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Sample records for age-related endothelial dysfunction

  1. Oxidative stress, redox signalling and endothelial dysfunction in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases: a role of NADPH oxidase 2

    PubMed Central

    Cahill-Smith, Sarah; Li, Jian-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oxidative stress and oxidative damage of the cerebral microvasculature and brain cells has become one of the most convincing theories in neurodegenerative pathology. Controlled oxidative metabolism and redox signalling in the central nervous system are crucial for maintaining brain function; however, excessive production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced redox signalling damage neurons. While several enzymes and metabolic processes can generate intracellular reactive oxygen species in the brain, recently an O2−-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), has emerged as a major source of oxidative stress in ageing-related vascular endothelial dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. The currently available inhibitors of Nox2 are not specific, and general antioxidant therapy is not effective in the clinic; therefore, insights into the mechanism of Nox2 activation and its signalling pathways are needed for the discovery of novel drug targets to prevent or treat these neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes the recent developments in understanding the mechanisms of Nox2 activation and redox-sensitive signalling pathways and biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, such as ageing-related mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25279404

  2. Markers of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Endothelial Dysfunction and the 20-year Cumulative Incidence of Early Age-related Macular Degeneration: The Beaver Dam Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Danforth, Lorraine G.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Modifying levels of factors associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may decrease risk of visual impairment in older persons. Objective To examine the relationships of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction to the 20-year cumulative incidence of early AMD. Design Longitudinal population-based cohort study. Setting Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Participants A random sample of 975 persons in the Beaver Dam Eye Study without signs of AMD who participated in the baseline examination in 1988-1990 and up to four follow-up examinations in 1993-1995, 1998-2000, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010. Exposures Serum markers of inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 2 [TNF-αR2], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and white blood cell count), oxidative stress (8-isoprostane and total carbonyl content), and endothelial dysfunction (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [sVCAM-1] and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1) were measured. Interactions with Complement Factor H (rs1061170) and Age-Related Maculopathy Susceptibility 2 (rs10490924), C3 (rs2230199) and C2/CFB (rs4151667) were examined using multiplicative models. AMD was assessed from fundus photographs. Main Outcome Measure Early AMD defined by the presence of any size drusen and the presence of pigmentary abnormalities, or by the presence of large-sized drusen (≥125 μm diameter), in the absence of late AMD. Results The 20-year cumulative incidence of early AMD was 23.0%. Adjusting for age, sex, and other risk factors, hsCRP (odds ratio [OR] comparing 4th to 1st quartile 2.18, P=0.005), TNF-αR2 (1.78, P=0.04), and IL-6 (1.78, P=0.03) were associated with the incidence of early AMD. Increased incidence of early AMD was associated with sVCAM-1 (OR per standard deviation on the log ng/mL scale 1.21, P=0.04). Conclusions and Relevance We found modest evidence of relationships of serum hsCRP, TNF-αR2, and IL-6 and sVCAM-1 to the 20

  3. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  4. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  5. Endothelial dysfunction and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane

    2005-03-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a crucial role in the physiology of blood vessels and the pathological processes of atherosclerotic disease and acute coronary syndromes. Endothelial dysfunction is the core problem; it is an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation caused by a loss of nitric oxide activity in the vessel wall, which results in impairment in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. Further understanding of its mechanisms of action and possible therapeutic targets will be of great importance. The group of antioxidant vitamins, A, C and E, would seem uniquely situated to reduce cardiovascular events by improving endothelial function by reducing the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the vessel wall and by preventing oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, despite extensive studies in both observational and randomized trials, the weight of evidence points to little or no benefit from antioxidant therapy. PMID:15770336

  6. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  7. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  8. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  9. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  10. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  11. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  12. Senescence-Induced Oxidative Stress Causes Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhayadia, Raj; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Melk, Anette; Hömme, Meike

    2016-02-01

    Age is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, suggesting a causal relationship between age-related changes and vascular damage. Endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Senescence, the cellular equivalent of aging, was proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction, but functional data showing a causal relationship are missing.Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was measured in aortic rings ex vivo. We investigated aortas from aged C57Bl/6 mice (24-28 months), in which p16 (INK4a) and p19 (ARF) expression, markers of stress-induced senescence, were significantly induced compared to young controls (4-6 months). To reflect telomere shortening in human aging, we investigated aortas from telomerase deficient (Terc(-/-)) mice of generation 3 (G3). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and in Terc(-/-) G3 mice was impaired. A combination of the superoxide dismutase mimetic 1-Oxyl-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor apocynin significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and Terc(-/-) G3 mice compared to untreated controls. We show that both, aging and senescence induced by telomere shortening, cause endothelial dysfunction that can be restored by antioxidants, indicating a role for oxidative stress. The observation that cellular senescence is a direct signalling event leading to endothelial dysfunction holds the potential to develop new targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25735595

  13. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  14. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castellon, Xavier; Bogdanova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and subclinical atherosclerosis as well as early-stage endothelial dysfunction screening using the FMD method (Flow Mediated Dilation). This phenomenon, referred to as accelerated pathological remodeling of arterial wall, could be attributed to traditional risk factors associated with atherosclerosis. Several new non-invasive techniques have been used to study arterial wall’s structural and functional alterations. These techniques (based of Radio Frequency, RF) allow for an assessment of artery age through calculations of intima-media thickness (RF- QIMT), pulse wave rate (RF- QAS) and endothelial dysfunction degree (FMD). The inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors, result of the major consequences of oxidative stress and RAS (Renin Angiotensin System) imbalance associated with the deleterious effect of known risk factors that lead to the alteration of the arterial wall. Inflammation plays a key role in all stages of the formation of vascular lesions maintained and exacerbated by the risk factors. The consequence of chronic inflammation is endothelial dysfunction that sets in and we can define it as an integrated marker of the damage to arterial walls by classic risk factors. The atherosclerosis, which develops among these patients, is the main cause for cardiovascular morbi-mortality and uncontrolled chronic biological inflammation, which quickly favors endothelial dysfunction. These inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26815098

  15. Role of the renin–angiotensin system in age-related sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Groban, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe how recent pharmacological and genetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the role of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in age-related sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction. Treatment strategies are limited in the context of both of these conditions, although interventions, which include blockade of the RAS (using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers) are successful and lead to improvements in functional outcomes that are not necessarily mediated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Studies in animal models of sarcopenia and diastolic dysfunction point to ubiquitous effects of RAS blockade on multiple biological mechanisms, including inflammation, oxidative damage and metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the use of these drugs in other conditions should be considered for maintaining functional independence in older individuals. PMID:20445808

  16. Malondialdehyde induces autophagy dysfunction and VEGF secretion in the retinal pigment epithelium in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuxiang; Kaneko, Hiroki; Hayashi, Yumi; Takayama, Kei; Hwang, Shiang-Jyi; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kimoto, Reona; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Tsunekawa, Taichi; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Yasukawa, Tsutomu; Kondo, Takaaki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries and is closely related to oxidative stress, which leads to lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a major byproduct of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) peroxidation. Increased levels of MDA have been reported in eyes of AMD patients. However, little is known about the direct relationship between MDA and AMD. Here we show the biological importance of MDA in AMD pathogenesis. We first confirmed that MDA levels were significantly increased in eyes of AMD patients. In ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line, MDA treatment induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression alternation, cell junction disruption, and autophagy dysfunction that was also observed in eyes of AMD patients. The MDA-induced VEGF increase was inhibited by autophagy-lysosomal inhibitors. Intravitreal MDA injection in mice increased laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (laser-CNV) volumes. In a mouse model fed a high-linoleic acid diet for 3 months, we found a significant increase in MDA levels, autophagic activity, and laser-CNV volumes. Our study revealed an important role of MDA, which acts not only as a marker but also as a causative factor of AMD pathogenesis-related autophagy dysfunction. Furthermore, higher dietary intake of linoleic acid promoted CNV progression in mice with increased MDA levels. PMID:26923802

  17. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  18. Genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lili; Feng, Haiyan; Gong, Dezheng; Zhao, Xu; Cai, Li; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zou, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) increases with age and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are supposed to be major factors leading to age-related IR. Genipin, an extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit, has been reported to stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells by regulating mitochondrial function. In this study, we first investigated the effects of genipin on insulin sensitivity and the potential mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver of aging rats. The rats were randomly assigned to receive intraperitoneal injections of either 25mg/kg genipin or vehicle once daily for 12days. The aging rats showed hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance as examined by the decreased glucose decay constant rate during insulin tolerance test (kITT). The hepatic tissues showed steatosis and reduced glycogen content. Hepatic malondialdehyde level and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were higher, and levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP were lower as compared with the normal control rats. Administration of genipin ameliorated systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, alleviated hyperinsulinemia, hyperglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, relieved hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rats. Furthermore, genipin not only improved insulin sensitivity by promoting insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and glycogen synthesis, inhibited cellular ROS overproduction and alleviated the reduction of levels of MMP and ATP, but also reversed oxidative stress-associated JNK hyperactivation and reduced Akt phosphorylation in palmitate-treated L02 hepatocytes. In conclusion, genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24041487

  19. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Agents for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zampros, Ilias; Praidou, Anna; Brazitikos, Periklis; Ekonomidis, Panagiotis; Androudi, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe visual loss and blindness over the age of 50 in developed countries. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered as a critical molecule in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), which characterizes the neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF agents are considered the most promising way of effectively inhibition of the neovascular AMD process. VEGF is a heparin-binding glycoprotein with potent angiogenic, mitogenic and vascular permeability-enhancing activities specific for endothelial cells. Two anti-VEGF agents have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of neovascular AMD. Pegaptanib sodium, which is an aptamer and ranibizumab, which is a monoclonal antibody fragment. Another humanized monoclonal antibody is currently off-label used, bevacizumab. This paper aims to discuss in details the effectiveness, the efficacy and safety of these three anti-VEGF agents. New anti-VEGF compounds which are recently investigated for their clinical usage (VEGF-trap, small interfering RNA) are also discussed for their promising outcomes. PMID:22174998

  20. Oxidative Stresses and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Chisato

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), the progressive loss of hearing associated with aging, is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. The pathology of ARHL includes the hair cells of the organ of Corti, stria vascularis, and afferent spiral ganglion neurons as well as the central auditory pathways. Many studies have suggested that the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage, the production of reactive oxygen species, and decreased antioxidant function are associated with subsequent cochlear senescence in response to aging stress. Mitochondria play a crucial role in the induction of intrinsic apoptosis in cochlear cells. ARHL can be prevented in laboratory animals by certain interventions, such as caloric restriction and supplementation with antioxidants. In this review, we will focus on previous research concerning the role of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathology of ARHL in both animal models and humans and introduce concepts that have recently emerged regarding the mechanisms of the development of ARHL. PMID:25110550

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  2. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  3. Advanced glycation end-products: a common pathway in diabetes and age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Neves, D

    2013-08-01

    Reactive derivatives of non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions integrate a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Numerous studies have investigated the role of the AGEs in cardiovascular system; however, its contribution to erectile dysfunction (ED) that is an early manifestation of cardiovascular disease has been less intensively investigated. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning AGEs effects in the cavernous tissue of the penis and in ED onset, particularly on diabetes and aging, conditions that not only favor AGEs formation, but also increase risk of developing ED. The specific contribution of AGE on intra- and extracellular deposition of insoluble complexes, interference in activity of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, NO bioavailability, endothelial-dependent vasodilatation, as well as molecular pathways activated by receptor of AGEs are presented. Finally, the interventional actions that prevent AGEs formation, accumulation or activity in the cavernous tissue and that include nutritional pattern modulation, nutraceuticals, exercise, therapeutic strategies (statins, anti-diabetics, inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-5, anti-hypertensive drugs) and inhibitors of AGEs formation and crosslink breakers, are discussed. From this review, we conclude that despite the experiments conducted in animal models pointing to the AGE/RAGE axis as a potential interventional target with respect to ED associated with diabetes and aging, the clinical data have been very disappointing and, until now, did not provide evidence of benefits of treatments directed to AGE inactivation. PMID:23822116

  4. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  5. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. PMID:26377633

  6. Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization and Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Félétou, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing various vasoactive substances but also by another pathway associated with the hyperpolarization of both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and is termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). These responses involve an increase in the endothelial intracellular Ca concentration by the activation of transient receptor potential channels (predominantly TRPV4) followed by the opening of Ca-activated K channels of small and intermediate conductance (SKCa and IKCa). These channels show a distinct subcellular distribution. SKCa are widely distributed over the plasma membrane but segregates at sites of homocellular endothelial junctions, whereas IKCa are preferentially expressed in the myoendothelial projections. Following KCa activation, smooth muscle hyperpolarization is evoked by electrical coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions and/or by the potassium efflux that subsequently activates smooth muscle Kir2.1 and/or Na/K-ATPase. Alteration of the EDH contributes to the endothelial dysfunctions observed in various pathologies or conversely compensates for the loss in NO bioavailability. A better characterization of EDH should allow determining whether new druggable targets can be identified for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26657714

  7. Molecular mechanisms associated with diabetic endothelial-erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castela, Ângela; Costa, Carla

    2016-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes, affecting up to 75% of all diabetic men. Although the aetiology of diabetic ED is multifactorial, endothelial dysfunction is recognized as a mainstay in the pathophysiology of the disease. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by the detrimental actions of high glucose levels and increased oxidative stress on endothelial cells that make up the vascular lining. Besides directly injuring the endothelium, diabetes might also hamper vascular repair mechanisms of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. These states exacerbate and maintain endothelial dysfunction, impairing vasorelaxation events and cavernosal blood perfusion, which are crucial for normal erectile function. PMID:26878803

  8. Spironolactone improves endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan; Khichi, Dinesh; Garg, Nidhi; Verma, Inderjeet; Kaur, Ladbans

    2013-07-01

    Chronic inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction which leads to accelerated atherosclerosis. Accelerated atherosclerosis contributes to premature cardiovascular disease and increased cardiovascular mortality in AS. Spironolactone inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines and improves endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to determine the effect of spironolactone in antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-naive AS patients. Twenty anti-TNF-naive AS patients (M/F = 15/5) with high disease activity (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, BASDAI >4) despite treatment with stable doses of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were investigated. Inflammatory disease activity (BASDAI and Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels), serum nitrite concentration, and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatation of the brachial artery were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy with oral spironolactone 2 mg/kg/day. Ten healthy subjects matched for age and sex acted as the control. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in AS patients at baseline was significantly impaired compared with healthy control group (p < 0.001). After treatment, FMD improved from 11.3 ± 1.70 to 24.69 ± 2.34% (p < 0.001); nitrite concentration reduced from 7.9 ± 0.28 to 4.79 ± 0.19 μmol/L (p < 0.001); ESR from 33.8 ± 4.38 to 15.13 ± 1.30 mm in the first hour, (p < 0.001); and CRP level from 22.39 ± 3.80 to 6.3 ± 1.29 mg/dL, (p < 0.001). BASDAI and BASFI also reduced significantly (p < 0.001). The study suggests that in AS endothelial dysfunction is a part of the disease process. This is the first study to show that treatment with spironolactone improves both endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory disease activity in AS. PMID:23504211

  9. The Relation between canine cognitive dysfunction and age-related brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    OZAWA, Makiko; CHAMBERS, James K.; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) is a syndrome that manifests itself in abnormal behaviors, such as disorientation and wandering. β-amyloid deposition in the brain, including the senile plaque (SP) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), has been suggested as a major cause of the syndrome. However, the pathological significance of β-amyloid deposition in CCD dogs remains unclear. The present study was conducted using 16 dogs aged 10 years or older to clarify the relationship between the age-related histopathological lesions, such as β-amyloid deposition, in the brain and the clinical symptoms of CCD as evaluated in a questionnaire previously established in a large survey. In addition, age-related brain lesions were assessed in 37 dogs. The pathological lesions were evaluated by the severity of β-amyloid deposition (SP and CAA), the amount of ubiquitin-positive granules (UBQ), GFAP-positive astrocytes, Iba-1-positive microglia and Nissle stain-positive nerve cells. The results revealed that there was no significant correlation between the severities of canine SP and CCD. The SP increased until 14 years old, but decreased thereafter, although the incidence of CCD is high at these ages. The CAA consistently increased with age, but did not correlate greatly with the CCD score. In contrast, the increases of UBQ, astrocytes and microglia were significantly correlated with CCD. Thus, the impairment in the synapse and/or myelin suggested by increased UBQ and glial activation might be involved in CCD pathogenesis, but β-amyloid deposition, especially SP, is not a direct pathogenic factor of CCD. PMID:26922972

  10. Endothelial dysfunction and atherothrombosis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Keller, Christiane; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Mildly elevated plasma homocysteine levels are an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic vascular disease in the coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral arterial circulation. Endothelial dysfunction as manifested by impaired endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone and blood flow, by increased recruitment and adhesion of circulating inflammatory cells to the endothelium, and by a loss of endothelial cell antithrombotic function contributes to the vascular disorders linked to hyperhomocysteinemia. Increased vascular oxidant stress through imbalanced thiol redox status and inhibition of important antioxidant enzymes by homocysteine results in decreased bioavailability of the endothelium-derived signaling molecule nitric oxide via oxidative inactivation. This plays a central role in the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of homocysteine on endothelial function. Supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 has been demonstrated to be efficient in lowering mildly elevated plasma homocysteine levels and in reversing homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity. Results from ongoing intervention trials will determine whether homocysteine-lowering therapies contribute to the prevention and reduction of atherothrombotic vascular disease and may thereby provide support for the causal relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and atherothrombosis. PMID:12553746

  11. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  12. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  13. [Hypertension, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, A

    2006-10-01

    Increased blood pressure induces functional and structural changes of the vascular endothelium. Depression of endothelium-dependant vasodilatation is an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension. It can be demonstrated by pharmacological or physiological tests. Decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) is a major determinant of the depression of vasodilatation. It may be caused by a reduction in the activity of NO-endothelial synthase (NOSe) related to: 1) a deficit in substrate (L-arginine), 2) an inhibition by asymmetrical dimethylarginine, 3) a deficit in the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). However, the increase in oxidative stress, a producer of superoxide radicals which combine with NO to form peroxynitrates (ONOO-), is the determining factor. It is related to activation of membranous NAD(P)H oxidases initiated by the stimulation of activating mecanosensors of protein C kinase. The message is amplified by oxidation of BH4 which transforms the NOSe into a producer of superoxide radicals. A cascade of auto-amplification loops leading to atherosclerosis and its complications is then triggered. The superoxide radicals and the peroxynitrates oxidise the LDL-cholesterol. They activate the nuclear factor-kappaB which controls the genes stimulating the expression of many proteins: angiotensinogen and AT1 receptors which stimulate the sympathetic system, receptors of oxidised LDL, adhesion and migration factors (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and MCP-1), pro-inflammatory cytokins (interleukines and TNF-alpha), growth factors (MAP kinases), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The monocytes and smooth muscle cells produce metalloproteinases and pro-inflammatory cytokins which destabilise the atheromatous plaque and favourise vascular remodelling. Inshort, the endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension plays a role in a complex physiopathological process and is a marker of future cardiovascular events. PMID:17100143

  14. [Epigenetic mutagenesis as program of age-related protein dysfunction and aging].

    PubMed

    Romanov, G A; Sukhoverov, V S; Vanyushin, B F

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important polyfunctional role in ontogenesis of human and mammals. A steep rise in probability of mutational substitution of CpG dinucleotide on TpG dinucleotide in the genome is one of the consequences of DNA methylation. All spectrum (17) of possible DNA and protein mutations caused by CpG-dinucleotide methylation in DNA were characterized, and the three most dangerous mutations (able to result in protein inactivation) were isolated. The computer program that allows one to predict all most probable mutations in the analyzed gene and encoded protein was created. On the example of genes from humans and various mammals, it was demonstrated that the amount of potentially dangerous sites of epigenetic mutagenesis in exons was drastically decreased as a result of genome evolution. But, at the same time, unforced preservation of such sites and their persistence were established, indicating the occurrence of age-related protein dysfunction built into the genome epigenetic program, resulting in apoptosis and aging; this program is based on the set and position of methylated codons in exonic gene regions. It is assumed that the program of epigenetic mutagenesis limits the lifetime of an individual, accelerating the deliverance of the population from long-lived individuals that completed the reproductive period. PMID:26021123

  15. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shaker A; Mousa, Shaymaa S

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the process by which new vessels are created from pre-existing vasculature, has become the subject of intense research in recent years. Increased rates of angiogenesis are associated with several disease states, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetic retinopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, and has been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions, including AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. AMD is a progressive disease of the macula and the third major cause of blindness worldwide. If not treated appropriately, AMD can progress to involve both eyes. Until recently, the treatment options for AMD have been limited, with photodynamic therapy (PDT) the mainstay of treatment. Although PDT is effective at slowing disease progression, it rarely results in improved vision. Several therapies have been or are now being developed for neovascular AMD, with the goal of inhibiting VEGF. These VEGF inhibitors include the RNA aptamer pegaptanib, partial and full-length antibodies ranibizumab and bevacizumab, the VEGF receptor decoy aflibercept, small interfering RNA-based therapies bevasiranib and AGN 211745, sirolimus, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vatalanib, pazopanib, TG 100801, TG 101095, AG 013958, and AL 39324. At present, established therapies have met with great success in reducing the vision loss associated with neovascular AMD, whereas those still under investigation offer the potential for further advances. In AMD patients, these therapies slow the rate of vision loss and in some cases increase visual acuity. Although VEGF-inhibitor therapies are a milestone in the treatment of these disease states, several concerns need to be addressed before their impact can be fully realized. PMID:20210371

  16. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and adropin levels in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Örnek, Nurgül; Örnek, Kemal; Aydin, Süleyman; Yilmaz, Musa; Ölmez, Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and adropin in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. METHODS Ninety-eight AMD patients were included in the study. Seventy-eight age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as the control group. Fundus florescein angiography and optical coherence tomography were performed to assess the posterior segment details. Serum VEGFR-2 and adropin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and compared between the study groups. RESULTS AMD group had significantly increased foveal retinal thickness, serum LDL and HDL levels and significantly decreased subfoveal choroidal thickness (P =0.01, 0.047, 0.025 and <0.001, respectively). Serum VEGFR-2 level revealed a significant decrease in AMD patients compared to controls (26.48±6.44 vs 30.42±7.92 ng/mL, P<0.001). There was an insignificant increase in serum adropin level in AMD patients (6.17±3.19 vs 5.79±2.71 ng/mL, P=0.4). Serum level of VEGFR-2 in AMD patients had a significant negative correlation with foveal retinal thickness (r=-0.226, P=0.025) and a significant positive correlation with subfoveal choroidal thickness (r=0.2, P=0.048). CONCLUSION The current study demonstrated that the decreased serum VEGFR-2 level may be considered in the development of AMD. Adropin does not seem to play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:27162728

  17. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dursunoğlu, Neşe; Dursunoğlu, Dursun

    2005-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), repetitive episodes of apnea cause increased sympathetic nerve activity, increased surges in arterial blood pressure, swings in intrathoracic pressure, oxidative stres, hypoxia and hypercapnia. The association of OSAS with some diseases, having endothelial dysfunction in their physiopathology, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, coronary artery diseases, stroke and heart failure is common. Increased sympathetic nerve activity and also endothelial dysfunction which are the results of hypoxia, have important roles in vascular complications of OSAS. When compared with healthy population, an important endothelial dysfunction in OSAS patients and relationship between OSAS severity and endothelial dysfunction have been shown. In this review, the relationship between OSAS and endothelial dysfunction was overviewed. PMID:16258893

  18. Age-related and site-specific adaptation of the arterial endothelial cytoskeleton during atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yost, J. C.; Herman, I. M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors probed the vascular endothelial cell cytoskeleton in strains of pigeons that are atherosclerosis-susceptible and disease-resistant, namely, the White Carneau and Show Racer pigeons. Endothelial cell actin and myosin were localized with the use of affinity-purified antibodies in conjunction with indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The endothelial cell cytoskeleton was characterized in a site-specific and time-dependent manner by examination of arterial segments from each strain of pigeons. Anti-actin and anti-myosin fluorescence staining patterns of endothelial cells lining the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and thoracic aorta from the White Carneau and Show Racer pigeons sacrificed at 1 and 12 months of age were compared and analyzed. In the Show Racer, irrespective of arterial site or chronologic age, endothelial cell cytoskeletal organization is similar. Actin and myosin fluorescence is brightest at the cortex, where endothelial cells meet their neighbors. There is also an amorphous (diffuse) fluorescence throughout the cytoplasm. In addition to the diffuse and cortical cytoskeletal fluorescence in the endothelial cells of the Show Racers, the White Carneau also possess a unique cytoskeletal array of linear fluorescence, ie, the endothelial cell ridge. At 1 month of age, anti-actin staining of endothelial cell ridges averages 28.5 mu in length in the ascending aorta, 28.0 mu in the aortic arch, and 40.0 mu in the thoracic aorta. At the same time, anti-myosin fluorescence extends past both ends of the anti-actin-stained endothelial cell ridge fluorescence. In the ascending aorta, anti-myosin labeling of endothelial cell ridges is 3.5 times longer than anti-actin staining. This staining is absent in the aortic arch, whereas the thoracic aorta possesses endothelial cell ridges that extend over the entire length of the vessel segment. At 12 months of age, actin-stained endothelial cell ridges increase 1.6- and 1.4-fold in the ascending aorta and aortic

  19. Dysfunctional endothelial cells directly stimulate cancer inflammation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Franses, Joseph W.; Drosu, Natalia C.; Gibson, William J.; Chitalia, Vipul C.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of context-dependent endothelial cell regulation of vascular disease and repair is well-established, the privileged roles endothelial cells play as paracrine regulators of tumor progression has only recently become appreciated. We hypothesized that if the same endothelial physiology governs vascular and cancer biology then endothelial cell control in cancer should follow endothelial regulation of vascular health. Healthy endothelial cells promote vascular repair and inhibit tumor invasiveness and metastasis; dysfunctional endothelial cells have the opposite effects. We now ask if dysfunctionally activated endothelial cells will promote cancer cell inflammatory signaling and aggressive properties. Indeed, while factors released from quiescent ECs induce balanced inflammatory signaling, correlating with decreased proliferation and invasiveness, factors released from dysfunctional ECs robustly activated NF-κB and STAT3 signaling within cancer cells, correlating with increased in vitro invasiveness and decreased proliferation and survival. Furthermore, matrix-embedded dysfunctional endothelial cells stimulated intratumoral pro-inflammatory signaling and spontaneous metastasis, while simultaneously slowing net primary tumor growth, when implanted adjacent to Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. These studies may broaden our realization of the roles of endothelial function and dysfunction, increase understanding and control of the tumor microenvironment, and facilitate optimization of anti-angiogenic and vascular-modifying therapies in cancer and related diseases. PMID:23463345

  20. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  1. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V.; Korokin, Mihail V.; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A.; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G.; Gureev, Vladimir V.; Konovalova, Elena A.; Gudyrev, Oleg S.; Kochkarov, Vladimir I.; Korokina, Liliya V.; Dudina, Eleonora N.; Babko, Anna V.; Terehova, Elena G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21747978

  2. Arginase inhibitor in the pharmacological correction of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V; Korokin, Mihail V; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G; Gureev, Vladimir V; Konovalova, Elena A; Gudyrev, Oleg S; Kochkarov, Vladimir I; Korokina, Liliya V; Dudina, Eleonora N; Babko, Anna V; Terehova, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    THIS PAPER IS ABOUT A WAY OF CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION WITH THE INHIBITOR OF ARGINASE: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21747978

  3. Endothelial dysfunction as a potential contributor in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takahiko; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Croker, Byron P.; Johnson, Richard J.; Grant, Maria B.; Kosugi, Tomoki; Li, Qiuhong

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive the development of diabetic nephropathy remain undetermined. Only 30–40% of patients with diabetes mellitus develop overt nephropathy, which suggests that other contributing factors besides the diabetic state are required for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with human diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy, and advanced diabetic glomerulopathy often exhibits thrombotic microangiopathy, including glomerular capillary microaneurysms and mesangiolysis, which are typical manifestations of endothelial dysfunction in the glomerulus. Likewise, diabetic mice with severe endothelial dysfunction owing to deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide synthase develop progressive nephropathy and retinopathy similar to the advanced lesions observed in humans with diabetes mellitus. Additionally, inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system fail to be renoprotective in some individuals with diabetic nephropathy (due in part to aldosterone breakthrough) and in some mouse models of the disease. In this Review, we discuss the clinical and experimental evidence that supports a role for endothelial nitric oxide deficiency and subsequent endothelial dysfunction in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. If endothelial dysfunction is the key factor required for diabetic nephropathy, then agents that improve endothelial function or raise intraglomerular nitric oxide level could be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21045790

  4. Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and the Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gimbrone, Michael A; García-Cardeña, Guillermo

    2016-02-19

    Dysfunction of the endothelial lining of lesion-prone areas of the arterial vasculature is an important contributor to the pathobiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell dysfunction, in its broadest sense, encompasses a constellation of various nonadaptive alterations in functional phenotype, which have important implications for the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis, local vascular tone and redox balance, and the orchestration of acute and chronic inflammatory reactions within the arterial wall. In this review, we trace the evolution of the concept of endothelial cell dysfunction, focusing on recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie its pivotal roles in atherosclerotic lesion initiation and progression; explore its relationship to classic, as well as more recently defined, clinical risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; consider current approaches to the clinical assessment of endothelial cell dysfunction; and outline some promising new directions for its early detection and treatment. PMID:26892962

  5. Clinical Significance of Endothelial Dysfunction in Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Triantafyllou, Areti; Douma, Stella

    2015-11-01

    The endothelium is recognized as a major determinant of vascular physiology and pathophysiology. Over the last few decades, a plethora of studies have implicated endothelial dysfunction in the progression of atherosclerosis and the subclinical target organ damage observed in essential hypertension. However, the clinical significance of diagnosing endothelial dysfunction in patients with essential hypertension remains under investigation. Although a number of vascular and non-vascular markers of endothelial dysfunction have been proposed, there is an ongoing quest for a marker in the clinical setting that is optimal, inexpensive, and reproducible. In addition, endothelial dysfunction emerges as a promising therapeutic target of agents that are readily available in clinical practice. In this context, a better understanding of its role in essential hypertension becomes of great importance. Here, we aim to investigate the clinical significance of endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension by accumulating novel data on (a) early diagnosis using robust markers with prognostic value in cardiovascular risk prediction, (b) the association of endothelial dysfunction with subclinical vascular organ damage, and (c) potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26371063

  6. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Sharon D.; Lindsley, Kristina; Vedula, Satyanarayana S.; Krzystolik, Magdalena G.; Hawkins, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of uncorrectable severe vision loss in people aged 55 years and older in the developed world. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to neovascular AMD accounts for most AMD-related severe vision loss. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, injected intravitreally, aim to block the growth of abnormal blood vessels in the eye to prevent vision loss and, in some instances, improve vision. Objectives To investigate: (1) the ocular and systemic effects of, and quality of life associated with, intravitreally injected anti-VEGF agents (pegaptanib, ranibizumab, and bevacizumab) for the treatment of neovascular AMD compared with no anti-VEGF treatment; and (2) the relative effects of one anti-VEGF agent compared with another when administered in comparable dosages and regimens. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to March 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to March 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlledtrials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 March 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated pegaptanib, ranibizumab, or bevacizumab versus each other or a control treatment (e.g., sham treatment or photodynamic therapy). All trials followed participants for at least one year. Data collection

  7. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D'Elia, Alessandra

    2016-04-20

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  8. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D’Elia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  9. Treating Coronary Disease and the Impact of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Guddeti, Raviteja R.; Kwon, Taek-Geun; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Many clinical trials have suggested that lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions are effective in attenuating atherosclerotic disease progression and events development. However, an individualized approach with careful consideration to comprehensive vascular health is necessary to perform successful intervention strategies. Endothelial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the early stage of atherosclerosis and is also associated with plaque progression and occurrence of atherosclerotic complications. The assessment of endothelial function provides us with important information about individual patient risk, progress and vulnerability of disease, and guidance of therapy. Thus, the application of endothelial function assessment might enable clinicians to innovate ideal individualized medicine. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the impact of pharmacological therapies for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on endothelial dysfunction, and argue for the utility of non-invasive assessment of endothelial function aiming at individualized medicine. PMID:25459974

  10. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  11. Calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation: Discrete and integrated mechanisms for age-related synaptic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sama, Diana M.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the best biomarkers of age-related cognitive decline are closely linked to synaptic function and plasticity. This review highlights several age-related synaptic alterations as they relate to Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, through elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and neuroinflammation, through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Though distinct in many ways, Ca2+ and neuroinflammatory signaling mechanisms exhibit extensive cross-talk and bidirectional interactions. For instance, cytokine production in glial cells is strongly dependent on the Ca2+ dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, which shows elevated activity in animal models of aging and disease. In turn, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, can augment the expression/activity of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels in neurons, leading to Ca2+ dysregulation, hyperactive calcineurin activity, and synaptic depression. Thus, in addition to discussing unique contributions of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation, this review emphasizes how these processes interact to hasten age-related synaptic changes. PMID:23751484

  12. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26537128

  13. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, Maskomani; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Kaur, Charanjit; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose) and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a) to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis. PMID:27070575

  14. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silambarasan, Maskomani; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Kaur, Charanjit; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose) and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a) to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis. PMID:27070575

  15. Endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Papalia, R; Moro, L; Franceschi, F; Albo, E; D'Adamio, S; Di Martino, A; Vadalà, G; Faldini, C; Denaro, V

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic tendon tears are one of the most important causes of pain and joint dysfunction. Among the intrinsic causes, vascularization recently gained a major role. Endothelial function is indeed a key factor, as well as vascular tone and thrombotic factors, in the regulation of vascular homeostasis and the composition of vascular wall. In this review, we studied systematically whether there is a relationship between endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy. A literature search was performed using the isolated or combined keywords endothelial dysfunction and tendon,' 'nitric oxide (NO) and tendinopathy,' and 'endothelial dysfunction in tendon healing.' We identified 21 published studies. Of the selected studies, 9 were in vivo studies, 2 focusing on animals and 7 on humans, while 12 reported about in vitro evaluations, where 7 were carried out on humans and 5 on animals. The evidence about a direct relationship between tendinopathy and endothelial dysfunction is still poor. As recent studies have shown, there is no significant improvement in clinical and functional assessments after treatment with NO in patients suffering from tendinopathy in different locations. No significant differences were identified in the outcomes reported for experiment group when compared with controls treated with conventional surgical procedures or rehabilitation programs. Nitric oxide could be a marker to quantify the response of the endothelium to mechanical stress or hypoxia indicating the final balance between vasodilatating and vasoconstricting factors and their effects, but more ad stronger evidence is still needed to fully support this practice. PMID:23907599

  16. Rosuvastatin improves endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Krishan, Pawan; Syngle, Ashit

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced cardiovascular risk in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) provides a strong rationale for early therapeutical intervention. In view of the proven benefit of statins in atherosclerotic vascular disease, we aimed to investigate the effect of rosuvastatin on endothelial dysfunction (ED) and inflammatory disease activity in AS. In a single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study, 32 AS patients were randomized to receive 24 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/day, n = 17) and placebo (n = 15) as an adjunct to existing stable antirheumatic drugs. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was assessed by AngioDefender™ (Everest Genomic Ann Arbor, USA). Inflammatory measures (BASDAI, BASFI, CRP and ESR) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6] and interleukin-1 [IL-1]) were measured at baseline and after treatment. Lipids and adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule [ICAM-1] and vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM-1]) were estimated at baseline and after treatment. At baseline, inflammatory measures, pro inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules were elevated among both groups. After treatment with rosuvastatin, FMD improved significantly (p < 0.01). Levels of inflammatory measures, TNF-α, IL-6 and ICAM-1 decreased significantly (p < 0.01) after treatment with rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin exerted positive effect on lipid spectrum. No significant change in the placebo group. Significant negative correlation was observed between FMD and IL-6, ICAM-1, CRP after treatment with rosuvastatin. First study to show that rosuvastatin improves inflammatory disease activity and ED in AS. Rosuvastatin lowers the proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6 and TNF-α, which downregulates adhesion molecules and CRP production which in turns improves ED. Improvement in ED in AS occurs through both cholesterol-independent and cholesterol-dependent pathways. Rosuvastatin can mediate modest but clinically

  17. Assessment of Endothelial Dysfunction in Childhood Obesity and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Vissers, Dirk K.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2013-01-01

    The association of obesity with noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular complications and diabetes, is considered a major threat to the management of health care worldwide. Epidemiological findings show that childhood obesity is rapidly rising in Western society, as well as in developing countries. This pandemic is not without consequences and can affect the risk of future cardiovascular disease in these children. Childhood obesity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, the first yet still reversible step towards atherosclerosis. Advanced research techniques have added further insight on how childhood obesity and associated comorbidities lead to endothelial dysfunction. Techniques used to measure endothelial function were further brought to perfection, and novel biomarkers, including endothelial progenitor cells, were discovered. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical overview on both in vivo as well as in vitro markers for endothelial integrity. Additionally, an in-depth description of the mechanisms that disrupt the delicate balance between endothelial damage and repair will be given. Finally, the effects of lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy on endothelial dysfunction will be reviewed. PMID:23691262

  18. Age-related motor dysfunction and neuropathology in a transgenic mouse model of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fernagut, P O; Meissner, W G; Biran, M; Fantin, M; Bassil, F; Franconi, J M; Tison, F

    2014-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive degeneration of the striatonigral, olivo-ponto-cerebellar, and autonomic systems. Glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) containing alpha-synuclein represent the hallmark of MSA and are recapitulated in mice expressing alpha-synuclein in oligodendrocytes. To assess if oligodendroglial expression of human wild-type alpha-synuclein in mice (proteolipid promoter, PLP-SYN) could be associated with age-related deficits, PLP-SYN and wild-type mice were assessed for motor function, brain morphometry, striatal levels of dopamine and metabolites, dopaminergic loss, and distribution of GCIs. PLP-SYN displayed age-related impairments on a beam-traversing task. MRI revealed a significantly smaller brain volume in PLP-SYN mice at 12 months, which further decreased at 18 months together with increased volume of ventricles and cortical atrophy. The distribution of GCIs was reminiscent of MSA with a high burden in the basal ganglia. Mild dopaminergic cell loss was associated with decreased dopamine turnover at 18 months. These data indicate that PLP-SYN mice may recapitulate some of the progressive features of MSA and deliver endpoints for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. PMID:24243499

  19. An Integrated View of Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Iantorno, Micaela; Quon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance are frequently co-morbid states. Vasodilator actions of insulin are mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling pathways that stimulate production of nitric oxide from vascular endothelium. This helps to couple metabolic and hemodynamic homeostasis under healthy conditions. In pathological states, shared causal factors including glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, and inflammation selectively impair PI3K-dependent insulin signaling pathways that contribute to reciprocal relationships between insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. We discuss implications of pathway-selective insulin resistance in vascular endothelium, interactions between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and therapeutic interventions that may simultaneously improve both metabolic and cardiovascular physiology in insulin-resistant conditions. PMID:18775359

  20. Age-Related Impairments in Object-Place Associations Are Not Due to Hippocampal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Abigail R.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Reasor, Jordan E.; Turner, Sean M.; Barthle, Sarah E.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline can reduce an individual’s quality of life. As no single neurobiological deficit can account for the wide spectrum of behavioral impairments observed in old age, it is critical to develop an understanding of how interactions between different brain regions change over the life span. The performance of young and aged animals on behaviors that require the hippocampus and cortical regions to interact, however, has not been well characterized. Specifically, the ability to link a spatial location with specific features of a stimulus, such as object identity, relies on the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices. Although aging is associated with dysfunction in each of these brain regions, behavioral measures of functional change within the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices in individual animals are often not correlated. Thus, how dysfunction of a single brain region within this circuit, such as the hippocampus, impacts behaviors that require communication with the perirhinal and prefrontal cortices remains unknown. To address this question, young and aged rats were tested on the interregion dependent object-place paired association task, as well as a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial reference memory. This particular cohort of aged rats did not show deficits on the hippocampal-dependent task, but were significantly impaired at acquiring object-place associations relative to young. These data suggest that behaviors requiring functional connectivity across different regions of the memory network may be particularly sensitive to aging, and can be used to develop models that will clarify the impact of systems-level dysfunction in the elderly. PMID:26413723

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases: Pathogenesis, assessment and implications.

    PubMed

    Cibor, Dorota; Domagala-Rodacka, Renata; Rodacki, Tomasz; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Mach, Tomasz; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-01-21

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered one of the etiological factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An inflammatory process leads to functional and structural changes in the vascular endothelium. An increase of leukocyte adhesiveness and leukocyte diapedesis, as well as an increased vascular smooth muscle tone and procoagulant activity is observed. Structural changes of the vascular endothelium comprise as well capillary and venule remodeling and proliferation of endothelial cells. Hypoxia in the inflammatory area stimulates angiogenesis by up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Inflammatory mediators also alter the lymphatic vessel function and impair lymph flow, exacerbating tissue edema and accumulation of dead cells and bacteria. The endothelial dysfunction might be diagnosed by the use of two main methods: physical and biochemical. Physical methods are based on the assessment of large arteries vasodilatation in response to an increased flow and receptors stimulation. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) is the method that is the most widely used; however, it is less sensitive in detecting early changes of the endothelium function. Most of the studies demonstrated a decrease of FMD in IBD patients but no changes in the carotic intima-media thickness. Biochemical methods of detecting the endothelial dysfunction are based on the assessment of the synthesis of compounds produced both by the normal and damaged endothelium. The endothelial dysfunction is considered an initial step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. In IBD patients, the risk of cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Large, prospective studies are needed to establish the role of particular medications or dietary elements in the endothelial dysfunction as well to determine the real risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26811647

  2. Endothelial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases: Pathogenesis, assessment and implications

    PubMed Central

    Cibor, Dorota; Domagala-Rodacka, Renata; Rodacki, Tomasz; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Mach, Tomasz; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered one of the etiological factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An inflammatory process leads to functional and structural changes in the vascular endothelium. An increase of leukocyte adhesiveness and leukocyte diapedesis, as well as an increased vascular smooth muscle tone and procoagulant activity is observed. Structural changes of the vascular endothelium comprise as well capillary and venule remodeling and proliferation of endothelial cells. Hypoxia in the inflammatory area stimulates angiogenesis by up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Inflammatory mediators also alter the lymphatic vessel function and impair lymph flow, exacerbating tissue edema and accumulation of dead cells and bacteria. The endothelial dysfunction might be diagnosed by the use of two main methods: physical and biochemical. Physical methods are based on the assessment of large arteries vasodilatation in response to an increased flow and receptors stimulation. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) is the method that is the most widely used; however, it is less sensitive in detecting early changes of the endothelium function. Most of the studies demonstrated a decrease of FMD in IBD patients but no changes in the carotic intima-media thickness. Biochemical methods of detecting the endothelial dysfunction are based on the assessment of the synthesis of compounds produced both by the normal and damaged endothelium. The endothelial dysfunction is considered an initial step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. In IBD patients, the risk of cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Large, prospective studies are needed to establish the role of particular medications or dietary elements in the endothelial dysfunction as well to determine the real risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26811647

  3. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression-induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  4. Aging-Related Dysfunction of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Produces Conflict in Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Matamales, Miriam; Skrbis, Zala; Hatch, Robert J; Balleine, Bernard W; Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-04-20

    For goal-directed action to remain adaptive, new strategies are required to accommodate environmental changes, a process for which parafascicular thalamic modulation of cholinergic interneurons in the striatum (PF-to-CIN) appears critical. In the elderly, however, previously acquired experience frequently interferes with new learning, yet the source of this effect has remained unexplored. Here, combining sophisticated behavioral designs, cell-specific manipulation, and extensive neuronal imaging, we investigated the involvement of the PF-to-CIN pathway in this process. We found functional alterations of this circuit in aged mice that were consistent with their incapacity to update initial goal-directed learning, resulting in faulty activation of projection neurons in the striatum. Toxicogenetic ablation of CINs in young mice reproduced these behavioral and neuronal defects, suggesting that age-related deficits in PF-to-CIN function reduce the ability of older individuals to resolve conflict between actions, likely contributing to impairments in adaptive goal-directed action and executive control in aging. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27100198

  5. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  6. Is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

    PubMed Central

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although the endothelium has a number of important functions, the term endothelial dysfunction is commonly used to describe impairment in its vasodilatory capacity. There have been numerous studies evaluating the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, however assessment of endothelial function is perhaps still primarily thought of as a research tool and has not reached widespread clinical acceptance. In this review we explore the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, its prognostic significance, methods of pharmacological reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and ask the question, is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology? PMID:25228961

  7. Age-related autoregulatory dysfunction and cerebromicrovascular injury in mice with angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Tarantini, Stefano; Deak, Ferenc; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension in the elderly substantially contributes to cerebromicrovascular damage and promotes the development of vascular cognitive impairment. Despite the importance of the myogenic mechanism in cerebromicrovascular protection, it is not well understood how aging affects the functional adaptation of cerebral arteries to high blood pressure. Hypertension was induced in young (3 months) and aged (24 months) C57/BL6 mice by chronic infusion of angiotensin II (AngII). In young hypertensive mice, the range of cerebral blood flow autoregulation was extended to higher pressure values, and the pressure-induced tone of middle cerebral artery (MCA) was increased. In aged hypertensive mice, autoregulation was markedly disrupted, and MCAs did not show adaptive increases in myogenic tone. In young mice, the mechanism of adaptation to hypertension involved upregulation of the 20-HETE (20-hydroxy-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid)/transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C (TRPC6) pathway and this mechanism was impaired in aged hypertensive mice. Downstream consequences of cerebrovascular autoregulatory dysfunction in aged AngII-induced hypertensive mice included exacerbated disruption of the blood–brain barrier and neuroinflammation (microglia activation and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines), which were associated with impaired hippocampal dependent cognitive function. Collectively, aging impairs autoregulatory protection in the brain of mice with AngII-induced hypertension, potentially exacerbating cerebromicrovascular injury and neuroinflammation. PMID:23942363

  8. Prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ladeia, Ana Marice; Sampaio, Raphael Ribeiro; Hita, Maiara Costa; Adan, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are at high risk of developing atherosclerosis, associated with higher rates of micro and macro vascular involvement such as coronary artery disease and renal disease. The role of hyperglycemia to induce synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the oxidation of glucose, leading to an increased production of advanced glycosylation end products, as well as inflammation and oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction (ED). The interaction between C-peptide - the connecting segment of pro-insulin-and nitric oxide in vasodilation is also discussed. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an early marker of vascular disorder in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In some other diseases, ED has been considered an independent predictor of vascular disease, regardless of the method used. Studies have demonstrated the importance of endothelial dysfunction as an useful tool for identifying the risk of vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, particularly as regards to renal impairment. The aim of this review is to clarify the prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular disease in these subjects. PMID:25317238

  9. Contribution of oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bruno R.; Pernomian, Laena; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark of hypertension, which is a multifactorial disorder. In the cardiovascular system reactive oxygen species play a pivotal role in controlling the endothelial function and vascular tone. Physiologically, the endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs) and endothelium-derived contractile factors (EDCFs) that have functions on the vascular smooth muscle cells. The relaxation induced by the EDRFs nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin, and the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) could be impaired in hypertension. The impaired ability of endothelial cells to release NO along with enhanced EDCFs production has been described to contribute to the endothelium dysfunction, which appears to lead to several cardiovascular diseases. The present review discusses the role of oxidative stress, vascular endothelium, and vascular tone control by EDRFs, mainly NO, and EDCFs in different models of experimental hypertension. PMID:23227009

  10. Baicalin attenuates angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiling; Zhu, Xingyu; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Xiuqin; Sun, Tianjiao; Xu, Jiyang; Bian, Xiaohong

    2015-09-11

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to activate multiple downstream pathways resulting in endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Baicalin, a natural flavone, exerts anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we hypothesized that baicalin has beneficial effects in Ang II-induced endothelial cells injury. Here, we shown that baicalin improved endothelial fuction impaired by Ang II through promoting endothelial-dependent vasodilation and suppressing the apoptosis of HUVECs in which baicalin decreased the expression of bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased bcl-2 expression. Additionally, baicalin significantly conversed Ang II to angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] by activating angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Mas receptor mRNA expression and protein expression. Moreover, treatment with baicalin significantly reduced cell oxidative damage induced by Ang II through MDA/ROS decrease and NO/T-AOC increase. This antioxidant capacity was related to the increases of PI3K, phosphor-AKT (Ser-473) and phosphor-eNOS (Ser-1177). In conclusion, our results implicate that baicalin could protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress via modulating the expression of bax, bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3, activating ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and up-regulating PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway. PMID:26239661

  11. Targeting Endothelial Dysfunction in Vascular Complications Associated with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arpeeta; Bernatchez, Pascal N.; de Haan, Judy B.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes remain a significant health issue in westernized societies. Overwhelming evidence from clinical and laboratory investigations have demonstrated that these cardiovascular complications are initiated by a dysfunctional vascular endothelium. Indeed, endothelial dysfunction is one of the key events that occur during diabetes, leading to the acceleration of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. In a diabetic milieu, endothelial dysfunction occurs as a result of attenuated production of endothelial derived nitric oxide (EDNO) and augmented levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, in this review, we discuss novel therapeutic targets that either upregulate EDNO production or increase antioxidant enzyme capacity in an effort to limit oxidative stress and restore endothelial function. In particular, endogenous signaling molecules that positively modulate EDNO synthesis and mimetics of endogenous antioxidant enzymes will be highlighted. Consequently, manipulation of these unique targets, either alone or in combination, may represent a novel strategy to confer vascular protection, with the ultimate goal of improved outcomes for diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:22013533

  12. [Endothelial dysfunction in patients with primary hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia].

    PubMed

    Baszczuk, Aleksandra; Kopczyński, Zygmunt; Thielemann, Anna

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that endothelial dysfunction is the basis of the development of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. With regard to hypertension, endothelial dysfunction is concerned mainly with impaired vascular expansion; however, it is also related to the intensity of the development of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Among the factors that cause damage to the endothelium, along with classic risk factors, is hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia promotes the formation of oxygen radicals, lowering the oxidation-reduction potential, adversely affects the biosynthesis and function of vasodilator factors in the vascular wall, contributes to the inhibition of endothelial cell division with intense myocyte proliferation and migration, and impairs production of extracellular matrix components in the vascular wall. In addition, high levels of homocysteine and its derivatives contribute to the modification of LDL and HDL particles, inflammation and disorders in coagulation and fibrinolysis. Biochemical effects of the impact of hyperhomocysteinemia on endothelium can lead to damage of endothelial cells, dysfunction of diastolic function of vessels and reduction of their flexibility through its influence on vascular wall remodeling. These changes lead to an increase in blood pressure, strengthening the development of hypertension and target organ damage in patients with this disease. PMID:24491900

  13. Endothelial dysfunction in cirrhosis: Role of inflammation and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vairappan, Balasubramaniyan

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in the pathobiology of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in the context of cirrhosis with portal hypertension and defines novel strategies and potential targets for therapy. ED has prognostic implications by predicting unfavourable early hepatic events and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and advanced liver diseases. ED characterised by an impaired bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) within the hepatic circulation and is mainly due to decreased bioavailability of NO and accelerated degradation of NO with reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, elevated inflammatory markers also inhibit NO synthesis and causes ED in cirrhotic liver. Therefore, improvement of NO availability in the hepatic circulation can be beneficial for the improvement of endothelial dysfunction and associated portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. Furthermore, therapeutic agents that are identified in increasing NO bioavailability through improvement of hepatic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and reduction in hepatic asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous modulator of eNOS and a key mediator of elevated intrahepatic vascular tone in cirrhosis would be interesting therapeutic approaches in patients with endothelial dysfunction and portal hypertension in advanced liver diseases. PMID:25848469

  14. Endothelial cell transfusion ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in 5/6 nephrectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Xing, Dongqi; Hilgers, Rob H. P.; Guo, Yuan Yuan; Yang, Zhengqin

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is prevalent in chronic kidney disease. This study tested the hypothesis that transfusion of rat aortic endothelial cells (ECs) ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham surgery or 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). Five weeks after Nx, EC (1.5 × 106 cells/rat) or vehicle were transfused intravenously. One week later, vascular reactivity of mesenteric artery was assessed on a wire myograph. Sensitivity of endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and maximum vasodilation were impaired by Nx and improved by EC transfusion. Using selective pharmacological nitric oxide synthase isoform inhibitors, we demonstrated that the negative effect of Nx on endothelial function and rescue by EC transfusion are, at least in part, endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediated. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine was increased by Nx and decreased by EC transfusion, whereas mRNA expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases 1 (DDAH1) was decreased by Nx and restored by EC transfusion. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that local expression of DDAH1 is decreased by Nx and increased by EC transfusion. In conclusion, EC transfusion attenuates Nx-induced endothelium-dependent vascular dysfunction by regulating DDAH1 expression and enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. These results suggest that EC-based therapy could provide a novel therapeutic strategy to improve vascular function in chronic kidney disease. PMID:23955716

  15. SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Suowen; Yin, Meimei; Koroleva, Marina; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Zhang, Wenbo; Bai, Peter; Little, Peter J.; Jin, Zheng Gen

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 is an important member of sirtuin family that represses inflammation, aging and DNA damage, three of which are causing factors for endothelial dysfunction. SIRT6 expression is decreased in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice and human patients. However, the role of SIRT6 in regulating vascular endothelial function and atherosclerosis is not well understood. Here we show that SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Global and endothelium-specific SIRT6 knockout mice exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Moreover, SIRT6+/− haploinsufficient mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) also displayed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Importantly, SIRT6+/−;ApoE−/− mice after HFD feeding exhibited exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion development, concurrent with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine VCAM-1. Loss- and gain-of-SIRT6 function studies in cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) showed that SIRT6 attenuated monocyte adhesion to ECs. RNA-sequencing profiling revealed that SIRT6 overexpression decreased the expression of multiple atherosclerosis-related genes, including proatherogenic gene TNFSF4 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that SIRT6 decreased TNFSF4 gene expression by binding to and deacetylating H3K9 at TNFSF4 gene promoter. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SIRT6 play a pivotal role in maintaining endothelial function and increased SIRT6 activity could be a new therapeutic strategy to combat atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27249230

  16. SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suowen; Yin, Meimei; Koroleva, Marina; Mastrangelo, Michael A; Zhang, Wenbo; Bai, Peter; Little, Peter J; Jin, Zheng Gen

    2016-05-01

    SIRT6 is an important member of sirtuin family that represses inflammation, aging and DNA damage, three of which are causing factors for endothelial dysfunction. SIRT6 expression is decreased in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE(-/-) mice and human patients. However, the role of SIRT6 in regulating vascular endothelial function and atherosclerosis is not well understood. Here we show that SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Global and endothelium-specific SIRT6 knockout mice exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Moreover, SIRT6(+/-) haploinsufficient mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) also displayed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Importantly, SIRT6(+/-); ApoE(-/-) mice after HFD feeding exhibited exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion development, concurrent with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine VCAM-1. Loss- and gain-of-SIRT6 function studies in cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) showed that SIRT6 attenuated monocyte adhesion to ECs. RNA-sequencing profiling revealed that SIRT6 overexpression decreased the expression of multiple atherosclerosis-related genes, including proatherogenic gene TNFSF4 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that SIRT6 decreased TNFSF4 gene expression by binding to and deacetylating H3K9 at TNFSF4 gene promoter. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SIRT6 play a pivotal role in maintaining endothelial function and increased SIRT6 activity could be a new therapeutic strategy to combat atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27249230

  17. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Daniel; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Sagan, Agnieszka; Filip, Magdalena; Dróżdż, Mirosław; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2014-01-01

    Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n = 20) and without DRS (n = 24). While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD) or intima-media thickness (IMT) was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25045683

  18. Altered gene expression in dry age-related macular degeneration suggests early loss of choroidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S. Scott; Braun, Terry A.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Haas, Christine M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries. The molecular pathogenesis of early events in AMD is poorly understood. We investigated differential gene expression in samples of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid from early AMD and control maculas with exon-based arrays. Methods Gene expression levels in nine human donor eyes with early AMD and nine control human donor eyes were assessed using Affymetrix Human Exon ST 1.0 arrays. Two controls did not pass quality control and were removed. Differentially expressed genes were annotated using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on RPE-specific and endothelium-associated gene sets. The complement factor H (CFH) genotype was also assessed, and differential expression was analyzed regarding high AMD risk (YH/HH) and low AMD risk (YY) genotypes. Results Seventy-five genes were identified as differentially expressed (raw p value <0.01; ≥50% fold change, mean log2 expression level in AMD or control ≥ median of all average gene expression values); however, no genes were significant (adj. p value <0.01) after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Of 52 genes with decreased expression in AMD (fold change <0.5; raw p value <0.01), 18 genes were identified by DAVID analysis as associated with vision or neurologic processes. The GSEA of the RPE-associated and endothelium-associated genes revealed a significant decrease in genes typically expressed by endothelial cells in the early AMD group compared to controls, consistent with previous histologic and proteomic studies. Analysis of the CFH genotype indicated decreased expression of ADAMTS9 in eyes with high-risk genotypes (fold change = –2.61; raw p value=0.0008). Conclusions GSEA results suggest that RPE transcripts are preserved or elevated in early AMD, concomitant with loss of endothelial cell marker

  19. Raman microscopy as a novel tool to detect endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baranska, Malgorzata; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Malek, Kamilla; Jaworska, Aleksandra; Majzner, Katarzyna; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Pacia, Marta Z; Zajac, Grzegorz; Dybas, Jakub; Wiercigroch, Ewelina

    2015-08-01

    Raman microscopy, a label-free method with high spatial resolution, shows growing potential in various fields of medical diagnostics. Several proof-of-concept studies related to the application of Raman microscopy to detect endothelial dysfunction are summarized in this work. Both ex vivo measurements of the tissues in the murine models of endothelial pathologies, as well as in vitro investigations of the cell cultures in the context of cellular transport, drug action and inflammation processes are discussed. The future directions in application of Raman spectroscopy-based methods in such studies are also described. PMID:26321275

  20. Mechanism of subclinical hypothyroidism accelerating endothelial dysfunction (Review).

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Chong-Bo; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and cardiovascular disease has received increasing attention in recent years. The predisposition of patients with SH to endothelial dysfunction, an early sign of atherosclerosis, has been observed. This predisposition may be partially explained by the factors also found in patients with SH, including changes in lipid profile, low grade chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. The proportional risks of endothelial dysfunction to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) also indicate that the action of TSH on extra thyroidal-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a possible mechanism underlying the correlation, which has later been supported by the associated basic studies. L-thyroxine replacement therapy appears to improve the aforementioned aspects, whereas there remain certain controversies, particularly for the elderly. Thus, more study data are required to confirm the benefit of L-thyroxine treatment for patients with SH. PMID:25452768

  1. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    PubMed

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction and Coronary Artery Disease: Assessment, Prognosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Progress in modification of conventional coronary risk factors and lifestyle behavior reduced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease incidence, nonetheless it continues to be the leading cause of mortality in the world. It might be attributed to the defective risk stratifying and prevention strategy for coronary artery disease. Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease risk is estimated based on identifying and quantifying only traditional risk factors in current clinical settings, it does not consider non-traditional risk factors. In addition, most of prevailing therapies for atherosclerosis are targeted for traditional risk factors rather than atherosclerosis itself. It is desirable to have a methodology which can directly assess the activity of atherogenesis at each moment. Endothelial function is an integrated index of all atherogenic and atheroprotective factors present in an individual including non-traditional and heretofore unknown factors, and is reported to have additional predictive value for future cardiovascular events to traditional risk factors. Moreover, endothelial function has a pivotal role in all phases of atherosclerosis, from initiation to atherothrombotic complication, and is reversible at every phase, indicating that endothelial function-guided therapies might be effective and feasible in cardiovascular practice. Thus, the introduction of endothelial function testing into clinical practice might enable us to innovate individualized cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to atherogenesis and review methods that assess endothelial function. Finally we focus on the effects of major anti-atherosclerotic disease therapies on endothelial function, and argue the possibility of non-invasive assessment of endothelial function aiming at individualized cardiovascular medicine. PMID:25365643

  3. Endothelial Dysfunction Correlates with Liver Fibrosis in Chronic HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Michele; Viggiani, Maria Teresa; Amoruso, Annabianca; Schiraldi, Serafina; Devito, Fiorella; Brunetti, Natale; Di Leo, Alfredo; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can exert proatherogenic activities due to its direct action on vessel walls and/or via the chronic inflammatory process involving the liver. Aims. To clarify the role of HCV in atherosclerosis development in monoinfected HCV patients at different degrees of liver fibrosis and with no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Methods. Forty-five patients were included. Clinical, serological, and anthropometric parameters, liver fibrosis (transient liver elastometry (fibroscan) and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI)), carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT), and brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) were assessed. Patients were divided into 3 tertiles according to fibroscan values. Results. Patients in the third tertile (fibroscan value >11.5 KPa) showed FMD values were significantly lower than second and first tertiles (4.7 ± 1.7% versus 7.1 ± 2.8%, p = 0.03). FMD values were inversely related to liver elastomeric values. c-IMT values were normal. The risk for endothelial dysfunction development in the third tertile (p = 0.02) was 6.9 higher than the first tertile. A fibroscan value >11.5 KPa had a positive predictive power equal to 79% for endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions. HCV advanced liver fibrosis promotes atherosclerosis by inducing endothelial dysfunction independently of common cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26000012

  4. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with liver fibrosis in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Barone, Michele; Viggiani, Maria Teresa; Amoruso, Annabianca; Schiraldi, Serafina; Zito, Annapaola; Devito, Fiorella; Cortese, Francesca; Gesualdo, Michele; Brunetti, Natale; Di Leo, Alfredo; Scicchitano, Pietro; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can exert proatherogenic activities due to its direct action on vessel walls and/or via the chronic inflammatory process involving the liver. Aims. To clarify the role of HCV in atherosclerosis development in monoinfected HCV patients at different degrees of liver fibrosis and with no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Methods. Forty-five patients were included. Clinical, serological, and anthropometric parameters, liver fibrosis (transient liver elastometry (fibroscan) and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI)), carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT), and brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) were assessed. Patients were divided into 3 tertiles according to fibroscan values. Results. Patients in the third tertile (fibroscan value >11.5 KPa) showed FMD values were significantly lower than second and first tertiles (4.7 ± 1.7% versus 7.1 ± 2.8%, p = 0.03). FMD values were inversely related to liver elastomeric values. c-IMT values were normal. The risk for endothelial dysfunction development in the third tertile (p = 0.02) was 6.9 higher than the first tertile. A fibroscan value >11.5 KPa had a positive predictive power equal to 79% for endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions. HCV advanced liver fibrosis promotes atherosclerosis by inducing endothelial dysfunction independently of common cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26000012

  5. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  6. Calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelial dysfunction: therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Félétou, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The three subtypes of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) of large, intermediate and small conductance (BKCa, IKCa and SKCa) are present in the vascular wall. In healthy arteries, BKCa channels are preferentially expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, while IKCa and SKCa are preferentially located in endothelial cells. The activation of endothelial IKCa and SKCa contributes to nitric oxide (NO) generation and is required to elicit endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations. In the latter responses, the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells is evoked either via electrical coupling through myo-endothelial gap junctions or by potassium ions, which by accumulating in the intercellular space activate the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 and/or the Na+/K+-ATPase. Additionally, endothelium-derived factors such as cytochrome P450-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and under some circumstances NO, prostacyclin, lipoxygenase products and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) hyperpolarize and relax the underlying smooth muscle cells by activating BKCa. In contrast, cytochrome P450-derived 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and various endothelium-derived contracting factors inhibit BKCa. Aging and cardiovascular diseases are associated with endothelial dysfunctions that can involve a decrease in NO bioavailability, alterations of EDHF-mediated responses and/or enhanced production of endothelium-derived contracting factors. Because potassium channels are involved in these endothelium-dependent responses, activation of endothelial and/or smooth muscle KCa could prevent the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, direct activators of these potassium channels or compounds that regulate their activity or their expression may be of some therapeutic interest. Conversely, blockers of IKCa may prevent restenosis and that of BKCa channels sepsis-dependent hypotension. PMID:19187341

  7. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  8. Reversibility of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes: role of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Sarada, D V L; Ramkumar, K M

    2016-07-01

    The endothelium, a thin single sheet of endothelial cells, is a metabolically active layer that coats the inner surface of blood vessels and acts as an interface between the circulating blood and the vessel wall. The endothelium through the secretion of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors serves as a critical mediator of vascular homeostasis. During the development of the vascular system, it regulates cellular adhesion and vessel wall inflammation in addition to maintaining vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A shift in the functions of the endothelium towards vasoconstriction, proinflammatory and prothrombic states characterise improper functioning of these cells, leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED), implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes. Major mechanisms of ED include the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels, differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress. ED tends to be the initial event in macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and microvascular complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Numerous strategies have been developed to protect endothelial cells against various stimuli, of which the role of polyphenolic compounds in modulating the differentially regulated pathways and thus maintaining vascular homeostasis has been proven to be beneficial. This review addresses the factors stimulating ED in diabetes and the molecular mechanisms of natural polyphenol antioxidants in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27264638

  9. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  10. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Chen, Chia-Ling; Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  11. Hypothyroidism Is Associated With Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Zhang, Ming; Gharib, Hossein; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, beyond that which can be explained by its association with conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction precedes atherosclerosis, has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, and may account for some of the increased risk in patients with hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between epicardial and microvascular coronary endothelial dysfunction and hypothyroidism. Methods and Results In 1388 patients (mean age 50.5 [12.3] years, 34% male) presenting with stable chest pain to Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN for diagnostic coronary angiography, and who were found to have nonobstructive coronary artery disease (<40% stenosis), we invasively assessed coronary artery endothelial-dependent microvascular and epicardial function by evaluating changes in coronary blood flow (% Δ CBF Ach) and diameter (% Δ CAD Ach), respectively, in response to intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine. Patients were divided into 2 groups: hypothyroidism, defined as a documented history of hypothyroidism or a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) >10.0 mU/mL, n=188, and euthyroidism, defined as an absence of a history of hypothyroidism in the clinical record and/or 0.3endothelial dysfunction, even after adjusting for confounders, and may explain some of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in these patients. PMID:26224049

  12. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Berjis, Nezamoddin; Moeinimehr, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyyed Mostafa; Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad; Bakhtiari, Elham Khosravi; Nasiri, Safoura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endothelial dysfunction probably has a role in the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). The aim of this study was determining of the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and SSNHL. Materials and Methods: In a case–control study, 30 patients with SSNHL and 30 otherwise healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Demographic data gathered included age, gender, family history of SSNHL, and history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Laboratory data included measurement of hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and lipid profile. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results: The two groups were the same in age (47.9 ± 9.3 and 48.1 ± 9.6 years, P = 0.946) with female/male ratio of 1:1 in both groups. Diabetes and dyslipidemia were more frequent in patients than controls (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.024). Brachial artery diameter was greater in patients than controls before (4.24 ± 0.39 vs. 3.84 ± 0.23 mm, P < 0.001) and after ischemia (4.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.28 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.020), but FMD was lower in patients than controls (6.21 ± 3.0 vs. 11.52 ± 2.30%, P < 0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that FMD was associated with SSNHL independent from FBS and lipid profile (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.439 [0.260–0.740], P = 0.002). Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction, among other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with SSNHL. This association is independent from other cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:26955626

  13. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  14. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  15. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries. PMID:26381906

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor A polymorphisms and age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Xu, Yongsheng; Li, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the present work, the aim was to systematically review all studies about the association of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) polymorphisms with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to perform a meta-analysis. Methods Relevant studies were searched using PubMed, Embase, Wanfang (Chinese), VIP (Chinese), and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases up to October, 2011. A meta-analysis was conducted using Stata software, version 11.0. Results A total of nine studies with 2,281 AMD cases and 2,820 controls met our eligibility criteria, and meta-analyses of four polymorphisms of the VEGF-A gene (rs1413711, rs833061, rs2010963, and rs3025039) were performed. This meta-analysis revealed moderate evidence supporting an association between the VEGF-A polymorphisms and AMD. For rs1413711, the TT genotype was associated with an increased risk of overall AMD (TT versus CT model, odds ratio (OR) 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22–2.48) and of wet AMD (TT versus CT model, OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.22–2.71; TT versus (CC+CT) model, OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.13–2.35). For rs833061, the C allele (C allele versus T allele, OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.00–2.96) and CC genotype (CC versus TT model, OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.00–3.11) were the risk factors for overall AMD, while the C allele was also associated with an increased risk of wet AMD (C allele versus T allele, OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.03–2.31). No association was observed between AMD risk and the variant genotypes of VEGF-A rs2010963 and rs3025039 polymorphisms in different genetic models. Conclusions The results suggest the VEGF-A rs1413711 and rs833061 polymorphisms may contribute to AMD susceptibility. PMID:23761723

  17. The role of BMPs in endothelial cell function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Laura A; Pi, Xinchun; Patterson, Cam

    2014-09-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of proteins has a multitude of roles throughout the body. In embryonic development, BMPs promote endothelial specification and subsequent venous differentiation. The BMP pathway also plays important roles in the adult vascular endothelium, promoting angiogenesis and mediating shear and oxidative stress. The canonical BMP pathway functions through the Smad transcription factors; however, other intracellular signaling cascades can be activated, and receptor complexes beyond the traditional type I and type II receptors add additional layers of regulation. Dysregulated BMP signaling has been linked to vascular diseases including pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. This review addresses recent advances in the roles of BMP signaling in the endothelium and how BMPs affect endothelial dysfunction and human disease. PMID:24908616

  18. Blood flow and arterial endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Abdul I.

    2013-06-01

    The arterial endothelium exquisitely regulates vascular function, and endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions develop preferentially at arterial branches and bifurcations where the blood flow is disturbed. Understanding the basis for this observation requires elucidating the effects of blood flow on the endothelial cell (EC) function. The goal of this review is: (1) to describe our current understanding of the relationships between arterial blood flow and atherosclerosis, (2) to present the wide array of flow-induced biological responses in ECs, and (3) to discuss the mechanisms by which ECs sense, transmit, and transduce flow-derived mechanical forces. We conclude by presenting some future perspectives in the highly interdisciplinary field of EC mechanotransduction.

  19. Role of homocysteinylation of ACE in endothelial dysfunction of arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, An; Pinto, John T.; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Wolin, Michael S.; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The direct impact of de novo synthesis of homocysteine (Hcy) and its reactive metabolites, Hcy-S-S-Hcy and Hcy thiolactone (HCTL), on vascular function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that Hcy synthesized within endothelial cells affects activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by direct homocysteinylation of its amino- and/or sulfhydryl moieties. This covalent modification enhances ACE reactivity toward angiotensin II (ANG II)-NADPH oxidase-superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction. Mesenteric and coronary arteries isolated from normal rats were incubated for 3 days with or without exogenous methionine (Met, 0.1–0.3 mM), a precursor to Hcy. Incubation of arteries in Met-free media resulted in time-dependent decreases in vascular Hcy formation. By contrast, vessels incubated with Met produced Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. There was a notably greater de novo synthesis of Hcy from endothelial than from smooth muscle cells. Enhanced levels of Hcy production significantly impaired shear stress-induced dilation and release of nitric oxide, events that are associated with elevated production of vascular superoxide. Each of these processes was attenuated by ANG II type I receptor blocker or ACE and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. In addition, in vitro exposure of purified ACE to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL resulted in formation of homocysteinylated ACE and an enhanced ACE activity. The enhanced ACE activity was confirmed in isolated coronary and mesenteric arteries that had been exposed directly to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL or after Met incubation. In conclusion, vasculature-derived Hcy initiates endothelial dysfunction that, in part, may be mediated by ANG II-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase in association with homocysteinylation of ACE. PMID:25416191

  20. Omega-3 Supplementation Combined With Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Lowers Vitreal Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    REZENDE, FLAVIO A.; LAPALME, ERIC; QIAN, CYNTHIA X.; SMITH, LOIS E.; SANGIOVANNI, JOHN PAUL; SAPIEHA, PRZEMYSLAW

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the influence of omega-3 supplementation on vitreous vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) levels in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center, clinical trial, consecutive interventional case series. METHODS The study included 3 cohorts with wet AMD and a control group with epiretinal membrane or macular hole. Twenty wet AMD patients being treated with anti-VEGF were randomized to daily supplementation of antioxidants, zinc, and carotenoids with omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; group 1, n = 10) or without omega-3 fatty acids (group 2, n = 10). They were compared with an anti-VEGF treatment-naïve wet AMD group (group 3, n = 10) and an epiretinal membrane or macular hole group (group 4, n = 10). Primary outcome was vitreal VEGF-A levels (at the time of anti-VEGF injection). Secondary outcomes were plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness. Patients with new submacular hemorrhage or any other treatment within 3 months were excluded. Final analyses included 9, 6, 7, and 8 patients in groups 1 through 4, respectively. RESULTS Patients receiving omega-3s (group 1) had significantly lower levels of vitreal VEGF-A (141.11 ± 61.89 pg/mL) when compared with group 2 (626.09 ± 279.27 pg/mL; P = .036) and group 3 (735.48 ± 216.43 pg/mL; P = .013), but similar levels to group 4 (235.81 ± 33.99 pg/mL; P=.215). All groups showed similar values for plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness measurements. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that omega-3 supplementation combined with anti-VEGF treatment is associated with decreased vitreal VEGF-A levels in wet AMD patients. PMID:25089351

  1. Involvement of Rho-kinase in experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhvanit I; Singh, Manjeet

    2006-02-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of fasudil (Rho-kinase inhibitor) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperhomocyteinemia (HHcy) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED). Streptozotocin (55 mg kg(-1), i.v., once only) and methionine (1.7% w/w, p.o., daily for 4 weeks) were administered to rats to produce DM (serum glucose >140 mg dl(-1)) and HHcy (serum homocysteine >10 microM) respectively. VED was assessed using isolated aortic ring, electron microscopy of thoracic aorta, and serum concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration was estimated to assess oxidative stress. Atorvastatin has been employed in the present study as standard agent to improve vascular endothelial dysfunction. Fasudil (15 mg kg(-1) and 30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) and atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) treatments significantly attenuated increase in serum glucose and homocysteine but their concentrations remained markedly higher than sham control value. Fasudil and atorvastatin treatments markedly prevented DM and HHcy-induced (i) attenuation of acetylcholine induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, (ii) impairment of vascular endothelial lining, (iii) decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, and (iv) increase in serum TBARS. It may be concluded that fasudil prevented DM and HHcy-induced VED partially by decreasing serum glucose and homocysteine concentration due to inhibition of Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase by fasudil and consequent prevention of oxidative stress may have directly improved VED in diabetic and hyperhomocysteinemic rats. The Rho-kinase appears to be a pivotal target site involved in DM and HHcy-induced VED. PMID:16444602

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction and Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seon Mi; Yang, Sei Won; Bae, Eun Jung; Shin, Choong Ho; Chung, Hae Rim; Kim, You Yeh; Yun, Yong Soo

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether alterations in vascular endothelial function and early structural changes in atherosclerosis are associated with microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement were performed in 70 young adults (aged 19 to 35 yr), 48 with type 1 DM, and 22 normal controls. Patients with diabetes had a lower peak FMD response (7.8±3.9 vs. 11.1±1.9%, p<0.001) and increased IMT (0.51±0.10 vs. 0.42±0.07 mm, p<0.001) compared with controls. Twenty (41.7%) of the patients had microvascular complications including neuropathy, nephropathy, or retinopathy. In these complicated diabetic patients, we found a lower FMD response (6.1±2.5 vs. 9.9±3.5%, p=0.001) compared with diabetics without microvascular complications. The presence of microvascular complications was also associated with older age and longer duration of the disease. However, no differences were observed in IMT, body size, blood pressure, HbA1c, C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between complicated and non-complicated patients. Endothelial dysfunction and early structural atherosclerotic changes are common manifestations in type 1 DM, and endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an early event in the atherosclerotic process and important in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications. PMID:18303203

  3. Development of Novel Arginase Inhibitors for Therapy of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, impaired NO signaling, and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the endothelium NO is produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), for which l-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes l-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α–α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors [such as (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid], that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3′-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (PG). All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes. PMID:24062745

  4. Nitrones reverse hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Headley, Colwyn A; DiSilvestro, David; Bryant, Kelsey E; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Chun-An; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A

    2016-03-15

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)​ levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC with nitrones for 24h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased (BH4) levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  5. Endothelial dysfunction impairs vascular neurotransmission in tail arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana B; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study intends to clarify if endothelium dysfunction impairs vascular sympathetic neurotransmission. Electrically-evoked tritium overflow (100 pulses/5 Hz) was evaluated in arteries (intact and denuded) or exhibiting some degree of endothelium dysfunction (spontaneously hypertensive arteries), pre-incubated with [(3)H]-noradrenaline in the presence of enzymes (nitric oxide synthase (NOS); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; xanthine oxidase; cyclooxygenase; adenosine kinase) inhibitors and a nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with L-NIO dihydrochloride reduced tritium overflow in intact arteries whereas inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase with Nω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride was devoid of effect showing that only endothelial nitric oxide synthase is involved in vascular sympathetic neuromodulation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species or prostaglandins production with apocynin and allopurinol or indomethacin, respectively, failed to alter tritium overflow. A facilitation or reduction of tritium overflow was observed in the presence of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or of 5-iodotubericidin, respectively, but only in intact arteries. These effects can be ascribed to a tonic inhibitory effect mediated by A1 receptors. In denuded and hypertensive arteries, 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine (SCH 58261) reduced tritium overflow, suggesting the occurrence of a tonic activation of A2A receptors. When endogenous adenosine bioavailability was increased by the nucleoside transporter inhibitor, S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine, tritium overflow increased in intact, denuded and hypertensive arteries. Among the endothelium-derived substances studied that could alter vascular sympathetic transmission only adenosine/adenosine receptor mediated mechanisms were clearly impaired by endothelium injury/dysfunction

  6. Mechanistic link between erectile dysfunction and systemic endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Musicki, B; Hannan, J L; Lagoda, G; Bivalacqua, T J; Burnett, A L

    2016-09-01

    Men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and erectile dysfunction (ED) have greater risk of cardiovascular events than T2DM men without ED, suggesting ED as a predictor of cardiovascular events in diabetic men. However, molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in the diabetic penis explaining these clinical observations are not known. We evaluated whether the temporal relationship between ED and endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vasculature in T2DM involves earlier redox imbalance and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase (eNOS) dysfunction in the penis than in the systemic vasculature, such as the carotid artery. Rats were rendered T2DM by high-fat diet for 2 weeks, followed by an injection with low-dose streptozotocin. After 3 weeks, erectile function (intracavernosal pressure) was measured and penes and carotid arteries were collected for molecular analyses of eNOS uncoupling, protein S-glutathionylation, oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, 4-HNE), protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) , endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the carotid artery, and non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC)-mediated cavernosal relaxation. Erectile response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and NANC-mediated cavernosal relaxation was decreased (p < 0.05), while relaxation of the carotid artery to acetylcholine was not impaired in T2DM rats. eNOS monomerization, protein expressions of 4-HNE and gp91(phox) , and protein S-glutathionylation, were increased (p < 0.05) in the penis, but not in the carotid artery, of T2DM compared to non-diabetic rats. In conclusion, redox imbalance, increased oxidative stress by NADPH oxidase, and eNOS uncoupling, occur early in T2DM in the penis, but not in the carotid artery. These molecular changes contribute to T2DM ED, while vascular function in the systemic vasculature remains preserved. PMID:27153512

  7. DIET QUALITY SCORES AND PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF MARKERS OF INFLAMMATION AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial dysfunction is one of the mechanisms linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We assessed the association between several diet-quality scores and plasma concentrations of markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Diet-quality scores on the Healthy Eating Index (H...

  8. Endothelial Dysfunction and Procoagulant Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Arnon; Vaispapir, Vladimir; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Soboh, Soboh; Yehuda, Hila; Tamir, Snait

    2012-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilator function may be regarded as an index of inflammation. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity, and outcome. Our aim was to measure systemic vascular function directly (using forearm flow mediated dilatation) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and to clarify whether recent acute ischemic stroke is associated with impaired vascular function. Patients who were not eligible for thrombolytic therapy because of delayed arrival were randomly recruited to the study after signing a consent form. All 43 patients were conscious and had an acute ischemic stroke. Brain CT was performed on admission, and clinical evaluation was carried out by a neurologist on admission and four days later. Vascular responsiveness was evaluated by ABI and by endothelial function measurements on admission. Levels of P-selectin were measured during the first 24 hrs and on day 4. Forty-three patients (28 men and 15 women) and 23 healthy men (control) were enrolled in the study. Patients were older (62.4±12.5 y vs 44.2±11.6 y, p=0.001), had worse endothelial dysfunction (–4.4±7.4% vs 16.6±7.6%, p=0.001), and had a higher BMI (28±6 vs 24±5, p=0.001). No gender effect was found in endothelial function (–5.1±7.8% vs –2.5±6.6%, p=0.25) and ABI (1.0±0.26 vs 1.0±0.5, p=0.29). However, men had lower BMIs compared to women (26.8±5.8 vs 31.4±5.5, p=0.01). The neurological scale decreased from 4.9±3.4 to 3.2±3.0 on day 4 (p=0.001). In men, it was 4.8±3.8 on admission, and decreased to 3.2±3.4 on day 4 (p=0.001). In women, it was 5.0±2.7, and decreased to 3.3±2.3 on day 4 (p=0.001). P-selectin levels were high on admission (68.0±55.5 pg/ml) and increased 4 days later (102.3±72.0 pg/ml) (p=0.01). Men had higher levels on admission (79.1± 66.7 pg/ml vs 48.9± 15.4 pg/ml, p=0.02) and rose on day 4 to 113.6±82.6 pg/ml (p=0.05); in women P

  9. Endothelial dysfunction and preeclampsia: role of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aranguren, Lissette C.; Prada, Carlos E.; Riaño-Medina, Carlos E.; Lopez, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is an often fatal pathology characterized by hypertension and proteinuria at the 20th week of gestation that affects 5–10% of the pregnancies. The problem is particularly important in developing countries in where the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is higher and maternal mortality rates are 20 times higher than those reported in developed countries. Risk factors for the development of PE include obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia that stimulate inflammatory cytokine release and oxidative stress leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). However, how all these clinical manifestations concur to develop PE is still not very well understood. The related poor trophoblast invasion and uteroplacental artery remodeling described in PE, increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypoxia and ED. Here we aim to review current literature from research showing the interplay between oxidative stress, ED and PE to the outcomes of current clinical trials aiming to prevent PE with antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25346691

  10. Effect of agmatine on experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nader, M A; Gamiel, N M; El-Kashef, H; Zaghloul, M S

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of agmatine sulfate (AG, CAS2482-00-0) in nicotine (NIC)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rabbits. NIC was administered to produce VED in rabbits with or without AG for 6 weeks. Serum lipid profile, serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase generation, serum nitrite/nitrate, serum vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and aortic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) levels were analyzed.Treatment with AG markedly improves lipid profile and prevented NIC-induced VED and oxidative stress. The mechanism of AG in improving NIC-induced VED may be due to the significant reduction in serum VCAM-1 levels and aortic NF-κB. Thus, it may be concluded that AG reduces the oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, VCAM-1 levels, and aortic NF-κB expression, thereby consequently improving the integrity of vascular endothelium. PMID:26424770

  11. Endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Reed-Gitomer, Berenice Y; McFann, Kim; Pennington, Alexander; Klawitter, Jost; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Klepacki, Jacek; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Brosnahan, Godela; Chonchol, Michel; Christians, Uwe; Schrier, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of premature mortality in ADPKD patients. The aim was to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with the severity of ADPKD. Serum samples from a homogenous group of 61 HALT study A ADPKD patients [early disease group with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)] were compared with samples from 49 patients from the HALT study B group with moderately advanced disease (eGFR 25-60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)). Targeted tandem-mass spectrometry analysis of markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress was performed and correlated with eGFR and total kidney volume normalized to the body surface area (TKV/BSA). ADPKD patients with eGFR >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2) showed higher levels of CVD risk markers asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and SDMA), homocysteine, and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) compared with the healthy controls. Upon adjustments for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and creatinine, SDMA, homocysteine, and SAH remained negatively correlated with eGFR. Resulting cellular methylation power [S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/SAH ratio] correlated with the reduction of renal function and increase in TKV. Concentrations of prostaglandins (PGs), including oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane, as well as PGF2α, PGD₂, and PGE₂, were markedly elevated in patients with ADPKD compared with healthy controls. Upon adjustments for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and creatinine, increased PGD₂ and PGF₂α were associated with reduced eGFR, whereas 8-isoprostane and again PGF₂α were associated with an increase in TKV/BSA. Endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are evident early in ADPKD patients, even in those with preserved kidney function. The identified pathways may provide potential therapeutic targets for slowing down the disease progression. PMID:25234311

  12. Cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction induced by mercury exposure at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Briones, Ana María; Avendaño, María Soledad; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) has many harmful vascular effects by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular/endothelial dysfunction, all of which may contribute to cerebrovascular diseases development. We aimed to explore the effects of chronic low-mercury concentration on vascular function in cerebral arteries and the mechanisms involved. Basilar arteries from control (vehicle-saline solution, im) and mercury chloride (HgCl2)-treated rats for 30 days (first dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07μg/kg/day, im, to cover daily loss) were used. Vascular reactivity, protein expression, nitric oxide (NO) levels and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production were analyzed. HgCl2 exposure increased serotonin contraction and reduced the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to bradykinin. After NO synthase inhibition, serotonin responses were enhanced more in control than in mercury-treated rats while bradykinin-induced relaxation was abolished. NO levels were greater in control than Hg-treated rats. Tiron and indomethacin reduced vasoconstriction and increased the bradykinin-induced relaxation only in HgCl2-treated rats. Vascular O2(-) production was greater in mercury-treated when compared to control rats. Protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, copper/zinc (Cu/Zn), Manganese (Mn) and extracellular-superoxide dismutases were similar in cerebral arteries from both groups. Results suggest that Hg treatment increases cerebrovascular reactivity by reducing endothelial negative modulation and NO bioavailability; this effect seems to be dependent on increased reactive oxygen species and prostanoids generation. These findings show, for the first time, that brain vasculature are also affected by chronic mercury exposure and offer further evidence that even at small concentration, HgCl2 is hazardous and might be an environmental risk factor accounting for cerebral vasospasm development. PMID:26945730

  13. Endothelial dysfunction in hypertension: the role of arginase.

    PubMed

    Michell, Danielle L; Andrews, Karen L; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2011-01-01

    Essential hypertension is the leading risk factor for mortality worldwide, accountable for 13% of deaths globally. Despite numerous therapies available uncontrolled hypertension is still very prevalent today and a large subset are shown to have treatment resistant hypertension. Several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension result in endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Once thought of as a passive barrier between blood flow and tissue the endothelium is now considered a main hub for maintaining vascular tone, structure and haemostasis. Several pathways occur in the endothelium that can result in dysfunction and altered vascular stasis. Such pathways include the impairment of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO), increases in pro-inflammatory pathways such as ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and also recent reports suggest that the enzyme arginase, associated with the L-arginine-urea cycle, may be an important factor that is increased in hypertension. These pathways may offer alternative mechanisms to treat the complications associated with hypertension rather than the conventional therapies that aim to lower blood pressure. PMID:21622244

  14. Interrelationship of Multiple Endothelial Dysfunction Biomarkers with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Hamm, L Lee; Mohler, Emile R; Hudaihed, Alhakam; Arora, Robin; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Liu, Yanxi; Browne, Grace; Mills, Katherine T; Kleinpeter, Myra A; Simon, Eric E; Rifai, Nader; Klag, Michael J; He, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The interrelationship of multiple endothelial biomarkers and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been well studied. We measured asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), L-arginine, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), von Willebrand factor (vWF), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID) in 201 patients with CKD and 201 community-based controls without CKD. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the interrelationship of endothelial biomarkers with CKD. The multivariable-adjusted medians (interquartile ranges) were 0.54 (0.40, 0.75) in patients with CKD vs. 0.25 (0.22, 0.27) μmol /L in controls without CKD (p<0.0001 for group difference) for ADMA; 67.0 (49.6, 86.7) vs. 31.0 (27.7, 34.2) μmol/L (p<0.0001) for L-arginine; 230.0 (171.6, 278.6) vs. 223.9 (178.0, 270.6) ng/mL (p=0.55) for sICAM-1; 981.7 (782.6, 1216.8) vs. 633.2 (507.8, 764.3) ng/mL (p<0.0001) for sVCAM-1; 47.9 (35.0, 62.5) vs. 37.0 (28.9, 48.0) ng/mL (p=0.01) for sE-selectin; 1320 (1044, 1664) vs. 1083 (756, 1359) mU/mL (p=0.008) for vWF; 5.74 (3.29, 8.72) vs. 8.80 (6.50, 11.39)% (p=0.01) for FMD; and 15.2 (13.5, 16.9) vs. 19.1 (17.2, 21.0)% (p=0.0002) for NID, respectively. In addition, the severity of CKD was positively associated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF and inversely associated with FMD and NID. Furthermore, FMD and NID were significantly and inversely correlated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF. In conclusion, these data indicate that multiple dysfunctions of the endothelium were present among patients with CKD. Interventional studies are warranted to test the effects of treatment of endothelial dysfunction on CKD. PMID:26132137

  15. Resveratrol Prevents Age-Related Memory and Mood Dysfunction with Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Microvasculature, and Reduced Glial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol. PMID:25627672

  16. Endothelial cell markers reflecting endothelial cell dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and endothelial dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and to determine which biomarkers are associated with atherosclerotic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. Methods Fifty MCTD patients and 38 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. In order to describe endothelial dysfunction, we assessed flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). We investigated FMD of the brachial artery after reactive hyperemia and NMD after sublingual nitroglycerin administration, while the IMT of the common carotid artery was determined by ultrasound. Anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein (anti-U1RNP) antibodies, anti-cardiolipin (anti-CL) antibodies, anti-endothelial cell antibody (AECA) and endothelial cell markers, such as soluble thrombomodulin (TM) and von Willebrand factor antigen (vWFAg), were assessed. Results The endothelium-dependent vasodilation (FMD) was significantly impaired in patients with MCTD, as compared with controls (%FMD: 4.7 ± 4.2% vs. 8.7 ± 5.0%; P < 0.001), while the percentage NMD did not differ (%NMD: 14.3 ± 6.6% vs. 17.1 ± 6.7%; P = 0.073). Mean carotid IMT values were higher in patients than in controls (IMT: MCTD, 0.64 ± 0.13 mm vs. controls, 0.53 ± 0.14 mm; P < 0.001). FMD negatively correlated with disease duration, the levels of apolipoprotein A1, the paraoxonase-1 activity, and systolic blood pressure in MCTD patients. The percentage FMD was significantly lower in MCTD patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), than in those without CVD (%FMD: 3.5 ± 2.9 vs. 5.8 ± 4.8, P < 0.0002), while percentage NMD did not differ between patients with and without CVDs. Serum levels of autoantibodies (anti-U1RNP, AECA and anti-CL) were significantly higher in MCTD patients and differed between MCTD patients with and

  17. Soluble CD40 ligand induces endothelial dysfunction in human and porcine coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyi; Chai, Hong; Wang, Xinwen; Jiang, Jun; Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Liao, Dan; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Hao; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Min; Lin, Peter; Yao, Qizhi

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects and mechanisms of sCD40L on endothelial dysfunction in both human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and porcine coronary artery rings. HCAECs treated with sCD40L showed significant reductions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein levels, eNOS mRNA stability, eNOS enzyme activity, and cellular NO levels, whereas superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production was significantly increased. sCD40L enhanced eNOS mRNA 3'UTR binding to cytoplasmic molecules and induced a unique expression pattern of 95 microRNAs. sCD40L significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and catalase and SOD activities, whereas it increased NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity. sCD40L increased phosphorylation of MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 as well as IkappaBalpha and enhanced NF-kappaB nuclear translocation. In porcine coronary arteries, sCD40L significantly decreased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and eNOS mRNA levels, whereas it increased O(2)(-) levels. Antioxidant seleno-l-methionine; chemical inhibitors of p38, ERK1/2, and mitochondrial complex II; as well as dominant negative mutant forms of IkappaBalpha and NOX4 effectively blocked sCD40L-induced eNOS down-regulation in HCAECs. Thus, sCD40L reduces eNOS levels, whereas it increases oxidative stress through the unique molecular mechanisms involving eNOS mRNA stability, 3'UTR-binding molecules, microRNAs, mitochondrial function, ROS-related enzymes, p38, ERK1/2, and NF-kappaB signal pathways in endothelial cells. PMID:18658029

  18. Endothelial dysfunction as a predictor of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bertoluci, Marcello C; Cé, Gislaine V; da Silva, Antônio MV; Wainstein, Marco V; Boff, Winston; Puñales, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Macro and microvascular disease are the main cause of morbi-mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Although there is a clear association between endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes, a cause-effect relationship is less clear in T1DM. Although endothelial dysfunction (ED) precedes atherosclerosis, it is not clear weather, in recent onset T1DM, it may progress to clinical macrovascular disease. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction may either be reversed spontaneously or in response to intensive glycemic control, long-term exercise training and use of statins. Acute, long-term and post-prandial hyperglycemia as well as duration of diabetes and microalbuminuria are all conditions associated with ED in T1DM. The pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction is closely related to oxidative-stress. NAD(P)H oxidase over activity induces excessive superoxide production inside the mitochondrial oxidative chain of endothelial cells, thus reducing nitric oxide bioavailability and resulting in peroxynitrite formation, a potent oxidant agent. Moreover, oxidative stress also uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which becomes dysfunctional, inducing formation of superoxide. Other important mechanisms are the activation of both the polyol and protein kinase C pathways as well as the presence of advanced glycation end-products. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential clinical applicability of endothelial dysfunction as a marker for early vascular complications in T1DM. PMID:26069717

  19. [Vascular endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress--a new topic within the referral section of Orvosi Hetilap].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2008-07-13

    The author describes some of the numerous domains regarding the new topic called "Vascular endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress". The endothelium is responsible for the constancy and integrity of the milieu interieur by producing various substances. Endothelial dysfunction occurs when there is imbalance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors, growth factors and their inhibitors, proinflammatory and antiinflammatory agents, prothrombotic and fibrinolytic activities. The reason for this imbalance may be response to vascular endothelial or intimal injury caused by mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, genetic damage or any of their combination. Endothelial dysfunction occurring on the huge inner surface of the vessels (the endothelium) is responsible for the triggering of atherosclerosis, which is a chronic vascular disease. All the risk factors of vascular pathology are leading to chronic (cardio)vascular diseases by causing endothelial dysfunction. Decreased endogenous antioxidative capacity leads to oxidative stress by free radical reactions of physiological oxidative metabolic processes, ending as the ultimate reason for endothelial dysfunction induced by risk factors. The therapeutic and preventive effects of causal antioxidant treatments having intracellular and mitochondrial effects (statins, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor-blockers, acetylsalicylic acid, and third generation beta-blockers) should be emphasized. It is also important to underline the physiological-pathophysiological-therapeutic consubstantiality and systemic nature of human vasculature and to emphasize the preventive-therapeutic significance of the vascular consequence cascade. And finally, there has been large process in the assessment of oxidative stress and consecutive endothelial dysfunction which revolutionized our clinical point of view. PMID:18617460

  20. Circulating biologic markers of endothelial dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Poggesi, Anna; Pasi, Marco; Pescini, Francesca; Pantoni, Leonardo; Inzitari, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The term cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) refers to a group of pathologic processes with various etiologies that affect small arteries, arterioles, venules, and capillaries of the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of SVD are lacunes, recent small subcortical infarcts, white-matter hyperintensities, enlarged perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to have a role in the mechanisms leading to SVD-related brain changes, and the study of endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as an important step for a better comprehension of cerebral SVD. Among available methods to assess endothelial function in vivo, measurement of molecules of endothelial origin in peripheral blood is currently receiving selective attention. These molecules include products of endothelial cells that change when the endothelium is activated, as well as molecules that reflect endothelial damage and repair. This review examines the main molecular factors involved in both endothelial function and dysfunction, and the evidence linking endothelial dysfunction with cerebral SVD, and gives an overview of clinical studies that have investigated the possible association between endothelial circulating biomarkers and SVD-related brain changes. PMID:26058695

  1. Autophagy and heterophagy dysregulation leads to retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction and development of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Blasiak, Janusz; Kauppinen, Anu; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Boulton, Michael E.; Petrovski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex, degenerative and progressive eye disease that usually does not lead to complete blindness, but can result in severe loss of central vision. Risk factors for AMD include age, genetics, diet, smoking, oxidative stress and many cardiovascular-associated risk factors. Autophagy is a cellular housekeeping process that removes damaged organelles and protein aggregates, whereas heterophagy, in the case of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is the phagocytosis of exogenous photoreceptor outer segments. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both autophagy and heterophagy are highly active in the RPE. To date, there is increasing evidence that constant oxidative stress impairs autophagy and heterophagy, as well as increases protein aggregation and causes inflammasome activation leading to the pathological phenotype of AMD. This review ties together these crucial pathological topics and reflects upon autophagy as a potential therapeutic target in AMD. PMID:23590900

  2. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  3. Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and p66Shc Interplay in Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Simona; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Gaetano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability play a causal role in endothelial cell dysfunction occurring in the vasculature of diabetic patients. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms underpinning diabetic endothelial and vascular dysfunction. In particular, we focused our attention on the complex interplay existing among NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and one crucial regulator of intracellular ROS production, p66Shc protein. PMID:24734227

  4. microRNAs as Pharmacological Targets in Endothelial Cell Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Suárez, Yajaira

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative, migratory and morphogenic capacities of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. This review summarizes the latest insights in the identification of endothelial-specific miRNAs and their targets, as well as their roles in controlling endothelial cell functions in both autocrine and paracrine manner. In addition, we discuss the therapeutic potential for the treatment of endothelial cell dysfunction and associated vascular pathophysiological conditions. PMID:23603154

  5. Descemet Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty for Endothelial Dysfunction in Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Clinicopathological Correlation and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Vira, Divya; Fernandes, Merle; Mittal, Ruchi

    2016-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) mainly affects the ocular surface; however, endothelial damage may also occur. We would like to report changes in the endothelial-Descemet layer and review the literature on similar findings in patients with XP, including the role of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the management of a 21-year-old man who presented with nonresolving corneal edema in the right eye after excision biopsy for conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. His best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/200 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. On general examination, there was patchy hyperpigmentation of the exposed areas of skin suggestive of XP. On examination of the right eye, there was stromal edema involving the exposed half of cornea. The left eye appeared normal. Pachymetry readings were 860 and 600 μm in the right and left eye, respectively. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty was performed for endothelial dysfunction and the stripped endothelium, and Descemet membrane (DM) was sent for histopathologic evaluation. Postoperatively, the donor lenticule was well apposed and the overlying stromal edema resolved. The patient achieved a BCVA of 20/30 in the right eye without progression of corneal scarring at 1-year follow-up. In the meanwhile, however, the left eye developed corneal edema. Histopathology revealed gross attenuation of endothelial cells with uniform thickness of the DM. Corneal endothelial dysfunction in XP is amenable to treatment with DSAEK. PMID:25996422

  6. GPR55 Deletion in Mice Leads to Age-Related Ventricular Dysfunction and Impaired Adrenoceptor-Mediated Inotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Sarah K.; Hector, Emma E.; Andréasson, Anne-Christine; Jönsson-Rylander, Ann-Cathrine; Wainwright, Cherry L.

    2014-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is expressed throughout the body, and although its exact physiological function is unknown, studies have suggested a role in the cardiovascular system. In particular, GPR55 has been proposed as mediating the haemodynamic effects of a number of atypical cannabinoid ligands; however this data is conflicting. Thus, given the incongruous nature of our understanding of the GPR55 receptor and the relative paucity of literature regarding its role in cardiovascular physiology, this study was carried out to examine the influence of GPR55 on cardiac function. Cardiac function was assessed via pressure volume loop analysis, and cardiac morphology/composition assessed via histological staining, in both wild-type (WT) and GPR55 knockout (GPR55−/−) mice. Pressure volume loop analysis revealed that basal cardiac function was similar in young WT and GPR55−/− mice. In contrast, mature GPR55−/− mice were characterised by both significant ventricular remodelling (reduced left ventricular wall thickness and increased collagen deposition) and systolic dysfunction when compared to age-matched WT mice. In particular, the load-dependent parameter, ejection fraction, and the load-independent indices, end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) and Emax, were all significantly (P<0.05) attenuated in mature GPR55−/− mice. Furthermore, GPR55−/− mice at all ages were characterised by a reduced contractile reserve. Our findings demonstrate that mice deficient in GPR55 exhibit maladaptive adrenergic signalling, as evidenced by the reduced contractile reserve. Furthermore, with age these mice are characterised by both significant adverse ventricular remodelling and systolic dysfunction. Taken together, this may suggest a role for GPR55 in the control of adrenergic signalling in the heart and potentially a role for this receptor in the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:25275556

  7. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Migrino, Raymond Q

    2016-02-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26661197

  8. Neurovascular dysfunction, inflammation and endothelial activation: Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Alzheimer's disease is an increasingly prevalent disease with 5.3 million people in the United States currently affected. This number is a 10 percent increase from previous estimates and is projected to sharply increase to 8 million by 2030; it is the sixth-leading cause of death. In the United States the direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer's and other dementias to Medicare, Medicaid and businesses amount to more than $172 billion each year. Despite intense research efforts, effective disease-modifying therapies for this devastating disease remain elusive. At present, the few agents that are FDA-approved for the treatment of AD have demonstrated only modest effects in modifying clinical symptoms for relatively short periods and none has shown a clear effect on disease progression. New therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Although the idea that vascular defects are present in AD and may be important in disease pathogenesis was suggested over 25 years ago, little work has focused on an active role for cerebrovascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD. Nevertheless, increasing literature supports a vascular-neuronal axis in AD as shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease implicate vascular mechanisms in the development and/or progression of AD. Also, chronic inflammation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, as well as a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases of aging including AD. In this review we summarize data regarding, cardiovascular risk factors and vascular abnormalities, neuro- and vascular-inflammation, and brain endothelial dysfunction in AD. We conclude that the endothelial interface, a highly synthetic bioreactor that produces a large number of soluble factors, is functionally altered in AD and contributes to a noxious CNS milieu by releasing inflammatory and neurotoxic species

  9. Left Atrial Volume and Pulmonary Artery Diameter Are Noninvasive Measures of Age-Related Diastolic Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Hermosillo-Rodriguez, Jesus; Pham, Thuy; Granillo, Alejandro; Hartley, Craig J; Reddy, Anilkumar; Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Entman, Mark L; Taffet, George E

    2016-09-01

    Impaired cardiac diastolic function occurs with aging in many species and may be difficult to measure noninvasively. In humans, left atrial (LA) volume is a robust measure of chronic diastolic function as the LA is exposed to increased left ventricular filling pressures. We hypothesized that LA volume would be a useful indicator of diastolic function in aging mice. Further, we asked whether pressures were propagated backwards affecting pulmonary arteries (PAs) and right ventricle (RV). We measured LA, PA, and RV infundibulum dimensions with echocardiography and used mouse-specific Doppler systems and pressure catheters for noninvasive and invasive measures. As C57BL/6 mice aged from 3 to 29-31 months, LA volume almost tripled. LA volume increases correlated with traditional diastolic function measures. Within groups of 14- and 31-month-old mice, LA volume correlated with diastolic function measured invasively. In serial studies, mice evaluated at 20 and 24 months showed monotonic increases in LA volume; other parameters changed less predictably. PA diameters, larger in 30-month-old mice than 6-month-old mice, correlated with LA volumes. Noninvasive LA volume and PA diameter assessments are useful and state independent measures of diastolic function in mice, correlating with other measures of diastolic dysfunction in aging. Furthermore, serial measurements over 4 months demonstrated consistent increases in LA volume suitable for longitudinal cardiac aging studies. PMID:26511013

  10. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Davel, A P; Wenceslau, C F; Akamine, E H; Xavier, F E; Couto, G K; Oliveira, H T; Rossoni, L V

    2011-09-01

    The endothelium plays a vital role in maintaining circulatory homeostasis by the release of relaxing and contracting factors. Any change in this balance may result in a process known as endothelial dysfunction that leads to impaired control of vascular tone and contributes to the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased production of thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and superoxide anion in conductance and resistance arteries are commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive, diabetic and obese animals, resulting in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and in increased vasoconstrictor responses. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the role of enhanced overactivation of β-adrenergic receptors inducing vascular cytokine production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling that seem to be the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in hypertension, heart failure and in endocrine-metabolic disorders. However, some adaptive mechanisms can occur in the initial stages of hypertension, such as increased NO production by eNOS. The present review focuses on the role of NO bioavailability, eNOS uncoupling, cyclooxygenase-derived products and pro-inflammatory factors on the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in hypertension, sympathetic hyperactivity, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. These are cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases of high incidence and mortality around the world, especially in developing countries and endothelial dysfunction contributes to triggering, maintenance and worsening of these pathological situations. PMID:21956535

  11. Identification of a biochemical marker for endothelial dysfunction using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rygula, A; Pacia, M Z; Mateuszuk, L; Kaczor, A; Kostogrys, R B; Chlopicki, S; Baranska, M

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, we propose the spectroscopic approach to identify biochemical alterations in endothelial dysfunction. The method is based on the quantification of the ratio of phenylalanine (Phe) to tyrosine (Tyr) contents in the endothelium. The synthesis of Tyr from Phe requires the presence of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) as a cofactor of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). Limitation of BH4 availability in the endothelium is a hallmark endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction that may also lead to PAH dysfunction and a fall in Tyr contents. Using Raman spectra, the ratio of marker bands of Tyr to Phe was calculated and the pathological state of the endothelium was detected. We provide evidence that Phe/Tyr ratio analysis by Raman spectroscopy discriminate endothelial dysfunction in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice as compared to control mice. PMID:25664353

  12. Olive Oil Supplements Ameliorate Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Healthy Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for clinical cardiovascular events and progression of atherosclerosis. Dietary supplements such as olive oil and fish oil have beneficial effects on endothelial function, and ther...

  13. S-allyl cysteine ameliorates the quality of sperm and provides protection from age-related sperm dysfunction and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species play a central role in the pathophysiology of the age-related decrease in male fertility. It has been reported that the total protein of DJ-1 was decreased in a proteomic analysis of seminal plasma from asthenozoospermia patients and a DJ-1 protein acts as a sensor of cellular redox homeostasis. Therefore, we evaluated the age-related changes in the ratio of the oxidized/reduced forms of the DJ-1 protein in the epididymis. In addition, the protective effects of S-allyl cysteine (SAC), a potent antioxidant, were evaluated against sperm dysfunction. Male rats aged 15-75 weeks were used to assess age-associated sperm function and oxidative stress. Sperm count increased until 25 weeks, but then decreased at 50 and 75 weeks. The rate of sperm movement at 75 weeks was decreased to approximately 60% of the rate observed at 25 weeks. Expression of DJ-1 decreased, but oxidized-DJ-1 increased with age. In addition, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins in the epididymis increased until 50 weeks of age. The total number and DNA synthetic potential of the sperm increased until 25 weeks, and then decreased. In rats 75 weeks of age, SAC (0.45% diet) attenuated the decrease in the number, motility, and DNA synthesis of sperm and inhibited the oxidized proteins. These results suggest that SAC ameliorates the quality of sperm subjected to age-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25411519

  14. The Soluble VEGF Receptor sFlt1 Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Giovana S. Di; Reuter, Stefan; Hillebrand, Uta; Amler, Susanne; König, Maximilian; Larger, Etienne; Oberleithner, Hans; Brand, Eva; Pavenstädt, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk that accompanies CKD. We hypothesized that the soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1), a VEGF antagonist, plays a role in endothelial dysfunction and decreased angiogenesis in CKD. We enrolled 130 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and 56 age- and gender-matched control patients. Plasma sFlt-1 levels were higher in patients with CKD and, after multivariate regression analyses, exclusively associated with renal function and levels of vWF, a marker of endothelial dysfunction. Compared with serum from control patients, both recombinant sFlt-1 and serum from patients with CKD had antiangiogenic activity in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, induced endothelial cell apoptosis in vitro, and decreased nitric oxide generation in two different endothelial cell lines. Pretreating the sera with an antibody against sFlt-1 abrogated all of these effects. Furthermore, we observed increased sFlt1 levels in 5/6-nephrectomized rats compared with sham-operated animals. Finally, using real-time PCR and ELISA, we identified monocytes as a possible source of increased sFlt-1 in patients with CKD. Our findings show that excess sFlt-1 associates with endothelial dysfunction in CKD and suggest that increased sFlt-1 may predict cardiovascular risk in CKD. PMID:19608702

  15. HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation. PMID:24854267

  16. Endothelial ROS and Impaired Myocardial Oxygen Consumption in Sepsis-induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Potz, Brittany A; Sellke, Frank W; Abid, M Ruhul

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is known as the presence of a Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in response to an infection. In the USA alone, 750,000 cases of severe sepsis are diagnosed annually. More than 70% of sepsis-related deaths occur due to organ failure and more than 50% of septic patients demonstrate cardiac dysfunction. Patients with sepsis who develop cardiac dysfunction have significantly higher mortality, and thus cardiac dysfunction serves as a predictor of survival in sepsis. We have very little understanding about the mechanisms that result in cardiac dysfunction in the setting of sepsis. At present, the factors involved in sepsis-related cardiac dysfunction are believed to include the following: persistent inflammatory changes in the vascular endothelium and endocardium leading to circulatory and micro vascular changes, increase in endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS), abnormal endothelium-leukocyte interaction resulting in a feed-forward loop for inflammatory cytokines and ROS, contractile dysfunction of the heart due to autonomic dysregulation, metabolic changes in myocardium leading to impaired oxygen delivery and increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial dysfunction, and persistent inflammatory signaling. In this review article, we will briefly discuss the clinical challenges and our current understanding of cardiac dysfunction in sepsis. Major focus will be on the pathological changes that occur in vascular endothelium, with an emphasis on endocardium, and how endothelial ROS, impaired endothelium-leukocyte interaction, and microcirculatory changes lead to cardiac dysfunction in sepsis. The importance of the ongoing quest for the clinical biomarkers for cardiac dysfunction will also be discussed. PMID:27135058

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Eyes with Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration Treated with Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hae; Chang, Young Suk; Lee, Tae Gon; Kim, Jong Woo; Lew, Young Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term outcomes of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy for patients diagnosed with submacular hemorrhage secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration. Methods This retrospective, observational study included 49 patients (49 eyes) who initially presented with submacular hemorrhage associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration and who were followed-up for at least 24 months. Only eyes that were treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy were included in the study. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared. The associations of BCVA at the final visit with baseline BCVA, BCVA at six months, symptom duration, hemorrhage extent, and central foveal thickness were also analyzed. Results Over the course of follow-up (mean, 32.1 ± 8.5 months), an average of 5.1 ± 2.2 anti-VEGF injections were administered. Recurrent hemorrhage was noted in 13 eyes (26.5%). The mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were 1.40 ± 0.52, 0.87 ± 0.64, and 1.03 ± 0.83, respectively. Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit. Conclusions Improved visual acuity was maintained for more than two years with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy. BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis. PMID:26457037

  18. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase dysfunction causes cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration in rat prefrontal cortex slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Cerebrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in imbalance of cerebral blood flow contributes to the onset of psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Although decrease in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity has been reported in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the contribution of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase to endothelial cell dysfunction remains poorly understood. Here, by using rat neonatal prefrontal cortex slice cultures, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase by ouabain induced endothelial cell injury. Treatment with ouabain significantly decreased immunoreactive area of rat endothelial cell antigen-1 (RECA-1), a marker of endothelial cells, in a time-dependent manner. Ouabain also decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) (Ser9), which were prevented by lithium carbonate. On the other hand, ouabain-induced endothelial cell injury was exacerbated by concomitant treatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3- (PI3-) kinase. We also found that xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor, but not SEA0400, an inhibitor of Na(+), Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), protected endothelial cells from cytotoxicity of ouabain. These results suggest that cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration induced by Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition resulting in Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activation of GSK3β signaling underlies pathogenesis of these psychiatric disorders. PMID:27208492

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Circulating Microparticles from Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agouni, Abdelali; Lagrue-Lak-Hal, Anne Hélène; Ducluzeau, Pierre Henri; Mostefai, Hadj Ahmed; Draunet-Busson, Catherine; Leftheriotis, Georges; Heymes, Christophe; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2008-01-01

    Microparticles are membrane vesicles that are released during cell activation and apoptosis. Elevated levels of microparticles occur in many cardiovascular diseases; therefore, we characterized circulating microparticles from both metabolic syndrome (MS) patients and healthy patients. We evaluated microparticle effects on endothelial function; however, links between circulating microparticles and endothelial dysfunction have not yet been demonstrated. Circulating microparticles and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry of blood samples from patients and healthy subjects. Microparticles were used either to treat human endothelial cells in vitro or to assess endothelium function in mice after intravenous injection. MS patients had increased circulating levels of microparticles compared with healthy patients, including microparticles from platelet, endothelial, erythrocyte, and procoagulant origins. In vitro treatment of endothelial cells with microparticles from MS patients reduced both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion production, resulting in protein tyrosine nitration. These effects were associated with enhanced phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase at the site of inhibition. The reduction of O2− was linked to both reduced expression of p47phox of NADPH oxidase and overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase. The decrease in NO production was triggered by nonplatelet-derived microparticles. In vivo injection of MS microparticles into mice impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreased endothelial NO synthase expression. These data provide evidence that circulating microparticles from MS patients influence endothelial dysfunction. PMID:18772329

  20. Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Dysfunction Constitute a Common Therapeutic Target in Cardiometabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, G.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, promote endothelial dysfunction and lead to development of metabolic syndrome which constitutes an introduction to cardiovascular disease. The insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction cross talk between each other by numerous metabolic pathways. Hence, targeting one of these pathologies with pleiotropic treatment exerts beneficial effect on another one. Combined and expletive treatment of hypertension, lipid disorders, and insulin resistance with nonpharmacological interventions and conventional pharmacotherapy may inhibit the transformation of metabolic disturbances to fully developed cardiovascular disease. This paper summarises the common therapeutic targets for insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammatory reaction at molecular level and analyses the potential pleiotropic effects of drugs used currently in management of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. PMID:27413253

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in metabolic diseases: role of oxidation and possible therapeutic employment of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Masha, A; Martina, V

    2014-01-01

    Several metabolic diseases present a high cardiovascular mortality due to endothelial dysfunction consequences. In the last years of the past century, it has come to light that the endothelial cells, previously considered as inert in what regards an eventual secretion activity, play a pivotal role in regulating different aspects of the vascular function (endothelial function). It was clearly demonstrated that the endothelium acts as a real active organ, owning endocrine, paracrine and autocrine modulation activities by means of which it is able to regulate the vascular homeostasis. The present review will investigate the relationship between some metabolic diseases and the endothelial dysfunction and in particular the mechanisms underlying the effects of metabolic pathologies on the endothelium. Furthermore, it will consider the possible therapeutic employment of the N-acetilcysteine in such conditions. PMID:25005185

  2. Different antivascular endothelial growth factor treatments and regimens and their outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lanzetta, Paolo; Mitchell, Paul; Wolf, Sebastian; Veritti, Daniele

    2013-12-01

    Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy has revolutionised the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD). Recent research has focused on evaluating competing agents and alternative dosage regimens, providing evidence to help determine optimal treatment strategies. We therefore conducted a review of clinical research studies in wAMD published since 2008 that compared anti-VEGF dosing regimens and therapies; seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Data on baseline disease characteristics, disease outcomes, safety (ocular and systemic) and treatment burden (injection and visit frequencies) were extracted on patients treated with ranibizumab 0.5 mg, bevacizumab 1.25 mg or aflibercept 2.0 mg for up to 2 years. For ranibizumab and bevacizumab, visual and anatomical outcomes at 1 and 2 years were superior using scheduled monthly (or 4 weekly (q4w)) compared with as needed or scheduled quarterly dosing regimens. Treatment outcomes were generally better for both drugs when more aggressive retreatment criteria were used, which resulted in more frequent injections. Bevacizumab, however, was associated with a 30-35% elevated rate of serious systemic adverse events compared with ranibizumab, regardless of dosing interval; further study in larger patient populations will be required to determine the validity of this finding. Intravitreal aflibercept injection every 8 weeks was non-inferior to ranibizumab q4w on all visual and anatomical endpoints at week 52, had a similar safety profile and required five fewer anti-VEGF injections. PMID:23929309

  3. Long-Term Visual Outcomes for a Treat and Extend Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regimen in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mrejen, Sarah; Jung, Jesse J; Chen, Christine; Patel, Samir N; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Yannuzzi, Nicolas; Xu, Luna; Marsiglia, Marcela; Boddu, Sucharita; Freund, K Bailey

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy, clinicians are now focused on various treatment strategies to better control neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD), a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Herein, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients with treatment-naïve NVAMD initially classified based on fluorescein angiography (FA) alone or with an anatomic classification utilizing both FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and correlated long-term visual outcomes of these patients treated with an anti-VEGF Treat-and-Extend Regimen (TER) with baseline characteristics including neovascular phenotype. Overall, 185 patients (210 eyes) were followed over an average of 3.5 years (range 1-6.6) with a retention rate of 62.9%, and visual acuity significantly improved with a TER that required a mean number of 8.3 (±1.6) (± standard deviation) intravitreal anti-VEGF injections/year (range 4-13). The number of injections and the anatomic classification were independent predictors of visual acuity at 6 months, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years. Patients with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes and received more injections than the other neovascular subtypes. There were no serious adverse events. A TER provided sustained long-term visual gains. Eyes with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes than those with other neovascular subtypes. PMID:26239682

  4. Early life stress in male mice induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ho, Dao H; Burch, Mariah L; Musall, Benjamin; Musall, Jacqueline B; Hyndman, Kelly A; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2016-05-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk for cardiovascular disease in adulthood although very little mechanistic insight is available. Because oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are major contributors to cardiovascular risk, we hypothesized that ELS induces endothelial dysfunction in adult male mice via increased superoxide production. Studies employed a mouse model of ELS, maternal separation with early weaning (MSEW), in which litters were separated from the dam for 4 h/day [postnatal days (PD) 2-5] and 8 h/day (PD6-16), and weaned at PD17. Control litters remained undisturbed until weaning at PD21. When compared with control mice, thoracic aortic rings from adult male MSEW mice displayed significant endothelial dysfunction that was reversed by the superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD). PEG-SOD-inhibitable superoxide production by aortae from MSEW mice was significantly greater than observed in control aortae, although unaffected by nitric oxide synthase inhibition, suggesting that uncoupled nitric oxide synthase was not responsible for the accelerated superoxide production. Aortic SOD expression, plasma SOD activity, and total antioxidant activity were similar in MSEW and control mice, indicating unaltered antioxidant capacity in MSEW mice. Increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits, NOX2 and NOX4, was evident in the aortae of MSEW mice. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction and superoxide production in MSEW mice was reversed with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, indicating increased NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction. The finding that MSEW induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adult mice may provide a mechanistic link between ELS and adult cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26921433

  5. Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin in the Fetoplacental Endothelial Dysfunction in Maternal Supraphysiological Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, Andrea; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Toledo, Fernando; Salomón, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    Maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia occurs during pregnancy, ensuring normal fetal development. In some cases, the maternal plasma cholesterol level increases to above this physiological range, leading to maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia (MSPH). This condition results in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the fetal and placental vasculature. The fetal and placental endothelial dysfunction is related to alterations in the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the arginase/urea pathway and results in reduced NO production. The level of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is reduced in nonpregnant women who have hypercholesterolemia, which favors the generation of the superoxide anion rather than NO (from eNOS), causing endothelial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether MSPH is associated with changes in the level or metabolism of BH4; as a result, eNOS function is not well understood. This review summarizes the available information on the potential link between MSPH and BH4 in causing human fetoplacental vascular endothelial dysfunction, which may be crucial for understanding the deleterious effects of MSPH on fetal growth and development. PMID:26697136

  6. Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin in the Fetoplacental Endothelial Dysfunction in Maternal Supraphysiological Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Andrea; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Westermeier, Francisco; Toledo, Fernando; Salomón, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián; Sobrevia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia occurs during pregnancy, ensuring normal fetal development. In some cases, the maternal plasma cholesterol level increases to above this physiological range, leading to maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia (MSPH). This condition results in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the fetal and placental vasculature. The fetal and placental endothelial dysfunction is related to alterations in the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the arginase/urea pathway and results in reduced NO production. The level of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is reduced in nonpregnant women who have hypercholesterolemia, which favors the generation of the superoxide anion rather than NO (from eNOS), causing endothelial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether MSPH is associated with changes in the level or metabolism of BH4; as a result, eNOS function is not well understood. This review summarizes the available information on the potential link between MSPH and BH4 in causing human fetoplacental vascular endothelial dysfunction, which may be crucial for understanding the deleterious effects of MSPH on fetal growth and development. PMID:26697136

  7. Does obstructive sleep apnea cause endothelial dysfunction? A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Camilla M; Melehan, Kerri L; Liu, Peter Y; Grunstein, Ronald R; Phillips, Craig L

    2015-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular consequences. The ease with which endothelial function can be assessed has led to it becoming a useful marker of cardiovascular diseases in research studies. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been independently associated with endothelial dysfunction which may explain the increased risk for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in this population. One possible mechanism for the development of endothelial dysfunction in OSA is through the cyclical pattern of hypoxia and re-oxygenation. This creates a haemostatic imbalance in which nitric oxide bio-availability is reduced and pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic forces prevail. Furthermore the repair capacity of the endothelium to protect itself against this increased damage is diminished. All of these pathways contribute to vascular disease which ultimately gives rise to adverse cardiovascular consequences. This review aims to provide a critical appraisal of the cross-sectional and interventional studies which have investigated micro- and macro-vascular endothelial dysfunction in OSA with emphasis on randomised controlled studies. PMID:25088969

  8. Aging-related 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced neurochemial and behavioral deficits and redox dysfunction: improvement by AK-7.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiang; Wang, Meihua; Chen, Hanqing; Yang, Liu; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xijin

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a prominent risk factor for the occurrence and progression of Parkinson disease (PD). Aging animals are more significant for PD research than young ones. It is promising to develop effective treatments for PD through modulation of aging-related molecules. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a strong deacetylase highly expressed in the brain, has been implicated in the aging process. In our present study, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 12mg/kg once daily) was observed to bring about significant behavioral deficits and striatal dopamine depletion in aging male and female mice, while it did not do so in young animals. MPTP did not cause significant reduction in striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine content in aging male and female mice. Furthermore, we observed that MPTP treatment resulted in significant reduction in GSH content and significant increase in MDA content and SIRT2 expression in the substantia nigra (SN) of aging mice, while it did not do so in young animals. Importantly, we observed that AK-7 (a selective SIRT2 inhibitor) significantly improved behavior abnormality and neurochemical deficits in aging male and female mice treated with MPTP. Significant increase in GSH content and significant decrease in MDA content were also observed in the SN of aging male and female mice co-treated with MPTP and AK-7 compared with the MPTP-treated animals. Our results indicated that MPTP induce aging-related neurochemical and behavioural deficits and dysfunction of redox network in male and female mice and AK-7 may be neuroprotective in PD through modulating redox network. PMID:27235848

  9. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiuping; Andresen1, Bradley T.; Hill, Michael; Zhang, Jing; Booth, Frank; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell injury and dysfunction are the major triggers of pathophysiological processes leading to cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) has been implicated in atherosclerosis, hypertension, coronary artery disease, vascular complications of diabetes, chronic renal failure, insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia. Although now recognized as a class of physiological second messengers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators in cellular injury, specifically, as a factor in endothelial cell damage. Uncontrolled ROS production and/or decreased antioxidant activity results in a deleterious state referred to as ‘oxidative stress’. A candidate factor in causing ROS production in endothelial cells is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine. TNF-α has been shown to both be secreted by endothelial cells and to induce intracellular ROS formation. These observations provide a potential mechanism by which TNF-α may activate and injure endothelial cells resulting in ED. In this review, we focus on the relationship between intracellular ROS formation and ED in endothelial cells or blood vessels exposed to TNF-α to provide insight into the role of this important cytokine in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20559453

  10. Effects of Grape Skin Extract on Age-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Memory and Life Span in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Asseburg, Heike; Schäfer, Carmina; Müller, Madeleine; Hagl, Stephanie; Pohland, Maximilian; Berressem, Dirk; Borchiellini, Marta; Plank, Christina; Eckert, Gunter P

    2016-09-01

    Dementia contributes substantially to the burden of disability experienced at old age, and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) was identified as common final pathway in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease. Due to its early appearance, MD is a promising target for nutritional prevention strategies and polyphenols as potential neurohormetic inducers may be strong neuroprotective candidates. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a polyphenol-rich grape skin extract (PGE) on age-related dysfunctions of brain mitochondria, memory, life span and potential hormetic pathways in C57BL/6J mice. PGE was administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight/d in a 3-week short-term, 6-month long-term and life-long study. MD in the brains of aged mice (19-22 months old) compared to young mice (3 months old) was demonstrated by lower ATP levels and by impaired mitochondrial respiratory complex activity (except for mice treated with antioxidant-depleted food pellets). Long-term PGE feeding partly enhanced brain mitochondrial respiration with only minor beneficial effect on brain ATP levels and memory of aged mice. Life-long PGE feeding led to a transient but significant shift of survival curve toward higher survival rates but without effect on the overall survival. The moderate effects of PGE were associated with elevated SIRT1 but not SIRT3 mRNA expressions in brain and liver tissue. The beneficial effects of the grape extract may have been influenced by the profile of bioavailable polyphenols and the starting point of interventions. PMID:27455862

  11. HIV antiretroviral drug combination induces endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production, but not apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Li, Yuchi; Mathis, J. Michael; Alexander, J. Steven; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2007-10-01

    Numerous reports now indicate that HIV patients administered long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at a greater risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction is an initiating event in atherogenesis and may contribute to HIV-associated atherosclerosis. We previously reported that ART induces direct endothelial dysfunction in rodents. In vitro treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with ART indicated endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we determined whether ART-induced endothelial dysfunction is mediated via mitochondria-derived ROS and whether this mitochondrial injury culminates in endothelial cell apoptosis. Two major components of ART combination therapy, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor, were tested, using AZT and indinavir as representatives for each. Microscopy utilizing fluorescent indicators of ROS and mitochondria demonstrated the mitochondrial localization of ART-induced ROS. MnTBAP, a cell-permeable metalloporphyrin antioxidant, abolished ART-induced ROS production. As a final step in confirming the mitochondrial origin of the ART-induced ROS, HUVEC were transduced with a cytosolic- compared to a mitochondria-targeted catalase. Transduction with the mitochondria-targeted catalase was more effective than cytoplasmic catalase in inhibiting the ROS and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) produced after treatment with either AZT or indinavir. However, both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic catalase attenuated ROS and 8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}} production induced by the combination treatment, suggesting that in this case, the formation of cytoplasmic ROS may also occur, and thus, that the mechanism of toxicity in the combination treatment group may be different compared to treatment with AZT or indinavir alone. Finally, to determine whether ART-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and

  12. Endothelial Dysfunction is Associated with Occult Coronary Artery Disease Detected by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Ambar; Zheng, Yan; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Veledar, Emir; Votaw, John; Uphoff, Irina; Bremner, Douglas J.; Goldberg, Jack; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Silent myocardial ischemia is common in asymptomatic subjects without a prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Our objective was to determine whether endothelial dysfunction is associated with silent myocardial ischemia and whether the association is independent of genetic and familial factors. Material and methods We examined 416 male monozygotic and dizygotic twins aged 47 to 63 years, free of symptomatic CAD. Subclinical ischemia was diagnosed by [13N] ammonia positron emission tomography at rest and after adenosine stress. Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Generalized estimating equations were used for analysis. Results Fixed perfusion defects were found in 24 (6%) twins and reversible perfusion defects in 90 (22%) twins, indicating subclinical ischemia. There was an inverse correlation between FMD and the reversible perfusion defect score (r = - 0.14, p=0.01) but not the fixed defect score (r= -0.017, p=0.73). From the lowest to the highest quartile of FMD, the prevalence of reversible defects decreased 28% to 14%, p=0.008. In multivariable analysis, reversible defects were significantly associated with each quartile of decreasing FMD (OR =1.3; 95% 1.1, 2.5). In 54 twin pairs discordant for endothelial dysfunction (FMD ≤ 7% dilation from baseline), twins with endothelial dysfunction had 9% higher likelihood of having perfusion defects than their co-twins without endothelial dysfunction (p=0.041). Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with silent ischemia and this association is not confounded by genetic or other shared familial factors. PMID:25414815

  13. Associations of Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction With Subclinical Ventricular Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Beussink, Lauren; Scherzer, Rebecca; Ganz, Peter; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer high rates of heart failure and cardiovascular mortality, and we lack a thorough understanding of what, if any, modifiable factors contribute to cardiac dysfunction in these high-risk patients. To evaluate endothelial function as a potentially modifiable cause of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, we investigated cross-sectional associations of macro- and microvascular dysfunction with left and right ventricular dysfunction in a well-controlled ESRD cohort. We performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography of the left and right ventricle, in 149 ESRD patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational study. Of these participants, 123 also underwent endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (macrovascular function). Microvascular function was measured as the velocity time integral of hyperemic blood flow after cuff deflation. Impaired flow-mediated dilation was associated with higher left ventricular mass, independently of age and blood pressure: per 2-fold lower flow-mediated dilation, left ventricular mass was 4.1% higher (95% confidence interval, 0.49-7.7; P=0.03). After adjustment for demographics, blood pressure, comorbidities, and medications, a 2-fold lower velocity time integral was associated with 9.5% higher E/e' ratio (95% confidence interval, 1.0-16; P=0.03) and 6.7% lower absolute right ventricular longitudinal strain (95% confidence interval, 2.0-12; P=0.003). Endothelial dysfunction is a major correlate of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, particularly diastolic and right ventricular dysfunction, in patients whose volume status is well controlled. Future investigations are needed to determine whether therapies targeting the vascular endothelium could improve cardiac outcomes in ESRD. PMID:27550915

  14. Impact of Corneal Endothelial Dysfunctions on Intraocular Oxygen Levels in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Andrew J. W.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Han, Yu-Ping; Bai, Fang; Siegfried, Carla J.; Beebe, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We studied the implications of corneal endothelial dysfunctions on oxidative stress in the anterior segment via in vivo measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in the anterior chamber (AC) of human eyes. Methods We recruited 51 patients undergoing cataract surgery and/or endothelial keratoplasty (EK). Endothelial cell density (ECD; n = 33) and central corneal thickness (CCT; n = 41) were measured on patients with relatively clear corneas. Before surgery, an oxygen sensor was introduced into the AC via a peripheral corneal paracentesis. In all patients, seven measurements of pO2 were obtained by positioning the flexible tip near the endothelium at the central cornea, at four cardinal subendothelial locations near the midperipheral cornea, and in the mid-AC and AC angle. In patients with pseudophakia or eyes undergoing cataract surgery, pO2 also was measured near the lens surface and in the posterior chamber. Results Consistent with our previous reports, a steep oxygen gradient was noted in the anterior segment of normal controls (n = 24). In patients with endothelial dysfunctions (n = 27), there was a significant increase of pO2 at all five subendothelial locations without a significant increase of pO2 in the AC angle. By regression analyses, subendothelial pO2 correlated inversely with ECD and positively with CCT in patients with endothelial dysfunctions. Conclusions This study demonstrates an even steeper intraocular oxygen gradient in eyes with corneal endothelial dysfunctions. It suggests that the reduced oxygen consumption in corneal endothelial cells may increase oxidative stress in the AC and the existence of an alternative aqueous inflow pathway that maintains a relatively low and constant pO2 at the AC angle. PMID:26447982

  15. Transforming growth factor-β mediates endothelial dysfunction in rats during high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguang; Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal J; Sanders, Paul W

    2015-12-15

    Endothelial dysfunction has been shown to be predictive of subsequent cardiovascular events and death. Through a mechanism that is incompletely understood, increased dietary salt intake promotes endothelial dysfunction in healthy, salt-resistant humans. The present study tested the hypothesis that dietary salt-induced transforming growth factor (TGF)-β promoted endothelial dysfunction and salt-dependent changes in blood pressure (BP). Sprague-Dawley rats that received diets containing 0.3% NaCl [low salt (LS)] or 8.0% NaCl [high salt (HS)] were treated with vehicle or SB-525334, a specific inhibitor of TGF-β receptor I/activin receptor-like kinase 5, beginning on day 5. BP was monitored using radiotelemetry in four groups of rats (LS, LS + SB-525334, HS, and HS + SB-525334) for up to 14 days. By day 14 of the study, mean daytime systolic BP and mean pulse pressure of the HS group treated with vehicle was greater than those in the other three groups; mean daytime systolic BP and pulse pressure of the HS + SB-525334 group did not differ from the LS and LS + SB-525334-treated groups. Whereas mean systolic BP, mean diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure did not differ among the groups on the seventh day of the study, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was impaired specifically in the HS group; treatment with the activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor prevented the dietary HS intake-induced increases in phospho-Smad2 (Ser(465/467)) and NADPH oxidase-4 in endothelial lysates and normalized endothelial function. These findings suggest that HS-induced endothelial dysfunction and the development of salt-dependent increases in BP were related to endothelial TGF-β signaling. PMID:26447221

  16. Endothelial dysfunction and progressive coronary atherosclerosis: sequential invasive studies in a patient with multiple cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chander, R; Kuhner, P A; Laws Houghton, J

    2001-08-01

    This manuscript describes sequential angiographic, endothelial and vasoreactivity characteristics of the coronary arterial circulation in a middle-aged patient with multiple cardiac risk factors who developed hemodynamically significant coronary atherosclerosis over a 6-year period. A 56-year-old woman demonstrated marked angiographic progression of coronary atherosclerosis over time beginning with minor luminal irregularities in the setting of severe endothelial dysfunction. The association of endothelial dysfunction, ineffective cardiac risk factor management and progressive atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:11481511

  17. Glycated serum albumin stimulates expression of endothelial cell specific molecule-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Implication in diabetes mediated endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nirala, Bikesh K; Perumal, Vivekanandan; Gohil, Nivedita K

    2015-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory conditions induced by products of protein glycation in diabetes substantially enhance the risk of endothelial dysfunction and related vascular complications. Endothelial cell specific molecule-1 (ESM-1) or endocan has been demonstrated as a potential biomarker in cancer and sepsis. Its role in diabetes-induced pathologies remains unknown. The expression of ESM-1 gene is under cytokine regulation, indicating its role in endothelium-dependent pathological disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect of advanced glycated human serum albumin (AGE-HSA) on the production of ESM-1. We show that AGE-HSA exerts a modulating role on the expression of ESM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. It up-regulates expression of ESM-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner which correlates with its messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription. RAGE and galectin-3, both AGE receptors, show antagonistic action on its expression. While gene silencing of RAGE has down-regulatory effect, that of galectin-3 has up-regulatory effect on AGE-induced expression of ESM-1. Inhibition of MAPKKK and JNK pathways did not alter the expression. In contrast, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibition significantly up-regulated ESM-1 expression. In conclusion, these results suggest that AGE-induced activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells promotes formation of endocan which is an endothelial dysfunction marker and may be related to vascular disease in diabetes. PMID:25963575

  18. Change of retinal pigment epithelial atrophy after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment in exudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moosang; Kim, Eung Suk; Seo, Kyung Hoon; Yu, Seung-Young; Kwak, Hyung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the quantitative changes of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy during a 24-month follow-up period of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study. Sixty-five eyes of 62 consecutive patients with naïve exudative AMD who had received treatment with anti-VEGF therapy and followed for more 24 months were enrolled. All patients received three initial monthly injections of anti-VEGF (ranibizumab or bevacizumab), followed by pro re nata or treat-and-extend protocol. Color fundus image, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence were evaluated for RPE atrophy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the predictive factors found during univariate analysis to identify an association with increased RPE atrophic areas. Results: The mean number of anti-VEGF treatments was 9.18. RPE atrophic area was 1.293 ± 1.298 mm2 at baseline and enlarged to 2.394 ± 1.940 mm2 after 24 months, which differed significantly (P = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that larger areas of RPE atrophy at month 4 and larger numbers of anti-VEGF treatments were associated with increased RPE atrophic areas. Conclusions: RPE atrophy progresses in eyes with exudative AMD during anti-VEGF treatment. Larger areas of RPE atrophy at month 4 and larger numbers of anti-VEGF injections were associated with an increased risk of progression of RPE atrophy the following treatment. These findings may be useful to clinicians using intravitreal anti-VEGF for the treatment of exudative AMD, both for selecting an appropriate treatment plan and for predicting the progression of RPE atrophy. PMID:27488150

  19. Bruch's membrane diffusivity for vascular endothelial growth factors may explain variable response to wet age-related macular degeneration treatment: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Peddada, Ram R

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis presented is that diffusivity of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) across Bruch's membrane is an important parameter that distinguishes prompt and slow responders to anti-VEGF treatment in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Accordingly, slow-responders have a high diffusivity and will attain peak VEGF levels on the choroidal side of Bruch's membrane rapidly, probably before or around the time of the next monthly anti-VEGF injection. If a fixed dose of anti-VEGF is used at each monthly treatment (as is the current practice), depending on the initial level of VEGF at that time of injection, VEGF with each treatment will vary. Therefore, diffusion will occur at a different concentration gradient in each treatment cycle subsequent to the injection. Hence, by Fick's Second Law of Diffusion, the slope of the concentration versus time curve for each treatment cycle will be different from the preceding cycle. This leads to a different peak concentration just prior to the next monthly injection. So, when a fixed dose of the anti-VEGF is used at each monthly treatment peak VEGF level fluctuates instead of going down continuously which prolongs the treatment. Thus, doses of anti-VEGF may have to be tapered to decrease the concentration gradient and to slow down the rate of diffusion of VEGF. Diffusivity of Bruch's membrane with regards to VEGF is a simple concept that can explain the variable response to anti-VEGF treatment in wet AMD. If validated through clinical trial the treatment protocol for wet AMD can be more precise and tailored to individual patients. PMID:25468789

  20. Delay to Treatment and Visual Outcomes in Patients Treated With Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    LIM, JONATHAN H.; WICKREMASINGHE, SANJEEWA S.; XIE, JING; CHAUHAN, DEVINDER S.; BAIRD, PAUL N.; ROBMAN, LUBA D.; HAGEMAN, GREGORY; GUYMER, ROBYN H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the potential influences that affect visual acuity (VA) outcome in a clinic-based cohort of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients undergoing anti–vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for choroidal neovascularization. DESIGN Prospective interventional case series. METHODS Patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to AMD were prospectively recruited. A detailed questionnaire was given to patients at time of enrollment, to collect information relating to demographics, history of visual symptoms, visual acuity (VA), and treatment scheduling. Delay from symptoms to treatment (“Treatment delay”) was measured in terms of weeks and analyzed in tertiles. Information pertaining to treatment outcomes was collected over a 6-month period. RESULTS One hundred eighty-five eyes of 185 patients were recruited into the study. Longer delay from first symptoms suggestive of CNV to first injection was a significant predictor (P = .015) of poorer treatment outcome, when controlling for age, sex, and baseline VA. Patients with a delay in treatment of 21 weeks or more compared to a delay of 7 weeks or less had an odds ratio of 2.62 (1.20, 5.68) for worsening vision after treatment. CONCLUSIONS Patients experiencing a longer delay between their first symptoms of CNV and their first anti-VEGF treatment have a significantly lower chance of improving vision at 6 months following anti-VEGF therapy. It is critical that this information reach those at potential vision loss from AMD, in order that prompt treatment may be instituted, to maximize the benefits of anti-VEGF treatment. PMID:22245460

  1. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with primary aldosteronism: a biomarker of target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Yin, G-S; Tang, J-y; Ma, D-J; Ru, J; Huang, X-H

    2014-12-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) has been associated with increased target organ damage (TOD), most likely through mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent endothelial dysfunction, in comparison with essential hypertension (EH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in PA and the relationship with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and microalbuminuria (MAU). A total of 50 PA patients and 51 patients with EH individually matched for age, sex, blood pressure and duration of hypertension participated in this study. Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, including von Willebrand factor (vWF), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), were measured. Plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC), MAU and echocardiography were also evaluated. In PA patients, vWF, ICAM-1, ox-LDL, LVH and MAU were all significantly higher than in EH patients (all P<0.05). Furthermore, LVH was positively correlated with PAC (P=0.002), vWF (P=0.013) and ox-LDL (P=0.020). MAU was positively correlated with PAC (P<0.001), vWF (P=0.013) and ICAM-1 (P=0.001). Multiple regression analysis indicated that vWF, ICAM-1 and PAC independently predicted MAU (all P<0.05). Likewise, PAC, vWF and ox-LDL were significant predictors of LVH (all P<0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to TOD in PA patients. PMID:24553636

  2. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  3. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 mediates TNFα-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Haines, RJ; Beard, RS; Wu, MH

    2014-01-01

    A key event in the progression of systemic inflammation resulting from severe trauma or shock involves microvascular hyperpermeability, which leads to excessive plasma fluid and proteins accumulating in extravascular space resulting in tissue edema. The precise molecular mechanism of the hyperpermeability response is not completely understood. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also known as breast tumor kinase BRK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase related to Src-family proteins. Although it has also been shown that PTK6 participates in regulating epithelial barrier function, the role of PTK6 in endothelial barrier function has not been reported. In this study, we hypothesized that PTK6 is 1) expressed in vascular endothelial cells, and 2) contributes to vascular endothelial hyperpermeability in response to TNFα. Results showed that PTK6 was detected in mouse endothelial cells at the level of protein and mRNA. In addition, PTK6 knockdown attenuated TNFα induced decrease in endothelial barrier function as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and in vitro transwell albumin-flux assays. Furthermore, we showed that TNFα treatment of endothelial cells increased active PTK6 association with p120-catenin at endothelial cell-cell junctions. Further analysis using immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that PTK6 knockdown attenuated TNFα induced VE-cadherin internalization as well as promoting its association with p120-catenin. Our study demonstrates a novel role of PTK6 in mediating endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25446122

  4. Local Association Between Endothelial Dysfunction and Intimal Hyperplasia: Relevance in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Yvonne; Stegemann, Emilia; Sansone, Roberto; Benedens, Kolja; Wagstaff, Rabea; Balzer, Jan; Rassaf, Tienush; Lauer, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Heiss, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Commonly, endothelial function is determined in the brachial artery, whereas patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) present with lower limb atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that in PAD, a segmental or local association exists between endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic structural changes. Methods and Results We used ultrasound to study endothelial function as flow‐mediated vasodilation, intima media thickness, and local stiffness of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and brachial artery (BA). PAD patients with symptomatic SFA or below‐the‐knee disease were compared with age‐matched patients without PAD and young healthy controls. PAD patients with SFA or below‐the‐knee disease exhibited endothelial dysfunction of the proximal SFA (flow‐mediated vasodilation: 3.9±0.6%, 3.7±0.6%) compared with healthy controls (7.4±1.0%) and patients without PAD (5.4±0.6%). Brachial artery flow‐mediated vasodilation values were not different in PAD patients with SFA or below‐the‐knee disease compared with patients without PAD, but they were significantly lower than those of healthy controls. Endothelial dysfunction correlated with increased intima media thickness or plaque thickness at the site of flow‐mediated vasodilation measurement across vascular sites. In PAD patients with SFA disease, SFA flow‐mediated vasodilation was further impaired within and distal to stenosis (prestenosis 3.9±0.6%, intrastenosis 2.3±0.7%, poststenosis 2.5±0.6%) and recovered within 24 hours after SFA balloon angioplasty to prestenotic values but not to the brachial artery or SFA values in patients without PAD or controls. Conclusion A close association exists between local endothelial function and atherosclerotic structural remodeling, suggesting that in PAD, local and segmental factors—in addition to systemic factors—influence local endothelial function. Our data

  5. HIV-1 infection, microenvironment and endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Pietro; Caruso, Arnaldo; Caccuri, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 promotes a generalized immune activation that involves the main targets of HIV-1 infection but also cells that are not sensitive to viral infection. ECs display major dysfunctions in HIV+ patients during long-standing viral infection that persist even in the current cART era, in which new-generation drugs have reduced dysmetabolic side effects and successfully impeded viral replication. In vivo studies have failed to demonstrate the presence of replicating virus in ECs suggesting that a direct role of the virus is unlikely, and implying that the mechanism accounting for vascular dysfunction may rely on the indirect action of molecules released in the microenvironment by HIV-1-infected cells. This article reviews the current understanding of how HIV-1 infection can contribute to vascular dysfunction. In particular, we discuss the emerging role played by different HIV-1 proteins in driving inflammation and EC dysregulation, and highlight the need to target them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27602413

  6. Endocardial Endothelial Dysfunction Progressively Disrupts Initially Anti then Pro-Thrombotic Pathways in Heart Failure Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schoner, Amanda; Tyrrell, Christina; Wu, Melinda; Gelow, Jill M.; Hayes, Alicia A.; Lindner, Jonathan R.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Hasan, Wohaib

    2015-01-01

    Objective An experimental model of endocardial thrombosis has not been developed and endocardial endothelial dysfunction in heart failure (HF) is understudied. We sought to determine whether disruption of the endothelial anti-coagulant activated protein C (APC) pathway in CREBA133 HF mice promotes endocardial thrombosis in the acute decompensated phase of the disease, and whether alterations in von Willebrand factor (vWF) secretion from HF endocardium reduces thrombus formation as HF stabilizes. Approach and results Echocardiography was used to follow HF development and to detect endocardial thrombi in CREBA133 mice. Endocardial thrombi incidence was confirmed with immunohistochemistry and histology. In early and acute decompensated phases of HF, CREBA133 mice had the highest incidence of endocardial thrombi and these mice also had a shorter tail-bleeding index consistent with a pro-thrombotic milieu. Both APC generation, and expression of receptors that promote APC function (thrombomodulin, endothelial protein C receptor, protein S), were suppressed in the endocardium of acute decompensated HF mice. However, in stable compensated HF mice, an attenuation occurred for vWF protein content and secretion from endocardial endothelial cells, vWF-dependent platelet agglutination (by ristocetin), and thrombin generation on the endocardial surface. Conclusions CREBA133 mice develop HF and endocardial endothelial dysfunction. Attenuation of the anti-coagulant APC pathway promotes endocardial thrombosis in early and acute decompensated phases of HF. However, in stable compensated HF mice, disruptions in endothelial vWF expression and extrusion may actually reduce the incidence of endocardial thrombosis. PMID:26565707

  7. Endothelial and Microcirculatory Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Colbert, James F; Schmidt, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    The microcirculation is a series of arterioles, capillaries, and venules that performs essential functions of oxygen and nutrient delivery, customized to the unique physiologic needs of the supplied organ. The homeostatic microcirculatory response to infection can become harmful if overactive and/or dysregulated. Pathologic microcirculatory dysfunction can be directly visualized by intravital microscopy or indirectly measured via detection of circulating biomarkers. Although several treatments have been shown to protect the microcirculation during sepsis, they have not improved patient outcomes when applied indiscriminately. Future outcomes-oriented studies are needed to test sepsis therapeutics when personalized to a patient's microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:27229643

  8. Endothelial antioxidant compound prolonged the endothelial antiapoptotic effects registered after tadalafil treatment in patients with arterial erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita; Vicari, Enzo; D'Agata, Rosario; Calogero, Aldo E

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a chronic treatment with tadalafil, a specific phosphodiesterase V inhibitor, on endothelial apoptosis through changes in the serum concentration of endothelial microparticles (EMP). EMPs were arbitrarily chosen as a marker of endothelial apoptosis, and the changes in their concentration were monitored before and after treatment. Additionally, administration of endothelial antioxidant compound (EAC) during the follow-up, after discontinuation of tadalafil, was evaluated to determine whether this treatment improved the potential effects of tadalafil on the endothelium. Seventy-five patients with arterial erectile dysfunction were evaluated at baseline and after administration of tadalafil (5 mg once daily for 90 days). The International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire was administered, and penile dynamic Doppler and flow-cytometric (serum concentrations of EMPs) analyses were performed before (T0) and after treatment. Time points after tadalafil discontinuation: T1, after 1 week; T2, after 3 months; and T3, after 6 months. Three different schemes of follow-up were evaluated: group A, follow-up with EAC administration, after tadalafil discontinuation, for 6 months; group B, follow-up without other treatment; and group C, follow-up with placebo during the follow-up, after tadalafil cessation. The events CD45(neg)/CD144(pos)/annexinV(pos) were defined EMPs. Patients treated with tadalafil showed a significant decrease in serum EMPs 1 week after discontinuing tadalafil (16.4% ± 3.6% vs 7.1% ± 3.3%). This effect was maintained for up to 3 months in the group without other treatment during follow-up and was maintained for up to 6 months in the group treated with EAC during follow-up. Chronic treatment with tadalafil reduces endothelial apoptosis in patients with arterial erectile dysfunction. Further, EAC treatment prolongs and stabilizes the duration of antiapoptotic effects on the endothelium that are initially promoted by

  9. Plasma asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine in a rat model of endothelial dysfunction induced by acute hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Magné, Joëlle; Huneau, Jean-François; Borderie, Didier; Mathé, Véronique; Bos, Cécile; Mariotti, François

    2015-09-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces vascular endothelial dysfunction, an early hallmark of atherogenesis. While higher levels of circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and symmetric dimethyl arginine (SDMA), endogenous inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis, have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the role that ADMA and SDMA play in the initiation of hyperhomocysteinemia-induced endothelial dysfunction remains still controversial. In the present study, we studied the changes of circulating ADMA and SDMA in a rat model of acutely hyperhomocysteinemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. In healthy rats, endothelium-related vascular reactivity (measured as acetylcholine-induced transient decrease in mean arterial blood pressure), plasma ADMA and SDMA, total plasma homocysteine (tHcy), cysteine and glutathione were measured before and 2, 4 and 6 h after methionine loading or vehicle. mRNA expression of hepatic dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH1), a key protein responsible for ADMA metabolism, was measured 6 h after the methionine loading or the vehicle. Expectedly, methionine load induced a sustained increase in tHcy (up to 54.9 ± 1.9 µM) and a 30 % decrease in vascular reactivity compared to the baseline values. Plasma ADMA and SDMA decreased transiently after the methionine load. Hepatic mRNA expression of DDAH1, cathepsin D, and ubiquitin were significantly lower 6 h after the methionine load than after the vehicle. The absence of an elevation of circulating ADMA and SDMA in this model suggests that endothelial dysfunction induced by acute hyperhomocysteinemia cannot be explained by an up-regulation of protein arginine methyltransferases or a down-regulation of DDAH1. In experimental endothelial dysfunction induced by acute hyperhomocysteinemia, down-regulation of the proteasome is likely to dampen the release of ADMA and SDMA in the circulation. PMID:25792109

  10. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deletion Prevents Diet-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Females.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Ma, Lixin; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Aroor, Annayya R; Domeier, Timothy L; Zhu, Yi; Meininger, Gerald A; Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Jaffe, Iris Z; Sowers, James R

    2015-12-01

    Overnutrition and insulin resistance are especially prominent risk factors for the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in females. We recently reported that consumption of a Western diet (WD) containing excess fat (46%), sucrose (17.5%), and high fructose corn syrup (17.5%) for 16 weeks resulted in cardiac diastolic dysfunction and aortic stiffening in young female mice and that these abnormalities were prevented by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. Herein, we extend those studies by testing whether WD-induced diastolic dysfunction and factors contributing to diastolic impairment, such as cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation, and impaired insulin signaling, are modulated by excess endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Four-week-old female endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice were fed mouse chow or WD for 4 months. WD feeding resulted in prolonged relaxation time, impaired diastolic septal wall motion, and increased left ventricular filling pressure indicative of diastolic dysfunction. This occurred in concert with myocardial interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that were associated with enhanced profibrotic (transforming growth factor β1/Smad) and progrowth (S6 kinase-1) signaling, as well as myocardial oxidative stress and a proinflammatory immune response. WD also induced cardiomyocyte stiffening, assessed ex vivo using atomic force microscopy. Conversely, endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency prevented WD-induced diastolic dysfunction, profibrotic, and progrowth signaling, in conjunction with reductions in macrophage proinflammatory polarization and improvements in insulin metabolic signaling. Therefore, our findings indicate that increased endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling associated with consumption of a WD plays a key role in the activation of cardiac profibrotic, inflammatory, and growth pathways that lead to diastolic dysfunction in

  11. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  12. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Backman, Joshua D.; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Lewis, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  13. Upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor, Flt-1, in rat hippocampal neurons after envenoming by Phoneutria nigriventer; age-related modulation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Siqueira Soares, Edilene; Miguel Stávale, Leila; Pierre Irazusta, Silvia; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-15

    This study characterizes the distribution and quantifies the expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flt-1, in the rat hippocampus following intra-peritoneal injection of Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV). Post-natal day 14 (P14) and 8-10 weeks (adult) old rats were used and analyses were done at 1, 2, 5 and 24 h after venom exposure and compared with saline-injected counterparts. PNV-injected animals showed hippocampal venules with perivascular edema indicating blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. This was accompanied by significant overexpression of Flt-1 which though was not the same for CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) hippocampal regions, neither for P14 and adult rats. Regional analysis using GIMP methodology showed that Flt-1 was constitutively distributed more densely in neurons of DG, followed by CA1/CA2 and CA3 of both control P14 and adult animals, without variation over time, but significantly more expressed in P14 than in adults. A time-course analysis showed that Flt-1 upregulation was progressive and that neurons VEGFR1/Flt-1+ of PNV-exposed animals are timely and regionally modulated depending on the hippocampal region, being CA2 the least responsive region regardless animal's age, whilst DG was the most susceptible with adult animals having higher upregulation than neonates. Since VEGF has been reported to confer protection in several pathological processes we suggest that VEGF may be involved in hippocampal neurons response via Flt-1 mediation following PNV envenoming; its higher upregulation in adult envenomed rats may be an indication that Flt-1 neuroprotective mediation is more efficient with age. The Flt-1 upregulation and the incidence of perivascular edema in young animals may indicate a pro-inflammatory role of the receptor. PMID:22659541

  14. Suppression of endothelial PGC-1α is associated with hypoxia-induced endothelial dysfunction and provides a new therapeutic target in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jia-Xin; Wang, Shan-Shan; Ge, Min; Wang, Dong-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a principal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which is a fatal disease with limited effective clinical treatments. Mitochondrial dysregulation and oxidative stress are involved in endothelial dysfunction. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the roles of PGC-1α in hypoxia-induced endothelial dysfunction are not completely understood. We hypothesized that hypoxia reduces PGC-1α expression and leads to endothelial dysfunction in hypoxia-induced PAH. We confirmed that hypoxia has a negative impact on endothelial PGC-1α in experimental PAH in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-induced PGC-1α inhibited the oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial function, whereas sustained PGC-1α decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial swelling, and NF-κB activation and increased ATP formation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. Furthermore, hypoxia-induced changes in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure and right heart hypertrophy were nearly normal after intervention. These results suggest that PGC-1α is associated with endothelial function in hypoxia-induced PAH and that improved endothelial function is associated with improved cellular mitochondrial respiration, reduced inflammation and oxygen stress, and increased PGC-1α expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that PGC-1α may be a new therapeutic target in PAH. PMID:27084848

  15. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Lee, Jung Eun; Choi, Hoon Young; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Kim, Eun Jin; Han, Jae Hyun; Han, Ji Suk; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is implicated in increased cardiovascular risk in nondialyzed population. However, the prognostic impact of endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular outcome has not been investigated in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We prospectively determined endothelial function by brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in 143 nondiabetic PD patients and 32 controls. Primary outcome was a major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE). Brachial FMD was significantly lower in PD patients than in controls (2.9% [1.3-4.7] vs 6.2% [5.4-8.3], P < 0.001). During a mean follow-up of 42 months, primary outcome was observed in 25 patients (17.5%). When patients were dichotomized by the median value of FMD (2.9%), incidence rates of MACCEs were significantly higher in the group with lower FMD compared with higher FMD (7.2 vs 3.0/100 person-years, P = 0.03). In multivariate Cox analysis, low FMD (≤2.9%) was a significant independent predictor of MACCEs (hazard ratio = 2.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-7.22, P = 0.04). Furthermore, multivariate fractional polynomial analysis showed that the risk of MACCE decreased steadily with higher FMD values. Impaired brachial FMD was a significant independent predictor of MACCEs in PD patients. Estimating endothelial dysfunction by brachial FMD could be useful for stratifying cardiovascular risk in these patients. PMID:25192486

  16. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  17. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  18. 3D Raman imaging of systemic endothelial dysfunction in the murine model of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pacia, Marta Z; Buczek, Elzbieta; Blazejczyk, Agnieszka; Gregorius, Aleksandra; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata; Kaczor, Agnieszka

    2016-05-01

    It was recently reported in the murine model of metastatic breast cancer (4T1) that tumor progression and development of metastasis is associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by impaired nitric oxide (NO) production. Using Raman 3D confocal imaging with the analysis of the individual layers of the vascular wall combined with AFM endothelial surface imaging, we demonstrated that metastasis-induced systemic endothelial dysfunction resulted in distinct chemical changes in the endothelium of the aorta. These changes, manifested as a significant increase in the protein content (18 %) and a slight decrease in the lipid content (4 %), were limited to the endothelium and did not occur in the deeper layers of the vascular wall. The altered lipid to protein ratio in the endothelium, although more pronounced in the fixed vascular wall, was also observed in the freshly isolated unfixed vascular wall samples in the aqueous environment (12 and 7 % change of protein and lipid content, respectively). Our results support the finding that the metastasis induces systemic endothelial dysfunction that may contribute to cancer progression. Graphical Abstract Schematic illustration of methodology of sample preparation and measurement. PMID:26935932

  19. Salidroside improves homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sin Bond; Zhang, Huina; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Lin, Zhixiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases through increased oxidative stress. Salidroside is an active ingredient of the root of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative, antihypoxia and neuroprotective properties. However, the vascular benefits of salidroside against endothelial dysfunction have yet to be explored. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the protective effect of salidroside on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. Functional studies on the rat aortas were performed to delineate the vascular effect of salidroside. DHE imaging was used to evaluate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in aortic wall and endothelial cells. Western blotting was performed to assess the protein expression associated with oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Exposure to homocysteine attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortas while salidroside pretreatment rescued it. Salidroside inhibited homocystein-induced elevation in the NOX2 expression and ROS overproduction in both aortas and cultured endothelial cells and increased phosphorylation of eNOS which was diminished by homocysteine. The present study shows that salidroside is effective in preserving the NO bioavailability and thus protects against homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, largely through inhibiting the NOX2 expression and ROS production. Our results indicate a therapeutic potential of salidroside in the management of oxidative-stress-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:23589720

  20. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in aged human choroid and eyes with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A.; McLeod, D. Scott; Hasegawa, Takuya; Kim, Sahng Y.; Merges, Carol; Tong, Patrick; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the localization and relative levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; an angiogenic factor) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF; an antiangiogenic factor) in aged human choroid and to determine if the localization or their relative levels changed in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ocular tissues were obtained from eight aged control donors (age range, 75–86 years; mean age, 79.8 years) with no evidence or history of chorioretinal disease and from 12 donors diagnosed with AMD (age range, 61–105 years; mean age, 83.9 years). Tissues were cryopreserved and streptavidin alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemistry was performed with rabbit polyclonal anti-human VEGF and rabbit polyclonal anti-human PEDF antibodies. Binding of the antibodies was blocked by preincubation of the antibody with an excess of recombinant human PEDF or VEGF peptide. Choroidal blood vessels were identified with mouse anti-human CD-34 antibody in adjacent tissue sections. Three independent observers graded the immunohistochemical reaction product. The most prominent sites of VEGF and PEDF localization in aged control choroid were RPE–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex including RPE basal lamina, intercapillary septa, and choroidal stroma. There was no significant difference in immunostaining intensity and localization of VEGF and PEDF in aged control choroids. The most intense VEGF immunoreactivity was observed in leukocytes within blood vessels. AMD choroid had a similar pattern and intensity of VEGF immunostaining to that observed in aged controls. However, PEDF immunoreactivity was significantly lower in RPE cells (p = 0.0073), RPE basal lamina (p = 0.0141), Bruch’s membrane (p < 0.0001), and choroidal stroma (p = 0.0161) of AMD choroids. The most intense PEDF immunoreactivity was observed in disciform scars. Drusen and basal laminar deposits (BLDs) were positive for VEGF and PEDF. In aged control subjects

  1. ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by promoting Arp2/3 complex expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhao, Jianting; Shen, Liming; Jin, Yiqi; Zhang, Zhixuan; Xu, Guoxiong; Huang, Xianchen

    2016-06-24

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury including cytoskeleton reorganization, which is closely related to actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Arp2/3 complex in ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we found that Arp2 and Arp3 expression was increased under atherosclerotic conditions both in ApoE-/- mice and in ox-LDL-stimulated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Arp2/3 complex inhibitor CK666 significantly reduced ox-LDL-induced ROS generation and cytoskeleton reorganization, and increased NO release in HCAECs. Pretreatment with LOX-1- but not CD36-blocking antibody markedly decreased ox-LDL-induced Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Moreover, Rac-1 siRNA remarkably suppressed ox-LDL-stimulated Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Additionally, CK666 reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice. Collectively, ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by activating LOX-1/Rac-1 signaling and upregulating Arp2/3 complex expression. PMID:27181356

  2. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S.; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E.; Chen, Alex F.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature. PMID:25326583

  3. Asymmetric dimethylarginine inhibits HSP90 activity in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wells, Sandra M.; Wiseman, Dean A.; Wilham, Jason; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased ADMA levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of conditions affecting the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanism(s) by which ADMA exerts its effect has not been adequately elucidated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increased ADMA on nitric oxide (NO) signaling and to begin to elucidate the mechanism by which ADMA acts. Our initial data demonstrated that that ADMA increased NOS uncoupling both in recombinant human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Further, we found that this eNOS uncoupling increased 3-nitrotyrosine levels preferentially in the mitochondria of PAEC due to a redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to the mitochondria. This increase in nitration in the mitochondria was found to induce mitochondrial dysfunction as determined by increased mitochondrial derived reactive oxygen species and decreased generation of ATP. Finally, we found that the decrease in ATP resulted in a reduction in the chaperone activity of HSP90 resulting in a decrease in its interaction with eNOS. In conclusion increased levels of ADMA causes mitochondrial dysfunction and a loss of HSP90 chaperone activity secondary to an uncoupling of eNOS. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an understudied component of the endothelial dysfunction associated with various cardiovascular disease states. PMID:18385287

  4. Febuxostat, a novel xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, improves hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Takashi; Nomura, Johji; Matsui, Chieko; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; Tamura, Mizuho; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an enzyme responsible for the production of uric acid. XO produces considerable amount of oxidative stress throughout the body. To date, however, its pathophysiologic role in hypertension and endothelial dysfunction still remains controversial. To explore the possible involvement of XO-derived oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of vascular dysfunction, by use of a selective XO inhibitor, febuxostat, we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of XO on hypertension and vascular endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Sixteen-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with tap water (control) or water containing febuxostat (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in febuxostat-treated SHR (220 ± 3 mmHg) was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with the control SHR (236 ± 4 mmHg) while SBP in febuxostat-treated WKY was constant. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortas from febuxostat-treated SHR was significantly (P < 0.05) improved compared with the control SHR, whereas relaxation in response to sodium nitroprusside was not changed. Vascular XO activity and tissue nitrotyrosine level, a representative indicator of local oxidative stress, were considerably elevated in the control SHR compared with the control WKY, and this increment was abolished by febuxostat. Our results suggest that exaggerated XO activity and resultant increase in oxidative stress in this experimental model contribute to the hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, thereby supporting a notion that pharmacological inhibition of XO is valuable not only for hyperuricemia but also for treating hypertension and related endothelial dysfunction in human clinics. PMID:27198514

  5. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  6. O-GlcNAcase overexpression reverses coronary endothelial cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Ayako; Dai, Anzhi; Han, Ying; Youssef, Katia D; Wang, Weihua; Donthamsetty, Reshma; Scott, Brian T; Wang, Hong; Dillmann, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes, and endothelial dysfunction is commonly seen in these patients. Increased O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) protein modification is one of the central pathogenic features of diabetes. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) is regulated by two key enzymes: β-N-acetylglucosaminidase [O-GlcNAcase (OGA)], which catalyzes the reduction of protein O-GlcNAcylation, and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which induces O-GlcNAcylation. However, it is not known whether reducing O-GlcNAcylation can improve endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. To examine the effect of endothelium-specific OGA overexpression on protein O-GlcNAcylation and coronary endothelial function in diabetic mice, we generated tetracycline-inducible, endothelium-specific OGA transgenic mice, and induced OGA by doxycycline administration in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. OGA protein expression was significantly decreased in mouse coronary endothelial cells (MCECs) isolated from diabetic mice compared with control MCECs, whereas OGT protein level was markedly increased. The level of protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in diabetic compared with control mice, and OGA overexpression significantly decreased the level of protein O-GlcNAcylation in MCECs from diabetic mice. Capillary density in the left ventricle and endothelium-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries were significantly decreased in diabetes, while OGA overexpression increased capillary density to the control level and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation without changing endothelium-independent relaxation. We found that connexin 40 could be the potential target of O-GlcNAcylation that regulates the endothelial functions in diabetes. These data suggest that OGA overexpression in endothelial cells improves endothelial function and may have a beneficial effect on coronary vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:26269457

  7. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26149505

  8. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Aman, Jurjan; Weijers, Ester M; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Malik, Asrar B; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-08-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. PMID:27343194

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction and Blood Viscosity Inpatients with Unstable Angina in Different Periods of a Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshina, S. S.; Tokaeva, L. K.; Dolgova, E. M.; Afanas'yeva, T. N.; Strelnikova, O. A.

    The origin of hemorheologic and endothelial defects in patients with unstable angina (comparing with healthy persons) is determined by a solar activity period: the blood viscosity increases in a period of high solar activity in the vessels of small, medium and macro diameters, a local decompensate dysfunction of small vessels endothelium had been fixed (microcirculation area). In the period of a low solar activity there is an increase of a blood viscosity in vessels of all diameters, generalized subcompensated endothelial dysfunction is developed (on the background of the III phase blood clotting activating). In the period of a high solar activity a higher blood viscosity had been fixed, comparing with the period of a low solar activity.

  10. CD36 as a therapeutic target for endothelial dysfunction in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sunghee

    2012-01-01

    Stroke pathology involves multifactorial pro-death responses, including inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, and activation of necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The interruption of a single specific pathway in defined stroke model systems has not been sufficient to address the multifactorial nature of stroke-induced injuries in the human population. CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor that functions in regulating normal physiological and pathological functions. CD36 pathways are activated by several distinct ligands. Convergence of these pathways results in inflammatory responses and endothelial dysfunction, which may be an underlying cause of cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. The current review describes receptor CD36-ligand interactions relevant to endothelial function and discusses how targeting CD36 may have therapeutic utility in stroke. PMID:22574985

  11. Autonomic Neuropathy and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tiftikcioglu, Bedile Irem; Bilgin, Sule; Duksal, Tarik; Kose, Sukran; Zorlu, Yasar

    2016-04-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). The etiology of autonomic impairment is not well-understood, yet. There is need for studies to investigate the cause-effect relationships of inflammation and/or endothelial dysfunction and diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Only a few reports have mentioned autonomic neuropathy in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), previously. Furthermore, the association between the plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction (von Willebrand factor (vWF), soluble E-selectin) and autonomic neuropathy in patients with IGT or DM has not been studied before. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction and autonomic neuropathy in patients with IGT or type 2 DM (T2DM).In this case-control study, 25 IGT patients, 25 T2DM patients with autonomic symptoms, and 30 controls were included. Demographical data, HbA1c, vWF, and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) levels were analyzed. Sympathetic skin response (SSR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were used as the indicator of autonomic activity.Plasma levels of HbA1c, vWF, and sE-selectin were higher in patients with IGT than the controls; patients with T2DM had higher levels than both the controls and the patients with IGT. SSR measures were similar among the groups. However, higher number of T2DM patients had absent plantar SSR than controls. HRV analysis at rest revealed lower standard deviation of R-R interval, coefficient of variation of R-R interval, low-frequency (LF) power and total power in patients with IGT and T2DM than the controls. In addition, HRV analysis at deep breathing showed lower high-frequency (HF) power in IGT group. LF:HF ratio was lower in both patient groups at rest. No strong correlation was found between the levels of HbA1c, vWF, sE-selectin, HRV, and SSR measures.Our results support that endothelial dysfunction is evident in individuals with IGT or T2DM and HRV

  12. Alogliptin ameliorates postprandial lipemia and postprandial endothelial dysfunction in non- diabetic subjects: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia impairs endothelial function and participates in the development of atherosclerosis. We investigated the postprandial effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, alogliptin, on endothelial dysfunction and the lipid profile. Methods A randomized cross-over trial design in 10 healthy volunteers (8 males and 2 females, 35 ± 10 years) was performed. The postprandial effects before and after a 1-week treatment of 25 mg/day alogliptin on endothelial function were assessed with brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and changing levels of lipids, apolipoprotein B48 (apoB-48), glucose, glucagon, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) during fasting and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after a standard meal loading test. Results Alogliptin treatment significantly suppressed the postprandial elevation in serum triglyceride (incremental area under the curve [AUC]; 279 ± 31 vs. 182 ± 32 mg h/dl, p = 0.01), apoB-48 (incremental AUC; 15.4 ± 1.7 vs. 11.7 ± 1.1 μg h/ml, p = 0.04), and remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) (incremental AUC: 29.3 ± 3.2 vs. 17.6 ± 3.3 mg h/dl, p = 0.01). GLP-1 secretion was significantly increased after alogliptin treatment. Postprandial endothelial dysfunction (maximum decrease in%FMD, from −4.2 ± 0.5% to −2.6 ± 0.4%, p = 0.03) was significantly associated with the maximum change in apoB-48 (r = −0.46, p = 0.03) and RLP-C (r = −0.45, p = 0.04). Conclusion Alogliptin significantly improved postprandial endothelial dysfunction and postprandial lipemia, suggesting that alogliptin may be a promising anti-atherogenic agent. PMID:23298374

  13. The association between endothelial dysfunction and hypertensive retinopathy in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Mustafa; Coban, Erkan; Ozdem, Sebahat; Unal, Mustafa; Salim, Ozan; Yucel, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by an imbalance between relaxing and contracting factors, procoagulant and anticoagulant substances, and between pro-inflammatory mediators, may play a particularly significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Numerous experimental and clinical reports suggest that a high von Willebrand factor (vWF) level reflects endothelial damage or dysfunction. Hypertensive retinopathy (HR) is a condition characterized by a spectrum of retinal vascular signs in people with elevated blood pressure. The pathophysiological mechanism of HR is not completely understood. Elevated blood pressure alone does not fully account for the extent of retinopathy. Endothelial dysfunction and mechanisms known to be involved in vascular lesions may be involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of HR. Therefore, this study was designed to answer the following questions: (i) Do vWf levels change in HR? and (ii) Is there any relation between degree of HR and vWf levels? Material/Methods This study included 80 hypertensive patients with HR. Group 1 comprised 40 patients with grade I HR, and group 2 comprised 40 patients with grade II HR. We selected 40 healthy subjects for the control group. Results Level of vWf in group 2 was significantly higher than in group 1 (p=0.017) and the control group (p<0.001), and it was also higher in group 1 than in the control group (p<0.005). Also, vWf showed positive correlation with degree of HR in the hypertensive group (r=0.284, p=0.009) Conclusions Our study suggests that endothelial dysfunction, which is a mechanism known to be involved in vascular lesions, may promote the development of HR. PMID:24441931

  14. There's life in the old dog yet: vitamin C as a therapeutic option in endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rodemeister, Sandra; Biesalski, Hans K

    2014-01-01

    The use of vitamin C against different diseases has been controversially and emotionally discussed since Linus Pauling published his cancer studies. In vitro and animal studies showed promising results and explained the impact of vitamin C, particularly in cases with endothelial dysfunction. Indeed, studies (reviewed in this issue of Critical Care by Oudemans-van Straaten and colleagues) using high-dose vitamin C and the parenteral route of application seem to be more successful than oral vitamin C delivery. PMID:25184406

  15. Endothelial dysfunction as assessed with magnetic resonance imaging - A major determinant in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Slavica; Plazonić, Željko; Batinac, Tanja; Miletić, Damir; Ružić, Alen

    2016-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a clinical syndrome resulting from interaction of different structure and functional disturbances leading to decreased heart ability to ensure adequate supply of oxygenized blood to tissues and ensure adequate metabolic needs in the cases of normal or increased afterload. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a pathological condition characterized by general imbalance of all major endothelial mechanisms with key role in development and progression of atherosclerotic disease. ED has been associated with most cardiovascular risk factors. There is increasing interest in assessing endothelial function non-invasively, leading to development and evaluation of new diagnostic methods. We suggest that MRI is safe and reliable test that offers important advantages over ultrasound for the detection of ED and monitoring of the expected therapeutic effect. We believe that ED plays a pivotal role in chronic heart failure development and progression, regardless of its etiology, and that MRI should be introduced as a "gold standard" in diagnostic procedure and treatment. PMID:27063091

  16. Impact of diabetic serum on endothelial cells: An in-vitro-analysis of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus type 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muenzel, Daniela; Lehle, Karla Haubner, Frank; Schmid, Christof; Birnbaum, Dietrich E.; Preuner, Juergen G.

    2007-10-19

    Diabetic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by altered levels of adhesion molecules and cytokines. Aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of diabetic serum on cell-growth and proinflammatory markers in human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) from diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic serum showed (1) complementary proliferative activity for non-diabetic and diabetic HSVEC, (2) unchanged surface expression of adhesion molecules, and (3) elevated levels of sICAM-1 in HSVEC of all donors. The concentration of sVCAM-1 was increased only in diabetic cells. The proinflammatory state of diabetic HSVEC characterized by increased levels of cytokines was compensated. We concluded that even under normoglycemic conditions the serum itself contains critical factors leading to abnormal regulation of inflammation in diabetics. We introduced an in vitro model of diabetes representing the endothelial situation at the beginning of diabetes (non-diabetic cells/diabetic serum) as well as the diabetic chronic state (diabetic cells/diabetic serum)

  17. Protective effects of Astragalus polysaccharides against endothelial dysfunction in hypertrophic rats induced by isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Han, Ronghui; Tang, Futian; Lu, Meili; Xu, Chonghua; Hu, Jin; Mei, Meng; Wang, Hongxin

    2016-09-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) is an important bioactive component extracted from Chinese herb Astragalus membranaceus. It has been widely used in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that APS could inhibit isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of APS on vascular endothelia in cardiac hypertrophy rats induced by isoproterenol (ISO). ISO (10mg×kg(-1)) was intraperitoneally injected once daily for 2weeks to induce cardiac hypertrophy. APS (400 and 800mg×kg(-1)) was intragastrically injected once daily along with ISO. The results showed that combination with APS significantly ameliorates the endothelial dysfunction while attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO. We found that administration with APS could attenuate the increase in number of circulating endothelial cell (CEC). APS also decreases the superoxide anion generation and the protein expression of p65 and the levels of TNF-α and IL-6; while increases the cGMP levels, an activity marker for nitric oxide (NO) in aortas. In addition, APS improves the relaxation dysfunction in isolated aortic rings and increases the protein expression of IκBα and Cu/Zn-SOD in aortas. In conclusion, our results suggested that APS had a protective effect against endothelial dysfunction in hypertrophic rats induced by ISO. The underlining mechanisms may be contributed to the anti-inflammatory effects and the improvement of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO. PMID:27344039

  18. The Roles of HIV-1 Proteins and Antiretroviral Drug Therapy in HIV-1-Associated Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients have demonstrated dramatic decreases in viral burden and opportunistic infections, and an overall increase in life expectancy. Despite these positive HAART-associated outcomes, it has become increasingly clear that HIV-1 patients have an enhanced risk of developing cardiovascular disease over time. Clinical studies are instrumental in our understanding of vascular dysfunction in the context of HIV-1 infection. However, most clinical studies often do not distinguish whether HIV-1 proteins, HAART, or a combination of these 2 factors cause cardiovascular complications. This review seeks to address the roles of both HIV-1 proteins and antiretroviral drugs in the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark initial step of many cardiovascular diseases. We analyze recent in vitro and in vivo studies examining endothelial toxicity in response to HIV-1 proteins or in response to the various classes of antiretroviral drugs. Furthermore, we discuss the multiple mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins and HAART injure the vascular endothelium in HIV-1 patients. By understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 protein- and antiretroviral-induced cardiovascular disease, we may ultimately improve the quality of life of HIV-1 patients through better drug design and the discovery of new pharmacological targets. PMID:18525451

  19. Role of Nox isoforms in angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in brain

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Banfi, Botond; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes vascular disease through several mechanisms including by producing oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Although multiple potential sources of reactive oxygen species exist, the relative importance of each is unclear, particularly in individual vascular beds. In these experiments, we examined the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox1 and Nox2) in Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction in the cerebral circulation. Treatment with Ang II (1.4 mg·kg−1·day−1 for 7 days), but not vehicle, increased blood pressure in all groups. In wild-type (WT; C57Bl/6) mice, Ang II reduced dilation of the basilar artery to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine compared with vehicle but had no effect on responses in Nox2-deficient (Nox2−/y) mice. Ang II impaired responses to acetylcholine in Nox1 WT (Nox1+/y) and caused a small reduction in responses to acetylcholine in Nox1-deficient (Nox1−/y) mice. Ang II did not impair responses to the endothelium-independent agonists nitroprusside or papaverine in either group. In WT mice, Ang II increased basal and phorbol-dibutyrate-stimulated superoxide production in the cerebrovasculature, and these increases were abolished in Nox2−/y mice. Overall, these data suggest that Nox2 plays a relatively prominent role in mediating Ang II-induced oxidative stress and cerebral endothelial dysfunction, with a minor role for Nox1. PMID:22628375

  20. Skin Autofluorescence Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in Uremic Subjects on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Yao-Chang; Wang, Guei-Jane; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chang, Yen-Lin; Liou, Show-Yih; Chen, Hung-Chih; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) within tissues may contribute to endothelial dysfunction, an early indicator of atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether levels of skin AGEs could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis. Methods and Results One hundred and nineteen uremic patients on hemodialysis and 57 control subjects with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk factors and without chronic kidney disease (CKD) were enrolled. We used ultrasound to measure flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). An AGE reader measured skin autoflurorescence (AF). We then compared differences in FMD and skin AF values between the two groups. The uremic subjects had significantly higher levels of skin AF (3.47±0.76 AU vs. 2.21±0.45 arbitrary units; P<0.01) and significantly lower levels of FMD (4.79%±1.88% vs. 7.19%±2.17%; P<0.01) than the non-CKD subjects. After adjusting for all potential covariates, we found that skin AF level independently predicted FMD in both the hemodialysis and the non-CKD groups. In the hemodialysis group, skin AF ≥ 3.05 arbitrary units predicted abnormal FMD at a sensitivity of 87.9% and a specificity of 78.6% (P<0.01). Conclusions Skin AF could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis. PMID:26809145

  1. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Ameliorates Endothelial Dysfunction in Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwei; Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanting; Fu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhu, Weiming; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and histological changes in the urinary bladder. bFGF was administrated to human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) or urinary bladder immediately after radiation. Reduced expression of thrombomodulin (TM) was indicated in the HUVEC and urinary bladder after treatment with radiation. Decreased apoptosis was observed in HUVEC treated with bFGF. Administration of bFGF increased the expression of TM in HUVEC medium, as well as in the urinary bladder at the early and delayed phases of radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). At the early phase, injection of bFGF increased the thickness of urothelium and reduced inflammation within the urinary bladder. At the delayed phase, bFGF was effective in reducing fibrosis within the urinary bladder. Our results indicate that endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature of RIBI. Administration of bFGF can ameliorate radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in urinary bladder and preserve bladder histology at early and delayed phases of RIBI. PMID:26351640

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction: The Role of SREBP-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Martin, Marcy; Li, Zhao; Shyy, John Y-J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Great effort has been devoted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which inflammasome in macrophages contributes to atherosclerosis. Inflammasome in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and its causal relationship with endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis are less understood. Here we review recent studies of inflammasome and its activation in ECs, and highlight such endothelial inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. Recent findings Inflammasomes are critical effectors in innate immunity, and their activation in macrophages and the arterial wall contributes to atherogenesis. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), a master regulator in cholesterol biosynthesis, can be activated in a non-canonical manner, which leads to activation of the inflammasome NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing protein (NLRP) in macrophages and ECs. Results from in vitro and in vivo models suggest that SREBP2 is a key molecule in aggravating pro-inflammatory responses in ECs, and promoting atherosclerosis. Summary The SREBP-induced NLRP inflammasome and its instigation of innate immunity is an important contributor to atherosclerosis. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms will expand our understanding of endothelial dysfunction and its dynamic interaction with vascular inflammation. Furthermore, targeting SREBP-inflammasome pathways can be a therapeutic strategy for attenuating atherosclerosis. PMID:25188917

  3. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Shasha; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wenjing; Bian, Fang; Wu, Dan; Chi, Jiangyang; Xu, Gao; Zhang, Yonghui; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙−) production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB). SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24868319

  4. Black tea protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    San Cheang, Wai; Yuen Ngai, Ching; Yen Tam, Ye; Yu Tian, Xiao; Tak Wong, Wing; Zhang, Yang; Wai Lau, Chi; Chen, Zhen Yu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Huang, Yu; Ping Leung, Fung

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have been found to be associated with elevated levels of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine (Hcy) can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells. This study aims to investigate whether black tea (BT) protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of ER stress. Rat aortae and cultured rat aortic endothelial cells were treated with Hcy, BT extract, and theaflavin-3,3’-digallate (TF3). Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce hypertension and orally administrated with BT extract at 15 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. Hcy impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations of rat aortae and led to ER stress in endothelial cells, which were ameliorated by co-incubation of BT extract and TF3. The blood pressure of Ang II-infused rats and plasma Hcy level were normalized by BT consumption. Impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in renal arteries, carotid arteries and aortae, and flow-mediated dilatations in third-order mesenteric resistance arteries were improved. Elevations of ER stress markers and ROS level, plus down-regulation of Hcy metabolic enzymes in aortae from Ang II-infused rats were prevented by BT treatment. Our data reveal the novel cardiovascular benefits of BT in ameliorating vascular dysfunctions, providing insight into developing BT into beneficial dietary supplements in hypertensive patients. PMID:25976123

  5. Therapeutic Approaches to Limit Hemolysis-Driven Endothelial Dysfunction: Scavenging Free Heme to Preserve Vasculature Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Hemolysis results in the release of hemoglobin and heme into the bloodstream and is associated with the development of several pathologic conditions of different etiology, including hemoglobinopathies, hemolytic anemias, bacterial infections, malaria, and trauma. In addition, hemolysis is associated with surgical procedures, hemodialysis, blood transfusion, and other conditions in which mechanical forces can lead to red blood cell rupture. Free plasma hemoglobin and heme are toxic for the vascular endothelium since heme iron promotes oxidative stress that causes endothelial activation responsible for vasoocclusive events and thrombus formation. Moreover, free hemoglobin scavenges nitric oxide, reducing its bioavailability, and heme favours ROS production, thus causing oxidative nitric oxide consumption. This results in the dysregulation of the endothelium vasodilator:vasoconstrictor balance, leading to severe vasoconstriction and hypertension. Thus, endothelial dysfunction and impairment of cardiovascular function represent a common feature of pathologic conditions associated with hemolysis. In this review, we discuss how hemoglobin/heme released following hemolysis may affect vascular function and summarise the therapeutic approaches available to limit hemolysis-driven endothelial dysfunction. Particular emphasis is put on recent data showing the beneficial effects obtained through the use of the plasma heme scavenger hemopexin in counteracting heme-mediated endothelial damage in mouse models of hemolytic diseases. PMID:23781294

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction: Associations with Exposure to Ambient Fine Particles in Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Alexandra; Neas, Lucas; Herbst, Margaret C.; Case, Martin; Williams, Ronald W.; Cascio, Wayne; Hinderliter, Alan; Holguin, Fernando; Buse, John B.; Dungan, Kathleen; Styner, Maya; Peters, Annette; Devlin, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter [≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] has been associated with cardiovascular and hematologic effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that adults with diabetes also may be a particularly susceptible population. Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of ambient PM2.5 on markers of endothelial function in diabetic volunteers. Methods We conducted a prospective panel study in 22 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (USA), from November 2004 to December 2005. We acquired daily measurements of PM2.5 and meteorologic data at central monitoring sites. On 4 consecutive days, we measured endothelial function by brachial artery ultrasound in all participants and by pulsewave measurements in a subgroup. Data were analyzed using additive mixed models with a random participant effect and adjusted for season, day of the week, and meteorology. Results Flow-mediated dilatation decreased in association with PM2.5 during the first 24 hr, whereas small-artery elasticity index decreased with a delay of 1 and 3 days. These PM2.5-associated decrements in endothelial function were greater among participants with a high body mass index, high glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, low adiponectin, or the null polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1. However, high levels of myeloperoxidase on the examination day led to strongest effects on endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions These data demonstrate that PM2.5 exposure may cause immediate endothelial dysfunction. Clinical characteristics associated with insulin resistance were associated with enhanced effects of PM on endothelial function. In addition, participants with greater oxidative potential seem to be more susceptible. PMID:19079718

  7. Raloxifene prevents endothelial dysfunction in aging ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Ming; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Au, Chak Leung; Tsang, Suk Ying; Fung, Kwok Pui; Laher, Ismail; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Huang, Yu

    2006-05-01

    Lack of an appropriate animal model has delayed the better understanding of mechanisms related to higher cardiovascular risk in women after menopause. The aging female rat may share some menopausal changes observed in women. However, most studies have attempted to mimic menopause by ovariectomizing young (6-12 weeks old) animals without taking into accounts the influence of aging and of declining ovarian function. Therefore, the present study examined changes in vascular reactivity in the aging (15 months old) female rat after ovariectomy and the effects of chronic raloxifene therapy on vascular reactivity and eNOS protein expression. Aortic rings were prepared from the three experimental groups of rats: sham-operated control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized aging rats receiving daily oral administration of raloxifene for 3 months. Aortic rings were suspended in organ baths for the measurement of isometric tension. Rings with endothelium contracted significantly more to phenylephrine after inhibition of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP-signaling pathway by L-NAME or ODQ (as an index of basal nitric oxide release) in control and raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. This effect was abolished upon mechanical removal of the endothelium. Phenylephrine induced greater contractions only in rings with endothelium from ovariectomized rats as compared with control rats and raloxifene treatment normalized this response. In the presence of L-NAME or ODQ, phenylephrine-induced contraction was similar in rings from the three groups. Rings relaxed more to thapsigargin and acetylcholine in raloxifene-treated ovariectomized rats than in ovariectomized rats. There was no significant difference in aortic eNOS protein contents among the different groups. These results suggest that chronic oral administration of raloxifene to aging ovariectomized female rats augmented the bioavailability of endothelial nitric oxide in isolated aortic rings without altering e

  8. Hemodynamic Shear Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Hemodialysis Access

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, Michelle K.; Pike, Daniel B.; Anderson, Kasey; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Surgically-created blood conduits used for chronic hemodialysis, including native arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and synthetic AV grafts (AVGs), are the lifeline for kidney failure patients. Unfortunately, each has its own limitations: AVFs often fail to mature to become useful for dialysis and AVGs often fail due to stenosis as a result of neointimal hyperplasia, which preferentially forms at the graft-venous anastomosis. No clinical therapies are currently available to significantly promote AVF maturation or prevent neointimal hyperplasia in AVGs. Central to devising strategies to solve these problems is a complete mechanistic understanding of the pathophysiological processes. The pathology of arteriovenous access problems is likely multi-factorial. This review focuses on the roles of fluid-wall shear stress (WSS) and endothelial cells (ECs). In arteriovenous access, shunting of arterial blood flow directly into the vein drastically alters the hemodynamics in the vein. These hemodynamic changes are likely major contributors to non-maturation of an AVF vein and/or formation of neointimal hyperplasia at the venous anastomosis of an AVG. ECs separate blood from other vascular wall cells and also influence the phenotype of these other cells. In arteriovenous access, the responses of ECs to aberrant WSS may subsequently lead to AVF non-maturation and/or AVG stenosis. This review provides an overview of the methods for characterizing blood flow and calculating WSS in arteriovenous access and discusses EC responses to arteriovenous hemodynamics. This review also discusses the role of WSS in the pathology of arteriovenous access, as well as confounding factors that modulate the impact of WSS. PMID:25309636

  9. Measures of endothelial dysfunction predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, David R; Lawford, Patricia; Sheridan, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) improves morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). Impaired endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in HF and may help to differentiate responders from non-responders. Methods 19 patients were recruited, comprising 94% men, mean age 69±8 years, New York Heart Association functional classes II–IV, QRSd 161±21 ms and mean left ventricular ejection fraction 26±8%. Markers of response and FMD were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months following CRT. Results 14 patients were responders to CRT. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6±1.7 to 14.7±1.5 mL/kg/min, p<0.05), quality of life score (44.4±22.9–24.1±21.3, p<0.01), left ventricular end diastolic volume (201.5±72.5 mL–121.3±72.0 mL, p<0.01) and 6-min walk distance (374.0±112.8 m at baseline to 418.1±105.3 m, p<0.05). Baseline FMD in responders was 2.9±1.9% and 7.4±3.73% in non-responders (p<0.05). Conclusions Response to CRT at 6 and 12 months is predicted by baseline FMD. This study confirms that FMD identifies responders to CRT, due to endothelium-dependent mechanisms alone. PMID:27335654

  10. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  11. Cardiovascular risk reduction by reversing endothelial dysfunction:ARBs, ACE inhibitors, or both? Expectations from The ONTARGET Trial Programme

    PubMed Central

    Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Redón, Josep; Schmieder, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the initial pathophysiological step in a progression of vascular damage that leads to overt cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Angiotensin II, the primary agent of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), has a central role in endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, RAS blockade with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor provides a rational approach to reverse endothelial dysfunction, reduce microalbuminuria, and, thus, improves cardiovascular and renal prognosis. ARBs and ACE inhibitors act at different points in the RAS pathway and recent evidence suggests that there are differences regarding their effects on endothelial dysfunction. In addition to blood pressure lowering, studies have shown that ARBs reduce target-organ damage, including improvements in endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes, proteinuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) Programme is expected to provide the ultimate evidence of whether improved endothelial function translates into reduced cardiovascular and renal events in high-risk patients, and to assess possible differential outcomes with telmisartan, the ACE inhibitor ramipril, or a combination of both (dual RAS blockade). Completion of ONTARGET is expected in 2008. PMID:17583170

  12. Systemic sclerosis induces pronounced peripheral vascular dysfunction characterized by blunted peripheral vasoreactivity and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Frech, Tracy; Walker, Ashley E; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Hopkins, Paul N; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) vasculopathy can result in a digital ulcer (DU) and/or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that bedside brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing with duplex ultrasound could be used in SSc patients to identify features of patients at risk for DU or PAH. Thirty-eight SSc patients were compared to 52 age-matched healthy controls from the VAMC Utah Vascular Research Laboratory. Peripheral hemodynamics, arterial structure, and endothelial function were assessed by duplex ultrasound. A blood pressure cuff was applied to the forearm and 5-min ischemia was induced. Post-occlusion, brachial artery vascular reactivity (peak hyperemia/area under the curve [AUC]), shear rate, and endothelial function (FMD) were measured. SSc patients had smaller brachial artery diameters (p < 0.001) and less reactive hyperemia (p < 0.001), peak shear rate (p = 0.03), and brachial artery FMD (p < 0.001) compared with healthy controls. Brachial artery FMD was lower (p < 0.05) in SSc patients with DU. Tertile analysis suggested the 2 lower FMD tertiles (<5.40 %) had a 40-50 % chance of presenting with DU while the SSc patients with highest FMD tertile (>5.40 %) had less than 15 % chance of DU. All brachial artery FMD measurements were similar between SSc patients with and without PAH (all p > 0.05). Compared to healthy controls, SSc patients had significantly smaller brachial artery diameter and blunted peripheral vascular reactivity and endothelial function. SSc patients with DU have even greater impairments in endothelial function compared to those without DU. FMD testing has clinical utility to identify SSc patients at risk for DU. PMID:25511849

  13. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Is Involved in the Effects of Atorvastatin on Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Statins exert pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells in addition to lowering cholesterol. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) has been implicated in vascular inflammation and disease. The relationship between atorvastatin and ALOX15 was investigated using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed that ALOX15 overexpression increased the thickness of the intima-media (IMT). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that atorvastatin increased the expression of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) but decreased the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); these effects of atorvastatin were blocked by ALOX15 overexpression. In human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), silencing of ALOX15 enhanced the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial function. Expression levels of CAMs and Akt/eNOS/NO under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation were modulated by ALOX15 inhibitor and ALOX15 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Atorvastatin abolished the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) induced by ox-LDL. Exposure to ox-LDL induced upregulation of ALOX15 in HUVECs, but this effect was partially abolished by atorvastatin or the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). These results demonstrate that regulation of ALOX15 expression might be involved in the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27594770

  14. Arsenite promotes apoptosis and dysfunction in microvascular endothelial cells via an alteration of intracellular calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2012-04-01

    Vascular endothelium has been considered as a target for arsenic-induced cardiovascular toxicity. The present study demonstrated that arsenite caused slow and sustained elevation of intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) in HMEC-1, a human microvessel-derived endothelial cell line, in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with U-73122 (a specific PLC inhibitor) or 2-APB (a specific IP3 receptor antagonist) attenuated this effect, suggesting that PLC/IP3 signaling cascade is involved in arsenite-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. Cytotoxic concentrations of arsenite (5 and 10 μM) significantly enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, nitric oxide (NO) production and apoptosis after 24-h exposure. Additionally, 2-APB attenuated eNOS phosphorylation and apoptosis induced by arsenite, indicating that Ca2+ -mediated eNOS activation participates in arsenite-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, we also found that non-apoptotic concentrations of arsenite (0.5 and 1 μM) dramatically mitigated thrombin-induced rapid transient rise of [Ca2+]i, eNOS phosphorylation and NO production, suggesting functional disruption of endothelial by arsenite, and these effects occurred without an alteration of PLC-β1 and thrombin receptor levels. Altogether, the results reveal that arsenite induces apoptotic cell death and endothelial dysfunction as indicated by the reduction of thrombin responses, particularly related to an alteration of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:22244921

  15. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Is Involved in the Effects of Atorvastatin on Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Xin; Hu, Chunxiao; Yu, Hui; Dong, Qian; Chang, Guanglei; Qin, Shu; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Dongying

    2016-01-01

    Statins exert pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells in addition to lowering cholesterol. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) has been implicated in vascular inflammation and disease. The relationship between atorvastatin and ALOX15 was investigated using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining showed that ALOX15 overexpression increased the thickness of the intima-media (IMT). Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that atorvastatin increased the expression of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) but decreased the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); these effects of atorvastatin were blocked by ALOX15 overexpression. In human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs), silencing of ALOX15 enhanced the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial function. Expression levels of CAMs and Akt/eNOS/NO under oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) stimulation were modulated by ALOX15 inhibitor and ALOX15 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Atorvastatin abolished the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) induced by ox-LDL. Exposure to ox-LDL induced upregulation of ALOX15 in HUVECs, but this effect was partially abolished by atorvastatin or the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). These results demonstrate that regulation of ALOX15 expression might be involved in the effects of atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27594770

  16. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Kudaravalli, Jyothsna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two SLE patients and age, sex-matched 10 healthy control subjects were studied. The patients were between 17 and 65 years of age and positive for diagnostic tests, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Photoplethysmogram (PPG) detects the changes in the amount of light absorbed by hemoglobin, which reflects changes in the blood volume. Pulse wave analysis was performed at rest, 30 s, 90 s after shear stress, and 10 min after 300 μm of salbutamol inhalation. Results: Stiffness index (SI) of patients before the treatment was 8.46±2.78 cm/s and of controls was 6.07±1.4 cm/s (P = 0.002) and that of reflection index (RI) was 73±13 for patients and 65±7 for controls (P = 0.001). The percentage change in RI after salbutamol inhalation for controls and patients were -16±6 and -7±4 (P = 0.001), respectively, indicating the presence of endothelial dysfunction. The percentage decrease in RI after salbutamol inhalation was from -2.36±0.76 to ?7.92±1.46 in patients treated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, P = 0.007). The percentage decrease in RI after salbutamol inhalation was from ?6.36΁1.21 to -9.92±1.21 in patients treated with atorvastatin (P = 0.05). This indicated the improvement in endothelial function. There was decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) from 1.03±0.72 mg/dL to 0.52±0.22 mg/dL and that of malondialdehyde (MDA) from 11.20±4.07 nmol/mL to 8.81±2.79 nmol/mL with N-acetylcysteine treatment (P < 0.05). The CRP was decreased from 1.11±0.92 mg/dL to 0.440.16 mg/dL (P = 0.05) and that of MDA was decreased from 9.37±3.29 nmol/mL to 8.51±3.27 nmol/mL after treatment with atorvastatin. It showed improvement in oxidative stress with these treatments. Conclusion: The presence of arterial stiffness indicated endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in RI and SI with

  17. RNA Sequencing Analysis Detection of a Novel Pathway of Endothelial Dysfunction in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Christopher J.; Im, Hogune; Cao, Aiqin; Hennigs, Jan K.; Wang, Lingli; Sa, Silin; Chen, Pin-I; Nickel, Nils P.; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Hopper, Rachel K.; Tojais, Nancy F.; Li, Caiyun G.; Gu, Mingxia; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Xian, Zhaoying; Chen, Rui; Zhao, Mingming; Kaschwich, Mark; del Rosario, Patricia A.; Bernstein, Daniel; Zamanian, Roham T.; Wu, Joseph C.; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by endothelial dysregulation, but global changes in gene expression have not been related to perturbations in function. Objectives: RNA sequencing was used to discriminate changes in transcriptomes of endothelial cells cultured from lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension versus control subjects and to assess the functional significance of major differentially expressed transcripts. Methods: The endothelial transcriptomes from the lungs of seven control subjects and six patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes were related to bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) signaling. Those down-regulated were assessed for function in cultured cells and in a transgenic mouse. Measurements and Main Results: Fold differences in 10 genes were significant (P < 0.05), four increased and six decreased in patients versus control subjects. No patient was mutant for BMPR2. However, knockdown of BMPR2 by siRNA in control pulmonary arterial endothelial cells recapitulated 6 of 10 patient-related gene changes, including decreased collagen IV (COL4A1, COL4A2) and ephrinA1 (EFNA1). Reduction of BMPR2-regulated transcripts was related to decreased β-catenin. Reducing COL4A1, COL4A2, and EFNA1 by siRNA inhibited pulmonary endothelial adhesion, migration, and tube formation. In mice null for the EFNA1 receptor, EphA2, versus control animals, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blockade and hypoxia caused more severe pulmonary hypertension, judged by elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and loss of small arteries. Conclusions: The novel relationship between BMPR2 dysfunction and reduced expression of endothelial COL4 and EFNA1 may underlie vulnerability to injury in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:26030479

  18. Angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction is temporally linked with increases in interleukin-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Gomolak, Jessica R.; Didion, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is associated with vascular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction and activation of a number of inflammatory molecules, however the linear events involved in the development of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction produced in response to Ang II are not well defined. The goal of this study was to examine the dose- and temporal-dependent development of endothelial dysfunction in response to Ang II. Blood pressure and responses of carotid arteries were examined in control (C57Bl/6) mice and in mice infused with 50, 100, 200, 400, or 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II for either 14 or 28 Days. Infusion of Ang II was associated with graded and marked increases in systolic blood pressure and plasma Ang II concentrations. While low doses of Ang II (i.e., 50 and 100 ng/kg/min) had little to no effect on blood pressure or endothelial function, high doses of Ang II (e.g., 1000 ng/kg/min) were associated with large increases in arterial pressure and marked impairment of endothelial function. In contrast, intermediate doses of Ang II (200 and 400 ng/kg/min) while initially having no effect on systolic blood pressure were associated with significant increases in pressure over time. Despite increasing blood pressure, 200 ng/kg/min had no effect on endothelial function, whereas 400 ng/kg/min produced modest impairment on Day 14 and marked impairment of endothelial function on Day 28. The degree of endothelial dysfunction produced by 400 and 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II was reflective of parallel increases in plasma IL-6 levels and vascular macrophage content, suggesting that increases in arterial blood pressure precede the development of endothelial dysfunction. These findings are important as they demonstrate that along with increases in arterial pressure that increases in IL-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation correlate with the impairment of endothelial function produced by Ang II. PMID:25400581

  19. Subclinical Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Patients with Diabetes: A Study from United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Aburawi, Elhadi H.; AlKaabi, Juma; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Shehab, Abdullah; Lessan, Nader; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Saadi, Hussain; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of obesity and dyslipidemia on cardiovascular health in adolescents and young adults with diabetes is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the effects of these co-morbidities on markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in young patients with the disease. Methods The study investigated sets of inflammatory, endothelial, and adipocyte biomarkers in 79 patients with type 1 diabetes, 55 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 47 controls. Results Mean (±SD) age was 20±6 y (median = 17, range = 12–31). Patients with diabetes had higher levels of cytoadhesive molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, p<0.001), adiponectin (p<0.001), and haptoglobin (p = 0.023). Their heart rate variability assessment revealed lower standard deviation of beat-to-beat intervals and lower total power (p≤0.019), reflecting autonomous nervous dysfunction. Hemoglobin A1c >8.0% (estimated average blood glucose >10 mmol/L) was associated with higher adiponectin (p<0.001) and obesity was associated with lower adiponectin (p<0.001); thus, obesity damped the effect of hyperglycemia on adiponectin. Obesity was associated with higher sICAM-1 (p≤0.015), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), p<0.001. Similarly, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) <1.02 mmol/L was associated with higher sICAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and hsCRP (p≤0.009) and lower adiponectin (p<0.001). Adiponectin correlated negatively with the inflammatory biomarkers in patients with diabetes. Conclusion Subclinical inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are common among young patients with diabetes. Poor diabetes control is associated with higher adiponectin. Obesity and dyslipidemia are associated with lower adiponectin and higher inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers. Intuitively, these predictors of cardiovascular disease are amenable to proper glycemic control, nutritional choices, and regular exercise. PMID:27459718

  20. Chronic Sleep Fragmentation Induces Endothelial Dysfunction and Structural Vascular Changes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X.; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Li, Richard C.; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is a common occurrence and constitutes a major characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). SF has been implicated in multiple OSA-related morbidities, but it is unclear whether SF underlies any of the cardiovascular morbidities of OSA. We hypothesized that long-term SF exposures may lead to endothelial dysfunction and altered vessel wall structure. Methods and Results: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed normal chow and exposed to daylight SF or control sleep (CTL) for 20 weeks. Telemetric blood pressure and endothelial function were assessed weekly using a modified laser-Doppler hyperemic test. Atherosclerotic plaques, elastic fiber disruption, lumen area, wall thickness, foam cells, and macrophage recruitment, as well as expression of senescence-associated markers were examined in excised aortas. Increased latencies to reach baseline perfusion levels during the post-occlusive period emerged in SF mice with increased systemic BP values starting at 8 weeks of SF and persisting thereafter. No obvious atherosclerotic plaques emerged, but marked elastic fiber disruption and fiber disorganization were apparent in SF-exposed mice, along with increases in the number of foam cells and macrophages in the aorta wall. Senescence markers showed reduced TERT and cyclin A and increased p16INK4a expression, with higher IL-6 plasma levels in SF-exposed mice. Conclusions: Long-term sleep fragmentation induces vascular endothelial dysfunction and mild blood pressure increases. Sleep fragmentation also leads to morphologic vessel changes characterized by elastic fiber disruption and disorganization, increased recruitment of inflammatory cells, and altered expression of senescence markers, thereby supporting a role for sleep fragmentation in the cardiovascular morbidity of OSA. Citation: Carreras A, Zhang SX, Peris E, Qiao Z, Gileles-Hillel A, Li RC, Wang Y, Gozal D. Chronic sleep fragmentation induces endothelial dysfunction and

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction Is Associated With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Lee, Jung Eun; Choi, Hoon Young; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Kim, Eun Jin; Han, Jae Hyun; Han, Ji Suk; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial dysfunction is implicated in increased cardiovascular risk in nondialyzed population. However, the prognostic impact of endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular outcome has not been investigated in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We prospectively determined endothelial function by brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in 143 nondiabetic PD patients and 32 controls. Primary outcome was a major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE). Brachial FMD was significantly lower in PD patients than in controls (2.9% [1.3–4.7] vs 6.2% [5.4–8.3], P < 0.001). During a mean follow-up of 42 months, primary outcome was observed in 25 patients (17.5%). When patients were dichotomized by the median value of FMD (2.9%), incidence rates of MACCEs were significantly higher in the group with lower FMD compared with higher FMD (7.2 vs 3.0/100 person-years, P = 0.03). In multivariate Cox analysis, low FMD (≤2.9%) was a significant independent predictor of MACCEs (hazard ratio = 2.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.03–7.22, P = 0.04). Furthermore, multivariate fractional polynomial analysis showed that the risk of MACCE decreased steadily with higher FMD values. Impaired brachial FMD was a significant independent predictor of MACCEs in PD patients. Estimating endothelial dysfunction by brachial FMD could be useful for stratifying cardiovascular risk in these patients. PMID:25192486

  2. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension☆

    PubMed Central

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M.; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice) received a 24 hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock. PMID:26276526

  3. Protective effect of curcumin on cyclosporin A-induced endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Sagiroglu, Tamer; Kanter, Mehmet; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Sezer, Atakan; Erboga, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is the most widely used immunosuppressive drug for preventing graft rejection and autoimmune disease. However, the therapeutic treatment induces several side effects such as nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hypertension, and hepatotoxicity. Curcumin has been successfully used as a potent antioxidant against many pathophysiological states. This experimental study was performed to test, during CsA treatment, the alterations of curcumin antioxidant properties against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction. Rats were divided into four groups: control, curcumin alone, CsA, and CsA + curcumin; each group containing eight animals. The animals in the CsA + curcumin group were treated with CsA (10 days, 25 mg/kg, orally) and curcumin (15 days, 200 mg/kg, orally, starting 5 days before CsA administration). At the end of the treatments, the animals were killed; serum and aorta tissue were treated for biochemical and morphological analyses. The results indicate that CsA-induced aortic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by morphological and ultrastructural alterations in tissue architecture, changes in malondialdehyde and ferric reducing/antioxidant power levels, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) expression. In conclusion, our data suggest that the imbalance between production of free oxygen radicals and antioxidant defence systems, due to CsA administration, is a mechanism responsible for oxidative stress. Moreover, we show that curcumin plays a protective action against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress, as supported by biochemical, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL results. PMID:22903178

  4. [Endothelial dysfunction and nonspecific immune reactions in development and progression of osteoarthrosis in women engaged into manual work].

    PubMed

    Maliutina, N N; Nevzorova, M S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers mechanisms of development and progression of osteoarthrosis as an occupationally conditioned disease in women of manual work. Women working in physical overstrain conditions are under occupational risk with dysfunction of many body systems. The authors set a hypothesis on association of endothelial dysfunction markers dysbalance and structural remodelling of cartilage matrix as a proof of degenerative changes. PMID:26596115

  5. The Role of Maternal Gestational Diabetes in Inducing Fetal Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Samar A; Liu, Wanting; Peng, Yonghong; Roberts, W; Whitelaw, Donald; Graham, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is known to be associated with fetal endothelial dysfunction, however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. This study examines the effect of maternal diabetes on fetal endothelial function and gene expression under physiological glucose conditions (5 mM). Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) isolated from diabetic mothers (d.HUVEC) grew more slowly than HUVEC isolated from healthy mothers (c.HUVEC) and had delayed doubling time despite increased levels of total vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and protein production as determined by real-time PCR and ELISA respectively. Using western blot, the levels of antiproliferative VEGF165b isoform were increased in d.HUVEC relative to c.HUVEC. Successful VEGF165b knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in increased proliferation of d.HUVEC measured by MTT, compared with negative siRNA control, to similar levels measured in c.HUVEC. In addition, d.HUVEC generated excess levels of ROS as revealed by 2',7' Dichlorodihydrofluorescein Diacetate (DCFH-DA) and Nitrotetrazolium blue (NBT). Using microarray, 102 genes were differentially overexpressed between d.HUVEC versus c.HUVEC (>1.5-fold change; P < 0.05). Functional clustering analysis of these differentially expressed genes revealed participation in inflammatory responses (including adhesion) which may be related to pathological outcomes. Of these genes, ICAM-1 was validated as upregulated, confirming microarray results. Additional confirmatory immunofluorescence staining revealed increased protein expression of ICAM-1 compared with c.HUVEC which was reduced by vitamin C treatment (100 μM). Thus, maternal diabetes induces persistent alterations in fetal endothelial function and gene expression following glucose normalization and antioxidant treatment could help reverse endothelium dysfunction. PMID:25808705

  6. Evidence of endothelial dysfunction in the development of Alzheimer’s disease: Is Alzheimer’s a vascular disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Rory J; Soiza, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. The emerging view is that cerebrovascular dysfunction is a feature not only of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke, but also of neurodegenerative conditions, such as AD. In AD, there is impaired structure and function of cerebral blood vessels and cells in the neurovascular unit. These effects are mediated by vascular oxidative stress. Injury to the neurovascular unit alters cerebral blood flow regulation, depletes vascular reserves, disrupts the blood-brain barrier and reduces the brain’s repair capacity. Such injury can exacerbate the cognitive dysfunction exerted by incident ischemia and coexisting neurodegeneration. This article summarises data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, vascular abnormalities and brain endothelial damage in AD. In view of accumulating evidence of vascular pathology in AD, we also review the literature (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for clinical evidence of impaired endothelial function in AD. A total of 15 articles investigating endothelial dysfunction in AD were identified. 10 of these articles showed impaired endothelial function in AD patients. The current literature suggests endothelial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. This aspect of AD pathology is particularly interesting in view of its potential for therapeutic intervention. Future research on endothelial function in AD should concentrate on population-based analysis and combine multiple methods to evaluate endothelial function. PMID:24224133

  7. Magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles induce vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammation by disturbing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, XueQin; Miao, YiMing; Chen, ZhiQiang; Qiang, PengFei; Cui, LiuQing; Jing, Hongjuan; Guo, YuQi

    2016-03-01

    Despite the considerable use of magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) worldwide, their safety is still an important topic of debate. In the present study, we detected the toxicity and biological behavior of bare-Fe3O4NPs (B-Fe3O4NPs) on human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results showed that B-Fe3O4NPs did not induce cell death within 24h even at concentrations up to 400 μg/ml. The level of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were decreased after exposure to B-Fe3O4NPs, whereas the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were elevated. Importantly, B-Fe3O4NPs increased the accumulation of autophagosomes and LC3-II in HUVECs through both autophagy induction and the blockade of autophagy flux. The levels of Beclin 1 and VPS34, but not phosphorylated mTOR, were increased in the B-Fe3O4NP-treated HUVECs. Suppression of autophagy induction or stimulation of autophagy flux, at least partially, attenuated the B-Fe3O4NP-induced HUVEC dysfunction. Additionally, enhanced autophagic activity might be linked to the B-Fe3O4NP-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results demonstrated that B-Fe3O4NPs disturb the process of autophagy in HUVECs, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. PMID:26551222

  8. Chemical pathology of homocysteine. IV. Excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2009-01-01

    This review considers recent advances in the chemical pathology of homocysteine in atherogenesis, oxidative metabolism, and carcinogenesis. Homocysteine is a potent excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and leads to oxidative stress, cytoplasmic calcium influx, cellular apoptosis, and endothelial dysfunction. According to the adsorption-induction theory, cytoplasmic calcium influx leads to depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by reaction with cytoplasmic phosphate, leading to calcium apatite deposition. Oxidative stress is caused by failure of ATP synthesis and accumulation of reactive oxygen radicals, theoretically because of inhibition of thioretinaco ozonide function within mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The toxicity of oxygen difluoride is theoretically explained by the displacement of ozone from thioretinaco ozonide, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. Depletion of thioretinaco ozonide from cellular membranes is suggested to underlie the carcinogenic and atherogenic effects of fluoride and other electrophilic carcinogens. In atherogenesis the acute inflammatory response is related to cellular apoptosis and necrosis, autoantibodies to proteins containing peptide-bound homocysteine and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), and microbial products and antigens originating from homocysteinylated LDL aggregates trapped within vasa vasorum of developing atherosclerotic plaques. The trapping of lipoprotein aggregates and obstruction of the lumen of vasa vasorum are enhanced by high tissue pressure and by endothelial dysfunction because of narrowing of the lumen by swollen and hyperplastic endothelial cells, leading to the creation of vulnerable plaques. PMID:19667406

  9. Size and composition effects of household particles on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction of human coronary artery endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Liu, I.-Jung; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2013-10-01

    People spend generally 90 percent of their time indoors, yet toxicity of household particles has not been thoroughly investigated before. The objective of this study is to examine particle size and components effects of household particles on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). We used two micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors to collect 60 sets of indoor particulate matters (PM) from 30 houses in Taipei, Taiwan. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) effects of household particles were determined by high-resolution gas chromatograph/high-resolution mass spectrometer, respectively. HCAEC were exposed to household particles extracts in three size ranges: PM0.1 (diameters less than 0.1 μm), PM1.0-0.1 (diameters between 1.0 and 0.1 μm), and PM10-1.0 (diameters between 10 and 1.0 μm) at 50 μg mL-1 for 4 h, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in the medium were measured. We found that household PM1.0-0.1 was associated with increased IL-6 and ET-1 production and decreased NO synthesis. Naphthalene of PM1.0-0.1 was highly correlated with IL-6 and ET-1 production and NO reduction. We concluded that size and compositions of household particles were both important factors on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in HCAEC.

  10. High fat diet exacerbates vascular endothelial dysfunction in rats exposed to continuous hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Tang, Feng; Ga, Qin; Wuren, Tana; Wang, Ya-Ping; Rondina, Matthew T; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-02-13

    Independently, a high fat diet and hypoxia are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and often occur concurrently in patients. Nevertheless, the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function combined with hypoxia, a situation occurring with increasing frequency in many parts of the world, remain largely unknown. We investigated the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function in rats exposed to continuous hypoxia for 4 weeks. Seventy two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: a hypoxia group fed regular chow, a combined hypoxia and high fat diet (HFD) group, and for comparison, rats maintained in normoxia, regular chow conditions were set as baseline (BL) group. The experimental data of BL group were obtained at beginning of hypoxia given in the other groups. Continuous hypoxia was induced in a hypobaric chamber maintained at an altitude of 5000 m. Compared to hypoxic conditions alone, hypoxia plus a HFD prevented adaptive changes in plasma nitric oxide (NOx) levels and caused earlier and more severe changes in aortic endothelial structures. Functionally, hypoxia plus a HFD resulted in impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation responses to acetylcholine and altered the bioavailability of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) substrate L-Arginine. At the molecular level, hypoxia plus a HFD blunted increases in endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA and protein in aortic endothelial tissue. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in the setting of hypoxia, a high fat diet leads to earlier and more severe VED than hypoxia alone. These data have important implications for populations residing at high-altitude, as dietary patterns shift towards increased fat intake. PMID:25603049

  11. Perirenal fat promotes renal arterial endothelial dysfunction in obese swine through tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuangtao; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R.; Jordan, Kyra L.; Tang, Hui; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Perirenal fat is associated with poor blood pressure control and chronic kidney disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that perirenal fat impairs renal arterial endothelial function in pigs with obesity-metabolic derangements (ObM). Material and Methods Fourteen domestic pigs were studied after 16 weeks of a high-fat/high-fructose diet (ObM) or standard chow (Lean). Renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and visceral fat volumes were studied in-vivo with CT. Renal arterial endothelial function was also studied ex-vivo in the organ bath. Results ObM pigs demonstrated increased body weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and intra-abdominal fat compared to lean pigs, and perirenal fat volume was significantly larger. RBF and GFR were markedly elevated, while urinary protein level was preserved. Ex-vivo acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of renal artery rings was substantially impaired in ObM compared to Lean. Endothelial function was further blunted in both ObM and Lean arterial rings by incubation with perirenal fat harvested from ObM, but not from Lean pigs, and was restored by inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. ObM perirenal fat also showed increased pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltration and TNF-α expression. Conclusions ObM perirenal fat directly causes renal artery endothelial dysfunction, partly mediated by TNF-α. PMID:26417644

  12. Diabetes Causes Bone Marrow Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Activation of the RhoA–Rho-Associated Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Katare, Rajesh; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Meloni, Marco; Reni, Carlotta; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus causes bone marrow (BM) microangiopathy. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for BM endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results The analysis of differentially expressed transcripts in BM endothelial cells (BMECs) from type-1 diabetic and nondiabetic mice showed an effect of diabetes mellitus on signaling pathways controlling cell death, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Type-1 diabetic-BMECs displayed high reactive oxygen species levels, increased expression and activity of RhoA and its associated protein kinases Rho-associated kinase 1/Rho-associated kinase 2, and reduced Akt phosphorylation/activity. Likewise, diabetes mellitus impaired Akt-related BMEC functions, such as migration, network formation, and angiocrine factor-releasing activity, and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, high glucose disrupted BMEC contacts through Src tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin. These alterations were prevented by constitutively active Akt (myristoylated Akt), Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and Src inhibitors. Insulin replacement restored BMEC abundance, as assessed by flow cytometry analysis of the endothelial marker MECA32, and endothelial barrier function in BM of type-1 diabetic mice. Conclusion Redox-dependent activation of RhoA/Rho-associated kinase and Src/vascular endothelial cadherin signaling pathways, together with Akt inactivation, contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic BM. Metabolic control is crucial for maintenance of endothelial cell homeostasis and endothelial barrier function in BM of diabetic mice. PMID:23307872

  13. Coronary endothelial dysfunction and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Basu, Aninda; Dai, Anzhi; Heldak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes. The decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is the hallmark of endothelial dysfunction, and it leads to attenuated vascular relaxation and atherosclerosis followed by a decrease in blood flow. In the heart, decreased coronary blood flow is responsible for insufficient oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and, subsequently, increases the incidence of cardiac ischemia. In this study we investigate whether and how reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria contribute to coronary endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice. T2D was induced in mice by a high-fat diet combined with a single injection of low-dose streptozotocin. ACh-induced vascular relaxation was significantly attenuated in coronary arteries (CAs) from T2D mice compared with controls. The pharmacological approach reveals that NO-dependent, but not hyperpolarization- or prostacyclin-dependent, relaxation was decreased in CAs from T2D mice. Attenuated ACh-induced relaxation in CAs from T2D mice was restored toward control level by treatment with mitoTempol (a mitochondria-specific O2− scavenger). Coronary ECs isolated from T2D mice exhibited a significant increase in mitochondrial ROS concentration and decrease in SOD2 protein expression compared with coronary ECs isolated from control mice. Furthermore, protein ubiquitination of SOD2 was significantly increased in coronary ECs isolated from T2D mice. These results suggest that augmented SOD2 ubiquitination leads to the increase in mitochondrial ROS concentration in coronary ECs from T2D mice and attenuates coronary vascular relaxation in T2D mice. PMID:23986204

  14. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  15. Periodontitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in a General Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Birte; Empen, Klaus; Gläser, Sven; Lorbeer, Roberto; Völzke, Henry; Ewert, Ralf; Kocher, Thomas; Dörr, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence underlines an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In contrast, data on its relation with endothelial dysfunction as a marker of early subclinical atherosclerosis is inconclusive and limited to patient-cohort studies. We therefore investigated the association between periodontal disease and flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (FMD) as a measure of endothelial dysfunction in a general population, and also addressed a possible mediation via inflammation. The study population comprised 1,234 subjects (50.5% men) aged 25–85 years from the 5-year follow-up of the Study of Health in Pomerania, a population-based cohort study. Clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket probing depth (PPD) as measures of periodontal disease were assessed half-mouth at four sites per tooth. Subjects were classified according to the periodontitis case definition proposed by Tonetti and Claffey (2005). Measurements of FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) were performed using standardized ultrasound techniques. High-sensitive C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and leukocyte count were measured. Fully adjusted multivariate linear regression analyses revealed significant associations of the percentage of sites with PPD ≥6 mm with FMD (ptrend=0.048), with subjects within the highest category having a 0.74% higher FMD compared to subjects within the lowest category (p<0.05). Consistently, FMD values increased significantly across categories of the percentage of sites with CAL ≥6 mm (ptrend=0.01) and the periodontitis case definition (ptrend=0.006). Restrictions to subjects without antihypertensive or statin medication or current non-smokers confirmed previous results. Systemic inflammation did not seem to mediate the relation. Both PPD and CAL were not consistently associated with NMD. In contrast to previous studies, high levels of periodontal disease were significantly associated with high FMD values. This association

  16. Steatosis Grade is the Most Important Risk Factor for Development of Endothelial Dysfunction in NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Sapmaz, Ferdane; Uzman, Metin; Basyigit, Sebahat; Ozkan, Selcuk; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Yeniova, Abdullah; Kefeli, Ayse; Asilturk, Zeliha; Nazligül, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is shown that there are strong associations between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of our study was to reveal whether steatosis or fibrosis score is more important in the development of endothelial dysfunction in patients with NAFLD in a prospective manner. This cross-sectional study included 266 subjects. These subjects were divided into 2 groups depending on presence of hepatosteatosis sonographically. Patients with hepatosteatosis were also divided into 3 subgroups depending on degree of steatosis: grade 1, 2, and 3. In all patients, Aspartate aminotransferase-to-Platelet Ratio Index and Fibrosis-4 (FIB4) scores were calculated. In addition, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) measurements were recorded. There was NAFLD in 176 (66.2%) of 266 patients included. There were no significant differences in sex and age distributions between patients with NAFLD (group 1) and controls without NAFLD (group 2) (P = 0.05). Mean Aspartate aminotransferase-to-Platelet Ratio Index score was significantly higher in group 1 compared with the control group (P = 0.001), whereas no significant difference was detected regarding FIB4 scores between groups (P = 0.4). Mean FMD value was found to be significantly lower in group 1 (P = 0.008). Patients with grade 3 hepatosteatosis had significantly lower FMD values than those with grade 1 steatosis and controls (P = 0.001). In univariate and multivariate analyses in group 1, no significant difference was detected regarding mean FMD measurements (P = 0.03). Again, no significant difference was detected in mean FMD measurement between FIB4 subgroups among patients with NAFLD and the whole study group (P = 0.09). The endothelial dysfunction is associated with steatosis in patients with NAFLD. PMID:27057890

  17. Paeonol protects against endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced endothelial dysfunction via AMPK/PPARδ signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ker-Woon; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Lau, Yeh Siang; Liu, Jian; Murugan, Dharmani; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Li; Zhao, Lei; Huang, Yu

    2016-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells often leads to endothelial dysfunction which underlies the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Paeonol, a major phenolic component extracted from Moutan Cortex, possesses various medicinal benefits which have been used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study investigated the protective mechanism of paeonol against tunicamycin-induced ER stress in isolated mouse aortas and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Vascular reactivity in aorta was measured using a wire myograph. The effects of paeonol on protein expression of ER stress markers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) activity in the vascular wall were assessed by Western blot, dihydroethidium fluorescence (DHE) or lucigenin enhanced-chemiluminescence, 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM DA) and dual luciferase reporter assay, respectively. Ex vivo treatment with paeonol (0.1μM) for 16h reversed the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in C57BJ/6J and PPARδ wild type (WT) mouse aortas following incubation with tunicamycin (0.5μg/mL). Elevated ER stress markers, oxidative stress and reduction of NO bioavailability induced by tunicamycin in HUVECs, C57BJ/6J and PPARδ WT mouse aortas were reversed by paeonol treatment. These beneficial effects of paeonol were diminished in PPARδ knockout (KO) mouse aortas. Paeonol increased the expression of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and PPARδ expression and activity while restoring the decreased phosphorylation of eNOS. The present study delineates that paeonol protects against tunicamycin-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction by inhibition of ER stress and oxidative stress, thus elevating NO bioavailability via the AMPK/PPARδ signaling pathway. PMID:27449753

  18. Prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is prevented by fidgeting.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Takuma; Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Kanaley, Jill A; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature, and this impairment is thought to be largely mediated by a sustained reduction in blood flow-induced shear stress. Indeed, preventing the marked reduction of shear stress during sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that sitting-induced reductions in shear stress and ensuing endothelial dysfunction would be prevented by periodic leg movement, or "fidgeting." In 11 young, healthy subjects, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one leg was subjected to intermittent fidgeting (1 min on/4 min off) while the contralateral leg remained still throughout and served as an internal control. Fidgeting produced a pronounced increase in popliteal artery blood flow and shear rate (prefidgeting, 33.7 ± 2.6 s(-1) to immediately postfidgeting, 222.7 ± 28.3 s(-1); mean ± SE; P < 0.001) that tapered off during the following 60 s. Fidgeting did not alter popliteal artery blood flow and shear rate of the contralateral leg, which was subjected to a reduction in blood flow and shear rate throughout the sitting period (presit, 71.7 ± 8.0 s(-1) to 3-h sit, 20.2 ± 2.9 s(-1); P < 0.001). Popliteal artery FMD was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the control leg (presit, 4.5 ± 0.3% to postsit: 1.6 ± 1.1%; P = 0.039) but improved in the fidgeting leg (presit, 3.7 ± 0.6% to postsit, 6.6 ± 1.2%; P = 0.014). Collectively, the present study provides evidence that prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is preventable with small amounts of leg movement while sitting, likely through the intermittent increases in vascular shear stress. PMID:27233765

  19. Diosgenin regulates adipokine expression in perivascular adipose tissue and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via regulation of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Xu, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Kang; Huang, Fang; Liu, Baolin; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) has been recognized as an active contributor to vascular function due to its paracrine effects on cells contained within vascular wall. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of diosgenin on adipokine expression in PVAT with emphasis on the regulation of endothelial function. Palmitic acid (PA) stimulation induced inflammation and dysregulation of adipokine expression in PVAT. Diosgenin treatment inhibited IKKβ phosphorylation and downregulated mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines/proteins including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), while reduced gene expressions for adiponectin, PPARγ, and arginase 1 (Arg-1) were reversed by diosgenin treatment. Diosgenin enhanced AMPK phosphorylation under basal and inflammatory conditions in PVAT, whereas knockdown of AMPK by SiRNA diminished its modulatory effect, indicating that diosgenin inhibited inflammation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We prepared conditioned medium from PA-stimulated PVAT to induce endothelial dysfunction and found that pre-treatment of PVAT with diosgenin effectively restored the loss of ACh-induced vasodilation and increased eNOS phosphorylation in rat aorta. High-fat diet feeding in rats induced inflammation in PVAT and the impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas these alterations were prevented by oral administration of diosgenin at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg. In conclusion, the obtained data showed that diosgenin ameliorated inflammation-associated adipokine dysregulation, and thereby prevented endothelial dysfunction. Our findings would shed a novel insight into the potential mechanism by which diosgenin protected endothelial function against inflammatory insult. PMID:26277096

  20. Cynanchum wilfordii ameliorates hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia increases the incidence of atherosclerosis and its pathologic complications. This study was performed to test the effect of an ethanol extract of Cynanchum wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCD). Male rats were fed a HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100, 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Rats fed with HFCD increased body weight associated with an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level. Chronic ECW treatment in HFCD-fed rats lessened LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as elevated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Chronic ECW treatment recovered the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intima endothelial layers by the decrease of intima-media thickness. ECW significantly recovered the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation to acetylcholine, high-dose ECW apparently increased vasorelaxation response to sodium nitroprusside in rats fed with HFCD. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and Akt expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to improve endothelial function through an increase in endothelium-derived NO production. Furthermore, treatment of ECW significantly recovered the HFCD-induced decrease in aortic cGMP levels in rats. These findings suggest that ECW ameliorates hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via improvement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in aortic tissue of rats fed with HFCD, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22176675

  1. To ED or not to ED--is erectile dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea related to endothelial dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Camilla M; Melehan, Kerri L; Phillips, Craig L; Grunstein, Ronald R; Liu, Peter Y

    2015-04-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and erectile dysfunction (ErectD) are highly prevalent and largely under diagnosed medical conditions. These disorders often co-exist, with about half of the male OSA population having ErectD and vice versa. OSA is strongly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality while ErectD has been proposed as a phenotypic marker of cardiovascular disease. This implies that the two conditions may be linked by a common pathophysiological mechanism. In this review we provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction (EndoD) may be the common pathophysiological mechanism linking OSA with both ErectD and cardiovascular complications. EndoD is one of the earliest markers of cardiovascular disease and substantial evidence suggests that OSA independently causes EndoD. There is also strong evidence that causally links EndoD with organic ErectD. Further research should be directed at determining the value of simultaneously assessing both ErectD and OSA in patients presenting with symptoms of either condition. In both ErectD and OSA clinics, identifying both conditions could improve overall cardiovascular risk stratification whilst treatment of OSA could reduce both ErectD and cardiovascular risk. PMID:24813467

  2. Glucocorticoid excess induces superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells and elicits vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Takahiko; Akaike, Masashi; Mitsui, Takao; Ohshima, Yasushi; Shintani, Yasumi; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2003-01-10

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess often elicits serious adverse effects on the vascular system, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, and effective prophylaxis for these complications is limited. We sought to reveal the mechanism underlying GC-induced vascular complications. Responses in forearm blood flow to reactive hyperemia in 20 GC-treated patients were significantly decreased to 43+/-8.9% (mean+/-SEM) from the values obtained before GC therapy (130+/-14%). An administration of vitamin C almost normalized blood flow responses. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), production of hydrogen peroxide was increased up to 166.5+/-3.3% of control values by 10(-7) mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (P<0.01). Concomitant with DEX-induced hydrogen peroxide production, intracellular amounts of peroxynitrite significantly increased and those of nitric oxide (NO) decreased, respectively (P<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody showed that peroxynitrite formation was increased in DEX-treated HUVECs. Using inhibitors against metabolic pathways for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we identified that the major production sources of ROS by DEX treatment were mitochondrial electron transport chain, NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that GC excess causes overproduction of ROS and thereby perturbs NO availability in the vascular endothelium, leading to vascular complications in patients with GC excess. PMID:12522124

  3. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  4. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  5. Docetaxel Facilitates Endothelial Dysfunction through Oxidative Stress via Modulation of Protein Kinase C Beta: The Protective Effects of Sotrastaurin

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chan, Shih-Hung; Chu, Pei-Ming; Tsai, Kun-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel (DTX), a taxane drug, has widely been used as an anticancer or antiangiogenesis drug. However, DTX caused side effects, such as vessel damage and phlebitis, which may reduce its clinical therapeutic efficacy. The molecular mechanisms of DTX that cause endothelial dysfunction remain unclear. The aim of this study as to validate the probable mechanisms of DTX-induced endothelial dysfunction in endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with DTX (2.5, 5, and 10nM) for 24 h to induce endothelial dysfunction. Stimulation with DTX reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. DTX upregulated caspase-3 activity and TUNEL-positive cells. DTX treatment also increased PKCβ phosphorylation levels and NADPH oxidase activity, which resulted in ROS formation. However, all of these findings were reversed by PKCβ inhibition and NADPH oxidase repression. Finally, we demonstrated that sotrastaurin (AEB-071), a new PKCβ inhibitor, mitigated DTX-induced oxidative injury in endothelial cells. Our findings from this study provide a probable molecular mechanism of DTX-induced oxidative injury in endothelial cells and a new clinical and therapeutic approach for preventing DTX-mediated vessel injury. PMID:25634538

  6. Long-Term Exposure to AZT, but not d4T, Increases Endothelial Cell Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Bassit, Leda; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda I.; Detorio, Mervi A.; Liang, Bill; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Walp, Erik R.; Dikalov, Sergey; Jones, Dean P.; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), such as zidovudine (AZT) and stavudine (d4T), cause toxicities to numerous tissues, including the liver and vasculature. While much is known about hepatic NRTI toxicity, the mechanism of toxicity in endothelial cells is incompletely understood. Human aortic endothelial and HepG2 liver cells were exposed to 1 μM AZT or d4T for up to 5 weeks. Markers of oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, NRTI phosphorylation, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, and cytotoxicity were monitored over time. In endothelial cells, AZT significantly oxidized glutathione redox potential, increased total cellular and mitochondrial-specific superoxide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased lactate release, and caused cell death from weeks 3 through 5. Toxicity occurred in the absence of di- and tri-phosphorylated AZT and mtDNA depletion. These data show that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in endothelial cells occur with a physiologically relevant concentration of AZT, and require long-term exposure to develop. In contrast, d4T did not induce endothelial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, or cytotoxicity despite the presence of d4T-triphosphate. Both drugs depleted mtDNA in HepG2 cells without causing cell death. Endothelial cells are more susceptible to AZT-induced toxicity than HepG2 cells, and AZT caused greater endothelial dysfunction than d4T because of its pro-oxidative effects. PMID:19067249

  7. The phytoestrogen alpha-zearalenol reverses endothelial dysfunction induced by oophorectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, D; Saitta, A; Galeano, M; Squadrito, G; Marino, D; Minutoli, L; Calapai, G; Deodato, B; D'Anna, R; Corrado, F; Caputi, A P; Squadrito, F

    2001-02-01

    It has been shown recently that alpha-zearalenol, a resorcyclic acid lactone, prevents bone loss in a rat model of postmenopausal bone loss. We have therefore investigated the effects of this phytoestrogen on endothelial dysfunction induced by estrogen deficiency in rats. Female mature Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a bilateral oophorectomy (OVX rats). Sham-operated animals (sham OVX rats) were used as controls. Three weeks after surgery, animals were randomized to the following treatments: alpha-zearalenol (1 mg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks), 17beta-estradiol (20 microg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks), or their vehicle (100 microl, i.m., of cottonseed oil). Two other groups of rats were treated with alpha-zearalenol or 17beta-estradiol plus the pure estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 (2.5 mg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), total plasma cholesterol, plasma estradiol, and plasma alpha-zearalenol were studied. We also investigated endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine, 10 nM to 10 microM) and endothelial-independent (sodium nitroprusside, 15 nM to 30 nM) relaxation of aortic rings, as well as N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA: 10 to 100 microM)-induced vasoconstriction and calcium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity in homogenates of lungs taken from both sham OVX rats and OVX rats. Untreated OVX rats had, compared with sham OVX animals, unchanged body weight, MAP, HR, and plasma cholesterol. In contrast oophorectomy reduced plasma estradiol levels (OVX, 2 +/- 0.5 pg/ml; sham OVX, 35 +/- 6 pg/ml), impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation and blunted L-NMA-induced contraction (L-NMA 100 microM: sham OVX, 2.7 +/- 0.3 g/mg tissue; OVX, 1.3 +/- 0.1 g/mg tissue). Moreover OVX rats showed a reduced calcium-dependent NO synthase (cNOS) activity. Treatment with alpha-zearalenol or with 17beta-estradiol reverted the endothelial dysfunction and increased cNOS activity in lung homogenates. These effects were abolished by the

  8. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W; Champion, Hunter C; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2009-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2(-)) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2S-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2(-) production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692-702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2(-) production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  9. Preclinical pulmonary capillary endothelial dysfunction is present in brain dead subjects.

    PubMed

    Glynos, Constantinos; Athanasiou, Chariclea; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Korovesi, Ioanna; Kaziani, Katerina; Livaditi, Olga; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Roussos, Charis; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary endothelium is a major metabolic organ affecting pulmonary and systemic vascular homeostasis. Brain death (BD)-induced physiologic and metabolic derangements in donors' lungs, in the absence of overt lung pathology, may cause pulmonary dysfunction and compromise post-transplant graft function. To explore the impact of BD on pulmonary endothelium, we estimated pulmonary capillary endothelium-bound (PCEB)-angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, a direct and quantifiable index of pulmonary endothelial function, in eight brain-dead patients and ten brain-injured mechanically ventilated controls. No subject suffered from acute lung injury or any other overt lung pathology. Applying indicator-dilution type techniques, we measured single-pass transpulmonary percent metabolism (%M) and hydrolysis (v) of the synthetic, biologically inactive, and highly specific for ACE substrate (3)H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro, under first order reaction conditions, and calculated lung functional capillary surface area (FCSA). Substrate %M (35 ± 6.8%) and v (0.49 ± 0.13) in BD patients were decreased as compared to controls (55.9 ± 4.9, P = 0.033 and 0.9 ± 0.15, P = 0.033, respectively), denoting decreased pulmonary endothelial enzyme activity at the capillary level; FCSA, a reflection of endothelial enzyme activity per vascular bed, was also decreased (BD patients: 1,563 ± 562 mL/min vs 4,235 ± 559 in controls; P = 0.003). We conclude that BD is associated with subtle pulmonary endothelial injury, expressed by decreased PCEB-ACE activity. The applied indicator-dilution type technique provides direct and quantifiable indices of pulmonary endothelial function at the bedside that may reveal the existence of preclinical lung pathology in potential lung donors. PMID:24015344

  10. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J.; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A.; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W.; Champion, Hunter C.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2−) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2(S)-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2− production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692–702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2− production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  11. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  12. Endothelial dysfunction in young healthy men is associated with aspirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Janus, Agnieszka; Jakubowski, Maciej; Turek, Aleksandra; Ilnicka, Paulina; Szuba, Andrzej; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between endothelial dysfunction and aspirin response in a young healthy population (102 men aged 18-40). Initial concentrations of the NO pathway metabolites (ADMA, l-arginine, SDMA), cardiovascular risk markers, oxidative stress markers (MDA, thiol index), sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, VEGF, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and arachidonate-induced platelet aggregation (to separate aspirin resistant from sensitive group) were measured. Flow-mediated-vasodilation (FMD) was measured before and after intravenous infusion of 16.0 g of l-arginine. Measurements were repeated following aspirin administration (75 mg/24 h) for 4 days. Both groups were homogenous regarding demographic and biochemical characteristics reflecting cardiovascular risk. Aspirin resistant subjects were characterized by lower baseline FMD and higher FMD following aspirin and l-arginine treatment, as compared to aspirin sensitive control. MDA and nitrotyrosine were greater, whereas thiol index was lower in aspirin resistant men. The sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin and VEGF levels were similar in the analyzed groups. Thromboxane in aspirin resistant subjects was greater both at baseline and following aspirin therapy. However, a significant decrease following aspirin treatment was present in both groups. Aspirin resistance in young men is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which could be due to oxidative stress resulting from lipid peroxidation. PMID:25697550

  13. Coffee bean polyphenols ameliorate postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Ryuji; Sugiura, Yoko; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Hashiguchi, Teruto

    2015-05-01

    To reveal the effect of coffee bean polyphenols (CBPs) on blood vessels, this study aimed to investigate the effect of CBPs on acute postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Thirteen healthy non-diabetic men (mean age, 44.9 ± 1.4 years) consumed a test beverage (active: containing CBPs, placebo: no CBPs) before a 554-kcal test meal containing 14 g of protein, 30 g of fat and 58 g of carbohydrates. Then, a crossover analysis was performed to investigate the time-dependent changes in flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the brachial artery. In the active group, the postprandial impairment of FMD was significantly improved, the two-hour postprandial nitric oxide metabolite levels were significantly increased and the six-hour postprandial urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α levels were significantly reduced compared to the placebo group. The test meal increased the levels of blood glucose, insulin and triglycerides in both groups with no significant intergroup differences. These findings indicate that CBPs intake ameliorates postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy men. PMID:25666414

  14. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-Ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  15. Ultrasound measurement of peripheral endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients: correlation with risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bosevski, Marijan; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the endothelial dysfunction (ED) in type 2 diabetic patients ultrasonographically and estimate the correlation of ED with glycemia and other cardio-metabolic risk factors. 171 patient (age 60.0 + 8.5 years) with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) were randomly included in a cross sectional study. B-mode ultrasound system with a linear transducer of 7.5 MHz was used for evaluation of flow-mediated vasodilation in brachial artery (FMV). FMV was presented as a change of brachial artery diameter at rest and after limb ischemia, previously provoked by cuff inflation. Peripheral ED was found in 77.2% (132 patients). Multivariate logistic regression model defined: age (OR 1.071, 95% CI 1.003 1,143) and plasma cholesterol (OR 4.083 95% CI 1.080 17,017) as determinants for ED. Linear multivariate analysis presented duration of diabetes (Beta 0.173, Sig 0.024), and glycemia (Beta 0.132, Sig 0.044) to be associated independently with FMV value. Estimated factors influencing FMV, might be potential therapeutic targets for presented endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:20507285

  16. Protective effect of ginseng against gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heba Hosny

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the potential protective effects of ginseng on gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats. Twenty four male albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days. The second group was administered ginseng extract (100 mg/kg, by gavage) for 7 consecutive days. Animals in the third group were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days, then exposed to single dose gamma-irradiation (6 Gy). The Fourth group received ginseng extract for 7 consecutive days, one hour later rats were exposed to gamma-irradiation. Oral administration of ginseng extract prior to irradiation produced a significant protection which was evidenced by a significant reduction in serum creatine kinase (CPK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), urea and creatinine levels with significant increase in serum total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) level. Moreover, ginseng significantly increased cardiac and renal superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, associated with a significant depletion in malondialdehyde (MDA) and NO(x) levels compared to irradiated group. This study suggests that ginseng may serve as a potential protective agent against gamma-irradiation-induced cardio-nephrotoxicity via enhancing the antioxidant activity and inhibition of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26622217

  17. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from animal studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 30% to 50% of all deaths. In patients with RA, atherosclerosis lesions occur earlier and have a more rapid evolution than in the general population. Beyond mortality, the impact of CVD on quality of life, combined with the associated increase in health-care costs, renders CVD in RA a major public health problem. Recent studies showed that patients with RA are characterized by the presence of endothelial dysfunction (ED), which is recognized as a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. By definition, ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state and proliferative and prothrombotic properties. Although the improvement of endothelial function is becoming an important element of the global management of patients with RA, the mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. Animal models of RA provide the unique opportunity to unravel the pathophysiological features of ED in RA. The present review summarizes the available data on mechanisms underlying ED in animal models of RA and proposes attractive prospects in order to discover novel therapeutic strategies of RA-associated ED. PMID:24457026

  18. The relationship between circulating TRAIL and endothelial dysfunction in subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guangda; Yue, Ling; Zhang, Junxia; Xiang, Lin; Dong, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is associated with atherosclerosis. Subclinical hypothyroidism (sHT) is associated with the increased prevalence of atherosclerotic lesions and cardiovascular events. Therefore, we hypothesized that circulating TRAIL levels are associated with endothelial dysfunction in sHT patients. Two hundred and four patients with newly diagnosed sHT and 52 healthy subjects were recruited. Circulating TRAIL concentration was measured by an ELISA, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. The mean value of circulating TRAIL in newly diagnosed sHT patients was 67.2 pg/ml, which was lower than that in controls (78.5 pg/ml, p < 0.001). By dividing the distribution of FMD levels into quartiles, TRAIL levels were increased gradually with the increase of FMD levels (p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that serum TRAIL levels were independently associated with FMD (p = 0.007). By logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for lower FMD levels was reduced by 12.1 % per 1 pg/ml increase in serum TRAIL concentration after adjustment for multivariate metabolic factors [OR (95 % CI); 0.879 (0.721-0.973)]. Circulating TRAIL level decreased in newly diagnosed sHT patients and is positively associated with endothelial function, suggesting that circulating TRAIL level may be a protective marker of endothelial function in sHT patients. PMID:25294014

  19. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  20. Deletion of sirtuin 6 accelerates endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Wang, Jiaojiao; Huang, Xiaoyang; Li, Zhuoming; Liu, Peiqing

    2016-06-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a chromatin-associated deacetylase that plays a leading role in genomic stability and aging. However, the precise role of SIRT6 in atherosclerosis, an aging-associated cardiovascular disease, remains elusive. This study aims at defining the role of SIRT6 in atherosclerotic lesion development. SIRT6 messenger RNA and protein expression are markedly decreased in atherosclerotic aortas of apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-cholesterol diet. SIRT6 was knocked down in ApoE(-/-) mice using small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) lentivirus injection. SIRT6-shRNA-treated ApoE(-/-) mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased plaque size (in aortic sinus, aortic root and en face aorta), and augmented plaque vulnerability (evidenced by increased necrotic core areas and macrophage accumulation and reduced collagen content). At the cellular level, SIRT6 depletion by RNA interference in human umbilical vein endothelial cells significantly increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by inducing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1. Consistently, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was significantly upregulated in aortic endothelium of SIRT6-shRNA-treated ApoE(-/-) mice compared with controls. In sum, the aforementioned findings suggest that SIRT6 is a primary negative regulation factor in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis development. As a result, SIRT6 is a promising therapeutic target for treating atherosclerosis and its cardiovascular complications. PMID:26924042

  1. Oxidative stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction in mouse models of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Sotov, Valentin; Letarte, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular dysplasia caused by mutations in endoglin (ENG; HHT1) or activin receptor-like kinase (ALK1; HHT2) genes, coding for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily receptors. We demonstrated previously that endoglin and ALK1 interact with endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and affect its activation. Endothelial cells deficient in endoglin or ALK1 proteins show eNOS uncoupling, reduced NO, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In this study, we measured NO and H(2)O(2) levels in several organs of adult Eng and Alk1 heterozygous mice, to ascertain whether decreased NO and increased ROS production is a generalized manifestation of HHT. A significant reduction in NO and increase in ROS production were found in several organs, known to be affected in patients. ROS overproduction in mutant mice was attributed to eNOS, as it was L-NAME inhibitable. Mitochondrial ROS contribution, blocked by antimycin, was highest in liver while NADPH oxidase, inhibited by apocynin, was a major source of ROS in the other tissues. However, there was no difference in antimycin- and apocynin-inhibitable ROS production between mutant and control mice. Our results indicate that eNOS-derived ROS contributes to endothelial dysfunction and likely predisposes to disease manifestations in several organs of HHT patients. PMID:23320130

  2. Tetrahydrobiopterin Role in human umbilical vein endothelial dysfunction in maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Andrea; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Salsoso, Rocío; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Pardo, Fabián; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia (MPH) allows a proper foetal development; however, maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia (MSPH) associates with foetal endothelial dysfunction and early development of atherosclerosis. MSPH courses with reduced endothelium-dependent dilation of the human umbilical vein due to reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity compared with MPH. Whether MSPH modifies the availability of the nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin is unknown. We investigated whether MSPH-associated lower umbilical vein vascular reactivity results from reduced bioavailability of tetrahydrobiopterin. Total cholesterol <7.2mmol/L was considered as maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia (n=72 women) and ≥7.2mmol/L as MSPH (n=35 women). Umbilical veins rings were used for vascular reactivity assays (wire myography), and primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to measure nitric oxide synthase, GTP cyclohydrolase 1, and dihydrofolate reductase expression and activity, as well as tetrahydrobiopterin content. MSPH reduced the umbilical vein rings relaxation caused by calcitonine gene-related peptide, a phenomenon partially improved by incubation with sepiapterin. HUVECs from MSPH showed lower nitric oxide synthase activity (l-citrulline synthesis from l-arginine) without changes in its protein abundance, as well as reduced tetrahydrobiopterin level compared with MPH, a phenomenon reversed by incubation with sepiapterin. Expression and activity of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 was lower in MSPH, without changes in dihydrofolate reductase expression. MSPH is a pathophysiological condition reducing human umbilical vein reactivity due to lower bioavailability of tetrahydrobiopterin leading to lower NOS activity in the human umbilical vein endothelium. PMID:26826019

  3. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and the effects of treatment with levothyroxine

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Nasmi; Khalili, Noushin; Khosravi, Elham; Nourbakhsh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism (SHT) may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. We compared endothelial function between SHT patients and euthyroid individuals, and evaluated the effects of levothyroxine therapy on endothelial function in the patients. Materials and Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and intima-media thickness (IMT) were assessed in SHT patients and healthy controls (n = 25 in each group). Patients then received levothyroxine (50 μg/day) for 2 months, and the FMD and IMT assessments were repeated. Results: Patients and controls were similar in IMT (0.56 ± 0.09 vs. 0.58 ± 0.08 mm, P = 0.481), but FMD was lower in patients than in controls (4.95 ± 2.02 vs. 6.50 ± 2.57%, P = 0.011). A significant increase was observed in FMD (4.11 ± 2.37%, P = 0.001), but not in IMT (−0.004 ± 0.020 mm, P = 0.327), after levothyroxine therapy among the patients. Conclusions: Patients with SHT have endothelial dysfunction which responds to levothyroxine therapy. Randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27099851

  4. The mineralocorticoid receptor in endothelial physiology and disease: novel concepts in the understanding of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Mammi, Caterina; Jaffe, Iris Z; Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Aversa, Antonio; Mendelsohn, Michael E; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe M C

    2008-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone that controls blood pressure by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, and regulating genes that play a role in salt and water homeostasis in the kidney. Dysregulation of the mineralocorticoid system reveals its crucial role in various human diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiac failure, mineralocorticoid resistance, and disorders of the nervous system. Recently, experimental animal models of mineralocorticoid/salt-induced hypertension and atherosclerosis have revealed an epithelial, pro-inflammatory role for MR activation. Extensive investigation has begun to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of MR activation which involve its direct role in cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. More specifically, in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and disease, including diabetes, hypertension, and/or congestive heart failure, an excess of MR activation has been shown to have a negative impact on endothelial function hence disrupting the physiological balance between vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Such a mechanism may play a role in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (ED), a condition that occurs frequently in patients with increased cardiovascular risk and involves endothelial dysregulation of vascular relaxation. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest concepts in MR signaling, with particular attention to the endothelium, and to discuss the potential benefits of tissue-selective MR blockade in treating subsets of ED patients, such as those with congestive heart failure and hypertension, in which the MR system may be over activated. PMID:19128227

  5. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  6. Citreoviridin Enhances Atherogenesis in Hypercholesterolemic ApoE-Deficient Mice via Upregulating Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Sun, Tao; Li, Cheng; Liu, Jian-Bao; Li, Qun-Wei; Jiang, Bao-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory response are early events during initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. In vitro studies have described that CIT markedly upregulates expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of endothelial cells, which result from NF-κB activation induced by CIT. In order to determine whether it plays a role in atherogenesis in vivo, we conducted the study to investigate the effects of CIT on atherosclerotic plaque development and inflammatory response in apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Five-week-old apoE-/- mice were fed high-fat diets and treated with CIT for 15 weeks, followed by assay of atherosclerotic lesions. Nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were detected in serum. Levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), VEGF, and ET-1 in plaque areas of artery walls were examined. NF-κB p65 expression and NF-κB activation in aorta also were assessed. CIT treatment significantly augmented atherosclerotic plaques and increased expressions of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, VEGF and ET-1 in aorta. Mechanistic studies showed that activation of NF-κB was significantly elevated by CIT treatment, indicating the effect of CIT on atherosclerosis may be regulated by activation of NF-κB. PMID:25933220

  7. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

    PubMed

    Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s(-1); P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s(-1); P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress. PMID:26747508

  8. p53 protects against LPS-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Birmpas, Charalampos; Joshi, Atul; Thangjam, Gagan; Catravas, John D.

    2015-01-01

    New therapies toward heart and blood vessel disorders may emerge from the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. Several independent studies suggest potent anti-inflammatory activities of those agents in human tissues. The molecular mechanisms responsible for their protective effects in the vasculature remain unclear. The present study demonstrates that the transcription factor p53, an Hsp90 client protein, is crucial for the maintenance of vascular integrity, protects again LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, and is involved in the mediation of the anti-inflammatory activity of Hsp90 inhibitors in lung tissues. p53 silencing by siRNA decreased transendothelial resistance (a measure of endothelial barrier function). A similar effect was induced by the p53 inhibitor pifithrin, which also potentiated the LPS-induced hyperpermeability in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC). On the other hand, p53 induction by nutlin suppressed the LPS-induced vascular barrier dysfunction. LPS decreased p53 expression in lung tissues and that effect was blocked by pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allyl-amino-demethoxy-geldanamycin suppressed the LPS-induced overexpression of the p53 negative regulator MDMX as well as p53 and MDM2 (another p53 negative regulator) phosphorylation in HLMVEC. Both negative p53 regulators were downregulated by LPS in vivo. Chemically induced p53 overexpression resulted in the suppression of LPS-induced RhoA activation and MLC2 phosphorylation, whereas p53 suppression caused the opposite effects. These observations reveal new mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory actions of Hsp90 inhibitors, i.e., the induction of the transcription factor p53, which in turn can orchestrate robust vascular anti-inflammatory responses both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25713322

  9. Intake of heat-expanded amaranth grain reverses endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Caselato-Sousa, Valeria Maria; Ozaki, Michiko Regina; de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2014-12-01

    This study reports the new functional property of amaranth grain against diet-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbits. Twenty-seven New Zealand rabbits were fed either a standard diet (SD/G1) or a hypercholesterolemic diet (Hichol) for 28 days. On day 29, the Hichol group was subdivided into four groups and begun receiving the following diets for 21 days: G2: SD + amaranth, G3: Hichol + amaranth, G4: SD alone, and G5: Hichol alone, while G1 continued to receive SD for 21 days. Amaranth intake restored endothelial function (G2, G3) to nearly normal during the 21-day recovery besides substantially lowering total and LDL blood cholesterol levels. This effect was not seen by simply correcting the diet (G4). Upon continuance of Hichol, however, amaranth supplementation did show some contribution to the cholesterol-lowering effect (G4 vs. G3). On day 49, feeding Hichol without the help of amaranth, harm was further magnified by lowering HDL-cholesterol (G5). Fecal cholesterol was found increased in groups that ingested amaranth (G2, G3), but no significant impact from either supplementation or diet reversal was found in fecal bile acids. Amaranth supplementation granted some protection against tissue cholesterol (G5) and tissue peroxidation (G3). It is concluded that even in concurrence with a hypercholesterolemic diet, intake of heat-expanded amaranth can revert an associated endothelial dysfunction besides incrementing fecal cholesterol excretion and lowering blood and tissue cholesterol oxidation in dyslipidemic rabbits. These results supported the notion of a lipid peroxidation process occurring with high cholesterol intakes. PMID:25347416

  10. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with the severity of cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Nezu, Tomohisa; Hosomi, Naohisa; Aoki, Shiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Araki, Mutsuko; Mukai, Tomoya; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Higashi, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-04-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease, a disease that involves white matter lesions (WMLs) and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), is thought to be associated with endothelial dysfunction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) has been used to measure endothelium-dependent vasodilation. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between endothelial function (as measured by FMD) and cerebral small vessel disease. Patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease and comorbidities were enrolled in this study (n=102; 69 males, 70.1±9.2 years). The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of WMLs, which were assessed by Fazekas classification; grades 0 to 1 as mild WMLs group and grades 2 to 3 as severe WMLs group. A gradient-echo MRI was performed in 96 patients (94.1%) to evaluate whether CMBs were present. The patients in the severe WMLs group (n=40) were older (P=0.001), more frequently exhibited hypertension (P=0.045) and diabetes mellitus (P=0.026) and possessed lower FMD values (P<0.001) than the patients in the mild WMLs group (n=62). CMBs were observed in 30 patients (31.3%). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, the optimal FMD cutoff values for predicting the presence of severe WMLs and CMBs were 3.9% and 3.7%, respectively. On multivariate logistic analysis, FMD <4.0% (odds ratio 9.50; 95% confidence interval 3.55-28.83) was independently associated with severe WMLs. Additionally, FMD <3.8% (5.82; 2.23-16.50) was also associated with the presence of CMBs. Endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by FMD may be predictive of the severity of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:25672660

  12. Impairment of IKCa channels contributes to uteroplacental endothelial dysfunction in rat diabetic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bonev, Adrian D.; Phillips, Julie; Gokin, Alexander P.; Veilleux, Kelsey; Oppenheimer, Karen; Goloman, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes in rat pregnancy is associated with impaired vasodilation of the maternal uteroplacental vasculature. In the present study, we explored the role of endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+-activated K+ channels of small conductance (SKCa channels) and intermediate conductance (IKCa channels) in diabetes-induced uterine vascular dysfunction. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin to second-day pregnant rats and confirmed by the development of maternal hyperglycemia. Control rats were injected with citrate buffer. Changes in smooth muscle cell intracellular Ca2+ concentration, membrane potential, and vasodilation induced by SKCa/IKCa channel activators were studied in uteroplacental arteries of control and diabetic rats. The impact of diabetes on SKCa- and IKCa-mediated currents was explored in freshly dissociated ECs. NS309 evoked a potent vasodilation that was effectively inhibited by TRAM-34 but not by apamin. NS309-induced smooth muscle cell intracellular Ca2+ concentration, membrane potential, and dilator responses were significantly diminished by diabetes; N-cyclohexyl-N-2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinamine (CyPPA)-evoked responses were not affected. Ca2+-activated ion currents in ECs were insensitive to paxilline, markedly inhibited by charybdotoxin (ChTX), and diminished by apamin. NS309-induced EC currents were generated mostly due to activation of ChTX-sensitive channels. Maternal diabetes resulted in a significant reduction in ChTX-sensitive currents with no effect on apamin-sensitive or CyPPA-induced currents. We concluded that IKCa channels play a prevalent role over SKCa channels in the generation of endothelial K+ currents and vasodilation of uteroplacental arteries. Impaired function of IKCa channels importantly contributes to diabetes-induced uterine endothelial dysfunction. Therapeutic restoration of IKCa channel function may be a novel strategy for improvement of maternal uteroplacental blood flow in pregnancies

  13. Impairment of IKCa channels contributes to uteroplacental endothelial dysfunction in rat diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gokina, Natalia I; Bonev, Adrian D; Phillips, Julie; Gokin, Alexander P; Veilleux, Kelsey; Oppenheimer, Karen; Goloman, Gabriela

    2015-08-15

    Diabetes in rat pregnancy is associated with impaired vasodilation of the maternal uteroplacental vasculature. In the present study, we explored the role of endothelial cell (EC) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels of small conductance (SKCa channels) and intermediate conductance (IKCa channels) in diabetes-induced uterine vascular dysfunction. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin to second-day pregnant rats and confirmed by the development of maternal hyperglycemia. Control rats were injected with citrate buffer. Changes in smooth muscle cell intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, membrane potential, and vasodilation induced by SKCa/IKCa channel activators were studied in uteroplacental arteries of control and diabetic rats. The impact of diabetes on SKCa- and IKCa-mediated currents was explored in freshly dissociated ECs. NS309 evoked a potent vasodilation that was effectively inhibited by TRAM-34 but not by apamin. NS309-induced smooth muscle cell intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, membrane potential, and dilator responses were significantly diminished by diabetes; N-cyclohexyl-N-2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinamine (CyPPA)-evoked responses were not affected. Ca(2+)-activated ion currents in ECs were insensitive to paxilline, markedly inhibited by charybdotoxin (ChTX), and diminished by apamin. NS309-induced EC currents were generated mostly due to activation of ChTX-sensitive channels. Maternal diabetes resulted in a significant reduction in ChTX-sensitive currents with no effect on apamin-sensitive or CyPPA-induced currents. We concluded that IKCa channels play a prevalent role over SKCa channels in the generation of endothelial K(+) currents and vasodilation of uteroplacental arteries. Impaired function of IKCa channels importantly contributes to diabetes-induced uterine endothelial dysfunction. Therapeutic restoration of IKCa channel function may be a novel strategy for improvement of maternal uteroplacental blood flow in

  14. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  15. Endothelial dysfunction in young patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyh-Ming; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Hang, Chi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Kan; Fang, Chi-Yuan; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Guo, Gary Bih-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of young patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), because they have different clinical characteristics compared with older patients. We investigated endothelial function in relation to AMI in this young age group. From January 2005 to March 2008, 29 of 31 consecutive patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were <40 years old and received direct percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were enrolled in the study. We compared the coronary risk factors and flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in the brachial artery between the acute STEMI patients and 29 age- and gender-matched controls that did not have AMI. Baseline brachial artery diameter and responses to glyceryl trinitrate were similar between the two groups. In contrast, FMD was significantly lower in the young acute STEMI group than in the control (3.47 ± 4.08 vs. 7.45 ± 4.67%, p = 0.001) and correlated with the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk score. The impaired FMD in the acute STEMI group was independent of smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, nitrate use, or body mass index. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only FMD and age, not traditional cardiovascular risk factors, were found to be significantly associated with acute STEMI (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% CI 0.63-0.90, p < 0.01). In conclusion, independent of conventional risk factors, severe endothelial dysfunction occurs in young acute STEMI patients and correlates with TIMI score. In addition to age, impaired FMD is the only significant factor associated with acute STEMI in this young population. PMID:20949355

  16. Diffuse endothelial dysfunction is common to ANCA associated systemic vasculitis and polyarteritis nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Filer, A; Gardner-Medwin, J; Thambyrajah, J; Raza, K; Carruthers, D; Stevens, R; Liu, L; Lowe, S; Townend, J; Bacon, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Excess cardiovascular mortality complicates systemic rheumatic disease, suggesting an accelerated atheromatous process, which it has been proposed relates to the vascular inflammation common in such diseases. Impaired endothelium dependent vasodilatation is an early marker of atheromatous disease. It has previously been shown that such endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) occurring in the brachial artery can complicate primary systemic necrotising vasculitis (SNV). Objective: To determine if ECD occurs in a wider spectrum of primary SNV, if it is restricted to the major arteries, and whether vasculitis subgroup, ANCA status, or renal involvement influenced the endothelial responses. Methods: Fifty four patients attending the Birmingham vasculitis clinic, including patients with a range of ANCA and non-ANCA associated primary vasculitides, and a group of age matched controls were recruited. The length of patient follow up and disease activity was variable. Disease activity, damage scores, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded before assessment of flow mediated brachial artery vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound. Dermal microvascular responses to acetylcholine were also measured in 32 patients and 21 controls by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results: ECD was demonstrated in all primary SNV subgroups of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis and in polyarteritis nodosa, compared with controls. Significant impairment occurred in both vascular beds, regardless of vessel size targeted in the inflammatory vasculitis, ANCA association and titre, or renal involvement. Conclusions: Diffuse endothelial dysfunction, a predictor of atherosclerotic disease, is found extensively in primary systemic vasculitis. Involvement of different vascular beds is independent of target vessel size or ANCA association, and is unrelated to local disease expression. It is suggested that this results from a systemic response that may be a consequence of primary vasculitis

  17. Circulating Microparticles from Crohn’s Disease Patients Cause Endothelial and Vascular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Daniela; Reimund, Jean-Marie; Tesse, Angela; Viennot, Stéphanie; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Bretagne, Anne-Laure; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2013-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs) are small vesicles released during cell activation or apoptosis. They are involved in coagulation, inflammation and vascular dysfunction in several diseases. We characterized circulating MPs from Crohn’s Disease (CD) patients and evaluated their effects on endothelial function and vascular reactivity after in vivo injection into mice. Methods Circulating MPs and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry from blood samples from healthy subjects (HS) and inactive or active CD patients. MPs were intravenously injected into mice. After 24 hours, endothelial function and vascular reactivity were assessed. Results Circulating MP levels did not differ between HS and inactive CD patients except for an increase in leukocyte-derived MPs in CD. Active CD patients compared to HS displayed increased total circulating MPs, pro-coagulant MPs and those from platelets, endothelium, erythrocytes, leukocytes, activated leukocytes and activated platelets. A significant correlation was found between total levels of MPs, those from platelets and endothelial cells, and the Harvey-Bradshaw clinical activity index. MPs from CD, but not from HS, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mice aorta and flow-induced dilation in mice small mesenteric arteries, MPs from inactive CD patients being more effective than those from active patients. CDMPs induced vascular hypo-reactivity in aorta that was prevented by a nitric oxide (NO)-synthase inhibitor, and was associated with a subtle alteration of the balance between NO, reactive oxygen species and the release of COX metabolites. Conclusions We provide evidence that MPs from CD patients significantly alter endothelial and vascular function and therefore, may play a role in CD pathophysiology, at least by contributing to uncontrolled vascular-dependent intestinal damage. PMID:24019899

  18. Retrospectively gated MRI for in vivo assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and endothelial permeability in murine models of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bar, Anna; Skórka, Tomasz; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Sternak, Magdalena; Bartel, Żaneta; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is linked to impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and permeability changes. Here, we quantify both of these phenomena associated with endothelial dysfunction by MRI in vivo in mice. Endothelial function was evaluated in the brachiocephalic artery (BCA) and left carotid artery (LCA) in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice as compared with control mice (C57BL/6J). The 3D IntraGate® FLASH sequence was used for evaluation of changes in vessels' cross-sectional area (CSA) and volume following acetylcholine (Ach) administration. Evaluation of endothelial permeability after administration of contrast agent (Galbumin, BioPAL) was based on the variable flip angle method for the assessment of parameters based on the relaxation time (T1 ) value. In order to confirm the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in response to Ach, L-NAME-treated mice were also analyzed. To confirm that endothelial permeability changes accompany the impairment of Ach-dependent vasodilatation, permeability changes were analyzed in isolated, perfused carotid artery. In C57BL/6J mice, Ach-induced vasodilatation led to an approximately 25% increase in CSA in both vessels, which was temporarily dissociated from the effect of Ach on heart rate. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) or HFD-fed mice Ach induced a paradoxical vasoconstriction that amounted to approximately 30% and 50% decreases in CSA of BCA and LCA respectively. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and HFD-fed mice endothelial permeability in BCA was also increased (fall in T1 by about 25%). In L-NAME-treated mice Ach-induced vasodilatation in BCA was lost. In isolated, perfused artery from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice endothelial permeability was increased. MRI-based assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by Ach and endothelial permeability using a retrospectively self-gated 3D gradient-echo sequence (IntraGate® FLASH) enables the reliable detection of systemic endothelial dysfunction in mice and provides an important tool

  19. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  20. Age related vascular endothelial function following lifelong sedentariness: positive impact of cardiovascular conditioning without further improvement following low frequency high intensity interval training

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Fergal M.; Herbert, Peter; Ratcliffe, John W.; New, Karl J.; Baker, Julien S.; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with diffuse impairments in vascular endothelial function and traditional aerobic exercise is known to ameliorate these changes. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving vascular function in aging men with existing disease, but its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in otherwise healthy sedentary aging. However, the frequency of commonly used HIIT protocols may be poorly tolerated in older cohorts. Therefore, the present study investigated the effectiveness of lower frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) on vascular function in a cohort of lifelong sedentary (SED; n =22, age 62.7 ± 5.2 years) men compared with a positive control group of lifelong exercisers (LEX; n = 17, age 61.1 ± 5.4 years). The study consisted of three assessment phases; enrolment to the study (Phase A), following 6 weeks of conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B) and following 6 weeks of low frequency HIIT in both SED and LEX (LfHIIT; Phase C). Conditioning exercise improved FMD in SED (3.4 ± 1.5% to 4.9 ± 1.1%; P <0.01) such that the difference between groups on enrolment (3.4 ± 1.5% vs. 5.3 ± 1.4%; P <0.01) was abrogated. This was maintained but not further improved following LfHIIT in SED whilst FMD remained unaffected by LfHIIT in LEX. In conclusion, LfHIIT is effective at maintaining improvements in vascular function achieved during conditioning exercise in SED. LfHIIT is a well‐tolerated and effective exercise mode for reducing cardiovascular risk and maintaining but does not improve vascular function beyond that achieved by conditioning exercise in aging men, irrespective of fitness level. PMID:25626864

  1. Protection against vascular endothelial dysfunction by polyphenols in sea buckthorn berries in rats with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Suo, Yourui; Chen, Dongli; Tong, Li

    2016-07-19

    Chronic hyperlipemia increases the incidence of vascular endothelial dysfunction and can even induce cardiovascular disease. Sea buckthorn contains a host of bioactives such as flavonoids and polyphenols that can prevent the development of cardiovascular disease. The current study isolated active ingredients, polyphenols, from sea buckthorn berries (SVP) and orally administered SVP at a dose of 7-28 mg/kg. This treatment significantly reduced serum lipids, it enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and it decreased the level of serum TNF-α and IL-6. SVP also alleviate vascular impairment by decreasing the expression of eNOS, ICAM-1, and LOX-1 mRNA and proteins in aortas of rats with hyperlipidemia. Based on these findings, SVP has antioxidant action and it protects endothelium. PMID:27237219

  2. Response to LPS Injection after Anti-Orthostatic Hypokinesia in Rats, an Hypothesis for Endothelial Dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navasiolava, N. M.; Pashkevich, S. G.; Custaud, M. A.; Emelianova, A. A.; Kulchitsky, V. A.

    2008-06-01

    The indirect estimation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by measuring of IL-6 serum level after LPS injection was carried out. We found a decreased response to LPS injection as the result of previous LPS translocation in rats after head-down tilt -45° (HDT) during 7 days and in rats after the repeated injection of LPS in 7 days after the first injection. Under electron microscopy, fringe-looking protrusions in vessel lumen, disturbance of basal membrane integrity and infringement of interendothelial junctions, adhesion of leukocytes were found in arterioles of these groups of animals. So, we suppose that translocation of LPS from gut could occur in simulated weightlessness model in rats (HDT) and could be associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shehatou, George S G; Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  4. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  5. Enhanced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats exposed to fine particles.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu-Chen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Lee, Chung-Te; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2005-11-01

    The association between ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Recent studies suggest that diabetic patients are at greater risk for PM-associated cardiovascular events. Although diabetes and PM exposure individually have been reported to be associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction, it is not clear whether PM may induce synergistic interaction effects on these parameters in diabetics. Strepotozotocin-induced diabetic (n=4) and healthy (n=4) rats were intratracheally administered with PM2.5 collected from a busy traffic area in a dose of 200 microg suspended in 0.5 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The same number of rats was exposed to PBS as controls. Cell and differential counts and protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage. Markers of 8-hydroxydeoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and [nitrate+nitrite], an indicator of nitric oxide (NO) production, in addition to C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in peripheral blood were also determined. Our results showed that diabetic rats were associated with increased 8-OHdG, IL-6, and ET-1 decreased [nitrate+nitrite]. In nondiabetic rats PM exposure was also associated with increased 8-OHdG, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and CRP but decreased [nitrate+nitrite]. Interestingly, increases of 8-OHdG and ET-1 after PM exposure were more prominent in diabetic rats than in nondiabetic rats. The general linear model further indicated that there were interactions between diabetes and PM on 8-OHdG (P<0.01) and ET-1 (P=0.08). We suggest that PM exposure may enhance the risk of cardiovascular diseases through interaction between PM and diabetes on excess reactive oxygen species generation and endothelial dysfunction. These findings provide further support for previous epidemiological studies. PMID:16307975

  6. Glutathione-S-transferase P protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to tobacco smoke

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; Prough, Russell A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke impairs endothelium-dependent arterial dilation. Reactive constituents of cigarette smoke are metabolized and detoxified by glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs). Although polymorphisms in GST genes are associated with the risk of cancer in smokers, the role of these enzymes in regulating the cardiovascular effects of smoking has not been studied. The P isoform of GST (GSTP), which catalyzes the conjugation of electrophilic molecules in cigarette smoke such as acrolein, was expressed in high abundance in the mouse lung and aorta. Exposure to tobacco smoke for 3 days (5 h/day) decreased total plasma protein. These changes were exaggerated in GSTP−/− mice. Aortic rings isolated from tobacco smoke-exposed GSTP−/− mice showed greater attenuation of ACh-evoked relaxation than those from GSTP+/+ mice. The lung, plasma, and aorta of mice exposed to tobacco smoke or acrolein (for 5 h) accumulated more acrolein-adducted proteins than those tissues of mice exposed to air, indicating that exposure to tobacco smoke results in the systemic delivery of acrolein. Relative to GSTP+/+ mice, modification of some proteins by acrolein was increased in the aorta of GSTP−/− mice. Aortic rings prepared from GSTP−/− mice that inhaled acrolein (1 ppm, 5 h/day for 3 days) or those exposed to acrolein in an organ bath showed diminished ACh-induced arterial relaxation more strongly than GSTP+/+ mice. Acrolein-induced endothelial dysfunction was prevented by pretreatment of the aorta with N-acetylcysteine. These results indicate that GSTP protects against the endothelial dysfunction induced by tobacco smoke exposure and that this protection may be related to the detoxification of acrolein or other related cigarette smoke constituents. PMID:19270193

  7. Nebivolol has protective effect against endothelial and ileal dysfunction due to I/R.

    PubMed

    Soydan, Güray; Cekiç, Edip Güvenç; Tuncer, Meral

    2011-03-01

    In this study, two enantiomers of the drug, L-nebivolol and racemic nebivolol, were used to measure and compare their ability to prevent endothelial dysfunction, disturbed ileal contractility, and ileal injury induced by I/R. The superior mesenteric artery of male Sprague-Dawley rats was occluded for 45 min to induce ischemia, and then the clamp was removed for 60-min reperfusion. Drugs or saline were administered prior to the surgical procedure in the I/R and sham-operated groups. Vasodilation in the third branch of the mesenteric artery was evaluated with a myograph system. Isometric contractions of the ileal segments in response to acetylcholine or electrical field stimulation (EFS) (120 V, 2-ms pulse duration for 5 s, 1-20 Hz) were recorded on a polygraph. Additionally, the ileal segments were examined histopathologically. Acetylcholine-induced relaxation of the mesenteric artery, precontracted by submaximal phenylephrine, markedly decreased after I/R. L-nebivolol pretreatment reversed this relaxation, but racemic nebivolol did not. Contractions induced by both acetylcholine and EFS were significantly reduced after I/R. L-nebivolol, but not racemic nebivolol, prevented this reduction in the acetylcholine-induced contractions. I/R-induced reduction was prevented by L-nebivolol only in response to EFS of 20 Hz. Intestinal I/R caused severe ischemic injury in the rat ileum, which was prevented by L-nebivolol, but not racemic nebivolol. Control responses were not affected by L-nebivolol or racemic nebivolol. These results suggest that L-nebivolol had a protective effect against both endothelial dysfunction of the mesenteric artery and ileal injury induced by intestinal I/R; however, similar effects were not observed for racemic nebivolol. PMID:19922953

  8. Extracellular but not cytosolic superoxide dismutase protects against oxidant-mediated endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Foresman, Erin L; Miller, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide (O2 (•-)) contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease. Generation of O2 (•-) occurs in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments. We hypothesized that the gene transfer of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or extracellular SOD (SOD3) to blood vessels would differentially protect against O2 (•-)-mediated endothelial-dependent dysfunction. Aortic ring segments from New Zealand rabbits were incubated with adenovirus (Ad) containing the gene for Escherichia coli β-galactosidase, SOD1, or SOD3. Activity assays confirmed functional overexpression of both SOD3 and SOD1 isoforms in aorta 24 h following gene transfer. Histochemical staining for β-galactosidase showed gene transfer occurred in the endothelium and adventitia. Next, vessels were prepared for measurement of isometric tension in Kreb's buffer containing xanthine. After precontraction with phenylephrine, xanthine oxidase impaired relaxation to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (ACh, max relaxation 33±4% with XO vs. 64±3% without XO, p<0.05), whereas relaxation to the endothelium-independent dilator sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. In the presence of XO, maximal relaxation to ACh was improved in vessels incubated with AdSOD3 (55±2%, p<0.05 vs. control) but not AdSOD1 (34±4%). We conclude that adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of SOD3, but not SOD1, protects the aorta from xanthine/XO-mediated endothelial dysfunction. These data provide important insight into the location and enzymatic source of O2 (•-) production in vascular disease. PMID:24024163

  9. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  10. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in rats is associated with erectile dysfunction by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weijun; Xiong, Lei; Bin Yang; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCy) on penile erectile function in a rat model, a methionine-rich diet was used in which erectile function, the reproductive system, and nitric oxide synthase were characterized. The intracavernous pressure, apomorphine experiments, measurement of oxidative stress, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity were utilized. Our results showed that erections in the middle-dose, high-dose, and interference (INF) groups were significantly lower than the control (P < 0.05). INF group, being fed with vitamins B and folic acid, demonstrated markedly improved penile erections compared with the middle-dose group (P < 0.05). HHCy-induced eNOS and phospho-eNOS protein expression was reduced and the antioxidant effect was markedly impaired. The data of the present data provide evidence that HHCy is a vascular risk factor for erectile dysfunction by impairing cavernosa endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Intake of vitamins B can alleviate this abnormality. PMID:27221552

  11. [Effect of intravenous laser blood irradiation on endothelial dysfunction in patients with hypertensive disease].

    PubMed

    Burduli, N M; Aleksandrova, O M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study effect of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI) on endothelial dysfunction in 120 patients (mean age 53.4 +/- 1.3 yr) with grade I-II hypertensive disease (HD) allocated to 2 groups. Traditional drug therapy given to patients of control group was supplemented by ILBI using a Mulat laser therapy device in the study group. Endothelial function was evaluated from the total plasma concentration of stable NOx metabolites, nitrates (NO3-), nitrites (NO2-), and Willebrand's factor. HD patients were found to have elevated activity of the Willebrand factor and show 3 types of response of the NO generating system: (1) decreased NO synthesis, (2) lack of its changes, and (3) increased NO synthesis. NO production in HD patients negatively correlated with systolic (r = -0.59) and diastolic (r = - 0.64) arterial pressure (AP) which suggests the relationship between decreased NO production and elevated AP. Inclusion of ILBl in the therapy of HD resulted in a significant decrease of Willebrand's factor activity and normalization of the NO level regardless of its initial value. PMID:19670711

  12. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in rats is associated with erectile dysfunction by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weijun; Xiong, Lei; Bin Yang; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCy) on penile erectile function in a rat model, a methionine-rich diet was used in which erectile function, the reproductive system, and nitric oxide synthase were characterized. The intracavernous pressure, apomorphine experiments, measurement of oxidative stress, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity were utilized. Our results showed that erections in the middle-dose, high-dose, and interference (INF) groups were significantly lower than the control (P < 0.05). INF group, being fed with vitamins B and folic acid, demonstrated markedly improved penile erections compared with the middle-dose group (P < 0.05). HHCy-induced eNOS and phospho-eNOS protein expression was reduced and the antioxidant effect was markedly impaired. The data of the present data provide evidence that HHCy is a vascular risk factor for erectile dysfunction by impairing cavernosa endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Intake of vitamins B can alleviate this abnormality. PMID:27221552

  13. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction induced by unilateral as compared to bilateral thoracic irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'Ao, C.H.; Solliday, N.H.

    1987-07-01

    Rats were sacrificed 2 months after a single dose of 10-30 Gy of /sup 60/Co gamma rays delivered to either a right unilateral or a bilateral thoracic port. Four indices of lung endothelial function were measured: the activities of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator (PLA) and the production of prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane (TXA2). The number of macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and the degree of right ventricular hypertrophy (an index of pulmonary hypertension) also were determined. Right lung ACE and PLA activity decreased linearly, and PGI2 and TXA2 production increased linearly with increasing radiation dose. The response curves for right unilateral and bilateral thoracic irradiation were not significantly different. In contrast, bilateral irradiation was more toxic than unilateral, since rats exposed to the former exhibited decreased body weight, an increased incidence of pleural effusions, an increase in the number of macrophages recovered by BAL, and right ventricular hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that pulmonary endothelial dysfunction induced by hemithorax irradiation represents a direct response of the endothelium to radiation injury and is not secondary to other phenomena such as shunting of function to the shielded lung.

  14. Erythropoietin prevents endothelial dysfunction in GTP-cyclohydrolase I-deficient hph1 mice

    PubMed Central

    d'Uscio, Livius V.; Santhanam, Anantha V.R.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we used the mutant hph-1 mouse model, that has deficiency in GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I) activity, to test the hypothesis that erythropoietin (EPO) protects aortic wall from oxidative stress induced by uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Both GTPCH I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels were reduced in hph-1 mice while 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2) levels were significantly increased. Furthermore, BH4 deficiency caused increased production of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide in the aorta thus resulting in impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine. Treatment of hph1 mice with recombinant human EPO (1000 U/kg, s.c. for three days) significantly decreased superoxide anion production by eNOS and improved BH4 to 7,8-BH2 ratio in aortas. EPO also significantly decreased production of hydrogen peroxide and improved endothelium-dependent relaxations in aortas of hph1 mice. In addition, EPO treatment increased protein expressions of copper-/zinc-superoxide dismutase, manganese-superoxide dismutase, and catalase in the aorta of hph1 mice. Our findings demonstrate that treatment with EPO prevented oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction caused by eNOS uncoupling. Increased vascular expressions of antioxidants appear to be an important molecular mechanism underlying vascular protection by EPO during chronic BH4 deficiency. PMID:25490417

  15. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent “natural” antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47phox and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II–induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress–related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress–mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  16. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Jamaira A.; Clerici, Stefano P.; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rossoni, Luciana V.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase–derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue–derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  17. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent "natural" antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II-induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress-related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  18. Antioxidants, endothelial dysfunction, and DCS: in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Mazur, Aleksandra; Guerrero, François; Lambrechts, Kate; Buzzacott, Peter; Belhomme, Marc; Theron, Michaël

    2015-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a well-known effect in individuals after an undersea dive. This study aimed to delineate the links between ROS, endothelial dysfunction, and decompression sickness (DCS) through the use of antioxidants in vitro and in vivo. The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on superoxide and peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cell viability during in vitro diving simulation were analyzed. Also analyzed was the effect of vitamin C and NAC on plasma glutathione thiol and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and angiotensin-II and DCS morbidity during in vivo diving simulation. During an in vitro diving simulation, vascular endothelial cells showed overproduction of superoxide and peroxynitrite, obvious attenuation of NO generation, and promotion of cell death, all of which were reversed by NAC treatment. After in vivo diving simulation, plasma ACE activity and angiotensin-II level were not affected. The plasma level of glutathione thiol was downregulated after the dive, which was attenuated partially by NAC treatment. Plasma TBARS level was upregulated; however, either NAC or vitamin C treatment failed to prevent DCS morbidity. During in vitro simulation, endothelial superoxide and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative stress were involved in the attenuation of NO availability and cell death. This study is the first attempt to link oxidative stress and DCS occurrence, and the link could not be confirmed in vivo. Even in the presence of antioxidants, ROS and bubbles generated during diving and/or decompression might lead to embolic or biochemical stress and DCS. Diving-induced oxidative stress might not be the only trigger of DCS morbidity. PMID:26472863

  19. Wavelet-analysis of skin temperature oscillations during local heating for revealing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, Sergey; Stepanov, Rodion; Smirnova, Elena; Loran, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    Skin microvessels have proven to be a model to investigate the mechanisms of vascular disease; in particular, endothelial dysfunction. To analyze skin blood flow, high-resolution thermometry can be used because low-amplitude skin temperature oscillations are caused by changes in the tone of skin vessels. The aim of our study was to test the possibilities of wavelet analysis of skin temperature (WAST) for the diagnosis of impaired regulation of microvascular tone in patients with type 2 diabetes. A local heating functional test was used for the assessment of microvascular tone regulation. A control group consisted of healthy male and female volunteers (n=5 each), aged 39.1±5.3years. A group of patients with type 2 diabetes comprised thirteen people, seven men and six women, aged 36 to 51years old (43.2±3.4years). The diagnosis of diabetes was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). The mean disease duration was 7.36±0.88years. Skin temperature oscillations, reflecting intrinsic myogenic activity (0.05-0.14Hz), neurogenic factors (0.02-0.05Hz) and endothelial activity (0.0095-0.02Hz) increase greatly during local heating for healthy subjects. In the group of patients with type 2 diabetes, no statistically significant differences in the amplitudes in the endothelial range were observed. Relative changes in the oscillation amplitudes in patients with type 2 diabetes were markedly lower compared to the control group. The latter indicates that the WAST method enables assessment of the state of vascular tone and the effects of mechanisms responsible for regulation of blood flow in the microvasculature. PMID:25446367

  20. Endothelial dysfunction enhances vasoconstriction due to scavenging of nitric oxide by a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binglan; Shahid, Mohd; Egorina, Elena M.; Sovershaev, Mikhail A.; Raher, Michael J.; Lei, Chong; Wu, Mei X.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no safe and effective hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) to substitute for red blood cell transfusion. It is uncertain whether a deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability (endothelial dysfunction) prevents or augments the HBOC-induced vasoconstriction. Methods Hemodynamic effects of infusion of PolyHeme (1.08 g hemoglobin/kg, Northfield Laboratories, Evanston, IL) or murine tetrameric hemoglobin (0.48 g hemoglobin/kg) were determined in awake healthy lambs, awake mice and anesthetized mice. In vitro, a cumulative dose-tension response was obtained by sequential addition of PolyHeme or tetrameric hemoglobin to phenylephrine-precontracted murine aortic rings. Results Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in awake lambs, but produced acute systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction. Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in healthy wild-type mice, but induced severe systemic vasoconstriction in mice with endothelial dysfunction (either db/db mice or high-fat fed wild-type mice for 4–6 weeks). The db/db mice were more sensitive to systemic vasoconstriction than wild-type mice after the infusion of either tetrameric hemoglobin or PolyHeme. Murine aortic ring studies confirmed that db/db mice have an impaired response to an endothelial-dependent vasodilator and an enhanced vasoconstrictor response to a HBOC. Conclusions Reduction of low molecular weight hemoglobin concentrations to less than 1% is insufficient to abrogate the vasoconstrictor effects of HBOC infusion in healthy awake sheep or in mice with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels associated with endothelial dysfunction. These findings suggest that testing HBOCs in animals with endothelial dysfunction can provide a more sensitive indication of their potential vasoconstrictor effects. PMID:20179495

  1. Contribution of Cyclooxygenase End Products and Oxidative Stress to Intrahepatic Endothelial Dysfunction in Early Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales Arraez, Dalia; Marcelino Reyes, Raquel; Abrante, Beatriz; Diaz-Flores, Felicitas; Salido, Eduardo; Quintero, Enrique; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome induces endothelial dysfunction, a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease. In parallel, metabolic syndrome is frequently associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which may progress to cirrhosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intrahepatic endothelial dysfunction related to cyclooxygenase end products and oxidative stress as possible mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of NAFLD. Materials and Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed standard diet (control-diet, CD) or high-fat-diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. Metabolic syndrome was assessed by recording arterial pressure, lipids, glycemia and rat body weight. Splanchnic hemodynamics were measured, and endothelial dysfunction was evaluated using concentration-effect curves to acetylcholine. Response was assessed with either vehicle, L-NG-Nitroarginine (L-NNA), indomethacin, tempol, or a thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29548. We quantified inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress, nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and thromboxane B2 levels. Results HFD rats exhibited metabolic syndrome together with the presence of NAFLD. Compared to control-diet livers, HFD livers showed increased hepatic vascular resistance unrelated to inflammation or fibrosis, but with decreased NO activity and increased oxidative stress. Endothelial dysfunction was observed in HFD livers compared with CD rats and improved after cyclooxygenase inhibition or tempol pre-incubation. However, pre-incubation with SQ 29548 did not modify acetylcholine response. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that endothelial dysfunction at an early stage of NAFLD is associated with reduced NO bioavailability together with increased cyclooxygenase end products and oxidative stress, which suggests that both pathways are involved in the pathophysiology and may be worth exploring as therapeutic targets to prevent progression of the disease. PMID:27227672

  2. Markers of early endothelial dysfunction in intrauterine growth restriction-derived human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed by 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analyses.

    PubMed

    Caniuguir, Andres; Krause, Bernardo J; Hernandez, Cherie; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) associates with fetal and placental vascular dysfunction, and increased cardiovascular risk later on life. We hypothesize that endothelial cells derived from IUGR umbilical veins present significant changes in the proteome which could be involved in the endothelial dysfunction associated to this conditions. To address this the proteome profile of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) isolated from control and IUGR pregnancies was compared by 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) and further protein identification by MALDI-TOF MS. Using 2D-DIGE 124 spots were identified as differentially expressed between control and IUGR HUVEC, considering a cut-off of 2 fold change, which represented ∼10% of the total spots detected. Further identification by MALDI-TOF MS and in silico clustering of the proteins showed that those differentially expressed proteins between control and IUGR HUVEC were mainly related with cytoskeleton organization, proteasome degradation, oxidative stress response, mRNA processing, chaperones and vascular function. Finally Principal Component analysis of the identified proteins showed that differentially expressed proteins allow distinguishing between control and IUGR HUVEC based on their proteomic profile. This study demonstrates for the first time that IUGR-derived HUVEC maintained in primary culture conditions present an altered proteome profile, which could reflect an abnormal programming of endothelial function in this fetal condition. PMID:27208404

  3. Pro-inflammatory endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with intersectin-1s down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The response of lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is central to the pathogenesis of lung injury. It is dual in nature, with one facet that is pro-inflammatory and another that is cyto-protective. In previous work, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL rescued ECs from apoptosis triggered by siRNA knockdown of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a pro-survival protein crucial for ECs function. Here we further characterized the cyto-protective EC response to LPS and pro-inflammatory dysfunction. Methods and Results Electron microscopy (EM) analyses of LPS-exposed ECs revealed an activated/dysfunctional phenotype, while a biotin assay for caveolae internalization followed by biochemical quantification indicated that LPS causes a 40% inhibition in biotin uptake compared to controls. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression, respectively, for several regulatory proteins of intrinsic apoptosis, including ITSN-1s. The decrease in ITSN-1s mRNA and protein expression were countered by Bcl-XL and survivin upregulation, as well as Bim downregulation, events thought to protect ECs from impending apoptosis. Absence of apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and lack of cytochrome c (cyt c) efflux from mitochondria. Moreover, LPS exposure caused induction and activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a mitochondrial variant (mtNOS), as well as augmented mitochondrial NO production as measured by an oxidation oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) assay applied on mitochondrial-enriched fractions prepared from LPS-exposed ECs. Interestingly, expression of myc-ITSN-1s rescued caveolae endocytosis and reversed induction of iNOS expression. Conclusion Our results suggest that ITSN-1s deficiency is relevant for the pro-inflammatory ECs dysfunction induced by LPS. PMID:21486462

  4. Downregulation of Syndecan-1 induce glomerular endothelial cell dysfunction through modulating internalization of VEGFR-2.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhou; Wei-Jie, Yuan; Yi-Feng, Zhu-Ge; Jing, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to have high morbidity and mortality rates. The mechanism of glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) dysfunction in the development of ischemic AKI is still unclear. Syndecan-1, one kind of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), is extensively studied in tumor for its effects in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we found that, Syndecan-1 was reduced in GEnC both in vivo and in vitro after hypoxia treatment. Besides, down-regulation of Syndecan-1 could lead to dysfunction and apoptosis of GEnC, as indicated by increased cell permeability, decreased cell viability and inhibited tube formation. VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling is essential in maintaining biology of GEnC, and activation of its downstream effectors, ERK1/2, AKT, and Rac1, were inhibited in GEnC transfected with Syndecan-1 siRNA compared with control siRNA. Moreover, membrane VEGFR-2 expression was reduced significantly in GEnC transfected with Syndecan-1 siRNA. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of VEGFR-2 is essential in the activation of VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling. Our further study demonstrated that down-regulation of Syndecan-1 in GEnC inhibit VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling by recruiting VEGFR-2 to the Caveolin-dependent endocytosis route, there by sequestering it from Clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Moreover, as shown by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis, VEGFR-2 co-localizes and interacts with Syndecan-1, indicating Syndecan-1 may act as a co-receptor of VEGFR-2, thus to mediate internalization of VEGFR-2. We speculated that down-regulation of Syndecan-1 could inhibit VEGF-VEGFR-2 signaling through regulating internalization of VEGFR-2, thus leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of GEnC. This indicates a potential target for the therapy of ischemic AKI. PMID:27075925

  5. Depletion of NADP(H) due to CD38 activation triggers endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Levy A.; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; De Pascali, Francesco; Hemann, Craig; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    In the postischemic heart, coronary vasodilation is impaired due to loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Although the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is depleted, its repletion only partially restores eNOS-mediated coronary vasodilation, indicating that other critical factors trigger endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, studies were performed to characterize the unidentified factor(s) that trigger endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart. We observed that depletion of the eNOS substrate NADPH occurs in the postischemic heart with near total depletion from the endothelium, triggering impaired eNOS function and limiting BH4 rescue through NADPH-dependent salvage pathways. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), depletion of the NADP(H) pool occurred and was most marked in the endothelium, with >85% depletion. Repletion of NADPH after I/R increased NOS-dependent coronary flow well above that with BH4 alone. With combined NADPH and BH4 repletion, full restoration of NOS-dependent coronary flow occurred. Profound endothelial NADPH depletion was identified to be due to marked activation of the NAD(P)ase-activity of CD38 and could be prevented by inhibition or specific knockdown of this protein. Depletion of the NADPH precursor, NADP+, coincided with formation of 2’-phospho-ADP ribose, a CD38-derived signaling molecule. Inhibition of CD38 prevented NADP(H) depletion and preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO generation with increased recovery of contractile function and decreased infarction in the postischemic heart. Thus, CD38 activation is an important cause of postischemic endothelial dysfunction and presents a novel therapeutic target for prevention of this dysfunction in unstable coronary syndromes. PMID:26297248

  6. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  7. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  8. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John A.; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W.; Alexander, M. Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  9. Long-term dietary extra-virgin olive oil rich in polyphenols reverses age-related dysfunctions in motor coordination and contextual memory in mice: role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pitozzi, Vanessa; Jacomelli, Michela; Catelan, Dolores; Servili, Maurizio; Taticchi, Agnese; Biggeri, Annibale; Dolara, Piero; Giovannelli, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of olive oil phenols on brain aging in mice and to verify whether the antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities of these polyphenols were involved. C57Bl/6J mice were fed from middle age to senescence with extra-virgin olive oil (10% wt/wt dry diet) rich in phenols (total polyphenol dose/day, 6 mg/kg). Behavioral tests were employed to assess cognitive, motor, and emotional behavior after 6 or 12 months of treatment. Parameters of oxidative status and inflammation were measured in different brain areas at the same times and evaluated for correlation with behavioral changes. The treatment with olive oil phenols improved contextual memory in the step-down test to levels similar to young animals and prevented the age-related impairment in motor coordination in the rotarod test. This motor effect was correlated with reduced lipid peroxidation in the cerebellum (p<0.05), whereas the memory effect did not correlate with oxidation or inflammation parameters. In conclusion, this work points out that natural polyphenols contained in extra-virgin olive oil can improve some age-related dysfunctions by differentially affecting different brain areas. Such a modulation can be obtained with an olive oil intake that is normal in the Mediterranean area, provided that the oil has a sufficiently high content of polyphenols. PMID:22950431

  10. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:26976926

  11. Gender Differences in Protection Against Angiotensin II-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction by MnSOD in the Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Faraci, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) produces oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in blood vessels. The vasculature from females may be protected against deleterious effects of Ang II. We tested the hypothesis that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protects against Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. Experiments were performed in C57Bl/6, wild-type (MnSOD+/+) and MnSOD deficient (MnSOD+/−) mice treated systemically with vehicle or Ang II. Basilar arteries were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice treated for one week with a non-pressor dose of Ang II (0.28 mg/kg × day). Ang II treatment produced superoxide-mediated impairment of responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (Ach)(P<0.05). In male, but not female MnSOD+/+ mice, Ang II modestly inhibited responses to ACh (P<0.05). In contrast, Ang II selectively impaired these responses by up to 70% in male MnSOD+/− mice (P<0.05) and this effect was reversed by tempol (P<0.05). Ang II had no effect on ACh responses in MnSOD+/− female mice. Vascular superoxide levels following treatment with an inhibitor of CuZn- and extracellular-SOD, were higher in Ang II-treated vs vehicle-treated MnSOD+/− mice. Thus, a non-pressor dose of Ang II produces endothelial dysfunction in male mice only, suggesting that the female vasculature is protected from Ang II. In male, but not female mice, MnSOD deficiency enhanced endothelial dysfunction, suggesting that MnSOD normally protects the vasculature during disease states in which Ang II contributes to vascular dysfunction. PMID:20194298

  12. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces actin reorganization, intercellular gap formation, and endothelial barrier dysfunction in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells: concurrent F-actin depolymerization and new actin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Goldblum, S E; Ding, X; Brann, T W; Campbell-Washington, J

    1993-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) influences pulmonary vascular endothelial barrier function in vitro. We studied whether LPS regulates endothelial barrier function through actin reorganization. Postconfluent bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were exposed to Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS 10 ng/ml or media for up to 6 h and evaluated for: 1) transendothelial 14C-albumin flux, 2) F-actin organization with fluorescence microscopy, 3) F-actin quantitation by spectrofluorometry, and 4) monomeric G-actin levels by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. LPS induced increments in 14C-albumin flux (P < 0.001) and intercellular gap formation at > or = 2-6 h. During this same time period the endothelial F-actin pool was not significantly changed compared to simultaneous media controls. Mean (+/- SE) G-actin (micrograms/mg total protein) was significantly (P < 0.002) increased compared to simultaneous media controls at 2, 4, and 6 h but not at 0.5 or 1 h. Prior F-actin stabilization with phallicidin protected against the LPS-induced increments in G-actin (P = 0.040) as well as changes in barrier function (P < 0.0001). Prior protein synthesis inhibition unmasked an LPS-induced decrement in F-actin (P = 0.0044), blunted the G-actin increment (P = 0.010), and increased LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function (P < 0.0001). Therefore, LPS induces pulmonary vascular endothelial F-actin depolymerization, intercellular gap formation, and barrier dysfunction. Over the same time period, LPS increased total actin (P < 0.0001) and new actin synthesis (P = 0.0063) which may be a compensatory endothelial cell response to LPS-induced F-actin depolymerization. PMID:8408232

  13. Fenofibrate attenuates nicotine-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of fenofibrate on nicotine-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) was administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy of thoracic aorta. The expression of mRNA for p22phox and eNOS was assessed by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion concentration were estimated to assess oxidative stress. Moreover, the serum lipid profile was assessed by estimating serum cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein. The administration of nicotine induces VED by increased oxidative stress, altered lipid profile and impaired the integrity of vascular endothelium as assessed in terms of decrease in expression of mRNA for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine produced oxidative stress, assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation and increase in expression of mRNA for p22phox. Nicotine altered the lipid profile by increasing the serum cholesterol, triglycerides and decreasing the high density lipoprotein. However, treatment with fenofibrate (32 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly prevented nicotine-induced VED by decreasing oxidative stress and improving integrity of vascular endothelium, normalising the altered lipid profile, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic

  14. NOTCH4 signaling controls EFNB2-induced endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Luo, Qingqing; Zheng, Yanfang; Liu, Xiaoping; Hu, Ying; Liu, Weifang; Luo, Minglian; Zhao, Yin; Zou, Li

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious complication of pregnancy and is closely related to endothelial dysfunction, which can be repaired by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 (ephrinB2) cascade may be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia by inhibiting the biological activity of EPCs. In addition, both NOTCH1 and NOTCH4, which are specific receptors for DLL4/NOTCH, play critical roles in the various steps of angiogenesis. However, it has not been determined which receptor (NOTCH1, NOTCH4, or both) is specific for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Accordingly, we performed a series of investigations to evaluate it. EFNB2 expression was examined when NOTCH4 or NOTCH1 was downregulated, with or without DLL4 treatment. Then, the effects of NOTCH4 on EPC function were detected. Additionally, we analyzed NOTCH4 and EFNB2 expression in the EPCs from preeclampsia and normal pregnancies. Results showed that NOTCH4 downregulation led to decreased expression of EFNB2, which maintained the same level in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. By contrast, NOTCH1 silencing resulted in a moderate increase in EFNB2 expression, which further increased in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. The downregulation of NOTCH4 resulted in an increase of EPC biological activity, which was similar to EFNB2 silencing. NOTCH4 expression, consistent with the EFNB2 level, increased notably in preeclampsia EPCs compared with the controls. These findings suggest that NOTCH4, not NOTCH1, is the specific receptor for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Blockade of this cascade may enhance the angiogenic property of EPCs, and act as a potential target to promote angiogenesis in patients with preeclampsia. PMID:27069008

  15. Diesel exhaust particles induce endothelial dysfunction in apoE{sup -/-} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Christian S.; Sheykhzade, Majid; Moller, Peter; Folkmann, Janne Kjaergaard; Amtorp, Ole; Jonassen, Thomas; Loft, Steffen . E-mail: s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk

    2007-02-15

    Background: Particulate air pollution can aggravate cardiovascular disease by mechanisms suggested to involve translocation of particles to the bloodstream and impairment of endothelial function, possibly dependent on present atherosclerosis. Aim: We investigated the effects of exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in vivo and ex vivo on vasomotor functions in aorta from apoE{sup -/-} mice with slight atherosclerosis and from normal apoE{sup +/+} mice. Methods: DEP 0, 0.5 or 5 mg/kg bodyweight in saline was administered i.p. The mice were sacrificed 1 h later and aorta ring segments were mounted on wire myographs. Segments from unexposed mice were also incubated ex vivo with 0, 10 and 100 {mu}g DEP/ml before measurement of vasomotor functions. Results: Exposure to 0.5 mg/kg DEP in vivo caused a decrease in the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine elicited vasorelaxation in apoE{sup -/-} mice, whereas the response was enhanced in apoE{sup +/+} mice. No significant change was observed after administration of 5 mg/kg DEP. In vivo DEP exposure did not affect constriction induced by K{sup +} or phenylephrine. In vitro exposure to 100 {mu}g DEP/ml enhanced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and attenuated phenylephrine-induced constriction. Vasodilation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not affected by any DEP exposure. Conclusion: Exposure to DEP has acute effect on vascular functions. Endothelial dysfunction possibly due to decreased NO production as suggested by decreased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and unchanged sodium nitroprusside response can be induced by DEP in vivo only in vessels of mice with some atherosclerosis.

  16. Acute and Chronic Hyperglycemia Elicit JIP1/JNK-Mediated Endothelial Vasodilator Dysfunction of Retinal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Travis W.; Xu, Wenjuan; Xu, Xin; Kuo, Lih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hyperglycemia, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus, is associated with retinal inflammation and impairment of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)–mediated dilation of retinal arterioles. However, molecular mechanisms involved in this diminished endothelial vasodilator function remain unclear. We examined whether inflammatory stress-activated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, contribute to retinal arteriolar dysfunction during exposure to acute and chronic hyperglycemia. Methods Retinal arterioles were isolated from streptozocin-induced diabetic pigs (2 weeks; chronic hyperglycemia, 471 ± 23 mg/dL) or age-matched control pigs (euglycemia, 79 ± 5 mg/dL), and then cannulated and pressurized for vasoreactivity study. For acute hyperglycemia study, vessels from nondiabetic pigs were exposed intraluminally to high glucose (25 mM ≈ 450 mg/dL) for 2 hours, and normal glucose (5 mM ≈ 90 mg/dL) served as the control. Results Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin was reduced in a similar manner after exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Administration of NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) nearly abolished vasodilations either in control (euglycemia and normal glucose) or hyperglycemic (acute and chronic) vessels. Treatment of either acute or chronic hyperglycemic vessels with JNK inhibitor SP600125 or JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) inhibitor BI-78D3, but not p38 inhibitor SB203580, preserved bradykinin-induced dilation in an L-NAME–sensitive manner. By contrast, endothelium-independent vasodilation to sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Conclusions Activation of JIP1/JNK signaling in retinal arterioles during exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia leads to selective impairment of endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilation. Therapeutic targeting of the vascular JNK pathway may improve retinal endothelial vasodilator function during early diabetes. PMID

  17. Serum from Diesel Exhaust-Exposed Rats with Cardiac Dysfunction Alters Aortic Endothelial Cell Function In Vitro: Circulating Mediators as Causative Factors?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although circulating inflammatory mediators are strongly associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes triggered by inhaled air pollution, direct cause-effect linkage has not been established. Given that endothelial toxicity often precedes and precipitates cardiac dysfunction, ...

  18. Epoetin beta pegol prevents endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by flow-mediated dilation in chronic kidney disease rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Aizawa, Ken; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Hirata, Michinori; Endo, Koichi

    2015-11-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have a poor prognosis due to cardiovascular disease. Anemia and endothelial dysfunction are important risk factors for cardiovascular events in CKD patients, and treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) has been reported to improve the quality of life in CKD patients. In this study, we evaluated the effect of anemia correcting dose of epoetin beta pegol (continuous erythropoietin receptor activator; C.E.R.A.) on endothelial function in 5/6 nephrectomized rats (Nx rats). C.E.R.A. was subcutaneously administered once a fortnight, 5 times in total, from 1 week after nephrectomy. Twenty-four hours after last administration, endothelial function was evaluated by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the femoral arteries of anesthetized Nx rats by ultrasound system. Femoral arteries were harvested for western blot analysis. C.E.R.A. significantly increased FMD of Nx rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation induced by nitroglycerin injection was not influenced by C.E.R.A treatment. Nox4 expression and nitrotyrosine accumulation were significantly decreased, and phosphorylation of eNOS was significantly enhanced in the femoral arteries of C.E.R.A.-treated rats. C.E.R.A. normalized hemoglobin levels but did not affect body weight, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, urinary protein excretion and plasma creatinine. These results indicate that C.E.R.A. prevented endothelial dysfunction in Nx rats, possibly through reduction of local oxidative stress and enhancement of eNOS phosphorylation in the arteries. This study provides the first evidence that C.E.R.A. prevented endothelial dysfunction in CKD model rats under conditions of amelioration of anemia. PMID:26432688

  19. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio is associated with endothelial dysfunction in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Matteo; Mannarino, Massimo R.; Francisci, Daniela; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Bianconi, Vanessa; Bagaglia, Francesco; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mannarino, Elmo; Baldelli, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a marker of cardiovascular (CV) risk, is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Microalbuminuria is frequent in HIV-infected patients, and is a predictor of renal impairment and CV risk. We investigated the association between microalbuminuria and endothelial dysfunction among HIV-infected patients receiving highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Endothelial function, measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (bFMD), and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), were measured in 170 HAART-treated HIV-infected adults. The relationship between UACR and bFMD was evaluated. The prevalence of increased UACR, defined by two cut-off levels (20 mg/g and 30 mg/g), was 29% and 17%. UACR was significantly higher while bFMD was lower among patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). UACR was associated with bFMD (r = −0.31; p < 0.001). This association was stronger in MS-patients (r = −0.44; p = 0.003). UACR above 20 mg/g was associated with an increased risk (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.15–4.89, p = 0.020) of severely impaired bFMD (bFMD ≤ 2.1%). Patients with MS and increased UACR had the lowest bFMD compared with those with none or one of the two conditions. Microalbuminuria and endothelial dysfunction are positively associated in HIV-infected patients regardless of known confounders. The coexistence of microalbuminuria and MS amplifies their deleterious influence on endothelial function. PMID:27353425

  20. PGC-1α ameliorates AngiotensinII-induced eNOS dysfunction in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Geng, Xiao-Yong; Cong, Xiao-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidences support that PGC-1α participates in regulating endothelial homeostasis, in part by mediating endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PGC-1α regulates eNOS activity are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PGC-1α on eNOS dysfunction and further explore the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that PGC-1α expression was downregulated after AngiotensinII (AngII) treatment and paralleled with the decreased NO generation in human aortic endothelial cells. Overexpression of PGC-1α with adenovirus or pharmacological agonist ameliorated AngII-induced the decrease of NO generation, evidenced by the restoration of cGMP and nitrite concentration. Rather than affecting eNOS expression and uncoupling, PGC-1α inhibited AngII-induced decrease of eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. In addition, PGC-1α overexpression suppressed AngII-induced the increase of PP2A-A/eNOS interaction and PP2A phosphatase activity, with a concomitant decrease in PP2A phosphorylation, leading to eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation. However, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling blunted the observed effect of PGC-1α on PP2A activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that PGC-1α overexpression improves AngII-induced eNOS dysfunction and that improved eNOS dysfunction is associated with activated PI3K/Akt pathway, impaired PP2A activity and reduced PP2A-A/eNOS association. These date indicate that forced PGC-1α expression may be a novel therapeutic approach for endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27235860

  1. Pathogenesis of endothelial cell dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: a retrospective and what the future may hold

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications dominate the landscape of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) is a well-known culprit of cardiovascular morbidity and it develops in CKD with remarkable frequency. This brief overview of ECD in CKD scans two decades of studies performed in my laboratory, from genetic analyses to proteomic and metabolomics screens. I provide a detailed description of findings related to the premature senescence of endothelial cells, cell transition from the endothelial to mesenchymal phenotype, and stages of development of ECD. Clinical utility of some of these findings is illustrated with data on laser-Doppler flowmetry and imaging in patients with CKD. Some currently available and emerging therapeutic options for the management of ECD are briefly presented. PMID:26484026

  2. Pathogenesis of endothelial cell dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: a retrospective and what the future may hold.

    PubMed

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications dominate the landscape of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) is a well-known culprit of cardiovascular morbidity and it develops in CKD with remarkable frequency. This brief overview of ECD in CKD scans two decades of studies performed in my laboratory, from genetic analyses to proteomic and metabolomics screens. I provide a detailed description of findings related to the premature senescence of endothelial cells, cell transition from the endothelial to mesenchymal phenotype, and stages of development of ECD. Clinical utility of some of these findings is illustrated with data on laser-Doppler flowmetry and imaging in patients with CKD. Some currently available and emerging therapeutic options for the management of ECD are briefly presented. PMID:26484026

  3. Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Remodeling and Endothelial Dysfunction Require Functional Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Coelho, Suellen C; Ouerd, Sofiane; Rautureau, Yohann; Coffman, Thomas M; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AGTR1a) in vascular injury induced by aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors in Agtr1a(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with aldosterone for 14 days while receiving 1% NaCl in drinking water. Aldosterone increased systolic blood pressure (BP) by ≈30 mm Hg in WT mice and ≈50 mm Hg in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone induced aortic and small artery remodeling, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in WT mice, and enhanced fibronectin and collagen deposition and vascular inflammation. None of these vascular effects were observed in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone effects were prevented by the AGTR1 antagonist losartan in WT mice. In contrast to aldosterone, norepinephrine caused similar BP increase and mesenteric artery remodeling in WT and Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Agtr1a(-/-) mice infused with aldosterone did not increase sodium excretion in response to a sodium chloride challenge, suggesting that sodium retention could contribute to the exaggerated BP rise induced by aldosterone. Agtr1a(-/-) mice had decreased mesenteric artery expression of the calcium-activated potassium channel Kcnmb1, which may enhance myogenic tone and together with sodium retention, exacerbate BP responses to aldosterone/salt in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. We conclude that although aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors raises BP more in Agtr1a(-/-) mice, AGTR1a is required for mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation to induce vascular remodeling and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27045029

  4. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure increased fibronectin (FN) expression, decreased Robo4 expression, and enhanced the permeability of L-LEC monolayers. Moreover, incubating L-LECs with both cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 exacerbated hyperpermeability, significantly enhanced apoptosis, and further impaired in vitro wound healing as compared with cocaine alone. Our studies also suggested that the sigma-1 receptor (Sigma-1R) and the dopamine-4 receptor (D4R) are involved in cocaine-induced pathology in L-LECs. Seeking clinical correlation, we found that FN levels in sera and lung tissue of HIV+ donors were significantly elevated as compared to HIV− donors. Our in vitro data demonstrate that cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 induce dysfunction and damage of lung lymphatics, and suggest that cocaine use may exacerbate pulmonary edema and fibrosis associated with HIV infection. Continued exploration of the interplay between cocaine and HIV should assist the design of therapeutics to ameliorate HIV-induced pulmonary disorders within the drug using population. PMID:26311830

  5. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure increased fibronectin (FN) expression, decreased Robo4 expression, and enhanced the permeability of L-LEC monolayers. Moreover, incubating L-LECs with both cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 exacerbated hyperpermeability, significantly enhanced apoptosis, and further impaired in vitro wound healing as compared with cocaine alone. Our studies also suggested that the sigma-1 receptor (Sigma-1R) and the dopamine-4 receptor (D4R) are involved in cocaine-induced pathology in L-LECs. Seeking clinical correlation, we found that FN levels in sera and lung tissue of HIV(+) donors were significantly elevated as compared to HIV(-) donors. Our in vitro data demonstrate that cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 induce dysfunction and damage of lung lymphatics, and suggest that cocaine use may exacerbate pulmonary edema and fibrosis associated with HIV infection. Continued exploration of the interplay between cocaine and HIV should assist the design of therapeutics to ameliorate HIV-induced pulmonary disorders within the drug using population. PMID:26311830

  6. Measures of endothelial dysfunction in plasma of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    von Känel, Roland; Hepp, Urs; Traber, Rafael; Kraemer, Bernd; Mica, Ladislav; Keel, Marius; Mausbach, Brent T; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2008-04-15

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) confers an increased cardiovascular risk. In 14 otherwise healthy patients with PTSD and in 14 age- and gender-matched non-PTSD controls, we investigated whether the categorical diagnosis of PTSD and severity of PTSD symptom clusters (i.e. re-experiencing, avoidance, arousal, and overall score) would be associated with plasma concentrations of three markers of endothelial dysfunction [soluble tissue factor (sTF), von Willebrand factor (VWF), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1]. Compared with controls, patients had significantly higher sTF; this difference became nonsignificant when controlling for psychological distress. VWF and sICAM-1 levels were not significantly different between patients and controls. In the entire sample virtually all PTSD symptom clusters correlated significantly and positively with sTF and VWF but not with sICAM-1. The correlation between symptoms of re-experiencing and sTF was significantly different between patients and controls. Controlling for symptoms of anxiety and depression (i.e. psychological distress) rendered most associations between PTSD symptom clusters and sTF nonsignificant, whereas controlling for age retained significance of associations with VWF. Posttraumatic stress showed a continuous relationship with sTF and VWF, with the former relationship being partly affected by psychological distress. This suggests one mechanism by which posttraumatic stress could contribute to atherosclerosis. PMID:18252265

  7. Arctium lappa ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae), burdock, is a medicinal plant that is popularly used for treating hypertension, gout, hepatitis, and other inflammatory disorders. This study was performed to test the effect of ethanol extract of Arctium lappa L. (EAL) seeds on vascular reactivity and inflammatory factors in rats fed a high fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Method EAL-I (100 mg·kg−1/day), EAL-II (200 mg·kg−1/day), and fluvastatin (3 mg·kg−1/day) groups initially received HFCD alone for 8 weeks, with EAL supplementation provided during the final 6 weeks. Results Treatment with low or high doses of EAL markedly attenuated plasma levels of triglycerides and augmented plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL markedly reduced impairments of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation of aortic rings. Furthermore, chronic treatment with EAL significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) and maintained smooth and flexible intimal endothelial layers in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL suppressed upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and E-selectin in the aorta. Chronic treatment with EAL also suppressed increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression. These results suggested that EAL can inhibit HFCD-induced vascular inflammation in the rat model. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that EAL ameliorates HFCD-induced vascular dysfunction through protection of vascular relaxation and suppression of vascular inflammation. PMID:22866890

  8. Association of Biomarkers for Inflammation, Endothelial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress with Cognitive Impairment. The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS)

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Nondahl, David M.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Nieto, F. Javier; Shankar, Anoop; Fischer, Mary E.; Tsai, Michael Y; Chappell, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Background Individual biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been associated with cognitive impairment. This study explored whether a combination of biomarkers could prospectively identify those who developed cognitive decline. Methods Biomarkers were obtained during the baseline examination of the Beaver Dam Eye Study (1988–90), and cognitive status was assessed during the 5-year follow-up examination of the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (1998–2000). Cognitive impairment was defined as a score of < 24 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination or self- or proxy report of Alzheimer Disease or dementia. Among those with cognitive data, interleukin-6, isoprostanes, protein carbonyl, soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were available for 950 participants and 2,336 had high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Results Biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were not associated with cognitive impairment. There was a weak inverse association between higher levels of protein carbonyl content and cognitive impairment (OR, 0.8 per quartile of protein carbonyl content, p=0.045 unadjusted for multiple comparisons). This was not significant on multiple testing and may have been a chance finding. Conclusion We found that many markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were not associated with cognitive impairment. An inverse association with carbonyl protein, a marker of oxidative stress needs further confirmation. PMID:23814681

  9. Hepatotoxicity and endothelial dysfunction induced by high choline diet and the protective effects of phloretin in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Daoyuan; Liu, Yafei; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of choline and its metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis has been repeatedly confirmed. Phloretin, a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in apples, possesses a variety of biological activities including vascular nutrition. This study was designed to investigate whether phloretin could alleviate or prevent high choline-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice. Mice were provided with 3% high choline water and given phloretin orally daily for 10 weeks. The high choline-treated mice showed the significant dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia with the impaired liver and vascular endothelium (p < 0.01). Administration of phloretin at 200 and 400 mg/kg bw significantly reduced the choline-induced elevation of serum TC, TG, LDL-C, AST, ALT, ET-1 and TXA2 (p < 0.01), and markedly antagonized the choline-induced decrease of serum PGI2, HDL-C and NO levels. Furthermore, phloretin elevated hepatic SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased hepatic MDA levels of the mice exposed to high choline water. Moreover, histopathological test with the H&E and Oil Red O staining of liver sections confirmed the high choline diet-caused liver steatosis and the hepatoprotective effect of phloretin. These findings suggest that high choline causes oxidative damage, and phloretin alleviate vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury. PMID:27316781

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 mediates endothelial cells dysfunction by PI3K-Akt pathway under high glucose condition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Liu, Bin; Liu, Shaojun; Zhang, Jingzhi; Lin, Shuangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is believed the early stage of development of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates various biological activities by binding to sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) including S1PR1-S1PR5. In the present study, the role of S1P receptors in S1P-induced human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) dysfunction under high glucose condition was investigated and the underlying mechanism was explored. S1PR1-S1PR5 mRNA levels were detected by quantitative Real-time PCR. NO level and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN)-endothelial cells adhesion were measured by nitrate reductase and myeloperoxidase colorimetric method, respectively. Protein levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt were measured by Western blot analysis. S1PR2 were found the predominant S1P receptor expressed in HCAECs exposed to high glucose. NO level and eNOS activity were remarkably decreased, while PMN adhesion, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein levels were increased significantly by S1P treatment in HCAECs exposed to high glucose and normal glucose. Blockage of S1PR2 with specific antagonist JTE-013 and small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in enhanced NO level and eNOS activity as well as decreased PMN adhesion, reduced protein levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 induced by S1P. Furthermore, Phosphor-PI3K and phosphor-Akt level were markedly increased by S1PR2 blockade in S1P-treated cells exposed to high glucose, which were suppressed by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, S1P/S1PR2 mediated endothelial dysfunction partly by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway under high glucose condition. S1PR2 blockage could ameliorate endothelial dysfunction which might provide a potential therapeutic strategy for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26921757

  11. Age-related vascular stiffening: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Julie C.; Lampi, Marsha C.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffening occurs with age and is closely associated with the progression of cardiovascular disease. Stiffening is most often studied at the level of the whole vessel because increased stiffness of the large arteries can impose increased strain on the heart leading to heart failure. Interestingly, however, recent evidence suggests that the impact of increased vessel stiffening extends beyond the tissue scale and can also have deleterious microscale effects on cellular function. Altered extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture has been recognized as a key component of the pre-atherogenic state. Here, the underlying causes of age-related vessel stiffening are discussed, focusing on age-related crosslinking of the ECM proteins as well as through increased matrix deposition. Methods to measure vessel stiffening at both the macro- and microscale are described, spanning from the pulse wave velocity measurements performed clinically to microscale measurements performed largely in research laboratories. Additionally, recent work investigating how arterial stiffness and the changes in the ECM associated with stiffening contributed to endothelial dysfunction will be reviewed. We will highlight how changes in ECM protein composition contribute to atherosclerosis in the vessel wall. Lastly, we will discuss very recent work that demonstrates endothelial cells (ECs) are mechano-sensitive to arterial stiffening, where changes in stiffness can directly impact EC health. Overall, recent studies suggest that stiffening is an important clinical target not only because of potential deleterious effects on the heart but also because it promotes cellular level dysfunction in the vessel wall, contributing to a pathological atherosclerotic state. PMID:25926844

  12. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in type 1 diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Petrizzo, Michela; Della Volpe, Elisabetta; Orlando, Rosanna; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2015-06-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived stem cells able to migrate to sites of damaged endothelium and differentiate into endothelial cells, thereby contributing to vascular repair. Recent studies demonstrated a reduction of EPCs in patients with diabetes mellitus or erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of this study was to evaluate the circulating levels of different EPCs phenotypes and their relation with testosterone levels in young type 1 diabetic patients with ED. We studied 118 consecutively type 1 diabetic patients and 60 age-matched healthy controls. Erectile function was assessed by completing the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and EPCs levels by flow cytometry. Testosterone concentrations were evaluated in all the study population. We identified 38 diabetic patients with ED (Group 1) and 80 patients without ED (Group 2). CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells were significantly lower in patients in Group 1 as compared with those in Group 2 [median and interquartile range, n/10(6) events, 12 (6-16) vs. 18 (13-22), P < 0.001)]. In all participants in the study, there was a significant correlation between circulating CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells and testosterone levels (r = 0.410, P < 0.001), which was highest in Group 1, intermediate in Group 2, and lowest in Group 3 (controls). There was a significant correlation between IIEF-5 score and both CD34+KDR+ (r = 0.459, P = 0.003) and CD34+KDR+CD133+ (r = 0.316, P = 0.050) cells among patients of Group 1, as well as between testosterone levels and most of the EPCs phenotypes. Finally, multivariate regression analysis identified levels of circulating CD34+KDR+ cells as an independent risk factor for ED (β-coefficient 0.348, P = 0.007). In conclusion, type 1 diabetic patients with ED show reduced levels of CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells, whose number correlates with IIEF. Further studies are needed to fully understand the exact mechanisms by which testosterone regulates vascular homeostasis. PMID

  13. Regular exercise alleviates renovascular hypertension-induced cardiac/endothelial dysfunction and oxidative injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumral, Z N O; Sener, G; Ozgur, S; Koc, M; Suleymanoglu, S; Hurdag, C; Yegen, B C

    2016-02-01

    The importance of physical activity in the management of renovascular diseases is well-known, but lacks evidence of underlying mechanisms. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the protective/therapeutic effects of regular exercise on experimental renovascular hypertension (RVH)-induced oxidative stress and cardiac dysfunction. Wistar albino rats underwent a RVH surgery (2K1C, Goldblatt). Three weeks later half of the rats started swimming exercise for 9 weeks (n = 15), while the sedentary RVH group (n = 15) had no exercise during that period. Sham-operated control rats (n = 10), had the similar surgical procedures but the left renal artery was left unclipped. Body weights were monitored, and blood pressures were measured weekly using tail-cuff. Echocardiographic evaluation was performed on the 3(rd) week and on the 12(th) week of the experiment before the rats were decapitated. Heart and thoracic aorta were removed and serum was collected, while aortic samples were put in a 10% formaldehyde solution for immunochemistry. Cardiac tissue samples obtained from each animal were used for the determination of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) and catalase (CAT) activities, malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels. In the sedentary RVH group, aortic contractile response (contraction/relaxation in isolated organ bath), left ventricular diastolic and systolic dimensions, and immunohistochemical staining of aortic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were increased, while ejection fraction and aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) staining were decreased. RVH in the sedentary rats resulted in increased pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6), lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) and neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) along with reductions in antioxidant glutathione and catalase levels in the cardiac tissue. Exercise after RVH increased the immunhistochemical staining of aortic eNOS, decreased iNOS staining and reversed the

  14. Vitamin K{sub 1} (phylloquinone) induces vascular endothelial dysfunction: Role of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tirapelli, Carlos R.; De Andrade, Claudia R.; Lieberman, Marcel; Laurindo, Francisco R.; De Souza, Heraldo P.; Oliveira, Ana M. de . E-mail: amolive@usp.br

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects induced by phylloquinone (Vitamin K{sub 1}; VK{sub 1}). Vascular reactivity experiments, using standard muscle bath procedures, showed that VK{sub 1} (5 and 50 {mu}M) enhances the contractile response of endothelium-intact, but not denuded, rat carotid rings to phenylephrine. Similarly, maximal contraction induced by phenylephrine was enhanced in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N {sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The combination of L-NAME and VK{sub 1} did not produce any further additional effect. Pre-incubation of intact-rings with VK{sub 1} reduced both acetylcholine- and bradykinin-induced relaxation. VK{sub 1} induced an increment in tension on carotid rings submaximally pre-contracted with phenylephrine. VK{sub 1}-induced increment in tension was completely abolished by endothelial removal or incubation of intact rings with L-NAME and L-NNA. Conversely, 7-nitroindazole, 1400 W, or indomethacin did not affect VK{sub 1}-induced contraction. Moreover, VK{sub 1} reduced L-arginine-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact rings. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence assays showed that VK{sub 1} induced an increase in the level of superoxide anions in endothelium-intact but not denuded rings. Measurement of nitrite and nitrate generation showed that VK{sub 1} did not alter nitrate formation but strongly inhibited the generation of nitrite. Finally, the superoxide anions scavenger tiron prevented the endothelial vasomotor dysfunction caused by VK{sub 1} on phenyleprine-induced contraction and acetylcholine or bradykinin-induced relaxation. In conclusion, our data show that VK{sub 1} disrupts the vasomotor function of rat carotid. Our results suggest that VK{sub 1}-induced oxidative stress through production of superoxide anion is interfering with the NO pathway, which in turn is responsible for the altered vascular reactivity induced by VK{sub 1}.

  15. Generation and Feasibility Assessment of a New Vehicle for Cell-Based Therapy for Treating Corneal Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoki; Kakutani, Kazuya; Inoue, Ryota; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shimada, Tomoki; Nakahara, Makiko; Kiyanagi, Yumiko; Itoh, Takehiro; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency by its pump and barrier functions; consequently, its decompensation due to any pathological reason causes severe vision loss due to corneal haziness. Corneal transplantation is the only therapeutic choice for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, but associated problems, such as a shortages of donor corneas, the difficulty of the surgical procedure, and graft failure, still need to be resolved. Regenerative medicine is attractive to researchers as a means of providing innovative therapies for corneal endothelial dysfunction, as it now does for other diseases. We previously demonstrated the successful regeneration of corneal endothelium in animal models by injecting cultured corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the vehicle for clinical use in cell-based therapy. Our screening of cell culture media revealed that RELAR medium promoted CEC adhesion. We then modified RELAR medium by removing hormones, growth factors, and potentially toxic materials to generate a cell therapy vehicle (CTV) composed of amino acid, salts, glucose, and vitamins. Injection of CECs in CTV enabled efficient engraftment and regeneration of the corneal endothelium in the rabbit corneal endothelial dysfunction model, with restoration of a transparent cornea. The CECs retained >85% viability after a 24 hour preservation as a cell suspension in CTV at 4°C and maintained their potency to regenerate the corneal endothelium in vivo. The vehicle developed here is clinically applicable for cell-based therapy aimed at treating the corneal endothelium. Our strategy involves the generation of vehicle from a culture medium appropriate for a given cell type by removing materials that are not favorable for clinical use. PMID:27355373

  16. Generation and Feasibility Assessment of a New Vehicle for Cell-Based Therapy for Treating Corneal Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Naoki; Kakutani, Kazuya; Inoue, Ryota; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shimada, Tomoki; Nakahara, Makiko; Kiyanagi, Yumiko; Itoh, Takehiro; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency by its pump and barrier functions; consequently, its decompensation due to any pathological reason causes severe vision loss due to corneal haziness. Corneal transplantation is the only therapeutic choice for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, but associated problems, such as a shortages of donor corneas, the difficulty of the surgical procedure, and graft failure, still need to be resolved. Regenerative medicine is attractive to researchers as a means of providing innovative therapies for corneal endothelial dysfunction, as it now does for other diseases. We previously demonstrated the successful regeneration of corneal endothelium in animal models by injecting cultured corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. The purpose of the present study was to optimize the vehicle for clinical use in cell-based therapy. Our screening of cell culture media revealed that RELAR medium promoted CEC adhesion. We then modified RELAR medium by removing hormones, growth factors, and potentially toxic materials to generate a cell therapy vehicle (CTV) composed of amino acid, salts, glucose, and vitamins. Injection of CECs in CTV enabled efficient engraftment and regeneration of the corneal endothelium in the rabbit corneal endothelial dysfunction model, with restoration of a transparent cornea. The CECs retained >85% viability after a 24 hour preservation as a cell suspension in CTV at 4°C and maintained their potency to regenerate the corneal endothelium in vivo. The vehicle developed here is clinically applicable for cell-based therapy aimed at treating the corneal endothelium. Our strategy involves the generation of vehicle from a culture medium appropriate for a given cell type by removing materials that are not favorable for clinical use. PMID:27355373

  17. Role of UCP2 in the protective effects of PPARβ/δ activation on lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Tamargo, Juan; Martínez, María Carmen; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2016-06-15

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates inflammatory pathways, induces cytokine expression in the endothelium, augments reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the vascular wall, and induces endothelial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β/δ activation on LPS-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction and to determine whether uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) plays a role in these effects. In vivo, the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 treatment prevented the LPS-induced reduction in aortic relaxation, the increase in vascular ROS production, the upregulation of NOX1, NOX2, p47(phox), and p22(phox) mRNA levels, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in mice. We show that in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), GW0742 prevented the decreased A23187-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production, and the increased intracellular ROS levels caused by exposure to LPS in vitro. The PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK0660 abolished all these in vivo and in vitro protective effects induced by GW0742. This agonist also restored the reduced expression of UCP2 and mitofusin-2 induced by LPS. The effects of GW0742 on NO and ROS production in MAEC exposed to LPS were abolished by the UCP2 inhibitor genipin or by siRNA targeting UCP-2. Genipin also suppressed the expressional changes on NADPH oxidase and ER stress markers induced by GW0742. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ activation restored the LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction by upregulation of UCP2, with the subsequent alleviation of ER stress and NADPH oxidase activity, thus reducing intracellular ROS production and increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:27179975

  18. Endothelial dysfunction in hyperandrogenic polycystic ovary syndrome is not explained by either obesity or ectopic fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Aziz, Nabil F; Daousi, Christina; Kemp, Graham J; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Cuthbertson, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome) is associated with IR (insulin resistance), increased visceral fat and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) all of which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction, an early marker of CVD (cardiovascular disease) risk. Our objective was to examine the relationships between endothelial dysfunction in PCOS, the volume of AT (adipose tissue) compartments and the size of intracellular TAG (triacylglycerol) pools in liver and skeletal muscle. A total of 19 women with PCOS (means±S.D.; 26±6 years, 36±5 kg/m2) and 16 control women (31±8 years, 30±6 kg/m2) were recruited. Endothelial function was assessed in the brachial artery using FMD (flow-mediated dilation). VAT (visceral AT) and abdominal SAT (subcutaneous AT) volume were determined by whole body MRI, and liver and skeletal muscle TAG by 1H-MRS (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Cardiorespiratory fitness and HOMA-IR (homoeostasis model assessment of IR) were also determined. Differences between groups were analysed using independent Student's t tests and ANCOVA (analysis of co-variance). FMD was impaired in PCOS by 4.6% [95% CI (confidence interval), 3.0-7.7; P<0.001], and this difference decreased only slightly to 4.2% (95% CI, 2.4-6.1; P<0.001) when FMD was adjusted for individual differences in visceral and SAT and HOMA-IR. This magnitude of impairment was also similar in lean and obese PCOS women. The results suggest that endothelial dysfunction in PCOS is not explained by body fat distribution or volume. FMD might be a useful independent prognostic tool to assess CVD risk in this population. PMID:23826984

  19. HZE ⁵⁶Fe-ion irradiation induces endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta: role of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Kim, Jae Hyung; Oh, Young; Attarzadeh, David O; Sevinc, Baris; Kuo, Maggie M; Shoukas, Artin A; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2011-10-01

    Ionizing radiation has been implicated in the development of significant cardiovascular complications. Since radiation exposure is associated with space exploration, astronauts are potentially at increased risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) iron-ion radiation on vascular and endothelial function as a model of space radiation. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body dose of iron-ion radiation at doses of 0, 0.5 or 1 Gy. In vivo aortic stiffness and ex vivo aortic tension responses were measured 6 and 8 months after exposure as indicators of chronic vascular injury. Rats exposed to 1 Gy iron ions demonstrated significantly increased aortic stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity. Aortic rings from irradiated rats exhibited impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Acute xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging restored endothelial-dependent responses to normal. In addition, XO activity was significantly elevated in rat aorta 4 months after whole-body irradiation. Furthermore, XO inhibition, initiated immediately after radiation exposure and continued until euthanasia, completely inhibited radiation-dependent XO activation. ROS production was elevated after 1 Gy irradiation while production of nitric oxide (NO) was significantly impaired. XO inhibition restored NO and ROS production. Finally, dietary XO inhibition preserved normal endothelial function and vascular stiffness after radiation exposure. These results demonstrate that radiation induced XO-dependent ROS production and nitroso-redox imbalance, leading to chronic vascular dysfunction. As a result, XO is a potential target for radioprotection. Enhancing the understanding of vascular radiation injury could lead to the development of effective methods to ameliorate radiation-induced vascular damage. PMID:21787183

  20. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats. PMID:20422371

  1. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  2. Nigella sativa seed decreases endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Abbasnezhad, Abbasali; Niazmand, Saeed; Mahmoudabady, Maryam; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is an important risk factor for cardiovascular events. The great percent of morbidity in patients with diabetes is due to endothelial dysfunction. The present study investigated the effects of hydroalcholic extract of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) on contractile and dilatation response of isolated aorta in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into six experimental groups (control, untreated STZ-diabetic, and N. sativa hydroalcholic extract or metformin-treated diabetic rats). Treated rats received N. sativa extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) or metformin (300 mg/kg) by gavage, daily for 6 weeks. Isolated rat thoracic rings were mounted in an organ bath system then contractile and dilatation responses induced by phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine (ACh), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were evaluated in different situations. Results: The lower concentrations of N. sativa seed extract (DE 100 and DE 200) and metformin significantly reduced the contractile responses to higher concentrations of PE (10-6 - 10-5 M) compared to diabetic group (p<0.05 to p<0.01). The relaxation response to Ach 10-8 M, was increased in DE 200 and metformin groups compared to diabetic group (p<0.05). The relaxation responses to Ach 10-7 - 10-5 M were significantly higher in all treated groups compared to diabetic group (p<0.05 to p<0.001). Conclusion: Chronic administration of N. sativa seed extract has a significant hypoglycemic effect and improves aortic reactivity to vasoconstrictor and vasodilator agents in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:27247923

  3. AST-120 Improves Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung-Hwa; Yu, Mina; Lee, Sihna; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Kim, Seung-Jung; Kang, Duk-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a pivotal phenomenon in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a known uremic toxin that induces ED in patients with chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AST-120, an absorbent of IS, improves microvascular or macrovascular ED in HD patients. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective, case-controlled trial. Fourteen patients each were enrolled in respective AST-120 and control groups. The subjects in the AST-120 group were treated with AST-120 (6 g/day) for 6 months. Microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry using iontophoresis of acetylcholine (Ach) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months. Carotid arterial intima-media thickness (cIMT) and flow-mediated vasodilation were measured at baseline and 6 months. The Wilcoxon rank test was used to compare values before and after AST-120 treatment. Results Ach-induced iontophoresis (endothelium-dependent response) was dramatically ameliorated at 3 months and 6 months in the AST-120 group. SNP-induced response showed delayed improvement only at 6 months in the AST-120 group. The IS level was decreased at 3 months in the AST-120 group, but remained stable thereafter. cIMT was significantly reduced after AST-120 treatment. No significant complications in patients taking AST-120 were reported. Conclusion AST-120 ameliorated microvascular ED and cIMT in HD patients. A randomized study including a larger population will be required to establish a definitive role of AST-120 as a preventive medication for CVD in HD patients. PMID:27189289

  4. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin counteracts HIV protease inhibitor-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Durante, Zane E; Peyton, Kelly J; Durante, William

    2016-05-01

    The use of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) has extended the duration and quality of life for HIV-positive individuals. However there is increasing concern that this antiviral therapy may promote premature cardiovascular disease by impairing endothelial cell (EC) function. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HIV PIs on EC function and determined if the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1) influences the biological action of these drugs. We found that three distinct PIs, including ritonavir, atazanavir, and lopinavir, stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA. The induction of HO-1 was associated with an increase in NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS). PIs also stimulated HO-1 promoter activity and this was prevented by mutating the antioxidant responsive element or by overexpressing dominant-negative Nrf2. In addition, the PI-mediated induction of HO-1 was abolished by N-acetyl-l-cysteine and rotenone. Furthermore, PIs blocked EC proliferation and migration and stimulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and the adhesion of monocytes on ECs. Inhibition of HO-1 activity or expression potentiated the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of PIs which was reversed by bilirubin but not carbon monoxide. Alternatively, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of HO-1 attenuated the growth-inhibitory and inflammatory effect of PIs. In contrast, blocking HO-1 activity failed to modify the anti-migratory effect of the PIs. Thus, induction of HO-1 via the ROS-Nrf2 pathway in human ECs counteracts the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of PIs by generating bilirubin. Therapeutic approaches targeting HO-1 may provide a novel approach in preventing EC dysfunction and vascular disease in HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26968795

  5. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects against Hydrogen Peroxide-Provoked Endothelial Dysfunction in Isolated Rat Aortic Rings: Implications for Antioxidant Therapy of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chi Wai; Shi, Xiaogeng; Cai, Yefeng; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Oxidative stress can initiate endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. This study evaluated whether tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), the predominant active ingredient in Rhizoma Ligustici Wallichii (chuanxiong), prevents endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of oxidative stress. Methods. Isolated rat aortic rings were pretreated with various drugs before the induction of endothelial dysfunction by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Changes in isometric tension were then measured in acetylcholine- (ACh-) relaxed rings. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression was evaluated in the rings by Western blotting, and superoxide anion (O2∙−) content was assessed in primary rat aortic endothelial cells by dihydroethidium- (DHE-) mediated fluorescence microscopy. Results. ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) was disrupted by H2O2 in endothelium-intact aortic rings. H2O2-impaired relaxation was ameliorated by acute pretreatment with low concentrations of TMP, as well as by pretreatment with catalase and the NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI). TMP, apocynin, and DPI also reduced O2∙− accumulation in endothelial cells,but TMP failed to alter eNOS expression in aortic rings incubated with H2O2. Conclusions. TMP safeguards against oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction, suggesting that the agent might find therapeutic utility in the management of vascular diseases. However, TMP's role in inhibiting NADPH oxidase and its vascular-protective mechanism of action requires further investigation. PMID:25258643

  6. Salvianolic acid A protects against vascular endothelial dysfunction in high-fat diet fed and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Ying; Qiang, Gui-Fen; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shou-Bao; Sun, Lan; Yang, Hai-Guang; Du, Guan-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Salvianolic acid A (SalA) is one of the main active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhizae. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of SalA on the diabetic vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED). The rats were given a high-fat and high-sucrose diet for 1 month followed by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (30 mg/kg). The diabetic rats were treated with SalA (1 mg/kg, 90% purity) orally for 10 weeks after modeling, and were given a high-fat diet. Contractile and relaxant responses of aorta rings as well as the serum indications were measured. Our results indicated that SalA treatment decreased the level of serum Von Willebrand factor and ameliorated acetylcholine-induced relaxation and KCl-induced contraction in aorta rings of the diabetic rats. SalA treatment also reduced the serum malondialdehyde, the content of aortic advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity as well as the expression of endothelial NOS protein in the rat aorta. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to AGEs decreased the cell viability and changed the cell morphology, whereas SalA had protective effect on AGEs-induced cellular vitality. Our data suggested that SalA could protect against vascular VED in diabetes, which might attribute to its suppressive effect on oxidative stress and AGEs-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21972802

  7. The vascular dysfunction in the α-galactosidase A knockout mouse is an endothelial cell, plasma membrane-based defect

    PubMed Central

    Park, James L; Whitesall, Steven E; D'Alecy, Louis G; Shu, Liming; Shayman, James A

    2009-01-01

    Summary Fabry disease results from an X-linked mutation in the lysosomal α-galactosidase A (Gla). Defective Gla results in multi-organ accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids (GSLs), especially in the vascular endothelium, the major accumulating GSL being globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Excessive endothelial Gb3 accumulation is associated with increased thrombosis, atherogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanism(s) by which endothelial dysfunction occurs, however, is unclear. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the vasculopathy associated with a murine model of Fabry disease.Vascular reactivity was performed in vessels from wildtype (Gla +/0) and Gla knockout (Gla -/0) mice. Conscious blood pressure and heart rate were measured in the Gla +/0 and Gla -/0 mice by telemetry.The present study demonstrates that vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractions were blunted in the Gla -/0 mice to phenylephrine and serotonin, but not to U46619. Endothelium-dependent contraction and receptor-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine were significantly attenuated in vessels from Gla -/0 mice. However, receptor-independent endothelium-dependent relaxation to the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, remained intact in vessels from Gla -/0 mice. Furthermore, VSM reactivity was normal in the aortas from Gla -/0 mice in the absence of endothelium. These changes in vascular function were observed without changes in whole-animal blood pressure or heart rate.These results suggest that the vasculopathy associated with Fabry disease is localized to the endothelium despite the accumulation of GSLs throughout the vasculature. PMID:18565198

  8. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; D’Agnillo, Felice; Golding, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelial monolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in the expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Together, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies. PMID:27504984

  9. The NRF2 knockout rat: a new animal model to study endothelial dysfunction, oxidant stress, and microvascular rarefaction.

    PubMed

    Priestley, Jessica R C; Kautenburg, Katie E; Casati, Marc C; Endres, Bradley T; Geurts, Aron M; Lombard, Julian H

    2016-02-15

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like-2 (NRF2) is a master antioxidant and cell protective transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. In this study we developed a strain of Nrf2 null mutant rats to evaluate the role of reduced NRF2-regulated antioxidant defenses in contributing to endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenic responses during salt-induced ANG II suppression. Nrf2(-/-) mutant rats were developed using transcription activator-like effector nuclease technology in the Sprague-Dawley genetic background, and exhibited a 41-bp deletion that included the start codon for Nrf2 and an absence of immunohistochemically detectable NRF2 protein. Expression of mRNA for the NRF2-regulated indicator enzymes heme oxygenase-1, catalase, superoxide dismutase 1, superoxide dismutase 2, and glutathione reductase was significantly lower in livers of Nrf2(-/-) mutant rats fed high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) for 2 wk compared with wild-type controls. Endothelium-dependent dilation to acetylcholine was similar in isolated middle cerebral arteries (MCA) of Nrf2(-/-) mutant rats and wild-type littermates fed low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet, and was eliminated by short-term (3 days) HS diet in both strains. Low-dose ANG II infusion (100 ng/kg sc) reversed salt-induced endothelial dysfunction in MCA and prevented microvessel rarefaction in wild-type rats fed HS diet, but not in Nrf2(-/-) mutant rats. The results of this study indicate that suppression of NRF2 antioxidant defenses plays an essential role in the development of salt-induced oxidant stress, endothelial dysfunction, and microvessel rarefaction in normotensive rats and emphasize the potential therapeutic benefits of directly upregulating NRF2-mediated antioxidant defenses to ameliorate vascular oxidant stress in humans. PMID:26637559

  10. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 up-regulation by PPAR-β/δ prevents lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Mahmoud, Ayman Moawad; Barroso, Emma; Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Sánchez, Manuel; Cogolludo, Ángel; García-Redondo, Ana B; Briones, Ana M; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acids cause endothelial dysfunction involving increased ROS (reactive oxygen species) and reduced NO (nitric oxide) bioavailability. We show that in MAECs (mouse aortic endothelial cells), the PPARβ/δ (peroxisome- proliferator-activated receptor β/δ) agonist GW0742 prevented the decreased A23187-stimulated NO production, phosphorylation of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) at Ser1177 and increased intracellular ROS levels caused by exposure to palmitate in vitro. The impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine in mouse aorta induced by palmitate was restored by GW0742. In vivo, GW0742 treatment prevented the reduced aortic relaxation, phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177, and increased ROS production and NADPH oxidase in mice fed on a high-fat diet. The PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK0660 abolished all of these protective effects induced by GW0742. This agonist enhanced the expression of CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase)-1. The effects of GW0742 on acetylcholine- induced relaxation in aorta and on NO and ROS production in MAECs exposed to palmitate were abolished by the CPT-1 inhibitor etomoxir or by siRNA targeting CPT-1. GW0742 also inhibited the increase in DAG (diacylglycerol), PKCα/βII (protein kinase Cα/βII) activation, and phosphorylation of eNOS at Thr495 induced by palmitate in MAECs, which were abolished by etomoxir. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ activation restored the lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction by up-regulation of CPT-1, thus reducing DAG accumulation and the subsequent PKC-mediated ROS production and eNOS inhibition. PMID:26253087

  11. Pharmacological activation of AMPK ameliorates perivascular adipose/endothelial dysfunction in a manner interdependent on AMPK and SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Li, Jia; Xiao, Na; Wang, Meng; Kou, Junping; Qi, Lianwen; Huang, Fang; Liu, Baolin; Liu, Kang

    2014-11-01

    Adipose and endothelial dysfunction is tightly associated with cardiovascular diseases in obesity and insulin resistance. Because perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) surrounds vessels directly and influences vessel functions through paracrine effect, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) show similarities in modulation of metabolic pathway, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK and SIRT1 in PVAT might regulate the endothelial function in pathological settings. Thus, in this study, we focused on the regulation of AMPK and SIRT1 activities implicated in adipocytokine expression and endothelial homeostasis under inflammatory conditions by using salicylate, metformin, AICA riboside (AICAR) and resveratrol as AMPK activating agents. We prepared conditioned medium (CM) by stimulating PVAT with palmitic acid (PA) and observed the effects of AMPK activating agents on adipocytokine expression and vessel vasodilation in rats. Moreover, we explored the effects of resveratrol and metformin in fructose-fed rats. We observed that PA stimulation induced inflammation and dysregulation of adipocytokine expression accompanied with reduced AMPK activity and SIRT1 abundance in PVAT. AMPK activating agents inhibited NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and suppressed gene expression of pro-inflammatory adipocytokines, and upregulated adiponectin and PPARγ expression in PVAT in an AMPK/SIRT1-interdependent manner. Meanwhile, CM stimulation impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to acetylcholine (ACh). Pretreatment of CM with AMPK-activating agents enhanced eNOS phosphorylation in the aorta and restored the loss of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas this action was abolished by co-treatment with AMPK inhibitor compound C or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide. Long-term fructose-feeding in rats induced dysregulation of adipocytokine expression in PVAT and the loss of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas these alterations were reversed by oral

  12. Endothelial Dysfunction in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes Is Opposed by Compensatory Overexpression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Nacci, Carmela; Tarquinio, Mariela; De Benedictis, Leonarda; Mauro, Annamaria; Zigrino, Addolorata; Carratù, Maria Rosaria; Quon, Michael J.; Montagnani, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications of diabetes result from endothelial dysfunction secondary to persistent hyperglycemia. We investigated potential compensatory mechanisms in the vasculature that oppose endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. BALB/c mice were treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce type 1 diabetes (T1D). In mesenteric vascular beds (MVBs), isolated ex vivo from mice treated with STZ for 1 wk, dose-dependent vasorelaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) or sodium nitroprusside was comparable with that in age-matched control mice (CTRL). By contrast, MVBs from mice treated with STZ for 8 wk had severely impaired vasodilator responses to ACh consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of MVBs from CTRL mice with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor nearly abolished vasodilation to ACh. In MVB from 1-wk STZ-treated mice, vasodilation to ACh was only partially impaired by L-Nω-arginine methyl ester. Thus, vasculature of mice with T1D may have compensatory nitric oxide-independent mechanisms to augment vasodilation to ACh and oppose endothelial dysfunction. Indeed, pretreatment of MVBs isolated from 1-wk STZ-treated mice with NS-398 [selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor] unmasked endothelial dysfunction not evident in CTRL mice pretreated without or with NS-398. Expression of COX-2 in MVBs, aortic endothelial cells, and aortic vascular smooth muscle cells from STZ-treated mice was significantly increased (vs. CTRL). Moreover, concentrations of the COX-2-dependent vasodilator 6-keto-prostaglandin F-1α was elevated in conditioned media from aorta of STZ-treated mice. We conclude that endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of T1D is opposed by compensatory up-regulation of COX-2 expression and activity in the vasculature that may be relevant to developing novel therapeutic strategies for diabetes and its cardiovascular complications. PMID:18845644

  13. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor antagonism restores epithelial barrier dysfunction via affecting zonula occludens proteins

    PubMed Central

    YUKSEL, HASAN; YILMAZ, OZGE; KARAMAN, MERAL; FIRINCI, FATIH; TURKELI, AHMET; KANIK, ESRA TOPRAK; INAN, SEVINC

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial barrier dysfunction is important in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic responses, and is therefore a therapeutic target. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dexamethasone, a classic therapeutic agent, an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent (etanercept), which is used to treat difficult cases of asthma, and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent (bevacizumab), which is an angiogenesis inhibitor, on zonula occludens (ZO) proteins in an experimental asthma model. The experimental model of asthma was developed using intraperitoneal (IP) and inhaled administration of ovalbumin in 38 BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups. The control group (n=6) did not receive any treatment, while the four remaining groups (n=8 per group) received an IP injection of saline, etanercept, bevacizumab or dexamethasone, respectively. Occludin, claudin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) were immunohistochemically stained in the left middle lobe samples using an indirect avidin-peroxidase method, after which the staining was semiquantified with H-scores. Statistically significant differences were observed in the occludin, claudin and JAM H-scores among the four groups (P<0.001). In the untreated asthma, etanercept, bevacizumab and dexamethasone groups, the median H-scores for occludin were 93, 177, 280 and 198, respectively, while the H-scores for claudin were 82, 193.5, 274 and 202.5, respectively, and the median H-scores for JAM were 130, 210, 288 and 210, respectively. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all three ZO protein H-scores were significantly lower in the saline group when compared with each treatment group. However, the H-scores of the ZO proteins were not significantly different between the etanercept and dexamethasone groups. Furthermore, the bevacizumab group exhibited higher H-scores for all the proteins compared with the dexamethasone group. Therefore, antagonism of VEGF with bevacizumab restores the

  15. Efficacy of bosentan, a dual ETA and ETB endothelin receptor antagonist, in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Sharma, Bhupesh; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-09-01

    The study was designed to investigate the efficacy of bosentan a dual endothelin (ETA and ETB) receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia. Diabetes was induced in rats by administration of a single dose (50mg/kg, i.p.) of streptozotocin (STZ). Drug treatment was started after 1 month of STZ administration and treatment was continued until the end of the study. Morris water maze (MWM) test was employed for testing spatial learning and memory. Endothelial function was measured on isolated aortic rings using student physiograph. Serum glucose, body weight, serum nitrite/nitrate, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, and brain acetylcholinesterase activity were also tested. STZ treatment resulted in significant development of cognitive and vascular endothelial deficits, manifested in the terms of endothelial dysfunction, impairment of learning and memory, reduction in body weight and serum nitrite/nitrate levels along with increase in serum glucose, brain acetylcholinesterase activity, TBARS, and decreased GSH levels. Treatment of bosentan attenuated diabetes induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that bosentan has shown efficacy in STZ induced cognitive and vascular endothelial deficits. Thus, endothelin receptors can be considered as a potential pharmacological target for the management of experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia. PMID:24836182

  16. Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain-Like Receptor Protein with Pyrin Domain Containing 3 Inflammasome Activation During Hypercholesterolemia: Beyond Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Pitzer, Ashley L.; Chen, Yang; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: This study hypothesized that activation of endothelial nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein with pyrin domain containing 3 (Nlrp3) inflammasomes directly produces endothelial dysfunction during hypercholesterolemia, which is distinct from its canonical roles in inflammation. Results: Acute hypercholesterolemia in mice was induced by intraperitoneal administration of poloxamer 407 (0.5 g/kg) for 24 h. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by evaluating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in isolated, perfused, and pressurized coronary arteries in response to bradykinin (10−10–10−6 M) and acetylcholine (10−9–10−5 M). Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation was observed in Nlrp3+/+ mice with acute hypercholesterolemia, which was markedly ameliorated in Nlrp3−/− mice. Treatment of mice with inhibitors for caspase-1 or high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) significantly restored endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Nlrp3+/+ mice with acute hypercholesterolemia. Confocal microscopic analysis demonstrated that hypercholesterolemia markedly increased caspase-1 activity and HMGB1 expression in coronary arterial endothelium of Nlrp3+/+ mice, which was absent in Nlrp3-deficient mice. Further, recombinant HMGB1 directly induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Nlrp3+/+ coronary arteries. In vitro, Nlrp3 inflammasome formation and its activity were instigated in cultured endothelial cells by cholesterol crystal, a danger factor associated with hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, cholesterol crystals directly induced endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries from Nlrp3+/+ mice, which was attenuated in Nlrp3−/− arteries. Such cholesterol crystal-induced impairment was associated with enhanced superoxide production, downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, and pyroptosis. Innovation and Conclusion: Our data provide the first evidence that activation of endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome directly impairs

  17. Serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) prevents high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction by ameliorating prostacyclin production in the mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hooi Hooi; Leo, Chen Huei; Parry, Laura J

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiating factor in the development of cardiovascular complications. Treatment with relaxin improves tumour necrosis factor α-induced endothelial dysfunction by enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and restoring superoxide dismutase 1 protein in rat aortic rings ex vivo. It is, therefore, possible that relaxin treatment could alleviate endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) prevents high glucose-induced vascular dysfunction in the mouse aorta. Abdominal aortae were isolated from C57BL/6 male mice and incubated in M199 media for 3days with either normal glucose (5.5mM) or high glucose (30mM), and co-incubated with placebo (20mM sodium acetate) or 10nM serelaxin at 37°C in 5% CO2. Vascular function was analysed using wire-myography. High glucose significantly reduced the sensitivity to the endothelium-dependent agonist, acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50; normal glucose=7.66±0.10 vs high glucose=7.29±0.10, n=11-12, P<0.05) and the contraction induced by NOS inhibitor, L-NAME (200μM) (normal glucose=59.9±8.3% vs high glucose=38.7±4.3%, n=6, P<0.05), but had no effect on the endothelium-independent agonist, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-mediated relaxation. Treatment with serelaxin restored endothelial function (pEC50; 7.83±0.11, n=11) but not NO availability. The presence of the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (1μM) (pEC50; control=7.29±0.10 vs indo=7.74±0.18, n=6-12, P<0.05) and a superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol (10μM) (pEC50; control=7.29±0.10 vs tempol=7.82±0.05, n=6-12, P<0.01) significantly improved sensitivity to ACh in high glucose treated aortae, but had no effect in serelaxin treated aortae. This suggests that high glucose incubation alters the superoxide and COX-sensitive pathway, which was normalized by co-incubation with serelaxin. Neither high glucose incubation nor serelaxin

  18. Mechanism of attenuation of diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia induced vascular endothelial dysfunction by protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh; Singh, Manjeet; Sharma, Pyare Lal

    2011-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate downstream mechanisms in the PTPase inhibition mediated attenuation of diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats using streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, i.v. once), while hypercholesterolemia was produced by feeding high cholesterol diet. After 4 weeks of streptozotocin and Cholesterol rich diet administration, vascular endothelium dysfunction was assessed, in terms of attenuation of acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxation (Isolated Aortic Ring Preparation), a decrease in serum nitrate/nitrite level, as well as mRNA expression of eNOS (rtPCR) and disruption of integrity of vascular endothelium (Electron microscopy). After 14 days of daily administration, sodium orthovanadate (8 mg/kg, p.o., 16 mg/kg, p.o and 24 mg/kg, p.o) and atorvastatin (30 mg/kg, p.o) (positive control) significantly improved acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, serum nitrate/nitrite level, mRNA expression of eNOS and maintained integrity of vascular endothelium. However, this ameliorative effect of SOV was significantly blocked by UCN-01, (PDK inhibitor) and L-NAME (Inhibitor of eNOS). Therefore, it may be concluded that sodium orthovanadate, a specific inhibitor of PTPase, may stimulate PDK and eNOS and consequently improve vascular endothelium dysfunction. Thus, inhibition of PTPase might be a useful approach in the therapeutics of vascular endothelium dysfunction. PMID:21237289

  19. Silica nanoparticles induce autophagy and endothelial dysfunction via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Yu, Yang; Li, Yang; Wang, Ji; Geng, Weijia; Jiang, Lizhen; Li, Qiuling; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Although nanoparticles have a great potential for biomedical applications, there is still a lack of a correlative safety evaluation on the cardiovascular system. This study is aimed to clarify the biological behavior and influence of silica nanoparticles (Nano-SiO2) on endothelial cell function. The results showed that the Nano-SiO2 were internalized into endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Monodansylcadaverine staining, autophagic ultrastructural observation, and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion were employed to verify autophagy activation induced by Nano-SiO2, and the whole autophagic process was also observed in endothelial cells. In addition, the level of nitric oxide (NO), the activities of NO synthase (NOS) and endothelial (e)NOS were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent way, while the activity of inducible (i)NOS was markedly increased. The expression of C-reactive protein, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin [IL]-1β, and IL-6) were significantly elevated. Moreover, Nano-SiO2 had an inhibitory effect on the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrated that Nano-SiO2 could disturb the NO/NOS system, induce inflammatory response, activate autophagy, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. This indicates that exposure to Nano-SiO2 is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25395850

  20. Additive Effect of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Metabolic Syndrome-Related Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Maria; Cimellaro, Antonio; Maio, Raffaele; Caroleo, Benedetto; Sciacqua, Angela; Sesti, Giorgio; Perticone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by an increased risk of incident diabetes and cardiovascular (CV) events, identifying insulin resistance (IR) and endothelial dysfunction as key elements. Moreover, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is bidirectionally linked with MS as a consequence of metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities. We addressed the question if the evolution in NAFLD might worsen endothelium-dependent vasodilating response in MS hypertensives. We recruited 272 Caucasian newly-diagnosed never-treated hypertensive outpatients divided into three groups according to the presence/absence of MS alone or in combination with NAFLD. MS and NAFLD were defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) and non-invasive fatty liver index, respectively. We determined IR by using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Vascular function, as forearm blood flow (FBF), was determined through strain-gauge plethysmography after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside. MS+NAFLD+ group showed worse metabolic, inflammatory and vascular profiles compared with MS-NAFLD- and MS+NAFLD-. HOMA resulted in being the strongest predictor of FBF both in the MS+NAFLD- and in the MS+NAFLD+ groups, accounting for 20.5% and 33.2% of its variation, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MS+NAFLD+ hypertensives show a worse endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared with MS+NAFLD-, allowing for consideration of NAFLD as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction in hypertensives. PMID:27023537

  1. Additive Effect of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Metabolic Syndrome-Related Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perticone, Maria; Cimellaro, Antonio; Maio, Raffaele; Caroleo, Benedetto; Sciacqua, Angela; Sesti, Giorgio; Perticone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by an increased risk of incident diabetes and cardiovascular (CV) events, identifying insulin resistance (IR) and endothelial dysfunction as key elements. Moreover, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is bidirectionally linked with MS as a consequence of metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities. We addressed the question if the evolution in NAFLD might worsen endothelium-dependent vasodilating response in MS hypertensives. We recruited 272 Caucasian newly-diagnosed never-treated hypertensive outpatients divided into three groups according to the presence/absence of MS alone or in combination with NAFLD. MS and NAFLD were defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) and non-invasive fatty liver index, respectively. We determined IR by using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Vascular function, as forearm blood flow (FBF), was determined through strain-gauge plethysmography after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside. MS+NAFLD+ group showed worse metabolic, inflammatory and vascular profiles compared with MS−NAFLD− and MS+NAFLD−. HOMA resulted in being the strongest predictor of FBF both in the MS+NAFLD− and in the MS+NAFLD+ groups, accounting for 20.5% and 33.2% of its variation, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MS+NAFLD+ hypertensives show a worse endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared with MS+NAFLD−, allowing for consideration of NAFLD as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction in hypertensives. PMID:27023537

  2. Inflammation, Endothelial Dysfunction and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Jager, Kitty J.; Papagianni, Aikaterini; Pappas, Konstantinos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C.; Zoccali, Carmine; Tsakiris, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Within this longitudinal study we investigated the association of inflammation markers C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and endothelial dysfunction markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) with left ventricular mass indexed for height2·71 (LVMI) in hypertensive predialysis CKD patients. Material and Methods From 2004 to 2005, 182 incident consecutive adult patients from the outpatient CKD clinics of two hospitals in Greece with CKD and hypertension or using antihypertensive medication, were included. Of these, 107 patients underwent CRP (mg/l) and LVMI (g/height2·71) measurements annually for three years. Results In the longitudinal analyses, using linear mixed modeling, a higher IL-6 (ß = 1.9 (95%ci:0.38;3.5), inflammation score based on CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α (ß = 5.0 (95%ci:0.72; 9.4) and VCAM-1 (ß = 0.01 (95%ci:0.005;0.02) were associated with higher LVMI. These models were adjusted for age, gender and primary renal disease, and for confounders that on top changed the beta with ≥10%, i.e. diuretic use (for IL-6 and inflammation score). Conclusion The results suggest that in predialysis CKD patients, inflammation as well as endothelial dysfunction may play an important role towards the increase in LVMI. PMID:26398099

  3. Endothelial barrier dysfunction caused by LPS correlates with phosphorylation of HSP27 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Rees, R S; Yancy, S L; Welsh, M J; Remick, D G; Yamada, T; Hata, J; Gilmont, R R

    2004-02-01

    Lung edema during sepsis is triggered by formation of gaps between endothelial cells followed by macrophage infiltration. Endothelial gap formation has been proposed to involve changes in the structure of the actin filament cytoskeleton. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is believed to modulate actin filament dynamics or structure, in a manner dependent on its phosphorylation status. We hypothesized that HSP27 may play a role in endothelial gap formation, by affecting actin dependent events in endothelial cells. As there has been no report concerning HSP27 in lung edema in vivo, we examined induction and phosphorylation of HSP27 in lung following LPS injection, as a model of sepsis. In lung, HSP27 mainly localized in capillary endothelial cells of the alveolus, and in smooth muscle cells of pulmonary arteries. HSP27 became significantly more phosphorylated at 3 h after LPS treatment, while the distribution of HSP27 remained unchanged. Pre-treatment with anti-TNFalpha antibody, which has been shown to reduce lung injury, blocked increases in HSP27 phosphorylation at 3 h. HSP27 phosphorylation was also increased in cultured rat pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (RPAEC) by treatment with TNFalpha, LPS, or H2O2. This phosphorylation was blocked by pre-treatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of the upstream kinase, p38 MAP kinase. Increased endothelial permeability caused by H2O2 in vitro was also blocked by SB203580. The amount of actin associated with HSP27 was reduced after treatment with LPS, or H2O2. In summary, HSP27 phosphorylation temporally correlated with LPS induced pathological endothelial cell gap formation in vivo and in a cell culture model system. This is the first report of increased HSP27 phosphorylation associated with pathological lung injury in an animal model of sepsis. PMID:15119843

  4. Endothelial dysfunction exacerbates renal interstitial fibrosis through enhancing fibroblast Smad3 linker phosphorylation in the mouse obstructed kidney.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu Bo Yang; Qu, Xinli; Li, Xueling; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad3 signalling are common features of progressive renal fibrosis. This study investigated a potential link between these mechanisms. In unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) we observed an acute (6 hr) down-regulation of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3/eNOS) levels and increased phosphorylation of the linker region of Smad3 at T179 and S208 in Smad3/JNK complexes. These events preceded Smad3 C-terminal domain phosphorylation and the induction of myofibroblast proliferation at 48 hrs. Mice deficient in NOS3 showed enhanced myofibroblast proliferation and collagen accumulation compared to wild type mice in a 7 day UUO model. This was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 92% and 88%, respectively, whereas Smad3-C-terminal phosphorylation was not affected. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) can suppress renal fibrosis in the UUO model, and further analysis herein showed that RvD1 protected against endothelial dysfunction and suppressed Smad3/JNK complex formation with a consequent reduction in phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 78% and 65%, respectively, while Smad3 C-terminal phosphorylation was unaltered. In vitro, conditioned media from mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMEC) treated with a general inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) augmented the proliferation and collagen production of renal fibroblasts (NRK49F cells) compared to control MMEC media and this was associated with increased phosphorylation of JNK and Smad3 T179 and S208, whereas Smad3-C-terminal domain phosphorylation was unaffected. The addition of RvD1 to L-NAME treated MMEC abrogated these effects of the conditioned media on renal fibroblasts. Finally, Smad3 T179/V and S208/A mutations significantly inhibit TGF-β1 induced up-regulation collagen I promoter. In conclusion, these data suggest that endothelial dysfunction can exacerbate renal interstitial fibrosis through increased fibroblast

  5. Hepatic Extracellular Signal–Regulated Kinase 2 Suppresses Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Protects From Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kujiraoka, Takehiko; Satoh, Yasushi; Ayaori, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yasunaga; Arai‐Nakaya, Yuko; Hakuno, Daihiko; Yada, Hirotaka; Kuwada, Naruo; Endo, Shogo; Isoda, Kikuo; Adachi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin signaling comprises 2 major cascades: the insulin receptor substrate/phosphatidylinositol 3′‐kinase/protein kinase B and Ras/Raf/mitogen‐activated protein kinase/kinase/ERK pathways. While many studies on the tissue‐specific effects of the insulin receptor substrate/phosphatidylinositol 3′ ‐kinase/protein kinase B pathway have been conducted, the role of the other cascade in tissue‐specific insulin resistance has not been investigated. High glucose/fatty acid toxicity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, all of which are associated with insulin resistance, can activate ERK. The liver plays a central role in metabolism, and hepatosteatosis is associated with vascular diseases. The aim of study was to elucidate the role of hepatic ERK2 in hepatosteatosis, metabolic remodeling, and endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results We created liver‐specific ERK2 knockout mice and fed them with a high‐fat/high‐sucrose diet for 20 weeks. The high‐fat/high‐sucrose diet–fed liver‐specific ERK2 knockout mice exhibited a marked deterioration in hepatosteatosis and metabolic remodeling represented by impairment of glucose tolerance and decreased insulin sensitivity without changes in body weight, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol/triglyceride levels. In the mice, endoplasmic reticulum stress was induced together with decreased mRNA and protein expressions of hepatic sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+‐ATPase 2. In a hepatoma cell line, inhibition of ERK activation– induced endoplasmic reticulum stress only in the presence of palmitate. Vascular reactive oxygen species were elevated with upregulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase1 (Nox1) and Nox4 and decreased phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which resulted in the remarkable endothelial dysfunction in high‐fat/high‐sucrose diet–fed liver‐specific ERK2 knockout mice. Conclusions Hepatic ERK2 suppresses endoplasmic reticulum

  6. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  7. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  8. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  9. Effects of Cyclic Intermittent Hypoxia on ET-1 Responsiveness and Endothelial Dysfunction of Pulmonary Arteries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Jian-Ping; An, Qi; Guo, Ya-jing; Chu, Li; Weiss, J. Woodrow; Ji, En-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and in some cases is complication of pulmonary hypertension. We simulated OSA by exposing rats to cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) to investigate its effect on pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley Rats were exposed to CIH (FiO2 9% for 1 min, repeated every 2 min for 8 h/day, 7 days/wk for 3 wk), and the pulmonary arteries of normoxia and CIH treated rats were analyzed for expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET receptors by histological, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR and Western Blot analyses, as well as for contractility in response to ET-1. In the pulmonary arteries, ET-1 expression was increased, and ET-1 more potently elicited constriction of the pulmonary artery in CIH rats than in normoxic rats. Exposure to CIH induced marked endothelial cell damage associated with a functional decrease of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the pulmonary artery. Compared with normoxic rats, ETA receptor expression was increased in smooth muscle cells of the CIH rats, while the expression of ETB receptors was decreased in endothelial cells. These results demonstrated endothelium-dependent vasodilation was impaired and the vasoconstrictor responsiveness increased by CIH. The increased responsiveness to ET-1 induced by intermittent hypoxia in pulmonary arteries of rats was due to increased expression of ETA receptors predominantly, meanwhile, decreased expression of ETB receptors in the endothelium may also participate in it. PMID:23555567

  10. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside improves TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction: involvement of TGFβ/Smad pathway and inhibition of vimentin expression.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjuan; Gu, Chengjing; Shao, Haoran; Meng, Guoliang; Wang, Huiming; Jing, Xiang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherogenesis. 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an active component of the rhizome extract from Polygonum multiflorum (PM), exhibits significant anti-atherosclerotic activity. Here, we used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in vitro to investigate the cytoprotective effects of TSG on TNF-α-induced endothelial injury and the related mechanisms. Pretreatment with 50 and 100 μM TSG markedly attenuated TNF-α-induced loss of cell viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and inhibited TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis. The inhibition of vimentin expression was involved in the cytoprotection afforded by TSG. Using inhibitors for PI3K and TGFβ or siRNA for Akt and Smad2, we found that vimentin production in HUVECs is regulated by TGFβ/Smad signaling, but not by PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling. Meanwhile, TSG inhibited both the expression of TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, and TSG suppressed the nuclear translocation of Smad4 induced by TNF-α. These results suggest that TSG protects HUVECs against TNF-α-induced cell damage by inhibiting vimentin expression via the interruption of the TGFβ/Smad signaling pathway. PMID:25571766

  11. Protective effects of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside from blackberry extract against peroxynitrite-induced endothelial dysfunction and vascular failure.

    PubMed

    Serraino, Ivana; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi; Mazzon, Emanuela; Dugo, Giovanni; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2003-07-18

    Anthocyanins are a group of naturally occurring phenolic compounds as colorants in several plants, flowers and fruits. These pigments have a great importance as quality indicators, as chemotaxonomic markers and antioxidants. The content of blackberry (Rubus species) juice was investigated by HPLC/ESI/MS using narrow bore HPLC columns. Using this method we demonstrated that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside represents about 80% of the total anthocyanin contents in blackberry extract. Here we investigated antioxidant activity of the blackberry juice and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside on the endothelial dysfunction in cells and in vascular rings exposed to peroxynitrite. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro, peroxynitrite caused a significant suppression of mitochondrial respiration (38 +/- 2.1% of control cells), as measured by the mitochondrial-dependent conversion of the dye MTT to formazan. Peroxynitrite caused DNA strand breakage (63 +/- 1.9% single strand vs 3 +/- 0.9% single strand in control cells), as measured by the alkaline unwinding assay, and caused an activation of PARS, as measured by the incorporation of radiolabeled NAD(+) to nuclear proteins. Blackberry juice (different dilutions that contained 80 ppm;40 ppm;14.5 ppm of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside) and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (as chloride) (0.085 microM; 0.028 microM; 0.0085 microM) reduced the peroxynitrite-induced suppression of mitochondrial respiration, DNA damage and PARS activation in HUVECs. Vascular rings exposed to peroxynitrite exhibited reduced endothelium-dependent relaxant responses in response to acetylcholine as well as a vascular contractility dysfunction in response to norepinephrine. The development of this peroxynitrite-induced vascular dysfunction was ameliorated by the blackberry juice (different dilutions that contained 80 ppm;40 ppm;14.5 ppm of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside) and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (as chloride) (0.085 microM;0.028 microM;0.0085 microM). In conclusion our findings

  12. Fine particles, genetic pathways, and markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction: Analysis on particulate species and sources.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lingzhen; Bind, Marie-Abele; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Schwartz, Joel D

    2016-06-01

    Studies have found associations between PM2.5 and cardiovascular events. The role of different components of PM2.5 is not well understood. We used linear mixed-effects models with the adaptive LASSO penalty to select PM2.5 species and source(s), separately, that may be associated with markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, with adjustment for age, obesity, smoking, statin use, diabetes mellitus, temperature, and season as fixed effects in a large longitudinal cohort of elderly men. We also analyzed these associations with source apportionment models and examined genetic pathway-air pollution interactions within three relevant pathways (oxidative stress, metal processing, and endothelial function). We found that independent of PM2.5 mass vanadium (V) was associated with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). An IQR increase (3.2 ng/m(3)) in 2-day moving average V was associated with a 2.5% (95% CI: 1.2-3.8%) change in ICAM-1 and a 3.9% (95% CI: 2.2-5.7%) change in VCAM-1, respectively. In addition, an oil combustion source rich in V was linked to these adhesion molecules. People with higher allelic risk profiles related to oxidative stress may have greater associations (P-value of interaction=0.11). Our findings suggest that particles derived from oil combustion may be associated with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, and it is likely that oxidative stress plays a role in the associations. PMID:26732377

  13. Improved endothelial dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice fed a high fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-02-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)(-/-) mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE(-/-) mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE(-/-) mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  14. Improved Endothelial Dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice Fed a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)−/− mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE−/− mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE−/− mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  15. Chronic Aldosterone Administration Causes NOX2-Mediated Increases In Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Endothelial Dysfunction in the Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    CHRISSOBOLIS, Sophocles; DRUMMOND, Grant R.; FARACI, Frank M.; SOBEY, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective An elevated plasma aldosterone level is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Although excess aldosterone promotes cardiovascular disease, no studies have examined the effect of increased plasma aldosterone on the cerebral circulation. A major source of vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cardiovascular disease is the NADPH oxidases. Because NOX2-containing NADPH oxidase (NOX2 oxidase) is highly expressed in cerebral endothelium, we postulated that it might contribute to ROS generation and vascular dysfunction in response to aldosterone. Here we examined the effect of aldosterone and NOX2 oxidase on ROS production and endothelial dysfunction in the cerebral circulation, and whether the effects of aldosterone are exacerbated in aged mice. Methods and Results In adult (average age ~24–25 wk) wild-type (WT) and Nox2-deficient (Nox2−/y) mice, neither vehicle nor aldosterone (0.28 mg/kg/day for 14 days) affected blood pressure (measured using tail-cuff). By contrast, aldosterone treatment reduced dilation of the basilar artery (measured using myography) to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine in WT mice (P<0.05), but had no such effect in NOX2−/y mice (P>0.05). Aldosterone increased basal and phorbol-dibutyrate stimulated superoxide production (measured using L-012-enhanced chemiluminesence) in cerebral arteries from WT but not Nox2−/y mice. In aged WT mice (average age ~70 wk), aldosterone treatment increased blood pressure, but had a similar effect on cerebral artery superoxide levels as in adult WT mice. Conclusions These data indicate that NOX2 oxidase mediates aldosterone-induced increases in ROS production and endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arteries from adult mice independently of blood pressure changes. Aldosterone-induced hypertension is augmented during aging. PMID:24991871

  16. Is HIV-1 infection associated with endothelial dysfunction in a population of African ancestry in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Fourie, C; van Rooyen, J; Pieters, M; Conradie, K; Hoekstra, T; Schutte, A

    2011-01-01

    The chronic infection status suffered by HIV-infected individuals promotes chronic arterial inflammation and injury, which leads to dysfunction of the endothelium, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Although HIV-1 subtype C is prevalent in South Africa and accounts for almost a third of the infections worldwide, this subtype differs genetically from HIV-1 subtype B on which the majority of studies have been done. The objective of this study was to assess whether newly identified, never-treated, HIV-1-infected South African participants showed signs of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis and increased blood coagulation. We compared 300 newly diagnosed (never antiretroviraltreated) HIV-infected participants to 300 age-, gender-, body mass index- and locality-matched uninfected controls. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and carotid radialis pulse wave velocity (cr-PWV) were determined. The HIV-infected participants showed lower HDL-C and higher IL-6, CRP, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels compared to the uninfected controls. No differences in fibrinogen and PAI-1 levels were detected. A continuous positive trend of increasing age with cr-PWV was detected in the HIV-infected group. Our findings suggest inflammatory injury of the endothelium, pointing to endothelial dysfunction of never-treated HIV-1-infected South Africans of African ancestry. Although no indication of a prothrombotic state could be detected, there was an indication of accelerated vascular aging and probable early atherosclerosis in the older HIV-infected participants. PMID:21713302

  17. Angiotensin 1-7 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction via Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Dharmani; Lau, Yeh Siang; Lau, Wai Chi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) counter-regulates the cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II (Ang II). The present study investigated the protective effect of Ang 1–7 against Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial dysfunction. Ex vivo treatment with Ang II (0.5 μM, 24 hours) impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mouse aortas; this harmful effect of Ang II was reversed by co-treatment with ER stress inhibitors, l4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as well as Ang 1–7. The Mas receptor antagonist, A779, antagonized the effect of Ang 1–7. The elevated mRNA expression of CHOP, Grp78 and ATF4 or protein expression of p-eIF2α and ATF6 (ER stress markers) in Ang II-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse aortas were blunted by co-treatment with Ang 1–7 and the latter effect was reversed by A779. Furthermore, Ang II-induced reduction in both eNOS phosphorylation and NO production was inhibited by Ang 1–7. In addition, Ang 1–7 decreased the levels of ER stress markers and augmented NO production in HUVECs treated with ER stress inducer, tunicamycin. The present study provides new evidence for functional antagonism between the two arms of the renin-angiotensin system in endothelial cells by demonstrating that Ang 1–7 ameliorates Ang II-stimulated ER stress to raise NO bioavailability, and subsequently preserves endothelial function. PMID:26709511

  18. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  19. Endothelial deletion of ADAM17 in mice results in defective remodeling of the semilunar valves and cardiac dysfunction in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carole L.; Gough, Peter J.; Chang, Cindy A.; Chan, Christina K.; Frey, Jeremy M.; Liu, Yonggang; Braun, Kathleen R.; Chin, Michael T.; Wight, Thomas N.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2013-01-01

    Global inactivation of the metalloproteinase ADAM17 during mouse development results in perinatal lethality and abnormalities of the heart, including late embryonic cardiomegaly and thickened semilunar and atrioventricular valves. These defects have been attributed in part to a lack of ADAM17-mediated processing of HB-EGF, as absence of soluble HB-EGF results in similar phenotypes. Because valvular mesenchymal cells are largely derived from cardiac endothelial cells, we generated mice with a floxed Adam17 allele and crossed these animals with Tie2-Cre transgenics to focus on the role of endothelial ADAM17 in valvulogenesis. We find that although hearts from late-stage embryos with ablation of endothelial ADAM17 appear normal, an increase in valve size and cell number is evident, but only in the semilunar cusps. Unlike Hbegf−/− valves, ADAM17-null semilunar valves do not differ from controls in acute cell proliferation at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5), suggesting compensatory processing of HB-EGF. However, levels of the proteoglycan versican are significantly reduced in mutant hearts early in valve remodeling (E12.5). After birth, aortic valve cusps from mutants are not only hyperplastic but also show expansion of the glycosaminoglycan-rich component, with the majority of adults exhibiting aberrant compartmentalization of versican and increased deposition of collagen. The inability of mutant outflow valve precursors to transition into fully mature cusps is associated with decreased postnatal viability, progressive cardiomegaly, and systolic dysfunction. Together, our data indicate that ADAM17 is required in valvular endothelial cells for regulating cell content as well as extracellular matrix composition and organization in semilunar valve remodeling and homeostasis. PMID:23354118

  20. Vitamin D Prevents Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction Induced by Sera from Women with Preeclampsia or Conditioned Media from Hypoxic Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Myerski, Ashley C.; von Kaisenberg, Constantin S.; Grundmann, Magdalena; Hubel, Carl A.; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Context Placenta-derived circulating factors contribute to the maternal endothelial dysfunction underlying preeclampsia. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), a sub-population of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), are thought to be involved in vasculogenesis and endothelial repair. Low vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia. Objective We hypothesized that the function of human fetal ECFCs in culture would be suppressed by exposure to preeclampsia-related factors–preeclampsia serum or hypoxic placental conditioned medium– in a fashion reversed by vitamin D. Design, Setting, Patients ECFCs were isolated from cord blood of uncomplicated pregnancies and expanded in culture. Uncomplicated pregnancy villous placenta in explant culture were exposed to either 2% (hypoxic), 8% (normoxic) or 21% (hyperoxic) O2 for 48 h, after which the conditioned media (CM) was collected. Outcome Measures ECFC tubule formation (Matrigel assay) and migration were examined in the presence of either maternal serum from preeclampsia cases or uncomplicated pregnancy controls, or pooled CM, in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3. Results 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 reversed the adverse effects of preeclampsia serum or CM from hypoxic placenta on ECFCs capillary-tube formation and migration. Silencing of VDR expression by VDR siRNA, VDR blockade, or VEGF pathway blockade reduced ECFC functional abilities. Effects of VDR or VEGF blockade were partially prevented by vitamin D. Conclusion Vitamin D promotes the capillary-like tubule formation and migration of ECFCs in culture, minimizing the negative effects of exposure to preeclampsia-related factors. Further evaluation of the role of vitamin D in ECFC regulation and preeclampsia is warranted. PMID:24887145

  1. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration What is AMD? Click for more information Age-related macular degeneration, ... the macula allows you to see fine detail. AMD Blurs Central Vision AMD blurs the sharp central ...

  2. Urine albumin to creatinine ratio: A marker of early endothelial dysfunction in youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) is a useful predictor of cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Its relationship to vascular function in children is not clear. We investigated whether UACR was related to insulin resistance and endothelial function, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis...

  3. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  4. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction are attenuated by dietary polyphenols in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols possess anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cytotoxic brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, OS and pro-inflammatory cytokines also damage the endothelial cells and the neurovascular uni...

  5. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  6. Cytokine release and endothelial dysfunction: a perfect storm in orbivirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Howerth, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Although bluetongue viruses (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDV) are closely related, there are differences in susceptibility to these viruses both between and within a species. White‑tailed deer are susceptible to disease by both BTV and EHDV, sheep are susceptible to BTV, but resistant to EHDV, and cattle can be infected with both viruses but disease is usually subclinical. Host genetics probably play a role in the disease outcome, but cytokine and endothelial responses are likely to determine if subclinical or clinical disease develops. Dendritic macrophages deliver virus to lymph nodes following the bite of an infected Culicoides. The virus then disseminates to many organs replicating in mononuclear phagocytes and endothelium. Initially, an interferon‑1 response probably determines if the disease develops. Replication in mononuclear cells and endothelium results in the release of cytokines and vasoactive mediators, and may result in endothelial cell death leading to the clinical features of fever, hyperaemia, exudation of fluid, and haemorrhage. Disease outcome may also be linked to virus binding Toll‑like receptor‑3 and upregulation of endothelial surface receptors potentiating cytokine release and allowing transmigration of inflammatory cells, respectively. Despite a wealth of information, host genetics involved in resistance to BTV and EHDV and how variations in cytokines and endothelial responses determine clinical outcome still need further elucidation. PMID:26741244

  7. Heat-shock protein 60 of Porphyromonas gingivalis may induce dysfunction of human umbilical endothelial cells via regulation of endothelial-nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cunjin; Guo, Shijie; Niu, Yuanjie; Yang, Limin; Liu, Bainian; Jiang, Ning; Su, Ming; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has established that periodontitis was an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CAD). Porphyromonus gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a major periodontal pathogen, has already been shown to have a significant role in the inflammatory response of CAD in vivo. The aim of the present study was to identify whether P. gingivalis heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) induced the dysfunction of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. HUVECs were stimulated with a range of P. gingivalis HSP60 concentrations (1, 10 and 100 ng/l) at different time-points. The levels of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-3 (caspase-3) were measured using western blot analysis. The apoptotic rate of HUVECs was detected using flow cytometry. P. gingivalis HSP60 at a concentration of 10 ng/l significantly decreased the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS protein at 24 h stimulation, whereas no difference in these proteins was identified following a low dose of P. gingivalis HSP60 (1 ng/l). P. gingivalis HSP60 at 100 ng/l significantly downregulated the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS protein at 12 h in HUVECs. However, the cleavage of caspase-3 showed an opposing change at different concentrations. Consistently, P. gingivalis HSP60 induced apoptosis of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicated that P. gingivalis HSP60 may induce dysfunction and apoptosis in HUVECs via downregulating the expression levels of VE-cadherin and eNOS, and promoting the cleavage of caspase-3. PMID:27446550

  8. Reduction of obesity, as induced by leptin, reverses endothelial dysfunction in obese (Lep(ob)) mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, B.; Mo, Z.; Brooks-Asplund, E.; Kim, S.; Shoukas, A.; Li, D.; Nyhan, D.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Obesity is a major health care problem and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. Leptin, a neuroendocrine hormone released by adipose tissue, is important in modulating obesity by signaling satiety and increasing metabolism. Moreover, leptin receptors are expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and mediate angiogenesis. We hypothesized that leptin may also play an important role in vasoregulation. We investigated vasoregulatory mechanisms in the leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mouse model and determined the influence of leptin replacement on endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses. The direct effect of leptin on EC nitric oxide (NO) production was also tested by using 4, 5-diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate staining and measurement of nitrate and nitrite concentrations. Vasoconstrictor responses to phenylephrine, norepinephrine, and U-46619 were markedly enhanced in aortic rings from ob/ob mice and were modulated by NO synthase inhibition. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were markedly attenuated in mesenteric microvessels from ob/ob mice. Leptin replacement resulted in significant weight loss and reversal of the impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses observed in ob/ob mice. Preincubation of ECs with leptin enhanced the release of NO production. Thus leptin-deficient ob/ob mice demonstrate marked abnormalities in vasoregulation, including impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilation, which is reversed by leptin replacement. These findings may be partially explained by the direct effect of leptin on endothelial NO production. These vascular abnormalities are similar to those observed in obese, diabetic, leptin-resistant humans. The ob/ob mouse may, therefore, be an excellent new model for the study of the cardiovascular effects of obesity.

  9. Ameliorating Endothelial Mitochondrial Dysfunction Restores Coronary Function via Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Mediated Protein Kinase A/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiqiang; Wang, Peijian; Ma, Liqun; Gao, Peng; Gong, Liuping; Li, Li; Li, Qiang; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Xunmei; He, Hongbo; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiogenic death worldwide. Mitochondria are the principal source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and defective oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributes to ROS generation. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an adaptive antioxidant defense factor, protects against mitochondrial ROS-induced endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) attenuates vascular dysfunction. Therefore, whether TRPV1 activation antagonizes coronary lesions by alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the activity of the protein kinase A/UCP2 pathway warrants examination. ApoE(-/-), ApoE(-/-)/TRPV1(-/-), and ApoE(-/-)/UCP2(-/-) mice were fed standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or the HFD plus 0.01% capsaicin. HFD intake profoundly impaired coronary vasodilatation and myocardial perfusion and shortened the survival duration of ApoE(-/-) mice. TRPV1 or UCP2 deficiency exacerbated HFD-induced coronary dysfunction and was associated with increased ROS generation and reduced nitric oxide production in the endothelium. The activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin upregulated UCP2 expression via protein kinase A phosphorylation, thereby alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting mitochondrial ROS generation. In vivo, dietary capsaicin supplementation enhanced coronary relaxation and prolonged the survival duration of HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. These effects were not observed in ApoE(-/-) mice lacking the TRPV1 or UCP2 gene. The upregulation of protein kinase A /UCP2 via TRPV1 activation ameliorates coronary dysfunction and prolongs the lifespan of atherosclerotic mice by ameliorating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction. Dietary capsaicin supplementation may represent a promising intervention for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease. PMID:26667415

  10. Reduction in visceral adiposity is highly related to improvement in vascular endothelial dysfunction among obese women: an assessment of endothelial function by radial artery pulse wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Hoon; Shim, Kyung-Won

    2005-08-31

    Because obesity is frequently complicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, the impact of a reduction in visceral adiposity on vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in obese patients is difficult to determine. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of a reduction in visceral adiposity on VED in obese women. Thirty-six premenopausal obese women (BMI >/= 25 kg/m2) without complications were enrolled in the study. VED was evaluated by determining the augmentation index (AIx) from radial artery pulse waves obtained by applanation tonometry. Changes in AIx in response to nitroglycerin- induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation (DeltaAIx-NTG) and in response to salbutamol administration (DeltaAIx-Salb) were determined before and after weight reduction. After a 12-week weight reduction program, the average weight loss was 7.96 +/- 3.47 kg, with losses of 21.88 +/- 20.39 cm2 in visceral fat areas (p < 0.001). Pulse wave analysis combined with provocative pharmacological testing demonstrated preserved endothelium-independent vasodilation in healthy premenopausal obese women (DeltaAIx-NTG: 31.36 +/- 9.80% before weight reduction vs. 28.25 +/- 11.21% after weight reduction, p > 0.1) and an improvement in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following weight reduction (DeltaAIx-Salb: 10.03 +/- 6.49% before weight reduction vs. 19.33 +/- 9.28% after reduction, p < 0.001). A reduction in visceral adipose tissue was found to be most significantly related to an increase in DeltaAIx-Salb (beta=-0.57, p < 0.001). A reduction in visceral adiposity was significantly related to an improvement in VED. This finding suggests that reduction of visceral adiposity may be as important as the control of other major risk factors in the prevention of atherosclerosis in obese women. PMID:16127776

  11. Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome Independently Predict Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Minimal Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Lilitkarntakul, Pajaree; Dhaun, Neeraj; Melville, Vanessa; Kerr, Debbie; Webb, David J.; Goddard, Jane

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metabolic syndrome (MS) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its contribution to arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in CKD is not well defined. We hypothesized that risk factors for MS would independently predict arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in CKD patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Risk factors for MS, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as measures of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, respectively, were assessed in 113 minimally comorbid CKD patients and in 23 matched control subjects. RESULTS CF-PWV correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), waist circumference, and plasma glucose (r2 = 0.25, 0.09, and 0.09; P < 0.01 for all). FMD correlated with SBP (r2 = 0.09; P < 0.01) and waist circumference (r2 = 0.03; P < 0.05). CF-PWV increased progressively (r2 = 0.07; P < 0.01) with increasing number of risk factors for MS. In multiple linear regression, SBP and waist circumference were independent determinants of CF-PWV, whereas only SBP predicted FMD. CONCLUSIONS The number of MS risk factors is an important determinant of arterial stiffness in CKD patients irrespective of the degree of renal impairment. Although BP remains the major determinant of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, waist circumference independently predicts arterial stiffness. MS risk factors, particularly abdominal girth, are potential targets for future interventional studies in patients with CKD. PMID:22648437

  12. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  13. Insulin resistance in SHR/NDmc-cp rats correlates with enlarged perivascular adipocytes and endothelial cell dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hariya, Natsuyo; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Inoue, Seiya; Morioka, Kosuke; Shimada, Masaya; Okuda, Tohru; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic adipose tissue in skeletal muscle is implicated in the development of insulin resistance, which is frequently induced by abnormal dietary habits such as excessive eating and a high-fat diet. However, the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes are unknown. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive corpulent congenic (SHR/NDmc-cp) rats as a model of insulin resistance from excessive eating. SHR/NDmc-cp rats displayed overt insulin resistance with high plasma glucose, insulin, and triacylglycerol concentrations relative to control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In contrast, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated WKY rats had high glucose but low insulin concentrations. Ectopic adipocytes were found around blood vessels in the gastrocnemius in SHR/NDmc-cp rats. Areas of perivascular adipocytes and protein expression of resistin were greater in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in control and STZ-treated WKY rats. The level of the phosphorylated (active) form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the gastrocnemius was lower in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in the other groups. Insulin-resistant SHR/NDmc-cp rats showed enlarged perivascular adipocytes and greater endothelial cell dysfunction in the gastrocnemius. PMID:24759260

  14. [Influence of exam stress on the development of endothelial dysfunction and the formation of platelet-leukocyte coagregates].

    PubMed

    Fefelova, E V; Tereshkov, P P; Plotnikova, O K; Stafeev, A N; Semenov, A V; Svistunova, N M; Ivanov, M O

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the qualitative and quantitative composition of circulating endotheliocytes, P-selectin-associated leukocyte and platelet of coogregation blood levels of endothelin, interleukin-6 students on the background of exam stress. The research was made on the group conditionally healthy volunteers aged MT 18.3 ± 1 years that before participating in the study had a medical examination (n = 15). Blood sampling was made three times: 1--three months before the session (in a normal school day, two hours after training sessions), 2--for 25 ± 10 min before the exam, 3 - 15 ± 10 min after the exam. Approved the development of endothelial dysfunction in the background of exam stress, manifested by increased levels of circulating endothelial cells and endothelin. The total number of leukocyte and platelet of coogregation during the semester, before and after the exam has not changed, while there was an increase outlets, due to the expression of P-selectin on red blood cells before the exam and precipitous decline after the exam. PMID:25868334

  15. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  16. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  17. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Liu, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  18. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  19. Relationship between chronic tadalafil administration and improvement of endothelial function in men with erectile dysfunction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aversa, A; Greco, E; Bruzziches, R; Pili, M; Rosano, G; Spera, G

    2007-01-01

    Men with erectile dysfunction (ED) frequently have a disproportionate burden of comorbid vascular disorders including atherosclerotic disease. We investigated whether scheduled tadalafil is better than on-demand (OD) in improving endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of cavernous arteries in men with ED and whether this effect is also exerted on markers of endothelial function. We did an open-label, randomized, crossover study including 20 male outclinic patients aged 18 years or older (mean age 54 years) who had at least a 3-month history of ED of any severity or etiology. Tadalafil (20 mg) on alternate days (ADs) or OD was administered for 4 weeks. Primary end points were variations of basal inflow (peak systolic velocity (PSV)) and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of cavernous arteries compared with baseline at penile Duplex ultrasound. Secondary end points were variations of Q13-SIEDY scores regarding morning erections and of markers of endothelial function, that is, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule, endothelin-1 (ET-1), insulin and C-reactive protein (CRP). PSVs and FMD were higher after AD treatment when compared with OD and baseline, respectively (P=0.0001), and improvements were maintained from 2 weeks after discontinuation (P<0.005). Patients receiving tadalafil AD experienced a significant improvement of morning erections as compared to AD treatment (P<0.0001); ET1, VCAM and CRP showed a robust decrease after chronic vs OD regimes (P<0.05), with concomitant increase in insulin levels (P<0.05), without any variation in blood pressure and other laboratory parameters. Chronic but not OD tadalafil improves endothelial function with sustained effects from its discontinuation. Chronic treatment also produces a dramatic increase in morning erections, which determines better oxygenation to the penis, thus providing a rationale for vascular rehabilitation. PMID:16943794

  20. Endothelial dysfunction of rat coronary arteries after exposure to low concentrations of mercury is dependent on reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Furieri, Lorena B; Galán, María; Avendaño, María S; García-Redondo, Ana B; Aguado, Andrea; Martínez, Sonia; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Bartolomé, M Visitación; Alonso, María J; Vassallo, Dalton V; Salaices, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Exposure to mercury is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying mechanisms are not well explored. We analysed whether chronic exposure to low mercury doses affects endothelial modulation of the coronary circulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Left coronary arteries and hearts from Wistar rats treated with either HgCl2 (first dose 4.6 µg·kg−1, subsequent doses 0.07 µg·kg−1 day−1, 30 days) or vehicle were used. Endothelial cells from pig coronary arteries incubated with HgCl2 were also used. KEY RESULTS Mercury treatment increased 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction but reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation. It also reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the effects of NO synthase inhibition with L-NAME (100 µmol·L−1) on 5-HT and acetylcholine responses. Superoxide anion production and mRNA levels of NOX-1 and NOX-4 were all increased. The superoxide anion scavenger tiron (1 mmol·L−1) reduced 5-HT responses and increased acetylcholine responses only in vessels from mercury-treated rats. In isolated hearts from mercury-treated rats, coronary perfusion and diastolic pressure were unchanged, but developed isovolumetric systolic pressure was reduced. In these hearts, L-NAME increased coronary perfusion pressure and diastolic pressure while it further reduced developed systolic pressure. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Chronic exposure to low doses of mercury promotes endothelial dysfunction of coronary arteries, as shown by decreased NO bioavailability induced by increased oxidative stress. These effects on coronary function increase resistance to flow, which under overload conditions might cause ventricular contraction and relaxation impairment. These findings provide further evidence that mercury, even at low doses, could be an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. PMID:21232032

  1. Remote ischemic precondition prevents radial artery endothelial dysfunction induced by ischemia and reperfusion based on a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen-Bing; Yang, Wen-Xia; Fu, Xiang-Hua; Zhao, Lin-Feng; Gao, Jun-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and remote ischemic precondition (RIPC) are resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. They have common protective mechanism. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in the mechanism of IPC. So, the purpose of this study was to determine whether RIPC protects endothelial function of radial artery in human against IR and whether COX-2 involves in this effect. Endothelial IR injury was induced by arm ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the radial artery was measured before and after IR. RIPC (three 5-min cycles of ischemia of the contralateral arm) was applied immediately and 24 h before IR. All volunteers received the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (200 mg orally twice daily) for 5 days. On day 6, all subjects experienced the same studies as described. FMD was reduced by IR without administration of RIPC (P<0.0001). RIPC prevent this impairment of FMD immediately (P=NS) and at 24 h (P=NS). Nevertheless, the COX-2 inhibiter abolished protective effect of RIPC at 24 h (P=NS), but not immediately (P=0.001). After administration of the COX-2 inhibiter, post-IR FMD after RIPC performed immediately had significant increase than after RIPC performed at 24 h (P=0.001) and without administration of RIPC (P=0.003). The COX-2 inhibiter made post-IR FMD evidently decrease after RIPC performed at 24 h (P=0.002). RIPC prevents radial artery endothelial dysfunction induced by IR. This protective effect of RIPC in the late phase is mediated by a COX-2-dependent mechanism. PMID:26885023

  2. Tetramethylpyrazine ameliorates high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Xia, Pu; Li, Xi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhenqi; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound isolated from a Chinese herbal prescription that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that TMP acts as a potent antioxidant protecting endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damages. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the antioxidant effect of TMP remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that TMP increases nitric oxide production in endothelial cells and promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation in rate aortic rings. The antioxidant effect of TMP appears attributable to its ability to activate the mitochondrial biogenesis, as reflected in an up-regulation of complex III and amelioration of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, TMP is able to reverse high glucose-induced suppression of SIRT1 and the biogenesis-related factors, including PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM, suggesting a new molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of TMP on the endothelium. PMID:24505445

  3. Tetramethylpyrazine Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Xia, Pu; Li, Xi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhenqi; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound isolated from a Chinese herbal prescription that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that TMP acts as a potent antioxidant protecting endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damages. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the antioxidant effect of TMP remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that TMP increases nitric oxide production in endothelial cells and promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation in rate aortic rings. The antioxidant effect of TMP appears attributable to its ability to activate the mitochondrial biogenesis, as reflected in an up-regulation of complex III and amelioration of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, TMP is able to reverse high glucose-induced suppression of SIRT1 and the biogenesis-related factors, including PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM, suggesting a new molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of TMP on the endothelium. PMID:24505445

  4. Differential impact of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on subsequent cardiovascular events following percutaneous coronary intervention between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and non-CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Noriaki; Hokimoto, Seiji; Akasaka, Tomonori; Arima, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) status might modify the predictive effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to examine the differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients. We conducted a cohort study of 435 patients following PCI. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Peripheral endothelial dysfunction was examined using reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry index (RHI), and we divided patients into low- and high-natural logarithmic RHI (Ln-RHI) group. The endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris, and coronary revascularization. A total of 56 patients had a cardiovascular event. Patients who suffered a cardiovascular event had significantly lower Ln-RHI than other patients in the non-CKD group (0.46 ± 0.18 versus 0.60 ± 0.25; P = 0.002). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significantly higher probability of cardiovascular events in low Ln-RHI patients in the non-CKD group (log-rank test: P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified Ln-RHI as an independent and significant predictor of future cardiovascular events in the non-CKD group (HR: 0.096; 95 % CI 0.02-0.47; P = 0.004) but not in the CKD group. There was a differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients, and peripheral endothelial dysfunction significantly correlates with subsequent cardiovascular events after PCI in non-CKD patients. PMID:26164597

  5. Spontaneous Lung Dysfunction and Fibrosis in Mice Lacking Connexin 40 and Endothelial Cell Connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Michael; Billaud, Marie; Straub, Adam C.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Zarbock, Alexander; Duling, Brian R.; Isakson, Brant E.

    2011-01-01

    Gap junction proteins (connexins) facilitate intercellular communication and serve several roles in regulation of tissue function and remodeling. To examine the physiologic effects of depleting two prominent endothelial connexins, Cx40 and Cx43, transgenic mice were generated by breeding Cx40-deficient mice (Cx40−/−) with a vascular endothelial cell (VEC)-specific Cx43-deficient mouse strain (VEC Cx43−/−) to produce double-connexin knockout mice (VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/−). The life span in VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/− mice was dramatically shortened, which correlated with severe spontaneous lung abnormalities as the mice aged including increased fibrosis, aberrant alveolar remodeling, and increased lung fibroblast content. Moreover, VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/− mice exhibited cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension. Because VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/− mice demonstrated phenotypic hallmarks that were remarkably similar to those in mice deficient in caveolin-1, pulmonary caveolin expression was examined. Lungs from VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/− mice demonstrated significantly decreased expression of caveolin-1 and caveolin-2. This suggests that expression of caveolin-1 may be linked to expression of Cx40 and endothelial Cx43. Moreover, the phenotype of caveolin-1−/− mice and VEC Cx43−/−/Cx40−/− mice may arise via a common mechanism. PMID:21641379

  6. Cell-Based Screening Identifies Paroxetine as an Inhibitor of Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Módis, Katalin; Oláh, Gabor; Coletta, Ciro; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a phenotypic screening in endothelial cells exposed to elevated extracellular glucose (an in vitro model of hyperglycemia) to identify compounds that prevent hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation without adversely affecting cell viability. From a focused library of >6,000 clinically used drug-like and pharmacologically active compounds, several classes of active compounds emerged, with a confirmed hit rate of <0.5%. Follow-up studies focused on paroxetine, a clinically used antidepressant compound that has not been previously implicated in the context of hyperglycemia or diabetes. Paroxetine reduced hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial ROS formation, mitochondrial protein oxidation, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage, without interfering with mitochondrial electron transport or cellular bioenergetics. The ability of paroxetine to improve hyperglycemic endothelial cell injury was unique among serotonin reuptake blockers and can be attributed to its antioxidant effect, which primarily resides within its sesamol moiety. Paroxetine maintained the ability of vascular rings to respond to the endothelium-dependent relaxant acetylcholine, both during in vitro hyperglycemia and ex vivo, in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thus, the current work identifies a novel pharmacological action of paroxetine as a protector of endothelial cells against hyperglycemic injury and raises the potential of repurposing of this drug for the experimental therapy of diabetic cardiovascular complications. PMID:23223176

  7. Circulating Endothelial Cells in Patients with Heart Failure and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sales, Vicenta; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio; Vila, Virtudes; Almenar, Luis; Contreras, Teresa; Reganon, Edelmiro

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Acute and chronic heart failure may manifest different degrees of endothelial damage and angiogenesis. Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) have been identified as marker of vascular damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the evolution of the CEC at different stages of patients with heart failure. We also investigated a potential correlation between CEC and markers of vascular damage and angiogenesis. Methods: We studied 32 heart failure patients at hospital admission (acute phase) and at revision after 3 months (stable phase) and 32 controls. Circulating markers of endothelial damage (CEC; von Willebrand factor, vWF and soluble E-selectin, sEsel) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF and thrombospondin-1) were quantified. Results: Levels of CEC, vWF, sEsel and VEGF are significantly higher in heart failure patients than in controls. Levels of CEC (36.9 ± 15.3 vs. 21.5 ± 10.0 cells/ml; p < 0.001), vWF (325 ± 101 vs. 231 ± 82%; p < 0.001) and VEGF (26.3 ± 15.2 vs. 21.9 ± 11.9 ng/ml; p < 0.001) are significantly higher in the acute phase than in the stable phase of heart failure. CEC levels correlate with vWF and VEGF. Results show than 100% of patients in acute phase and 37.5% in stable phase have levels of CEC higher than the 99th percentile of the distribution of controls (16 cells/ml). Therefore, increases in CEC represent a relative risk of 9.5 for heart failure patients suffering from acute phase. Conclusions: CEC, in addition to being elevated in heart failure, correlate with vWF levels, providing further support for CEC as markers of endothelial damage. Levels of CEC are associated with the acute phase of heart failure and could be used as a marker of the worsening in heart failure. PMID:21897001

  8. Cocaine Abstinence and Reduced Use Associated With Lowered Marker of Endothelial Dysfunction in African Americans: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hong; Stitzer, Maxine; Treisman, Glenn; Moore, Richard; Brinker, Jeffrey; Gerstenblith, Gary; Kickler, Thomas S.; Li, Ji; Chen, Shaoguang; Fishman, Elliot; Lai, Shenghan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that cocaine use is associated with an increased risk of premature atherosclerosis. The objectives of this study were to explore (1) whether cocaine abstinence is associated with a reduced marker of endothelial dysfunction, (2) whether cocaine abstinence is associated with a slower coronary plaque progression, and (3) whether reduction in cocaine use is associated with a reduced marker of endothelial dysfunction in African American chronic cocaine users with contrast-enhanced coronary CT angiography-confirmed less than 50% coronary stenosis. Methods Between March and June 2014, a total of 57 African American cocaine users with contrast-enhanced CT angiography-confirmed less than 50% coronary stenosis in Baltimore, Maryland, were enrolled in a 6-month follow-up study to investigate whether cocaine abstinence or reduction in cocaine use is associated with decreased endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels and coronary plaque progression at the 6-month follow-up. A voucher-based incentive approach was used to systematically reinforce cocaine abstinence, and urine benzoylecgonine test was implemented to confirm cocaine use. Results Among the 57 participants, 44 were HIV-infected. The median of duration of cocaine use was 18 (interquartile range, 7–30) years. According to generalized estimating equation analyses, both cocaine abstinence and reduction in cocaine use in the 6 months were independently associated with decreased ET-1. The incidence of coronary plaque progression was 7.4/100 person-years and 23.1/100 person-years in those who were totally abstinent from cocaine and those who continued to use cocaine, respectively. However, the difference in the incidence between these 2 groups was not significant (exact P = 0.30). Conclusions The findings of this study revealed a possible association of cocaine abstinence/reduction with lowered ET levels, which suggests that such changes in cocaine use might be beneficial for

  9. Argan (Argania spinosa) oil lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Pérez-Guerrero, Concepción; Ettaib, Abdelkader; Hmamouchi, Mohamed; Marhuenda, Elisa; Herrera, Maria Dolores

    2004-12-01

    Traditionally hand-pressed argan oil, obtained from Argania spinosa seeds, is eaten raw in south-west Morocco; its rich composition of tocopherols, MUFA and PUFA make a study of its actions on risk factors for CVD, such as hypertension, interesting. The effects of 7 weeks of treatment with argan oil (10 ml/kg) on the blood pressure and endothelial function of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats were investigated. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured every week by the tail-cuff method and endothelial function was assessed by carbachol (10(-8) to 10(-4) M)-induced relaxations of aortic rings and small mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine. Argan-oil administration reduced the mean blood pressure of SHR after the fifth week of treatment (P<0.05) and increased (P<0.01) the endothelial responses of arteries from SHR. The NO synthase inhibitor, L-N-omega-nitroarginine (3 x 10(-5) M) revealed a greater participation of NO in the relaxant effect after the treatment. When cyclooxygenase (COX) was blocked with indomethacin (10(-5) M), an involvement of COX products in the endothelium-dependent response was characterized. Enzyme immunoassay of thromboxane B2 showed a significant decrease (P<0.05) in the release of thromboxane A2 in both aorta and small mesenteric artery after argan-oil treatment of SHR. Experiments in the presence of the thromboxane A2-prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist ICI 192,605 (10(-5) M) confirmed this result. Results after incubation with the antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase suggested that a decreased oxidative stress might contribute to explain the beneficial effects of argan-oil treatment. PMID:15613254

  10. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  11. Delphinidin-3-Glucoside Protects against Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Endothelial Cells via the Sodium-Dependent Glucose Transporter SGLT1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-liang; Chen, Chun-ye; Chang, Hui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Li; Zhu, Jun-dong; Zhang, Qian-yong; Mi, Man-tian

    2013-01-01

    Delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dp) is a member of a family of bioactive compounds known as anthocyanins that occur naturally in pigmented plants and are known to ameliorate oxidative stress. Previous studies have showed that Dp decreased oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells, however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that pretreatment with Dp significantly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Also, Dp pretreatment attenuated oxLDL-induced mitochondrial dysfunction via decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anion generation, thereby repressing mitochondrial membrane potential and closing mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data showed that Dp was transported into endothelial cells in a temperature, concentration, and time-dependent manner via the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). Suppression of SGLT1 by its substrate glucose, its inhibitor phlorizin or SGLT1 siRNA blocked Dp transportation. Repression of SGLT1 significantly inhibited Dp function of ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction induced by pro-apoptotic factors (Apoptosis-inducing factor, Cytochrome c, Caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio). Taken together, our data indicate that Dp protects VECs via the SGLT1-ROS-mitochodria pathway. This new insight may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the vascular protection afforded by Dp, and anthocyanins in general, in the context of prevention of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:23874689

  12. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD ... distorted and wavy. There may be a small dark spot in the center of your vision that ... leafy vegetables, may also decrease your risk of age-related macular degeneration. If you have wet AMD, ...

  13. Reversal of Endothelial Dysfunction by GPBAR1 Agonism in Portal Hypertension Involves a AKT/FOXOA1 Dependent Regulation of H2S Generation and Endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Simonetti, Michele; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background GPBAR1 is a bile acids activated receptor expressed in entero-hepatic tissues. In the liver expression of GPBAR1 is restricted to sinusoidal and Kuppfer cells. In the systemic circulation vasodilation caused by GPBAR1 agonists is abrogated by inhibition of cystathione-γ-liase (CSE), an enzyme essential to the generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a vasodilatory agent. Portal BAR501 is a semisynthetic bile acid derivative endowed with a potent and selective agonistic activity toward GPBAR1. Methods Cirrhosis was induced in mice by carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) administration for 9 weeks. Liver endothelial dysfunction was induced by feeding wild type and Gpbar1-/- mice with methionine for 4 weeks. In both models, mice were administered BAR501, 15 mg/kg/day. Results By transactivation assay we demonstrate that BAR501 is a selective GPBAR1 agonist devoid of any FXR agonistic activity. In naïve rats, BAR501 effectively reduced hepatic perfusion pressure and counteracted the vasoconstriction activity of norepinephrine. In the CCl4 model, 9 weeks treatment with BAR501 effectively protected against development of endothelial dysfunction by increasing liver CSE expression and activity and by reducing endothelin (ET)-1 gene expression. In mice feed methionine, treatment with BAR501 attenuated endothelial dysfunction and caused a GPBAR1-dependent regulation of CSE. Using human liver sinusoidal cells, we found that modulation of CSE expression/activity is mediated by both genomic (recruitment of CREB to CRE in the CSE promoter) and non-genomic effects, involving a Akt-dependent phosporylation of CSE and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). BAR501, phosphorylates FOXO1 and inhibits ET-1 transcription in liver sinusoidal cells. Conclusions BAR501, a UDCA-like GPBAR1 agonist, rescues from endothelial dysfunction in rodent models of portal hypertension by exerting genomic and non-genomic effects on CSE, eNOS and ET-1 in liver sinusoidal cells. PMID:26539823

  14. Polyphenol fraction of extra virgin olive oil protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by high glucose and free fatty acids through modulation of nitric oxide and endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Storniolo, Carolina Emilia; Roselló-Catafau, Joan; Pintó, Xavier; Mitjavila, María Teresa; Moreno, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have reported that olive oil reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect have not been delineated. The endothelium plays an important role in blood pressure regulation through the release of potent vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agents such as nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), respectively, events that are disrupted in type 2 diabetes. Extra virgin olive oil contains polyphenols, compounds that exert a biological action on endothelial function. This study analyzes the effects of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction using an in vitro model that simulates the conditions of type 2 diabetes. Our findings show that high glucose and linoleic and oleic acids decrease endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, and consequently intracellular NO levels, and increase ET-1 synthesis by ECV304 cells. These effects may be related to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species production in these experimental conditions. Hydroxytyrosol and the polyphenol extract from extra virgin olive oil partially reversed the above events. Moreover, we observed that high glucose and free fatty acids reduced NO and increased ET-1 levels induced by acetylcholine through the modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, events also reverted by hydroxytyrosol and polyphenol extract. Thus, our results suggest a protective effect of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia and free fatty acids. PMID:25460732

  15. Uric acid enhances PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and mediates cellular ER stress: A mechanism for uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; ZHANG, LINA; ZHANG, MEI; ZHOU, CHANGYONG; LIN, NAN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which hyperuricemia induced-endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we used uric acid (UA) to trigger endothelial dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells, and investigated the effects of induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction, and the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 6, 9 or 12 mg/dl UA, ROS scavenger polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), and PKC inhibitor polymyxin B for 6–48 h. Nitric oxide (NO) production, eNOS activity, intracellular ROS, ER stress levels, and the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM) and cytosolic calcium levels were assessed using fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining. UA increased HUVEC apoptosis and reduced eNOS activity and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS was elevated after 3 h, while ER stress level increased after 6 h. UA did not alter intracellular Ca2+, CaM, or eNOS concentration, or eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 was greatly enhanced, and consequently interaction between eNOS and CaM was reduced. Cellular ROS depletion, ER stress inhibition and PKC activity reduction inhibited the effect of UA on eNOS activity, NO release and apoptosis in HUVECs. Thus, we concluded that UA induced HUVEC apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction by triggering oxidative and ER stress through PKC/eNOS-mediated eNOS activity and NO production. PMID:26935704

  16. Inactivation of Endothelial Small/Intermediate Conductance of Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Contributes to Coronary Arteriolar Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhong; Xie, An; Singh, Arun K; Ehsan, Afshin; Choudhary, Gaurav; Dudley, Samuel; Sellke, Frank W; Feng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with coronary arteriolar endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the role of the small/intermediate (SKCa/IKCa) conductance of calcium-activated potassium channels in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Coronary arterioles (80 to 150 μm in diameter) were dissected from discarded right atrial tissues of diabetic (glycosylated hemoglobin = 9.6±0.25) and nondiabetic patients (glycosylated hemoglobin 5.4±0.12) during coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n=8/group). In-vitro relaxation response of precontracted arterioles was examined in the presence of the selective SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 and other vasodilatory agents. The channel density and membrane potential of diabetic and nondiabetic endothelial cells was measured by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The protein expression and distribution of the SKCa/IKCa in the human myocardium and coronary arterioles was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that diabetes significantly reduced the coronary arteriolar response to the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 compared to the respective responses of nondiabetic vessels (P<0.05 versus nondiabetes). The relaxation response of diabetic arterioles to NS309 was prevented by denudation of endothelium (P=0.001 versus endothelium-intact). Diabetes significantly decreased endothelial SKCa/IKCa currents and hyperpolarization induced by the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 as compared with that of nondiabetics. There were no significant differences in the expression and distribution of SKCa/IKCa proteins in the coronary microvessels. Conclusions Diabetes is associated with inactivation of endothelial SKCa/IKCa channels, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients. PMID:26304940

  17. High-intensity interval training attenuates endothelial dysfunction in a Dahl salt-sensitive rat model of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Adams, Volker; Alves, Marcia; Fischer, Tina; Rolim, Natale; Werner, Sarah; Schütt, Nicole; Bowen, T Scott; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2015-09-15

    Heart failure patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF) have endothelial dysfunction, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In addition, whether exercise training improves endothelial function in HFpEF is still controversial. The present study therefore aimed to determine the functional and molecular alterations in the endothelium associated with HFpEF, while further assessing the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT). Female Dahl salt-sensitive rats were randomized for 28 wk into the following groups: 1) control: fed 0.3% NaCl; 2) HFpEF: fed 8% NaCl; and 3) HFpEF + HIT: animals fed 8% NaCl and HIT treadmill exercise. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic measurements were used to assess diastolic dysfunction. Endothelial function of the aorta was measured in vitro. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase [NAD(P)H oxidase], and advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins were quantified by Western blot, and zymography quantified matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. In this model of HFpEF, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was impaired. However, this was prevented by HIT. In HFpEF protein expression of eNOS was reduced by 47%, but MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was elevated by 186 and 68%. The expression of AGE-modified proteins was increased by 106%. All of these changes were prevented by HIT. Endothelial function was impaired in this model of HFpEF, which was associated with reduced expression of eNOS, increased MMP activity, and increased AGE-modified proteins. HIT was able to attenuate both these functional and molecular alterations. These findings therefore suggest HFpEF induces endothelial dysfunction, but this is reversible by HIT. PMID:26229002

  18. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = – 0.325, p <  0.05), HDL cholesterol (r = – 0.393, p <  0.05), body mass index (BMI; r = 0.530, p <  0.01), and plasma fibrinogen concentration (r = 0.335, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained significantly associated with BMI and fibrinogen, but not with FMD, in healthy controls. In patients with coronary risk factors, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = – 0.331, p <  0.01), HDL cholesterol (r = – 0.241, p <  0.05), BMI (r = 0.290, p <  0.01), hematocrit (r = 0.422, p <  0.001), white blood cell count (r = 0.295, p <  0.01), platelet count (r = 0.204, p <  0.05), and insulin (r = 0.210, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained strongly associated with FMD and hematocrit in patients with coronary risk factors. These data indicate that BPT is closely associated with FMD in patients with coronary risk factors and suggest that the measurement of blood rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients. PMID:26444592

  19. Effects of Complementary Creatine Monohydrate and Physical Training on Inflammatory and Endothelial Dysfunction Markers Among Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Farajollah; Rahmani, Asghar; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Soleimannejad, Koroush; Khalighi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory cytokine in heart failure patients (HF). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of creatine monohydrate and exercise on inflammatory and endothelial dysfunction markers among HF patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients were prospectively randomized into two groups: Intervention group which received 5 grams/day creatine monohydrate and exercised for 8 weeks; and control group which did not receive any interventions. Interleukine-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) were measured at the start and end of the study for both groups. Results: In total, 100 patients including 50 controls and 50 intervention group (54% male, mean EF of 34.2 ± 10.5% and 52% male, mean EF of 35.6 ± 12.7%, respectively) were analyzed. The