimed to determine whether this age-related pattern of non-disabling BP is a function of increasing cognitive impairment. Methods: Cross-sectional study of adults aged >77 years. Participants answered interviewer-administered questions on BP and cognitive function, assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination, categorised into normal versus mild, moderate or severe impairment. The relationship between cognitive function and BP was examined using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and residence. Results: Of 1174 participants with BP data, 1126 (96%) completed cognitive assessments. The relationship between cognitive function and BP differed for disabling and non-disabling BP. Across categories of cognitive impairment, increasingly higher prevalence of disabling BP was reported, compared to those with normal cognition, although this was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.7–4.6). No association was found between cognitive function and non-disabling BP (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.4–1.6). Conclusion: This study found no association between the reporting of BP and level of cognitive impairment, suggesting that increasing cognitive impairment is an inadequate explanation for age-related decline in self-reported non-disabling BP. Future research should determine the reasons for the decline in non-disabling pain in older adults, although, meanwhile, it is important to ensure that this group receive appropriate pain assessment and pain management. Key points Prevalence of non-disabling back pain decreases in the oldest old. Some have proposed that this may be a function of cognitive impairment in older age, and an increasing inability to adequately report pain

  15. B-vitamin deficiency causes hyperhomocysteinemia and vascular cognitive impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Troen, Aron M; Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Smith, Donald E; Selhub, Jacob; Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2008-08-26

    In older adults, mildly elevated plasma total homocysteine (hyperhomocysteinemia) is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease, but it is uncertain whether this is due to underlying metabolic, neurotoxic, or vascular processes. We report here that feeding male C57BL6/J mice a B-vitamin-deficient diet for 10 weeks induced hyperhomocysteinemia, significantly impaired spatial learning and memory, and caused a significant rarefaction of hippocampal microvasculature without concomitant gliosis and neurodegeneration. Total hippocampal capillary length was inversely correlated with Morris water maze escape latencies (r = -0.757, P < 0.001), and with plasma total homocysteine (r = -0.631, P = 0.007). Feeding mice a methionine-rich diet produced similar but less pronounced effects. Our findings suggest that cerebral microvascular rarefaction can cause cognitive dysfunction in the absence of or preceding neurodegeneration. Similar microvascular changes may mediate the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with human age-related cognitive decline.

  16. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  17. Parental Cognitive Impairment and Child Maltreatment in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, David; Feldman, Maurice; Aunos, Marjorie; Prasad, Narasimha

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of parental cognitive impairment in cases opened for child maltreatment investigation in Canada, and to examine the relationship between parental cognitive impairment and maltreatment investigation outcomes including substantiation, case disposition and court application. Methods:…

  18. Mnemonic Strategy Instruction for Beginning Readers with Cognitive Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rivka

    2013-01-01

    Many students with cognitive impairments are not afforded the opportunity to develop their potential as readers. A review of the literature reveals that few researchers have evaluated the effects of phonics instruction on the reading skills of students with cognitive impairments. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a…

  19. Selective Impairment of Auditory Selective Attention under Concurrent Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, Kerstin; Stahl, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Load theory predicts that concurrent cognitive load impairs selective attention. For visual stimuli, it has been shown that this impairment can be selective: Distraction was specifically increased when the stimulus material used in the cognitive load task matches that of the selective attention task. Here, we report four experiments that…

  20. Multimorbidity and Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Vassilaki, Maria; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Cha, Ruth H.; Kremers, Walter K.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Machulda, Mary M.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Roberts, Rosebud O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the association of multiple chronic conditions with risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/dementia. DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING Olmsted County, Minnesota. PARTICIPANTS Cognitively normal individuals (N=2,176) enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA). MEASUREMENTS Participants were randomly selected from the community and evaluated by a study coordinator, a physician, and underwent neuropsychometric testing at baseline and at 15-month intervals to assess diagnoses of MCI and dementia. We electronically captured information on International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) codes for chronic conditions in the five years prior to enrollment using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system. We defined multimorbidity as having two or more chronic conditions and examined the association of multimorbidity with MCI/dementia using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS Among 2,176 cognitively normal participants (mean [±SD] age 78.5 [±5.2] years; 50.6% men), 1,884 (86.6%) had multimorbidity. The risk of MCI/dementia was elevated in persons with multimorbidity (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.82). The HR was stronger in persons with ≥4 conditions (HR: 1.61; 95%CI, 1.21–2.13) compared to persons with only 0 or 1 conditions, and for men (HR: 1.53, 95% CI, 1.01– 2.31) than for women (HR: 1.20, 95% CI, 0.83– 1.74). CONCLUSION In older adults, having multiple chronic conditions is associated with an increased risk of MCI/dementia. This is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple etiologies may contribute to MCI and late-life dementia. Preventing chronic diseases may be beneficial in delaying or preventing MCI or dementia. PMID:26311270

  1. Cognitive Impairment in CKD: Keep Vascular Disease in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Drew, David A; Weiner, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a major cause of morbidity in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with lower quality of life, more difficulty adhering to medications, and worse survival. Prior data suggest a relationship between vascular disease and cognitive impairment in individuals with CKD, although overall risk factors remain poorly understood. Critically, clinicians should be aware of the high rates of cognitive impairment that occur in all stages of CKD, which, although sometimes subtle, may impact comprehension and decision making in these individuals and may herald future, more debilitating impairment. PMID:24583984

  2. Age-related cognitive decline and electroencephalogram slowing in Down's syndrome as a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Partanen, J; Jousmäki, V; Helkala, E L; Vanhanen, M; Majuri, S; Kaski, M; Hartikainen, P; Riekkinen, P

    1993-03-01

    We studied quantitative electroencephalogram and neuropsychological performance in an aging series of 31 patients with Down's syndrome and compared the findings with those of 36 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and age-matched controls. We found an age-related decline of cortical functions and slowing of the electroencephalogram in Down's syndrome patients aged from 20 to 60 years. Slowing of the electroencephalogram, i.e. the decrease of the peak frequency, was significantly related to Mini-Mental status scores, and visual, praxic and speech functions, as well as memory in the Down patients, similar to the Alzheimer patients. Similar correlations were not demonstrated for young or elderly controls. This study provides neuropsychological and electrophysiological data to suggest that studying Down's syndrome patients of different ages can serve as a model for progression of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:8469312

  3. Age-Related Changes in Electrophysiological and Neuropsychological Indices of Working Memory, Attention Control, and Cognitive Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Carrie Brumback; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Older adults exhibit great variability in their cognitive abilities, with some maintaining high levels of performance on executive control tasks and others showing significant deficits. Previous event-related potential (ERP) work has shown that some of these performance differences are correlated with persistence of the novelty/frontal P3 in older adults elicited by task-relevant events, presumably reflecting variability in the capacity to suppress orienting to unexpected but no longer novel events. In recent ERP work in young adults, we showed that the operation-span (OSPAN) task (a measure of attention control) is predictive of the ability of individuals to keep track of stimulus sequencing and to maintain running mental representations of task stimuli, as indexed by the parietally distributed P300 (or P3b). Both of these phenomena reflect aspects of frontal function (cognitive flexibility and attention control, respectively). To investigate these phenomena we sorted both younger and older adults into low- and high-working memory spans and low- and high-cognitive flexibility subgroups, and examined ERPs during an equal-probability choice reaction time task. For both age groups (a) participants with high OSPAN scores were better able to keep track of stimulus sequencing, as indicated by their smaller P3b to sequential changes; and (b) participants with lower cognitive flexibility had larger P3a than their high-scoring counterparts. However, these two phenomena did not interact suggesting that they manifest dissociable control mechanisms. Further, the fact that both effects are already visible in younger adults suggests that at least some of the brain mechanisms underlying individual differences in cognitive aging may already operate early in life. PMID:21887150

  4. Age-related deficits in skeletal muscle recovery following disuse are associated with neuromuscular junction instability and ER stress, not impaired protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Leslie M.; West, Daniel W.D.; Marcotte, George; Marshall, Andrea G.; De Sousa, Luis Gustavo; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass and strength can be accelerated by impaired recovery of muscle mass following a transient atrophic stimulus. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms underlying the attenuated recovery of muscle mass and strength in old rats following disuse-induced atrophy. Adult (9 month) and old (29 month) male F344BN rats underwent hindlimb unloading (HU) followed by reloading. HU induced significant atrophy of the hindlimb muscles in both adult (17-38%) and old (8-29%) rats, but only the adult rats exhibited full recovery of muscle mass and strength upon reloading. Upon reloading, total RNA and protein synthesis increased to a similar extent in adult and old muscles. At baseline and upon reloading, however, proteasome-mediated degradation was suppressed leading to an accumulation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins and p62. Further, ER stress, as measured by CHOP expression, was elevated at baseline and upon reloading in old rats. Analysis of mRNA expression revealed increases in HDAC4, Runx1, myogenin, Gadd45a, and the AChRs in old rats, suggesting neuromuscular junction instability/denervation. Collectively, our data suggests that with aging, impaired neuromuscular transmission and deficits in the proteostasis network contribute to defects in muscle fiber remodeling and functional recovery of muscle mass and strength. PMID:26826670

  5. Expression levels of the BAK1 and BCL2 genes highlight the role of apoptosis in age-related hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Masoumeh; Najafi, Mohammad; Houshmand, Massoud; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a progressive and a common sensory disorder in the elderly and will become an increasingly important clinical problem given the growing elderly population. Apoptosis of cochlear cells is an important factor in animal models of ARHI. As these cells cannot regenerate, their loss leads to irreversible hearing impairment. Identification of molecular mechanisms can facilitate disease prevention and effective treatment. In this study, we compared the expression of the genes BAK1 and BCL2 as two arms of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway between patients with ARHI and healthy subjects. ARHI and healthy subjects were selected after an ear nose throat examination, otoscopic investigation, and pure tone audiometry. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples, and relative gene expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. BAK1 and the BAK1/BCL2 ratio were statistically significantly upregulated in the ARHI subjects. The BAK1/BCL2 ratio was positively correlated with the results of the audiometric tests. Our results indicate that BAK-mediated apoptosis may be a core mechanism in the progression of ARHI in humans, similar to finding in animal models. Moreover, the gene expression changes in peripheral blood samples could be used as a rapid and simple biomarker for early detection of ARHI. PMID:27555755

  6. Expression levels of the BAK1 and BCL2 genes highlight the role of apoptosis in age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Falah, Masoumeh; Najafi, Mohammad; Houshmand, Massoud; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a progressive and a common sensory disorder in the elderly and will become an increasingly important clinical problem given the growing elderly population. Apoptosis of cochlear cells is an important factor in animal models of ARHI. As these cells cannot regenerate, their loss leads to irreversible hearing impairment. Identification of molecular mechanisms can facilitate disease prevention and effective treatment. In this study, we compared the expression of the genes BAK1 and BCL2 as two arms of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway between patients with ARHI and healthy subjects. ARHI and healthy subjects were selected after an ear nose throat examination, otoscopic investigation, and pure tone audiometry. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples, and relative gene expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. BAK1 and the BAK1/BCL2 ratio were statistically significantly upregulated in the ARHI subjects. The BAK1/BCL2 ratio was positively correlated with the results of the audiometric tests. Our results indicate that BAK-mediated apoptosis may be a core mechanism in the progression of ARHI in humans, similar to finding in animal models. Moreover, the gene expression changes in peripheral blood samples could be used as a rapid and simple biomarker for early detection of ARHI. PMID:27555755

  7. [New insights into the underestimated impairment of quality of life in age-related macular degeneration - a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Ruesenberg, B; Richard, G

    2010-08-01

    Different forms of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can lead to massive visual impairment up to blindness. Therefore, AMD has a high impact on patients' daily life and causes restrictions of their psychological well-being, autonomy and mobility. These restrictions influence their quality of life. It is difficult to define the term "quality of life". It consists of different aspects that can be measured with psychometric tests. Besides the general health status and the psychological well-being, the vision-specific functional status plays a central role for determining the quality of life of AMD patients. To compare the impact of different diseases on the quality of life, the utility analysis has been developed. It demonstrates the relevance of AMD for patients and shows that its impact on patients' life is comparable to those of other systemic diseases like carcinoma or HIV. The impairment of patients' quality of life by AMD is often underestimated by their attending ophthalmologists. Different medical treatments have influenced the quality of life of AMD patients. However, there is still a large group that cannot be treated. These patients benefit from rehabilitation with low vision aids or psychosocial interventions. Further clinical trials at a high evidence level using valid and comparable psychometric tests are necessary to improve the therapy for and the rehabilitation of AMD patients and to increase their quality of life.

  8. Age-related deficits in skeletal muscle recovery following disuse are associated with neuromuscular junction instability and ER stress, not impaired protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Baehr, Leslie M; West, Daniel W D; Marcotte, George; Marshall, Andrea G; De Sousa, Luis Gustavo; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass and strength can be accelerated by impaired recovery of muscle mass following a transient atrophic stimulus. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms underlying the attenuated recovery of muscle mass and strength in old rats following disuse-induced atrophy. Adult (9 month) and old (29 month) male F344BN rats underwent hindlimb unloading (HU) followed by reloading. HU induced significant atrophy of the hindlimb muscles in both adult (17-38%) and old (8-29%) rats, but only the adult rats exhibited full recovery of muscle mass and strength upon reloading. Upon reloading, total RNA and protein synthesis increased to a similar extent in adult and old muscles. At baseline and upon reloading, however, proteasome-mediated degradation was suppressed leading to an accumulation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins and p62. Further, ER stress, as measured by CHOP expression, was elevated at baseline and upon reloading in old rats. Analysis of mRNA expression revealed increases in HDAC4, Runx1, myogenin, Gadd45a, and the AChRs in old rats, suggesting neuromuscular junction instability/denervation. Collectively, our data suggests that with aging, impaired neuromuscular transmission and deficits in the proteostasis network contribute to defects in muscle fiber remodeling and functional recovery of muscle mass and strength.

  9. Sarcopenia and impairment in cognitive and physical performance

    PubMed Central

    Tolea, Magdalena I; Galvin, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether older adults with sarcopenia who underperform controls on tests of physical performance and cognition also have a higher likelihood of combined cognitive-physical impairment is not clear. We assessed the impact of sarcopenia on impairment in both aspects of functionality and the relative contribution of its components, muscle mass and strength. Methods Two hundred and twenty-three community-dwelling adults aged 40 years and older (mean age =68.1±10.6 years; 65% female) were recruited and underwent physical functionality, anthropometry, and cognitive testing. Participants with low muscle mass were categorized as pre-sarcopenic; those with low muscle mass and muscle strength as sarcopenic; those with higher muscle mass and low muscle strength only were categorized as non-sarcopenic and were compared on risk of cognitive impairment (Montreal Cognitive Assessment <26; Ascertaining Dementia 8 ≥2), physical impairment (Mini Physical Performance Test <12), both, or neither by ordinal logistic regression. Results Compared to controls, those with sarcopenia were six times more likely to have combined cognitive impairment/physical impairment with a fully adjusted model showing a three-fold increased odds ratio. The results were consistent across different measures of global cognition (odds ratio =3.46, 95% confidence interval =1.07–11.45 for the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; odds ratio =3.61, 95% confidence interval =1.11–11.72 for Ascertaining Dementia 8). Pre-sarcopenic participants were not different from controls. The effect of sarcopenia on cognition is related to low muscle strength rather than low muscle mass. Conclusion Individuals with sarcopenia are not only more likely to have single but also to have dual impairment in cognitive and physical function. Interventions designed to prevent sarcopenia and improve muscle strength may help reduce the burden of cognitive and physical impairments of functionality in community-dwelling seniors

  10. Age-related impairments in skeletal muscle PDH phosphorylation and plasma lactate are indicative of metabolic inflexibility and the effects of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Consitt, Leslie A; Saxena, Gunjan; Saneda, Alicson; Houmard, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether plasma lactate and skeletal muscle glucose regulatory pathways, specifically PDH dephosphorylation, are impaired during hyperinsulinemic conditions in middle- to older-aged individuals and determine whether exercise training could improve key variables responsible for skeletal muscle PDH regulation. Eighteen young (19-29 yr; n = 9 males and 9 females) and 20 middle- to older-aged (57-82 yr; n = 10 males and 10 females) individuals underwent a 2-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 50, 90, and 120 min for analysis of lactate, and skeletal muscle biopsies were performed at 60 min for analysis of protein associated with glucose metabolism. In response to insulin, plasma lactate was elevated in aged individuals when normalized to insulin action. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of skeletal muscle PDH on serine sites 232, 293, and 300 decreased in young individuals only. Changes in insulin-stimulated PDH phosphorylation were positively related to changes in plasma lactate. No age-related differences were observed in skeletal muscle phosphorylation of LDH, GSK-3α, or GSK-3β in response to insulin or PDP1, PDP2, PDK2, PDK4, or MPC1 total protein. Twelve weeks of endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training improved insulin-stimulated PDH dephosphorylation, which was related to a reduced lactate response. These findings suggest that impairments in insulin-induced PDH regulation in a sedentary aging population contribute to impaired glucose metabolism and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating metabolic inflexibility. PMID:27221120

  11. Sleep Habits in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tamara L.; Riley, Thomas; Mattek, Nora; Pavel, Misha; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between sleep disturbances and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in community-dwelling seniors. Recent evidence suggests that sleep habits are differentially compromised in different subtypes of MCI, but the relationship between sleep disruption and MCI remains poorly understood. We gathered daily objective measures of sleep disturbance from 45 seniors, including 16 with MCI (mean age 86.9 ± 4.3 years), over a six month period. We also collected self-report measures of sleep disturbance. Although there were no differences between groups in any of our self-report measures, we found that amnestic MCI (aMCI) volunteers had less disturbed sleep than both non-amnestic MCI (naMCI) and cognitively intact volunteers, as measured objectively by movement in bed at night (F2,1078=4.30, p=0.05), wake after sleep onset (F2,1078=41.6, p<0.001), and times up at night (F2,1078=26.7, p<0.001). The groups did not differ in total sleep time. In addition, the aMCI group had less day-to-day variability in these measures than the intact and naMCI volunteers. In general, the naMCI volunteers showed a level of disturbed sleep that was intermediate to that of aMCI and intact volunteers. These differences in sleep disruption between aMCI and naMCI may be related to differences in the pathology underlying these MCI subtypes. PMID:24145694

  12. The Characterization of Biological Rhythms in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mardomingo, Carmen; García-Herranz, Sara; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Peraita, Herminia; Venero, César; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease, present several circadian impairments related to an accelerated perturbation of their biological clock that is caused by the illness itself and not merely age-related. Thus, the objective of this work was to elucidate whether these circadian system alterations were already present in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as compared to healthy age-matched subjects. Methods. 40 subjects (21 patients diagnosed with MCI, 74.1 ± 1.5 y.o., and 19 healthy subjects, 71.7 ± 1.4 y.o.) were subjected to ambulatory monitoring, recording wrist skin temperature, motor activity, body position, and the integrated variable TAP (including temperature, activity, and position) for one week. Nonparametrical analyses were then applied. Results. MCI patients exhibited a significant phase advance with respect to the healthy group for the following phase markers: temperature M5 (mean ± SEM: 04:20 ± 00:21 versus 02:52 ± 00:21) and L10 (14:35 ± 00:27 versus 13:24 ± 00:16) and TAP L5 (04:18 ± 00:14 versus 02:55 ± 00:30) and M10 (14:30 ± 00:18 versus 13:28 ± 00:23). Conclusions. These results suggest that significant advances in the biological clock begin to occur in MCI patients, evidenced by an accelerated aging of the circadian clock, as compared to a healthy population of the same age. PMID:25157363

  13. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what are the mechanisms. PMID:22433668

  14. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, José A

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies, and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what the mechanisms are.

  15. Impairment in cognitive and affective empathy in patients with brain lesions: anatomical and cognitive correlates.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, S G; Tomer, R; Goldsher, D; Berger, B D; Aharon-Peretz, J

    2004-11-01

    The present study was designed to examine the degree of impairment in cognitive and affective empathy among patients with focal brain lesions, and the contribution of specific cognitive abilities (such as cognitive flexibility and processing of emotional information), to empathy. The cognitive and affective empathic response of patients with localized prefrontal lesions (n=36) was compared to responses of patients with parietal lesions (n=15) and healthy control subjects (n=19). Results indicate that patients with prefrontal lesions (especially those with lesions involving the orbitoprefrontal and medial regions) were significantly impaired in both cognitive and affective empathy as compared to parietal patients and healthy controls. When the damage was restricted to the prefrontal cortex, either left- or right-hemisphere lesions resulted in impaired empathy. However, when the lesion involved the right hemisphere, patients with parietal lesions were also impaired. The pattern of relationships between cognitive performance and empathy suggested dissociation between the cognitive correlates of affective and cognitive empathy. PMID:15590464

  16. Rodent Models of Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Kimura-Ohba, Shihoko; Thompson, Jeffrey; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2016-10-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment dementia (VCID), which is an increasingly important cause of dementia in the elderly, lacks effective treatments. Many different types of vascular disease are included under the diagnosis of VCID, including large vessel disease with multiple strokes and small vessel disease with lacunar infarcts and white matter disease. Animal models have been developed to study the multiple forms of VCID. Because of its progressive course, small vessel disease (SVD) is thought to be the optimal form of VCID for treatment. One theory is that the pathophysiology involves hypoxic hypoperfusion resulting in injury to the white matter and neuronal death. Bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCAO) in a normotensive rat, which reduces cerebral blood flow, induces hypoxia with white matter damage; this model has been used to test drugs to block the injury. Another model is the spontaneously hypertensive/stroke prone rat (SHR/SP). Hypertension leads to small vessel disease resulting in progressive damage to the white matter, cortex, and hippocampus. Bilateral carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) with coils or ameroid constrictors produces a slower development of changes than BCAO, avoiding the acute ischemia. A few studies have been done with the two-clip, two-vessel occlusion renal model for induction of hypertension. There are benefits and drawbacks to each of these models with the model selected depending on the type of vascular damage that is to be studied. This review describes the most commonly used models, and the drugs that have been used to reduce the damage. PMID:27498679

  17. Positive Effects of Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, C.; Chambon, C.; Michel, B. F.; Paban, V.; Alescio-Lautier, B.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a…

  18. Separating mood disturbance from mild cognitive impairment in geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David C

    2008-08-01

    Disentangling depression from dementia remains one of the most difficult clinical challenges for psychiatrists caring for older adults. The relationship between geriatric depression and dementia is complex for several reasons. First, cognitive impairment is often a prominent feature of depression in the elderly. Cognition may improve with successful treatment of depression but it may not normalize. Indeed, marked memory impairment in older depressed individuals may indicate a prodromal state of dementia. This review will examine issues related to depression and cognitive disorder in the elderly. The author will provide an evidence-based approach to separate mood disorder from cognitive disorder among older adults.

  19. Drinking hydrogen water ameliorated cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Inoue, Tota; Yamashita, Takenori; Ishida, Torao; Kang, Ki-Mun; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to have neuron protective effects due to its antioxidant properties, but the effects of hydrogen on cognitive impairment due to senescence-related brain alterations and the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated the efficacies of drinking hydrogen water for prevention of spatial memory decline and age-related brain alterations using senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits early aging syndromes including declining learning ability and memory. However, treatment with hydrogen water for 30 days prevented age-related declines in cognitive ability seen in SAMP8 as assessed by a water maze test and was associated with increased brain serotonin levels and elevated serum antioxidant activity. In addition, drinking hydrogen water for 18 weeks inhibited neurodegeneration in hippocampus, while marked loss of neurons was noted in control, aged brains of mice receiving regular water. On the basis of our results, hydrogen water merits further investigation for possible therapeutic/preventative use for age-related cognitive disorders.

  20. Drinking hydrogen water ameliorated cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Inoue, Tota; Yamashita, Takenori; Ishida, Torao; Kang, Ki-Mun; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogen has been reported to have neuron protective effects due to its antioxidant properties, but the effects of hydrogen on cognitive impairment due to senescence-related brain alterations and the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated the efficacies of drinking hydrogen water for prevention of spatial memory decline and age-related brain alterations using senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits early aging syndromes including declining learning ability and memory. However, treatment with hydrogen water for 30 days prevented age-related declines in cognitive ability seen in SAMP8 as assessed by a water maze test and was associated with increased brain serotonin levels and elevated serum antioxidant activity. In addition, drinking hydrogen water for 18 weeks inhibited neurodegeneration in hippocampus, while marked loss of neurons was noted in control, aged brains of mice receiving regular water. On the basis of our results, hydrogen water merits further investigation for possible therapeutic/preventative use for age-related cognitive disorders. PMID:20490324

  1. Depression and cognitive impairment following recovery from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Han, Bowie; Page, Evaren E; Stewart, Lauren M; Deford, Cassandra C; Scott, James G; Schwartz, Lauren H; Perdue, Jedidiah J; Terrell, Deirdra R; Vesely, Sara K; George, James N

    2015-08-01

    After recovery from an acute episode of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), patients often describe problems with memory, concentration, and endurance. We have previously reported the occurrence of depression and cognitive impairment in these patients. In this study, we describe the frequency, severity, and clinical course of depression and cognitive impairment. Fifty-two (85%) out of 61 eligible Oklahoma Registry patients who had recovered from TTP, documented by ADAMTS13 activity <10%, have had at least one (median, four) evaluation for depression over 11 years using the Beck Depression Inventory-II; 31 (59%) patients screened positive for depression at least once; in 15 (29%), the results suggested severe depression at least once. Nine of these 15 patients had a psychiatric interview, the definitive diagnostic evaluation; the diagnosis of major depressive disorder was established in eight (89%) patients. In 2014, cognitive ability was evaluated in 33 patients by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Repeatable Battery for Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Both tests detected significant cognitive impairment in the patients as a group. Fifteen out of the 33 patients had been evaluated by extensive cognitive tests in 2006. The 2014 RBANS results were significantly worse than the 2006 results for the overall score and two out of the five RBANS domains (immediate and delayed memory). Neither depression nor cognitive impairment was significantly associated with the occurrence of relapses or ADAMTS13 activity <10% during remission. These observations emphasize the importance of screening evaluations for depression and cognitive impairment after recovery from acquired TTP.

  2. Sensorimotor and cognitive factors associated with the age-related increase of visual field dependence: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agathos, Catherine P; Bernardin, Delphine; Huchet, Delphine; Scherlen, Anne-Catherine; Assaiante, Christine; Isableu, Brice

    2015-08-01

    Reliance on the visual frame of reference for spatial orientation (or visual field dependence) has been reported to increase with age. This has implications on old adults' daily living tasks as it affects stability, attention, and adaptation capacities. However, the nature and underlying mechanisms of this increase are not well defined. We investigated sensorimotor and cognitive factors possibly associated with increased visual field dependence in old age, by considering functions that are both known to degrade with age and important for spatial orientation and sensorimotor control: reliance on the (somatosensory-based) egocentric frame of reference, visual fixation stability, and attentional processing of complex visual scenes (useful field of view, UFOV). Twenty young, 18 middle-aged, and 20 old adults completed a visual examination, three tests of visual field dependence (RFT, RDT, and GEFT), a test of egocentric dependence (subjective vertical estimation with the body erect and tilted at 70°), a visual fixation task, and a test of visual attentional processing (UFOV®). Increased visual field dependence with age was associated with reduced egocentric dependence, visual fixation stability, and visual attentional processing. In addition, visual fixation instability and reduced UFOV were correlated. Results of middle-aged adults fell between those of the young and old, revealing the progressive nature of the age effects we evaluated. We discuss results in terms of reference frame selection with respect to ageing as well as visual and non-visual information processing. Inter-individual differences amongst old adults are highlighted and discussed with respect to the functionality of increased visual field dependence.

  3. Advances in the treatment of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent complication, with significant interindividual variability in clinical symptoms, severity, timing, and neural substrates. Recent studies have focused not only on understanding PD dementia, but also mild cognitive impairment in PD, which may represent a prodromal stage for dementia. In recent years, there have been important advances regarding clinical characterizations, definitions, associated biomarkers, and risk factors for both mild cognitive impairment in PD and PD dementia. However, there is a paucity of effective therapies for cognitive impairment in PD, whether for mild symptoms or for moderate to severe dementia. At present, only rivastigmine is U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for PD dementia, an indication received nearly a decade ago. Given the frequency of PD cognitive impairment and its substantial impact on both patients and families, the lack of available and effective treatments represents a striking gap in the field, especially when compared to the large number of available therapies for PD motor symptoms and complications. Improved symptomatic therapies, as well as potential disease-modifying agents, for PD cognitive impairment are needed. Most therapeutic trials for PD dementia and mild cognitive impairment in PD have focused on drugs developed for and tested in Alzheimer's disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine, though recent and ongoing trials examine the effects of pharmacological agents affecting other neurotransmitters, as well as nonpharmacological therapies, including mental and physical exercise and neurostimulation. This review summarizes the design and outcomes of trials for PD cognitive impairment published since 2013 and highlights future therapeutic research opportunities and challenges.

  4. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26590911

  5. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Childhood nutritional deprivation and cognitive impairment among older Chinese people.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenmei; Gu, Danan; Hayward, Mark D

    2010-09-01

    Late-life cognitive impairment may have its origins in childhood. Here, we examine the associations between markers of childhood nutritional deprivation and cognitive impairment in older adults. We made use of the 2002 and 2005 waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey to examine these associations for persons aged 65-105 (N=15,444). Anthropometric measures (arm length, knee height) and self-reported hunger were used to measure early-life nutritional deficiencies. Cognitive impairment was measured using the Chinese version of the Mini Mental State Examination. Results from multivariate logistic regression models show that both anthropometric measures and self-report markers of early-life nutritional status were significantly associated with the odds of cognitive impairment at baseline for both men and women after controlling for age and ethnicity. Adjustments for childhood and adulthood socioeconomic status, adulthood health, and lifestyle habits had little effect on these associations except for the effect of hunger among men. Results from multinomial logistic regression models show that during the three-year follow-up period, arm length was significantly associated with the onset of cognitive impairment after controlling for various confounders in men, but not in women. Our findings suggest that early-life nutritional deprivation may contribute to cognitive impairment among older Chinese adults.

  7. Which part of the Quick mild cognitive impairment screen (Qmci) discriminates between normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Caoimh, Rónán; Gao, Yang; Gallagher, Paul Francis; Eustace, Joesph; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D. William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: the Qmci is a sensitive and specific test to differentiate between normal cognition (NC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the subtests of the Qmci to determine which best discriminated NC, MCI and dementia. Objective: the objective was to determine the contribution each subtest of the Qmci makes, to its sensitivity and specificity in differentiating MCI from NC and dementia, to refine and shorten the instrument. Methods: existing data from our previous study of 965 subjects, testing the Qmci, was analysed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Qmci subtests. Results: all the subtests of the Qmci differentiated MCI from NC. Logical memory (LM) performed the best (area under the receiver operating curve of 0.80), registration the worst, (0.56). LM and verbal fluency had the largest median differences (expressed as percentage of total score) between MCI and NC, 20 and 25%, respectively. Other subtests did not have clinically useful differences. LM was best at differentiating MCI from NC, irrespective of age or educational status. Conclusion: the Qmci incorporates several important cognitive domains making it useful across the spectrum of cognitive impairment. LM is the best performing subtest for differentiating MCI from NC. PMID:23612864

  8. The spectrum of cognitive impairment in Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Barker, Roger A; Duda, John E; Galvin, James E

    2014-04-15

    Cognitive impairment represents an important and often defining component of the clinical syndromes of Lewy body disorders: Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The spectrum of cognitive deficits in these Lewy body diseases encompasses a broad range of clinical features, severity of impairment, and timing of presentation. It is now recognized that cognitive dysfunction occurs not only in more advanced Parkinson's disease but also in early, untreated patients and even in those patients with pre-motor syndromes, such as rapid eye movement behavior disorder and hyposmia. In recent years, the concept of mild cognitive impairment as a transitional or pre-dementia state in Parkinson's disease has emerged. This has led to much research regarding the diagnosis, prognosis, and underlying neurobiology of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, but has also raised questions regarding the usefulness of this concept and its application in clinical and research settings. In addition, the conundrum of whether Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies represent the same or different entities remains unresolved. Although these disorders overlap in many aspects of their presentations and pathophysiology, they differ in other elements, such as timing of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms; medication responses; and neuropathological contributions. This article examines the spectrum and evolution of cognitive impairment in Lewy body disorders and debates these controversial issues in the field using point-counterpoint approaches.

  9. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193487

  10. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. [Effect of anticholinergic drugs on cognitive impairment in the elderly].

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, Jorge; Zea Sevilla, María Ascensión; Agüera Ortiz, Luis; Fernández Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí Soler, Meritxell; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even in people with cognitive impairment. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed (anticholinergic effects, anticholinergic and dementia) to define the effects of anticholinergic drugs in the elderly. We emphasized the search in patterns of use, the combined use with AChEIs, the measurement of the Serum Anticholinergic Activity, and the short-term and long-term cognitive effects. The conclusions are that the use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even more so than the medical prescription of AChEIs in Alzheimer's disease. The use of anticholinergic drugs may result in cognitive impairment. In long-term use it may generate a worsening of cognitive functions. It can lead to a wrong diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, and they can also initiate signs of dementia. Greater cognitive effects appear when there is a previous deficit, but cognitive effects from anticholinergic drugs disappear in severe dementia. The presence of ApoEɛ4 increases the vulnerability for cognitive impairment when these drugs are employed. PMID:25087132

  12. Cognitive Communication Impairments: A Family-Focused Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePompei, Roberta; And Others

    1988-01-01

    An active role is recommended for family members involved in rehabilitation of cognitive communicative impairments of head-injured individuals. The paper discusses family systems theory, dysfunctional family reactions to the cognitive communicative behaviors of the head-injured member, and methods of assisting the family to develop the…

  13. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors: Rescuers of cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    King, Margaret K.; Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Downey, Kimberlee; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eléonore

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of cognitive processes is a devastating outcome of many diseases, injuries, and drugs affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Most often, very little can be done by available therapeutic interventions to improve cognitive functions. Here we review evidence that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) ameliorates cognitive deficits in a wide variety of animal models of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, traumatic brain injury, and others. GSK3 inhibitors also improve cognition following impairments caused by therapeutic interventions, such as cranial irradiation for brain tumors. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 inhibitors are able to ameliorate cognitive impairments caused by a diverse array of diseases, injury, and treatments. The improvements in impaired cognition instilled by administration of GSK3 inhibitors appear to involve a variety of different mechanisms, such as supporting long-term potentiation and diminishing long-term depression, promotion of neurogenesis, reduction of inflammation, and increasing a number of neuroprotective mechanisms. The potential for GSK3 inhibitors to repair cognitive deficits associated with many conditions warrants further investigation of their potential for therapeutic interventions, particularly considering the current dearth of treatments available to reduce loss of cognitive functions. PMID:23916593

  14. Acute stress impairs cognitive flexibility in men, not women.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Trainor, Brian C; Lam, Jovian C W; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    Psychosocial stress influences cognitive abilities, such as long-term memory retrieval. However, less is known about the effects of stress on cognitive flexibility, which is mediated by different neurobiological circuits and could thus be regulated by different neuroendocrine pathways. In this study, we randomly assigned healthy adults to an acute stress induction or control condition and subsequently assessed participants' cognitive flexibility using an open-source version of the Wisconsin Card Sort task. Drawing on work in rodents, we hypothesized that stress would have stronger impairing effects on cognitive flexibility in men than women. As predicted, we found that stress impaired cognitive flexibility in men but did not significantly affect women. Our results thus indicate that stress exerts sex-specific effects on cognitive flexibility in humans and add to the growing body of research highlighting the need to consider sex differences in effects of stress.

  15. Primary cerebellar agenesis presenting as isolated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Obaid; Jabeen, Shumyla; Khan, Azhar; Shaheen, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Primary cerebellar agenesis is a rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, eleven living cases have been reported till date. Most of these were associated with some degree of motor impairment. We present a case of cerebellar agenesis in a child who presented with cognitive abnormalities leading to poor performance at school. No motor impairment was seen. Among the eleven cases reported earlier, only one case showed lack of motor impairment.

  16. Primary cerebellar agenesis presenting as isolated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Obaid; Jabeen, Shumyla; Khan, Azhar; Shaheen, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Primary cerebellar agenesis is a rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, eleven living cases have been reported till date. Most of these were associated with some degree of motor impairment. We present a case of cerebellar agenesis in a child who presented with cognitive abnormalities leading to poor performance at school. No motor impairment was seen. Among the eleven cases reported earlier, only one case showed lack of motor impairment. PMID:27606028

  17. [Cognitive impairment associated to primary hyperparathyroidism: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fuentes R, Paola; Gac, Homero; Carrasco, Marcela; Aguilar, Lorena; Marín, Pedro Paulo

    2011-05-01

    We report a 79-year-old male patient presenting with progressive memory loss associated with anxiety and muscular pain. An extensive biochemical control revealed high serum calcium and parathormone levels, and normal thyroid hormones. Cognitive assessment prior to surgery was compatible with mild cognitive impairment, showing significant improvement two months after parathyroidectomy. Our case suggests that, although rare, primary hyperparathyroidism should be considered as a possible cause of cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:22051716

  18. Assessing and treating cognitive impairment in schizophrenia: current and future.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yuan; Tsai, Guochuan E; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious neuropsychiatric disease characterized by positive symptoms, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. Evidence have shown that cognitive impairment sustains in every clinical stage, may relate with the liability, may predict functional outcome in schizophrenia and could be the core symptom of schizophrenia. The treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia could alleviate the burden of the illness and has become the subject of intensive research. In this review, we synthesize current advances of assessing strategies, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. According to the registered records of ClinicalTrials.gov, the most widely studied strategies have aimed at modifying neurochemical mechanisms of dopamine metabolism, glutamate metabolism, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism, serotonin metabolism, acetylcholine metabolism, and oxytocin. Despite preclinical data for putative pro-cognitive drugs, their clinical benefits for schizophrenia patients have been limited. The small sample sizes and the short treatment duration could be related with the suboptimal results. Evidence supported the short-term benefits of cognitive remediation therapy on cognitive domains with small to moderate effects; however, the small sample sizes and the characteristics of subjects limited the generalization of the positive results and the long-term functional outcome is not clear. Combination therapy is promising, by integrating pro-cognitive agents and cognitive rehabilitation programs or combining two kinds of pro-cognitive agents via different mechanisms. Future studies should investigate the pro-cognitive drugs' long-term efficacy, rebound deterioration in psychosis/cognition following discontinuation, and related biomarkers of functional outcome.

  19. Intracranial stenosis, cerebrovascular diseases, and cognitive impairment in chinese.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Saini, Monica; Tan, Chuen Seng; Catindig, Joseree A; Dong, Yan Hong; Holandez, Rachelle L; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri A; Ting, Eric; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial carotid artery disease has been shown to be related to cognitive deficits. However, limited data are available on intracranial stenosis (ICS) and cognitive impairment. We investigate the association between ICS and cognitive impairment in Chinese. Subjects (n=278), recruited from the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore Study, underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3-dimensional-time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia and dementia were diagnosed according to internationally accepted diagnostic criteria. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, education, vascular risk factors, and other MRI markers. A total of 29 (10.4%) persons had ICS on MRA, which was significantly associated with both composite cognitive Z-scores [mean difference in Z-score, presence vs. absence of ICS: -0.37 (95% confidence interval: -0.63, -0.12)] and specific domains including executive function, language, visuomotor speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. ICS was also related to significant cognitive impairment (odds ratio: 5.10 [1.24 to 21.02]). With respect to other MRI markers, adjusted for the presence of lacunar infarcts, the associations of ICS with both composite and domain-specific Z-scores, and significant cognitive impairment became nonsignificant; however, adjustment for other MRI markers did not alter these associations. In this Chinese population, presence of ICS was associated with cognitive impairment independent of vascular risk factors. These associations may be mediated through the presence of infarcts.

  20. Pathology and MRI: exploring cognitive impairment in MS.

    PubMed

    Paul, F

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive impairment is a frequent symptom in people with multiple sclerosis, affecting up to 70% of patients. This article reviews the published association of cognitive dysfunction with neuroimaging findings. Cognitive impairment has been related to focal T2 hyperintense lesions, diffuse white matter damage and corical and deep gray matter atrophy. Focal lesions cannot sufficiently explain cognitive dysfunction in MS; microstructural tissue damage detectable by diffusion tensor imaging and gray matter atrophy are probably at least as relevant. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to investigate the contribution of functional connectivity changes to cognitive function in MS. The fact that at least one third of MS patients are not overtly cognitively impaired despite significant radiographic tissue damage argues for protective factors (brain reserve, cognitive reserve) that require further clarification. It is concluded that the reported correlations between imaging findings and cognitive function do not imply causality. Well conceived and sufficiently powered longitudinal studies are lacking. Such studies would help unravel protective mechanisms against cogniitve decline and identify suitable imaging techniques to monitor cognitive function in individual patients with MS. PMID:27580903

  1. Association of GRM7 Variants with Different Phenotype Patterns of Age-Related Hearing Impairment in an Elderly Male Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaojie; Pang, Xiuhong; Li, Jiping; Chai, Yongchuan; Li, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Luping; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Qin; Hu, Xianting; Sun, Jingwen; Jiang, Xuemei; Fan, Zhuping; Huang, Zhiwu; Wu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the Glutamate metabotrophic receptor 7 gene (GRM7) have recently been identified by the genome-wide association study (GWAS) as potentially playing a role in susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), however this has not been validated in the Han Chinese population. The aim of this study was to determine if these SNPs are also associated with ARHI in an elderly male Han Chinese population. In this case-control candidate genes association study, a total of 982 men with ARHI and 324 normal-hearing controls subjects were studied. Using K-means cluster analysis, four audiogram shape subtypes of ARHI were identified in the case group: ‘‘flat shape (FL)’’, ‘‘sloping shape (SL)’’, ‘‘2-4 kHz abrupt loss (AL) shape’’ and ‘‘8 kHz dip (8D) shape’’. Results suggested that the SNP rs11928865 (A>T) of GRM7 was significantly associated with ARHI after adjusting for non-genetic factors (p= 0.000472, OR= 1.599, 95%CI= 1.229~2.081). Furthermore, frequency of TT genotype (rs11928865) were significant higher in the SL subgroup and AL subgroup with compared to controls group (p= 9.41E-05, OR= 1.945, 95%CI= 1.393~2.715; p= 0.000109, OR= 1.915, 95%CI= 1.378~2.661 adjusted, respectively) after Bonferroni correction. However, there wasn’t significant difference in the frequency of the TT genotype between cases in the FL subgroup or the 8D subgroup with when compared with controls. Results of the current study suggest that, in an elderly male Han Chinese population, GRM7 SNP rs11928865 (TT) occurs more frequently in ARHI patients with SL and AL phenotype patterns. PMID:24146964

  2. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-09-21

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions.

  3. Prevalence and Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Blake J; Gasson, Natalie; Loftus, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the prevalence and subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an Australian sample of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seventy participants with PD completed neuropsychological assessments of their cognitive performance, using MDS Task Force Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. A cut-off score of less than one standard deviation (SD) below normative data determined impaired performance on a neuropsychological test. Of 70 participants, 45 (64%) met Level II diagnostic criteria for PD-MCI. Among those with PD-MCI, 42 (93%) were identified as having multiple domain impairment (28 as amnestic multiple domain and 14 as nonamnestic multiple domain). Single domain impairment was less frequent (2 amnestic/1 nonamnestic). Significant differences were found between the PD-MCI and Normal Cognition groups, across all cognitive domains. Multiple domain cognitive impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment in an Australian sample of people with PD. However, PD-MCI is heterogeneous and current prevalence and subtyping statistics may be an artifact of variable application methods of the criteria (e.g., cut off scores and number of tests). Future longitudinal studies refining the criteria will assist with subtyping the progression of PD-MCI, while identifying individuals who may benefit from pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. PMID:27650569

  4. Early Detection of Cognitive-Linguistic Change Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Valarie B.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may present with subtle declines in linguistic ability that go undetected by tasks not challenging enough to tax a relatively intact cognitive-linguistic system. This study was designed to replicate and extend a previous study of cognitive-linguistic ability in MCI using a complex discourse…

  5. Frailty and Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Mechanisms Behind the Link.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Navarro, Sara Gloria; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto José; Anaya-Escamilla, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between frailty and cognitive impairment has been recognized for decades, but it was not until a few years ago that the interest in this relationship increased and is now being understood. Epidemiological evidence suggests that physical frailty may be linked to cognitive impairment since both conditions share pathophysiological mechanisms at the cellular and systemic levels. Aging itself promotes multiple vascular changes, making the brain susceptible to cognitive decline through mechanisms such as thinning of blood vessels, increased collagen accumulation, rupture of the blood-brain barrier, inflammation, and oxidative damage. The prevalence of frailty and cognitive decline increases as individuals become older, and cognitive impairment attributable to cerebrovascular disease has become a major public health problem since vascular dementia is now the second most common subtype of dementia. However, full understanding of the mechanisms underlying the relationship between frailty and vascular cognitive impairment remains fragmented. This review examines the link between frailty and vascular cognitive decline and also explores the role of vascular changes in the genesis of both conditions. PMID:27028174

  6. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes. PMID:26516060

  7. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes.

  8. Cognitive Impairment and Disability in Older Japanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sangyoon; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of disability is increasing due to an expanding aging population and an increasing incidence of chronic health problems. Cognitive impairment may predict the development of disability in older adults. Therefore, we examined the association of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and/or general cognitive impairment (GCI, defined as a Mini Mental State Examination [MMSE] score of 20–23) with the development of disability in a cohort of Japanese community-dwelling older adults. A total of 4290 participants (aged ≥65 years) enrolled in the Obu Study of Health Promotion for the Elderly were classified according to the presence and degree of cognitive impairment as follows: cognitively healthy, GCI, MCI single domain (MCIs), MCIs with GCI, MCI multiple domain (MCIm), and MCIm with GCI. MMSE scores, risk factors for dementia, and incidences of new disability were recorded. After an average of 29.5 months, 205 participants (4.8%) experienced a new onset of disability. All subtypes of cognitive impairment showed significant relationships with disability except for GCI alone. The following hazard ratios (HRs) were determined: MCIs (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39–3.00), MCIs with GCI (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.21–3.62), MCIm (HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.39–3.85), and MCIm with GCI (HR, 4.23; 95% CI, 2.73–6.57). These results indicate that cognitive impairment may be related to an increased risk for the development of disability. Healthcare providers should implement global cognitive assessments to identify MCI and GCI and consider preventive interventions for disability, especially in older persons. PMID:27415430

  9. Children’s Internal Attributions of Anxiety-Related Physical Symptoms: Age-Related Patterns and the Role of Cognitive Development and Anxiety Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Birgit; Freher, Nancy Kramer; Duncan, Sylvana; van den Hout, Annemiek

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined age-related patterns in children’s anxiety-related interpretations and internal attributions of physical symptoms. A large sample of 388 children aged between 4 and 13 years completed a vignette paradigm during which they had to explain the emotional response of the main character who experienced anxiety-related physical symptoms in a variety of daily situations. In addition, children completed measures of cognitive development and anxiety sensitivity. Results demonstrated that age, cognitive development, and anxiety sensitivity were all positively related to children’s ability to perceive physical symptoms as a signal of anxiety and making internal attributions. Further, while a substantial proportion of the younger children (i.e., <7 years) were able to make a valid anxiety-related interpretation of a physical symptom, very few were capable of making an internal attribution, which means that children of this age lack the developmental prerequisites for applying physical symptoms-based theories of childhood anxiety. PMID:20440551

  10. Impaired Financial Abilities in Parkinson’s Disease Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roy C.; Triebel, Kristen; Kennedy, Richard E.; Nicholas, Anthony P.; Watts, Ray L.; Stover, Natividad; Brandon, Mariko; Marson, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Financial capacity (FC) is an instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) critical to independent functioning and sensitive to cognitive impairment in dementia. Little is known about FC in cognitively impaired patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The present study investigated FC in PD patients with prodromal and clinical dementia. Methods Participants were 20 older controls and 35 PD patients who met consensus criteria for either mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI, n=18) or PD dementia (PDD, n=17). FC was assessed using a standardized performance based measure consisting of 9 domain and two global scores (Financial Capacity Instrument; FCI)(1). FCI domain and global performance scores were compared across groups. Capacity impairment ratings (no impairment, mild/moderate impairment, severe impairment) were calculated for each PD patient’s domain and global scores. Results Relative to controls, PD-MCI patients were impaired on both FCI global scores and domains of basic monetary skills, financial concepts, and investment decision-making. Relative to both controls and PD-MCI patients, PDD patients were impaired on virtually all FCI variables. With respect to impairment ratings, greater than 50% of PD-MCI patients and greater than 90% of PDD patients were classified as either mild/moderate or severely impaired on the two FCI global scores. Conclusions Impairment of financial capacity is already present in PD-MCI and is advanced in PDD. Complex cognitively-mediated IADLs such as financial capacity appear to be impaired early in the course of PD dementia. PMID:23899743

  11. Variability in performance: Identifying early signs of future cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gamaldo, Alyssa A.; An, Yang; Allaire, Jason C.; Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H.; Zonderman, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The current study examined whether year-to-year variability in cognitive performance differ between individuals cognitively unimpaired and individuals who subsequently develop dementia. Method Analyses included a case-control sample of Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA; M age = 69.90, SD = 8.92) participants. One hundred and thirty five clinically diagnosed demented participants were matched with 135 non-demented participants based on age at initial testing and sex. Cognitive performance was examined using measures of memory, executive function, attention, language, and global mental status performance. Cognitive performance was examined from baseline to 5 years before cognitive impairment (mean assessments = 3.03, SD = 2.80). Results Compared to unimpaired individuals, individuals diagnosed with dementia had greater variability on measures of attention, executive function, language, and semantic memory at least 5 years before the estimated onset of cognitive impairment, which may be indicative of maladaptive cognitive functioning. The dementia cases, however, had less variability on visual memory than the unimpaired group, which may suggest that these cases had more difficulty learning. Conclusions These results demonstrate that performance variability indexed over annual or biennial visits may be useful in identifying early signs of subsequent cognitive impairment. PMID:22746310

  12. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  13. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  14. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  15. Impaired social cognition in anorexia nervosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Sayo; Tomotake, Masahito; Takeda, Tomoya; Kameoka, Naomi; Kawabata, Masashi; Kubo, Hiroko; Tada, Yukio; Tomioka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of social cognition in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods Eighteen female patients with AN (mean age =35.4±8.6 years) and 18 female healthy controls (HC) (mean age =32.8±9.4 years) participated in the study. Their social cognition was assessed with the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). Results The results showed that total score of the SCSQ and scores of theory of mind and metacognition were significantly lower in AN group than those in HC group. Moreover, significant differences in theory of mind, metacognition, and total score of the SCSQ remained when the effects of depression, anxiety, and starvation were eliminated statistically. Conclusion These results suggest that patients with AN may have difficulty inferring other people’s intention and also monitoring and evaluating their own cognitive activities. Therefore, these features may explain some aspects of the pathology of AN. PMID:27785029

  16. Association between smoking and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Muhammed Emin; İnce, Bahri; Bingöl, Ayhan; Ertürk, Simge; Altınöz, Meriç Adil; Karadeli, Hasan Hüseyin; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Asil, Talip

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although smoking is known to cause various symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, there have been no reports regarding the relationship between smoking and cognitive impairment in MS. Studying the effects of cigarette smoking in MS patients is imperative as there is a high prevalence of cognitive impairment in MS patients. In this study we examined the potentially deleterious effects of heavy smoking on mentation of patients with MS. Patients and methods MS patients receiving care at the Neurology Clinic at Bezmialem Vakıf University, between the ages of 18–65 years who have at least graduated elementary school were included in the study. The Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N) is a commonly used method to assess cognitive function in MS patients and was utilized in our study. Patients that smoked for at least 10 pack-years were considered heavy smokers. Results All the patients were stratified into two groups: heavy smokers (n=20) and nonsmokers (n=24). For heavy smokers, their cognitive functioning was more impaired than that of nonsmokers (P=0.04, χ2=4.227). For patients with cognitive impairment, 78.9% of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test and 63.2% of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test scores were found to be lower. Conclusion Previous reports have suggested that smoking increases the frequency of relapse among individuals with relapsing-remitting MS and accelerates disease progression in patients with progressive MS. According to the results of our study, heavy smokers had increased cognitive impairment when compared to nonsmokers. Extensive studies are necessary to further elucidate the relationship between smoking and cognitive impairment in MS patients. PMID:25246792

  17. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Aarsland, Dag

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) share clinical and pathological similarities. The defining features are motor parkinsonism and cognitive impairment, often accompanied by visual hallucinations, fluctuating consciousness, autonomic and sleep disturbances, and a number of other non-motor symptoms. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be identified in 15% of PD patients at time of diagnosis, and may even precede motor symptoms. MCI usually progresses further, and dementia is a common endpoint. Cognitive impairment is usually the initial symptom of DLB, and the disease course is severe. A variety of biomarkers can assist in the diagnosis and prognosis of PD and DLB, including structural and functional imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, and EEG. Compared to the many treatments available for motor symptoms, relatively few systematic studies exist to guide the treatment of cognitive impairment in PD, and even less in DLB. However, there is good evidence for cholinesterase inhibitors in both DLB and PD with dementia, and some indications that memantine is helpful. Emerging evidence suggest that physical exercise and cognitive training are also effective, as are some reports of various brain stimulation techniques. Disease-modifying agents that delay the rate of cognitive decline in PD and DLB are urgently needed.

  18. Finances in the Older Patient with Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Widera, Eric; Steenpass, Veronika; Marson, Daniel; Sudore, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Financial capacity is the ability to manage money and financial assets in ways that meet a person’s needs and which are consistent with his/her values and self-interest. Financial capacity is essential for an individual to function independently in our society; however, dementia eventually leads to a complete loss of financial capacity. Many patients with cognitive impairment and their families turn to their primary care clinician for help with financial impairment, yet most clinicians do not understand their role or how to help. We review the prevalence and impact of financial incapacity in older adults with cognitive impairment. We also articulate the role of the primary clinician which includes: (1) educating older adult patients and families about the need for advance financial planning; (2) recognizing signs of possible impaired financial capacity; (3) assessing financial impairments in cognitively impaired adults; (4) recommending interventions to help patients maintain financial independence; and (5) knowing when and to whom to make medical and legal referrals. Clearly delineating the clinician’s role in financial impairment can lead to the establishment of effective financial protections and can limit the economic, psychological, and legal hardships of financial incapacity on patients with dementia and their families. PMID:21325186

  19. How can cognitive status predispose to psychological impairment?

    PubMed

    Baker, Gus A; Taylor, Joanne; Hermann, Bruce

    2009-06-01

    A significant proportion of people report cognitive impairments, in particular memory problems, and express concern that these impairments will worsen with the passage of time. Unfortunately, the lack of well-designed studies has meant that disentangling the relative influences of factors likely important in the development and course of neuropsychological impairment has proved problematic. In addition to experiencing neuropsychological difficulties, people with epilepsy have to manage the psychosocial sequalae often associated with epilepsy. A diagnosis of epilepsy can have negative implications for quality of life and be associated with an increased risk of psychosocial problems; and individuals with epilepsy do not all experience its impact equally. The impacts of neuropsychological functioning on quality of life have only been rarely investigated, but there is some evidence to suggest that quality of life may correlate better with self-perceived cognitive difficulties than with scores on formal tests of cognitive functioning.

  20. Child maltreatment investigations involving parents with cognitive impairments in Canada.

    PubMed

    McConnell, David; Feldman, Maurice; Aunos, Marjorie; Prasad, Narasimha

    2011-02-01

    The authors examined decision making and service referral in child maltreatment investigations involving children of parents with cognitive impairments using the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2003) core-data. The CIS-2003 includes process and outcome data on a total of 1,243 child investigations (n = 1,170 weighted) in which parental cognitive impairment was noted. Employing binary logistic regression analyses, the authors found that perceived parent noncooperation was the most potent predictor of court application. Alternative dispute resolution was rarely utilized. The findings from this study highlight the need for development and utilization of alternative dispute resolution strategies, worker training, dissemination of evidence-based parent training programs, and implementation of strategies to alleviate poverty and strengthen the social relationships of parents with cognitive impairments and promote a healthy start to life for their children. PMID:21131633

  1. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kah Poh; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya G.; Holmes, Holly M.; Hsu, Tina; Inouye, Sharon K.; Karuturi, Meghan S.; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Lichtman, Stuart M.; Magnuson, Allison; Whitehead, Mary I.; Wong, Melisa L.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) can occur during or after chemotherapy and represents a concern for many patients with cancer. Among older patients with cancer, in whom there is little clinical trial evidence examining side effects like CRCI, many unanswered questions remain regarding risk for and resulting adverse outcomes from CRCI. Given the rising incidence of cancer with age, CRCI is of particular concern for older patients with cancer who receive treatment. Therefore, research related to CRCI in older patients with cancers is a high priority. In this manuscript, we discuss current gaps in research highlighting the lack of clinical studies of CRCI in older adults, the complex mechanisms of CRCI, and the challenges in measuring cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer. Although we focus on CRCI, we also discuss cognitive impairment related to cancer itself and other treatment modalities. We highlight several research priorities to improve the study of CRCI in older patients with cancer. PMID:27197918

  2. Polypharmacy Cut-Off for Gait and Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, Kristell; Morello, Remy; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Lescure, Pascale; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Marcelli, Christian; Descatoire, Pablo; Chavoix, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is a well-established risk factor for falls, and these are one of the major health problems that affect the quality of life as people age. However, the risk of mobility and cognitive impairments consecutive to polypharmacy has been little addressed, despite the association between these adverse outcomes and falls. Moreover, the rare polypharmacy cut-offs were all but one arbitrarily determined. Objective: Studying relationships between polypharmacy and both mobility and cognitive impairments, and statistically determining a cut-off point in the number of medicinal molecule beyond which polypharmacy has deleterious consequences with respect to mobility and cognitive impairment. Methods: We enrolled 113 community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older with a fall history, with or without injury, in the previous year. We carefully collected information about daily medicinal molecules taken. We assessed basic mobility and global cognition with the Time-Up-and-Go and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test, respectively (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02292316). Results: Timed-Up and Go test and MoCA scores were both significantly correlated with the number of molecule, used. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves indicate, with high prediction (p < 0.002), that daily consumption of five or more molecules is associated with risk for both impaired mobility and global cognition. These relationships were independent of the number of comorbidities and of the pharmacological class. Conclusion: Community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older who take five or more daily medicinal molecules are at high risk for both mobility and cognitive impairments. Physicians and patients should be aware of these new findings, especially when there are multiple prescribers involved in the care of the patient.

  3. Polypharmacy Cut-Off for Gait and Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, Kristell; Morello, Remy; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Lescure, Pascale; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Marcelli, Christian; Descatoire, Pablo; Chavoix, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is a well-established risk factor for falls, and these are one of the major health problems that affect the quality of life as people age. However, the risk of mobility and cognitive impairments consecutive to polypharmacy has been little addressed, despite the association between these adverse outcomes and falls. Moreover, the rare polypharmacy cut-offs were all but one arbitrarily determined. Objective: Studying relationships between polypharmacy and both mobility and cognitive impairments, and statistically determining a cut-off point in the number of medicinal molecule beyond which polypharmacy has deleterious consequences with respect to mobility and cognitive impairment. Methods: We enrolled 113 community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older with a fall history, with or without injury, in the previous year. We carefully collected information about daily medicinal molecules taken. We assessed basic mobility and global cognition with the Time-Up-and-Go and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test, respectively (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02292316). Results: Timed-Up and Go test and MoCA scores were both significantly correlated with the number of molecule, used. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves indicate, with high prediction (p < 0.002), that daily consumption of five or more molecules is associated with risk for both impaired mobility and global cognition. These relationships were independent of the number of comorbidities and of the pharmacological class. Conclusion: Community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older who take five or more daily medicinal molecules are at high risk for both mobility and cognitive impairments. Physicians and patients should be aware of these new findings, especially when there are multiple prescribers involved in the care of the patient. PMID:27630572

  4. Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus; Zhang, Jing; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an already prevalent neurodegenerative disease that is poised to at least double over the next 25 years. Although best known for its characteristic movement disorder, PD is now appreciated commonly to cause cognitive impairment, including dementia, and behavioral changes. Dementia in patients with PD is consequential and has been associated with reduced quality of life, shortened survival, and increased caregiver distress. Here we review clinical presentation and progression, pathological bases, identification of genetic risk factors, development of small molecule biomarkers, and emerging treatments for cognitive impairment in patients with PD. PMID:19754405

  5. [Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Yamile; Trujillo-Orrego, Natalia; Pineda, David

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. The cognitive disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been associated with the presence of dementia in later stages of the disease. Recent studies, however, consider that cognitive impairment can appear as of early stages. Knowing the cognitive profile of PD furthers our understanding of the clinical phenotype, making it easier to reach a timely diagnosis and favouring intervention on the symptoms from the initial stages. AIM. To present a review of the literature on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia associated with PD. DEVELOPMENT. Several studies report that patients with PD who have a prolonged time to progression develop dementia. Yet, there have also been reports claiming that, as of the early stages, patients can present subtle cognitive alterations known as MCI. The initial neuropsychological profile is mainly of a non-amnesic type, characterised by executive dysfunction, alterations affecting attention, operative memory deficit and faulty retrieval of information. When patients develop dementia, disorders will arise in the storage of information, in semantic fluency, and in visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. Currently there are criteria available for diagnosing the MCI and dementia associated with PD, as well as valid reliable instruments for detecting those disorders. CONCLUSIONS. Cognitive symptoms are frequent in PD. From the initial stages of the disease onwards patients may present MCI that is mainly characterised by a fronto-subcortical cognitive profile, whereas dementia usually develops at later stages, when a pattern of posterior cortical cognitive disorder is also observed.

  6. [Dissociating between Enhancing and Impairing Effects of Emotion on Cognition].

    PubMed

    Dolcos, Florin; Denkova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emerging evidence suggests that emotion can have both enhancing and impairing effects on various cognitive processes. These opposing effects can be identified at different levels, both within the same cognitive process and across different processes, as well as at more general levels, such as in the case of the response to stress. The aim of the present review is to discuss recent advances in the mechanisms underlying the enhancing and impairing effects of emotion on different aspects within the same process (e.g., episodic memory) and across specific cognitive processes (perception vs. episodic memory, working memory vs. episodic memory), as well as in the context of the response to stress.Emerging Evidence The available evidence points to a number of aspects that dissociate the opposing effects of emotion on cognition. (i) Opposing effects within episodic memory can be attributed to different accounts, involving dissociation at different levels: central vs. peripheral trade-off, high vs. low prioritization of information processing, and items encoding vs. the formation of complex associations. (ii) The opposing effects across cognitive processes, such as perception and episodic memory, can be linked to dissociation between immediate/impairing vs. long-term/enhancing effects, which are mediated by common and dissociable neural mechanisms, involving bottom-up and top-down processes. (iii) Finally, in the larger context of the response to stress, emotional stress can lead to opposing effects depending on the degree, context, and controllability of the stressors.Conclusions Overall, the present review highlights the need to consider the various factors that can influence enhancing or impairing effects of emotion on cognition, in studies investigating emotion-cognition interactions. These issues are important for understanding mechanisms of emotion-cognition interactions not only in healthy functioning but also in emotional disturbances, where these

  7. Homocysteine, B Vitamins, and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga

    2016-07-17

    Moderately elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is a strong modifiable risk factor for vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Prospectively, elevated tHcy is associated with cognitive decline, white matter damage, brain atrophy, neurofibrillary tangles, and dementia. Most homocysteine-lowering trials with folate and vitamins B6 and/or B12 tested as protective agents against cognitive decline were poorly designed by including subjects unlikely to benefit during the trial period. In contrast, trials in high-risk subjects, which have taken into account the baseline B vitamin status, show a slowing of cognitive decline and of atrophy in critical brain regions, results that are consistent with modification of the Alzheimer's disease process. Homocysteine may interact with both risk factors and protective factors, thereby identifying people at risk but also providing potential strategies for early intervention. Public health steps to slow cognitive decline should be promoted in individuals who are at risk of dementia, and more trials are needed to see if simple interventions with nutrients can prevent progression to dementia. PMID:27431367

  8. Focal Scn1a knockdown induces cognitive impairment without seizures.

    PubMed

    Bender, Alex C; Natola, Heather; Ndong, Christian; Holmes, Gregory L; Scott, Rod C; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal

    2013-06-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common comorbidity in pediatric epilepsy that can severely affect quality of life. In many cases, antiepileptic treatments fail to improve cognition. Therefore, a fundamental question is whether underlying brain abnormalities may contribute to cognitive impairment through mechanisms independent of seizures. Here, we examined the possible effects on cognition of Nav1.1 down-regulation, a sodium channel principally involved in Dravet syndrome but also implicated in other cognitive disorders, including autism and Alzheimer's disease. Using an siRNA approach to knockdown Nav1.1 selectively in the basal forebrain region, we were able to target a learning and memory network while avoiding the generation of spontaneous seizures. We show that reduction of Nav1.1 expression in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca leads to a dysregulation of hippocampal oscillations in association with a spatial memory deficit. We propose that the underlying etiology responsible for Dravet syndrome may directly contribute to cognitive impairment in a manner that is independent from seizures.

  9. Cognitive Impairment and Rehabilitation Strategies After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Apurba; Chatterjee, Ahana; Bhide, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the present world. Around 1.6 million persons sustain TBI, whereas 200,000 die annually in India, thus highlighting the rising need for appropriate cognitive rehabilitation strategies. This literature review assesses the current knowledge of various cognitive rehabilitation training strategies. The entire spectrum of TBI severity; mild to severe, is associated with cognitive deficits of varying degree. Cognitive insufficiency is more prevalent and longer lasting in TBI persons than in the general population. A multidisciplinary approach with neuropsychiatric evaluation is warranted. Attention process training and tasks for attention deficits, compensatory strategies and errorless learning training for memory deficits, pragmatic language skills and social behavior guidance for cognitive-communication disorder, meta-cognitive strategy, and problem-solving training for executive disorder are the mainstay of therapy for cognitive deficits in persons with TBI. Cognitive impairments following TBI are common and vary widely. Different cognitive rehabilitation techniques and combinations in addition to pharmacotherapy are helpful in addressing various cognitive deficits. PMID:27335510

  10. Cognitive Impairment and Rehabilitation Strategies After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Barman, Apurba; Chatterjee, Ahana; Bhide, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the present world. Around 1.6 million persons sustain TBI, whereas 200,000 die annually in India, thus highlighting the rising need for appropriate cognitive rehabilitation strategies. This literature review assesses the current knowledge of various cognitive rehabilitation training strategies. The entire spectrum of TBI severity; mild to severe, is associated with cognitive deficits of varying degree. Cognitive insufficiency is more prevalent and longer lasting in TBI persons than in the general population. A multidisciplinary approach with neuropsychiatric evaluation is warranted. Attention process training and tasks for attention deficits, compensatory strategies and errorless learning training for memory deficits, pragmatic language skills and social behavior guidance for cognitive-communication disorder, meta-cognitive strategy, and problem-solving training for executive disorder are the mainstay of therapy for cognitive deficits in persons with TBI. Cognitive impairments following TBI are common and vary widely. Different cognitive rehabilitation techniques and combinations in addition to pharmacotherapy are helpful in addressing various cognitive deficits. PMID:27335510

  11. Using the cognitive assessment interview to screen cognitive impairment in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Elosúa, María Rosa; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Moreno-Izco, Lucía; Peralta, Victor; Ventura, Joseph; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive impairment in psychosis is closely related to functional outcome, so research into psychotic disorders is focusing most effort on treatments for improving cognition. New treatments must show not only an improvement on neuropsychological tests but also in co-primary measures of cognition. The cognitive assessment interview (CAI) is an interview-based measure of cognition which assesses the impact of cognitive deficits in patients' daily lives. Information obtained from patients and their relatives is integrated into a rater composite score. This study examines the validity of the CAI (adapted to Spanish, CAI-Sp) as a screening instrument for cognitive impairment, compared to an objective test of cognitive functioning. The psychometric properties of the CAI-Sp and its association with clinical dimensions are also explored. Eighty-one patients with a psychotic disorder and 38 healthy controls were assessed using the CAI-Sp and the screen for cognitive impairment in psychiatry (SCIP-S). Patients also underwent a clinical assessment. Poorer cognitive functioning as assessed with the CAI-Sp was associated to illness severity, specifically positive, negative and disorganised syndromes. Binary logistic regression showed that the CAI-Sp was able to detect cognitive impairment in patients, when considering CAI-Sp patient and informant information and CAI-Sp rater scores. The CAI-Sp was found to be a valid and reliable scale to assess cognitive functioning in the context of its impact on daily living. Given its ease and speed of application, the CAI-Sp could prove useful in clinical practice, though not a substitute of objective cognitive testing.

  12. Dementia and cognitive impairment: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Julie; Ganguli, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Symptoms of memory loss are caused by a range of cognitive abilities or a general cognitive decline, and not just memory. Clinicians can diagnose the syndromes of dementia (major neurocognitive disorder) and mild cognitive impairment (mild neurocognitive disorder) based on history, examination, and appropriate objective assessments, using standard criteria such as Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. They can then diagnose the causal subtypes of these syndromes using standard criteria for each of them. Brain imaging and biomarkers are making progress in the differential diagnoses among the different disorders. Treatments are still mostly symptomatic.

  13. The senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8): a model of age-related cognitive decline with relevance to alterations of the gene expression and protein abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Poon, H Fai

    2005-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is an accelerated aging model that was established through phenotypic selection from a common genetic pool of AKR/J strain of mice. The SAM model was established in 1981, including nine major senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) substrains and three major senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. Recently, SAMP8 have drawn attention in gerontological research due to its characteristic learning and memory deficits at old age. Many recent reports provide insight into mechanisms of the cognitive impairment and pathological changes in SAMP8. Therefore, this mini review examines the recent findings of SAMP8 mice abnormalities at the gene and protein levels. The genes and proteins described in this review are functionally categorized into neuroprotection, signal transduction, protein folding/degradation, cytoskeleton/transport, immune response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All of these processes are involved in learning and memory. Although these studies provide insight into the mechanisms that contribute to the learning and memory decline in aged SAMP8 mice, higher throughput techniques of proteomics and genomics are necessary to study the alterations of gene expression and protein abnormalities in SAMP8 mice brain in order to more completely understand the central nervous system dysfunction in this mouse model. The SAMP8 is a good animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of age-related learning and memory deficits at the gene and protein levels. PMID:16026957

  14. Different Patterns of Theory of Mind Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Noémie; Rauzy, Stéphane; Bonnefoi, Bernadette; Renié, Laurent; Martinez-Almoyna, Laurent; Viallet, François; Champagne-Lavau, Maud

    2015-01-01

    Theory of Mind refers to the ability to infer other’s mental states, their beliefs, intentions, or knowledge. To date, only two studies have reported the presence of Theory of Mind impairment in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In the present study,we evaluated 20 MCI patients and compared them with 25 healthy control participants using two Theory of Mind tasks. The first task was a false belief paradigm as frequently used in the literature, and the second one was a referential communication task,assessing Theory of Mind in a real situation of interaction and which had never been used before in this population. The results showed that MCI patients presented difficulties inferring another person’s beliefs about reality and attributing knowledge to them in a situation of real-life interaction. Two different patterns of Theory of Mind emerged among the patients. In comparison with the control group, some MCI patients demonstrated impairment only in the interaction task and presented isolated episodicmemory impairment, while others were impaired in both Theory of Mind tasks and presented cognitive impairment impacting both episodic memory and executive functioning. Theory of Mind is thus altered in the very early stages of cognitive impairment even in real social interaction, which could impact precociously relationships in daily life.

  15. Inflammatory mediators of cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Isabelle E.; Pascoe, Michaela C.; Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flavio; Soares, Jair C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have pointed to neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neurotrophic factors as key mediators in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Little is however known about the cascade of biological episodes underlying the cognitive deficits observed during the acute and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this review is to assess the potential association between cognitive impairment and biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotrophic activity in BD. Methods Scopus (all databases), Pubmed and Ovid Medline were systematically searched with no language or year restrictions, up to November 2013, for human studies that collected both inflammatory markers and cognitive data in BD. Selected search terms were bipolar disorder, depression, mania, psychosis, inflammatory, cognitive and neurotrophic. Results Ten human studies satisfied the criteria for consideration. The findings showed that high levels of peripheral inflammatory-cytokine, oxidative stress and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were associated with poor cognitive performance. The BDNF val66met polymorphism is a potential vulnerability factor for cognitive impairment in BD. Conclusions Current data provide preliminary evidence of a link between the cognitive decline observed in BD and mechanisms of neuroinflammation and neuroprotection. The identification of BD specific inflammatory markers and polymorphisms in inflammatory response genes may be of assistance for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24862657

  16. The Societal Impact of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Use of Social Support Resources Differs by the Severity of the Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Mark; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Stuen, Cynthia; Rubio, Roman; Oestreicher, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among persons aged 50 years and older and is most prevalent among individuals of European descent aged 65 and older (Friedman et al., 2004; Rosenthal & Thompson, 2003). By affecting central vision, AMD interferes with such tasks as reading, driving, and activities of…

  17. Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms in Poststroke Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Meena; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Chowdhury, Debashish; Patidar, Yogesh; Batra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background. Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) cause significant patient and caregiver morbidity in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Objectives. To study and compare the occurrence and severity of BPSD between multi-infarct dementia (MID), subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD), and strategic infarct subtypes of poststroke VCI and to evaluate the relationship of these symptoms with the severity of cognitive impairment. Methods. Sixty patients with poststroke VCI were classified into MID, SIVD, and strategic infarct subtypes. BPSD were studied by the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI). The severity of cognitive impairment was evaluated by the clinical dementia rating scale (CDR). Results. 95% of cases had at least one neuropsychiatric symptom, with depression being the commonest, irrespective of subtype or severity of VCI. Strategic infarct patients had the lowest frequency of all symptoms. SIVD showed a higher frequency and severity of apathy and higher total NPI scores, compared to MID. Apathy and appetite disturbances occurred more commonly with increasing CDR scores. The total NPI score correlated positively with the CDR score. Conclusion. Depression was the commonest neuropsychiatric symptom in VCI. The neuropsychiatric profiles of MID and SIVD were similar. The frequency and severity of apathy and the net burden of BPSD increased with increasing cognitive impairment. PMID:24825957

  18. Brain imaging of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Changhao; Li, Siou; Zhao, Weina; Feng, Jiachun

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease has the potential to create a major worldwide healthcare crisis. Structural MRI studies in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are currently attracting considerable interest. It is extremely important to study early structural and metabolic changes, such as those in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and gray matter structures in the medial temporal lobe, to allow the early detection of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The microstructural integrity of white matter can be studied with diffusion tensor imaging. Increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy are found in subjects with white matter damage. Functional imaging studies with positron emission tomography tracer compounds enable detection of amyloid plaques in the living brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on key findings from brain imaging studies in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, including structural brain changes studied with MRI and white matter changes seen with diffusion tensor imaging, and other specific imaging methodologies will also be discussed. PMID:25206685

  19. Buspirone for stereotypic movements in elderly with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Helvink, Badalin; Holroyd, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive and stereotypic behavioral disturbances in patients with dementia are common; however, little is known regarding successful treatments. The authors describe six cases of elderly cognitively impaired patients exhibiting repetitive and stereotypic behaviors who were treated successfully with buspirone. The cases demonstrate that buspirone may be an effective and safe treatment for patients with dementia who demonstrate repetitive and stereotypic behavior disorders.

  20. Distinct Mechanisms of Impairment in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapstone, Mark; Dickerson, Kathryn; Duffy, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Similar manifestations of functional decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease obscure differences in the underlying cognitive mechanisms of impairment. We sought to examine the contributions of top-down attentional and bottom-up perceptual factors to visual self-movement processing in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We administered a novel…

  1. Epidemiology of Osteoporosis in Women with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrager, Sarina

    2006-01-01

    Osteoporosis is increasing due to the aging of the population. Women with cognitive impairment from childhood are at disproportionally high risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Suggested explanations for this increased risk include high use of anticonvulsant medications, lower peak bone densities, and higher rates of nonambulation. Down syndrome…

  2. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  3. Nonlinguistic Cognitive Treatment for Bilingual Children with Primary Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Rentmeester-Disher, Jill; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence points to the presence of subtle weaknesses in the nonlinguistic cognitive processing skills of children with primary (or specific) language impairment (PLI). It is possible that these weaknesses contribute to the language learning difficulties that characterize PLI, and that treating them can improve language skills. To test…

  4. [Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment: Current Knowledge and Future Challenges].

    PubMed

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from various distresses, including cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment during and after cancer diagnosis and treatment are collectively called "Cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI)". The number of publications about cognitive impairment due to cancer therapy, especially chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiotherapy, has been growing. Patients often worry not only about their disease condition and therapies, but also experience concerns regarding their memory, attention, and ability to concentrate. Even subtle CRCI can have a significant impact on social relationships, the ability to work, undergo treatment, accomplish meaningful goals, and the quality of life. Longitudinal studies of cancer patients indicated that up to 75% experience CRCI during treatment. Furthermore, CRCI may persist for many years following treatment. However, it is not well understood by most physicians and medical staff. CRCI can be mediated through increased inflammatory cytokines and hormonal changes. In addition, the biology of the cancer, stress, and attentional fatigue can also contribute to CRCI. Genetic factors and co-occurring symptoms may explain some of the inter-individual variability in CRCI. Researchers and patients are actively trying to identify effective interventional methods and useful coping strategies. Many patients are willing to discuss their disease condition and future treatment with medical staff and/or their families. Some patients also hope to discuss their end-of-life care. However, it is difficult to express their will after developing cognitive impairment. Advance care planning (ACP) can help in such situations. This process involves discussion between a patient, their family, and clinicians to clarify and reflect on values, treatment preferences, and goals to develop a shared understanding of how end-of-life care should proceed. The number of cancer patients with cognitive impairment has been increasing owing to the

  5. [Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment: Current Knowledge and Future Challenges].

    PubMed

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from various distresses, including cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment during and after cancer diagnosis and treatment are collectively called "Cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI)". The number of publications about cognitive impairment due to cancer therapy, especially chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiotherapy, has been growing. Patients often worry not only about their disease condition and therapies, but also experience concerns regarding their memory, attention, and ability to concentrate. Even subtle CRCI can have a significant impact on social relationships, the ability to work, undergo treatment, accomplish meaningful goals, and the quality of life. Longitudinal studies of cancer patients indicated that up to 75% experience CRCI during treatment. Furthermore, CRCI may persist for many years following treatment. However, it is not well understood by most physicians and medical staff. CRCI can be mediated through increased inflammatory cytokines and hormonal changes. In addition, the biology of the cancer, stress, and attentional fatigue can also contribute to CRCI. Genetic factors and co-occurring symptoms may explain some of the inter-individual variability in CRCI. Researchers and patients are actively trying to identify effective interventional methods and useful coping strategies. Many patients are willing to discuss their disease condition and future treatment with medical staff and/or their families. Some patients also hope to discuss their end-of-life care. However, it is difficult to express their will after developing cognitive impairment. Advance care planning (ACP) can help in such situations. This process involves discussion between a patient, their family, and clinicians to clarify and reflect on values, treatment preferences, and goals to develop a shared understanding of how end-of-life care should proceed. The number of cancer patients with cognitive impairment has been increasing owing to the

  6. Charles Bonnet syndrome and cognitive impairment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Russell, Gregor; Burns, Alistair

    2014-05-22

    ABSTRACT Background: Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is defined as complex persistent visual hallucinations in the absence of mental disorder. It is common in conditions causing significant visual impairment. Many authors advise reassurance, considering the condition benign. However, others have suggested that CBS may in some patients represent the early stages of dementia. This review seeks to systematically examine the evidence for any link between CBS and cognitive impairment. Methods: Literature search using OVID Medline, PsychINFO, and Embase. Results: Three studies where cognitive functioning was the primary focus of the research were found. All were small, did not properly apply diagnostic criteria, and reported conflicting results. Eight other studies commented on cognitive functioning, but none used tests sufficiently sensitive to detect changes seen in early dementia. One hundred and thirty four case reports were scrutinized, and reports found of 16 patients with CBS where dementia emerged. High rates of partial insight at diagnosis of CBS were seen in these patients. Conclusions: There have been no adequately powered studies, using accepted diagnostic criteria, where changes in cognitive functioning were the primary outcome. Existing studies are of limited methodological quality and allow no conclusion regarding a relationship between cognitive impairment and CBS to be reached. Numerous case reports of dementia developing in patients with CBS and partial insight raise the possibility of a link between these conditions. There is a clear need for properly constructed studies to investigate this.

  7. [Cognitive impairments in alcohol dependence: From screening to treatment improvements].

    PubMed

    Cabé, N; Laniepce, A; Ritz, L; Lannuzel, C; Boudehent, C; Vabret, F; Eustache, F; Beaunieux, H; Pitel, A-L

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol-related cognitive impairments are largely underestimated in clinical practice, even though they could limit the benefit of alcohol treatment and hamper the patient's ability to remain abstinent or to respect his/her therapeutic contract. These neuropsychological deficits can impact the management of patients well before the development of the well-known Korsakoff's syndrome. Indeed, even in the absence of ostensible neurological complications, excessive and chronic alcohol consumption results in damage of brain structure and function. The frontocerebellar circuit and the circuit of Papez, respectively involved in motor and executive abilities and episodic memory, are mainly affected. Those brain dysfunctions are associated with neuropsychological deficits, including deficits of executive functions, episodic memory, social cognition, as well as visuospatial and motor abilities. Such cognitive disorders can interfere with the motivation process to abandon maladjusted drinking behavior in favor of a healthier lifestyle (such as abstinence or controlled alcohol consumption). They can also limit the patient's capacity to fully benefit from treatment (notably psychoeducation and cognitive-behavioural treatments) currently widely proposed in French Addiction departments. In addition, they may contribute to relapse which is multi-determinated. A neuropsychological assessment appears therefore crucial to take relevant clinical decisions. However, very few addiction departments have the human and financial resources to conduct an extensive neuropsychological examination of all patients with alcohol dependence. Some brief screening tools can be used, notably the MOntreal Cognitive Assessment and the Brief Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neuropsychological Impairments, which has been especially designed to assess cognitive and motor deficits in alcoholism. These tools can be used by non-psychologist clinicians to detect alcohol-related cognitive deficits, which require

  8. Cognitive Impairments Preceding and Outlasting Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Robert; Davis, Jennifer; Roth, Julie; Querfurth, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be the initial manifestation of autoimmune limbic encephalitis (ALE), a disorder that at times presents a diagnostic challenge. In addition to memory impairment, clinical features that might suggest this disorder include personality changes, agitation, insomnia, alterations of consciousness, and seizures. Once recognized, ALE typically responds to treatment with immune therapies, but long-term cognitive deficits may remain. We report two cases of patients with MCI who were ultimately diagnosed with ALE with antibodies against the voltage gated potassium channel complex. Months after apparent resolution of their encephalitides, both underwent neuropsychological testing, which demonstrated persistent cognitive deficits, primarily in the domains of memory and executive function, for cases 1 and 2, respectively. A brief review of the literature is included. PMID:26881156

  9. Orthostatic hypotension and cognitive impairment: a dangerous association?

    PubMed

    Sambati, Luisa; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Poda, Roberto; Guaraldi, Pietro; Cortelli, Pietro

    2014-06-01

    Many studies have addressed the relation between orthostatic hypotension (OH) and cognitive impairment (CI) in the elderly, in mild cognitive impairment, vascular and neurodegenerative dementias and movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. However, results concerning both the increased coexistence of the two conditions and their causal relationship remain controversial. According to the literature three hypotheses can be formulated on the relation between OH and CI. In neurodegenerative disease, OH and CI may result from a common pathological process which affects areas involved in both cognition and cardiovascular autonomic control. Alternatively, OH may lead to cerebral hypoperfusion which is supposed to play a role in the development of CI. Finally, recent data suggest that CI should probably be considered more a transient symptom of OH than a chronic effect. This study reviews the literature reports on the relationship between OH and CI, and emphasises the need for longitudinal studies designed to investigate this topic.

  10. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  11. Is Mild Cognitive Impairment a Precursor of Alzheimer's Disease? Short Review.

    PubMed

    Janoutová, Jana; Šerý, Omar; Hosák, Ladislav; Janout, Vladimír

    2015-12-01

    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) may be a precursor of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a boundary area between normal aging and dementia. In practice, the term "age related cognitive decline" has been used interchangeably with "normal aging". Alternatively, the term "aging associated cognitive decline" was introduced and defined by a performance on a standardized cognitive scale focused on learning and memory, attention and cognitive speed, language, or visuoconstructional abilities. The term "mild cognitive impairment" was adopted by Petersen in 2004 to describe a period in the course of neurodegenerative disease where cognition is no longer normal relative to age expectations, however, daily functions are not sufficiently disrupted to correlate with the diagnosis of dementia. Most of the literature refers to the amnestic form of MCI, which is likely a precursor of AD. The rate of conversion from amnestic form of MCI to AD is estimated to reach 10-15% per year. That is why MCI generated a great deal of research. When considering MCI a precursor of AD, it seems reasonable to study AD genetic markers in the MCI patients. In AD, association studies focus on genetic polymorphisms assumed to have an effect on the expression and modulation function of genes associated with AD pathogenesis (ApoE, APP, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, tau protein), and on polymorphisms related to metabolism of the aforementioned proteins (splicing, degradation). Neuropsychological assesment plays a substantial role in the diagnosis of MCI, especially in the case of identification of different MCI subtypes or typical profiles of cognitive performance in prodromal phases of neurodegenerative diseases. The optimal composition of diet may increase an average age and prevent impairment of cognitive functions at the same time. Despite the progress in early diagnosis of MCI and dementia, further research is needed on differential diagnosis and treatment. In amnestic subtype of MCI some genetic

  12. Mild Cognitive Impairment and Susceptibility to Scams in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. Duke; Boyle, Patricia A.; James, Bryan D.; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Falling victim to financial scams can have a significant impact upon social and financial wellbeing and independence. A large proportion of scam victims are older adults, but whether older victims with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at higher risk remains unknown. Objective We tested the hypothesis that older persons with MCI exhibit greater susceptibility to scams compared to those without cognitive impairment. Methods Seven hundred and thirty older adults without dementia were recruited from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based epidemiologic study of aging. Participants completed a five-item self-report measure of susceptibility to scams, a battery of cognitive measures, and clinical diagnostic evaluations. Results In models adjusted for age, education, and gender, the presence of MCI was associated with greater susceptibility to scams (B = 0.125, SE = 0.063, p-value = 0.047). Further, in analyses of the role of specific cognitive systems in susceptibility to scams among persons with MCI (n = 144), the level of performance in two systems, episodic memory and perceptual speed abilities, were associated with susceptibility. Conclusions Adults with MCI may be more susceptible to scams in old age than older persons with normal cognition. Lower abilities in specific cognitive systems, particularly perceptual speed and episodic memory, may contribute to greater susceptibility to scams in those with MCI. PMID:26519434

  13. Mild cognitive impairment: a cross-national comparison

    PubMed Central

    Arnaiz, E; Almkvist, O; Ivnik, R; Tangalos, E; Wahlund, L; Winblad, B; Petersen, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this collaborative study was to assess the comparability of the most commonly used criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) by comparing the cognitive performance of patients with MCI from the Mayo Clinic (USA) and the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden). Methods: Standardised neuropsychological test scores were used to compare the two samples from the two institutions with regard to the number of cognitive domains in which performance was below 1.5 SD. Possible predictors for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD) were assessed. Results: When the two institutions were considered together in the Cox proportional hazard model, the number of affected cognitive domains below 1.5 SD was a significant predictor of time to AD diagnosis with age, education, and APOE ε4 genotype entered into the same model as covariates. The number of affected cognitive areas remained as a significant predictor when the institutions were considered separately. The logistic regression model of conversion to AD showed that only tests assessing learning and retention were predictors of developing AD. Conclusions: Differences in population as well as in methodology of case ascertainment as well as other aspects may account for the observed variability between samples of patients with MCI. The number of impaired cognitive factors at baseline can predict the progression from MCI to AD. Furthermore, tests assessing learning and retention are the best predictors for progression to AD. PMID:15314114

  14. Cognitive impairment in Huntington disease: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jane S

    2011-10-01

    Cognition has been well characterized in the various stages of Huntington disease (HD) as well as in the prodrome before the motor diagnosis is given. Although the clinical diagnosis of HD relies on the manifestation of motor abnormalities, the associated impairments have been growing in prominence for several reasons. First, research to understand the most debilitating aspects of HD has suggested that cognitive and behavioral changes place the greatest burden on families, are most highly associated with functional decline, and can be predictive of institutionalization. Second, cognitive impairments are evident at least 15 years prior to the time at which motor diagnosis is given. Finally, cognitive decline is associated with biological markers such as brain atrophy, circulating levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factors, and insulin-like growth factor 1. Efforts are now underway to develop valid and reliable measures of cognition in the prodrome as well as in all stages of HD so that clinical trials can be conducted using cognitive outcomes.

  15. The Cognitive and Neural Expression of Semantic Memory Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joubert, Sven; Brambati, Simona M.; Ansado, Jennyfer; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Felician, Olivier; Didic, Mira; Lacombe, Jacinthe; Goldstein, Rachel; Chayer, Celine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Semantic deficits in Alzheimer's disease have been widely documented, but little is known about the integrity of semantic memory in the prodromal stage of the illness. The aims of the present study were to: (i) investigate naming abilities and semantic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), early Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to…

  16. Changes in Patterns of Age-Related Visual Impairment in the Netherlands: A Comparison of Two Cohorts of Patients Referred to Rehabilitation Programs 10 Years Apart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rens, Ger H. M. B.; Lens, Judith A.; de Boer, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Most of the studies of the causes of visual impairment have been population-based studies. These population-based studies provide important information on the incidence and prevalence of "theoretical" eye problems in a community. However, not all those who are visually impaired, from a theoretical point of view, consider themselves as such and…

  17. Pumps, Aqueducts, and Drought Management: vascular physiology in vascular cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Randolph S; Lazar, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment has been traditionally defined by structural pathology – an accumulation of infarcts -- leading to progressive cognitive decline. Recent evidence, however, suggests that cognitive impairment may be independently mediated by hemodynamic dysfunction including global and hemispheral hypoperfusion and altered cerebral blood flow regulation. In this review we examine evidence for the contribution of hemodynamic impairment to cognitive dysfunction in the setting of large vessel disease, cardiac failure, and microvascular disease. If there is a hemodynamic component of vascular cognitive impairment, then treatments proposed to correct impaired vascular physiology may reasonably be expected to treat the cognitive dysfunction as well. PMID:21148438

  18. Bipolar Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Shared Mechanisms and New Treatment Avenues.

    PubMed

    Depp, Colin A; Dev, Sheena; Eyler, Lisa T

    2016-03-01

    Depression and cognitive impairment are pervasive and highly disabling aspects of bipolar disorder. Although cognitive impairment is partially independent from mood episodes, depressive symptoms may increase the risk of cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder through inflammatory processes as well as health risks such as obesity and sedentary behavior. Novel treatment avenues at the intersection of bipolar depression and cognitive impairment target inflammation directly or indirectly health behaviors such as diet, physical activity, and sleep hygiene.

  19. Bipolar Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Shared Mechanisms and New Treatment Avenues.

    PubMed

    Depp, Colin A; Dev, Sheena; Eyler, Lisa T

    2016-03-01

    Depression and cognitive impairment are pervasive and highly disabling aspects of bipolar disorder. Although cognitive impairment is partially independent from mood episodes, depressive symptoms may increase the risk of cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder through inflammatory processes as well as health risks such as obesity and sedentary behavior. Novel treatment avenues at the intersection of bipolar depression and cognitive impairment target inflammation directly or indirectly health behaviors such as diet, physical activity, and sleep hygiene. PMID:26876321

  20. Cognitive aspects of frailty: mechanisms behind the link between frailty and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Halil, M; Cemal Kizilarslanoglu, M; Emin Kuyumcu, M; Yesil, Y; Cruz Jentoft, A J

    2015-03-01

    Whereas physical impairment is the main hallmark of frailty, evidence suggests that other dimensions, such as psychological, cognitive and social factors also contribute to this multidimensional condition. Cognition is now considered a relevant domain of frailty. Cognitive and physical frailty interact: cognitive problems and dementia are more prevalent in physically frail individuals, and those with cognitive impairment are more prone to become frail. Disentangling the relationship between cognition and frailty may lead to new intervention strategies for the prevention and treatment of both conditions. Both frailty and cognitive decline share common potential mechanisms. This review examines the relationship between frailty and cognitive decline and explores the role of vascular changes, hormones, vitamin D, inflammation, insulin resistance, and nutrition in the development of physical frailty and cognitive problems, as potential underlying mechanisms behind this link. Dual tasking studies may be a useful way to explore and understand the relation between cognitive and physical frailty. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex relation to improve the outcomes of frailty.

  1. Sleep disturbances and mild cognitive impairment: A review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Alves Pachota Chaves

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mild cognitive impaired (MCI) is viewed as a transitional stage from normal to dementia. The aim of this study is analyze the sleep disturbances in subjects diagnosed as carries MCI. Methods A review of the literature was conducted in order to document sleeps problems in the context of MCI. Results Among the studies that compares the prevalence of sleep disturbances between subjects with MCI and those with normal cognition demonstrated that night time behaviors are more common in MCI patients (18.3–45.5%) than in normal population (10.9–23.3%). Conclusions Sleep disturbance is prevalent and predictive of cognitive decline in older people and in those with neurodegenerative disorders. The sleep problems have to be identified and treat to preserve the cognition and the MCI subjects with sleep disturbances have to be follow more closely to identify the initial signs of dementia. PMID:26483941

  2. Caspase-3-Dependent Proteolytic Cleavage of Tau Causes Neurofibrillary Tangles and Results in Cognitive Impairment During Normal Aging.

    PubMed

    Means, John C; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Sumien, Nathalie; Payne, Andrew J; Stark, Danny A; Borden, Priscilla K; Price, Jeffrey L; Koulen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are important for understanding how pathological signaling cascades change neural circuitry and with time interrupt cognitive function. Here, we introduce a non-genetic preclinical model for aging and show that it exhibits cleaved tau protein, active caspases and neurofibrillary tangles, hallmarks of AD, causing behavioral deficits measuring cognitive impairment. To our knowledge this is the first report of a non-transgenic, non-interventional mouse model displaying structural, functional and molecular aging deficits associated with AD and other tauopathies in humans with potentially high impact on both new basic research into pathogenic mechanisms and new translational research efforts. Tau aggregation is a hallmark of tauopathies, including AD. Recent studies have indicated that cleavage of tau plays an important role in both tau aggregation and disease. In this study we use wild type mice as a model for normal aging and resulting age-related cognitive impairment. We provide evidence that aged mice have increased levels of activated caspases, which significantly correlates with increased levels of truncated tau and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, cognitive decline was significantly correlated with increased levels of caspase activity and tau truncated by caspase-3. Experimentally induced inhibition of caspases prevented this proteolytic cleavage of tau and the associated formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Our study shows the strength of using a non-transgenic model to study structure, function and molecular mechanisms in aging and age related diseases of the brain. PMID:27220334

  3. Impaired cognitive function and mental performance in mild dehydration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M-M G; Morley, J E

    2003-12-01

    Dehydration is a reliable predictor of impaired cognitive status. Objective data, using tests of cortical function, support the deterioration of mental performance in mildly dehydrated younger adults. Dehydration frequently results in delirium as a manifestation of cognitive dysfunction. Although, the occurrence of delirium suggests transient acute global cerebral dysfunction, cognitive impairment may not be completely reversible. Animal studies have identified neuronal mitochondrial damage and glutamate hypertransmission in dehydrated rats. Additional studies have identified an increase in cerebral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity (nitric oxide synthase, NOS) with dehydration. Available evidence also implicates NOS as a neurotransmitter in long-term potentiation, rendering this a critical enzyme in facilitating learning and memory. With ageing, a reduction of NOS activity has been identified in the cortex and striatum of rats. The reduction of NOs synthase activity that occurs with ageing may blunt the rise that occurs with dehydration, and possibly interfere with memory processing and cognitive function. Dehydration has been shown to be a reliable predictor of increasing frailty, deteriorating mental performance and poor quality of life. Intervention models directed toward improving outcomes in dehydration must incorporate strategies to enhance prompt recognition of cognitive dysfunction.

  4. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  5. Mild cognitive impairment and its management in older people

    PubMed Central

    Eshkoor, Sima Ataollahi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Mun, Chan Yoke; Ng, Chee Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a common condition in the elderly. It is characterized by deterioration of memory, attention, and cognitive function that is beyond what is expected based on age and educational level. MCI does not interfere significantly with individuals’ daily activities. It can act as a transitional level of evolving dementia with a range of conversion of 10%–15% per year. Thus, it is crucial to protect older people against MCI and developing dementia. The preventive interventions and appropriate treatments should improve cognitive performance, and retard or prevent progressive deficits. The avoidance of toxins, reduction of stress, prevention of somatic diseases, implementation of mental and physical exercises, as well as the use of dietary compounds like antioxidants and supplements can be protective against MCI. The modification of risk factors such as stopping smoking, as well as the treatment of deficiency in vitamins and hormones by correcting behaviors and lifestyle, can prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. The progressive increase in the growth rate of the elderly population can enhance the rate of MCI all over the world. There is no exact cure for MCI and dementia; therefore, further studies are needed in the future to determine causes of MCI and risk factors of progression from MCI to dementia. This will help to find better ways for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment worldwide. PMID:25914527

  6. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Mark A.; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q.; Tempesta, Zechari R.; Knight, Robert T.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15–53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20–30 years) and older (60–70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <−1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise

  7. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <-1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in

  8. Impairments in social cognition following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Skye

    2013-03-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to physical, neuropsychological, and emotional deficits that interfere with the individual’s capacity to return to his or her former lifestyle. This review focuses on social cognition, that is, the capacity to attend to, recognize and interpret interpersonal cues that guide social behavior. Social cognition entails ‘‘hot’’ processes, that is, emotion perception and emotional empathy and ‘‘cold’’ processes, that is, the ability to infer the beliefs, feelings, and intentions of others (theory of mind: ToM) to see their point of view (cognitive empathy) and what they mean when communicating (pragmatic inference). This review critically examines research attesting to deficits in each of these domains and also examines evidence for theorized mechanisms including specific neural networks, the role of simulation, and non-social cognition. Current research is hampered by small, heterogeneous samples and the inherent complexity of TBI pathology. Nevertheless, there is evidence that facets of social cognition are impaired in this population. New assessment tools to measure social cognition following TBI are required that predict everyday social functioning. In addition, research into remediation needs to be guided by the growing empirical base for understanding social cognition that may yet reveal how deficits dissociate following TBI. PMID:23351330

  9. Knowingly not wanting to know: Discourses of people diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sian; Lamers, Carolien; Salisbury, Katie

    2016-09-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is a heterogeneous clinical state whereby assessed cognitive changes over time may progress to dementia, remain stable or revert to back to normal. This study aimed to identify, through discourse analysis, how people with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment used language in order to reveal the societal views and shared meanings of the diagnosis, and the positions taken by people. Seven people with mild cognitive impairment were interviewed, and three discourses emerged during analysis. One of the discourses revealed was 'Not Knowing' about mild cognitive impairment. Furthermore, in the absence of a coherent discourse related to mild cognitive impairment, participants went on to position themselves between two more familiar discourse; 'Knowing' about ageing and dying and 'Not Wanting to Know' about dementia. Clinicians must consider how information is presented to people about mild cognitive impairment, including where mild cognitive impairment is positioned in respect to normal ageing and dementia.

  10. Brain Rhythms Connect Impaired Inhibition to Altered Cognition in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin R.; Kocsis, Bernat; Vijayan, Sujith; Whittington, Miles A.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, schizophrenia research has focused on inhibitory interneuron dysfunction at the level of neurobiology, and on cognitive impairments at the psychological level. Reviewing both experimental and computational findings, we show how the temporal structure of the activity of neuronal populations, exemplified by brain rhythms, can begin to bridge these levels of complexity. Oscillations in neuronal activity tie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia to alterations in local processing and large-scale coordination, and these alterations in turn can lead to the cognitive and perceptual disturbances observed in schizophrenia. PMID:25850619

  11. Immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in MS.

    PubMed

    Berger, T

    2016-09-01

    In this review, the immune-to-brain communication pathways are briefly summarized, with emphasis on the impact of immune cells and their mediators on learning, memory and other cognitive domains. Further, the acute response of the central nervous system to peripherally generated inflammatory stimuli - termed as sickness behaviour - is described, and the central role of microglia in this immune-to-brain crosstalk in physiological and pathological conditions is highlighted. Finally, the role and consequences of immunological processes related to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis are discussed. PMID:27580904

  12. Dealing with mild cognitive impairment: help for patients and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Donald L

    2013-11-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a unique entity in the spectrum of syndromes of cognitive loss. Many patients referred for evaluation of memory loss come with an assumption that they already have dementia. When patients are diagnosed with MCI, they and their caregivers have to deal with the challenge of uncertainties. Patient and family education must stress the uncertainty of whether the deficits will progress. This article aims to guide the clinician who has reached a diagnosis of MCI and is working with the patient and family on coping with the uncertainties of MCI.

  13. Effectiveness of exercise on cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Sandor; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Frederico, Santos de Santana; Prestes, Jonato; Balsamo, Denise Coscrato; Dahan, da Cunha Nascimento; Dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo; Nobrega, Otávio T

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity has a protective effect on brain function in older people. Here, we briefly reviewed the studies and results related to the effects of exercise on cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The main findings from the current body of literature indicate positive evidence for structured physical activity (cardiorespiratory and resistance exercise) as a promising non-pharmacological intervention for preventing cognitive decline. More studies are needed to determine the mechanisms involved in this preventative effect, including on strength, cardiorespiratory, and other types of exercise. Thus, the prevention of Alzheimer's disease may depend on healthy lifestyle habits, such as a structured physical fitness program.

  14. Nutritional interventions protect against age-related deficits in behavior: from animals to humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks. Similar changes in behavior occur in humans with age, and the development of methods to retard or reverse these age-related neuronal and behavioral deficits could increase healthy aging and decrease health care costs. In the present s...

  15. Cognitive Training for Impaired Neural Systems in Neuropsychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Sophia; Fisher, Melissa; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric illnesses are associated with dysfunction in distributed prefrontal neural systems that underlie perception, cognition, social interactions, emotion regulation, and motivation. The high degree of learning-dependent plasticity in these networks—combined with the availability of advanced computerized technology—suggests that we should be able to engineer very specific training programs that drive meaningful and enduring improvements in impaired neural systems relevant to neuropsychiatric illness. However, cognitive training approaches for mental and addictive disorders must take into account possible inherent limitations in the underlying brain ‘learning machinery' due to pathophysiology, must grapple with the presence of complex overlearned maladaptive patterns of neural functioning, and must find a way to ally with developmental and psychosocial factors that influence response to illness and to treatment. In this review, we briefly examine the current state of knowledge from studies of cognitive remediation in psychiatry and we highlight open questions. We then present a systems neuroscience rationale for successful cognitive training for neuropsychiatric illnesses, one that emphasizes the distributed nature of neural assemblies that support cognitive and affective processing, as well as their plasticity. It is based on the notion that, during successful learning, the brain represents the relevant perceptual and cognitive/affective inputs and action outputs with disproportionately larger and more coordinated populations of neurons that are distributed (and that are interacting) across multiple levels of processing and throughout multiple brain regions. This approach allows us to address limitations found in earlier research and to introduce important principles for the design and evaluation of the next generation of cognitive training for impaired neural systems. We summarize work to date using such neuroscience-informed methods and indicate

  16. Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uguccioni, Ginevra; Lavault, Sophie; Chaumereuil, Charlotte; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Gagnon, Jean-François; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: In Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS), episodes of hypersomnia, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances alternate with asymptomatic periods. Because 50% of patients report decreased academic performances, we evaluated their cognitive status during asymptomatic periods, determinants of deficits, and changes during follow-up. Methods: The cognitive assessment during asymptomatic periods in all consecutive patients with typical KLS and healthy controls included the non-verbal intelligence quotient (Raven Progressive Matrices), the Trail Making Test, the Stroop Color-Word Test, the Wechsler Memory Test, verbal fluencies, the Free and Cued Learning Memory Test, and the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure. Cognitive status was reevaluated after 0.5 to 2 y in 44 patients. Results: At baseline, compared with the 42 controls, the 122 patients with KLS exhibited lower non-verbal intelligence quotient, speed of processing, attention, and reduced retrieval strategies in episodic memory. Higher episode frequency, shorter episode duration, shorter time since last episode, deeper sleep, and megaphagia during episodes predicted impaired memory. The visuoconstructional abilities and non-verbal memory were intact. After a mean follow-up of 1.7 ± 1.0 y, the episode frequency decreased from 4.6 ± 4.8 to 1.7 ± 1.9/y. The logical reasoning and attention improved, the processing speed remained low, and the retrieval strategies in verbal memory further worsened. Conclusions: In this field study, one-third of patients with KLS have long-term cognitive deficits affecting retrieval and processing speed. Cognitive function should be systematically tested in patients with KLS, which appears important to help patients in their academic studies. Citation: Uguccioni G, Lavault S, Chaumereuil C, Golmard JL, Gagnon JF, Arnulf I. Long-term cognitive impairment in kleine-levin syndrome. SLEEP 2016;39(2):429–438. PMID:26414895

  17. Animal Models of Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID).

    PubMed

    Gooch, Jennifer; Wilcock, Donna M

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is the most common etiology of dementia in the elderly. Both, vascular and Alzheimer's disease, pathologies work synergistically to create neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. The main causes of VCID include hemorrhage/microbleed (i.e., hyperhomocysteinemia), cerebral small vessel disease, multi-infarct dementia, severe hypoperfusion (i.e., bilateral common carotid artery stenosis), strategic infarct, angiopathy (i.e., cerebral angiopathy), and hereditary vasculopathy (i.e., cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy). In this review, we will discuss the experimental animal models that have been developed to study these pathologies. We will discuss the limitations and strengths of these models and the important research findings that have advanced the field through the use of the models. PMID:26988696

  18. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: contributions from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John P; Fine, David F; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are major public health burdens associated with aging. As the age of the population rapidly increases, a sheer increase in the incidence of these diseases is expected. Research has identified T2D as a risk factor for cognitive impairment and potentially AD, but the neurobiological pathways that are affected are only beginning to be understood. The rapid advances in neuroimaging in the past decade have added significant understanding to how T2D affects brain structure and function and possibly lead to AD. This article provides a review of studies that have utilized structural and functional neuroimaging to identify neural pathways that link T2D to impaired cognitive performance and potentially AD. A primary focus of this article is the potential for neuroimaging to assist in understanding the mechanistic pathways that may provide translational opportunities for clinical intervention.

  19. Deficits in episodic memory retrieval reveal impaired default mode network connectivity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Cameron J.; Duffy, Shantel L; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim; Lewis, Simon J.G.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Shine, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is believed to represent a transitional stage between normal healthy ageing and the development of dementia. In particular, aMCI patients have been shown to have higher annual transition rates to Alzheimer's Disease (AD) than individuals without cognitive impairment. Despite intensifying interest investigating the neuroanatomical basis of this transition, there remain a number of questions regarding the pathophysiological process underlying aMCI itself. A number of recent studies in aMCI have shown specific impairments in connectivity within the default mode network (DMN), which is a group of regions strongly related to episodic memory capacities. However to date, no study has investigated the integrity of the DMN between patients with aMCI and those with a non-amnestic pattern of MCI (naMCI), who have cognitive impairment, but intact memory storage systems. In this study, we contrasted the DMN connectivity in 24 aMCI and 33 naMCI patients using seed-based resting state fMRI. The two groups showed no statistical difference in their DMN intra-connectivity. However when connectivity was analysed according to performance on measures of episodic memory retrieval, the two groups were separable, with aMCI patients demonstrating impaired functional connectivity between the hippocampal formation and the posterior cingulate cortex. We provide evidence that this lack of connectivity is driven by impaired communication from the posterior cingulate hub and does not simply represent hippocampal atrophy, suggesting that posterior cingulate degeneration is the driving force behind impaired DMN connectivity in aMCI. PMID:24634833

  20. Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Julie; Ganguli, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Clinicians can diagnose the syndromes of dementia (major neurocognitive disorder) and mild cognitive impairment (mild neurocognitive disorder) based on history, examination, and appropriate objective assessments, using standard criteria such as DSM-5. They can then diagnose the etiological subtypes of these syndromes using standard criteria for each of them. Brain imaging and biomarkers are gaining ground for the differential diagnoses among the different disorders. Treatments for the most part are still symptomatic. PMID:25037289

  1. Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neurodegeneration, and Personalized Lifestyle Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The takeaway message of this advancing science surrounding the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is to recognize MCI symptoms early and intervene with a comprehensive, multifaceted, personalized lifestyle medicine program that is designed to improve neurological function and built on the components described above. The present evidence suggests this approach represents the best medicine available today for beating back the rising tide of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:27330484

  2. Persistence of Cognitive Impairment after Resolution of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Schubert, Christine M; Heuman, Douglas M; Wade, James B; Gibson, Douglas P; Topaz, Allyne; Saeian, Kia; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Bell, Debulon E; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R Todd; Luketic, Velimir; White, Melanie B; Sanyal, Arun J

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims In patients with cirrhosis, hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has acute but reversible as well as chronic components. We investigated the extent of residual cognitive impairment following clinical resolution of overt HE (OHE). Methods Cognitive function of cirrhotic patients was evaluated using psychometric tests (digit symbol [DS], block design [BD], and number connection [NCT-A&B]) and the inhibitory control test (ICT). Improvement (reduction) in ICT lures and 1st minus 2nd halves (ΔL1–2) were used to determine learning of response inhibition. Two cross-sectional studies (A and B) compared data from stable cirrhotics, with or without prior OHE. We then prospectively assessed cognitive performance, before and after the first episode of OHE. Results In study A, (226 cirrhotic patients) 54 had experienced OHE, 120 had minimal HE and 52 with no minimal HE. Despite normal mental status on lactulose after OHE, cirrhotics were cognitively impaired, based on results from all tests. Learning of response inhibition (ΔL1–2 ≥1), was evident in patients with minimal HE and no minimal HE, but was lost after OHE. In study B (50 additional patients who developed ≥1 documented OHE episode during follow-up), the number of OHE hospitalizations correlated with severity of residual impairment, indicated by ICT lures (r=0.5, P=0.0001), DST (r=−0.39, P=0.002) and NCT-B (r=0.33, P=0.04). In the prospective study (59 cirrhotics without OHE), 15 developed OHE; ICT lure response worsened significantly after OHE (12 before vs.18 after, P=0.0003) and learning of response inhibition was lost. The 44 patients who did not experience OHE did not have deteriorations in cognitive function in serial testing. Conclusion In cirrhosis, episodes of OHE are associated with persistent and cumulative deficits in working memory, response inhibition, and learning. PMID:20178797

  3. Functional MRI in investigating cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rocca, M A; De Meo, E; Filippi, M

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that the severity of the clinical manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) does not simply result from the extent of tissue destruction, but it rather represents a complex balance between tissue damage, tissue repair, and cortical reorganization. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides information about the plasticity of the human brain. Therefore, it has the potential to provide important pieces of information about brain reorganization following MS-related structural damage. When investigating cognitive systems, fMRI changes have been described in virtually all patients with MS and different clinical phenotypes. These functional changes have been related to the extent of brain damage within and outside T2-visible lesions as well as to the involvement of specific central nervous system structures. It has also been suggested that a maladaptive recruitment of specific brain regions might be associated with the appearance of clinical symptoms in MS, such as fatigue and cognitive impairment. fMRI studies from clinically (and cognitively) impaired MS patients may be influenced by different task performances between patients and controls. As a consequence, new strategies have been introduced to assess the role, if any, of brain reorganization in severely impaired patients, including the analysis of resting-state networks. The enhancement of any beneficial effects of this brain adaptive plasticity should be considered as a potential target of therapy for MS. PMID:27580905

  4. [How to care for elderly patients with cognitive impairment?].

    PubMed

    Rainfray, M

    2015-10-01

    Mild cognitive impairment occurs frequently with ageing, concerning memory complaint, attention and executive dysfunction without any consequence on the activities of daily living. They are strongly linked to the presence of vascular risk factors in adulthood. Nevertheless with the continuous progression of life expectancy, the incidence of dementia drastically increases after sixty-five years of age and the number of old people with dementia is expected to increase by 75% in 2030 in France. Caring for elderly patients with cancer needs to face the possibility of cognitive impairment and its consequences on a good comprehension of diagnosis and treatment and ability to properly take medication. Comprehensive geriatric assessment can help to diagnose cognitive impairment and evaluate the consequences on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and activities of daily living (ADL). Home care may be organised with the help of the family or social workers. Physiotherapy and speech rehabilitation are often useful. Assistance for housekeeping, shopping and cooking may be financed by social organisations such as APA in France. Complex cases must be referred to case managers in homes for patients suffering for Alzheimer's disease (MAIA) who liaise between doctors and home carers with good results. PMID:26277239

  5. Social problem solving, social cognition, and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel J; Simpson, Anna C; Channon, Shelley; Samuel, Michael; Brown, Richard G

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is a recognized feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), which, even if mild, can impact some aspects of a patient's ability to deal with everyday life. The current study examined the ability to solve social problems in three groups of participants: PD patients with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI); PD patients with no evidence of cognitive impairment (PD-N); and non-PD age-matched controls. All participants completed measures examining their ability to understand the actions and sarcastic remarks of others; provide a range of, and select, optimal solutions to social problems; and their self-perception of problem-solving abilities. Deficits emerged in the PD-MCI, but not the PD-N, group, suggesting that difficulties related to pathophysiological changes are associated with cognitive impairment and not PD per se. The findings are discussed with reference to the substrate of executive function and social cognition, and their implications for social interaction and everyday problem solving for people with PD. PMID:23067384

  6. Cognitive complaints correlate with depression rather than concurrent objective cognitive impairment in the SAGE baseline sample

    PubMed Central

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Moore, Raeanne C.; Palmer, Barton W.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Whether subjective cognitive complaints are suggestive of depression or concurrent cognitive impairment in older adults without dementia remains unclear. The current study examined this question in a large (N=1,000), randomly-selected community-based sample of adults ages 51-99 without a formal diagnosis of dementia (Successful AGing Evaluation study-SAGE). Methods The modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-m) measured objective cognitive function, the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) measured subjective cognitive complaints, and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) measured depression. Spearman rho correlations and linear regression models were conducted to examine the relationship among variables in the baseline SAGE sample. Results There was a weak association between TICS-m and CFQ scores (rho= -.12); however a moderate to large association was observed for CFQ and PHQ-9 (rho= .44). Scores on the CFQ were not associated with TICS-m scores (β=-.03, p=.42) after controlling for PHQ-9 and variables of interest, such as age, gender, ethnicity, and physical functioning, while PHQ-9 was significantly associated with CFQ scores (β=.46, p<.001) after controlling for variables of interest. Conclusions Subjective cognitive complaints are more likely related to symptoms of depression rather than concurrent cognitive impairment in a large cross-section of community-dwelling adults without a formal diagnosis of dementia. PMID:24614203

  7. Positive effects of computer-based cognitive training in adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Herrera, C; Chambon, C; Michel, B F; Paban, V; Alescio-Lautier, B

    2012-07-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a 12-week computer-based memory-attention training program based on recognition in subjects with A-MCI and compared their performances with those of A-MCI controls trained in cognitively stimulating activities. The effect of training was assessed by comparing outcome measures in pre- and post-tests 15 days before and after training. To evaluate the duration of training benefits, a follow-up test session was performed 6 months after memory and attention training or cognitively stimulating activities. Outcome measures showed that the trained group, compared to control group, improved episodic recall and recognition. Six months after training, scores remained at the level of the post-test. Since the training program was exclusively based on recognition, our results showed a generalization from recognition to recall processes, which are memory components that represent part of the core cognitive impairments in individuals at risk of converting to AD. Thus, cognitive training based on recognition holds promise as a preventive therapeutic method and could be proposed as a non-pharmacological early-intervention strategy. Future investigations need to focus on methodological constraints and delineating possible neuroplastic mechanisms of action. PMID:22525705

  8. Assessment of impairment in activities of daily living in mild cognitive impairment using an individualized scale.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Giseli de Fátima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Alexandra Martini; Chaves, Juliana Aparecida Dos Santos; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Aprahamian, Ivan; Nunes, Paula Villela

    2016-07-01

    Mild impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) can occur in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but the nature and extent of these difficulties need to be further explored. The Canadian occupational performance measure (COPM) is one of the few individualized scales designed to identify self-perceived difficulties in ADL. The present study investigated impairments in ADL using the COPM in elderly with MCI. A total of 58 MCI patients were submitted to the COPM for studies of its validity and reliability. The COPM proved a valid and consistent instrument for evaluating ADL in elderly MCI patients. A total of 74.6% of the MCI patients reported difficulties in ADL. Of these problems, 41.2% involved self-care, 31.4% productivity and 27.4% leisure. This data further corroborates recent reports of possible functional impairment in complex ADL in MCI. PMID:27487375

  9. Anosognosia and Anosodiaphoria in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Maria; Bjork, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the occurrence of anosognosia (lack of awareness) and anosodiaphoria (insouciance) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the influence of a worsening of dementia on these phenomena. Methods A self-evaluation scale was used assessing degrees of anosognosia and anosodiaphoria; furthermore, a neuropsychological assessment and statistical analyses with nonparametric tests which could cope with data on an ordinal scale level and small samples were employed. Results Cognitive ability was lower in AD (n = 9) than in MCI patients (n = 12), but AD patients self-rated lower cognitive disabilities, which is interpreted as one relative sign of anosognosia in AD. Awareness of the reasons for cognitive problems was also lower in AD, which is considered as another sign of anosognosia. The main pattern in MCI found that the higher the awareness, the lower the cognitive ability. In AD low awareness paralleled low cognitive functioning. Anosodiaphoria was present in AD but not in MCI. Conclusion According to the literature anosognosia and anosodiaphoria seem to increase with progression of dementia from MCI as a result of right hemispheric alterations. PMID:25759713

  10. Social cognition impairments in Asperger syndrome and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lugnegård, Tove; Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria; Hjärthag, Fredrik; Gillberg, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    Social cognition impairments are well described in both autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger syndrome (AS), and in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. However, little is known about whether there are differences between the two groups of disorders regarding this ability. The aim of this study was to compare social cognition abilities in AS and schizophrenia. Fifty-three individuals (26 men, 27 women) with a clinical diagnosis of AS, 36 (22 men, 14 women) with a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenic psychosis, and 50 non-clinical controls (19 men, 31 women) participated in the study. Clinical diagnoses were confirmed either by Structured Clinical Interview on DSM-IV diagnosis or the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders. Verbal ability was assessed using the Vocabulary subtest of the WAIS-III. Two social cognition instruments were used: Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (Eyes Test) and the Animations Task. On the Eyes Test, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer results compared to non-clinical controls; however, no other group differences were seen. Both clinical groups scored significantly lower than the comparison group on the Animations Task. The AS group performed somewhat better than the schizophrenia group. Some differences were accounted for by gender effects. Implicit social cognition impairments appear to be at least as severe in schizophrenia as they are in AS. Possible gender differences have to be taken into account in future research on this topic.

  11. [Social Cognitive Impairment in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1].

    PubMed

    Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka

    2016-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1) is a heritable, multisystem disease that affects not only the muscles but also the brain. DM 1 is often accompanied by developmental behavioral disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The autistic traits in DM 1 may be related to social cognitive dysfunction. The social cognitive function of patients with DM 1 was examined with respect to facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, which is the specific cognitive ability to understand the mental states of other people. With respect to facial emotion recognition, the sensitivities to disgust and anger were lower among patients with DM 1 than among healthy subjects, and this difference could not be attributed to visual impairment. To examine the theory of mind ability, the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test and the faux pas recognition test were used. Patients with DM 1 were found to be impaired in both tests, but the results were not attributed to visual ability and lexical comprehension. The possible causes of social cognitive dysfunction in DM 1 are the l cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities in the temporal, frontal, and insular cortex. Dysfunctions in these areas may affect the emotional and theory of mind abilities in DM 1, which result in the behavioral and communication disorders.

  12. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group.

  13. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26422359

  14. Modelling Alzheimer-like cognitive deficits in rats using biperiden as putative cognition impairer.

    PubMed

    Szczodry, Olga; van der Staay, Franz Josef; Arndt, Saskia S

    2014-11-01

    To enable the development of effective treatments for dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is important to establish valid animal models of cognitive impairments. Scopolamine is widely used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models of AD, but also causes non-cognitive side effects. We assessed whether biperiden, a selective antagonist of M1 muscarinic receptors, which are predominantly expressed in brain areas involved in cognitive processes, causes cognitive deficits without inducing peripheral side-effects. Two different doses of biperiden (3 or 10mgkg(-1)) on the acquisition of a spatial cone field task were assessed in male Lister Hooded rats. This task measures, among others, spatial working (WM) - and reference memory (RM) simultaneously. Biperiden did not impair learning of the task. The animals reached asymptotic levels for all variables except reference memory and the number of rewards collected. However, the 10mgkg(-1) dose decreased the tendency of rats to use searching strategies to solve the task and made them slower to start searching and completing the task. In conclusion, though no effects on WM and RM performance were seen, the present study cannot conclude that biperiden acts as a more selective cognition impairer than scopolamine in other rats strains and/or other doses than those tested.

  15. Cognitive impairment in patients with stress-related exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, I H; Nordlund, A; Ellbin, S; Ljung, T; Glise, K; Währborg, P; Wallin, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients who seek medical care for stress-related mental health problems frequently report cognitive impairments as the most pronounced symptom. The purpose of the present study was to compare cognitive function in patients with stress-related exhaustion with that in healthy controls, using a comprehensive battery of cognitive tests. We also explored whether neuropsychological findings were related to severity of illness measured using the Shirom-Melamed burnout questionnaire and hospital anxiety and depression scale. Thirty-three patients (15 males) and 37 healthy controls (11 males), mean age 46 years [standard deviation (SD) 3.9] and 47 years (SD 4.3), respectively, were included in the final analysis. Five cognitive domains were assessed: (1) speed, attention and working memory, (2) learning and episodic memory, (3) executive functions, (4) visuospatial functions and (5) language. The most pronounced difference between patients and controls was seen on executive function, when tested with a multidimensional test, including aspects of speed, control and working memory. The patients also performed poorer on Digit span, measuring attention span and working memory as well as on learning and episodic memory, when measured as delayed recall and the difference between immediate and delayed recall. Delayed recall was the only test that was significantly related to severity of burnout symptoms among the patients. This could reflect poor cognitive sustainability in the patients with the highest burnout scores, as this particular test was the last one performed during the test session. This study clearly shows that cognitive impairment should be considered when evaluating and treating patients who seek medical care for stress-related exhaustion.

  16. Beta-Band Functional Connectivity is Reorganized in Mild Cognitive Impairment after Combined Computerized Physical and Cognitive Training.

    PubMed

    Klados, Manousos A; Styliadis, Charis; Frantzidis, Christos A; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive idleness constitute significant risk factors for the clinical manifestation of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In contrast, a physically and cognitively active lifestyle may restructure age-declined neuronal networks enhancing neuroplasticity. The present study, investigated the changes of brain's functional network in a group of elderly individuals at risk for dementia that were induced by a combined cognitive and physical intervention scheme. Fifty seniors meeting Petersen's criteria of Mild Cognitive Impairment were equally divided into an experimental (LLM), and an active control (AC) group. Resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured before and after the intervention. Functional networks were estimated by computing the magnitude square coherence between the time series of all available cortical sources as computed by standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). A statistical model was used to form groups' characteristic weighted graphs. The introduced modulation was assessed by networks' density and nodes' strength. Results focused on the beta band (12-30 Hz) in which the difference of the two networks' density is maximum, indicating that the structure of the LLM cortical network changes significantly due to the intervention, in contrast to the network of AC. The node strength of LLM participants in the beta band presents a higher number of bilateral connections in the occipital, parietal, temporal and prefrontal regions after the intervention. Our results show that the combined training scheme reorganizes the beta-band functional connectivity of MCI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02313935 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02313935.

  17. Beta-Band Functional Connectivity is Reorganized in Mild Cognitive Impairment after Combined Computerized Physical and Cognitive Training.

    PubMed

    Klados, Manousos A; Styliadis, Charis; Frantzidis, Christos A; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive idleness constitute significant risk factors for the clinical manifestation of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In contrast, a physically and cognitively active lifestyle may restructure age-declined neuronal networks enhancing neuroplasticity. The present study, investigated the changes of brain's functional network in a group of elderly individuals at risk for dementia that were induced by a combined cognitive and physical intervention scheme. Fifty seniors meeting Petersen's criteria of Mild Cognitive Impairment were equally divided into an experimental (LLM), and an active control (AC) group. Resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured before and after the intervention. Functional networks were estimated by computing the magnitude square coherence between the time series of all available cortical sources as computed by standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). A statistical model was used to form groups' characteristic weighted graphs. The introduced modulation was assessed by networks' density and nodes' strength. Results focused on the beta band (12-30 Hz) in which the difference of the two networks' density is maximum, indicating that the structure of the LLM cortical network changes significantly due to the intervention, in contrast to the network of AC. The node strength of LLM participants in the beta band presents a higher number of bilateral connections in the occipital, parietal, temporal and prefrontal regions after the intervention. Our results show that the combined training scheme reorganizes the beta-band functional connectivity of MCI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02313935 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02313935. PMID:26973445

  18. Beta-Band Functional Connectivity is Reorganized in Mild Cognitive Impairment after Combined Computerized Physical and Cognitive Training

    PubMed Central

    Klados, Manousos A.; Styliadis, Charis; Frantzidis, Christos A.; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive idleness constitute significant risk factors for the clinical manifestation of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In contrast, a physically and cognitively active lifestyle may restructure age-declined neuronal networks enhancing neuroplasticity. The present study, investigated the changes of brain's functional network in a group of elderly individuals at risk for dementia that were induced by a combined cognitive and physical intervention scheme. Fifty seniors meeting Petersen's criteria of Mild Cognitive Impairment were equally divided into an experimental (LLM), and an active control (AC) group. Resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured before and after the intervention. Functional networks were estimated by computing the magnitude square coherence between the time series of all available cortical sources as computed by standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). A statistical model was used to form groups' characteristic weighted graphs. The introduced modulation was assessed by networks' density and nodes' strength. Results focused on the beta band (12–30 Hz) in which the difference of the two networks' density is maximum, indicating that the structure of the LLM cortical network changes significantly due to the intervention, in contrast to the network of AC. The node strength of LLM participants in the beta band presents a higher number of bilateral connections in the occipital, parietal, temporal and prefrontal regions after the intervention. Our results show that the combined training scheme reorganizes the beta-band functional connectivity of MCI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02313935 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02313935. PMID:26973445

  19. Use of genetic variation as biomarkers for mild cognitive impairment and progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Christiane; Mayeux, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is prevalent in the elderly. The high estimates of conversion to dementia have spurred the interest in identification of genetic risk factors associated with development of cognitive impairment and or its progression. However, despite notable achievements in human genetics over the years, in particular technological advances in gene mapping and in statistical methods that relate genetic variants to disease, to date only a small proportion of the genetic contribution to late-life cognitive impairment can be explained. A likely explanation for the difficulty in gene identification is that it is a multifactorial disorder with both genetic and environmental components, in which several genes with small effects each are likely to contribute to the quantitative traits associated with the disease. The motivation for identifying the underlying genetic risk factors elderly is clear. Not only could it shed light on disease pathogenesis, but it may also provide potential targets for effective treatment, screening, and prevention. In this article we review the current knowledge on underlying genetic variants and the usefulness of genetic variation as diagnostic tools and biomarkers. In addition, we discuss the potentials and difficulties researchers face in designing appropriate studies for gene discovery.

  20. Age-related impairment of humoral response to influenza is associated with changes in antigen specific T follicular helper cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Julie S; Masters, April R; Hopkins, Jacob W; Haynes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses are essential for generation of protective humoral immunity during influenza infection. Aging has a profound impact on CD4+ T cell function and humoral immunity, yet the impact of aging on antigen specific TFH responses remains unclear. Influenza specific TFH cells are generated in similar numbers in young and aged animals during infection, but TFH cells from aged mice exhibit significant differences, including reduced expression of ICOS and elevated production of IL-10 and IFNγ, which potentially impairs interaction with cognate B cells. Also, more influenza specific T cells in aged mice have a regulatory phenotype, which could contribute to the impaired TFH function. Adoptive transfer studies with young T cells demonstrated that TGF-β1 in the aged environment can drive increased regulatory T cell accumulation. Aging and the aged environment thus impact antigen specific TFH cell function and formation, which contribute to reduced protective humoral responses. PMID:27109638

  1. Glutamate Networks Implicate Cognitive Impairments in Schizophrenia: Genome-Wide Association Studies of 52 Cognitive Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Ikeda, Masashi; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Fukunaga, Masaki; Fujino, Haruo; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Masao; Kazui, Hiroaki; Iwata, Nakao; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are a core feature in patients with schizophrenia. These deficits could serve as effective tools for understanding the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. This study investigated whether genetic variants associated with cognitive impairments aggregate in functional gene networks related to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of a range of cognitive phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia were performed in 411 healthy subjects. We attempted to replicate the GWAS data using 257 patients with schizophrenia and performed a meta-analysis of the GWAS findings and the replicated results. Because gene networks, rather than a single gene or genetic variant, may be strongly associated with the susceptibility to schizophrenia and cognitive impairments, gene-network analysis for genes in close proximity to the replicated variants was performed. We observed nominal associations between 3054 variants and cognitive phenotypes at a threshold of P < 1.0 × 10− 4. Of the 3054 variants, the associations of 191 variants were replicated in the replication samples (P < .05). However, no variants achieved genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis (P > 5.0 × 10− 8). Additionally, 115 of 191 replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have genes located within 10 kb of the SNPs (60.2%). These variants were moderately associated with cognitive phenotypes that ranged from P = 2.50 × 10− 5 to P = 9.40 × 10− 8. The genes located within 10 kb from the replicated SNPs were significantly grouped in terms of glutamate receptor activity (false discovery rate (FDR) q = 4.49 × 10− 17) and the immune system related to major histocompatibility complex class I (FDR q = 8.76 × 10− 11) networks. Our findings demonstrate that genetic variants related to cognitive trait impairment in schizophrenia are involved in the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate network. PMID:25537281

  2. Montreal cognitive assessment: validation study for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandra; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Alves, Lara; Santana, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was recently proposed as a cognitive screening test for milder forms of cognitive impairment, having surpassed the well-known limitations of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). This study aims to validate the MoCA for screening Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) through an analysis of diagnostic accuracy and the proposal of cut-offs. Patients were classified into 2 clinical groups according to standard criteria: MCI (n=90) and AD (n=90). The 2 control groups (C-MCI: n=90; C-AD: n=90) consisted of cognitively healthy community dwellers selected to match patients in sex, age, and education. The MoCA showed consistently superior psychometric properties compared with the MMSE, and higher diagnostic accuracy to discriminate between MCI (area under the curve=0.856; 95% confidence interval, 0.796-0.904) and AD patients (area under the curve=0.980; 95% confidence interval, 0.947-0.995). At an optimal cut-off of below 22 for MCI and below 17 for AD, the MoCA achieved significantly superior values in comparison with MMSE for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and classification accuracy. Furthermore, the MoCA revealed higher sensitivity to cognitive decline in longitudinal monitoring. This study provides robust evidence that the MoCA is a better cognitive tool than the widely used MMSE for the screening and monitoring of MCI and AD in clinical settings.

  3. Cognitive impairment but preservation of sexual dimorphism in cognitive abilities in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Halari, Rozmin; Mehrotra, Ravi; Sharma, Tonmoy; Ng, Virginia; Kumari, Veena

    2006-02-28

    Neurocognitive impairment in schizophrenia is well established, though sex differences on cognitive tasks have produced equivocal findings. The present study was designed to examine performance of schizophrenia patients on a sexually dimorphic cognitive battery. The cognitive battery comprising tests of spatial (mental rotation, computerized version of the Benton Judgment of Line Orientation) and verbal abilities (phonological and semantic fluency) was administered to men (n = 22) and women (n = 21) with schizophrenia and healthy controls (n = 21 men and 21 women). A series of multivariate analyses showed that the patient group performed worse than controls on all the cognitive tasks. Cognitive sexual dimorphism on all spatial tasks favoring men and verbal tasks favoring women remained. Within the patient sample, correlational data demonstrated that earlier age at onset of illness related to poorer spatial performance. It is concluded that normal sexual dimorphism is undisturbed on both spatial and verbal tasks by the schizophrenia disease process.

  4. Does mild cognitive impairment always lead to dementia? A review.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Seema Y; Clem, Matthew A; Silva, Lynette M; Woon, Fu L

    2016-10-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has often been studied in its association with dementia, yet higher rates of reversion to normal cognition than progression to dementia suggest that MCI does not necessarily lead to dementia. Compared to the numerous studies on MCI progression, relatively few have examined reversion. This paper highlights the current literature on characteristics and predictive factors of MCI reversion, along with an overview of studies on MCI patients who remain diagnostically stable (i.e., MCI stability). Of the available studies, predictors of reversion have been noted in areas of cognitive/global functioning, demographic/genetic/biomarker data, and personality/lifestyle factors. However, there is a need for increased study of MCI reversion, considering that patients in this group can fluctuate between different trajectories of MCI (e.g., normal cognition back to MCI or even progression to dementia) within a given follow-up time period. Further examination of reversion via a longitudinal, multifactorial approach would better inform clinicians regarding the likelihood of reversion amongst MCI patients and subsequently modify treatment methods accordingly. Furthermore, researchers would have greater power in detecting treatment effects in their clinical intervention studies of early dementia by improving selection criteria to exclude MCI participants who are more likely to revert and remain cognitively normal than progress to a dementia.

  5. Does mild cognitive impairment always lead to dementia? A review.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Seema Y; Clem, Matthew A; Silva, Lynette M; Woon, Fu L

    2016-10-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has often been studied in its association with dementia, yet higher rates of reversion to normal cognition than progression to dementia suggest that MCI does not necessarily lead to dementia. Compared to the numerous studies on MCI progression, relatively few have examined reversion. This paper highlights the current literature on characteristics and predictive factors of MCI reversion, along with an overview of studies on MCI patients who remain diagnostically stable (i.e., MCI stability). Of the available studies, predictors of reversion have been noted in areas of cognitive/global functioning, demographic/genetic/biomarker data, and personality/lifestyle factors. However, there is a need for increased study of MCI reversion, considering that patients in this group can fluctuate between different trajectories of MCI (e.g., normal cognition back to MCI or even progression to dementia) within a given follow-up time period. Further examination of reversion via a longitudinal, multifactorial approach would better inform clinicians regarding the likelihood of reversion amongst MCI patients and subsequently modify treatment methods accordingly. Furthermore, researchers would have greater power in detecting treatment effects in their clinical intervention studies of early dementia by improving selection criteria to exclude MCI participants who are more likely to revert and remain cognitively normal than progress to a dementia. PMID:27653867

  6. Children's Internal Attributions of Anxiety-Related Physical Symptoms: Age-Related Patterns and the Role of Cognitive Development and Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Mayer, Birgit; Freher, Nancy Kramer; Duncan, Sylvana; van den Hout, Annemiek

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined age-related patterns in children's anxiety-related interpretations and internal attributions of physical symptoms. A large sample of 388 children aged between 4 and 13 years completed a vignette paradigm during which they had to explain the emotional response of the main character who experienced anxiety-related physical…

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration-Associated Silent Polymorphisms in HtrA1 Impair Its Ability To Antagonize Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo, Sarah Melissa P.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a transcript's coding region produce no change in the amino acid sequence of the protein product and are therefore intuitively assumed to have a neutral effect on protein function. We report that two common variants of high-temperature requirement A1 (HTRA1) that increase the inherited risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NvAMD) harbor synonymous SNPs within exon 1 of HTRA1 that convert common codons for Ala34 and Gly36 to less frequently used codons. The frequent-to-rare codon conversion reduced the mRNA translation rate and appeared to compromise HtrA1's conformation and function. The protein product generated from the SNP-containing cDNA displayed enhanced susceptibility to proteolysis and a reduced affinity for an anti-HtrA1 antibody. The NvAMD-associated synonymous polymorphisms lie within HtrA1's putative insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) binding domain. They reduced HtrA1's abilities to associate with IGF-1 and to ameliorate IGF-1-stimulated signaling events and cellular responses. These observations highlight the relevance of synonymous codon usage to protein function and implicate homeostatic protein quality control mechanisms that may go awry in NvAMD. PMID:23478260

  8. Cognitive impairment among children at-risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Hannah; Cullen, Alexis E; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Campbell, Desmond D; Morris, Robin G; Laurens, Kristin R

    2014-03-01

    Adults with schizophrenia present cognitive impairments, as do individuals at ultra-high risk for the disorder, youth with relatives with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and children with antecedents of schizophrenia. The present study aimed to determine if impairments in childhood differed depending on the definition of risk and/or on the degree of relatedness to an affected individual, and if impairments were explained by IQ. Four groups of children aged 9-12 years were studied: (1) 13 children with ≥1 first-degree or ≥2 second-degree affected relatives (high familial loading: FHx(H)); (2) 14 with ≥1 affected second-degree relative (lower familial loading: FHx(L)); (3) 32 with well-replicated antecedents of schizophrenia (ASz); and (4) 45 typically-developing (TD) children with neither a positive family history nor antecedents. Compared to TD children, both FHx(H) and ASz children exhibited significantly poorer verbal comprehension, scholastic achievement, and verbal working memory, while FHx(H) children additionally displayed significantly lower full-scale IQ, and verbal memory and executive function impairments. After adjusting statistical analyses for IQ, group differences were attenuated. Relative to TD children, FHx(L) children showed no significant differences in performance. The results imply that impairments in verbal comprehension, scholastic achievement, and verbal working memory may index vulnerability for schizophrenia among children with affected relatives with the disorder and among those with multiple antecedents of the disorder who have no affected relatives. More accurate identification of children at-risk for schizophrenia and the specific deficits that they present provides opportunities for interventions such as cognitive remediation that may impact the development of the illness. PMID:24373930

  9. Cognitive impairment among children at-risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Hannah; Cullen, Alexis E; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Campbell, Desmond D; Morris, Robin G; Laurens, Kristin R

    2014-03-01

    Adults with schizophrenia present cognitive impairments, as do individuals at ultra-high risk for the disorder, youth with relatives with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and children with antecedents of schizophrenia. The present study aimed to determine if impairments in childhood differed depending on the definition of risk and/or on the degree of relatedness to an affected individual, and if impairments were explained by IQ. Four groups of children aged 9-12 years were studied: (1) 13 children with ≥1 first-degree or ≥2 second-degree affected relatives (high familial loading: FHx(H)); (2) 14 with ≥1 affected second-degree relative (lower familial loading: FHx(L)); (3) 32 with well-replicated antecedents of schizophrenia (ASz); and (4) 45 typically-developing (TD) children with neither a positive family history nor antecedents. Compared to TD children, both FHx(H) and ASz children exhibited significantly poorer verbal comprehension, scholastic achievement, and verbal working memory, while FHx(H) children additionally displayed significantly lower full-scale IQ, and verbal memory and executive function impairments. After adjusting statistical analyses for IQ, group differences were attenuated. Relative to TD children, FHx(L) children showed no significant differences in performance. The results imply that impairments in verbal comprehension, scholastic achievement, and verbal working memory may index vulnerability for schizophrenia among children with affected relatives with the disorder and among those with multiple antecedents of the disorder who have no affected relatives. More accurate identification of children at-risk for schizophrenia and the specific deficits that they present provides opportunities for interventions such as cognitive remediation that may impact the development of the illness.

  10. Autonomous indoor wayfinding for individuals with cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A challenge to individuals with cognitive impairments in wayfinding is how to remain oriented, recall routines, and travel in unfamiliar areas in a way relying on limited cognitive capacity. While people without disabilities often use maps or written directions as navigation tools or for remaining oriented, this cognitively-impaired population is very sensitive to issues of abstraction (e.g. icons on maps or signage) and presents the designer with a challenge to tailor navigation information specific to each user and context. Methods This paper describes an approach to providing distributed cognition support of travel guidance for persons with cognitive disabilities. A solution is proposed based on passive near-field RFID tags and scanning PDAs. A prototype is built and tested in field experiments with real subjects. The unique strength of the system is the ability to provide unique-to-the-user prompts that are triggered by context. The key to the approach is to spread the context awareness across the system, with the context being flagged by the RFID tags and the appropriate response being evoked by displaying the appropriate path guidance images indexed by the intersection of specific end-user and context ID embedded in RFID tags. Results We found that passive RFIDs generally served as good context for triggering navigation prompts, although individual differences in effectiveness varied. The results of controlled experiments provided more evidence with regard to applicabilities of the proposed autonomous indoor wayfinding method. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ability to adapt indoor wayfinding devices for appropriate timing of directions and standing orientation will be particularly important. PMID:20840786

  11. [Guiding principles of clinical research on mild cognitive impairment (protocol)].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin-Zhou; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Xin-Qing; Bi, Qi; Ma, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Liang; Li, Xiao-Bin; Sheng, Shu-Li; Li, Lin; Wu, Zhen-Yun; Fang, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Miao, Ying-Chun; Wang, Peng-Wen; Ren, Ying; Yin, Jun-Xiang; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as a nosological entity referring to elderly people with MCI but without dementia, was proposed as a warning signal of dementia occurrence and a novel therapeutic target. MCI clinical criteria and diagnostic procedure from the MCI Working Group of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) may better reflect the heterogeneity of MCI syndrome. Beijing United Study Group on MCI funded by the Capital Foundation of Medical Developments (CFMD) proposed the guiding principles of clinical research on MCI. The diagnostic methods include clinical, neuropsychological, functional, neuroimaging and genetic measures. The diagnostic procedure includes three stages. Firstly, MCI syndrome must be defined, which should correspond to: (1) cognitive complaints coming from the patients or their families; (2) reporting of a relative decline in cognitive functioning during the past year by the patient or informant; (3) cognitive disorders evidenced by clinical evaluation; (4) activities of daily living preserved and complex instrumental functions either intact or minimally impaired; and (5) absence of dementia. Secondly, subtypes of MCI have to be recognized as amnestic MCI (aMCI), single non-memory MCI (snmMCI) and multiple-domains MCI (mdMCI). Finally, the subtype causes could be identified commonly as Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), and other degenerative diseases such as frontal-temporal dementia (FTD), Lewy body disease (LBD), semantic dementia (SM), as well as trauma, infection, toxicity and nutrition deficiency. The recommended special tests include serum vitamin B12 and folic acid, plasma insulin, insulin-degrading enzyme, Abeta40, Abeta42, inflammatory factors. Computed tomography (or preferentially magnetic resonance imaging, when available) is mandatory. As measurable therapeutic outcomes, the primary outcome should be the probability of progression to dementia, the secondary outcomes should be cognition and function

  12. Val66Met BDNF polymorphism is associated with Parkinson's disease cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Vivian; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur F; Rieck, Mariana; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Rieder, Carlos R M; Hutz, Mara H

    2016-02-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases worldwide. Besides characteristic PD motor features, the disease has important non-motor characteristics such as cognitive impairment. The role of genetic factors in cognitive impairment associated with PD is still unclear. In this study, we examined whether BDNF Val66Met was associated with impaired cognition in Parkinson's disease. One hundred and seventy five patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were included. Global cognitive abilities of the patients were measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Poisson Regression models were used to test for association between 66Met carriers and cognitive impairment controlling for covariates. Carriers of at least one BDNF 66Met allele presented a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment (p=0.005 RR=1.45 IC=95% [1.1-1.8]). These results suggest a role for BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cognitive impairment in PD. PMID:26806863

  13. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, ameliorates cognitive impairment, oxidative burden, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Shin, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Yamada, Shinnosuke; Nakai, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2013-08-01

    Senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) is a model of aging characterized by the early onset of learning and memory impairment and various pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, and NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves age-related cognitive impairment and reduces oxidative stress and tau phosphorylation in SAMP8 mice. Treatment with nobiletin (10 or 50mg/kg) reversed the impairment of recognition memory and context-dependent fear memory in SAMP8 mice. Treatment with nobiletin also restored the decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio in the brain of SAMP8 mice. In addition, increases in glutathione peroxidase and manganese-superoxide dismutase activities, as well as a decrease in protein carbonyl level, were observed in the brain of nobiletin-treated SAMP8 mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice. Together, the markedly beneficial effects of nobiletin represent a potentially useful treatment for ameliorating the learning and memory deficits, oxidative stress, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in aging as well as age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  14. Impact of novelty and type of material on recognition in healthy older adults and persons with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Sylvie; Ménard, Marie-Claude; Lepage, Emilie

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of novelty on correct recognition (hit minus false alarms) and on recollection and familiarity processes in normal aging and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Recognition tasks compared well-known and novel stimuli in the verbal domain (words vs. pseudowords) and in the musical domain (well-known vs. novel melodies). Results indicated that novel materials associated with lower correct recognition and lower recollection, an effect that can be related to its lower amenability to elaborative encoding in comparison with well-known items. Results also indicated that normal aging impairs recognition of well-known items, whereas MCI impairs recognition of novel items only. Healthy older adults showed impaired recollection and familiarity relative to younger controls and individuals with MCI showed impaired recollection relative to healthy older adults. The recollection deficit in healthy older adults and persons with MCI and their impaired recognition of well-known items is compatible with the difficulty both groups have in encoding information in an elaborate manner. In turn, familiarity deficit could be related to impaired frontal functioning. Therefore, novelty of material has a differential impact on recognition in persons with age-related memory disorders. PMID:21703285

  15. Is Body Mass Index Associated With the Development of Age-Related Hearing Impairment in Koreans? The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da Jung; Jang, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate whether body mass index (BMI) is associated with age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the Asian elderly population. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2012 were used for the analyses. The pure tones at 0.5 and 1 kHz of both ears of each subject were averaged to obtain the low-frequency, those at 2 and 3 kHz were averaged to obtain the mid-frequency, and those at 4 and 6 kHz were averaged to obtain the high-frequency. The average hearing threshold (AHT) was calculated as pure tone average at 4 frequencies in the better ear. ARHL was defined as the AHT >25 dB. Results Univariate analyses revealed an increase in the BMI tertile in men was associated with a decreased low-frequency threshold, while an increase in the BMI tertile in women was associated with decreased mid- and high-frequency thresholds. Multivariate analyses adjusted for confounders show no significant differences in low-, mid-, or high-frequency. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of ARHL by BMI tertiles. Linear regression analyses show no association between BMI and low-, mid-, and high-frequency or AHTs. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values for AHT was 0.515 in men and 0.522 in women. The logistic regression analyses showed no association between BMI and ARHL in either sex. Conclusion BMI is not advantageous for the prediction of ARHL. In future epidemiological studies, BMI as a covariate of obesity may be replaced by other active metabolic parameters that have better predictive ability of ARHL than BMI. PMID:27090278

  16. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura D.; Frank, Laura L.; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Green, Pattie S.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; McTiernan, Anne; Plymate, Stephen R.; Fishel, Mark A.; Stennis Watson, G.; Cholerton, Brenna A.; Duncan, Glen E.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition and other biomarkers associated with Alzheimer disease pathology for older adults with mild cognitive impairment, and assess the role of sex as a predictor of response. Design Six-month, randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Setting Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System clinical research unit. Participants Thirty-three adults (17 women) with amnestic mild cognitive impairment ranging in age from 55 to 85 years (mean age,70 years). Intervention Participants were randomized either to a high-intensity aerobic exercise or stretching control group. The aerobic group exercised under the supervision of a fitness trainer at 75% to 85% of heart rate reserve for 45 to 60 min/d, 4 d/wk for 6 months. The control group carried out supervised stretching activities according to the same schedule but maintained their heart rate at or below 50% of their heart rate reserve. Before and after the study, glucometabolic and treadmill tests were performed and fat distribution was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. At baseline, month 3, and month 6, blood was collected for assay and cognitive tests were administered. Main Outcome Measures Performance measures on Symbol-Digit Modalities, Verbal Fluency, Stroop, Trails B, Task Switching, Story Recall, and List Learning. Fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulinlike growth factor-I, and β-amyloids 40 and 42. Results Six months of high-intensity aerobic exercise had sex-specific effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and trophic activity despite comparable gains in cardiorespiratory fitness and body fat reduction. For women, aerobic exercise improved performance on multiple tests of executive function, increased glucose disposal during the metabolic clamp, and reduced fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. For men

  17. Negative affective states and cognitive impairments in nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hall, F Scott; Der-Avakian, Andre; Gould, Thomas J; Markou, Athina; Shoaib, Mohammed; Young, Jared W

    2015-11-01

    Smokers have substantial individual differences in quit success in response to current treatments for nicotine dependence. This observation may suggest that different underlying motivations for continued tobacco use across individuals and nicotine cessation may require different treatments in different individuals. Although most animal models of nicotine dependence emphasize the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine as the major motivational force behind nicotine use, smokers generally report that other consequences of nicotine use, including the ability of nicotine to alleviate negative affective states or cognitive impairments, as reasons for continued smoking. These states could result from nicotine withdrawal, but also may be associated with premorbid differences in affective and/or cognitive function. Effects of nicotine on cognition and affect may alleviate these impairments regardless of their premorbid or postmorbid origin (e.g., before or after the development of nicotine dependence). The ability of nicotine to alleviate these symptoms would thus negatively reinforce behavior, and thus maintain subsequent nicotine use, contributing to the initiation of smoking, the progression to dependence and relapse during quit attempts. The human and animal studies reviewed here support the idea that self-medication for pre-morbid and withdrawal-induced impairments may be more important factors in nicotine addiction and relapse than has been previously appreciated in preclinical research into nicotine dependence. Given the diverse beneficial effects of nicotine under these conditions, individuals might smoke for quite different reasons. This review suggests that inter-individual differences in the diverse effects of nicotine associated with self-medication and negative reinforcement are an important consideration in studies attempting to understand the causes of nicotine addiction, as well as in the development of effective, individualized nicotine cessation

  18. Negative affective states and cognitive impairments in nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hall, F Scott; Der-Avakian, Andre; Gould, Thomas J; Markou, Athina; Shoaib, Mohammed; Young, Jared W

    2015-11-01

    Smokers have substantial individual differences in quit success in response to current treatments for nicotine dependence. This observation may suggest that different underlying motivations for continued tobacco use across individuals and nicotine cessation may require different treatments in different individuals. Although most animal models of nicotine dependence emphasize the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine as the major motivational force behind nicotine use, smokers generally report that other consequences of nicotine use, including the ability of nicotine to alleviate negative affective states or cognitive impairments, as reasons for continued smoking. These states could result from nicotine withdrawal, but also may be associated with premorbid differences in affective and/or cognitive function. Effects of nicotine on cognition and affect may alleviate these impairments regardless of their premorbid or postmorbid origin (e.g., before or after the development of nicotine dependence). The ability of nicotine to alleviate these symptoms would thus negatively reinforce behavior, and thus maintain subsequent nicotine use, contributing to the initiation of smoking, the progression to dependence and relapse during quit attempts. The human and animal studies reviewed here support the idea that self-medication for pre-morbid and withdrawal-induced impairments may be more important factors in nicotine addiction and relapse than has been previously appreciated in preclinical research into nicotine dependence. Given the diverse beneficial effects of nicotine under these conditions, individuals might smoke for quite different reasons. This review suggests that inter-individual differences in the diverse effects of nicotine associated with self-medication and negative reinforcement are an important consideration in studies attempting to understand the causes of nicotine addiction, as well as in the development of effective, individualized nicotine cessation

  19. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: the dual syndrome hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, Angie A; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W

    2013-01-01

    Research into the heterogeneous nature of cognitive impairment documented in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused on disentangling deficits that vary between individuals, evolve and respond differentially to pharmacological treatments, and relate differentially to PD dementia (PDD). We summarise studies conducted in our laboratory over the last 2 decades, outlining the incremental development of our hypotheses, the starting point for which is our early work on executive deficits mirroring fronto-striatal dysfunction. We present subsequent findings linking these deficits to a model of dopaminergic function that conforms to an inverted curvilinear function. We review studies that investigated the range of dopamine-independent attentional and visuospatial memory deficits seen in PD, demonstrating that abnormalities in these domains more accurately predict PDD. We conclude with an exposition of the dual syndrome hypothesis, which distinguishes between dopaminergically mediated fronto-striatal executive impairments and a dementia syndrome with distinctive prodromal visuospatial deficits in which cholinergic treatments offer some clinical benefits.

  20. Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease: The Dual Syndrome Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kehagia, Angie A.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2012-01-01

    Research into the heterogeneous nature of cognitive impairment documented in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused on disentangling deficits that vary between individuals, evolve and respond differentially to pharmacological treatments, and relate differentially to PD dementia (PDD). We summarise studies conducted in our laboratory over the last 2 decades, outlining the incremental development of our hypotheses, the starting point for which is our early work on executive deficits mirroring fronto-striatal dysfunction. We present subsequent findings linking these deficits to a model of dopaminergic function that conforms to an inverted curvilinear function. We review studies that investigated the range of dopamine-independent attentional and visuospatial memory deficits seen in PD, demonstrating that abnormalities in these domains more accurately predict PDD. We conclude with an exposition of the dual syndrome hypothesis, which distinguishes between dopaminergically mediated fronto-striatal executive impairments and a dementia syndrome with distinctive prodromal visuospatial deficits in which cholinergic treatments offer some clinical benefits. PMID:23038420

  1. Magnetization Transfer Ratio Relates to Cognitive Impairment in Normal Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Stephan; Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Fazekas, Franz; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) can detect microstructural brain tissue changes and may be helpful in determining age-related cerebral damage. We investigated the association between the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in gray and white matter (WM) and cognitive functioning in 355 participants of the Austrian stroke prevention family study (ASPS-Fam) aged 38–86 years. MTR maps were generated for the neocortex, deep gray matter structures, WM hyperintensities, and normal appearing WM (NAWM). Adjusted mixed models determined whole brain and lobar cortical MTR to be directly and significantly related to performance on tests of memory, executive function, and motor skills. There existed an almost linear dose-effect relationship. MTR of deep gray matter structures and NAWM correlated to executive functioning. All associations were independent of demographics, vascular risk factors, focal brain lesions, and cortex volume. Further research is needed to understand the basis of this association at the tissue level, and to determine the role of MTR in predicting cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:25309438

  2. Aging-related impairment of urine-concentrating mechanisms correlates with dysregulation of adrenocortical angiotensin type 1 receptors in male Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Xie; Speth, Robert C; Verbalis, Joseph G; Stein, Lauren M; Yosten, Gina L C; Samson, Willis K; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2016-03-15

    To investigate age-associated impairments in fluid homeostasis, 4-mo (young) and 32-mo (old) Fischer 344/BN male rats were studied before and after a dietary sodium load. Transferring young rats from a low-sodium (LS) to a high-sodium (HS) diet increased water intake and urine volume by 1.9- and 3.0-fold, respectively, while urine osmolality and plasma aldosterone decreased by 33 and 98%. Concomitantly, adrenocortical angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) density decreased by 35%, and AT1bR mRNA decreased by 39%; no changes were observed in AT1aR mRNA. In contrast, the increase in water intake (1.4-fold) was lower in the old rats, and there was no effect of the HS diet on urine volume or urine osmolality. AT1R densities were 29% less in the old rats before transferring to the HS diet, and AT1R densities were not reduced as rapidly in response to a HS diet compared with the young animals. After 6 days on the HS diet, plasma potassium was lowered by 26% in the old rats, whereas no change was detected in the young rats. Furthermore, while plasma aldosterone was substantially decreased after 2 days on the HS diet in both young and old rats, plasma aldosterone was significantly lower in the old compared with the young animals after 2 wk on the LS diet. These findings suggest that aging attenuates the responsiveness of the adrenocortical AT1R to a sodium load through impaired regulation of AT1bR mRNA, and that this dysregulation contributes to the defects in water and electrolyte homeostasis observed in aging.

  3. Intellectual Disability, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Risk for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Wayne P.; Zigman, Warren B.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Ryan, Robert; Schupf, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) are living longer than ever before, raising concerns about old-age associated disorders. Dementia is among the most serious of these disorders, and theories relating cognitive reserve to risk predict that older adults with ID should be particularly vulnerable. Previous estimates of relative risk for dementia associated with ID have been inconsistent, and the present analyses examined the possible influence of variation in diagnostic criteria on findings. As expected, relaxation in the stringency of case definition for adults with ID increased relative risk, underscoring the importance of developing valid criteria for defining mild cognitive impairment, early dementia, and distinguishing between the two in adults with ID. Once available, these standards will contribute to more effective evidence-based planning. PMID:24273589

  4. Cognitive impairment in patients with AIDS – prevalence and severity

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Crystal C; Treisman, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of HIV patients and decreased the number of adults who progress to AIDS and HIV-associated dementia. However, neurocognitive deficits remain a pronounced consequence of HIV/AIDS. HIV-1 infection targets the central nervous system in subcortical brain areas and leads to high rates of delirium, depression, opportunistic central nervous system infections, and dementia. Long-term HIV replication in the brain occurs in astrocytes and microglia, allowing the virus to hide from antiviral medication and later compromise neuronal function. The associated cognitive disturbance is linked to both viral activity and inflammatory and other mediators from these immune cells that lead to the damage associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, a general term given for these disturbances. We review the severity and prevalence of the neuropsychiatric complications of HIV including delirium, neurobehavioral impairments (depression), minor cognitive-motor dysfunction, and HIV-associated dementia. PMID:25678819

  5. Coping with cognitive impairment and dementia: Rural caregivers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Branger, Camille; Burton, Rachel; O'Connell, Megan E; Stewart, Norma; Morgan, Debra

    2016-07-01

    Caregiving in a rural context is unique, but the experience of rural caregivers is understudied. This paper describes how rural caregivers cope with caring for a loved one diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia using qualitative description to generate a low-inference summary of a response to an open-ended question. This approach allowed these rural caregivers to describe their positive experiences in addition to the more commonly explored caregiver experiences related to stress. Analyses of coping revealed use of social support, engaging in relaxing and physical activity, and cognitive reframing. In addition, caregivers reported strong faith and religiosity, and to a lesser frequency behavioral changes, checking in with the person with dementia via telephone, and joint activity. Predominantly, these methods reflect approach-based strategies. The current data suggest that these caregivers manage well and adopt adaptive coping strategies to meet the demands of the caregiving role. PMID:24951255

  6. Regulatory aspects of mild cognitive impairment: toward a harmonized perspective

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    The development of the concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its practical application have been intimately tied to attempts to produce therapeutic agents. Understanding the regulatory environment and determining the way in which it can be influenced are critical to the development of drugs and their eventual approval. In this article, we review some of the current challenges surrounding the concept of MCI relevant to drug development, summarize activities in various regions of the world, and conclude with some suggested next steps and an alternative framing for approving drugs for MCI and related conditions. PMID:22033834

  7. Age-Related Differences and Cognitive Correlates of Self-Reported and Direct Navigation Performance: The Effect of Real and Virtual Test Conditions Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Taillade, Mathieu; N'Kaoua, Bernard; Sauzéon, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of aging on direct navigation measures and self-reported ones according to the real-virtual test manipulation. Navigation (wayfinding tasks) and spatial memory (paper-pencil tasks) performances, obtained either in real-world or in virtual-laboratory test conditions, were compared between young (n = 32) and older (n = 32) adults who had self-rated their everyday navigation behavior (SBSOD scale). Real age-related differences were observed in navigation tasks as well as in paper-pencil tasks, which investigated spatial learning relative to the distinction between survey-route knowledge. The manipulation of test conditions (real vs. virtual) did not change these age-related differences, which are mostly explained by age-related decline in both spatial abilities and executive functioning (measured with neuropsychological tests). In contrast, elderly adults did not differ from young adults in their self-reporting relative to everyday navigation, suggesting some underestimation of navigation difficulties by elderly adults. Also, spatial abilities in young participants had a mediating effect on the relations between actual and self-reported navigation performance, but not for older participants. So, it is assumed that the older adults carried out the navigation task with fewer available spatial abilities compared to young adults, resulting in inaccurate self-estimates.

  8. Age-Related Differences and Cognitive Correlates of Self-Reported and Direct Navigation Performance: The Effect of Real and Virtual Test Conditions Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Taillade, Mathieu; N'Kaoua, Bernard; Sauzéon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of aging on direct navigation measures and self-reported ones according to the real-virtual test manipulation. Navigation (wayfinding tasks) and spatial memory (paper-pencil tasks) performances, obtained either in real-world or in virtual-laboratory test conditions, were compared between young (n = 32) and older (n = 32) adults who had self-rated their everyday navigation behavior (SBSOD scale). Real age-related differences were observed in navigation tasks as well as in paper-pencil tasks, which investigated spatial learning relative to the distinction between survey-route knowledge. The manipulation of test conditions (real vs. virtual) did not change these age-related differences, which are mostly explained by age-related decline in both spatial abilities and executive functioning (measured with neuropsychological tests). In contrast, elderly adults did not differ from young adults in their self-reporting relative to everyday navigation, suggesting some underestimation of navigation difficulties by elderly adults. Also, spatial abilities in young participants had a mediating effect on the relations between actual and self-reported navigation performance, but not for older participants. So, it is assumed that the older adults carried out the navigation task with fewer available spatial abilities compared to young adults, resulting in inaccurate self-estimates. PMID:26834666

  9. Multimodal MRI classification in vascular mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Diciotti, Stefano; Ciulli, Stefano; Ginestroni, Andrea; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Inzitari, Domenico; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Vascular mild cognitive impairment (VMCI) is a disorder in which multimodal MRI can add significant value by combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with brain morphometry. In this study we implemented and compared machine learning techniques for multimodal classification between 58 VMCI patients and 29 healthy subjects as well as for discrimination (within the VMCI group) between patients with different cognitive performances. For each subject, a cortical feature vector was constructed based on cortical parcellation and cortical and subcortical volumetric segmentation and a DTI feature vector was formed by combining descriptive statistical metrics related to the distribution of DTI invariants within white matter. We employed both a sequential minimal optimization and a functional tree classifier, using feature selection and 10-fold cross-validation, and compared their performances in monomodal and multimodal classification for both classification problems (healthy subjects vs VMCI and prediction of cognitive performance). While monomodal classification resulted in satisfactory performance in most cases, turning from monomodal to multimodal classification resulted in an improvement of the performance in the discrimination between VMCI patients with low cognitive performance and healthy subjects by up to 10% in sensitivity (leaving specificity unchanged). We therefore are able to confirm the usefulness of machine learning techniques in discriminating diseased states based on neuroimaging data. PMID:26737240

  10. A systematic review of treatments for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Claudia; Li, Ryan; Lyketsos, Constantine; Livingston, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Background More people are presenting with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), frequently a precursor to dementia but we do not know how to reduce deterioration. Aims To systematically review Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) evaluating effects of any intervention for MCI on cognitive, neuropsychiatric, functional, global outcomes, life quality, or incident dementia. Methods We reviewed the 41 studies fitting predetermined criteria, assessed validity using a checklist, calculated standardised outcomes, and prioritised primary outcome findings in placebo-controlled studies. Results The strongest evidence was that cholinesterase inhibitors did not reduce incident dementia. Cognition improved in single trials of: a heterogeneous psychological group intervention over 6 months; piribedil, a dopamine agonist over 3 months; and donepezil over 48 weeks. Nicotine improved attention over 6 months. There was equivocal evidence that Huannao Yicong improved cognition and social functioning. Conclusions There was no replicated evidence that any intervention was effective. Cholinesterase inhibitors and rofecoxib are ineffective in preventing dementia. Further good quality RCTs are necessary and preliminary evidence suggests these should include trials of psychological group interventions and piribedil. PMID:24085737

  11. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: subtypes and motor characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sollinger, Ann B; Goldstein, Felicia C; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Factor, Stewart A

    2010-03-01

    The aims of this project were to determine the risk factors for and clinical characteristics of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed a retrospective record review of 72 non-demented PD patients (age: 57.79 +/- 10.57, duration of PD: 7.32 +/- 4.97) who completed a standardized neurological assessment, including a full neuropsychological battery, as part of their diagnostic work-up. Of these participants, 47.2% were cognitively normal and 52.8% met criteria for MCI. The majority of MCI patients had single domain MCI (23/38), the affected domains being memory (n = 9), executive function (n = 6), visuospatial skills (n = 6), and language (n = 2). The MCI group had longer duration of disease and higher postural instability and gait disorder subscale scores than the cognitively normal group. This report provides further support for use of the concept of MCI in PD research. There may be certain disease characteristics that could alert practitioners to the emergence of cognitive changes in patients. Future studies should focus on additional risk factors for MCI subtypes and their possible progression to frank dementia.

  12. Gray matter atrophy patterns of mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wen, Wei; Kochan, Nicole A; Crawford, John D; Brodaty, Henry; Slavin, Melissa J; Reppermund, Simone; Draper, Brian; Zhu, Wanlin; Kang, Kristan; Trollor, Julian N

    2012-04-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous neurocognitive disorder that can be classified into various subtypes. The present study aims to examine the gray matter (GM) atrophy patterns of MCI subtypes in comparison with a cognitively healthy group. Participants, including 135 MCI subjects and 120 cognitively healthy controls, were drawn from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The MCI subjects were first categorized into amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) subtypes, which were then divided into single-domain (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) and multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD). Furthermore, naMCI-SD was divided into three subgroups (language, processing speed, and executive function) according to individual cognitive impairment. Voxel-wise GM volumes were then compared between MCI subtypes and controls. The aMCI group had significantly lower GM volumes in the bilateral hippocampi and temporal cortices than the controls. This was mainly due to GM reduction of aMCI-MD but not aMCI-SD, as the latter did not show any significant GM reduction. GM reduction of naMCI and its two subdivisions was shown in widespread brain regions compared to controls. GM volumes of the multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD) were lower than their single-domain counterparts (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) in the frontal and temporal lobes, respectively. Moreover, the language subgroup of naMCI-SD showed GM reduction in the frontal and temporal lobes compared to controls. MCI subtypes displayed specific patterns of GM atrophy that appear to be related to their various clinical presentations, which implies that underlying mechanisms of MCI subtypes are different.

  13. Detecting Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Deaf People: The British Sign Language Cognitive Screening Test.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Joanna; Denmark, Tanya; Marshall, Jane; Mummery, Cath; Woll, Bencie

    2015-11-01

    To provide accurate diagnostic screening of deaf people who use signed communication, cognitive tests must be devised in signed languages with normative deaf samples. This article describes the development of the first screening test for the detection of cognitive impairment and dementia in deaf signers. The British Sign Language Cognitive Screening Test uses standardized video administration to screen cognition using signed, rather than spoken or written, instructions and a large norm-referenced sample of 226 deaf older people. Percentiles are provided for clinical comparison. The tests showed good reliability, content validity, and correlation with age, intellectual ability, and education. Clinical discrimination was shown between the normative sample and 14 deaf patients with dementia. This innovative testing approach transforms the ability to detect dementia in deaf people, avoids the difficulties of using an interpreter, and enables culturally and linguistically sensitive assessment of deaf signers, with international potential for adaptation into other signed languages. PMID:26245349

  14. How Exercise Influences Cognitive Performance When Mild Cognitive Impairment Exists: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yun; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Older adults who present with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have an increased risk of developing more advanced dementia. However, no pharmacological treatment currently exists to slow the progression of or reverse MCI. The purpose of the current systematic review is to summarize evidence surrounding the impact of exercise interventions on the cognitive performance levels of community-dwelling older adults with MCI. Computerized database and ancestry search strategies located distinct intervention trials between 1990 and 2015. Results indicated that physical exercise may benefit cognitive function among older adults who have MCI, including improvements in global cognition, executive function, memory, attention, and processing speed. Physical exercise may also positively impact the physiology of the aging brain. However, evidence surrounding the characteristics of effective physical exercise interventions in terms of exercise type, intensity, duration, and frequency remains limited. PMID:26565414

  15. Patterns of Cognitive Decline Prior to Dementia in Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Simon; Chertkow, Howard; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Gauthier, Serge; Belleville, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Only a limited number of studies have investigated the decline of discrete cognitive domains as individuals progress from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. Thus, the goal of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the cognitive changes underway during the years preceding a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and to compare these changes to those found in MCI participants who do not progress to dementia. Participants were compared as a function of whether they later converted to AD (n = 47) or not (n = 74). Cognitive change was assessed prior to the conversion year, using that year as a starting point. A combination of polynomial regression analyses and mixed ANOVAs assessed 1) the trajectory of cognitive decline for each domain and 2) the differences between non-progressors and those who had converted to AD. The different cognitive domains demonstrated very different patterns of decline in the group of MCI progressors. A quadratic function, i.e., many years of stable performance followed by a rapid decline just prior to diagnosis, was observed for delayed recall, working memory, and spatial memory. In contrast, a gradual linear decline was observed for immediate recall, executive function, and visuo-spatial abilities. Finally, language in progressors was impaired on all time periods relative to non-progressors, but there was no further change between the first assessments and conversion to AD. Individuals with MCI who progress to AD show abnormal cognition at least two years prior to their dementia diagnosis. The pattern of symptom change observed appears to depend upon the cognitive domain and thus, clinical studies should not assume similar rate of decline across domains. In contrast and, apart from verbal memory, the non-progressors present a performance similar to that of healthy older adults. PMID:26401770

  16. Life Course Pathways to Racial Disparities in Cognitive Impairment among Older Americans*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenmei; Hayward, Mark D.; Yu, Yan-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Blacks are especially hard hit by cognitive impairment at older ages compared to whites. Here, we take advantage of the Health and Retirement Study (1998–2010) to assess how this racial divide in cognitive impairment is associated with the racial stratification of life course exposures and resources over a 12-year period among 8,946 non-Hispanic whites and blacks aged 65 and older in 1998. We find that blacks suffer from a higher risk of moderate/severe cognitive impairment at baseline and during the follow-up. Blacks are also more likely to report childhood adversity and to have grown up in the segregated South, and these early-life adversities put blacks at a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment. Adulthood socioeconomic status is strongly associated with the risk of cognitive impairment, net of childhood conditions. However, racial disparities in cognitive impairment, though substantially reduced, are not eliminated when controlling for these life course factors. PMID:27247126

  17. Life Course Pathways to Racial Disparities in Cognitive Impairment among Older Americans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenmei; Hayward, Mark D; Yu, Yan-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Blacks are especially hard hit by cognitive impairment at older ages compared to whites. Here, we take advantage of the Health and Retirement Study (1998-2010) to assess how this racial divide in cognitive impairment is associated with the racial stratification of life course exposures and resources over a 12-year period among 8,946 non-Hispanic whites and blacks ages 65 and older in 1998. We find that blacks suffer from a higher risk of moderate/severe cognitive impairment at baseline and during the follow-up. Blacks are also more likely to report childhood adversity and to have grown up in the segregated South, and these early-life adversities put blacks at a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment. Adulthood socioeconomic status is strongly associated with the risk of cognitive impairment, net of childhood conditions. However, racial disparities in cognitive impairment, though substantially reduced, are not eliminated when controlling for these life course factors.

  18. Modification by acrolein, a component of tobacco smoke and age-related oxidative stress, mediates functional impairment of human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Tamamizu-Kato, Shiori; Wong, Jason Yiu; Jairam, Vikram; Uchida, Koji; Raussens, Vincent; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy

    2007-07-17

    Oxidative damage to proteins such as apolipoprotein B-100 increases the atherogenicity of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). However, little is known about the potential oxidative damage to apolipoprotein E (apoE), an exchangeable antiatherogenic apolipoprotein. ApoE plays an integral role in lipoprotein metabolism by regulating the plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Hepatic uptake of lipoproteins is facilitated by apoE's ability to bind with cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans and to lipoprotein receptors via basic residues in its 22 kDa N-terminal domain (NT). We investigated the effect of acrolein, an aldehydic product of endogenous lipid peroxidation and a tobacco smoke component, on the conformation and function of recombinant human apoE3-NT. Acrolein caused oxidative modification of apoE3-NT as detected by Western blot with acrolein-lysine-specific antibodies, and tertiary conformational alterations. Acrolein modification impairs the ability of apoE3-NT to interact with heparin and the LDL receptor. Furthermore, acrolein-modified apoE3-NT displayed a 5-fold decrease in its ability to interact with lipid surfaces. Our data indicate that acrolein disrupts the functional integrity of apoE3, which likely interferes with its role in regulating plasma cholesterol homeostasis. These observations have implications regarding the role of apoE in the pathogenesis of smoking- and oxidative stress-mediated cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  19. Cognitive impairment in childhood onset epilepsy: up-to-date information about its causes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment associated with childhood-onset epilepsy is an important consequence in the developing brain owing to its negative effects on neurodevelopmental and social outcomes. While the cause of cognitive impairment in epilepsy appears to be multifactorial, epilepsy-related factors such as type of epilepsy and underlying etiology, age at onset, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, and its treatment are considered important. In recent studies, antecedent cognitive impairment before the first recognized seizure and microstructural and functional alteration of the brain at onset of epilepsy suggest the presence of a common neurobiological mechanism between epilepsy and cognitive comorbidity. However, the overall impact of cognitive comorbidity in children with epilepsy and the independent contribution of each of these factors to cognitive impairment have not been clearly delineated. This review article focuses on the significant contributors to cognitive impairment in children with epilepsy.

  20. Cognitive impairment in childhood onset epilepsy: up-to-date information about its causes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment associated with childhood-onset epilepsy is an important consequence in the developing brain owing to its negative effects on neurodevelopmental and social outcomes. While the cause of cognitive impairment in epilepsy appears to be multifactorial, epilepsy-related factors such as type of epilepsy and underlying etiology, age at onset, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, and its treatment are considered important. In recent studies, antecedent cognitive impairment before the first recognized seizure and microstructural and functional alteration of the brain at onset of epilepsy suggest the presence of a common neurobiological mechanism between epilepsy and cognitive comorbidity. However, the overall impact of cognitive comorbidity in children with epilepsy and the independent contribution of each of these factors to cognitive impairment have not been clearly delineated. This review article focuses on the significant contributors to cognitive impairment in children with epilepsy. PMID:27186225

  1. Characterizing Executive Functioning in Older Special Populations: From Cognitively Elite to Cognitively Impaired

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Cindy M.; Dixon, Roger A.; Strauss, Esther

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the structure and invariance of executive functions (EF) across (a) a continuum of cognitive status in 3 groups of older adults (cognitively elite [CE], cognitively normal [CN], and cognitively impaired [CI]) and (b) a 3-year longitudinal interval. Using latent variable analyses (LIS-REL 8.80), the authors tested 3-factor models (“Inhibition”: Hayling [Burgess & Shallice, 1997], Stroop [Regard, 1981]; “Shifting”: Brixton [Burgess & Shallice, 1997], Color Trails [D’Elia et al., 1996]; and “Updating”: Reading and Computational Span [Salthouse & Babcock, 1991]) and 1-factor models within each group. Participants (initial N = 570; 53–90 years) were from the Victoria Longitudinal Study (Sample 3, Waves 1 and 2). Cross-sectionally, the authors observed a 3-factor EF structure especially for the CE group and 1-factor solutions for all 3 groups. Longitudinally, temporal invariance was supported for the 3-factor model (CE and CN groups) and the 1-factor model (CI and CN groups). Subgroups with higher cognitive status and greater 3-year stability performed better on EF factors than corresponding groups with lower cognitive status and less stability. Studies of EF structure, performance, dedifferentiation, and dysfunction will benefit from considering initial cognitive status and longitudinal stability. PMID:19899836

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of depression and cognitive impairment in late life.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Kanellopoulos, Dora; Manning, Kevin J; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive impairment in late-life depression is prevalent, disabling, and heterogeneous. Although mild cognitive impairment in depression does not usually progress to dementia, accurate assessment of cognition is vital to prognosis and treatment planning. For example, executive dysfunction often accompanies late-life depression, influences performance across cognitive domains, and is associated with poor antidepressant treatment outcomes. Here, we review how assessment can capture dysfunction across cognitive domains and discuss cognitive trajectories frequently observed in late-life depression in the context of the neurobiology of this disorder. We also review the efficacy of a sample of interventions tailored to specific cognitive profiles.

  3. Cerebral and blood correlates of reduced functional connectivity in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escamilla, Gabriel; Atienza, Mercedes; Garcia-Solis, David; Cantero, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that decreased functional connectivity in cortical networks precedes clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), although our knowledge about cerebral and biological correlates of this phenomenon is limited. To shed light on this issue, we have investigated whether resting-state oscillatory connectivity patterns in healthy older (HO) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects are related to anatomical grey matter (GM) and functional (2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET) changes of neuroelectric sources of alpha rhythms, and/or to changes in plasma amyloid-beta (Aβ) and serum lipid levels, blood markers tied to AD pathogenesis and aging-related cognitive decline. We found that aMCI subjects showed decreased levels of cortical connectivity, reduced FDG-PET intake of the precuneus, and GM atrophy of the thalamus, together with higher levels of Aβ and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) compared to HO. Interestingly, levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were positively correlated with the strength of neural-phase coupling in aMCI subjects, and increased triglycerides accompanied bilateral GM loss in the precuneus of aMCI subjects. Together, these findings provide peripheral blood correlates of reduced resting-state cortical connectivity in aMCI, supported by anatomo-functional changes in cerebral sources of alpha rhythms. This framework constitutes an integrated approach to assess functional changes in cortical networks through neuroimaging and peripheral blood markers during early stages of neurodegeneration.

  4. Spared and impaired aspects of motivated cognitive control in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mann, Claire L; Footer, Owen; Chung, Yu Sun; Driscoll, Lori L; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-08-01

    The ability to upregulate cognitive control in motivationally salient situations was examined in individuals with schizophrenia (patients) and healthy controls. Fifty-four patients and 39 healthy controls were recruited. A computerized monetary response conflict task required participants to identity a picture, over which was printed a matching (congruent), neutral, or incongruent word. This baseline condition was followed by an incentive condition, in which participants were given the opportunity to win money on reward-cued trials. These reward-cued trials were interleaved with nonreward cued trials. Reaction times (RT) were examined for both incentive context effects (difference in RT between baseline and nonreward cue trials in the incentive condition) and incentive cue effects (difference in RT between nonreward and reward cue trials in the incentive condition). Compared with baseline, controls showed a speeding of responses during both the nonreward (incentive context effect) and reward cued (incentive cue effect) trials during the incentive condition, but with a larger incentive context than incentive cue effect, suggesting a reliance on proactive control strategies. Although patients also showed a speeding of responses to both nonreward and reward cued trials, they showed a significantly smaller incentive context effect than controls, suggesting a reduction in the use of proactive control and a greater reliance on the use of "just-in-time," reactive control strategies. These results are discussed in light of the relationship between motivation and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, and the potential role of impairments in prefrontally mediated active maintenance mechanisms.

  5. Interference Impacts Working Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Aurtenetxe, Sara; García-Pacios, Javier; del Río, David; López, María E.; Pineda-Pardo, José A.; Marcos, Alberto; Delgado Losada, Maria L.; López-Frutos, José M.; Maestú, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most common cognitive impairment of MCI includes episodic memory loss and difficulties in working memory (WM). Interference can deplete WM, and an optimal WM performance requires an effective control of attentional resources between the memoranda and the incoming stimuli. Difficulties in handling interference lead to forgetting. However, the interplay between interference and WM in MCI is not well-understood and needs further investigation. The current study investigated the effect of interference during a WM task in 20 MCIs and 20 healthy elder volunteers. Participants performed a delayed match-to-sample paradigm which consisted in two interference conditions, distraction and interruption, and one control condition without any interference. Results evidenced a disproportionate impact of interference on the WM performance of MCIs, mainly in the presence of interruption. These findings demonstrate that interference, and more precisely interruption, is an important proxy for memory-related deficits in MCI. Thus, the current findings reveal novel evidence regarding the causes of WM forgetting in MCI patients, associated with difficulties in the mechanisms of attentional control. PMID:27790082

  6. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  7. Mild cognitive impairment: Conceptual, assessment, ethical, and social issues

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Perla; Korczyn, Amos D

    2008-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as a condition characterized by newly acquired cognitive decline to an extent that is beyond that expected for age or educational background, yet not causing significant functional impairment. The concept of MCI has received considerable attention in the literature over the past few years, and aspects related to its definition, prevalence, and evolution have been extensively studied and reviewed. Here we attempt to synthesize the implications of the current status of this entity, focusing on the conceptual, methodological, and, in particular, the social and ethical aspects of MCI which have attracted less attention. We discuss the weaknesses of the concept of MCI, which is heterogeneous in etiology, manifestations, and outcomes, and suggest that the emergence of the syndrome at this stage reflects industrial interests related to possible development of drugs for this disorder. On the other hand, the formal diagnosis of MCI, with its implications that the person may develop dementia, may have a grave impact on the psychological state of the individual, at a stage when prediction of outcome is tenuous and possibilities of useful interventions are meager. We present suggestions for the direction of future research in these areas. PMID:18982912

  8. Chronic Bickerstaff’s encephalitis with cognitive impairment, a reality?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bickerstaff’s encephalitis (BE) is an acute post-infectious demyelinating disease with albuminocytological dissociation. A chronic form has rarely been described previously. Case presentation A 44-year-old man was hospitalized for drowsiness, cognitive complaint limb weakness, ataxia and sensory disturbance after diarrhea. Neuropsychological evaluation showed slowing, memory and executive function impairment, while analysis of the CSF showed albuminocytological dissociation. Immunologic tests showed positive anti-ganglioside antibodies (anti-GM1 IgM, anti-GD1a IgG and anti-GD1b IgM). Brain MRI was normal but SPECT showed bilateral temporal and frontal hypoperfusion. Outcome under immunoglobulin treatment (IVIG) was favorable with an initial improvement but was marked by worsening after a few weeks. Consequently, the patient was treated with IVIG every 2 months due to the recurrence of symptoms after 6 weeks. Conclusion This case raises the question of the existence of a chronic form of BE with cognitive impairment, in the same way as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is considered to be a chronic form of Guillain–Barré syndrome. PMID:24885623

  9. Elevated Rates of Mild Cognitive Impairment in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, David P.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Bondi, Mark W.; Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Massman, Paul J.; Gilbert, Paul E.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the rising number of individuals in their 50s and 60s who are infected with HIV, concerns have emerged about possible increases in the rates of non-HIV-associated dementias. The current study examined the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older HIV-infected adults, since MCI is an intermediate state between typical cognitive aging and dementia that emerges in this age range. Participants included 75 adults with HIV disease aged 50 years and older who were on cART and had undetectable plasma viral loads and 80 demographically similar HIV seronegative comparison subjects. Participants completed a research neuropsychological evaluation that was used to classify MCI according to the comprehensive diagnostic scheme described by Bondi et al. (2014). HIV-infected persons were over seven times more likely to have an MCI designation (16%) than their seronegative counterparts (2.5%). Within the HIV+ cohort, MCI had minimal overlap with diagnoses of Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment and was significantly associated with older age, lower Karnofsky Scale of Performance Scores, and mild difficulties performing instrumental activities of daily living (iADLs). HIV infection in older adults is associated with a notably elevated concurrent risk of MCI, which may increase the likelihood of developing non-HIV-associated dementias as this population ages further. PMID:26139019

  10. Spared and impaired aspects of motivated cognitive control in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mann, Claire L; Footer, Owen; Chung, Yu Sun; Driscoll, Lori L; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-08-01

    The ability to upregulate cognitive control in motivationally salient situations was examined in individuals with schizophrenia (patients) and healthy controls. Fifty-four patients and 39 healthy controls were recruited. A computerized monetary response conflict task required participants to identity a picture, over which was printed a matching (congruent), neutral, or incongruent word. This baseline condition was followed by an incentive condition, in which participants were given the opportunity to win money on reward-cued trials. These reward-cued trials were interleaved with nonreward cued trials. Reaction times (RT) were examined for both incentive context effects (difference in RT between baseline and nonreward cue trials in the incentive condition) and incentive cue effects (difference in RT between nonreward and reward cue trials in the incentive condition). Compared with baseline, controls showed a speeding of responses during both the nonreward (incentive context effect) and reward cued (incentive cue effect) trials during the incentive condition, but with a larger incentive context than incentive cue effect, suggesting a reliance on proactive control strategies. Although patients also showed a speeding of responses to both nonreward and reward cued trials, they showed a significantly smaller incentive context effect than controls, suggesting a reduction in the use of proactive control and a greater reliance on the use of "just-in-time," reactive control strategies. These results are discussed in light of the relationship between motivation and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, and the potential role of impairments in prefrontally mediated active maintenance mechanisms. PMID:23834064

  11. Status of vitamin B-12 and B-6 but not of folate, homocysteine and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism are associated with impaired cognition and depression in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The C677T polymorphism of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene differs in frequency in different ethnic groups which have differing prevalence of age-related cognitive impairments. We used a battery of neuropsychological tests to examine association of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism w...

  12. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Shera, David M.; Lustig, Robert A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  13. Progressive impairment in olfactory working memory in a mouse model of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jared W; Sharkey, John; Finlayson, Keith

    2009-09-01

    Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), exhibiting both working memory and olfactory deficits are likely to progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Targeting this pre-clinical AD population with disease modifying agents or cognitive enhancers represents the best strategy for halting or delaying the impact of this pernicious disease. However, there is a paucity of animal models of MCI with which to assess putative therapeutic strategies. We describe an odour span task which assesses the ability of mice to remember lists of odours, and report subtle cognitive deficits in human amyloid over-expressing (Tg2576) mice, at an age prior to plaque deposition. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice exhibited normal acquisition and performance in the standard 12-span task, but were significantly impaired when memory load was increased to 22 odours. By 8-months, a performance deficit was apparent in the 12-span task and by 1-year mice also exhibited significant acquisition deficits. Thus, by assessing olfactory working memory in Tg2576 mice we can model aspects of MCI in rodents and aid development of future therapeutic strategies for AD.

  14. [Speech impairment predisposes to cognitive deterioration in hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Meparidze, M M; Kodua, T E; Lashkhi, K S

    2010-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible neuro-psychiatric syndrome that complicates liver insufficiency. The changes are complex and disorders are detected in digestive and neural systems. Disturbed consciousness and intellectual deterioration, particularly communicative difficulties are observed: speech is slurred, voice monotonous, writing disturbances, amimic face and rigid posture. Difficulties of socialization and tendency to self-isolation are observed. Memory, attention and perception are decreased. We suppose that disorders of cognitive functions are determined by impairment of speech and other communicative abilities. According to the theories of linguistic determinism and linguistic relativity thought categories move through the mould of native language. That means, speech impairment causes misperception of the real world. To confirm this hypothesis we investigated 106 patients with following diseases: peptic ulcer - 46, fatty liver - 30, liver cirrhosis - 19, viral hepatitis - 11 and 19 controls. Brain magnetic resonance tomography was carried out and psychometric tests were performed to patients with symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Atrophic changes in frontal, temporal and insular area of brain cortex were revealed in most cases. Those regions are responsible for actor observation, imitation and emotion, i.e. for empathy and sociability. They are very sensitive to the increased levels of ammonia and glutamine. In case of early treatment only slight atrophic changes are presented but without treatment atrophic processes become stable and expressed by impairments of speech and entire communicative ability. Human beings are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. They do not live in the objective world alone, or in the world of social activity alone. Accordingly, damage of speech in hepatic encephalopathy is primary and predisposes to cognitive dysfunction. PMID:20495225

  15. Cognitive impairment and cardiovascular disease: so near, so far.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Ferrari, Gian Franco; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2014-07-15

    In the spectrum of cognitive impairment, ranging from "pure" vascular dementia to Alzheimer's disease (AD), clinical interest has recently expanded from the brain to also include the vessels, shifting the pathophysiological focus from the leaves of synaptic dysfunction to the sap of cerebral microcirculation and the roots of cardiovascular function. From a diagnostic viewpoint, a thorough clinical evaluation of individuals presenting cognitive impairment might systematically include the assessment of the major cardiovascular rings of the chain linking regional perfusion to brain function: 1) lung (with assessment of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome); 2) heart function (with clinical examination and echocardiography) and cardiovascular risk factors; 3) orthostatic hypotension (with medical history and measurement of heart rate and blood pressure in supine and upright positions); 4) aorta and large artery stiffness (with assessment of pulse wave velocity); 5) large cerebro-vascular vessel status (with neuroimaging techniques); 6) assessment of microcirculation (with cerebrovascular reactivity testing with transcranial Doppler sonography or MRI perfusion imaging); and 7) assessment of venous cerebral circulation. The apparent difference in approaches to "brain" and "vascular" environmental enrichment with physical, cognitive and sensorial training is conceptually identical to that of a constant gardener caring for an unhealthy tree, watering the leaves ("train the brain") or simply the roots ("mind the vessel"). The therapeutic difference probably consists in the amount and quality of water added to the tree, rather than by where one pours it, with either a top-down (leaves to roots) or bottom-up (roots to leaves) approach. PMID:24856805

  16. Self-serving appraisal as a cognitive coping strategy to deal with age-related limitations: an empirical study with elderly adults in a real-life stressful situation.

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Rudi; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, I

    2006-03-01

    Elderly people are often confronted with stressful events that threaten psychological homeostasis. Nevertheless, the lack of a general age-related drop in life satisfaction remains intriguing. The objective of this study was to analyze the basic mechanisms of perceived control and self-protective processes. Eighty-four elderly adults who underwent a fitness-to-drive evaluation were asked how they appraised their performance in a driving simulation task and were classified as over-estimators versus people who estimated their performance correctly and people who didn't overestimate their performance. Decreased physical resources were related to self-serving appraisal and less depressive feelings. The results are in line with theories on self-immunizing processes and provide support for the use of cognitive therapies in dealing with age-related limitations.

  17. Caregivers in China: Knowledge of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Mei, John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali; Pacheco, Misty; Wu, Bei

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the experience and knowledge of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among Chinese family caregivers of individuals with MCI. The sample was recruited from memory clinics in Zhongnan Hospital in Wuhan, China. In-depth semi-structured interviews were used. Thirteen family members of individuals diagnosed with MCI participated in the study. Data analysis revealed three themes: 1) initial recognition of cognitive decline; 2) experience of the diagnosis of MCI; 3) perception of cognitive decline as a normal part of aging. While family members recognized the serious consequences of memory loss (e.g. getting lost), they would typically not take their family members to see a doctor until something specific triggered their access to the medical care system. The Chinese traditional perception of dementia as part of normal aging may serve to lessen the stigma of individuals with MCI, while the term “laonian chidai” which literally translates to “stupid, demented elderly” may exacerbate the stigma associated with individuals with MCI. It is suggested that family members’ worries may be relieved by improving their access to accurate knowledge of the disease, community-based and institutional care services, and culturally appropriately words are needed for MCI. PMID:23326541

  18. Protective effect of rutin on cognitive impairment caused by phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Shagun; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of the co-administration of phenytoin (PHT) and rutin in comparison with PHT and piracetam (PIM) on seizure control, cognitive, and motor functions in mice. Materials and Methods: Increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test was used to evaluate the effect of the co-administration of PHT and PIM on convulsions. Cognitive functions in mice were assessed by a spontaneous alternation in behavior on a plus maze while motor functions were screened using rolling roller apparatus and by counting the number of arms entries on a plus maze. Brain acetyl-cholinesterase (AChE) activity was also estimated. Statistical Analysis: The expression of data was done as mean ± standard error of the mean. The normally distributed data were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The study showed that rutin when co-administered with PHT, significantly reversed PHT-induced reduction in spontaneous alternation without altering the efficacy of PHT against ICES, in both acute and chronic studies. Further, it also reversed PHT-induced increase in AChE activity. Conclusion: Rutin alleviated the PHT-induced cognitive impairment without compromising its antiepileptic efficacy. PMID:26729954

  19. Prevalence and incidence of blindness and other degrees of sight impairment in patients treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a well-defined region of the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Buckle, M; Lee, A; Mohamed, Q; Fletcher, E; Sallam, A; Healy, R; Stratton, I; Tufail, A; Johnston, R L

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of blindness, sight impairment, and other visual acuity (VA) states in patients receiving ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in Gloucestershire. Methods Serial VA and injection data for all treatment-naive patients receiving their first intravitreal injections of ranibizumab for nAMD in the Gloucestershire National Health Service Ophthalmology department between 2008 and 2010 were extracted from an electronic medical record system. Results The prevalence of blindness (VA in the better-seeing eye ≤25 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters) at the time of first intravitreal injection was 0.8%, increasing to 3.5% after 3 years. The prevalence of sight impairment (VA in the better-seeing eye 26–39 ETDRS letters) increased from 4.1% at baseline to 5.5% after 3 years. The incidence of initiating ranibizumab treatment for nAMD in people aged ≥50 years in Gloucestershire was 111 people per 100 000 population in 2009, and 97 people in 2010. The incidence of patients meeting the visual criteria for blindness and sight impairment registration from treated nAMD in people aged ≥50 years in Gloucestershire was 3.5 and 9.7 people, respectively per 100 000 population in 2010. Conclusion This is the first real-world study on the incidence and prevalence of eligibility for blindness and sight impairment registration in treated nAMD in the UK based on VA data. The incidence and prevalence of eligibility for certification of blindness or sight impairment in patients treated with ranibizumab for nAMD is low in Gloucestershire, with only 3.6% of the incident population progressing to blindness in 2010. PMID:25592123

  20. Hydrogen Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Multidomain Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Vascular Cognitive Impairment Without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-Qing; Cai, Qing; Shen, Yu-Ying; Xu, Chuan-Xiao; Zhou, Hua; Zhao, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the value of hydrogen proton magnet resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) in the differential diagnosis of multiple-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment (M-aMCI) and vascular cognitive impairment with no dementia (VCIND); (1)H-MRS was performed in patients with M-aMCI and VCIND. The level was determined for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), inositol (mI), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr). Compared with the normal control group, the NAA-Cr ratio in all regions studied was significantly lower in the M-aMCI and VCIND groups. The Glu-Cr ratio in the posterior cingulate gyrus of the M-aMCI group was significantly lower than in the VCIND. The mI-Cr ratio in the frontal white matter of the VCIND was significantly higher than in the M-aMCI group. In the white matter adjacent to the lateral ventricles, the Cho-Cr ratio was significantly higher in the VCIND than the M-aMCI. Our results suggested (1)H-MRS is an effective method in the differential diagnosis of M-aMCI and VCIND. PMID:26980718

  1. Cognitive impairment and evaluation in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: an integrated cognitive-emotional approach.

    PubMed

    Willment, Kim; Hill, Melanie; Baslet, Gaston; Loring, David W

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies comparing patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) to those with epilepsy have been largely equivocal. The variability in the neuropsychological literature highlights the heterogeneity of the PNES population across a number of psychiatric and neurologic factors. Phenotypic presentations in PNES arise from complex interactions between vulnerable cognitive and emotional systems. We propose that variability in neuropsychological findings in PNES emerge in the context of diverse psychiatric, neurologic, and clinical factors. Traditional assessments that fail to integrate cognitive and emotional/behavioral profiles sufficiently would fall short in characterizing the complexity of brain-behavior relationships in this population. To advance the neuropsychology of PNES, we propose a systematic approach to measure a number of factors that influence cognitive impairment in this population. We begin by reviewing the current neuropsychological literature in PNES and discussing a number of factors that influence cognitive deficits. We then present a comprehensive neuropsychological battery designed to capture elements (cognitive dysfunction, psychopathology, emotion processing deficits) underlying the proposed vulnerable cognitive-emotional system in PNES. It is our hope that the proposed battery will facilitate the aggregation of data across neuropsychological investigations, to allow more advanced statistical analyses, and ultimately enhance our understanding of PNES and the development of effective management and treatment options.

  2. Cognitive impairment and evaluation in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: an integrated cognitive-emotional approach.

    PubMed

    Willment, Kim; Hill, Melanie; Baslet, Gaston; Loring, David W

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies comparing patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) to those with epilepsy have been largely equivocal. The variability in the neuropsychological literature highlights the heterogeneity of the PNES population across a number of psychiatric and neurologic factors. Phenotypic presentations in PNES arise from complex interactions between vulnerable cognitive and emotional systems. We propose that variability in neuropsychological findings in PNES emerge in the context of diverse psychiatric, neurologic, and clinical factors. Traditional assessments that fail to integrate cognitive and emotional/behavioral profiles sufficiently would fall short in characterizing the complexity of brain-behavior relationships in this population. To advance the neuropsychology of PNES, we propose a systematic approach to measure a number of factors that influence cognitive impairment in this population. We begin by reviewing the current neuropsychological literature in PNES and discussing a number of factors that influence cognitive deficits. We then present a comprehensive neuropsychological battery designed to capture elements (cognitive dysfunction, psychopathology, emotion processing deficits) underlying the proposed vulnerable cognitive-emotional system in PNES. It is our hope that the proposed battery will facilitate the aggregation of data across neuropsychological investigations, to allow more advanced statistical analyses, and ultimately enhance our understanding of PNES and the development of effective management and treatment options. PMID:25780266

  3. Relationship between regional atrophy rates and cognitive decline in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Carrie R; Gharapetian, Lusineh; McEvoy, Linda K; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Hagler, Donald J; Holland, Dominic; Dale, Anders M

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the relationship between regional atrophy rates and 2-year cognitive decline in a large cohort of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n = 103) and healthy controls (n = 90). Longitudinal magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans were analyzed using high-throughput image analysis procedures. Atrophy rates were derived by calculating percent cortical volume loss between baseline and 24 month scans. Stepwise regressions were performed to investigate the contribution of atrophy rates to language, memory, and executive functioning decline, controlling for age, gender, baseline performances, and disease progression. In MCI, left temporal lobe atrophy rates were associated with naming decline, whereas bilateral temporal, left frontal, and left anterior cingulate atrophy rates were associated with semantic fluency decline. Left entorhinal atrophy rate was associated with memory decline and bilateral frontal atrophy rates were associated with executive function decline. These data provide evidence that regional atrophy rates in MCI contribute to domain-specific cognitive decline, which appears to be partially independent of disease progression. MRI measures of regional atrophy can provide valuable information for understanding the neural basis of cognitive impairment in MCI.

  4. Thyroid Hormones Are Associated with Poorer Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Patrick; Nordlund, Arto; Lind, Karin; Gustafson, Deborah; Edman, Åke; Wallin, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Background Alterations in interrelated endocrine axes may be related to the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Methods Salivary cortisol before and after a 0.5-mg dexamethasone test, and serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, total thyroxine (T4), free T4, total triiodothyronine (TT3), estradiol, testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 were measured in 43 MCI cases and 26 healthy controls. All participants underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery covering the cognitive domains of speed/attention, memory, visuospatial functions, language and executive functions. Results The MCI group did not differ in basal levels of endocrine markers compared to controls. Among those with MCI, TT3 levels were inversely associated with cognitive performance across all domains. After stratifying MCI cases according to TT3 levels, those with relatively high TT3 levels showed impairment in memory as well as in visuospatial and executive functions. Those with TT3 levels at or below the lower boundary of the normal range performed comparably to healthy controls. Other endocrine markers were not related to cognitive performance. Conclusions Among those with MCI, TT3 was associated with a neuropsychological profile typical of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. While the mechanisms remain unclear, optimal levels of thyroid hormone under a compromising condition such as MCI and related neuropathology need reconsideration. PMID:20798541

  5. Cognitive Stimulation Modulates Platelet Total Phospholipases A2 Activity in Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Marta; Giuli, Cinzia; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Fabbietti, Paolo; Postacchini, Demetrio; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of cognitive stimulation (CS) on platelet total phospholipases A2 activity (tPLA2A) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI_P). At baseline, tPLA2A negatively correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE_s): patients with MMSE_s <26 (Subgroup 1) had significantly higher activity than those with MMSE_s ≥26 (Subgroup 2), who had values similar to the healthy elderly. Regarding CS effect, Subgroup 1 had a significant tPLA2A reduction, whereas Subgroup 2 did not significantly changes after training. Our results showed for the first time that tPLA2A correlates with the cognitive conditions of MCI_P, and that CS acts selectively on subjects with a dysregulated tPLA2A. PMID:26836161

  6. Studying nursing interventions in acutely ill, cognitively impaired older adults

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Kathleen; Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B; Naylor, Mary D

    2015-01-01

    Background Between one and two of every five hospitalized older adults have cognitive deficits, often not accurately assessed or well managed. Cognitive impairment adds substantially to the complexity of these patients’ care, places them at high risk for poor outcomes and increases the cost of health care. Methods We describe three evidence-based interventions, each capitalizing on the unique contributions of nurses and designed to improve outcomes of hospitalized older adults who have cognitive deficits. Interventions of varying intensity were compared across three hospitals (Phase I) and subsequently within the same hospitals (Phase II). All enrolled patients were screened during their index hospitalizations and cognitive deficits were communicated to relevant health care team members (Augmented Standard Care-ASC, lowest intensity). At one hospital, ASC was the only intervention. Patients at a second hospital also had care influenced by specially prepared registered nurses (Resource Nurse Care-RNC, medium intensity). Finally, patients at third hospital also received advanced practice nurse coordinated care (Transitional Care Model-TCM, higher intensity). In Phase II, newly enrolled patients at these same hospitals all received the TCM. We summarize major themes from review of multiple data sources and researcher recollections related to facilitators and barriers to implementing a complex research study. Findings Effective implementation of the three intervention strategies depended on clinician engagement and communication; degree of participation by nurses in the educational program with subsequent practice improvement; and success of advanced practice nurses in implementing the TCM with both with patients, family caregivers and clinicians. Implications Based on lessons learned in implementing complex research studies within the “real world” of clinical practice settings, recommendations focus on strengthening facilitators, minimizing barriers and gaining

  7. Mild cognitive impairment with suspected nonamyloid pathology (SNAP)

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Anna; Prestia, Annapaola; Galluzzi, Samantha; Ferrari, Clarissa; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Van Berckel, Bart; Barkhof, Frederik; Teunissen, Charlotte; Wall, Anders E.; Carter, Stephen F.; Schöll, Michael; Choo, Il Han; Grimmer, Timo; Redolfi, Alberto; Nordberg, Agneta; Scheltens, Philip; Drzezga, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of progressive cognitive deterioration in patients with suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (SNAP) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: We measured markers of amyloid pathology (CSF β-amyloid 42) and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume on MRI and cortical metabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET) in 201 patients with MCI clinically followed for up to 6 years to detect progressive cognitive deterioration. We categorized patients with MCI as A+/A− and N+/N− based on presence/absence of amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration. SNAPs were A−N+ cases. Results: The proportion of progressors was 11% (8/41), 34% (14/41), 56% (19/34), and 71% (60/85) in A−N−, A+N−, SNAP, and A+N+, respectively; the proportion of APOE ε4 carriers was 29%, 70%, 31%, and 71%, respectively, with the SNAP group featuring a significantly different proportion than both A+N− and A+N+ groups (p ≤ 0.005). Hypometabolism in SNAP patients was comparable to A+N+ patients (p = 0.154), while hippocampal atrophy was more severe in SNAP patients (p = 0.002). Compared with A−N−, SNAP and A+N+ patients had significant risk of progressive cognitive deterioration (hazard ratio = 2.7 and 3.8, p = 0.016 and p < 0.001), while A+N− patients did not (hazard ratio = 1.13, p = 0.771). In A+N− and A+N+ groups, none of the biomarkers predicted time to progression. In the SNAP group, lower time to progression was correlated with greater hypometabolism (r = 0.42, p = 0.073). Conclusions: Our findings support the notion that patients with SNAP MCI feature a specific risk progression profile. PMID:25568301

  8. Disrupted Intrinsic Networks Link Amyloid-β Pathology and Impaired Cognition in Prodromal Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kathrin; Myers, Nicholas E; Göttler, Jens; Pasquini, Lorenzo; Grimmer, Timo; Förster, Stefan; Manoliu, Andrei; Neitzel, Julia; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Riedl, Valentin; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid-β pathology (Aβ) and impaired cognition characterize Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, neural mechanisms that link Aβ-pathology with impaired cognition are incompletely understood. Large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) are potential candidates for this link: Aβ-pathology affects specific networks in early AD, these networks show disrupted connectivity, and they process specific cognitive functions impaired in AD, like memory or attention. We hypothesized that, in AD, regional changes of ICNs, which persist across rest- and cognitive task-states, might link Aβ-pathology with impaired cognition via impaired intrinsic connectivity. Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-positron emission tomography reflecting in vivo Aβ-pathology, resting-state fMRI, task-fMRI, and cognitive testing were used in patients with prodromal AD and healthy controls. In patients, default mode network's (DMN) functional connectivity (FC) was reduced in the medial parietal cortex during rest relative to healthy controls, relatively increased in the same region during an attention-demanding task, and associated with patients' cognitive impairment. Local PiB-uptake correlated negatively with DMN connectivity. Importantly, corresponding results were found for the right lateral parietal region of an attentional network. Finally, structural equation modeling confirmed a direct influence of DMN resting-state FC on the association between Aβ-pathology and cognitive impairment. Data provide evidence that disrupted intrinsic network connectivity links Aβ-pathology with cognitive impairment in early AD.

  9. Modeling of Cognitive Impairment by Disease Duration in Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Achiron, Anat; Chapman, Joab; Magalashvili, David; Dolev, Mark; Lavie, Mor; Bercovich, Eran; Polliack, Michael; Doniger, Glen M.; Stern, Yael; Khilkevich, Olga; Menascu, Shay; Hararai, Gil; Gurevich, Micharel; Barak, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Large-scale population studies measuring rates and dynamics of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis (MS) are lacking. In the current cross-sectional study we evaluated the patterns of cognitive impairment in MS patients with disease duration of up to 30 years. Methods 1,500 patients with MS were assessed by a computerized cognitive battery measuring verbal and non-verbal memory, executive function, visual spatial perception, verbal function, attention, information processing speed and motor skills. Cognitive impairment was defined as below one standard deviation (SD) and severe cognitive impairment as below 2SD for age and education matched healthy population norms. Results Cognitive performance in our cohort was poorer than healthy population norms. The most frequently impaired domains were information processing speed and executive function. MS patients with secondary-progressive disease course performed poorly compared with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting and primary progressive MS patients. By the fifth year from disease onset, 20.9% of patients performed below the 1SD cutoff for impairment, p = 0.005, and 6.0% performed below the 2SD cutoff for severe cognitive impairment, p = 0.002. By 10 years from onset 29.3% and 9.0% of patients performed below the 1SD and 2SD cutoffs, respectively, p = 0.0001. Regression modeling suggested that cognitive impairment may precede MS onset by 1.2 years. Conclusions The rates of cognitive impairment in this large sample of MS patients were lower than previously reported and severe cognitive impairment was evident only in a relatively small group of patients. Cognitive impairment differed significantly from expected normal distribution only at five years from onset, suggesting the existence of a therapeutic window during which patients may benefit from interventions to maintain cognitive health. PMID:23936485

  10. Current evidence for the clinical use of long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids to prevent age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dacks, P A; Shineman, D W; Fillit, H M

    2013-03-01

    An NIH State of the Science Conference panel concluded in 2010 that insufficient evidence is available to recommend the use of any primary prevention therapy for Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline with age. Despite the insufficient evidence, candidate therapies with varying levels of evidence for safety and efficacy are taken by the public and discussed in the media. One example is the long-chain n-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA), DHA and EPA, found in some fish and dietary supplements. With this report, we seek to provide a practical overview and rating of the level and type of available evidence that n-3 LC-PUFA supplements are safe and protective against cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease, with additional discussion of the evidence for effects on quality of life, vascular aging, and the rate of aging. We discuss available sources, dose, bioavailability, and variables that may impact the response to n-3 LC-PUFA treatment such as baseline n-3 LC-PUFA status, APOE ε4 genotype, depression, and background diet. Lastly, we list ongoing clinical trials and propose next research steps to validate these fatty acids for primary prevention of cognitive aging and dementia. Of particular relevance, epidemiology indicates a higher risk of cognitive decline in people in the lower quartile of n-3 LC-PUFA intake or blood levels but these populations have not been specifically targeted by RCTs. PMID:23459977

  11. Current evidence for the clinical use of long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids to prevent age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dacks, P A; Shineman, D W; Fillit, H M

    2013-03-01

    An NIH State of the Science Conference panel concluded in 2010 that insufficient evidence is available to recommend the use of any primary prevention therapy for Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline with age. Despite the insufficient evidence, candidate therapies with varying levels of evidence for safety and efficacy are taken by the public and discussed in the media. One example is the long-chain n-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA), DHA and EPA, found in some fish and dietary supplements. With this report, we seek to provide a practical overview and rating of the level and type of available evidence that n-3 LC-PUFA supplements are safe and protective against cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease, with additional discussion of the evidence for effects on quality of life, vascular aging, and the rate of aging. We discuss available sources, dose, bioavailability, and variables that may impact the response to n-3 LC-PUFA treatment such as baseline n-3 LC-PUFA status, APOE ε4 genotype, depression, and background diet. Lastly, we list ongoing clinical trials and propose next research steps to validate these fatty acids for primary prevention of cognitive aging and dementia. Of particular relevance, epidemiology indicates a higher risk of cognitive decline in people in the lower quartile of n-3 LC-PUFA intake or blood levels but these populations have not been specifically targeted by RCTs.

  12. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  13. Marital Quality in the Context of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Dew, Mary Amanda; Urda, Bridget; Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; DeKosky, Steven T.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    The behavioral changes in people with dementia often negatively affect marital relationships. Yet little is known about how the marital relationship is affected when the care recipient has mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study characterizes marital quality among adults who live with a spouse with MCI. Data were drawn from interviews with 27 spouses of people with a recent diagnosis of MCI. Even at early stages of MCI, many spouses report the frequent occurrence of distressing behaviors. This study demonstrates that MCI may degrade the quality of the marital relationship. These results have implications for clinical practice and the delivery of health care and social services to these families. It is important to develop interventions to address the needs of these individuals and their caregivers. Results of this study suggest the need for mental health interventions designed to preserve the quality of these marital relationships. PMID:17984481

  14. Writing Impairments in Japanese Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and with Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Ruriko; Ohnuma, Ayumu; Kimpara, Teiko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Mori, Etsuro

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We investigated writing abilities in patients with the amnestic type of mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). To examine the earliest changes in writing function, we used writing tests for both words and sentences with different types of Japanese characters (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji). Methods A total of 25 aMCI patients, 38 AD patients, and 22 healthy controls performed writing to dictation for Kana and Kanji words, copied Kanji words, and wrote in response to a picture story task. Analysis of variance was used to test the subject group effects on the scores in the above writing tasks. Results For the written Kanji words, the mild AD group performed worse than the aMCI group and the controls, but there was no difference between the aMCI group and the controls. For the picture story writing task, the mild AD and aMCI groups performed worse than the controls, but the difference between the AD and the aMCI groups was not significant. Conclusions The mild AD group showed defects in writing Kanji characters, and the aMCI group showed impairments in narrative writing. Our study suggests that narrative writing, which demands complex integration of multiple cognitive functions, can be used to detect the subtle writing deficits in aMCI patients. PMID:26483830

  15. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments

  16. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  17. Cognitive Impairment in Diabetes: Rationale and Design Protocol of the Cog-ID Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Jolien; Kooistra, Minke; van den Berg, Esther; Kappelle, L Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment frequently co-occurs with type 2 diabetes but is often undiagnosed. Cognitive impairment affects self-management leading to treatment-related complications. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a stepped diagnostic procedure, consisting of a screening test complemented by an evaluation by a general practitioner (GP), to detect undiagnosed cognitive impairment in older people with type 2 diabetes. Methods The accuracy of two self-administered cognitive tests, the “Test Your Memory” (TYM) and “Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination” (SAGE) alone, and in combination with an evaluation by a GP will be assessed. A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia at a memory clinic will serve as reference standard. This cognitive impairment in diabetes (Cog-ID) study will include 513 people from primary care facilities aged ≥70 with type 2 diabetes. The participants will first fill out the TYM and SAGE tests, followed by a standardized GP evaluation for cognitive impairment, including a mini mental state examination (MMSE). Subsequently, participants suspected of cognitive impairment (on either test or the GP assessment) and a random sample of 15% (65/435) of participants without suspected cognitive impairment will be referred to the memory clinic. At the memory clinic, a medical examination, neuropsychological examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain will be performed. Participants will also fill out questionnaires assessing health status and depressive symptoms at baseline and after 6 and 24 months. Results This research obtained funding and ethical approval. Enrolment started in August, 2012, and all study-related activities will be completed in September, 2016. Conclusions With the results from this study, physicians will be able to detect cognitive impairment affecting type 2 diabetes patients through case-finding, and can use tailored care to reduce associated complications

  18. The Efficacy of Cognitive Intervention Programs for Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yun Jeong; Jang, Eun Hye; Hwang, Jihye; Roh, Jee Hoon; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) describes a transitional state in progression from normal aging to dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment that offers a long-term beneficial effect to delay the progression to dementia. There is growing evidence that supports an important role of non-pharmacological cognitive interventions. Therefore, it is warranted to clarify the distinct forms of cognitive interventions and their effects based on previous clinical trials. We aimed to provide a review of clinical trials of non-pharmacological cognitive interventions for MCI and to address the characteristics of the study patients, cognitive intervention programs and short-term / long-term benefits of the interventions. A total of 32 articles were identified according to the inclusion criteria. The results showed positive effects for both objective and subjective outcome variables, and these effects persisted from 1 month up to 5 years. Although many of the positive effects were related to improvement in trained tasks, alterations in neuroimaging and the transfer effects shown by some studies are encouraging. Future research in this area requires a larger sample size with a wider spectrum of MCI, more instructive outcome measures and a longer follow up duration. PMID:26027815

  19. Ability of university-level education to prevent age-related decline in emotional intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Rosario; Navarro Bravo, Beatriz; Latorre, José Miguel; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that educational history, as a proxy measure of active cognitive reserve, protects against age-related cognitive decline and risk of dementia. Whether educational history also protects against age-related decline in emotional intelligence (EI) is unclear. The present study examined ability EI in 310 healthy adults ranging in age from 18 to 76 years using the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We found that older people had lower scores than younger people for total EI and for the EI branches of perceiving, facilitating, and understanding emotions, whereas age was not associated with the EI branch of managing emotions. We also found that educational history protects against this age-related EI decline by mediating the relationship between age and EI. In particular, the EI scores of older adults with a university education were higher than those of older adults with primary or secondary education, and similar to those of younger adults of any education level. These findings suggest that the cognitive reserve hypothesis, which states that individual differences in cognitive processes as a function of lifetime intellectual activities explain differential susceptibility to functional impairment in the presence of age-related changes and brain pathology, applies also to EI, and that education can help preserve cognitive-emotional structures during aging. PMID:24653697

  20. Cognitive Impairment among the Aging Population in a Community in Southwest Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adebiyi, Akindele O.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Adediran, Babatunde A.; Olakehinde, Olaide O.; Siwoku, Akeem A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular risk models can be quite informative in assisting the clinician to make a prediction of an individual's risk of cognitive impairment. Thus, a simple marker is a priority for low-capacity settings. This study examines the association of selected simple to deploy vascular markers with cognitive impairment in an elderly…

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Modified for Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Phillips, Natalie; Nasreddine, Ziad S.; Chertkow, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the cognitive status of individuals who are visually impaired is limited by the design of the test that is used. This article presents data on the sensitivity and specificity of the version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment for people who are visually impaired. The original validation data were reanalyzed, excluding the five visual…

  2. Impaired Cognition in Rats with Cortical Dysplasia: Additional Impact of Early-Life Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Marcella M.; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Holmes, Gregory L.; Scott, Rod C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most common and serious co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy is cognitive impairment. While early-life seizures are considered a major cause for cognitive impairment, it is not known whether it is the seizures, the underlying neurological substrate or a combination that has the largest impact on eventual learning and memory. Teasing…

  3. Making Sense of Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Qualitative Exploration of the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; Nightingale, Marcie C.; Erlen, Judith A.; Kane, April L.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Schulz, Richard; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed dementia precursor state of mild cognitive impairment is emerging as a primary target of aging research. Yet, little is known about the subjective experience of living with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. This study examines, from the patient's perspective, the experience of living with and making sense of the…

  4. Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency and cognitive impairment are both prevalent in hemodialysis patients in the United States. This study tested the hypothesis that 25(OH)D deficiency may be associated with cognitive impairment because of its vasculoprotective, neuroprotective, and immune-modul...

  5. Teaching Students with Cognitive Impairment Chained Mathematical Task of Decimal Subtraction Using Simultaneous Prompting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Shaila; Kane, Martha T.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed effectiveness of simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching two middle school students with cognitive impairment decimal subtraction using regrouping. A multiple baseline, multiple probe design replicated across subjects successfully taught two students with cognitive impairment at middle school level decimal subtraction…

  6. Physical Fitness Performance of Young Adults with and without Cognitive Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jiabei; Piwowar, Nathan; Reilly, Coleen Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the physical fitness performance of young adults with and without cognitive impairments. Participants were 75 young adults, including 41 without disabilities (23 females, 18 males; M of age = 21.88) and 34 with mild cognitive impairments (14 females, 20 males; M of age = 21.79). They received…

  7. Physicians' Perspectives on Caring for Cognitively Impaired Elders.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Wendy L.; McIlvain, Helen E.; Geske, Jenenne A.; Porter, Judy L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to develop ah in-depth understanding of the issues important to primary care physicians in providing care to cognitively impaired elders. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 primary care physicians. Text coded as "cognitive impairment" was retrieved and analyzed by use of grounded theory analysis…

  8. Semantic Knowledge for Famous Names in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Seidenberg, Michael; Guidotti, Leslie; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gander, Amelia; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Person identification represents a unique category of semantic knowledge that is commonly impaired in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but has received relatively little investigation in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The current study examined the retrieval of semantic knowledge for famous names from three time epochs (recent, remote, and enduring) in two participant groups; 23 aMCI patients and 23 healthy elderly controls. The aMCI group was less accurate and produced less semantic knowledge than controls for famous names. Names from the enduring period were recognized faster than both recent and remote names in both groups, and remote names were recognized more quickly than recent names. Episodic memory performance was correlated with greater semantic knowledge particularly for recent names. We suggest that the anterograde memory deficits in the aMCI group interferes with learning of recent famous names and as a result produces difficulties with updating and integrating new semantic information with previously stored information. The implications of these findings for characterizing semantic memory deficits in MCI are discussed. PMID:19128524

  9. Chronic administration of isocarbophos induces vascular cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Yin, Ya-Ling; Zhu, Mo-Li; Pan, Guo-Pin; Zhao, Fan-Rong; Lu, Jun-Xiu; Liu, Zhan; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia, being the most severe form of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), is caused by cerebrovascular disease. Whether organophosphorus causes VCI remains unknown. Isocarbophos (0.5 mg/kg per 2 days) was intragastrically administrated to rats for 16 weeks. The structure and function of cerebral arteries were assayed. The learning and memory were evaluated by serial tests of step-down, step-through and morris water maze. Long-term administration of isocarbophos reduced the hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and acetylcholine (ACh) content but did not alter the plasma AChE activity, and significantly damaged the functions of learning and memory. Moreover, isocarbophos remarkably induced endothelial dysfunction in the middle cerebral artery and the expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the posterior cerebral artery. Morphological analysis by light microscopy and electron microscopy indicated disruptions of the hippocampus and vascular wall in the cerebral arteries from isocarbophos-treated rats. Treatment of isocarbophos injured primary neuronal and astroglial cells isolated from rats. Correlation analysis demonstrated that there was a high correlation between vascular function of cerebral artery and hippocampal AChE activity or ACh cont