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Sample records for age-related endothelial dysfunction

  1. Prevention of age-related endothelial dysfunction by habitual aerobic exercise in healthy humans: possible role of nuclear factor κB.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Pierce, Gary L; Nowlan, Molly J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Habitual aerobic exercise prevents age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). We have hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) impairs EDD with sedentary aging, and habitual aerobic exercise prevents this age-related suppression of EDD by NF-κB. To test this hypothesis, we have inhibited NF-κB signalling via oral salsalate administration in healthy older aerobic exercise-trained adults (OT, n=14, 58 ± 2 years), older non-exercising adults (ON, n=16, 61 ± 1 years) and young non-exercising controls (YN, n=8, 23 ± 1 years). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell expression of NF-κB p65 by ~25% in ON (P<0.05) but did not significantly change expression in OT or YN (P>0.05). EDD, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), was improved by salsalate in ON (4.0 ± 0.7% compared with 6.8 ± 0.7%, placebo compared with salsalate, P<0.001) but did not change with salsalate in OT or YN (OT: 7.2 ± 0.7% compared with 7.7 ± 0.6%; YN: 7.6 ± 0.9% compared with 8.1 ± 0.8%; placebo compared with salsalate, P>0.05). Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by salsalate in any group (P>0.05). In ON, vitamin C infusion improved FMD by ~30% during placebo (P<0.001) but had no affect during salsalate (P>0.05). In OT and YN, vitamin C infusion did not affect FMD during either placebo or salsalate (P>0.05). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell nitrotyrosine content by ~25% and NADPH oxidase p47phox expression by ~30% in ON (P<0.05) but had no effect in OT or YN (P>0.05). Our results suggest that endothelial NF-κB signalling is associated with oxidative stress-related impairment of EDD in healthy non-exercising but not aerobically exercising older adults. This may be a key mechanism by which regular aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function and reduces cardiovascular risk with aging.

  2. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  3. Endothelial dysfunction in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Aldasoro, Martin; Ortega, Joaquin; Vila, José María

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic multifunctional disease characterized by an accumulation of fat. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction, as defined by an imbalance between relaxing and contractile endothelial factors, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these cardiometabolic diseases. Diminished bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to endothelial dysfunction and impairs endothelium- dependent vasodilatation. But this is not the only mechanism that drives to endothelial dysfunction. Obesity has been associated with a chronic inflammatory process, atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover levels of asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), are elevated in obesity. On the other hand, increasing prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction and decreasing vasodilator prostanoids also lead to endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Other mechanisms related to endothelin-1 (ET-1) or endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) have been proposed. Bariatric surgery (BS) is a safe and effective means to achieve significant weight loss, but its use is limited only to patients with severe obesity including morbid obesity. BS also proved efficient in endothelial dysfunction reduction improving cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities associated with morbid obesity such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. This review will provide a brief overview of the mechanisms that link obesity with endothelial dysfunction, and how weight loss is a cornerstone treatment for cardiovascular comorbidities obesity-related. A better understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction may help develop new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  4. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  5. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  6. Glial dysfunction causes age-related memory impairment in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Ueno, Kohei; Ueno, Taro; Saeki, Shinjiro; Matsuno, Motomi; Naganos, Shintaro; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Yukinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Honda, Yoshiko; Kodama, Tohru; Masuda, Tomoko; Saitoe, Minoru

    2014-11-19

    Several aging phenotypes, including age-related memory impairment (AMI), are thought to be caused by cumulative oxidative damage. In Drosophila, age-related impairments in 1 hr memory can be suppressed by reducing activity of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the mechanism for this effect has been unclear. Here we show that decreasing PKA suppresses AMI by reducing activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a glial metabolic enzyme whose amounts increase upon aging. Increased PC activity causes AMI through a mechanism independent of oxidative damage. Instead, increased PC activity is associated with decreases in D-serine, a glia-derived neuromodulator that regulates NMDA receptor activity. D-serine feeding suppresses both AMI and memory impairment caused by glial overexpression of dPC, indicating that an oxidative stress-independent dysregulation of glial modulation of neuronal activity contributes to AMI in Drosophila.

  7. Generating iPSC-Derived Choroidal Endothelial Cells to Study Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Songstad, Allison E.; Wiley, Luke A.; Duong, Khahn; Kaalberg, Emily; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J.; Cranston, Cathryn M.; Riker, Megan J.; Levasseur, Dana; Stone, Edwin M.; Mullins, Robert F.; Tucker, Budd A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of incurable blindness in the western world, is characterized by the dysfunction and eventual death of choroidal endothelial (CECs), RPE, and photoreceptor cells. Stem cell–based treatment strategies designed to replace photoreceptor and RPE cells currently are a major scientific focus. However, the success of these approaches likely also will require replacement of the underlying, supportive choroidal vasculature. The purpose of this study was to generate stem cell–derived CECs to develop efficient differentiation and transplantation protocols. Methods Dermal fibroblasts from the Tie2-GFP mouse were isolated and reprogrammed into two independent induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines via viral transduction of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Tie2-GFP iPSCs were differentiated into CECs using a coculture method with either the RF6A CEC line or primary mouse CECs. Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs were characterized via RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry for EC- and CEC-specific markers. Results Induced pluripotent stem cells generated from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the endothelial Tie2 promoter display classic pluripotency markers and stem cell morphology. Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs express carbonic anhydrase IV, eNOS, FOXA2, PLVAP, CD31, CD34, ICAM-1, Tie2, TTR, VE-cadherin, and vWF. Conclusions Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs will be a valuable tool for modeling of choriocapillaris-specific insults in AMD and for use in future choroidal endothelial cell replacement approaches. PMID:26720480

  8. Polyphenols in preventing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Biegańska-Hensoldt, Sylwia; Rosołowska-Huszcz, Danuta

    2017-03-27

    One of the main causes of mortality in developed countries is atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Consumption of food rich in natural antioxidants including polyphenols significantly improves endothelial cells functions. Polyphenols have a beneficial effect on the human body and play an important part in protecting the cardiovascular system. Polyphenols present in food have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, antithrombotic and antiproliferative properties. Catechins cause an increase in the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and decrease in blood pressure. Catechins also reduce platelet adhesion, lower the concentration of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6. Resveratrol inhibits NADPH oxidase expression, increases the expression of eNOS and NO production as well as decreases the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and also lowers the concentration of the soluble forms of adhesion molecules - sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in blood. Quercetin reduces the blood level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, reduces the concentration of C-reactive protein and F2-isoprostane level. Curcumin has antagonistic activity to homocysteine. Curcumin increases the expression of eNOS and reduces oxidative DNA damage in rat cardiomyocytes. Numerous attempts are taken for improving the bioavailability of polyphenols in order to increase their use in the body.

  9. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  10. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  11. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  12. Energy metabolism, proteotoxic stress and age-related dysfunction - protection by carnosine.

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2011-08-01

    This review will discuss the relationship between energy metabolism, protein dysfunction and the causation and modulation of age-related proteotoxicity and disease. It is proposed that excessive glycolysis, rather than aerobic (mitochondrial) activity, could be causal to proteotoxic stress and age-related pathology, due to the generation of endogenous glycating metabolites: the deleterious role of methylglyoxal (MG) is emphasized. It is suggested that TOR inhibition, exercise, fasting and increased mitochondrial activity suppress formation of MG (and other deleterious low molecular weight carbonyl compounds) which could control onset and progression of proteostatic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms by which the endogenous dipeptide, carnosine, which, by way of its putative aldehyde-scavenging activity, may control age-related proteotoxicity, cellular dysfunction and pathology, including cancer, are also considered. Whether carnosine could be regarded as a rapamycin mimic is briefly discussed.

  13. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Andjelkovic, A V; Stamatovic, S M; Shakui, P; Ennis, S R

    2005-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation upon reperfusion therapy has focused attention on ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. This study examined whether hyperglycemia may induce hemorrhagic transformation by enhancing endothelial mitochondrial damage during ischemia and whether preconditioning (PC) stimuli may limit ischemia-induced endothelial damage. In vivo, rats received 2.8 M D-glucose or arabinose (1 ml/100 g; i.p.) prior to undergoing two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and transcardiac fixation for electron microscopy. In vitro, brain endothelial cells were exposed to a PC impulse (short-term oxygen glucose deprivation; OGD) prior to an injurious event (5 hours OGD). Endothelial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Hyperglycemia during cerebral ischemia resulted in marked changes in endothelial morphology and mitochondrial swelling. Thus, in the ischemic hemisphere, there was no evidence of endothelial mitochondrial swelling in normoglycemic rats (mean profile width 0.22 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 microm in contralateral hemisphere) but there was marked swelling in hyperglycemic rats (0.44 +/- 0.02 microm). In vitro, cells preconditioned with one hour of OGD one day prior to 5 hours of OGD, showed reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hyperglycemia may have specific adverse effects on endothelial cell mitochondria during ischemia. Preventing those effects may help to ameliorate blood-brain barrier disruption on reperfusion. Insights into how to prevent endothelial injury may come from determining the mechanisms involved in endothelial preconditioning.

  14. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo; de Kreutzenberg, Saula Vigili

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents. It is associated with severe metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Adipose tissue secretes a great number of hormones and cytokines that not only regulate substrate metabolism but may deeply and negatively influence endothelial physiology, a condition which may lead to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, the physiology of the endothelium is summarised and the mechanisms by which obesity, through the secretory products of adipose tissue, influences endothelial function are explained. A short description of methodological approaches to diagnose endothelial dysfunction is presented. The possible pathogenetic links between obesity and cardiovascular disease, mediated by oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are described as well.

  15. Age-related impairment of endothelial progenitor cell migration correlates with structural alterations of heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kate A; Hamilton, Andrew; Reynolds, John A; Sipos, Peter; Crocker, Ian; Stringer, Sally E; Alexander, Yvonne M

    2013-02-01

    Aging poses one of the largest risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. The increased propensity toward vascular pathology with advancing age maybe explained, in part, by a reduction in the ability of circulating endothelial progenitor cells to contribute to vascular repair and regeneration. Although there is evidence to suggest that colony forming unit-Hill cells and circulating angiogenic cells are subject to age-associated changes that impair their function, the impact of aging on human outgrowth endothelial cell (OEC) function has been less studied. We demonstrate that OECs isolated from cord blood or peripheral blood samples from young and old individuals exhibit different characteristics in terms of their migratory capacity. In addition, age-related structural changes were discovered in OEC heparan sulfate (HS), a glycocalyx component that is essential in many signalling pathways. An age-associated decline in the migratory response of OECs toward a gradient of VEGF significantly correlated with a reduction in the relative percentage of the trisulfated disaccharide, 2-O-sulfated-uronic acid, N, 6-O-sulfated-glucosamine (UA[2S]-GlcNS[6S]), within OEC cell surface HS polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, disruption of cell surface HS reduced the migratory response of peripheral blood-derived OECs isolated from young subjects to levels similar to that observed for OECs from older individuals. Together these findings suggest that aging is associated with alterations in the fine structure of HS on the cell surface of OECs. Such changes may modulate the migration, homing, and engraftment capacity of these repair cells, thereby contributing to the progression of endothelial dysfunction and age-related vascular pathologies.

  16. Red ginseng delays age-related hearing and vestibular dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunjie; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Kim, Young Sun; Park, Hun Yi; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Since Korean red ginseng (KRG) has been proven to protect against gentamicin-induced vestibular and hearing dysfunction, the effects of KRG on age-related inner ear disorder in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. While age-related hearing loss was detected at the age of 6months (32kHz) and 9months (16kHz) in the control group, it was significantly delayed (p<0.05) in the 150mg/kg KRG-treated group. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in the tail-hanging and swimming tests, with significantly different severity scores and swimming times detected between the control and 150mg/kg KRG-treated group at the age of 12months (p<0.05). Mice treated with 500mg/kg KRG exhibited irritability and aggravated inner ear dysfunction. Histological observation supported the findings of hearing and vestibular function defects. In conclusion, C57BL/6 mice showed early-onset hearing loss and progressive vestibular dysfunction with aging, which were delayed by treatment with 150mg/kg KRG. However, 500mg/kg KRG treatment may induce aggressive behavior.

  17. Therapeutic Strategies for Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Age-Related Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, J S; Kumar, S; Vijayan, M; Bhatti, G K; Reddy, P H

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex, intercellular organelles present in the cells and are involved in multiple roles including ATP formation, free radicals generation and scavenging, calcium homeostasis, cellular differentiation, and cell death. Many studies depicted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in aging and pathogenesis of age-related metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Remarkable advancements have been made in understanding the structure, function, and physiology of mitochondria in metabolic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. Further, much progress has been done in the improvement of therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle interventions, pharmacological, and mitochondria-targeted therapeutic approaches. These strategies were mainly focused to reduce the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress and to retain the mitochondrial health in various diseases. In this chapter, we have highlighted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of various disorders and recent progress in the development of mitochondria-targeted molecules as therapeutic measures for metabolic disorders.

  18. [Endothelial cell apoptosis in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2012-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common male diseases, which seriously affects the patient's quality of life. The risk factors of ED include aging, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and unhealthy lifestyle, and its exact mechanism remains unclear. The apoptosis of endothelial cells in the corpus cavernosum penis may reduce NOS activity, block NO synthesis, and affect penile erection, and the mechanisms of their apoptosis vary with different causes of ED. This article updates the relationship between the apoptosis of endothelial cells and the development of ED.

  19. [Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jarasūniene, Dalia; Simaitis, Audrius

    2003-01-01

    Growing numbers of morbidity and mortality due to the Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is recognized as the more increasing challenge in the world. The initial stage of atherosclerosis, early diagnosis and treatment of CHD are the main objectives of current research. Endothelium dysfunction, the earliest expression of the atherosclerotic process is associated with subtle biochemical changes that gradually are transformed into the structural changes of the arterial wall. The theory of free radicals is the most common among the atherosclerosis explanations. Overproduction or impaired neutralization of the free radicals accounts for oxidative stress that is causing substantial damage to the low density lipoproteins, nitric oxyde (NO), endothelium cells, tissue cells and finally leads to the endothelium dysfuction. Pathophysiology of oxidative stress and its role in the endothelium dysfunction are discussed in this paper. Positive role of various medications (statins, angiotensin converting enzym inhibitors, aldosteron antagonists, estrogens, antioxidants, b-blockers with vasodilatative properties) to the oxidative stress and consequently to the endothelium dysfuction are discussed as well.

  20. Bubble-Induced Endothelial Microparticles Promote Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoyang; Zhang, Kun; Qing, Long; Liu, Wenwu; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness is a systemic pathophysiological process caused by bubbles and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are established markers reflecting competency of endothelial function and vascular biology. Here, we investigated the effects of bubble-induced EMPs on endothelial cells in vitro and vivo. Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were isolated and stimulated by bubbles and bubble-induced EMPs were collected and incubated with normal PMVECs in vitro. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected using Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and Annexin V FITC/PI double staining, respectively. Cell permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Intracellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production were analyzed microscopically. In vivo study, bubble-induced EMPs were intravenously injected to the rats and soluble thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascullar adhesion molecule 1 were involved in evaluating endothelial dysfunction. In our study, bubble stimulus resulted in a significant increase of EMPs release by 3 fold. Bubble-induced EMPs significantly decreased cell viability and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, bubble-induced EMPs induced abnormal increase of cell permeability and over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular ROS production increased while NO production decreased. These negative effects caused by bubble-induced EMPs were remarkably suppressed when EMPs pretreated with surfactant FSN-100. Finally, intravenous injection of bubble-induced EMPs caused elevations of soluble thrombomodulin and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the circulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated that bubble-induced EMPs can mediate endothelial dysfunction in vitro and vivo, which can be attenuated by EMPs abatement strategy. These data expanded our horizon of the detrimental effects of bubble

  1. Nucleic Acid Delivery for Endothelial Dysfunction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Dipti; Janero, David R.; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Blanco, Elvin; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple cardiovascular diseases and involves components of both innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Identifying signature patterns and targets associated with endothelial dysfunction can help in the development of novel nanotherapeutic platforms for treatment of vascular diseases. This review discusses nucleic acid-based regulation of endothelial function and the different nucleic acid-based nanotherapeutic approaches designed to target endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27826366

  2. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed.

  3. Methylglyoxal promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Rodrigues, Lisa; Fernandes, Rosa; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel M

    2012-05-01

    Modern diets can cause modern diseases. Research has linked a metabolite of sugar, methylglyoxal (MG), to the development of diabetic complications, but the exact mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate whether MG could directly influence endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Wistar and GK rats treated with MG in the drinking water for 3 months were compared with the respective control rats. The effects of MG were investigated on NO-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic arteries from the different groups. Insulin resistance, NO bioavailability, glycation, a pro-inflammatory biomarker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular oxidative stress were also evaluated. Methylglyoxal treated Wistar rats significantly reduced the efficacy of NO-dependent vasorelaxation (p<0.001). This impairment was accompanied by a three fold increase in the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation was significantly increased as well as MCP-1 and the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). NO bioavailability was significantly attenuated and accompanied by an increase in superoxide anion immunofluorescence. Methylglyoxal treated GK rats significantly aggravated endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, AGEs accumulation and diminished NO bioavailability when compared with control GK rats. These results indicate that methylglyoxal induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Wistar rats and aggravated the endothelial dysfunction present in GK rats. The mechanism is at least in part by increasing oxidative stress and/or AGEs formation with a concomitant increment of inflammation and a decrement in NO bioavailability. The present study provides further evidence for methylglyoxal as one of the causative factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of macrovascular

  4. Age-related dysfunctions of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons under proteasome stress.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, Elena; Pintado, Cristina; Gavilan, Maria P; Daza, Paula; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Castaño, Angélica; Ruano, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and autophagy deregulation gives rise to severe disorders. Many of the signaling pathways regulating autophagy under stress conditions are still poorly understood. Using a model of proteasome stress in rat hippocampus, we have characterized the functional crosstalk between the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway, identifying also age-related modifications in the crosstalk between both proteolytic systems. Under proteasome inhibition, both autophagy activation and resolution were efficiently induced in young but not in aged rats, leading to restoration of protein homeostasis only in young pyramidal neurons. Importantly, proteasome stress inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β in young but activated in aged rats. This age-related difference could be because of a dysfunction in the signaling pathway of the insulin growth factor-1 under stress situations. Present data highlight the potential role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the coordination of both proteolytic systems under stress situation, representing a key molecular target to sort out this deleterious effect.

  5. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~ 50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  6. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy.

  7. Endothelial dysfunction: the early predictor of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mudau, Mashudu; Genis, Amanda; Lochner, Amanda; Strijdom, Hans

    2012-05-01

    Since the discovery in the 1980s that nitric oxide (NO) is in fact the elusive endothelium-derived relaxing factor, it has become evident that NO is not only a major cardiovascular signalling molecule, but that changes in its bioavailability are crucial in determining whether atherosclerosis will develop or not. Sustained high levels of harmful circulating stimuli associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus elicit responses in endothelial cells that appear sequentially, namely endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED, characterised by reduced NO bioavailability, is now recognised by many as an early, reversible precursor of atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of ED is multifactorial; however, oxidative stress appears to be the common underlying cellular mechanism in the ensuing loss of vaso-active, inflammatory, haemostatic and redox homeostasis in the body's vascular system. The role of ED as a pathophysiological link between early endothelial cell changes associated with cardiovascular risk factors and the development of ischaemic heart disease is of importance to basic scientists and clinicians alike.

  8. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  9. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  10. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  11. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shaker A; Mousa, Shaymaa S

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the process by which new vessels are created from pre-existing vasculature, has become the subject of intense research in recent years. Increased rates of angiogenesis are associated with several disease states, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetic retinopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, and has been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions, including AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. AMD is a progressive disease of the macula and the third major cause of blindness worldwide. If not treated appropriately, AMD can progress to involve both eyes. Until recently, the treatment options for AMD have been limited, with photodynamic therapy (PDT) the mainstay of treatment. Although PDT is effective at slowing disease progression, it rarely results in improved vision. Several therapies have been or are now being developed for neovascular AMD, with the goal of inhibiting VEGF. These VEGF inhibitors include the RNA aptamer pegaptanib, partial and full-length antibodies ranibizumab and bevacizumab, the VEGF receptor decoy aflibercept, small interfering RNA-based therapies bevasiranib and AGN 211745, sirolimus, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vatalanib, pazopanib, TG 100801, TG 101095, AG 013958, and AL 39324. At present, established therapies have met with great success in reducing the vision loss associated with neovascular AMD, whereas those still under investigation offer the potential for further advances. In AMD patients, these therapies slow the rate of vision loss and in some cases increase visual acuity. Although VEGF-inhibitor therapies are a milestone in the treatment of these disease states, several concerns need to be addressed before their impact can be fully realized.

  12. CHOP deficiency inhibits methylglyoxal-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Suji; Han, Jung-Hwa; Nam, Dae-Hwan; Park, Kwon Moo; Kim, Seong Yong; Woo, Chang-Hoon

    2016-11-18

    Epidemiological studies suggested that diabetic patients are susceptible to develop cardiovascular complications along with having endothelial dysfunction. It has been suggested that methylglyoxal (MGO), a glycolytic metabolite, has more detrimental effects on endothelial dysfunction rather than glucose itself. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which MGO induces endothelial dysfunction via the regulation of ER stress. Biochemical data showed that 4-PBA significantly inhibited MGO-induced protein cleavages of PARP-1 and caspase-3. In addition, it was found that high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis was enhanced in the presence of GLO1 inhibitor, suggesting the role of endogenous MGO in high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction. MGO-induced endothelial apoptosis was significantly diminished by the depletion of CHOP with si-RNA against human CHOP, but not by SP600125, a specific inhibitor of JNK. The physiological relevance of this signaling pathway was demonstrated in CHOP deficiency mouse model, in which instillation of osmotic pump containing MGO led to aortic endothelial dysfunction. Notably, the aortic endothelial dysfunction response to MGO infusion was significantly improved in CHOP deficiency mice compared to littermate control. Taken together, these findings indicate that MGO specifically induces endothelial dysfunction in a CHOP-dependent manner, suggesting the therapeutic potential of CHOP inhibition in diabetic cardiovascular complications.

  13. Growth hormone action predicts age-related white adipose tissue dysfunction and senescent cell burden in mice.

    PubMed

    Stout, Michael B; Tchkonia, Tamara; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Palmer, Allyson K; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Escande, Carlos; Spong, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Oberg, Ann L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Miller, Richard A; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L

    2014-07-01

    The aging process is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. White adipose tissue (WAT) may play a central role in age-related disease onset and progression due to declines in adipogenesis with advancing age. Recent reports indicate that the accumulation of senescent progenitor cells may be involved in age-related WAT dysfunction. Growth hormone (GH) action has profound effects on adiposity and metabolism and is known to influence lifespan. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that GH activity would predict age-related WAT dysfunction and accumulation of senescent cells. We found that long-lived GH-deficient and -resistant mice have reduced age-related lipid redistribution. Primary preadipocytes from GH-resistant mice also were found to have greater differentiation capacity at 20 months of age when compared to controls. GH activity was also found to be positively associated with senescent cell accumulation in WAT. Our results demonstrate an association between GH activity, age-related WAT dysfunction, and WAT senescent cell accumulation in mice. Further studies are needed to determine if GH is directly inducing cellular senescence in WAT or if GH actions on other target organs or alternative downstream alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin or glucose levels are responsible.

  14. Growth hormone action predicts age-related white adipose tissue dysfunction and senescent cell burden in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Palmer, Allyson K.; List, Edward O.; Berryman, Darlene E.; Lubbers, Ellen R.; Escande, Carlos; Spong, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Oberg, Ann L.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Miller, Richard A.; Kopchick, John J.; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L.

    2014-01-01

    The aging process is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. White adipose tissue (WAT) may play a central role in age-related disease onset and progression due to declines in adipogenesis with advancing age. Recent reports indicate that the accumulation of senescent progenitor cells may be involved in age-related WAT dysfunction. Growth hormone (GH) action has profound effects on adiposity and metabolism and is known to influence lifespan. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that GH activity would predict age-related WAT dysfunction and accumulation of senescent cells. We found that long-lived GH-deficient and -resistant mice have reduced age-related lipid redistribution. Primary preadipocytes from GH-resistant mice also were found to have greater differentiation capacity at 20 months of age when compared to controls. GH activity was also found to be positively associated with senescent cell accumulation in WAT. Our results demonstrate an association between GH activity, age-related WAT dysfunction, and WAT senescent cell accumulation in mice. Further studies are needed to determine if GH is directly inducing cellular senescence in WAT or if GH actions on other target organs or alternative downstream alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin or glucose levels are responsible. PMID:25063774

  15. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health.

  16. Age-related differences in experimental stroke: possible involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanlin; Kong, Xiangwei; Ye, Ruidong; Yang, Qianzi; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize

    2011-06-01

    Age is the single most important risk factor for cerebral stroke. Unfortunately, the effect of age on ischemic brain damage is less clear. In this study, we sought to examine the potential influence of aging on the histologic and functional outcomes after ischemia. Juvenile (4 weeks of age), young adult (4 months of age), mid-aged (11-12 months of age), and aged (18-19 months of age) mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no remarkable difference of infarct volume on postoperative days 1 and 3. However, on postoperative day 7, aged mice exhibited significantly worsened infarct volume compared with juvenile and young mice. Intriguingly, the increase of infarct volume was most prominent in the striatal area rather than in cortex. Accordingly, aged mice displayed a slower and incomplete functional recovery after stroke. We further evaluated the effects of aging on the oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following ischemia. Brain tissues were assayed for lipid, DNA, and protein peroxidation products, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mitochondrial membrane potential, production of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant activities. Aging was associated with declined mitochondrial function and antioxidant detoxification following ischemia, thereby inducing a deteriorated oxidative damage. Regional subanalyses demonstrated that, in accordance with infarct area, the pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance occurred more prominently in subcortical areas. Collectively, these findings suggest mitochondria-mediated oxidative damage may be involved in the age-related aggravated injury in subcortical areas. Mitochondrial protection could be a promising target for neuroprotective therapy, especially in the aged population.

  17. Age-related decline in prostacyclin synthesis by human aortic endothelial cells. Qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, O.; Yamada, T.; Fan, J. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the functional alteration of human aortic endothelial cells with aging, prostacyclin synthesis was qualitatively and quantitatively examined. The endothelial cells of human aortas and umbilical veins or inferior vena cavae were immunohistochemically examined and found positive for prostacyclin, but the intensity of aortic endothelial cells from older subjects was low. In addition to the endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells in the thickened intima, not the media, of the aorta were also immunoreactive. Endothelial cells were successfully cultured from human aortas obtained from infants through aged subjects and were subdivided into three groups: young, middle, and old. Prostacyclin synthesis by endothelial cells from all types of blood vessels was extremely great at the primary culture, but decreased abruptly in the following subcultures. Among the aortic endothelial cells, the young group synthesized the largest amount of prostacyclin in a conventional culture condition, with synthesis progressively decreasing in the older groups. The in vitro prostacyclin biosynthesis was supported by the qualitative analysis on the tissue sections. These results indicate that prostacyclin synthesis of the aortic endothelial cells decreases with age, but intimal smooth muscle cells potentially have a back-up mechanism and substitute this synthesis to some extent. The decreased synthesis of prostacyclin with age may play an important role in the development and advancement of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1707240

  18. Age-related decline of autocrine pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide impairs angiogenic capacity of rat cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Banki, Eszter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Tamas, Andrea; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Reglodi, Dora; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-06-01

    Aging impairs angiogenic capacity of cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) promoting microvascular rarefaction, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. PACAP is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide secreted by endothelial cells and neurons, which confers important antiaging effects. To test the hypothesis that age-related changes in autocrine PACAP signaling contributes to dysregulation of endothelial angiogenic capacity, primary CMVECs were isolated from 3-month-old (young) and 24-month-old (aged) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. In aged CMVECs, expression of PACAP was decreased, which was associated with impaired capacity to form capillary-like structures, impaired adhesiveness to collagen (assessed using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing [ECIS] technology), and increased apoptosis (caspase3 activity) when compared with young cells. Overexpression of PACAP in aged CMVECs resulted in increased formation of capillary-like structures, whereas it did not affect cell adhesion. Treatment with recombinant PACAP also significantly increased endothelial tube formation and inhibited apoptosis in aged CMVECs. In young CMVECs shRNA knockdown of autocrine PACAP expression significantly impaired tube formation capacity, mimicking the aging phenotype. Cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production (dihydroethidium and MitoSox fluorescence, respectively) were increased in aged CMVECs and were unaffected by PACAP. Collectively, PACAP exerts proangiogenic effects and age-related dysregulation of autocrine PACAP signaling may contribute to impaired angiogenic capacity of CMVECs in aging.

  19. Age-Related Decline of Autocrine Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Impairs Angiogenic Capacity of Rat Cerebromicrovascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banki, Eszter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Tamas, Andrea; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Reglodi, Dora; Sonntag, William E.; Csiszar, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aging impairs angiogenic capacity of cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) promoting microvascular rarefaction, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. PACAP is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide secreted by endothelial cells and neurons, which confers important antiaging effects. To test the hypothesis that age-related changes in autocrine PACAP signaling contributes to dysregulation of endothelial angiogenic capacity, primary CMVECs were isolated from 3-month-old (young) and 24-month-old (aged) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. In aged CMVECs, expression of PACAP was decreased, which was associated with impaired capacity to form capillary-like structures, impaired adhesiveness to collagen (assessed using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing [ECIS] technology), and increased apoptosis (caspase3 activity) when compared with young cells. Overexpression of PACAP in aged CMVECs resulted in increased formation of capillary-like structures, whereas it did not affect cell adhesion. Treatment with recombinant PACAP also significantly increased endothelial tube formation and inhibited apoptosis in aged CMVECs. In young CMVECs shRNA knockdown of autocrine PACAP expression significantly impaired tube formation capacity, mimicking the aging phenotype. Cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production (dihydroethidium and MitoSox fluorescence, respectively) were increased in aged CMVECs and were unaffected by PACAP. Collectively, PACAP exerts proangiogenic effects and age-related dysregulation of autocrine PACAP signaling may contribute to impaired angiogenic capacity of CMVECs in aging. PMID:25136000

  20. Arginase inhibitor in the pharmacological correction of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V; Korokin, Mihail V; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G; Gureev, Vladimir V; Konovalova, Elena A; Gudyrev, Oleg S; Kochkarov, Vladimir I; Korokina, Liliya V; Dudina, Eleonora N; Babko, Anna V; Terehova, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    THIS PAPER IS ABOUT A WAY OF CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION WITH THE INHIBITOR OF ARGINASE: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovskiy, Mihail V.; Korokin, Mihail V.; Tsepeleva, Svetlana A.; Pokrovskaya, Tatyana G.; Gureev, Vladimir V.; Konovalova, Elena A.; Gudyrev, Oleg S.; Kochkarov, Vladimir I.; Korokina, Liliya V.; Dudina, Eleonora N.; Babko, Anna V.; Terehova, Elena G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:21747978

  2. Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) attenuates age-related renal dysfunction by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yokozawa, Takako; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyun Ju; Tanaka, Takashi; Sugino, Hidetoshi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Chu, Djong-Chi; Juneja, Lekh Raj

    2007-09-19

    To investigate the effects of amla on renal dysfunction involved in oxidative stress during the aging process, we employed young (2 months old) and aged (13 months old) male rats and administered SunAmla (Taiyo Kagaku Co., Ltd., Japan) or an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of amla, a polyphenol-rich fraction, at a dose of 40 or 10 mg/kg body weight/day for 100 days. The administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla reduced the elevated levels of serum creatinine and urea nitrogen in the aged rats. In addition, the tail arterial blood pressure was markedly elevated in aged control rats as compared with young rats, while the systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased by the administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla. Furthermore, the oral administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla significantly reduced thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels of serum, renal homogenate, and mitochondria in aged rats, suggesting that amla would ameliorate oxidative stress under aging. The increases of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the aorta of aging rats were also significantly suppressed by SunAmla extract or EtOAc extract of amla, respectively. Moreover, the elevated expression level of bax, a proapoptotic protein, was significantly decreased after oral administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla. However, the level of bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, did not show any difference among the groups. The expressions of renal nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), inhibitory kappaB in cytoplasm, iNOS, and COX-2 protein levels were also increased with aging. However, SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla reduced the iNOS and COX-2 expression levels by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation in the aged rats. These results indicate that amla would be a very useful antioxidant for the prevention of age-related renal disease.

  3. The Emerging Role of Arginase in Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pernow, John; Jung, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease due to increased vascular inflammatory and oxidative stress favouring atherogenesis. Endothelial dysfunction has received increasing attention as a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Although the underlying cause of endothelial dysfunction is multifactorial, a key factor is impairment of the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). Emerging evidence suggest that upregulation of arginase is of central importance for reduced NO bioavailability due to competition for the substrate L-arginine between arginase and the endothelial form of NO synthase. Arginase is also associated with increased oxidative stress, further impairing NO bioavailability. Upregulation of arginase has been suggested to be a key factor driving endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. The present review describes the regulation of arginase in relation to diabetes and arginase as a potential therapeutic target to improve endothelial function in experimental models and the clinical setting of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Cellular glutathione peroxidase deficiency and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Marc A; Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Cap, André; Klings, Elizabeth S; Bierl, Charlene; Eberhardt, Robert T; Farber, Harrison W; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) is the most abundant intracellular isoform of the GPx antioxidant enzyme family. In this study, we hypothesized that GPx-1 deficiency directly induces an increase in vascular oxidant stress, with resulting endothelial dysfunction. We studied vascular function in a murine model of homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 (GPx-1(-/-)). Mesenteric arterioles of GPx-1(-/-) mice demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction to beta-methacholine and bradykinin, whereas wild-type (WT) mice showed dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. One week of treatment of GPx-1(-/-) mice with L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), which increases intracellular thiol pools, resulted in restoration of normal vascular reactivity in the mesenteric bed of GPx-1(-/-) mice. We observed an increase of the isoprostane iPF(2alpha)-III, a marker of oxidant stress, in the plasma and aortas of GPx-1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, which returned toward normal after OTC treatment. Aortic sections from GPx-1(-/-) mice showed increased binding of an anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody in the absence of frank vascular lesions. These findings demonstrate that homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 leads to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator function presumably due to a decrease in bioavailable nitric oxide and to increased vascular oxidant stress. These vascular abnormalities can be attenuated by increasing bioavailable intracellular thiol pools.

  5. Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and the Pathobiology of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelial lining of lesion-prone areas of the arterial vasculature is an important contributor to the pathobiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD), in its broadest sense, encompasses a constellation of various non-adaptive alterations in functional phenotype, which have important implications for the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis, local vascular tone and redox balance, and the orchestration of acute and chronic inflammatory reactions within the arterial wall. In this review, we trace the evolution of the concept of endothelial cell dysfunction, focusing on recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie its pivotal roles in atherosclerotic lesion initiation and progression; explore its relationship to classic, as well as more recently defined, clinical risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; consider current approaches to the clinical assessment of endothelial cell dysfunction; and outline some promising new directions for its early detection and treatment. PMID:26892962

  6. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Sharon D.; Lindsley, Kristina; Vedula, Satyanarayana S.; Krzystolik, Magdalena G.; Hawkins, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of uncorrectable severe vision loss in people aged 55 years and older in the developed world. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to neovascular AMD accounts for most AMD-related severe vision loss. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, injected intravitreally, aim to block the growth of abnormal blood vessels in the eye to prevent vision loss and, in some instances, improve vision. Objectives To investigate: (1) the ocular and systemic effects of, and quality of life associated with, intravitreally injected anti-VEGF agents (pegaptanib, ranibizumab, and bevacizumab) for the treatment of neovascular AMD compared with no anti-VEGF treatment; and (2) the relative effects of one anti-VEGF agent compared with another when administered in comparable dosages and regimens. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to March 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to March 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlledtrials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 March 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated pegaptanib, ranibizumab, or bevacizumab versus each other or a control treatment (e.g., sham treatment or photodynamic therapy). All trials followed participants for at least one year. Data collection

  7. Raspberry supplementation alleviates age-related motor dysfunction in select populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related declines in balance, muscle strength and coordination often lead to a higher incidence of falling. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of distress, pain, injury, loss of confidence, and ultimately, loss of independence and death. Previous studies in our laboratory have demons...

  8. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D’Elia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  9. Early Determinants of H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boulden, Beth M.; Widder, Julian D.; Allen, Jon C.; Smith, Debra A.; Al-Baldawi, Ruaa N.; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.; Jo, Hanjoong; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can stimulate nitric oxide (NO•) production from the endothelium by transient activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). With continued or repeated exposure, NO• production is reduced, however. We investigated the early determinants of this decrease in NO• production. Following an initial H2O2 exposure, endothelial cells responded by increasing NO• production measured electrochemically. NO• concentrations peaked by 10 min with a slow reduction over 30 min. The decrease in NO• at 30 min was associated with a 2.7 fold increase O2•− production (p<0.05) and a 14 fold reduction of the eNOS cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4, p<0.05). Used as a probe for endothelial dysfunction, the integrated NO• production over 30 min upon repeat H2O2 exposure was attenuated by 2.1 fold (p=0.03). Endothelial dysfunction could be prevented by BH4 cofactor supplementation, by scavenging O2•− or peroxynitrite (ONOO−), or by inhibiting the NADPH oxidase. Hydroxyl radical (•OH) scavenging did not have an effect. In summary, early H2O2-induced endothelial dysfunction was associated with a decreased BH4 level and increased O2•− production. Dysfunction required O2•−, ONOO−, or a functional NADPH oxidase. Repeated activation of the NADPH oxidase by ROS may act as a feed forward system to promote endothelial dysfunction. PMID:16895801

  10. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  11. Calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation: Discrete and integrated mechanisms for age-related synaptic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sama, Diana M.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the best biomarkers of age-related cognitive decline are closely linked to synaptic function and plasticity. This review highlights several age-related synaptic alterations as they relate to Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, through elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and neuroinflammation, through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Though distinct in many ways, Ca2+ and neuroinflammatory signaling mechanisms exhibit extensive cross-talk and bidirectional interactions. For instance, cytokine production in glial cells is strongly dependent on the Ca2+ dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, which shows elevated activity in animal models of aging and disease. In turn, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, can augment the expression/activity of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels in neurons, leading to Ca2+ dysregulation, hyperactive calcineurin activity, and synaptic depression. Thus, in addition to discussing unique contributions of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation, this review emphasizes how these processes interact to hasten age-related synaptic changes. PMID:23751484

  12. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling.

  13. Endothelial Dysfunction Abrogates the Efficacy of Normobaric Hyperoxia in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Oka, Fumiaki; Kim, Ji Hyun; Atochin, Dmitriy; Huang, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxia has been uniformly efficacious in experimental focal cerebral ischemia. However, pilot clinical trials have showed mixed results slowing its translation in patient care. To explain the discordance between experimental and clinical outcomes, we tested the impact of endothelial dysfunction, exceedingly common in stroke patients but under-represented in experimental studies, on the neuroprotective efficacy of normobaric hyperoxia. We used hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knock-out and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knock-out mice as models of endothelial dysfunction, and examined the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on tissue perfusion and oxygenation using high-resolution combined laser speckle and multispectral reflectance imaging during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. In normal wild-type mice, normobaric hyperoxia rapidly and significantly improved tissue perfusion and oxygenation, suppressed peri-infarct depolarizations, reduced infarct volumes, and improved neurological function. In contrast, normobaric hyperoxia worsened perfusion in ischemic brain and failed to reduce infarct volumes or improve neurological function in mice with endothelial dysfunction. These data suggest that the beneficial effects of hyperoxia on ischemic tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and outcome are critically dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase function. Therefore, vascular risk factors associated with endothelial dysfunction may predict normobaric hyperoxia nonresponders in ischemic stroke. These data may have implications for myocardial and systemic circulation as well. PMID:25392489

  14. SU5416 induces premature senescence in endothelial progenitor cells from patients with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Kunst, Frank; Wege, Henning; Strunnikova, Natalya V.; Gordiyenko, Natalya; Grierson, Rebecca; Richard, Gisbert; Csaky, Karl G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We recently demonstrated increased frequency and growth potential of late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (OECs) in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD). This study investigated the effects of short- and long-term in vitro inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) signaling by SU5416 and other inhibitors of the VEGF signaling pathway in OECs. Methods OECs, from the peripheral blood of patients with nvAMD, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown in the presence of SU5416, other VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-Kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) and protein kinase C (PKC) in complete angiogenic medium. Apotosis was assessed after 48 h using the fluorescein isothiocyanate Annexin V method. Cell counts were performed for 10 days, and features of senescence were analyzed using senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining, the telomeric repeat amplification protocol for telomerase activity, Southern blot analysis for mean telomere length, flow cytometric analysis for cell-cycle arrest, and western blot for p53 and p21. Control OECs, cells treated for 7 days with inhibitors, as well as naturally senescent OECs were analyzed for expression of different endothelial antigens, including VEGFR-2 and the receptor for stromal cell-derived factor 1, chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR-4). Migration in vitro to VEGF and stromal cell-derived factor 1 of OECs was assessed. Results SU5416, other VEGFR-2 TKIs, and inhibitors of PI3K, Akt, and PKC induced apoptosis, inhibited long-term proliferation, reduced telomerase activity, and induced premature senescence and cell-cycle arrest in OECs as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Naturally senescent cells and cells rendered senescent by VEGFR-2 TKIs had reduced VEGFR-2 and CXCR-4 expression and demonstrated reduced migratory ability to VEGF. Conclusions This study demonstrates

  15. Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in the cell: its relevance to aging and aging-related disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David G

    2002-11-01

    Mitochondria plays a complex multi-factorial role in the cell. In addition to their primary role in ATP generation, the organelles sequester calcium and both generate and detoxify reactive oxygen species. All these functions are intimately inter-linked through the central bioenergetic parameter of the proton electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Subtle changes in respiratory chain capacity, substrate supply, glutathione levels, cytoplasmic calcium and membrane potential occur in aging and in conditions predisposing towards neurodegenerative disease. These interactions are incompletely understood and in this review I present an overview of some of the current research in this area, and its possible relevance to aging and aging-related disease.

  16. Endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Papalia, R; Moro, L; Franceschi, F; Albo, E; D'Adamio, S; Di Martino, A; Vadalà, G; Faldini, C; Denaro, V

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic tendon tears are one of the most important causes of pain and joint dysfunction. Among the intrinsic causes, vascularization recently gained a major role. Endothelial function is indeed a key factor, as well as vascular tone and thrombotic factors, in the regulation of vascular homeostasis and the composition of vascular wall. In this review, we studied systematically whether there is a relationship between endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy. A literature search was performed using the isolated or combined keywords endothelial dysfunction and tendon,' 'nitric oxide (NO) and tendinopathy,' and 'endothelial dysfunction in tendon healing.' We identified 21 published studies. Of the selected studies, 9 were in vivo studies, 2 focusing on animals and 7 on humans, while 12 reported about in vitro evaluations, where 7 were carried out on humans and 5 on animals. The evidence about a direct relationship between tendinopathy and endothelial dysfunction is still poor. As recent studies have shown, there is no significant improvement in clinical and functional assessments after treatment with NO in patients suffering from tendinopathy in different locations. No significant differences were identified in the outcomes reported for experiment group when compared with controls treated with conventional surgical procedures or rehabilitation programs. Nitric oxide could be a marker to quantify the response of the endothelium to mechanical stress or hypoxia indicating the final balance between vasodilatating and vasoconstricting factors and their effects, but more ad stronger evidence is still needed to fully support this practice.

  17. Assessment of Endothelial Dysfunction in Childhood Obesity and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Vissers, Dirk K.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2013-01-01

    The association of obesity with noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular complications and diabetes, is considered a major threat to the management of health care worldwide. Epidemiological findings show that childhood obesity is rapidly rising in Western society, as well as in developing countries. This pandemic is not without consequences and can affect the risk of future cardiovascular disease in these children. Childhood obesity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, the first yet still reversible step towards atherosclerosis. Advanced research techniques have added further insight on how childhood obesity and associated comorbidities lead to endothelial dysfunction. Techniques used to measure endothelial function were further brought to perfection, and novel biomarkers, including endothelial progenitor cells, were discovered. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical overview on both in vivo as well as in vitro markers for endothelial integrity. Additionally, an in-depth description of the mechanisms that disrupt the delicate balance between endothelial damage and repair will be given. Finally, the effects of lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy on endothelial dysfunction will be reviewed. PMID:23691262

  18. Thy-1 Regulates VEGF-Mediated Choroidal Endothelial Cell Activation and Migration: Implications in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Kunz, Eric; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study addresses the hypothesis that age-related stresses upregulate Thy-1 in choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) and contribute to CEC activation and migration, processes important in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods Measurements were made of Thy-1 protein (Western blot) in CECs and Thy-1 mRNA (real time quantitative PCR) in CECs treated with VEGF, CCL11, or PBS or in RPE/choroids from young or old donors or lasered or nonlasered mice. Immunolabeled Thy-1 in ocular sections was compared from young versus old human donor eyes or those with or without neovascular AMD or from lasered versus nonlasered mice. Choroidal endothelial cells transfected with Thy-1 or control siRNA or pretreated with Thy-1 blocking peptide or control were stimulated with VEGF or 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC). Choroidal endothelial cell migration, proliferation, cytoskeletal stress fibers, Rac1 activation, and phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), integrin β3, and Src were measured. Statistics were performed using ANOVA. Results Thy-1 was expressed in retinal ganglion cells and in vascular endothelial-cadherin–labeled choroid and localized to human or mouse laser-induced CNV lesions. Thy-1 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in CECs treated with VEGF or CCL11 and in RPE/choroids from aged versus young donor eyes or from lasered mice versus nonlasered controls. Knockdown or inhibition of Thy-1 in CECs significantly reduced VEGF-induced CEC migration and proliferation, stress fiber formation and VEGFR2, Src, integrin β3 and Rac1 activation, and 7-KC–induced Rac1 and Src activation. Conclusions Thy-1 in CECs regulates VEGF-induced CEC activation and migration and links extracellular 7-KC to intracellular signaling. Future studies elucidating Thy-1 mechanisms in neovascular AMD are warranted. PMID:27768790

  19. Biomarkers of endothelial activation/dysfunction in infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrea V; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of potentially serious infectious diseases and syndromes, including sepsis and septic shock, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, severe malaria, and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Because endothelial activation often precedes overt endothelial dysfunction, biomarkers of the activated endothelium in serum and/or plasma may be detectable before classically recognized markers of disease, and therefore, may be clinically useful as biomarkers of disease severity or prognosis in systemic infectious diseases. In this review, the current status of mediators of endothelial cell function (angiopoietins-1 and -2), components of the coagulation pathway (von Willebrand Factor, ADAMTS13, and thrombomodulin), soluble cell-surface adhesion molecules (soluble E-selectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1), and regulators of vascular tone and permeability (VEGF and sFlt-1) as biomarkers in severe infectious diseases is discussed in the context of sepsis, E. coli O157:H7 infection, malaria, and dengue virus infection. PMID:23669075

  20. Prefrontal cortical GABAergic dysfunction contributes to age-related working memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Frazier, Charles J; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2014-03-05

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions.

  1. Prefrontal Cortical GABAergic Dysfunction Contributes to Age-Related Working Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B. Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Frazier, Charles J.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions. PMID:24599447

  2. Age-Related Impairments in Object-Place Associations Are Not Due to Hippocampal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Abigail R.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Reasor, Jordan E.; Turner, Sean M.; Barthle, Sarah E.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline can reduce an individual’s quality of life. As no single neurobiological deficit can account for the wide spectrum of behavioral impairments observed in old age, it is critical to develop an understanding of how interactions between different brain regions change over the life span. The performance of young and aged animals on behaviors that require the hippocampus and cortical regions to interact, however, has not been well characterized. Specifically, the ability to link a spatial location with specific features of a stimulus, such as object identity, relies on the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices. Although aging is associated with dysfunction in each of these brain regions, behavioral measures of functional change within the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices in individual animals are often not correlated. Thus, how dysfunction of a single brain region within this circuit, such as the hippocampus, impacts behaviors that require communication with the perirhinal and prefrontal cortices remains unknown. To address this question, young and aged rats were tested on the interregion dependent object-place paired association task, as well as a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial reference memory. This particular cohort of aged rats did not show deficits on the hippocampal-dependent task, but were significantly impaired at acquiring object-place associations relative to young. These data suggest that behaviors requiring functional connectivity across different regions of the memory network may be particularly sensitive to aging, and can be used to develop models that will clarify the impact of systems-level dysfunction in the elderly. PMID:26413723

  3. Endothelial dysfunction - a major mediator of diabetic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Seiça, Raquel

    2013-12-01

    The vascular endothelium is a multifunctional organ and is critically involved in modulating vascular tone and structure. Endothelial cells produce a wide range of factors that also regulate cellular adhesion, thromboresistance, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and vessel wall inflammation. Thus, endothelial function is important for the homeostasis of the body and its dysfunction is associated with several pathophysiological conditions, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. Patients with diabetes invariably show an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Therefore, understanding and treating endothelial dysfunction is a major focus in the prevention of vascular complications associated with all forms of diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may point to new management strategies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. This review will focus on the mechanisms and therapeutics that specifically target endothelial dysfunction in the context of a diabetic setting. Mechanisms including altered glucose metabolism, impaired insulin signaling, low-grade inflammatory state, and increased reactive oxygen species generation will be discussed. The importance of developing new pharmacological approaches that upregulate endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis and target key vascular ROS-producing enzymes will be highlighted and new strategies that might prove clinically relevant in preventing the development and/or retarding the progression of diabetes associated vascular complications.

  4. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression–induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  5. Age-related spontaneous lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis is accompanied by dysfunctional T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G.; Bian, Fang; Zaheer, Mahira; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Volpe, Eugene A.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2016-01-01

    In both humans and animal models the development of Sjögren syndrome (SS) and non-SS keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) increases with age. Here, we investigated the ocular surface and lacrimal gland phenotype of NOD.B10.H2b mice at 7–14, 45–50, and 96–100 weeks. Aged mice develop increased corneal permeability, CD4+ T cell infiltration and conjunctival goblet cell loss. Aged mice have lacrimal gland (LG) atrophy with increased lymphocyte infiltration and inflammatory cytokine levels. An increase in the frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs cells was observed with age in the cervical lymph node (CLN), spleen and LG. These CD4+CD25+ lose suppressive ability, while maintaining expression of Foxp3 and producing IL-17 and IFN-γ. An increase Foxp3+IL-17+ or Foxp3+IFN-γ+ was observed in the LG and LG-draining CLN. In adoptive transfer experiments, recipients of either purified Tregs or purified T effector cells from aged donors developed lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis, while recipients of young Tregs or young T effector cells failed to develop disease. Overall, these results suggest inflammatory cytokine-producing CD4+Foxp3+ cells participate in the pathogenesis of age-related ocular surface disease. PMID:27706128

  6. 17α-Estradiol Alleviates Age-related Metabolic and Inflammatory Dysfunction in Male Mice Without Inducing Feminization

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Michael B.; Steyn, Frederik J.; Jurczak, Michael J.; Camporez, Joao-Paulo G.; Zhu, Yi; Hawse, John R.; Jurk, Diana; Palmer, Allyson K.; Xu, Ming; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Evans, Glenda L.; de Souza Santos, Roberta; Frank, Aaron P.; White, Thomas A.; Monroe, David G.; Singh, Ravinder J.; Casaclang-Verzosa, Grace; Miller, Jordan D.; Clegg, Deborah J.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Shulman, Gerald I.; Tchkonia, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with visceral adiposity, metabolic disorders, and chronic low-grade inflammation. 17α-estradiol (17α-E2), a naturally occurring enantiomer of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), extends life span in male mice through unresolved mechanisms. We tested whether 17α-E2 could alleviate age-related metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. 17α-E2 reduced body mass, visceral adiposity, and ectopic lipid deposition without decreasing lean mass. These declines were associated with reductions in energy intake due to the activation of hypothalamic anorexigenic pathways and direct effects of 17α-E2 on nutrient-sensing pathways in visceral adipose tissue. 17α-E2 did not alter energy expenditure or excretion. Fasting glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin were also reduced by 17α-E2, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps revealed improvements in peripheral glucose disposal and hepatic glucose production. Inflammatory mediators in visceral adipose tissue and the circulation were reduced by 17α-E2. 17α-E2 increased AMPKα and reduced mTOR complex 1 activity in visceral adipose tissue but not in liver or quadriceps muscle, which is in contrast to the generalized systemic effects of caloric restriction. These beneficial phenotypic changes occurred in the absence of feminization or cardiac dysfunction, two commonly observed deleterious effects of exogenous estrogen administration. Thus, 17α-E2 holds potential as a novel therapeutic for alleviating age-related metabolic dysfunction through tissue-specific effects. PMID:26809497

  7. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  8. Loss of the endothelial glycocalyx links albuminuria and vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Ferguson, Joanne K; Burford, James L; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Nakano, Daisuke; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2012-08-01

    Patients with albuminuria and CKD frequently have vascular dysfunction but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because the endothelial surface layer, a meshwork of surface-bound and loosely adherent glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, modulates vascular function, its loss could contribute to both renal and systemic vascular dysfunction in proteinuric CKD. Using Munich-Wistar-Fromter (MWF) rats as a model of spontaneous albuminuric CKD, multiphoton fluorescence imaging and single-vessel physiology measurements revealed that old MWF rats exhibited widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer in parallel with defects in microvascular permeability to both water and albumin, in both continuous mesenteric microvessels and fenestrated glomerular microvessels. In contrast to young MWF rats, enzymatic disruption of the endothelial surface layer in old MWF rats resulted in neither additional loss of the layer nor additional changes in permeability. Intravenous injection of wheat germ agglutinin lectin and its adsorption onto the endothelial surface layer significantly improved glomerular albumin permeability. Taken together, these results suggest that widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer links albuminuric kidney disease with systemic vascular dysfunction, providing a potential therapeutic target for proteinuric kidney disease.

  9. Loss of the Endothelial Glycocalyx Links Albuminuria and Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Joanne K.; Burford, James L.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Nakano, Daisuke; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2012-01-01

    Patients with albuminuria and CKD frequently have vascular dysfunction but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because the endothelial surface layer, a meshwork of surface-bound and loosely adherent glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, modulates vascular function, its loss could contribute to both renal and systemic vascular dysfunction in proteinuric CKD. Using Munich-Wistar-Fromter (MWF) rats as a model of spontaneous albuminuric CKD, multiphoton fluorescence imaging and single-vessel physiology measurements revealed that old MWF rats exhibited widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer in parallel with defects in microvascular permeability to both water and albumin, in both continuous mesenteric microvessels and fenestrated glomerular microvessels. In contrast to young MWF rats, enzymatic disruption of the endothelial surface layer in old MWF rats resulted in neither additional loss of the layer nor additional changes in permeability. Intravenous injection of wheat germ agglutinin lectin and its adsorption onto the endothelial surface layer significantly improved glomerular albumin permeability. Taken together, these results suggest that widespread loss of the endothelial surface layer links albuminuric kidney disease with systemic vascular dysfunction, providing a potential therapeutic target for proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:22797190

  10. Circulating endothelial cells: a new biomarker of endothelial dysfunction in hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-08-01

    The endothelium and its integrity are in the center of numerous cardiovascular, pulmonary and tumoral diseases. Several studies identified different circulating cellular sub-populations, which allow a noninvasive exploration of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, angiogenesis plays a major role in the biology of benign and malignant hematologic diseases. Among these biomarkers, circulating endothelial cells could be considered as a marker of endothelial injury and/or endothelial activation as well as vascular remodeling, whereas circulating endothelial progenitor cells would be only involved in the vascular regeneration. In the future, the quantification of circulating endothelial cells in many diseases could be a noninvasive biomarker used in diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic follow-up of lung vasculopathy and/or residual disease of hematological malignancies.

  11. Modest Visceral Fat Gain Causes Endothelial Dysfunction In Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Orban, Marek; Gami, Apoor; Davison, Diane; Singh, Prachi; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Huyber, Christine; Votruba, Susanne; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Jensen, Michael D.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the impact of fat gain and its distribution on endothelial function in lean healthy humans. Background Endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Whether fat gain impairs endothelial function is unknown. Methods A randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on endothelial function. We recruited 43 normal weight healthy volunteers (mean age 29 years; 18 women). Subjects were assigned to gain weight (approximately 4 kg) (n=35) or to maintain weight (n=8). Endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation -FMD) was measured at baseline, after fat gain (8 weeks) and after weight loss (16 weeks) for fat-gainers and at baseline and follow-up (8 weeks) for weight-maintainers. Body composition was measured by DXA and abdominal CT scans. Results After an average weight gain of 4.1 kg, fat-gainers significantly increased their total, visceral and subcutaneous fat. Blood pressure and overnight polysomnography did not change after fat gain or loss. FMD remained unchanged in weight-maintainers. FMD decreased in fat-gainers (9.1 ± 3% vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p =0.003), but recovered to baseline when subjects shed the gained weight. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in FMD and the increase in visceral fat gain (rho = −0.42, p=0.004), but not with subcutaneous fat gain (rho = −0.22, p=0.15). Conclusions In normal weight healthy young subjects, modest fat gain results in impaired endothelial function, even in the absence of changes in blood pressure. Endothelial function recovers after weight loss. Increased visceral rather than subcutaneous fat predicts endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20705223

  12. SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Suowen; Yin, Meimei; Koroleva, Marina; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Zhang, Wenbo; Bai, Peter; Little, Peter J.; Jin, Zheng Gen

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 is an important member of sirtuin family that represses inflammation, aging and DNA damage, three of which are causing factors for endothelial dysfunction. SIRT6 expression is decreased in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice and human patients. However, the role of SIRT6 in regulating vascular endothelial function and atherosclerosis is not well understood. Here we show that SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Global and endothelium-specific SIRT6 knockout mice exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Moreover, SIRT6+/− haploinsufficient mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) also displayed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Importantly, SIRT6+/−;ApoE−/− mice after HFD feeding exhibited exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion development, concurrent with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine VCAM-1. Loss- and gain-of-SIRT6 function studies in cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) showed that SIRT6 attenuated monocyte adhesion to ECs. RNA-sequencing profiling revealed that SIRT6 overexpression decreased the expression of multiple atherosclerosis-related genes, including proatherogenic gene TNFSF4 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that SIRT6 decreased TNFSF4 gene expression by binding to and deacetylating H3K9 at TNFSF4 gene promoter. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SIRT6 play a pivotal role in maintaining endothelial function and increased SIRT6 activity could be a new therapeutic strategy to combat atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27249230

  13. Vascular endothelial cells and dysfunctions: role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Favero, Gaia; Foglio, Eleonora; Rossini, Claudia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Lonati, Claudio; Rezzani, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Several pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, ischemia/reperfusion injury and nicotine-induced vasculopathy, are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction characterized by altered secretory output of endothelial cells. Therefore there is a search for molecules and interventions that could restore endothelial function, in particular augmenting NO production, reducing the generation of free radicals and vasoconstrictors and preventing undesired inflammation. The pineal hormone melatonin exhibits several endothelium protective properties: it scavenges free radicals, activates antioxidant defence enzymes, normalizes lipid and blood pressure profile and increases NO bioavailability. Melatonin improved vascular function in experimental hypertension, reducing intimal infiltration and restoring NO production. Melatonin improved the NO pathway also in animal models for the study of diabetes and prevented NO down-regulation and adhesive molecules up-regulation in nicotine-induced vasculopathy. The protection against endothelial damage, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation and leukocyte infiltration might contribute to the beneficial effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury by melatonin. Therefore, melatonin administration has endothelium-protective potential in several pathological conditions. Nevertheless, it still needs to be established, whether melatonin is able to revert already established endothelial dysfunction in these conditions.

  14. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Daniel; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Sagan, Agnieszka; Filip, Magdalena; Dróżdż, Mirosław; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2014-01-01

    Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n = 20) and without DRS (n = 24). While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD) or intima-media thickness (IMT) was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25045683

  15. Association between Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Polymorphisms and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in elderly people worldwide and the major degenerative disease of the retina that leads to progressive impairment of central vision. Several polymorphisms in different genes have been proposed as factors that increase the disease susceptibility. The aim of the present study is to carry out a systematic review and an updated meta-analysis in order to summarize the current published studies and to evaluate the associations between four common vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms (rs833061, rs1413711, rs3025039, and rs2010963) and AMD risk, also stratifying for AMD subtypes and ethnicity. A systematic literature search in the Medline database, using PubMed, was carried out for epidemiological studies, published before June 2016. Associations of VEGF polymorphisms with AMD were estimated by calculating pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) based on different models. Twelve articles were included in the analysis. The present meta-analysis constitutes a useful guide for readers to study AMD and adds new evidence to the growing literature on the role of VEGF polymorphisms in the risk of AMD. Significant associations with AMD risk were showed for rs833061, rs1413711, and rs3025039 polymorphisms but not for rs2010963. PMID:27999450

  16. [Insulin, renin-angiotensin system, aldosterone and endothelial dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto Francisco; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat Berenice

    2011-01-01

    Beyond its metabolic effects, insulin has several actions on the vasculature. Under normal conditions, insulin maintains normal endothelial function, but in the presence of insulin resistance, insulin leads to endothelial dysfunction. Insulin releases nitric oxide, which promotes an antiatherosclerotic, antiinflamatory and vasodilated state. However, in presence of high levels of angiotensin II, insulin activates pathways that lead to atherosclerosis, vasoconstriction and inflammation. We will review the actions of insulin on the vascular system, and its interactions with other vasoactive mediators, such as angiotensin II and endothelin-1.

  17. The urea decomposition product cyanate promotes endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Dalia; Rao, Shailaja P; Holzer, Michael; Hallström, Seth; Haybaeck, Johannes; Gauster, Martin; Wadsack, Christian; Kozina, Andrijana; Frank, Saša; Schicho, Rudolf; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2014-11-01

    The dramatic cardiovascular mortality of patients with chronic kidney disease is attributable in a significant proportion to endothelial dysfunction. Cyanate, a reactive species in equilibrium with urea, is formed in excess in chronic kidney disease. Cyanate is thought to have a causal role in promoting cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Immunohistochemical analysis performed in the present study revealed that carbamylated epitopes associate mainly with endothelial cells in human atherosclerotic lesions. Cyanate treatment of human coronary artery endothelial cells reduced expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and increased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression. In mice, administration of cyanate, promoting protein carbamylation at levels observed in uremic patients, attenuated arterial vasorelaxation of aortic rings in response to acetylcholine without affecting the sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation. Total endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production were significantly reduced in aortic tissue of cyanate-treated mice. This coincided with a marked increase of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein levels in aortas of cyanate-treated mice. Thus, cyanate compromises endothelial functionality in vitro and in vivo. This may contribute to the dramatic cardiovascular risk of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease.

  18. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity-associated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P.; Akamine, E.H.; Tostes, R.C.; Carvalho, M.H.C.; Fortes, Z.B.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. These conditions synergistically increase the risk of cardiovascular events. A number of central and peripheral abnormalities can explain the development or maintenance of high blood pressure in obesity. Of great interest is endothelial dysfunction, considered to be a primary risk factor in the development of hypertension. Additional mechanisms also related to endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to mediate the development of hypertension in obese individuals. These include: increase in both peripheral vasoconstriction and renal tubular sodium reabsorption, increased sympathetic activity and overactivation of both the renin-angiotensin system and the endocannabinoid system and insulin resistance. The discovery of new mechanisms regulating metabolic and vascular function and a better understanding of how vascular function can be influenced by these systems would facilitate the development of new therapies for treatment of obesity-associated hypertension. PMID:22488221

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in cold-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Shanjun; Zhu, Jijun; van der Giet, Markus; Tepel, Martin

    2002-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can be observed in preatherosclerotic conditions. However, its pathogenetic role in hypertension is still controversial. Endothelial-dependent changes of blood pressure (BP) and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were evaluated in cold-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were exposed to cold stress for 8 weeks. Exposure to cold stress significantly increased the systolic BP in rats. The infusion of acetylcholine significantly lowered mean arterial BP in control rats by 48 +/- 2% and by 32 +/- 1% in cold-induced hypertensive rats. The acetylcholine-induced reduction of mean arterial BP was significantly attenuated in cold-induced hypertensive rats (control rats, 45 +/- 2 mm Hg; cold-induced hypertensive rats, 34 +/- 3 mm Hg; P < .05). Administration of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester for 1 week significantly increased BP in control rats, whereas no effect could be observed in cold-induced hypertensive rats. In cold-induced hypertensive rats eNOS in aortic vessels was significantly reduced compared to control rats. In this nongenetic, nonsurgical animal model of cold-induced hypertensive rats an endothelial dysfunction can be observed due to reduced eNOS.

  20. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  1. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor and other endogenous interplayers in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Salvatore; Tatar, Olcay

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifaceted disease characterized by early subclinical changes at the choroidea-retinal pigment epithelium interface. Both the causal and formal pathogenesis of the disease is still puzzling. Similarly, the reason for progression into two distinct late forms which are "geographic atrophy" and "choroidal neovascularization" remains enigmatic. Late changes are usually responsible for the dramatic loss in central function that has a devastating effect on quality of life. In industrialized countries the disease is a major cause for visual disability among persons over 60 years of age. Due to demographic right-shift and increased life expectancy, AMD is not only a medical problem but will have a pronounced socio-economic effect. Neovascular AMD with the development of choroidal neovascularization in the macular area accounts for 80% of the severe loss of visual acuity due to AMD. In the last decades, treatment modes were merely based on the destruction or surgical removal of the neovascular complex. In the present, however, the philosophical approach to treat the disease is changing to a pathology modifying manner. Intelligent targeting of the involved relevant factors and pathways should stop disease progression, reduce complications and improve vision. The first step into this new era has been accomplished with the introduction of antiangiogenic agents. The new agents act either directly on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or indirectly on its functional cascade. VEGF makes a fundamental contribution to neovascular processes but it also acts in physiological pathways. The main purpose of this review is to summarize its physiological role especially within the eye, the role in the development of AMD and to understand and foresee both the benefits and potential side-effects of the anti-VEGF-based therapy.

  2. Experiences of patients undergoing repeated intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jessica; Vukicevic, Meri; Koklanis, Konstandina; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Rees, Gwyneth

    2017-01-09

    Current therapy to slow disease progression in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) entails regular intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections, often indefinitely. Little is known about the burden imposed on patients by this repetitive treatment schedule and how this can be best managed. The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of repeated intravitreal injections on patients with neovascular AMD. Forty patients (16 males, 24 females) with neovascular AMD undergoing anti-VEGF treatment were recruited using purposive sampling from a private ophthalmology practice and public hospital in Melbourne. Patients were surveyed using the Macular Disease Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (MacTSQ; Bradley, Health Psychology Research Unit, Surrey, England) and underwent semi-structured, one-on-one interviews. Interview topics were: treatment burden and satisfaction; tolerability; barriers to adherence; treatment motivation; and patient education. Interviews were audio recorded and thematic analysis performed using NVivo 10 (QSR International, Doncaster, Australia). Patients recognised the importance of treatment to preserve eyesight, yet experienced significant psychosocial and practical burden from the treatment schedule. Important issues included treatment-related anxiety, financial considerations and transport burden placed on relatives or carers. Many patients were restricted to sedentary activities post-injection owing to treatment side effects. Patients prioritised treatment, often sacrificing family, travel and social commitments owing to a fear of losing eyesight if treatment was not received. Whilst anti-VEGF injections represent the current mainstay of treatment for neovascular AMD, the ongoing treatment protocol imposes significant burden on patients. An understanding of the factors that contribute to the burden of treatment may help inform strategies to lessen its impact and assist

  3. SIRT-1 and vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Magerko, Katherine A; Lawson, Brooke R; Durrant, Jessica R; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that reductions in the cellular deacetylase, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing via modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) acetylation/activation-associated nitric oxide (NO) production. In older (30 months, n = 14) vs. young (5-7 months, n = 16) B6D2F1 mice, aortic protein expression of SIRT-1 and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 were lower (both P < 0.05), and acetylated eNOS was 6-fold higher (P < 0.05), whereas total eNOS did not differ (P = 0.65). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced peak endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD) was lower in isolated femoral arteries with ageing (P < 0.001). Incubation with sirtinol, a SIRT-1 inhibitor, reduced EDD in both young and older mice, abolishing age-related differences, whereas co-administration with l-NAME, an eNOS inhibitor, further reduced EDD similarly in both groups. Endothelium-independent dilatation to sodium nitroprusside (EID), was not altered by age or sirtinol treatment. In older (64 ± 1 years, n = 22) vs. young (25 ± 1 years, n = 16) healthy humans, ACh-induced forearm EDD was impaired (P = 0.01) and SIRT-1 protein expression was 37% lower in endothelial cells obtained from the brachial artery (P < 0.05), whereas EID did not differ. In the overall group, EDD was positively related to endothelial cell SIRT-1 protein expression (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). Reductions in SIRT-1 may play an important role in vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing. SIRT-1 may be a key therapeutic target to treat arterial ageing.

  4. SIRT-1 and vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J; Magerko, Katherine A; Lawson, Brooke R; Durrant, Jessica R; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that reductions in the cellular deacetylase, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing via modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) acetylation/activation-associated nitric oxide (NO) production. In older (30 months, n = 14) vs. young (5–7 months, n = 16) B6D2F1 mice, aortic protein expression of SIRT-1 and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 were lower (both P < 0.05), and acetylated eNOS was 6-fold higher (P < 0.05), whereas total eNOS did not differ (P = 0.65). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced peak endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD) was lower in isolated femoral arteries with ageing (P < 0.001). Incubation with sirtinol, a SIRT-1 inhibitor, reduced EDD in both young and older mice, abolishing age-related differences, whereas co-administration with l-NAME, an eNOS inhibitor, further reduced EDD similarly in both groups. Endothelium-independent dilatation to sodium nitroprusside (EID), was not altered by age or sirtinol treatment. In older (64 ± 1 years, n = 22) vs. young (25 ± 1 years, n = 16) healthy humans, ACh-induced forearm EDD was impaired (P = 0.01) and SIRT-1 protein expression was 37% lower in endothelial cells obtained from the brachial artery (P < 0.05), whereas EID did not differ. In the overall group, EDD was positively related to endothelial cell SIRT-1 protein expression (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). Reductions in SIRT-1 may play an important role in vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing. SIRT-1 may be a key therapeutic target to treat arterial ageing. PMID:21746786

  5. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  6. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Chen, Chia-Ling; Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  7. Reversibility of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes: role of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Sarada, D V L; Ramkumar, K M

    2016-07-01

    The endothelium, a thin single sheet of endothelial cells, is a metabolically active layer that coats the inner surface of blood vessels and acts as an interface between the circulating blood and the vessel wall. The endothelium through the secretion of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors serves as a critical mediator of vascular homeostasis. During the development of the vascular system, it regulates cellular adhesion and vessel wall inflammation in addition to maintaining vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A shift in the functions of the endothelium towards vasoconstriction, proinflammatory and prothrombic states characterise improper functioning of these cells, leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED), implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes. Major mechanisms of ED include the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels, differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress. ED tends to be the initial event in macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and microvascular complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Numerous strategies have been developed to protect endothelial cells against various stimuli, of which the role of polyphenolic compounds in modulating the differentially regulated pathways and thus maintaining vascular homeostasis has been proven to be beneficial. This review addresses the factors stimulating ED in diabetes and the molecular mechanisms of natural polyphenol antioxidants in maintaining vascular homeostasis.

  8. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  9. Endothelial dysfunction and lung capillary injury in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Phillips, Shane A; Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction of both systolic and diastolic origins leads to increased left atrial pressure, lung capillary injury and increased resistance to gas transfer. Acutely, pressure-induced trauma disrupts the endothelial and alveolar anatomical configuration and definitively causes an impairment of cellular pathways involved in fluid-flux regulation and gas exchange efficiency, a process well identified as stress failure of the alveolar-capillary membrane. In chronic heart failure (HF), additional stimuli other than pressure may trigger the true remodeling process of capillaries and small arteries characterized by endothelial dysfunction, proliferation of myofibroblasts, fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition. In parallel there is a loss of alveolar gas diffusion properties due to the increased path from air to blood (thickening of extracellular matrix) and loss of fine molecular mechanism involved in fluid reabsorption and clearance. Deleterious changes in gas transfer not only reflect the underlying lung tissue damage but also portend independent prognostic information and may play a role in the pathogenesis of exercise limitation and ventilatory abnormalities observed in these patients. Few currently approved treatments for chronic HF have the potential to positively affect structural remodeling of the lung capillary network; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are one of the few currently established options. Recently, more attention has been paid to novel therapies specifically targeting the nitric oxide pathway as a suitable target to improve endothelial function and permeability as well as alveolar gas exchange properties.

  10. Principles of targeting endothelial cell metabolism to treat angiogenesis and endothelial cell dysfunction in disease

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Jermaine; Stapor, Peter; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is the orchestral conductor of blood vessel function. Pathological blood vessel formation (a process termed pathological angiogenesis) or the inability of endothelial cells (ECs) to perform their physiological function (a condition known as EC dysfunction) are defining features of various diseases. Therapeutic intervention to inhibit aberrant angiogenesis or ameliorate EC dysfunction could be beneficial in diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, respectively, but current strategies have limited efficacy. Based on recent findings that pathological angiogenesis and EC dysfunction are accompanied by EC-specific metabolic alterations, targeting EC metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how EC metabolism is altered in disease and discuss potential metabolic targets and strategies to reverse EC dysfunction and inhibit pathological angiogenesis. PMID:25063693

  11. Obesity and aging: determinants of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. After the discovery of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by Robert F. Furchgott in 1980 it soon became clear that endothelial cells also release vasoactive factors distinct from nitric oxide (NO) namely, endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCF) as well as hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Vasoactive factors derived from endothelial cells include NO/EDRF, reactive oxygen species, endothelins and angiotensins which have either EDRF or EDCF functions, cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs and EDRFs, and EDHFs. Endothelial factors are formed by enzymes such as NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, converting enyzmes, NADPH oxidases, and epoxigenases, among others, and participate in the regulation of vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions; however, their abnormal regulation due to endothelial cell dysfunction contributes to disease processes such as atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and renal disease. Because of recent changes in world demographics and the declining health status of the world's population, both aging and obesity as independent risk factors for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke, will continue to increase in the years to come. Obesity and associated conditions such as arterial hypertension and diabetes are now also some of the primary health concerns among children and adolescents. The similarities of pathomechanisms activated in obesity and aging suggest that obesity--at least in the vasculature--can be considered to have effects consistent with accelerated, "premature" aging. Pathomechanisms as well as the clinical issues of obesity- and aging-associated vascular changes important for atherosclerosis development and prevention are discussed.

  12. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by proinflammatory oxidant hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Patel, R; Eiserich, J P; Zhou, F; Kelpke, S; Ma, W; Parks, D A; Darley-Usmar, V; White, C R

    2001-10-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) plays a role in tissue injury under inflammatory conditions. The present study tests the hypothesis that HOCl decreases nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in the vasculature of Sprague-Dawley rats. Aortic ring segments were pretreated with HOCl (1-50 microM) followed by extensive washing. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was then assessed by cumulative addition of acetylcholine (ACh) or the calcium ionophore A23187. HOCl treatment significantly impaired both ACh- and A23187-mediated relaxation. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. The inhibitory effect of HOCl on ACh-induced relaxation was reversed by exposure of ring segments to L-arginine but not D-arginine. In cellular studies, HOCl did not alter endothelial NO synthase (NOS III) protein or activity, but inhibited formation of the NO metabolites nitrate (NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-). The reduction in total NO metabolite production in bovine aortic endothelial cells was also reversed by addition of L-arginine. These data suggest that HOCl induces endothelial dysfunction via modification of L-arginine.

  13. Endothelial dysfunction impairs vascular neurotransmission in tail arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana B; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study intends to clarify if endothelium dysfunction impairs vascular sympathetic neurotransmission. Electrically-evoked tritium overflow (100 pulses/5 Hz) was evaluated in arteries (intact and denuded) or exhibiting some degree of endothelium dysfunction (spontaneously hypertensive arteries), pre-incubated with [(3)H]-noradrenaline in the presence of enzymes (nitric oxide synthase (NOS); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; xanthine oxidase; cyclooxygenase; adenosine kinase) inhibitors and a nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with L-NIO dihydrochloride reduced tritium overflow in intact arteries whereas inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase with Nω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride was devoid of effect showing that only endothelial nitric oxide synthase is involved in vascular sympathetic neuromodulation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species or prostaglandins production with apocynin and allopurinol or indomethacin, respectively, failed to alter tritium overflow. A facilitation or reduction of tritium overflow was observed in the presence of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or of 5-iodotubericidin, respectively, but only in intact arteries. These effects can be ascribed to a tonic inhibitory effect mediated by A1 receptors. In denuded and hypertensive arteries, 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine (SCH 58261) reduced tritium overflow, suggesting the occurrence of a tonic activation of A2A receptors. When endogenous adenosine bioavailability was increased by the nucleoside transporter inhibitor, S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine, tritium overflow increased in intact, denuded and hypertensive arteries. Among the endothelium-derived substances studied that could alter vascular sympathetic transmission only adenosine/adenosine receptor mediated mechanisms were clearly impaired by endothelium injury/dysfunction.

  14. Tetrahydrobiopterin corrects Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Pleiner, Johannes; Schaller, Georg; Zorn, Stefan; Namiranian, Khodadad; Kapiotis, Stylianos; Bartel, Gregor; Wolfrum, Mathias; Brügel, Mathias; Thiery, Joachim; Macallister, Raymond J; Wolzt, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Acute inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction, which is partly mediated by oxidant stress and inactivation of nitric oxide. The contribution of depletion of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), the cofactor required for nitric oxide generation, is unclear. In this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study, forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to ACh and glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) were measured before and 3.5 h after infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS, 20 IU/kg iv) in eight healthy men. The effect of intra-arterial BH(4) (500 microg/min), placebo, or vitamin C (24 mg/min) was studied on separate days 3.5 h after LPS infusion. In addition, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated for 24 h with vitamin C and LPS. ACh and GTN caused dose-dependent forearm vasodilation. The FBF response to ACh, which was decreased by 23 +/- 17% (P < 0.05) by LPS infusion, was restored to baseline reactivity by BH(4) and vitamin C. FBF responses to GTN were not affected by BH(4) or vitamin C. LPS increased leukocyte count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, pulse rate, and body temperature and decreased platelet count and vitamin C concentration. Vitamin C increased forearm plasma concentration of BH(4) by 32% (P < 0.02). Incubation with LPS and vitamin C, but not LPS alone, increased intracellular BH(4) concentration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Impaired endothelial function during acute inflammation can be restored by BH(4) or vitamin C. Vitamin C may exert some of its salutary effects by increasing BH(4) concentration.

  15. Vascular incompetence in dialysis patients--protein-bound uremic toxins and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Dou, Laetitia; Cerini, Claire; Dignat-George, Françoise; Brunet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a much higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than the general population. Endothelial dysfunction, which participates in accelerated atherosclerosis, is a hallmark of CKD. Patients with CKD display impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, elevated soluble biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, and increased oxidative stress. They also present an imbalance between circulating endothelial populations reflecting endothelial injury (endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial cells) and repair (endothelial progenitor cells). Endothelial damage induced by a uremic environment suggests an involvement of uremia-specific factors. Several uremic toxins, mostly protein-bound, have been shown to have specific endothelial toxicity: ADMA, homocysteine, AGEs, and more recently, p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate. These toxins, all poorly removed by hemodialysis therapies, share mechanisms of endothelial toxicity: they promote pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory response and inhibit endothelial repair. This article (i) reviews the evidence for endothelial dysfunction in CKD, (ii) specifies the involvement of protein-bound uremic toxins in this dysfunction, and (iii) discusses therapeutic strategies for lowering uremic toxin concentrations or for countering the effects of uremic toxins on the endothelium.

  16. Endothelial cell dysfunction in viral hemorrhage and edema

    PubMed Central

    Mackow, Erich R.; Gorbunova, Elena E.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium maintains a vascular barrier by controlling platelet and immune cell interactions, capillary tone and interendothelial cell (EC) adherence. Here we suggest common elements in play during viral infection of the endothelium that alter normal EC functions and contribute to lethal hemorrhagic or edematous diseases. In viral reservoir hosts, infection of capillaries and lymphatic vessels may direct immunotolerance without disease, but in the absence of these cognate interactions they direct the delayed onset of human disease characterized by thrombocytopenia and vascular leakage in a severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome. Here we present insight into EC controls of hemostasis, immune response and capillary permeability that are altered by viral infection of the endothelium. PMID:25601858

  17. Endothelial dysfunction and preeclampsia: role of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aranguren, Lissette C.; Prada, Carlos E.; Riaño-Medina, Carlos E.; Lopez, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is an often fatal pathology characterized by hypertension and proteinuria at the 20th week of gestation that affects 5–10% of the pregnancies. The problem is particularly important in developing countries in where the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is higher and maternal mortality rates are 20 times higher than those reported in developed countries. Risk factors for the development of PE include obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia that stimulate inflammatory cytokine release and oxidative stress leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). However, how all these clinical manifestations concur to develop PE is still not very well understood. The related poor trophoblast invasion and uteroplacental artery remodeling described in PE, increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypoxia and ED. Here we aim to review current literature from research showing the interplay between oxidative stress, ED and PE to the outcomes of current clinical trials aiming to prevent PE with antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25346691

  18. Simvastatin prevents inflammation-induced aortic stiffening and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Sharon M L; Mäki-Petäjä, Kaisa M; Cheriyan, Joseph; Davidson, Edward H; Cherry, Lynne; McEniery, Carmel M; Sattar, Naveed; Wilkinson, Ian B; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aim of this study was to determine whether simvastatin would protect against inflammation-induced aortic stiffening and endothelial dysfunction. METHODS Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were assessed three times, at baseline, after a 14 day administration of simvastatin or placebo and 8 h after Salmonella typhi vaccination in 50 healthy subjects. RESULTS Following vaccination there was a significant increase in aPWV in the placebo group (5.80 ± 0.87 vs. 6.21 ± 0.97 m s−1, 95% CI 0.19, 0.62, P = 0.002) but not the simvastatin group (5.68 ± 0.73 vs. 5.72 ± 0.74 m s−1, 95% CI −0.19, 0.27, P = 0.9; P = 0.016 for comparison). Whereas FMD response was reduced in the placebo group (6.77 ± 4.10 vs. 5.27 ± 2.88%, 95% CI −2.49, −0.52, P = 0.02) but not in the simvastatin group (7.07 ± 4.37 vs. 7.17 ± 9.94%, 95% CI −1.1, 1.3. P = 0.9, P < 0.001 for comparison). There was no difference in the systemic inflammatory response between groups following vaccination. However, there was a significant reduction in serum apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) in the placebo, but not in the simvastatin, group. CONCLUSIONS Simvastatin prevents vaccination-induced aortic stiffening and endothelial dysfunction. This protective mechanism may be due to preservation of the Apo A-I lipid fraction, rather than pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects of statins. PMID:21175435

  19. Nitrones Reverse Hyperglycemia-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Colwyn A.; DiSilvestro, David; Hemann, Craig; Bryant, Kelsey E.; Chen, Chun-Aun; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse eNOS dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5 mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50 mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC cells with nitrones for 24 h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased BH4 levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and SOD activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC cells grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC cells. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  20. Relationship of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Gámez, B; Fernandez-Marin, M C; Gómez-Chaparro, J L; Muñoz-Cabrera, L; Lopez-Barea, J; Perez-Jimenez, F; Lopez-Miranda, J

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate ischaemic reactive hyperaemia (IRH) in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and its relationship with oxidative stress. We studied 69 consecutive patients referred to our Sleep Unit (Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba, Spain). Patients with chronic diseases or those taking medication were excluded. IRH was assessed before and after polysomnography. Morning IRH and oxidative stress markers were compared between patients with (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥ 5) and without (AHI < 5) OSA. Measurements were repeated in 25 severe OSA patients after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We included 46 OSA patients (mean ± sd AHI 49 ± 32.1) and 23 non-OSA subjects (AHI 3 ± 0.9). The OSA patients showed a significant worsening of morning IRH, and a significant increase in malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels. Only the oxygen desaturation index independently explained morning IRH, while malondialdehyde levels showed a weak effect on IRH. In severe OSA patients, IRH improved significantly after CPAP treatment, as did malondialdehyde, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and protein carbonyl levels. In OSA patients, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed, and IRH worsened after sleep. The increase in oxidative stress was not associated with IRH, while intermittent hypoxia was strongly associated with IRH. In severe OSA patients, CPAP treatment improved oxidative stress and endothelial function.

  1. Angiotensin receptor blockers & endothelial dysfunction: Possible correlation & therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Radenković, Miroslav; Stojanović, Marko; Nešić, Ivana Milićević; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium is one of the most important constituents of vascular homeostasis, which is achieved through continual and balanced production of different relaxing and contractile factors. When there is a pathological disturbance in release of these products, endothelial dysfunction (ED) will probably occur. ED is considered to be the initial step in the development of atherosclerosis. This pathological activation and inadequate functioning of endothelial cells was shown to be to some extent a reversible process, which all together resulted in increased interest in investigation of different beneficial treatment options. To this point, the pharmacological approach, including for example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or statins, was clearly shown to be effective in the improvement of ED. One of many critical issues underlying ED represents instability in the balance between nitric oxide and angiotensin II (Ang II) production. Considering that Ang II was confirmed to be important for the development of ED, the aim of this review article was to summarize the findings of up to date clinical studies associated with therapeutic application of angiotensin receptor blockers and improvement in ED. In addition, it was of interest to review the pleiotropic actions of angiotensin receptor blockers linked to the improvement of ED. The prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo or active-controlled clinical trials were identified and selected for the final evaluation. PMID:27934794

  2. Association between periodontal disease and endothelial dysfunction in smoking patients.

    PubMed

    Velosa-Porras, Juliana; Escobar-Arregoces, Francina; Latorre-Uriza, Catalina; Ferro-Camargo, María B; Ruiz, Álvaro J; Uriza-Carrasco, Luis F

    2016-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in the impact of oral health on cardiovascular disease, particularly regarding the effects of chronic infections such as periodontitis on the endothelium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in healthy smokers whether there are any significant differences in the frequency of endothelial dysfunction between subjects with chronic moderate to severe periodontal disease and periodontally healthy subjects. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted. The target population was adults older than 40 years of age. Blood tests were performed to determine values of CBC, glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDLC. Periodontal examinations and probing were conducted with a Florida Probe®, and standardized procedures were used to measure flow-mediated dilation. Out of 150 subjects [69 male (46%) and 81 female (54%)], 75 (50%) had chronic periodontitis. The mean value for baseline flow-mediated dilation was 4.04% and the mean value for final flow-mediated dilation was 4.66%, with a 0.62% mean difference showing a statistically significant increase (p<0.001).This study found no significant difference in the flow-mediated dilation values between periodontally healthy subjects and those with periodontitis, in contrast to the literature, which suggests a negative impact of periodontal disease on endothelial function.

  3. Analysis of a thermal method for assessing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kharalkar, Nachiket; Valvano, Jonathan W

    2004-01-01

    The presence of atherosclerosis not only affects the normal functioning of the coronary blood vessels but also of the peripheral vasculature. Property measurements made in the peripheral vasculature hence do reflect the condition of the coronary blood vessels. The endothelial cells form the inner lining of the blood vessels, and are responsible for the release of nitric oxide (NO) in order to control the vascular tone. Under normal conditions the artery will dilate in response to increased blood flow, mediated by the release of NO. The hampering of this normal response, caused by certain cardiovascular diseases, is referred to as endothelial dysfunction (EDF). Occlusion of the arm using a standard blood pressure cuff for five minutes followed by sudden release of the occlusion is known to create a reactive hyperemia in a normally functioning vasculature. We propose to measure the EDF by attempting to create this reactive hyperemia in the arm and measuring the temperature response in the hand and forearm, using a computer-based data acquisition system. The rate of temperature fall during occlusion and the temperature rate of rise after release are combined to assess EDF. An engineering analysis of the instrument was performed. Initial studies on normal subjects have indicated that the rate of rise is significantly higher than the rate of fall of temperature.

  4. Epigenetic mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Prattichizzo, Francesco; Giuliani, Angelica; Ceka, Artan; Rippo, Maria Rita; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Testa, Roberto; Procopio, Antonio Domenico; Olivieri, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    The development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications is largely due to the complex interaction between genetic factors and environmental influences, mainly dietary habits and lifestyle, which can either accelerate or slow down disease progression. Recent findings suggest the potential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms as a crucial interface between the effects of genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The common denominator of environmental factors promoting T2DM development and progression is that they trigger an inflammatory response, promoting inflammation-mediated insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Proinflammatory stimuli, including hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and other inflammatory mediators, can affect epigenetic mechanisms, altering the expression of specific genes in target cells without changes in underlying DNA sequences. DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications (PTHMs) are the most extensively investigated epigenetic mechanisms. Over the past few years, non-coding RNA, including microRNAs (miRNAs), have also emerged as key players in gene expression modulation. MiRNAs can be actively released or shed by cells in the bloodstream and taken up in active form by receiving cells, acting as efficient systemic communication tools. The miRNAs involved in modulation of inflammatory pathways (inflammamiRs), such as miR-146a, and those highly expressed in endothelial lineages and hematopoietic progenitor cells (angiomiRs), such as miR-126, are the most extensively studied circulating miRNAs in T2DM. However, data on circulating miRNA signatures associated with specific diabetic complications are still lacking. Since immune cells and endothelial cells are primarily involved in the vascular complications of T2DM, their relative contribution to circulating miRNA signatures needs to be elucidated. An integrated approach encompassing different epigenetic mechanisms would have the potential to

  5. Cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction induced by mercury exposure at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Briones, Ana María; Avendaño, María Soledad; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) has many harmful vascular effects by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular/endothelial dysfunction, all of which may contribute to cerebrovascular diseases development. We aimed to explore the effects of chronic low-mercury concentration on vascular function in cerebral arteries and the mechanisms involved. Basilar arteries from control (vehicle-saline solution, im) and mercury chloride (HgCl2)-treated rats for 30 days (first dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07μg/kg/day, im, to cover daily loss) were used. Vascular reactivity, protein expression, nitric oxide (NO) levels and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production were analyzed. HgCl2 exposure increased serotonin contraction and reduced the endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to bradykinin. After NO synthase inhibition, serotonin responses were enhanced more in control than in mercury-treated rats while bradykinin-induced relaxation was abolished. NO levels were greater in control than Hg-treated rats. Tiron and indomethacin reduced vasoconstriction and increased the bradykinin-induced relaxation only in HgCl2-treated rats. Vascular O2(-) production was greater in mercury-treated when compared to control rats. Protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, copper/zinc (Cu/Zn), Manganese (Mn) and extracellular-superoxide dismutases were similar in cerebral arteries from both groups. Results suggest that Hg treatment increases cerebrovascular reactivity by reducing endothelial negative modulation and NO bioavailability; this effect seems to be dependent on increased reactive oxygen species and prostanoids generation. These findings show, for the first time, that brain vasculature are also affected by chronic mercury exposure and offer further evidence that even at small concentration, HgCl2 is hazardous and might be an environmental risk factor accounting for cerebral vasospasm development.

  6. Resveratrol prevents age-related memory and mood dysfunction with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and microvasculature, and reduced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-01-28

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol.

  7. Endothelial dysfunction as a predictor of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bertoluci, Marcello C; Cé, Gislaine V; da Silva, Antônio MV; Wainstein, Marco V; Boff, Winston; Puñales, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Macro and microvascular disease are the main cause of morbi-mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Although there is a clear association between endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes, a cause-effect relationship is less clear in T1DM. Although endothelial dysfunction (ED) precedes atherosclerosis, it is not clear weather, in recent onset T1DM, it may progress to clinical macrovascular disease. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction may either be reversed spontaneously or in response to intensive glycemic control, long-term exercise training and use of statins. Acute, long-term and post-prandial hyperglycemia as well as duration of diabetes and microalbuminuria are all conditions associated with ED in T1DM. The pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction is closely related to oxidative-stress. NAD(P)H oxidase over activity induces excessive superoxide production inside the mitochondrial oxidative chain of endothelial cells, thus reducing nitric oxide bioavailability and resulting in peroxynitrite formation, a potent oxidant agent. Moreover, oxidative stress also uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which becomes dysfunctional, inducing formation of superoxide. Other important mechanisms are the activation of both the polyol and protein kinase C pathways as well as the presence of advanced glycation end-products. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential clinical applicability of endothelial dysfunction as a marker for early vascular complications in T1DM. PMID:26069717

  8. Connecting heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and renal dysfunction: the role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Damman, Kevin; Verhaar, Marianne C; Paulus, Walter J; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline; van Heerebeek, Loek; Hillege, Hans L; Lam, Carolyn S P; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is common and is associated with increased mortality. Impaired renal function is also a risk factor for developing HFpEF. A new paradigm for HFpEF, proposing a sequence of events leading to myocardial remodelling and dysfunction in HFpEF, was recently introduced, involving inflammatory, microvascular, and cardiac components. The kidney might play a key role in this systemic process. Renal impairment causes metabolic and systemic derangements in circulating factors, causing an activated systemic inflammatory state and endothelial dysfunction, which may lead to cardiomyocyte stiffening, hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis via cross-talk between the endothelium and cardiomyocyte compartments. Here, we review the role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation to explain the link between renal dysfunction and HFpEF, which allows for identification of new early risk markers, prognostic factors, and unique targets for intervention.

  9. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  10. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  11. The SIRT1 activator SRT1720 reverses vascular endothelial dysfunction, excessive superoxide production, and inflammation with aging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J.; Pasha, Hamza M.; Hearon, Christopher M.; Sindler, Amy L.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in arterial SIRT1 expression and activity with aging are linked to vascular endothelial dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that the specific SIRT1 activator SRT1720 improves endothelial function [endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD)] in old mice. Young (4–9 mo) and old (29–32 mo) male B6D2F1 mice treated with SRT1720 (100 mg/kg body wt) or vehicle for 4 wk were studied with a group of young controls. Compared with the young controls, aortic SIRT1 expression and activity were reduced (P < 0.05) and EDD was impaired (83 ± 2 vs. 96 ± 1%; P < 0.01) in old vehicle-treated animals. SRT1720 normalized SIRT1 expression/activity in old mice and restored EDD (95 ± 1%) by enhancing cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-mediated dilation and protein expression in the absence of changes in nitric oxide bioavailability. Aortic superoxide production and expression of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) were increased in old vehicle mice (P < 0.05), and ex vivo administration of the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL restored EDD in that group. SRT1720 normalized aortic superoxide production in old mice, without altering NOX4 and abolished the improvement in EDD with TEMPOL, while selectively increasing aortic antioxidant enzymes. Aortic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were increased in old vehicle mice (P < 0.05), whereas SRT1720 normalized NF-κB activation and reduced TNF-α in old animals. SIRT1 activation with SRT1720 ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction with aging in mice by enhancing COX-2 signaling and reducing oxidative stress and inflammation. Specific activation of SIRT1 is a promising therapeutic strategy for age-related endothelial dysfunction in humans. PMID:25326534

  12. Does Aging or Endothelial Dysfunction Pose a Threat to Military Crewmembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    from consecutive defect in the endothelium-derived NO system, endothelial dysfunction alterations. possibly decreased synthesis and/or release of NO...elevated level of glucose cause endothelial Stress dysfunction. Mechanism hidden behind that phenomenon may involve an increased synthesis Stress...be associated with reduced expression of NO hypothalamus-pituitary gland-peripheral organs synthase and thereby with decreased synthesis of pathway

  13. Aged garlic extract improves homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in macro- and microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Ide, Nagatoshi; Abahji, Thomas; Nill, Lars; Keller, Christiane; Hoffmann, Ulrich

    2006-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction caused by increases in vascular oxidant stress that decrease bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in the vascular pathobiology of hyperhomocysteinemia. Boosting cellular glutathione levels or increasing the activity of cellular glutathione peroxidase can compensate for homocysteine's effects on endothelial function. Aged garlic extract (AGE) contains water- and oil-soluble sulfur compounds that modify the intracellular thiol and redox state, minimize intracellular oxidant stress, and stimulate NO generation in endothelial cells and animals. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, crossover trial to examine whether AGE reduces macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction during acute hyperhomocysteinemia induced by an oral methionine challenge in healthy subjects. Acute hyperhomocysteinemia leads to a significant decrease in flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery as determined by vascular ultrasound, indicative of macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. In addition, acute hyperhomocysteinemia leads to a decrease in acetylcholine-stimulated skin perfusion as measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. This indicates microvascular endothelial dysfunction, which is presumably a result of impairment of the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor pathway. Pretreatment with AGE for 6 wk significantly diminished the adverse effects of acute hyperhomocysteinemia in both vascular territories. We conclude that AGE may at least partly prevent a decrease in bioavailable NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor during acute hyperhomocysteinemia. This pilot study warrants further investigations on the effects of AGE on endothelial dysfunction in patients with other cardiovascular risk factors or established vascular disease and on the clinical outcome of patients with cardiovascular disease.

  14. Therapeutic approach in the improvement of endothelial dysfunction: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Radenković, Miroslav; Stojanović, Marko; Potpara, Tatjana; Prostran, Milica

    2013-01-01

    The endothelium has a central role in the regulation of blood flow through continuous modulation of vascular tone. This is primarily accomplished by balanced release of endothelial relaxing and contractile factors. The healthy endothelial cells are essential for maintenance of vascular homeostasis involving antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, pro-fibrinolytic, anti-adhesive, or anticoagulant effects. Oppositely, endothelial dysfunction is primarily characterized by impaired regulation of vascular tone as a result of reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, lack of cofactors for NO synthesis, attenuated NO release, or increased NO degradation. So far, the pharmacological approach in improving/reversal of endothelial dysfunction was shown to be beneficial in clinical trials that have investigated actions of different cardiovascular drugs. The aim of this paper was to summarize some of the latest clinical findings related to therapeutic possibilities for improving endothelial dysfunction in different pathological conditions. In the majority of presented clinical investigations, the assessment of improvement or reversal of endothelial dysfunction was performed through the flow-mediated dilatation measurement, and in some of those endothelial progenitor cells' count was used for the same purpose. Still, given the fast and continuous development of this field, the evidence acquisition included the MEDLINE data base screening and the selection of articles published between 2010 and 2012.

  15. NADPH oxidase 4 protects against development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Langbein, Heike; Brunssen, Coy; Hofmann, Anja; Cimalla, Peter; Brux, Melanie; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Deussen, Andreas; Koch, Edmund; Morawietz, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Aims Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in the development of atherosclerosis. Increased formation of superoxide anions by NADPH oxidase Nox1, 2, and 5 reduces nitric oxide availability and can promote endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, recent evidence supports a vasoprotective role of H2O2 produced by main endothelial isoform Nox4. Therefore, we analysed the impact of genetic deletion of Nox4 on endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) knockout model. Methods and results Ex vivo analysis of endothelial function by Mulvany myograph showed impaired endothelial function in thoracic aorta of Nox4−/−/Ldlr−/− mice. Further progression of endothelial dysfunction due to high-fat diet increased atherosclerotic plaque burden and galectin-3 staining in Nox4−/−/Ldlr−/− mice compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Under physiological conditions, loss of Nox4 does not influence aortic vascular function. In this setting, loss of Nox4-derived H2O2 production could be partially compensated for by nNOS upregulation. Using an innovative optical coherence tomography approach, we were able to analyse endothelial function by flow-mediated vasodilation in the murine saphenous artery in vivo. This new approach revealed an altered flow-mediated dilation in Nox4−/− mice, indicating a role for Nox4 under physiological conditions in peripheral arteries in vivo. Conclusions Nox4 plays an important role in maintaining endothelial function under physiological and pathological conditions. Loss of Nox4-derived H2O2 could be partially compensated for by nNOS upregulation, but severe endothelial dysfunction is not reversible. This leads to increased atherosclerosis under atherosclerotic prone conditions. PMID:26578199

  16. Spectrum of Factors Triggering Endothelial Dysfunction in PIH

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaga, Visala Sree

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal and fetal/neonatal mortality and morbidity. The aetiology and pathogenesis of PE is yet to be completely understood. Evidence shows that, Endothelial Dysfunction (ED) plays a pivotal role in the genesis of this multi-system disorder that develops in PE and eclampsia. Aim To determine the circulating levels of factors Malondialdehyde (MDA), Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma-α (FRAP), Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF-α), sFlt-1, VEGF, PlGF, Nitric Oxide (NO) that influence the ED. Materials and Methods Study groups consisted of Normotensive pregnant women (N), preeclamptic women (PE) and eclamptic women (E) with 100 subjects in each group in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. They were investigated for MDA, FRAP, TNF-α, sFlt-1, VEGF, PlGF, NO. Statistical analysis was done using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results When compared to controls MDA, TNF-α, sFlt-1 levels were found to be significantly high and FRAP, VEGF, PIGF and NO levels were significantly low in PE and E group. E showed a significantly high level of MDA, TNF-α, sFlt-1 and low levels of FRAP, VEGF, PIGF, NO when compared to PE group. Conclusion Our study substantiated the fact, that oxidative stress, imbalance between anti-angiogenic factors and pro- angiogenic factors exists in Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) condition. This imbalance is directly related to the ED, the hallmark of PE. So oxidative stress, VEGF, PlGF and sFlt-1 can be used as markers to analyze the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:28208844

  17. [The impact of detecting endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis: Role of positron emission tomography (PET)].

    PubMed

    Alexánderson-Rosas, Erick; Calleja-Torres, Rodrigo; Martínez-García, Alfonso; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro Alberto; Ochoa-López, Juan Manuel; Meléndez, Gabriela; Kimura-Hayama, Eric; Meave-González, Aloha

    2010-01-01

    The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of the intracellular fluid, vascular permeability, and modulation of vascular focal tone and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunction is manifested by the loss of the endothelium ability to modulate physiology changes in its vascular bed, and actually it is considered a prognostic marker of coronary artery disease. The relevance of assessing endothelial dysfunction relies in that it has been observed in different pathologies like DM, dyslipidemia, hypertension, tabaquism and in immunologic diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus. PET is a non invasive method that allows the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow during rest, stress and adrenergic stimulation, which allows to asses endothelial function. Therefore PET is a useful diagnostic technique to identify patients with endothelial dysfunction, and in the assessment of its response to administered therapy, allowing an optimal control and prevention of secondary adverse events of these diseases.

  18. Small caliber arterial endothelial cells calcium signals elicited by PAR2 are preserved from endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, John C; Stuyvers, Bruno D; McGuire, John J

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC)-dependent vasodilation by proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is preserved in small caliber arteries in disease states where vasodilation by muscarinic receptors is decreased. In this study, we identified and characterized the PAR2-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca2+)-release mechanisms in EC from small caliber arteries in healthy and diseased states. Mesenteric arterial EC were isolated from PAR2 wild-type (WT) and null mice, after saline (controls) or angiotensin II (AngII) infusion, for imaging intracellular calcium and characterizing the calcium-release system by immunofluorescence. EC Ca2+ signals comprised two forms of Ca2+-release events that had distinct spatial-temporal properties and occurred near either the plasmalemma (peripheral) or center of EC. In healthy EC, PAR2-dependent increases in the densities and firing rates of both forms of Ca2+-release were abolished by inositol 1,4,5- trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor, but partially reduced by transient potential vanilloid channels inhibitor ruthenium red (RR). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced less overall Ca2+-release than PAR2 activation, but enhanced selectively the incidence of central events. PAR2-dependent Ca2+-activity, inhibitors sensitivities, IP3R, small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels expressions were unchanged in EC from AngII WT. However, the same cells exhibited decreases in ACh-induced Ca2+-release, RR sensitivity, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, indicating AngII-induced dysfunction was differentiated by receptor, Ca2+-release, and downstream targets of EC activation. We conclude that PAR2 and muscarinic receptors selectively elicit two elementary Ca2+ signals in single EC. PAR2-selective IP3R-dependent peripheral Ca2+-release mechanisms are identical between healthy and diseased states. Further study of PAR2-selective Ca2+-release for eliciting pathological and/or normal EC functions is warranted. PMID:25729579

  19. Chronic intake of red wine polyphenols by young rats prevents aging-induced endothelial dysfunction and decline in physical performance: role of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ros, Stéphanie; Zoll, Joffrey; Lang, Anne-Laure; Auger, Cyril; Keller, Nathalie; Bronner, Christian; Geny, Bernard; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-01-14

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction and decline in physical performance, which promote cardiovascular diseases. This study examined whether chronic intake of red wine polyphenols (RWPs), a rich source of natural antioxidants, prevents aging-related impairment of vascular function and physical exercise capacity. Vascular reactivity from 12, 20 and 40 week-old rats was assessed in organ chambers. Rats received from week 16 to 40 either solvent, RWPs or the antioxidant and NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin. Aging was associated with blunted endothelium-dependent relaxations, oxidative stress (dihydroethidine staining), and an upregulation of eNOS, arginase I, NADPH oxidase p22phox and nox1 subunits, and AT1 and AT2 receptors (assessed by immunohistochemistry) in the mesenteric artery. RWPs and apocynin improved the endothelial dysfunction, normalized oxidative stress and the expression of the different proteins. RWPs also improved aging-related decline in physical exercise. Thus, intake of RWPs protects against aging-induced endothelial dysfunction and decline in physical performance. These effects likely involve the ability of RWPs to normalize oxidative stress and the expression of proteins involved in the formation of NO and the angiotensin II pathway.

  20. Olive Oil Supplements Ameliorate Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Healthy Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for clinical cardiovascular events and progression of atherosclerosis. Dietary supplements such as olive oil and fish oil have beneficial effects on endothelial function, and ther...

  1. S-allyl cysteine ameliorates the quality of sperm and provides protection from age-related sperm dysfunction and oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play a central role in the pathophysiology of the age-related decrease in male fertility. It has been reported that the total protein of DJ-1 was decreased in a proteomic analysis of seminal plasma from asthenozoospermia patients and a DJ-1 protein acts as a sensor of cellular redox homeostasis. Therefore, we evaluated the age-related changes in the ratio of the oxidized/reduced forms of the DJ-1 protein in the epididymis. In addition, the protective effects of S-allyl cysteine (SAC), a potent antioxidant, were evaluated against sperm dysfunction. Male rats aged 15–75 weeks were used to assess age-associated sperm function and oxidative stress. Sperm count increased until 25 weeks, but then decreased at 50 and 75 weeks. The rate of sperm movement at 75 weeks was decreased to approximately 60% of the rate observed at 25 weeks. Expression of DJ-1 decreased, but oxidized-DJ-1 increased with age. In addition, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins in the epididymis increased until 50 weeks of age. The total number and DNA synthetic potential of the sperm increased until 25 weeks, and then decreased. In rats 75 weeks of age, SAC (0.45% diet) attenuated the decrease in the number, motility, and DNA synthesis of sperm and inhibited the oxidized proteins. These results suggest that SAC ameliorates the quality of sperm subjected to age-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25411519

  2. A novel mechanism of diabetic vascular endothelial dysfunction: Hypoadiponectinemia-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinglong; Xia, Linying; Zhang, Fen; Zhu, Di; Xin, Chao; Wang, Helin; Zhang, Fuyang; Guo, Xian; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Shan; Guo, Xiong; Huang, Chong; Gao, Feng; Liu, Yi; Tao, Ling

    2017-02-12

    It has been well documented that hypoadiponectinemia is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. However, the exact molecular mechanism which mediates this process has not been fully described. The current study aimed to investigate the role of hypoadiponectinemia-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in diabetic vascular endothelial dysfunction and its molecular mechanism. Male adult adiponectin knockout mice and wild type mice were fed with a high fat diet to establish a type 2 diabetic mellitus model. In addition, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and subjected to high glucose/high fat (HG/HF). The NLRP3 inflammasome activation was increased in type 2 diabetic mice and treatment of diabetic aortic segments with MCC950, a potent selective inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome ex vivo improved endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation and vascular endothelial injury were significantly increased in APN-KO mice compared with WT mice in diabetes and MCC950 decreased diabetic vascular endothelial dysfunction to comparable levels in APN-KO mice and WT mice. Adiponectin could decrease NLRP3 inflammasome activation and attenuate endothelial cell injury, which was abolished by NLRP3 inflammasome overexpression. Inhibition of peroxynitrite formation preferentially attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation in APN-KO diabetic mice. The current study demonstrated for the first time that hypoadiponectinemia-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation was a novel mechanism of diabetic vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Uric Acid Induces Endothelial Dysfunction by Activating the HMGB1/RAGE Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Duan, Xi-Mei; Liu, Ying; Yu, Jiao; Tang, Yun-Liang; Liu, Ze-Lin; Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Jian-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction, a process in which inflammation may play an important role. UA increases high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) expression and extracellular release in endothelial cells. HMGB1 is an inflammatory cytokine that interacts with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inducing an oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with a high concentration of UA (20 mg/dL) after which endothelial function and the expression of HMGB1, RAGE, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules were evaluated. UA inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVECs, increased intracellular HMGB1 expression and extracellular HMGB1 secretion, and upregulated RAGE expression. UA also activated NF-κB and increased the level of inflammatory cytokines. Blocking RAGE significantly suppressed the upregulation of RAGE and HMGB1 and prevented the increase in DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. It also blocked the decrease in eNOS expression and NO production induced by UA. Our results suggest that high concentrations of UA cause endothelial dysfunction via the HMGB1/RAGE signaling pathway. PMID:28116308

  4. Dynamin-related protein 1 mediates low glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction in human arterioles.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael J; Wang, Jingli; Ying, Rong; Suboc, Tisha B; Malik, Mobin; Couillard, Allison; Branum, Amberly; Puppala, Venkata; Widlansky, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    Intensive glycemic regulation has resulted in an increased incidence of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic burden correlates with adverse cardiovascular complications and contributes acutely and chronically to endothelial dysfunction. Prior data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to hypoglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction, but the mechanisms behind this linkage remain unknown. We attempt to determine whether clinically relevant low-glucose (LG) exposures acutely induce endothelial dysfunction through activation of the mitochondrial fission process. Characterization of mitochondrial morphology was carried out in cultured endothelial cells by using confocal microscopy. Isolated human arterioles were used to explore the effect LG-induced mitochondrial fission has on the formation of detrimental reactive oxygen species (ROS), bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), and endothelial-dependent vascular relaxation. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to visualize changes in mitochondrial ROS and NO levels and videomicroscopy applied to measure vasodilation response. Pharmacological disruption of the profission protein Drp1 with Mdivi-1 during LG exposure reduced mitochondrial fragmentation among vascular endothelial cells (LG: 0.469; LG+Mdivi-1: 0.276; P = 0.003), prevented formation of vascular ROS (LG: 2.036; LG+Mdivi-1: 1.774; P = 0.005), increased the presence of NO (LG: 1.352; LG+Mdivi-1: 1.502; P = 0.048), and improved vascular dilation response to acetylcholine (LG: 31.6%; LG+Mdivi-1; 78.5% at maximum dose; P < 0.001). Additionally, decreased expression of Drp1 via siRNA knockdown during LG conditions also improved vascular relaxation. Exposure to LG imparts endothelial dysfunction coupled with altered mitochondrial phenotypes among isolated human arterioles. Disruption of Drp1 and subsequent mitochondrial fragmentation events prevents impaired vascular dilation, restores mitochondrial phenotype, and implicates mitochondrial fission as a primary

  5. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase dysfunction causes cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration in rat prefrontal cortex slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Cerebrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in imbalance of cerebral blood flow contributes to the onset of psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Although decrease in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity has been reported in the patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the contribution of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase to endothelial cell dysfunction remains poorly understood. Here, by using rat neonatal prefrontal cortex slice cultures, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase by ouabain induced endothelial cell injury. Treatment with ouabain significantly decreased immunoreactive area of rat endothelial cell antigen-1 (RECA-1), a marker of endothelial cells, in a time-dependent manner. Ouabain also decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) (Ser9), which were prevented by lithium carbonate. On the other hand, ouabain-induced endothelial cell injury was exacerbated by concomitant treatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3- (PI3-) kinase. We also found that xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor, but not SEA0400, an inhibitor of Na(+), Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), protected endothelial cells from cytotoxicity of ouabain. These results suggest that cerebrovascular endothelial cell degeneration induced by Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition resulting in Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activation of GSK3β signaling underlies pathogenesis of these psychiatric disorders.

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Circulating Microparticles from Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agouni, Abdelali; Lagrue-Lak-Hal, Anne Hélène; Ducluzeau, Pierre Henri; Mostefai, Hadj Ahmed; Draunet-Busson, Catherine; Leftheriotis, Georges; Heymes, Christophe; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2008-01-01

    Microparticles are membrane vesicles that are released during cell activation and apoptosis. Elevated levels of microparticles occur in many cardiovascular diseases; therefore, we characterized circulating microparticles from both metabolic syndrome (MS) patients and healthy patients. We evaluated microparticle effects on endothelial function; however, links between circulating microparticles and endothelial dysfunction have not yet been demonstrated. Circulating microparticles and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry of blood samples from patients and healthy subjects. Microparticles were used either to treat human endothelial cells in vitro or to assess endothelium function in mice after intravenous injection. MS patients had increased circulating levels of microparticles compared with healthy patients, including microparticles from platelet, endothelial, erythrocyte, and procoagulant origins. In vitro treatment of endothelial cells with microparticles from MS patients reduced both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion production, resulting in protein tyrosine nitration. These effects were associated with enhanced phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase at the site of inhibition. The reduction of O2− was linked to both reduced expression of p47phox of NADPH oxidase and overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase. The decrease in NO production was triggered by nonplatelet-derived microparticles. In vivo injection of MS microparticles into mice impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreased endothelial NO synthase expression. These data provide evidence that circulating microparticles from MS patients influence endothelial dysfunction. PMID:18772329

  7. Oxalomalate reduces expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in the retinal pigment epithelium and inhibits angiogenesis: Implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyunjin; Ku, Hyeong Jun; Park, Jung Hyun; Cha, Hanvit; Lee, Seoyoon; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2016-12-01

    Clinical and experimental observations indicate a critical role for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), secreted by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), in pathological angiogenesis and the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE-mediated VEGF expression, leading to angiogenesis, is a major signaling mechanism underlying ocular neovascular disease. Inhibiting this signaling pathway with a therapeutic molecule is a promising anti-angiogenic strategy to treat this disease with potentially fewer side effects. Oxalomalate (OMA) is a competitive inhibitor of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), which plays an important role in cellular signaling pathways regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of OMA on the expression of VEGF, and the associated underlying mechanism of action, using in vitro and in vivo RPE cell models of AMD. We found that OMA reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF in RPE cells, and consequently inhibited CNV formation. This function of OMA was linked to its capacity to activate the pVHL-mediated HIF-1α degradation in these cells, partly via a ROS-dependent ATM signaling axis, through inhibition of IDH enzymes. These findings reveal a novel role for OMA in inhibiting RPE-derived VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and suggest unique therapeutic strategies for treating pathological angiogenesis and AMD development.

  8. Long-Term Visual Outcomes for a Treat and Extend Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regimen in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mrejen, Sarah; Jung, Jesse J; Chen, Christine; Patel, Samir N; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Yannuzzi, Nicolas; Xu, Luna; Marsiglia, Marcela; Boddu, Sucharita; Freund, K Bailey

    2015-07-08

    With the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy, clinicians are now focused on various treatment strategies to better control neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD), a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Herein, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients with treatment-naïve NVAMD initially classified based on fluorescein angiography (FA) alone or with an anatomic classification utilizing both FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and correlated long-term visual outcomes of these patients treated with an anti-VEGF Treat-and-Extend Regimen (TER) with baseline characteristics including neovascular phenotype. Overall, 185 patients (210 eyes) were followed over an average of 3.5 years (range 1-6.6) with a retention rate of 62.9%, and visual acuity significantly improved with a TER that required a mean number of 8.3 (±1.6) (± standard deviation) intravitreal anti-VEGF injections/year (range 4-13). The number of injections and the anatomic classification were independent predictors of visual acuity at 6 months, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years. Patients with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes and received more injections than the other neovascular subtypes. There were no serious adverse events. A TER provided sustained long-term visual gains. Eyes with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes than those with other neovascular subtypes.

  9. Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Dysfunction Constitute a Common Therapeutic Target in Cardiometabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, G.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, promote endothelial dysfunction and lead to development of metabolic syndrome which constitutes an introduction to cardiovascular disease. The insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction cross talk between each other by numerous metabolic pathways. Hence, targeting one of these pathologies with pleiotropic treatment exerts beneficial effect on another one. Combined and expletive treatment of hypertension, lipid disorders, and insulin resistance with nonpharmacological interventions and conventional pharmacotherapy may inhibit the transformation of metabolic disturbances to fully developed cardiovascular disease. This paper summarises the common therapeutic targets for insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammatory reaction at molecular level and analyses the potential pleiotropic effects of drugs used currently in management of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. PMID:27413253

  10. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Implications for The Genesis of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Hsu, Ming-I; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may result in EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction in PCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects. PMID:24520442

  11. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with dysfunctional versus normally functioning congenitally bicuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Perl, Leor; Leshem-Lev, Dorit; Dadush, Oshrat; Bental, Tamir; Shapira, Yaron; Yedidya, Idit; Greenberg, Gabi; Kornowski, Ran; Sagie, Alexander; Battler, Alexander; Lev, Eli I

    2011-07-15

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) may gradually develop significant valve dysfunction, whereas others remain free of dysfunction. Factors that determine the prognosis of BAV remain unclear. Because endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have a role in the repair of endothelial surfaces after injury, we hypothesized that EPCs may also be involved in preventing BAV degeneration. Accordingly, we compared EPC level and function in patients with BAV with versus without valve dysfunction. The study group included 22 patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction (at least moderate aortic regurgitation and/or at least moderate aortic stenosis). The control group included 28 patients with BAV without valve dysfunction. All patients had 1 blood sample taken. Proportion of peripheral mononuclear cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133 and CD34 was evaluated by flow cytometry. EPC colony-forming units (CFUs) were grown from peripheral mononuclear cells, characterized, and counted after 7 days of culture. The 2 groups had similar clinical characteristics except for higher prevalence of hypertension in the dysfunctional valve group. Number of EPC CFUs was smaller in the dysfunctional valve group (32 CFUs/plate, 15 to 42.5, vs 48 CFUs/plate, 30 to 62.5, respectively, p = 0.01), and the migratory capacity of the cells in this group was decreased. In addition, the proportion of cells coexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133, and CD34 tended to be smaller in the dysfunctional valve group. In conclusion, patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction appear to have circulating EPCs with impaired functional properties. These findings require validation by further studies.

  12. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA-binding proteins in vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xin, HongBo; Deng, KeYu; Fu, MinGui

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative and migratory capacity of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular complications, sepsis-induced or severe virus infection-induced organ injuries. The expressions of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules induced by various stimuli, such as modified lipids, smoking, advanced glycation end products and bacteria toxin, significantly contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. The transcriptional regulation of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules has been well-studied. However, the regulation of those gene expressions at post-transcriptional level is emerging. RNA-binding proteins have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level in microRNA-dependent or independent manners. This review summarizes the latest insights into the roles of RNA-binding proteins in controlling vascular endothelial cell functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  13. Association Between the Female Athlete Triad and Endothelial Dysfunction in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Anne Z.; Papanek, Paula; Szabo, Aniko; Widlansky, Michael E.; Schimke, Jane E.; Gutterman, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of the 3 components of the female athlete triad [disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, low bone mineral density (BMD)] and their relationships with brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in professional dancers. Design Prospective study. Setting Academic institution in the Midwest. Participants Twenty-two professional ballet dancers volunteered for this study. Interventions The prevalence of the female athlete triad and its relationship to endothelial dysfunction. Main Outcome Measures Subjects completed questionnaires to assess disordered eating and menstrual status/history. They also completed a 3-day food record and wore an accelerometer for 3 days to determine energy availability. Serum baseline thyrotropin, prolactin, and hormonal concentrations were obtained. Bone mineral density and body composition were measured with a GE Lunar Prodigy dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Endothelial function was determined as flow-mediated vasodilation measured by high-frequency ultrasound in the brachial artery. An increase in brachial diameter <5% to hyperemic flow stimulus was defined a priori as endothelial dysfunction. Results Seventeen dancers (77%) had evidence of low/negative energy availability. Thirty-two percent had disordered eating (EDE-Q score). Thirty-six percent had menstrual dysfunction and 14% were currently using hormone contraception. Twenty-three percent had evidence of low bone density (Z-score < −1.0). Sixty-four percent had abnormal brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (<5%). Flow-mediated dilation values were significantly correlated with serum estrogen and whole-body and lumbar BMD. All the 3 components of the triad plus endothelial dysfunction were present in 14% of the subjects. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction was correlated with reduced BMD, menstrual dysfunction, and low serum estrogen. These findings may have profound implications for cardiovascular and bone health in professional women dancers

  14. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report.

    PubMed

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S; Anthony, Brian W; Manini, Todd M

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  15. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report

    PubMed Central

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S.; Anthony, Brian W.; Manini, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  16. Endothelial activation and dysfunction in the pathogenesis of influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan M; Darwish, Ilyse; Lee, Warren L

    2013-01-01

    The development of severe influenza has been attributed, in part, to a heightened innate immune response. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial activation, loss of barrier function, and consequent microvascular leak may also serve important mechanistic roles in the pathogenesis of severe influenza. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence in support of endothelial activation and dysfunction as a central feature preceding the development of severe influenza. We also discuss the effect of influenza on platelet–endothelial interactions. PMID:23863601

  17. Glucose and angiotensin II-derived endothelial extracellular vesicles regulate endothelial dysfunction via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Hida, Mari; Narimatsu, Haruka; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2017-02-01

    In various diseases, including diabetes, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been detected in circulation and tissues. EVs are small membrane vesicles released from various cell types under varying conditions. Recently, endothelial cell-derived EVs (EEVs) were identified as a marker of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes, but the ensuing mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we dissected the ensuing pathways with respect to nitric oxide (NO) production under the condition of type 2 diabetes. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with glucose alone and with glucose in combination with angiotensin II (Ang II) for 48 h. In supernatants from glucose + Ang II-stimulated HUVECs, release of EEVs was assessed using Western blotting with an anti-CD144 antibody. EEV release was significantly increased after stimulation of HUVECs, and high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs impaired ACh-induced vascular relaxation responses and NO production in mice aortic rings. Furthermore, high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs induced ERK1/2 signalling and decreased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression in mice aortas. Furthermore, in the presence of the MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, high glucose plus Ang II treatment stimulated EEVs in HUVECs and those EEVs prevented the impairments of ACh-induced relaxation and NO production in mice aortas. These data strongly indicate that high glucose and Ang II directly affect endothelial cells and the production of EEVs; the resultant EEVs aggravate endothelial dysfunction by regulating eNOS protein levels and ERK1/2 signalling in mice aortas.

  18. Time Course of Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Decompression Bubbles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Haowen; Liu, Yinuo; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Decompression stress can cause endothelial injury, leading to systematic inflammation and prothrombotic phenomena. Our previous work found that endothelial injury following decompression correlated positively with bubble formation. This study aimed to investigate the time course of endothelial injury and the relationship with bubble amounts. Rats were subjected to a simulated air dive to 7 ATA for 90 min with rapid decompression. Bubbles were detected ultrasonically at the root of pulmonary arteries following decompression. Surviving rats were randomly divided into six groups according to sampling time following decompression (2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h). Three parameters, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were identified from our previous study and measured. The level of MDA reached a peak level at 12 h post decompression, and then decreased gradually to control level before 72 h. For both ET-1 and ICAM-1, the greatest expression appeared at 24 h following surfacing, and the increases lasted for more than 72 h. These changes correlated positively with bubble counts at most detection time points. This study reveals the progress of endothelial dysfunction following decompression which provides guidance for timing the determination at least for the current model. The results further verify that bubbles are the causative agents of decompression induced endothelial damage and bubble amounts are an objective and suitable parameter to predict endothelial dysfunction. Most importantly, levels of endothelial biomarkers post dive may serve as sensitive parameters for assessing bubble load and decompression stress. PMID:28386238

  19. HIV antiretroviral drug combination induces endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production, but not apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Li, Yuchi; Mathis, J. Michael; Alexander, J. Steven; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2007-10-01

    Numerous reports now indicate that HIV patients administered long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at a greater risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction is an initiating event in atherogenesis and may contribute to HIV-associated atherosclerosis. We previously reported that ART induces direct endothelial dysfunction in rodents. In vitro treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with ART indicated endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we determined whether ART-induced endothelial dysfunction is mediated via mitochondria-derived ROS and whether this mitochondrial injury culminates in endothelial cell apoptosis. Two major components of ART combination therapy, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor, were tested, using AZT and indinavir as representatives for each. Microscopy utilizing fluorescent indicators of ROS and mitochondria demonstrated the mitochondrial localization of ART-induced ROS. MnTBAP, a cell-permeable metalloporphyrin antioxidant, abolished ART-induced ROS production. As a final step in confirming the mitochondrial origin of the ART-induced ROS, HUVEC were transduced with a cytosolic- compared to a mitochondria-targeted catalase. Transduction with the mitochondria-targeted catalase was more effective than cytoplasmic catalase in inhibiting the ROS and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) produced after treatment with either AZT or indinavir. However, both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic catalase attenuated ROS and 8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}} production induced by the combination treatment, suggesting that in this case, the formation of cytoplasmic ROS may also occur, and thus, that the mechanism of toxicity in the combination treatment group may be different compared to treatment with AZT or indinavir alone. Finally, to determine whether ART-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and

  20. Chronic Inhibition of PPAR-γ Signaling Induces Endothelial Dysfunction In The Juvenile Lamb

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Barton, Jubilee; Rafikov, Ruslan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that the development of endothelial dysfunction in lambs with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) correlates with a decrease in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) signaling. Thus, in this study we determined if the loss of PPAR-γ signaling is necessary and sufficient to induce endothelial dysfunction by exposing lambs with normal PBF to the PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662. Two-weeks of exposure to GW9662 significantly decreased both PPAR-γ protein and activity. In addition, although eNOS protein and nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) were significantly increased, endothelial dependent pulmonary vasodilation in response to acetylcholine was attenuated, indicative of endothelial dysfunction. To elucidate whether downstream mediators of vasodilation were impaired we examined soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)- α and β subunit protein, cGMP levels, and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) protein and activity, but we found no significant changes. However, we found that peroxynitrite levels were significantly increased in GW9662-treated lambs and this correlated with a significant increase in protein kinase G-1α (PKG-1α) nitration and a reduction in PKG activity. Peroxynitrite is formed by the interaction of NO with superoxide and we found that there was a significant increase in superoxide generation in GW9662-treated lambs. Further, we identified dysfunctional mitochondria as the primary source of the increased superoxide. Finally, we found that the mitochondrial dysfunction was due to a disruption in carnitine metabolism. We conclude that loss of PPAR-γ signaling is sufficient to induce endothelial dysfunction confirming its important role in maintaining a healthy vasculature. PMID:23257346

  1. Palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC21 mediates endothelial dysfunction in systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Meegan, Jamie E.; Overstreet, Jonathan W.; Yang, Clement G.Y.; Elliott, John A.; Reynolds, Jason J.; Cha, Byeong J.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Mitchell, David A.; Wu, Mack H.; Deschenes, Robert J.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of systemic inflammatory response underlying multiple organ failure. Here we report a novel function of DHHC-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs) in mediating endothelial inflammation. Pharmacological inhibition of PATs attenuates barrier leakage and leucocyte adhesion induced by endothelial junction hyperpermeability and ICAM-1 expression during inflammation. Among 11 DHHCs detected in vascular endothelium, DHHC21 is required for barrier response. Mice with DHHC21 function deficiency (Zdhhc21dep/dep) exhibit marked resistance to injury, characterized by reduced plasma leakage, decreased leucocyte adhesion and ameliorated lung pathology, culminating in improved survival. Endothelial cells from Zdhhc21dep/dep display blunted barrier dysfunction and leucocyte adhesion, whereas leucocytes from these mice did not show altered adhesiveness. Furthermore, inflammation enhances PLCβ1 palmitoylation and signalling activity, effects significantly reduced in Zdhhc21dep/dep and rescued by DHHC21 overexpression. Likewise, overexpression of wild-type, not mutant, PLCβ1 augments barrier dysfunction. Altogether, these data suggest the involvement of DHHC21-mediated PLCβ1 palmitoylation in endothelial inflammation. PMID:27653213

  2. Long-lasting partnership between insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction: role of metabolic memory

    PubMed Central

    Tallapragada, Divya Sri Priyanka; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The persistence of deleterious effects of hyperglycaemia even after glucose normalization is referred to as ‘metabolic memory’. However, similar persistent effects of the metabolic consequences of a high fat diet (HFD) have not been described. Experimental Approach Rats were given a normal pellet diet (NPD) or a HFD for 3 months. The animals from the HFD group were then returned to the NPD to observe the long-term effects of insulin resistance. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by carbachol-mediated vasorelaxation and eNOS phosphorylation. Key Results As expected, HFD consumption resulted in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177 was decreased in HFD rats, compared with that in the NPD group. Rats on 3 months of HFD showed glucose intolerance and impaired insulin sensitivity and were then switched back to NPD (REV group). Levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, and adiposity returned to normal in REV rats. However, endothelium-dependent vascular responses to carbachol which were impaired in HFD rats, continued to be impaired in REV rats. Similarly, decreased eNOS phosphorylation after HFD was not improved after 1 or 6 months of REV. Conclusions and Implications Our data indicate that returning to NPD did not improve the insulin sensitivity or the endothelial dysfunction induced by HFD. Although some biochemical parameters responsible for insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction were normalized, molecular and vascular abnormalities, involving NO, persisted for several months, highlighting the long-lasting effects of metabolic memory. PMID:25825057

  3. Methionine cycle kinetics and arginine supplementation in endothelial dysfunction of ESRD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the effect of arginine supplementation on metabolic pathways involved in endothelial dysfunction of end stage renal disease (ESRD), we conducted a study on 11 ESRD patients age 49+/-16; wt 93+/-26 kg receiving an adequate protein and energy intake for 1 week, followed by a primed, con...

  4. [The role of the interferon system in pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, O O; Rybalko, S L

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the serum interferon activity and its relation to the endothelial dysfunction. Atherosclerosis development in patients with metabolic syndrome is followed by significant increase in interferon activity. Close relation presents between activity of the serum interferon and indexes of structural and functional changes of arterial vessels compromised with atherosclerosis process.

  5. Imbalance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk in isocyanate mediated pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Jain, Deepika; Khan, Saba; Pathak, Neelam; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Bhargava, Arpit; Banerjee, Smita; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic investigations coupled with epidemiology, case-control, cohort and observational studies have increasingly linked isocyanate exposure (both chronic and acute) with pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Though ascribed for impairment in endothelial cell function, molecular mechanisms of these significant adverse pulmonary outcomes remains poorly understood. As preliminary studies conducted in past have failed to demonstrate a cause-effect relationship between isocyanate toxicity and compromised pulmonary endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that direct exposure to isocyanate may disrupt endothelial structural lining, resulting in cellular damage. Based on this premise, we comprehensively evaluated the molecular repercussions of methyl isocyanate (MIC) exposure on human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAE-26). We examined MIC-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine response, oxidative DNA damage response and apoptotic index. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MIC, augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, depletion in antioxidant defense enzymes, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine response and induced endothelial cell apoptosis via affecting the balance of mitochondrial-nuclear cross talk. We herein delineate the first and direct molecular cascade of isocyanate-induced pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. The results of our study might portray a connective link between associated respiratory morbidities with isocyanate exposure, and indeed facilitate to discern the exposure-phenotype relationship in observed deficits of pulmonary endothelial cell function. Further, understanding of inter- and intra-cellular signaling pathways involved in isocyanate-induced endothelial damage would not only aid in biomarker identification but also provide potential new avenues to target specific therapeutic interventions.

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R.; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:22474423

  7. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661197

  8. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: possible involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress?

    PubMed

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications.

  9. Excessive stimulation of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation contributes to endothelial dysfunction in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Ian P; Kenny, Louise C; Thornton, Wayne A; Szabo, Csaba; Baker, Philip N

    2004-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious pregnancy disorder associated with widespread activation of the maternal vascular endothelium. Recent evidence implicates a role for oxidative stress in the aetiology of this condition. Reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide anions, invokes endothelial cell activation through many pathways. Oxidant-induced cell injury triggers the activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) leading to endothelial dysfunction in various pathophysiological conditions (reperfusion, shock, diabetes). We have studied whether the loss of endothelial function in pre-eclampsia is dependent on PARP activity. Endothelium-dependent responses of myometrial arteries were tested following exposure to either plasma from women with pre-eclampsia or normal pregnant women in the presence and absence of a novel potent inhibitor of PARP, PJ34. Additional effects of plasma and PJ34 inhibition were identified in microvascular endothelial cell cultures. In myometrial arteries, PARP inhibition blocked the attenuation of endothelium-dependent responses following exposure to plasma from women with pre-eclampsia. In endothelial cell cultures, plasma from pre-eclamptics induced measurable oxidative stress and a concomitant increase in PARP activity and reduction in cellular ATP. Again, these biochemical changes were reversed by PJ34. These results suggest that PARP activity plays a pathogenic role in the development of endothelial dysfunction in pre-eclampsia and promotes PARP inhibition as a potential therapy in this condition. PMID:15778700

  10. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and nutritional compounds in early type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with type 1 diabetes. Vascular endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological precursor of cardiovascular disease. There is extensive evidence that hyperglycemia causes acute perturbations in endothelial function likely due to increases in oxidative damage. Interestingly, oscillating hyperglycemia may cause more damage than persistent hyperglycemia. Many, but not all, studies indicate that vascular endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of type 1 diabetes and is present even in adolescents. Ascorbic acid has been shown to diminish the acute effects of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes and in conjunction with euglycemia to restore endothelial function to normal values in adults with well-controlled diabetes. In vitro and in vivo animal evidence suggests potential benefit from two other small molecule antioxidants, nicotinamide and taurine. Early studies suggested that folate supplementation may improve endothelial function in adolescents with type 1 diabetes but this has not been confirmed by more recent studies. Epidemiological evidence suggests a possible role for vitamin D therapy although intervention studies in type 2 diabetes have yielded varying results and have not been done in type 1 diabetes. Further exploration of these and other compounds is clearly appropriate if we are to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes.

  11. Endocardial Endothelial Dysfunction Progressively Disrupts Initially Anti then Pro-Thrombotic Pathways in Heart Failure Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schoner, Amanda; Tyrrell, Christina; Wu, Melinda; Gelow, Jill M.; Hayes, Alicia A.; Lindner, Jonathan R.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Hasan, Wohaib

    2015-01-01

    Objective An experimental model of endocardial thrombosis has not been developed and endocardial endothelial dysfunction in heart failure (HF) is understudied. We sought to determine whether disruption of the endothelial anti-coagulant activated protein C (APC) pathway in CREBA133 HF mice promotes endocardial thrombosis in the acute decompensated phase of the disease, and whether alterations in von Willebrand factor (vWF) secretion from HF endocardium reduces thrombus formation as HF stabilizes. Approach and results Echocardiography was used to follow HF development and to detect endocardial thrombi in CREBA133 mice. Endocardial thrombi incidence was confirmed with immunohistochemistry and histology. In early and acute decompensated phases of HF, CREBA133 mice had the highest incidence of endocardial thrombi and these mice also had a shorter tail-bleeding index consistent with a pro-thrombotic milieu. Both APC generation, and expression of receptors that promote APC function (thrombomodulin, endothelial protein C receptor, protein S), were suppressed in the endocardium of acute decompensated HF mice. However, in stable compensated HF mice, an attenuation occurred for vWF protein content and secretion from endocardial endothelial cells, vWF-dependent platelet agglutination (by ristocetin), and thrombin generation on the endocardial surface. Conclusions CREBA133 mice develop HF and endocardial endothelial dysfunction. Attenuation of the anti-coagulant APC pathway promotes endocardial thrombosis in early and acute decompensated phases of HF. However, in stable compensated HF mice, disruptions in endothelial vWF expression and extrusion may actually reduce the incidence of endocardial thrombosis. PMID:26565707

  12. Sitting and endothelial dysfunction: The role of shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Thosar, Saurabh S.; Johnson, Blair D.; Johnston, Jeanne D.; Wallace, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sedentary activity is a modifiable life-style behavior and a key component in the etiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). US adults and children spend more than half their waking time in sedentary pursuits. Sedentary activity has been shown to result in impaired insulin sensitivity, impaired metabolic function and attenuated endothelial function, which are classic markers of ACVD. Sedentary activity is defined as ‘sitting without otherwise being active.’ This behavior promotes reduced muscular activity of the lower extremities which decreases leg blood flow, increases blood pooling in the calf, augments mean arterial pressure, and deforms arterial segments resulting in low mean shear stress (SS). SS activates distinct physiological mechanisms which have been proposed to be protective against ACVD; specifically through a SS-induced endothelium-derived nitric oxide mechanism. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide creates a pro-oxidant milieu resulting in increased oxidative stress. There is sufficient evidence which demonstrates that endothelial function is attenuated in the presence of oxidative stress. Sedentary activity results in low SS in the lower extremities which may result in increased oxidative stress and impaired endothelial function. This review furthers the use of sitting as model to study the effects of inactivity, discusses possible physiological mechanisms and suggests future directions. PMID:23197245

  13. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Adam S; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Backman, Joshua D; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A; Mitchell, Braxton D; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R; Wren, Jonathan D; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease.

  14. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Backman, Joshua D.; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Lewis, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  15. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deletion Prevents Diet-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Females.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Ma, Lixin; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Aroor, Annayya R; Domeier, Timothy L; Zhu, Yi; Meininger, Gerald A; Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Jaffe, Iris Z; Sowers, James R

    2015-12-01

    Overnutrition and insulin resistance are especially prominent risk factors for the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in females. We recently reported that consumption of a Western diet (WD) containing excess fat (46%), sucrose (17.5%), and high fructose corn syrup (17.5%) for 16 weeks resulted in cardiac diastolic dysfunction and aortic stiffening in young female mice and that these abnormalities were prevented by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. Herein, we extend those studies by testing whether WD-induced diastolic dysfunction and factors contributing to diastolic impairment, such as cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation, and impaired insulin signaling, are modulated by excess endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Four-week-old female endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice were fed mouse chow or WD for 4 months. WD feeding resulted in prolonged relaxation time, impaired diastolic septal wall motion, and increased left ventricular filling pressure indicative of diastolic dysfunction. This occurred in concert with myocardial interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that were associated with enhanced profibrotic (transforming growth factor β1/Smad) and progrowth (S6 kinase-1) signaling, as well as myocardial oxidative stress and a proinflammatory immune response. WD also induced cardiomyocyte stiffening, assessed ex vivo using atomic force microscopy. Conversely, endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency prevented WD-induced diastolic dysfunction, profibrotic, and progrowth signaling, in conjunction with reductions in macrophage proinflammatory polarization and improvements in insulin metabolic signaling. Therefore, our findings indicate that increased endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling associated with consumption of a WD plays a key role in the activation of cardiac profibrotic, inflammatory, and growth pathways that lead to diastolic dysfunction in

  16. Effects of Constituent Compounds of Smilax china on Nicotine-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lincha, Victor Ruberio; Zhao, Bing-Tian; Woo, Mi-Hee; Yang, In-Jun; Shin, Heung-Mook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of compounds isolated from 70% ethanol (EtOH) extraction of Smilax china L. (SCE), a plant belonging to the family Smilacaceae on nicotine-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We isolated 10 compounds from ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of 70% EtOH extract of SCE and investigated their inhibitory effect on nicotine-induced ED in endothelial cells. Kaempferol, kaempferol 7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, puerarin and ferulic acid showed strong inhibition of nicotine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression while kaempferol, kaempferin, and caffeic acid attenuated intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression. Lepidoside, caffeic acid and methylsuccinic acid caused the highest up-regulated expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at the protein level with caffeic acid and ferulic acid showing strong inhibitory effects on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In addition, ferulic acid and kaempferol showed inhibition against interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression while ferulic acid and caffeic acid showed comparatively higher inhibition of ED associated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. These results show the potential of the aforementioned compounds to reverse the toxic effects of nicotine on the endothelium.

  17. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  18. Comparative Analysis of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Patients Using Automated Rare Cell Analysis (ARCA) and Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.; Melamud, Alex; Esserman, Denise Ann; Povsic, Thomas J.; Chavala, Sai H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) begin with non-neovascular (NNV) phenotypes usually associated with good vision. Approximately 20% of NNV-ARMD patients will convert to vision debilitating neovascular (NV) ARMD, but precise timing of this event is unknown. Developing a clinical test predicting impending conversion to NV-ARMD is necessary to prevent vision loss. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), defined as CD34+VEGR2+ using traditional fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), are rare cell populations known to be elevated in patients with NV-ARMD compared to NNV-ARMD. FACS has high inter-observer variability and subjectivity when measuring rare cell populations precluding development into a diagnostic test. We hypothesized that automated rare cell analysis (ARCA), a validated and FDA-approved technology for reproducible rare cell identification, can enumerate EPCs in ARMD patients more reliably. This pilot study serves as the first step in developing methods for reproducibly predicting ARMD phenotype conversion. Methods We obtained peripheral venous blood samples in 23 subjects with NNV-ARMD or treatment naïve NV-ARMD. Strict criteria were used to exclude subjects with known angiogenic diseases to minimize confounding results. Blood samples were analyzed in masked fashion in two separate laboratories. EPCs were independently enumerated using ARCA and FACS within 24 hours of blood sample collection, and p<0.2 was considered indicative of a trend for this proof of concept study, while statistical significance was established at 0.05. Results We measured levels of CD34+VEGFR2+ EPCs suggestive of a trend with higher values in patients with NV compared to NNV-ARMD (p = 0.17) using ARCA. Interestingly, CD34+VEGR2+ EPC analysis using FACS did not produce similar results (p = 0.94). Conclusions CD34+VEGR2+ may have predictive value for EPC enumeration in future ARCA studies. EPC measurements in a small sample size were

  19. Chronic treatment with qiliqiangxin ameliorates aortic endothelial cell dysfunction in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Wu, Jia-Le; Fu, Guo-Sheng; Mou, Yun; Hu, Shen-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Qiliqiangxin (QL), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to be beneficial for chronic heart failure. However, whether QL can also improve endothelial cell function in diabetic rats remains unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of QL treatment on endothelial dysfunction by comparing the effect of QL to that of benazepril (Ben) in diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats for 8 weeks. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and catheterization. Assays for acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR), sodium nitroprusside-induced endothelium-independent relaxation, serum nitric oxide (NO), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as histological analyses were performed to assess endothelial function. Diabetic rats showed significantly inhibited cardiac function and EDR, decreased expression of serum NO and phosphorylation at Ser(1177) on endothelial NOS (eNOS), and impaired endothelial integrity after 8 weeks. Chronic treatment for 8 weeks with either QL or Ben prevented the inhibition of cardiac function and EDR and the decrease in serum NO and eNOS phosphorylation caused by diabetes. Moreover, either QL or Ben suppressed inducible NOS (iNOS) protein levels as well as endothelial necrosis compared with the diabetic rats. Additionally, QL prevented the increase in angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 and angiotensin II receptor type 1 in diabetes. Thus, chronic administration of QL improved serum NO production, EDR, and endothelial integrity in diabetic rat aortas, possibly through balancing eNOS and iNOS activity and decreasing renin-angiotensin system expression.

  20. Infliximab improves endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of antiphospholipid syndrome: Role of reduced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Ygal; Miranda, Sébastien; Armengol, Guillaume; Harouki, Najah; Drouot, Laurent; Zahr, Noel; Thuillez, Christian; Boyer, Olivier; Levesque, Hervé; Joannides, Robinson; Richard, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), induces endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and systemic inflammation that may be mediated by TNFα. Thus, we investigated the possible protective effect of the anti-TNFα antibody infliximab (5μg/g) on endothelial function in a mouse APS model (induced by injection of purified human anti-β2GP1-IgG). Seven days after anti-β2GPI-IgG injection, we observed an increase in plasma sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin levels and in aortic mRNA expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin. This was associated with a decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated mesenteric arteries to acetylcholine, together with decreased mesenteric eNOS mRNA expression and increased eNOS uncoupling, accompanied by increased iNOS and gp91phox mRNA and increased left ventricular GSH/GSSH ratio. Infliximab significantly improved the NO-mediated relaxing responses to acetylcholine, and induced a decrease in iNOS and gp91phox mRNA expression. The õpro-adhesive and pro-coagulant phenotypes induced by the anti-β2GP1-IgG were also reversed. This study provides the first evidence that TNFα antagonism improves endothelial dysfunction in APS and suggests that endothelial dysfunction is mediated by TNFα and oxidative stress. Therefore, infliximab may be of special relevance in clinical practice.

  1. Effects of Huang Qi Decoction on Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction can be induced by homocysteine (Hcy) through promoted oxidative stress. Huang Qi decoction (HQD) is a traditional Chinese medical formula and its components possess antioxidant effect. The study herein was therefore designed to investigate the effects of HQD at different dosage on endothelial dysfunction induced by Hcy. Tempol and apocynin were used to investigate whether antioxidant mechanisms were involved. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat aortas was investigated by isometric tension recordings. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by DHE staining. The assessment related to oxidative stress and NO bioavailability was performed by assay kits and western blot. In isometric tension experiment, HQD at the dose of 30 or 100 μg/mL, tempol, or apocynin prevented impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated aortas elicited by Hcy. In cellular experiments, substantial enhancement in NADPH oxidase and ROS generation and reduction in NO bioavailability triggered by Hcy were reversed by pretreatment of HQD at the dose of 100 μg/mL, tempol, or apocynin. The results proved that HQD at an appropriate dosage presented favorable effects on endothelial dysfunction initiated by Hcy through antioxidant mechanisms. HQD can act as a potent prescription for the treatment of endothelium related vascular complications. PMID:27725840

  2. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  3. Lack of Fibronectin Extra Domain A Alternative Splicing Exacerbates Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gortan Cappellari, Gianluca; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cattin, Luigi; Muro, Andrés F.; Zanetti, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-induced changes of artery anatomy and function account for diabetic vascular complications, which heavily impact disease morbidity and mortality. Since fibronectin containing extra domain A (EDA + FN) is increased in diabetic vessels and participates to vascular remodeling, we wanted to elucidate whether and how EDA + FN is implicated in diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction using isometric-tension recording in a murine model of diabetes. In thoracic aortas of EDA−/−, EDA+/+ (constitutively lacking and expressing EDA + FN respectively), and of wild-type mice (EDAwt/wt), streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes impaired endothelial vasodilation to acetylcholine, irrespective of genotype. However STZ + EDA−/− mice exhibited increased endothelial dysfunction compared with STZ + EDA+/+ and with STZ + EDAwt/wt. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms revealed that STZ + EDA−/− mice show increased oxidative stress as demonstrated by enhanced aortic superoxide anion, nitrotyrosine levels and expression of NADPH oxidase NOX4 and TGF-β1, the last two being reverted by treatment with the antioxidant n-acetylcysteine. In contrast, NOX1 expression and antioxidant potential were similar in aortas from the three genotypes. Interestingly, reduced eNOS expression in STZ + EDA+/+ vessels is counteracted by increased eNOS coupling and function. Although EDA + FN participates to vascular remodelling, these findings show that it plays a crucial role in limiting diabetic endothelial dysfunction by preventing vascular oxidative stress. PMID:27897258

  4. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E; Chen, Alex F; Gladwin, Mark T; McVerry, Bryan J

    2014-12-15

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature.

  5. Hypercholesterolemia increases coronary endothelial dysfunction, lipid content, and accelerated atherosclerosis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, L P; Mahlberg, F; Breugnot, C; Bidouard, J P; Villeneuve, N; Vilaine, J P; Vanhoutte, P M

    2000-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia may increase endothelial damage and promote accelerated atherogenesis in graft coronary vasculopathy. To study the effects of hypercholesterolemia on coronary endothelial dysfunction, intimal hyperplasia, and lipid content, a porcine model of heterotopic heart transplantation, allowing nonacute rejection without immunosuppressive drugs, was used. A high cholesterol diet was fed to donor and recipient swine 1 month before and after transplantation. The endothelial function of coronary arteries of native and transplanted hearts from cholesterol-fed animals was studied in organ chambers 30 days after implantation and compared with endothelial function in arteries from animals fed a normal diet. The total serum cholesterol increased 3-fold in donors and recipients. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to serotonin, to the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist UK14,304, and to the direct G-protein activator sodium fluoride were decreased significantly in allografted hearts compared with native hearts from both groups. Relaxations to the calcium ionophore A23187 and bradykinin were decreased significantly in allografts from animals fed the high cholesterol diet. The prevalence of intimal hyperplasia was significantly increased in coronary arteries from hypercholesterolemic swine. There was a significant increase in the lipid content of allograft arteries of hypercholesterolemic recipients. Hypercholesterolemia causes a general coronary endothelial dysfunction, increases the prevalence of intimal hyperplasia, and augments the incorporation of lipids in the vascular wall after heart transplantation. Hyperlipidemia accelerates graft coronary atherosclerosis through its effects on the endothelium.

  6. Fluctuating plasma phosphorus level by changes in dietary phosphorus intake induces endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Tanaka, Terumi; Ohminami, Hirokazu; Abuduli, Maerjianghan; Harada, Nagakatsu; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    High serum phosphorus (P) impairs endothelial function by increasing oxidative stress and decreasing nitric oxide production. Serum P levels fluctuate due to circadian rhythms or dietary P intake in healthy people and due to dialysis in end-stage chronic kidney disease patients. Here we examined whether fluctuating plasma P caused by changes in dietary P intake may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased cardiovascular risk. Rats were fed a diet containing 0.6% P for 16 days (control group), or a diet alternating between 0.02% P and 1.2% P (LH group) or between 1.2% P and 0.02% P (HL group) every 2 days; the total amount of P intake among the groups during the feeding period was similar. In the LH and HL groups, endothelial-dependent vasodilation significantly decreased plasma 8-(OH)dG level significantly increased, and the expression of inflammatory factors such as MCP-1 increased in the endothelium as compared with the control group. These data indicate that repetitive fluctuations of plasma P caused by varying dietary P intake can impair endothelial function via increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Taken together, these results suggest that habitual fluctuation of dietary P intake might be a cause of cardiovascular disease through endothelial dysfunction, especially in chronic kidney disease patients.

  7. Resveratrol rescues hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction via activation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-yi; Huang, Wei-qiang; Tu, Rong-hui; Zhong, Guo-qiang; Luo, Bei-bei; He, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a phytoalexin, has shown to prevent endothelial dysfunction and reduce diabetic vascular complications and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling mechanisms underlying the protecting effects of RSV against endothelial dysfunction during hyperglycemia in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with RSV, and then exposed to high glucose (HG, 30 mmol/L). Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation, and PTEN protein levels in the cells were detected using Western blot. For in vivo studies, WT and Akt−/− mice were fed a normal diet containing RSV (400 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 2 weeks, then followed by injection of STZ to induce hyperglycemia (300 mg/dL). Endothelial function was evaluated using aortic rings by assessing ACh-induced vasorelaxation. RSV (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, accompanied by increased eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation in HUVECs; these effects were more prominent under HG stimulation. Transfection with Akt siRNA abolished RSV-enhanced eNOS phosphorylation and NO release. Furthermore, RSV (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased the levels of PTEN, which was significantly increased under HG stimulation, and PTEN overexpression abolished RSV-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in HG-treated HUVECs. Moreover, RSV dramatically increased 26S proteasome activity, which induced degradation of PTEN. In in vivo studies, pretreatment with RSV significantly increased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation in aortic tissues and ACh-induced vasorelaxation, and improved diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in wild-type mice but not in Akt−/− mice. RSV attenuates endothelial function during hyperglycemia via activating proteasome-dependent degradation of PTEN, which increases Akt phosphorylation, and consequentially upregulation of eNOS-derived NO production. PMID:27941804

  8. Usefulness of retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction as a predictor of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Fiadh, Ali H; Wong, Tien Y; Kawasaki, Ryo; Clark, David J; Patel, Sheila K; Freeman, Melanie; Wilson, Andrew; Burrell, Louise M; Farouque, Omar

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of atherosclerosis. Retinal microvascular endothelial function can be assessed using noninvasive dynamic vessel imaging techniques. Whether it is impaired in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the relation of retinal microvascular endothelial function with CAD. Vascular studies were performed in 197 prospectively recruited subjects divided into 2 groups: those without CAD but ≥2 cardiovascular risk factors (non-CAD controls; n = 119) and those with stable CAD (n = 78). Retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction was assessed by measuring retinal arteriolar and venular dilatation to flicker light, a nitric oxide-dependent phenomenon, expressed as percentage increase over baseline diameter. Fingertip pulse-volume amplitude was measured to calculate reactive hyperaemia index and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation assessed as measures of peripheral microvascular and conduit vessel endothelial function, respectively. Mean retinal arteriolar dilatation was attenuated in patients with CAD compared with non-CAD controls (1.51 ± 1.51% vs 2.37 ± 1.95%, p = 0.001). Retinal arteriolar dilatation was independently associated with CAD after adjustment for age, gender, cardiovascular risk factors, and medication use (odds ratio 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 2.25, p = 0.007). Reactive hyperaemia index and flow-mediated dilatation were not different. In conclusion, the capacity of retinal arterioles to dilate in response to flicker light is an independent predictor of the presence of CAD and suggests that retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction is a marker for underlying CAD.

  9. Postprandial elevation of remnant lipoprotein leads to endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Funada, Jun-ichi; Sekiya, Michihito; Hamada, Mareomi; Hiwada, Kunio

    2002-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of cholesterol in the form of remnant-like particles (RLP-C) induce deterioration of endothelial function during the fasting state, but it is not known whether postprandial RLP-C elevation has the same effect. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of postprandial RLP-C elevation on endothelial function in 24 fasting normolipidemic subjects. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) during reactive hyperemia in the brachial artery was investigated. Serum lipids and lipoproteins during fasting and 4h after regular fat-loading were measured. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: the high responders (postprandial RLP-C level >7.5mg/dl, n=8) and the normal responders (postprandial RLP-C level < or =7.5mg/dl, n=16). Significant increases in the level of both triglycerides and RLP-C were observed in the high responders. Basal FMD in the high responders (4.3+/-3.0%) was significantly lower than that in the normal responders (8.3+/-2.4%) (p<0.01), but FMD after the fat-loading in both groups did not change significantly. The change in RLP-C levels during the fat-loading test correlated significantly with basal FMD (r=-0.588, p<0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation between basal FMD and the change in RLP-C levels (r=-0.488, p<0.02). The results of this study suggest that postprandial RLP-C elevation could be associated with atherosclerotic progression even in normolipidemic subjects.

  10. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  11. O-GlcNAcase overexpression reverses coronary endothelial cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Ayako; Dai, Anzhi; Han, Ying; Youssef, Katia D; Wang, Weihua; Donthamsetty, Reshma; Scott, Brian T; Wang, Hong; Dillmann, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes, and endothelial dysfunction is commonly seen in these patients. Increased O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) protein modification is one of the central pathogenic features of diabetes. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) is regulated by two key enzymes: β-N-acetylglucosaminidase [O-GlcNAcase (OGA)], which catalyzes the reduction of protein O-GlcNAcylation, and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which induces O-GlcNAcylation. However, it is not known whether reducing O-GlcNAcylation can improve endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. To examine the effect of endothelium-specific OGA overexpression on protein O-GlcNAcylation and coronary endothelial function in diabetic mice, we generated tetracycline-inducible, endothelium-specific OGA transgenic mice, and induced OGA by doxycycline administration in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. OGA protein expression was significantly decreased in mouse coronary endothelial cells (MCECs) isolated from diabetic mice compared with control MCECs, whereas OGT protein level was markedly increased. The level of protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in diabetic compared with control mice, and OGA overexpression significantly decreased the level of protein O-GlcNAcylation in MCECs from diabetic mice. Capillary density in the left ventricle and endothelium-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries were significantly decreased in diabetes, while OGA overexpression increased capillary density to the control level and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation without changing endothelium-independent relaxation. We found that connexin 40 could be the potential target of O-GlcNAcylation that regulates the endothelial functions in diabetes. These data suggest that OGA overexpression in endothelial cells improves endothelial function and may have a beneficial effect on coronary vascular complications in diabetes.

  12. Effects of Fuscoporia obliqua on postprandial glucose excursion and endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Maenaka, Toshihiro; Oshima, Masami; Itokawa, Yuka; Masubuchi, Takashi; Takagi, Yasuyuki; Choi, Jung-Sook; Ishida, Torao; Gu, Yeunhwa

    2008-03-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia has been reported to elicit endothelial dysfunction and provoke future cardiovascular complications. A reduction of postprandial blood glucose levels by the glucosidase inhibitor Fuscoporia obliqua was associated with a risk reduction of cardiovascular complications, but the effects of Fuscoporia obliqua on endothelial function have never been elucidated. This study is aimed to assess the efficacy of Fuscoporia obliqua on postprandial metabolic parameters and endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients. Postprandial peak glucose (14.47 +/- 1.27 vs. 8.50 +/- 0.53 mmol/liter), plasma glucose excursion (PPGE), and change in the area under the curve (AUC) glucose after a single loading of test meal (total 450 kcal; protein 15.3%; fat 32.3%; carbohydrate 51.4%) were significantly higher in the diet-treated type 2 diabetic patients (n=14) than the age- and sex-matched controls (n=12). The peak forearm blood flow response and total reactive hyperemic flow (flow debt repayment) during reactive hyperemia, indices of resistance artery endothelial function on strain-gauge plethysmography, were unchanged before and after meal loading in the controls. But those of the diabetics were significantly decreased 120 and 240 min after the test meal. A prior administration of Fuscoporia obliqua decreased postprandial peak glucose, PPGE, and AUC glucose. The peak forearm blood flow and flow debt repayment were inversely well correlated with peak glucose, PPGE, and AUC glucose, but not with AUC insulin or the other lipid parameters. Even a single loading of the test meal was shown to impair the endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients, and the postprandial endothelial dysfunction was improved by a prior use of Fuscoporia obliqua. Fuscoporia obliqua might reduce macrovascular complication by avoiding endothelial injury in postprandial hyperglycemic status.

  13. Inhibition of Aberrant MicroRNA-133a Expression in Endothelial Cells by Statin Prevents Endothelial Dysfunction by Targeting GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Yin, Ya-Ling; Guo, Tao; Sun, Xue-Ying; Ma, Hui; Zhu, Mo-Li; Zhao, Fan-Rong; Xu, Ping; Chen, Yuan; Wan, Guang-Rui; Jiang, Fan; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Liu, Chao; Liu, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) deficiency is critical for endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. We investigated whether statins prevent endothelial dysfunction via miR-dependent GCH1 upregulation. Methods: Endothelial function was assessed by measuring acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in the organ chamber. MiR-133a expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results: We first demonstrated that GCH1 mRNA is a target of miR-133a. In endothelial cells, miR-133a was robustly induced by cytokines/oxidants and inhibited by lovastatin. Furthermore, lovastatin upregulated GCH1 and tetrahydrobiopterin, and recoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase in stressed endothelial cells. These actions of lovastatin were abolished by enforced miR-133a expression and were mirrored by a miR-133a antagomir. In mice, hyperlipidemia- or hyperglycemia-induced ectopic miR-133a expression in the vascular endothelium, reduced GCH1 protein and tetrahydrobiopterin levels, and impaired endothelial function, which were reversed by lovastatin or miR-133a antagomir. These beneficial effects of lovastatin in mice were abrogated by in vivo miR-133a overexpression or GCH1 knockdown. In rats, multiple cardiovascular risk factors including hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia resulted in increased miR-133a vascular expression, reduced GCH1 expression, uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase function, and induced endothelial dysfunction, which were prevented by lovastatin. Conclusions: Statin inhibits aberrant miR-133a expression in the vascular endothelium to prevent endothelial dysfunction by targeting GCH1. Therefore, miR-133a represents an important therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27765794

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction and Blood Viscosity Inpatients with Unstable Angina in Different Periods of a Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshina, S. S.; Tokaeva, L. K.; Dolgova, E. M.; Afanas'yeva, T. N.; Strelnikova, O. A.

    The origin of hemorheologic and endothelial defects in patients with unstable angina (comparing with healthy persons) is determined by a solar activity period: the blood viscosity increases in a period of high solar activity in the vessels of small, medium and macro diameters, a local decompensate dysfunction of small vessels endothelium had been fixed (microcirculation area). In the period of a low solar activity there is an increase of a blood viscosity in vessels of all diameters, generalized subcompensated endothelial dysfunction is developed (on the background of the III phase blood clotting activating). In the period of a high solar activity a higher blood viscosity had been fixed, comparing with the period of a low solar activity.

  15. Emerging therapeutic strategies to prevent infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that loss of endothelial barrier function and resulting microvascular leak play important mechanistic roles in the pathogenesis of infection-related end-organ dysfunction and failure. Several distinct therapeutic strategies, designed to prevent or limit infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and permeability, thereby mitigating end-organ injury/dysfunction, have recently been investigated in pre-clinical models. In this review, these potential therapeutic strategies, namely, VEGFR2/Src antagonists, sphingosine-1-phosphate agonists, fibrinopeptide Bβ15–42, slit2N, secinH3, angiopoietin-1/tie-2 agonists, angiopoietin-2 antagonists, statins, atrial natriuretic peptide, and mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells, are discussed in terms of their translational potential for the management of clinical infectious diseases. PMID:23863603

  16. Endothelial Dysfunction and Diabetes: Effects on Angiogenesis, Vascular Remodeling, and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by inappropriate hyperglycemia due to lack of or resistance to insulin. Patients with DM are frequently afflicted with ischemic vascular disease or wound healing defect. It is well known that type 2 DM causes amplification of the atherosclerotic process, endothelial cell dysfunction, glycosylation of extracellular matrix proteins, and vascular denervation. These complications ultimately lead to impairment of neovascularization and diabetic wound healing. Therapeutic angiogenesis remains an attractive treatment modality for chronic ischemic disorders including PAD and/or diabetic wound healing. Many experimental studies have identified better approaches for diabetic cardiovascular complications, however, successful clinical translation has been limited possibly due to the narrow therapeutic targets of these agents or the lack of rigorous evaluation of pathology and therapeutic mechanisms in experimental models of disease. This paper discusses the current body of evidence identifying endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis during diabetes. PMID:22611498

  17. Single administration of vildagliptin attenuates postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and endothelial dysfunction in normoglycemic individuals.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kaoru; Hirota, Minoru; Miyoshi, Toru; Tani, Yoshinori; Noda, Yoko; Ito, Hiroshi; Nanba, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia impairs endothelial function and plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to examine the postprandial effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin and the α-glucosidase inhibitor voglibose on endothelial dysfunction and lipid profiles following a single administration. A randomized cross-over trial using 11 normoglycemic individuals was performed. The postprandial effects of a single administration of vildagliptin (50 mg) or voglibose (0.3 mg) on endothelial function were analyzed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and lipid profiles during fasting and 1.5 and 3 h after an oral cookie-loading test. Compared with voglibose, vildagliptin significantly suppressed postprandial endothelial dysfunction, (%FMD, -1.6±0.9 vildagliptin vs. -4.0±0.7 voglibose; P=0.01) and the postprandial incremental increase in the triglyceride level (28±18 vildagliptin vs. 51±26 mg/dl voglibose; P=0.01) 3 h after a cookie-loading test. In addition, vildagliptin significantly increased the levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 compared with voglibose 3 h after a loading cookie test (4.4±0.6 vs. 2.9±0.7 pmol/l, respectively; P=0.04). No significant differences in the levels of glucose, apolipoprotein B-48, glucagon or insulin were observed between vildagliptin and voglibose treatments. In conclusion, a single administration of vildagliptin attenuated postprandial endothelial dysfunction and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, suggesting that vildagliptin may be a promising antiatherogenic agent.

  18. Impact of diabetic serum on endothelial cells: An in-vitro-analysis of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus type 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muenzel, Daniela; Lehle, Karla Haubner, Frank; Schmid, Christof; Birnbaum, Dietrich E.; Preuner, Juergen G.

    2007-10-19

    Diabetic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by altered levels of adhesion molecules and cytokines. Aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of diabetic serum on cell-growth and proinflammatory markers in human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) from diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic serum showed (1) complementary proliferative activity for non-diabetic and diabetic HSVEC, (2) unchanged surface expression of adhesion molecules, and (3) elevated levels of sICAM-1 in HSVEC of all donors. The concentration of sVCAM-1 was increased only in diabetic cells. The proinflammatory state of diabetic HSVEC characterized by increased levels of cytokines was compensated. We concluded that even under normoglycemic conditions the serum itself contains critical factors leading to abnormal regulation of inflammation in diabetics. We introduced an in vitro model of diabetes representing the endothelial situation at the beginning of diabetes (non-diabetic cells/diabetic serum) as well as the diabetic chronic state (diabetic cells/diabetic serum)

  19. The Krebs cycle and mitochondrial mass are early victims of endothelial dysfunction: proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Addabbo, Francesco; Ratliff, Brian; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Ciszar, Anna; Krasnikov, Boris; Krasnikof, Boris; Sodhi, Komal; Zhang, Fung; Nasjletti, Alberto; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with bioavailable nitric oxide deficiency and an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. We modeled this condition by chronically inhibiting nitric oxide generation with subpressor doses of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) in C57B6 and Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mouse strains. L-NMMA-treated mice exhibited a slight reduction in vasorelaxation ability, as well as detectable abnormalities in soluble adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and matrix metalloproteinase 9), which represent surrogate indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis of the isolated microvasculature using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy revealed abnormal expression of a cluster of mitochondrial enzymes, which was confirmed using immunodetection. Aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 expression levels were decreased in L-NMMA-treated animals; this phenotype was absent in nitric oxide synthase-1 and -3 knockout mice. Depletion of aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1 resulted in the inhibition of the Krebs cycle and enhanced pyruvate shunting toward the glycolytic pathway. To assess mitochondrial mass in vivo, co-localization of green fluorescent protein and MitoTracker fluorescence was detected by intravital microscopy. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity showed that L-NMMA-treated animals exhibited lower fluorescence of MitoTracker in microvascular endothelia as a result of reduced mitochondrial mass. These findings provide conclusive and unbiased evidence that mitochondriopathy represents an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction, shifting cell metabolism toward "metabolic hypoxia" through the selective depletion of both aconitase-2 and enoyl-CoA-hydratase-1. These findings may contribute to an early preclinical diagnosis of endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Assessment of endothelial dysfunction in patients with impaired glucose tolerance during a cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Elena; Podtaev, Sergey; Mizeva, Irina; Loran, Evgenia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to explore changes in microvascular tone during a contralateral cold pressor test and to compare the results obtained in healthy subjects and in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes. Low-amplitude fluctuations of skin temperature in the appropriate frequency ranges were used as a characteristic for the mechanism for vascular tone regulation. In total, 13 adults with type 2 diabetes aged 40-67 years and 18 adults with IGT aged 31-60 years participated in this pilot study. The control group included 12 healthy men and women aged 39-60 years. The response to the cold pressor test in patients with type 2 diabetes and with IGT differs essentially from that of healthy subjects in the endothelial frequency range. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in the preclinical stage of diabetes and manifests, in particular, as a disturbance of the endothelial part of vascular tone regulation.

  1. The role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling in hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Devendra A; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A; Childs, Ed W

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock leads to endothelial cell barrier dysfunction resulting in microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. The results from our laboratory have illustrated a possible pathophysiological mechanism showing involvement of mitochondria-mediated "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling in regulating hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock results in overexpression of Bcl-2 family of pro-apoptotic protein, BAK, in the microvascular endothelial cells. The increase in BAK initiates "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling cascade with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in the cytoplasm and activation of downstream effector caspase-3, leading to loss of endothelial cell barrier integrity. Thus, this review article offers a brief overview of important findings from our past and present research work along with new leads for future research. The summary of our research work will provide information leading to different avenues in developing novel strategies against microvascular hyperpermeability following hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Arterial erectile dysfunction and peripheral arterial disease: reliability of a new phenotype of endothelial progenitor cells and endothelial microparticles.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, Rosita A; Calogero, Aldo E; Vicari, Enzo; di Pino, Luigi; Giacone, Filippo; Mongioì, Laura; la Vignera, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the blood concentrations of a new immunophenotype of circulating late endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and endothelial microparticles (EMP) varies in patients with arterial erectile dysfunction (aED) and abnormalities in other arterial districts. To accomplish this, cavernous artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), acceleration time (AT), and intima-media thickness (IMT) were determined after intracavernous administration of alprostadil by echo-color Doppler in 80 consecutive patients (age range, 50-75 years). Fifteen patients had aED alone (group A) and served as controls; 22 had aED plus atheroma plaques and/or increased IMT of the common carotid artery (group B); 20 had aED plus lower limb artery abnormalities (group C); and 23 had aED plus carotid and lower limb artery abnormalities (group D). EPC and EMP blood concentrations were evaluated by flow cytometry. Blood mononuclear cells with the immunophenotype CD45(neg)/CD34(pos)/CD144(pos) were defined as EPCs, whereas CD45(neg)/CD144(pos)/annexin V(pos) cells were defined as EMPs. Group B and C patients had a similar PSV, AT, and IMT at the level of the cavernous arteries. Their PSV values were significantly lower and mean values of AT and IMT significantly higher compared with group A patients. Patients of group D had a significantly lower PSV and significantly higher AT and IMT compared with all other groups. As far as serum concentrations of EPCs and EMPs, group D patients had significantly higher EPC and EMP mean values compared with all other groups. Group B and C patients had similar EPC and EMP values. This study showed that a more generalized peripheral atherosclerotic process is associated with a more severe penile artery insufficiency and endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, this study confirms the diagnostic reliability of the immunophenotype of EPCs and EMPs chosen in the clinical practice.

  3. Pulmonary artery endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased populations of highly proliferative endothelial cells in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Acker, Shannon N; Seedorf, Gregory J; Abman, Steven H; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Partrick, David A; Gien, Jason

    2013-12-01

    Decreased lung vascular growth and pulmonary hypertension contribute to poor outcomes in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Mechanisms that impair angiogenesis in CDH are poorly understood. We hypothesize that decreased vessel growth in CDH is caused by pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction with loss of a highly proliferative population of PAECs (HP-PAEC). PAECs were harvested from near-term fetal sheep that underwent surgical disruption of the diaphragm at 60-70 days gestational age. Highly proliferative potential was measured via single cell assay. PAEC function was assessed by assays of growth and tube formation and response to known proangiogenic stimuli, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nitric oxide (NO). Western blot analysis was used to measure content of angiogenic proteins, and superoxide production was assessed. By single cell assay, the proportion of HP-PAEC with growth of >1,000 cells was markedly reduced in the CDH PAEC, from 29% (controls) to 1% (CDH) (P < 0.0001). Compared with controls, CDH PAEC growth and tube formation were decreased by 31% (P = 0.012) and 54% (P < 0.001), respectively. VEGF and NO treatments increased CDH PAEC growth and tube formation. VEGF and VEGF-R2 proteins were increased in CDH PAEC; however, eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase proteins were decreased by 29 and 88%, respectively. We conclude that surgically induced CDH in fetal sheep causes endothelial dysfunction and marked reduction of the HP-PAEC population. We speculate that this CDH PAEC phenotype contributes to impaired vascular growth in CDH.

  4. Pulmonary artery endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased populations of highly proliferative endothelial cells in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Gregory J.; Abman, Steven H.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Partrick, David A.; Gien, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Decreased lung vascular growth and pulmonary hypertension contribute to poor outcomes in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Mechanisms that impair angiogenesis in CDH are poorly understood. We hypothesize that decreased vessel growth in CDH is caused by pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction with loss of a highly proliferative population of PAECs (HP-PAEC). PAECs were harvested from near-term fetal sheep that underwent surgical disruption of the diaphragm at 60–70 days gestational age. Highly proliferative potential was measured via single cell assay. PAEC function was assessed by assays of growth and tube formation and response to known proangiogenic stimuli, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nitric oxide (NO). Western blot analysis was used to measure content of angiogenic proteins, and superoxide production was assessed. By single cell assay, the proportion of HP-PAEC with growth of >1,000 cells was markedly reduced in the CDH PAEC, from 29% (controls) to 1% (CDH) (P < 0.0001). Compared with controls, CDH PAEC growth and tube formation were decreased by 31% (P = 0.012) and 54% (P < 0.001), respectively. VEGF and NO treatments increased CDH PAEC growth and tube formation. VEGF and VEGF-R2 proteins were increased in CDH PAEC; however, eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase proteins were decreased by 29 and 88%, respectively. We conclude that surgically induced CDH in fetal sheep causes endothelial dysfunction and marked reduction of the HP-PAEC population. We speculate that this CDH PAEC phenotype contributes to impaired vascular growth in CDH. PMID:24124189

  5. Measures of endothelial dysfunction predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, David R; Lawford, Patricia; Sheridan, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) improves morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). Impaired endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in HF and may help to differentiate responders from non-responders. Methods 19 patients were recruited, comprising 94% men, mean age 69±8 years, New York Heart Association functional classes II–IV, QRSd 161±21 ms and mean left ventricular ejection fraction 26±8%. Markers of response and FMD were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months following CRT. Results 14 patients were responders to CRT. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6±1.7 to 14.7±1.5 mL/kg/min, p<0.05), quality of life score (44.4±22.9–24.1±21.3, p<0.01), left ventricular end diastolic volume (201.5±72.5 mL–121.3±72.0 mL, p<0.01) and 6-min walk distance (374.0±112.8 m at baseline to 418.1±105.3 m, p<0.05). Baseline FMD in responders was 2.9±1.9% and 7.4±3.73% in non-responders (p<0.05). Conclusions Response to CRT at 6 and 12 months is predicted by baseline FMD. This study confirms that FMD identifies responders to CRT, due to endothelium-dependent mechanisms alone. PMID:27335654

  6. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Endothelial colony forming cells ameliorate endothelial dysfunction via secreted factors following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Collett, Jason A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Crone, Allison; Shelley, W Christopher; Yoder, Mervin C; Basile, David P

    2017-02-22

    Damage to endothelial cells contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI) by leading to impaired perfusion. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial precursor cells with high proliferative capacity, pro-angiogenic activity, and in vivo vessel forming potential. We hypothesized that ECFCs may ameliorate the degree of AKI and/or promote repair of the renal vasculature following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Rat pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMVEC) with high proliferative potential were compared with pulmonary artery ECs (PAEC) with low proliferative potential in rats subjected to renal I/R. PMVEC administration reduced renal injury and hastened recovery as indicated by serum creatinine and tubular injury scores, while PAEC did not. Vehicle-treated control animals showed consistent reductions in renal medullary blood flow (MBF) within 2 hours of reperfusion, while PMVEC protected against loss in MBF as measured by laser Doppler. Interestingly, PMVEC mediated protection occurred in the absence of homing to the kidney. Conditioned medium (CM) from human cultured cord blood ECFC also conveyed beneficial effects against I/R injury and loss of MBF. Moreover, ECFC-CM significantly reduced the expression of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and p-selectin, and decreased the number of differentiated lymphocytes typically recruited into the kidney following renal ischemia. Taken together, these data suggest that ECFC secrete factors that preserve renal function post ischemia, in part, by preserving microvascular function.

  8. The anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, causes oxidant stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2006-02-01

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is toxic to target cells, but also causes endothelial dysfunction and edema, secondary to oxidative stress in the vascular wall. Thus, the mechanism of action of this drug may involve chemotoxicity to both cancer cells and to the endothelium. Indeed, we found that the permeability of monolayers of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC) to albumin was increased by approximately 10-fold above control, following 24-h exposure to clinically relevant concentrations of DOX (up to 1 microM). DOX also caused >4-fold increases in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and large decreases in ATP and reduced glutathione (GSH) in BPAECs, which paralleled the increases in endothelial permeability. A large part of the ATP loss could be attributed to DOX-induced hydrogen peroxide production which inhibited key thiol-enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). Depletion of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) appeared to be a major factor leading to DOX-induced GSH depletion. At low concentrations, the sulfhydryl reagent, iodoacetate (IA), inhibited GAPDH, caused a decrease in ATP and increased permeability, without inhibiting G6PDH or decreasing GSH. These results, coupled with those of previous work on a related quinone, menadione, suggest that depletion of either GSH or ATP may lead independently to endothelial dysfunction during chemotherapy, contributing to the cardiotoxicity and other systemic side-effects of the drug.

  9. Cellular redox state and endothelial dysfunction in mildly hyperhomocysteinemic cystathionine beta-synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Bierl, Charlene; Cap, André; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Previous in vitro experiments have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia leads to oxidative inactivation of nitric oxide, in part by inhibiting the expression of cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1). To elucidate the role of intracellular redox status on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidant stress, heterozygous cystathionine beta-synthase-deficient (CBS(-/+)) and wild-type (CBS(+/+)) mice were treated with the cysteine donor L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC). CBS(-/+) mice had significantly lower GPx-1 activity compared with their CBS(+/+) littermates, and OTC treatment led to a modest increase in tissue GPx-1 activity and significant increases in total thiols and in reduced glutathione levels in both CBS(+/+) and CBS(-/+) mice. Superfusion of the mesentery with beta-methacholine or bradykinin produced dose-dependent vasodilation of mesenteric arterioles in CBS(+/+) mice and in CBS(+/+) mice treated with OTC. In contrast, mesenteric arterioles from CBS(-/+) mice manifested dose-dependent vasoconstriction in response to both agonists. OTC treatment of CBS(-/+) mice restored normal microvascular vasodilator reactivity to beta-methacholine and bradykinin. These findings demonstrate that mild hyperhomocysteinemia leads to endothelial dysfunction in association with decreased bioavailable nitric oxide. Increasing the cellular thiol and reduced glutathione pools and increasing GPx-1 activity restores endothelial function. These findings emphasize the importance of intracellular redox balance for nitric oxide bioactivity and endothelial function.

  10. Black tea protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    San Cheang, Wai; Yuen Ngai, Ching; Yen Tam, Ye; Yu Tian, Xiao; Tak Wong, Wing; Zhang, Yang; Wai Lau, Chi; Chen, Zhen Yu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Huang, Yu; Ping Leung, Fung

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have been found to be associated with elevated levels of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine (Hcy) can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells. This study aims to investigate whether black tea (BT) protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of ER stress. Rat aortae and cultured rat aortic endothelial cells were treated with Hcy, BT extract, and theaflavin-3,3’-digallate (TF3). Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce hypertension and orally administrated with BT extract at 15 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. Hcy impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations of rat aortae and led to ER stress in endothelial cells, which were ameliorated by co-incubation of BT extract and TF3. The blood pressure of Ang II-infused rats and plasma Hcy level were normalized by BT consumption. Impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in renal arteries, carotid arteries and aortae, and flow-mediated dilatations in third-order mesenteric resistance arteries were improved. Elevations of ER stress markers and ROS level, plus down-regulation of Hcy metabolic enzymes in aortae from Ang II-infused rats were prevented by BT treatment. Our data reveal the novel cardiovascular benefits of BT in ameliorating vascular dysfunctions, providing insight into developing BT into beneficial dietary supplements in hypertensive patients. PMID:25976123

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with endothelial dysfunction in patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Han; Park, Dong Kyu; Yong, Seok Woo; Hong, Ji Man

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) than healthy controls. Low vitamin D has been associated with endothelial dysfunction which may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is widely used as a clinical marker of overall endothelial function. We evaluated the relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and FMD in PD. We enrolled 81 patients with early PD and 52 healthy controls, and we evaluate endothelial function based on vitamin D status and identify the association between FMD and vitamin D status in patients with early PD. The mean serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower in the PD patients than in the controls (21.8 ± 9.5 vs. 25.2 ± 9.3 ng/mL, p < 0.05). FMD was significantly lower in the PD patients (7.1 ± 1.8 %) than in the controls (8.1 ± 2.1 %, p < 0.05). The serum 25(OH)D was significantly associated with FMD independently of age, cardiovascular disease risk factors, body mass index, motor Unified PD Rating Scale status and homocysteine levels (adjusted R (2) = 0.331, β = 0.494, p < 0.001). These findings provide evidence of a possible association between endothelial dysfunction as assessed by FMD and low vitamin D status in patients with early PD.

  12. Folic Acid Supplementation Improves Vascular Function in Professional Dancers With Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Anne Z.; Papanek, Paula; Szabo, Aniko; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gutterman, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if folic acid supplementation improves vascular function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in professional dancers with known endothelial dysfunction. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Academic institution in the Midwestern United States. Subjects Twenty-two professional ballet dancers volunteered for this study. Main Outcome Measures Subjects completed a 3-day food record to determine caloric and micronutrient intake. Menstrual status was determined by interview and questionnaire. Endothelial function was determined as flow-induced vasodilation measured by high-frequency ultrasound of the brachial artery. A change in brachial diameter of <5% to hyperemic flow stimulus was defined a priori as endothelial dysfunction. Subjects with abnormal FMD took 10 mg of folic acid daily for 4 weeks, and FMD testing was then repeated. Serum whole blood was measured for folic acid levels before and after supplementation. Results Sixty-four percent of dancers (n = 14) had abnormal brachial artery FMD (<5%) (mean ± standard deviation, 2.9% ± 1.5%). After 4 weeks of folic acid supplementation (10 mg/day), FMD improved in all the subjects (7.1% ± 2.3%; P < .0001). Conclusions This study reveals that vascular endothelial function improves in dancers after supplementation with folic acid (10 mg/day) for at least 4 weeks. This finding may have clinically important implications for future cardiovascular disease risk prevention. PMID:21715240

  13. miR-22 contributes to endosulfan-induced endothelial dysfunction by targeting SRF in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Guo, Yubing; Liu, Tong; Li, Shuai; Sun, Yeqing

    2017-03-05

    microRNAs (miRNAs) function in the posttranscriptional gene regulation, providing new insights into the epigenetic mechanism of toxicity induced by environmental pollutants. miR-22 was discovered to regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis in response to environmental toxicants. We have reported that endosulfan can cause endothelial toxicity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of miR-22 in endosulfan-induced endothelial dysfunction. The expression level of miR-22 was increased in a dose-dependent manner by endosulfan exposure. Overexpression of miR-22 induced apoptosis and inflammation in HUVECs. Anti-miR-22 transfection significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase-3 activity and Interleukin (IL)-6, 8 mRNA levels in endosulfan-exposed HUVECs. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that SRF and STAG2 were novel direct targets of miR-22. Endosulfan decreased mRNA expression of both SRF and STAG2, but only suppressed protein expression of SRF. Knockdown of SRF via siRNAs resulted in apoptosis and inflammation whereas STAG2 siRNAs only caused abnormal mitosis in HUVECs. Taken together, these findings will shed light on the role and mechanism of miR-22 in endosulfan-induced endothelial dysfunction via SRF in HUVECs.

  14. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Ameliorates Endothelial Dysfunction in Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwei; Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanting; Fu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhu, Weiming; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and histological changes in the urinary bladder. bFGF was administrated to human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) or urinary bladder immediately after radiation. Reduced expression of thrombomodulin (TM) was indicated in the HUVEC and urinary bladder after treatment with radiation. Decreased apoptosis was observed in HUVEC treated with bFGF. Administration of bFGF increased the expression of TM in HUVEC medium, as well as in the urinary bladder at the early and delayed phases of radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). At the early phase, injection of bFGF increased the thickness of urothelium and reduced inflammation within the urinary bladder. At the delayed phase, bFGF was effective in reducing fibrosis within the urinary bladder. Our results indicate that endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature of RIBI. Administration of bFGF can ameliorate radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in urinary bladder and preserve bladder histology at early and delayed phases of RIBI. PMID:26351640

  15. Endothelial Dysfunction: Associations with Exposure to Ambient Fine Particles in Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Alexandra; Neas, Lucas; Herbst, Margaret C.; Case, Martin; Williams, Ronald W.; Cascio, Wayne; Hinderliter, Alan; Holguin, Fernando; Buse, John B.; Dungan, Kathleen; Styner, Maya; Peters, Annette; Devlin, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter [≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] has been associated with cardiovascular and hematologic effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that adults with diabetes also may be a particularly susceptible population. Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of ambient PM2.5 on markers of endothelial function in diabetic volunteers. Methods We conducted a prospective panel study in 22 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (USA), from November 2004 to December 2005. We acquired daily measurements of PM2.5 and meteorologic data at central monitoring sites. On 4 consecutive days, we measured endothelial function by brachial artery ultrasound in all participants and by pulsewave measurements in a subgroup. Data were analyzed using additive mixed models with a random participant effect and adjusted for season, day of the week, and meteorology. Results Flow-mediated dilatation decreased in association with PM2.5 during the first 24 hr, whereas small-artery elasticity index decreased with a delay of 1 and 3 days. These PM2.5-associated decrements in endothelial function were greater among participants with a high body mass index, high glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, low adiponectin, or the null polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1. However, high levels of myeloperoxidase on the examination day led to strongest effects on endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions These data demonstrate that PM2.5 exposure may cause immediate endothelial dysfunction. Clinical characteristics associated with insulin resistance were associated with enhanced effects of PM on endothelial function. In addition, participants with greater oxidative potential seem to be more susceptible. PMID:19079718

  16. [Age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  17. Systemic sclerosis induces pronounced peripheral vascular dysfunction characterized by blunted peripheral vasoreactivity and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy; Walker, Ashley E.; Barrett-O’Keefe, Zachary; Hopkins, Paul N.; Richardson, Russell S.; Wray, D. Walter; Donato, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) vasculopathy can result in a digital ulcer (DU) and/or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that bedside brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing with duplex ultrasound could be used in SSc patients to identify features of patients at risk for DU or PAH. Thirty-eight SSc patients were compared to 52 age-matched healthy controls from the VAMC Utah Vascular Research Laboratory. Peripheral hemodynamics, arterial structure, and endothelial function were assessed by duplex ultrasound. A blood pressure cuff was applied to the forearm and 5-min ischemia was induced. Post-occlusion, brachial artery vascular reactivity (peak hyperemia/area under the curve [AUC]), shear rate, and endothelial function (FMD) were measured. SSc patients had smaller brachial artery diameters (p<0.001) and less reactive hyperemia (p<0.001), peak shear rate (p= 0.03), and brachial artery FMD (p<0.001) compared with healthy controls. Brachial artery FMD was lower (p<0.05) in SSc patients with DU. Tertile analysis suggested the 2 lower FMD tertiles (<5.40 %) had a 40–50 % chance of presenting with DU while the SSc patients with highest FMD tertile (>5.40 %) had less than 15 % chance of DU. All brachial artery FMD measurements were similar between SSc patients with and without PAH (all p>0.05). Compared to healthy controls, SSc patients had significantly smaller brachial artery diameter and blunted peripheral vascular reactivity and endothelial function. SSc patients with DU have even greater impairments in endothelial function compared to those without DU. FMD testing has clinical utility to identify SSc patients at risk for DU. PMID:25511849

  18. [Effects of mexidol and sulodexide on the level of specific markers of endothelial dysfunction in animals with experimental diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Voronkov, A V; Slietsans, A A; Snigur, G L

    2012-01-01

    Streptozotocin-induced diabetes leads to the development of endothelial dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increased expression of endothelin-1 as specific markers of endothelial disorders. All test substances showed endotelioprotective activity by increasing the concentration of eNOS and reducing the level of endothelin-1. With respect to the degree of impact on the eNOS and endothelin-1 levels, the compounds studied can be rated as follows: sulodexide > meksidol.

  19. Association of hypertension with coexistence of abnormal metabolism and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Guiyan; Wang, Aili; Tong, Weijun; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    To explore association of hypertension with coexistence of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal metabolism, a community-based study was conducted among Mongolian people in China. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle risk factors were investigated, blood pressure, body weight and waist circumference were measured, fasting blood samples were obtained to measure blood lipids, fasting plasma glucose and the biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and angiotensin II. Rates of abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II as well as coexistence of abnormal metabolism with the elevated biomarkers were all higher in hypertensives than these in normotensives (all p < 0.01). Compared with subjects with normal metabolism and without any elevated biomarker, multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of hypertension associated with abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin, elevated angiotensin II, coexistences of abnormal metabolism with elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1,elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II were 2.209 (1.594-3.062), 2.820 (1.992-3.992), 2.370 (1.665-3.374), 1.893 (1.331-2.691), 2.545 (1.793-3.612), 2.990 (2.102-4.252), 2.551 (1.775-3.667), 2.223 (1.544-3.220), 3.135 (2.185-4.519), respectively. In conclusion, this study indicated that inflammation and endothelial dysfunction was associated with hypertension and abnormal metabolism, and individuals with co-existence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction had higher risk of prevalent hypertension among Mongolian population. This study suggests that further study on treatment for hypertension patients with coexistence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction should be conducted in the near

  20. [Arterial rigidity and endothelial dysfunction in obese children].

    PubMed

    Aggoun, Y; Tounian, P; Dabbas-Tyan, M; Massih, T Abdel; Girardet, J P; Ricour, C; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor in adults. Poorly is known about effect of obesity on cardiovascular system in children. Mechanical properties of a great elastic trunk, the common carotid artery (CCA) and endothelium function of the brachial artery were studied in 130 obese children (age: 12 +/- 3 years, body mass index (BMI): 29 +/- 5.5 kg/m2, without hypertension (115 +/- 19/58 +/- 8 mmHg). These patients had a vascular high resolution echographical analysis. Cross sectional compliance (CSC), cross sectional distensibility (CSD) and incremental elastic modulus (Einc) were analysed at the CCA site. The brachial artery dilation was measured after hyperthemia (flow mediated dilation, FMD), an endothelium dependent function and after sublingually glyceryl trinitrate (GTNMD), an independent endothelium function. Fat mass composition and distribution were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 70 patients. In 50 obese patients an oral glucose tolerance test was done to determine insulin resistance. The obese children had significantly lower CSC and CSD than the healthy controls (respectively 0.12 +/- 0.04 vs 0.14 +/- 0.05 mm2.mmHg-1; p < 0.05 and 0.5 +/- 0.2 vs 0.8 +/- 0.4 mmHg(-1).10(-2); p < 0.001). Obese children had higher value than the controls for Einc (2.4 +/- 0.4 vs 1 +/- 0.24 mmHg.10(3); p < 0.001) that correlated poorly with fasting insulin concentrations (r = 0.34; p < 0.06) and BMI (r = 0.34; p < 0.01). FMD was significantly lower in obese children than in controls (6 +/- 3 vs 8 +/- 4%, p < 0.01) without modification of GTNMD (17 +/- 6 vs 18 +/- 7%, NS). These two parameters were respectively correlated with the android fat distribution (r = 0.36; p < 0.01; r = 0.49; p < 0.001). The CCA stiffness of obese children is linked to the amount of the overweight and to insulin resistance. The android fat distribution is related to endothelium dysfunction.

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction and Altered Coagulation As Mediators of Thromboembolism in Behçet Disease.

    PubMed

    Butta, Nora V; Fernández-Bello, Ihosvany; López-Longo, Francisco J; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor

    2015-09-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a rare multisystem, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with vascular involvement and associated thrombogenicity. This review aims to describe the involvement of various mediators in endothelial cell damage and in the hypercoagulable state of BD. The scenario of the chronic inflammation present in BD shows an increased oxidative condition that contributes to endothelial cell damage and induces platelet, leukocyte, and endothelial cell activation through the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These factors, together with the increased levels of homocysteine observed in BD patients, induce the endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) and tissue factor; the release of cytokines, soluble CD40L (sCD40L), matrix metalloproteinase-9, and blood coagulation factor V; the inhibition of fibrinolysis; the disruption of nitric oxide metabolism; and the increase in platelet reactivity and lipid peroxidation. Endothelial cell dysfunction leads to a prothrombotic and antifibrinolytic phenotype in BD patients. Increased levels of homocysteine, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 seem to be involved in the procoagulant condition of this pathology that has been verified by end-point tests as well as by global coagulation tests.

  2. Elevated 20-HETE impairs coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome via endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Gregory; Soler, Amanda; Hutcheson, Rebecca; Hunter, Ian; Bradford, Chastity; Hutcheson, Brenda; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Jiang, Houli; Falck, John R; Proctor, Spencer; Schwartzman, Michal Laniado; Rocic, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome (MetS). microRNA-145 (miR-145-Adv) delivery to our rat model of MetS (JCR) completely restored and neutrophil depletion significantly improved CCG. We determined whether low endogenous levels of miR-145 in MetS allowed for elevated production of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which, in turn, resulted in excessive neutrophil accumulation and endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired CCG. Rats underwent 0-9 days of repetitive ischemia (RI). RI-induced cardiac CYP4F (neutrophil-specific 20-HETE synthase) expression and 20-HETE levels were increased (4-fold) in JCR vs. normal rats. miR-145-Adv and 20-HETE antagonists abolished and neutrophil depletion (blocking antibodies) reduced (~60%) RI-induced increases in CYP4F expression and 20-HETE production in JCR rats. Impaired CCG in JCR rats (collateral-dependent blood flow using microspheres) was completely restored by 20-HETE antagonists [collateral-dependent zone (CZ)/normal zone (NZ) flow ratio was 0.76 ± 0.07 in JCR + 20-SOLA, 0.84 ± 0.05 in JCR + 20-HEDGE vs. 0.11 ± 0.02 in JCR vs. 0.84 ± 0.03 in normal rats]. In JCR rats, elevated 20-HETE was associated with excessive expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and neutrophil infiltration, which were reversed by miR-145-Adv. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of coronary arteries, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) Ser1179 phosphorylation, eNOS-dependent NO(·-) production and endothelial cell survival were compromised in JCR rats. These parameters of endothelial dysfunction were completely reversed by 20-HETE antagonism or miR-145-Adv delivery, whereas neutrophil depletion resulted in partial reversal (~70%). We conclude that low miR-145 in MetS allows for increased 20-HETE, mainly from neutrophils, which compromises endothelial cell survival and function leading to impaired CCG. 20-HETE antagonists could provide viable therapy for restoration of CCG in MetS.NEW & NOTEWORTHY

  3. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Kudaravalli, Jyothsna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and atorvastatin on endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two SLE patients and age, sex-matched 10 healthy control subjects were studied. The patients were between 17 and 65 years of age and positive for diagnostic tests, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Photoplethysmogram (PPG) detects the changes in the amount of light absorbed by hemoglobin, which reflects changes in the blood volume. Pulse wave analysis was performed at rest, 30 s, 90 s after shear stress, and 10 min after 300 μm of salbutamol inhalation. Results: Stiffness index (SI) of patients before the treatment was 8.46±2.78 cm/s and of controls was 6.07±1.4 cm/s (P = 0.002) and that of reflection index (RI) was 73±13 for patients and 65±7 for controls (P = 0.001). The percentage change in RI after salbutamol inhalation for controls and patients were -16±6 and -7±4 (P = 0.001), respectively, indicating the presence of endothelial dysfunction. The percentage decrease in RI after salbutamol inhalation was from -2.36±0.76 to ?7.92±1.46 in patients treated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, P = 0.007). The percentage decrease in RI after salbutamol inhalation was from ?6.36΁1.21 to -9.92±1.21 in patients treated with atorvastatin (P = 0.05). This indicated the improvement in endothelial function. There was decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) from 1.03±0.72 mg/dL to 0.52±0.22 mg/dL and that of malondialdehyde (MDA) from 11.20±4.07 nmol/mL to 8.81±2.79 nmol/mL with N-acetylcysteine treatment (P < 0.05). The CRP was decreased from 1.11±0.92 mg/dL to 0.440.16 mg/dL (P = 0.05) and that of MDA was decreased from 9.37±3.29 nmol/mL to 8.51±3.27 nmol/mL after treatment with atorvastatin. It showed improvement in oxidative stress with these treatments. Conclusion: The presence of arterial stiffness indicated endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in RI and SI with

  4. Dietary inhibition of xanthine oxidase attenuates radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Attarzadeh, David O; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Kim, Jae Hyung; Bhunia, Anil K; Sevinc, Baris; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2010-05-01

    Radiation exposure is associated with the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Although irradiation is known to cause elevated oxidant stress and chronic inflammation, both of which are detrimental to vascular function, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously demonstrated that radiation causes endothelial dysfunction and increased vascular stiffness by xanthine oxidase (XO) activation. In this study, we investigated whether dietary inhibition of XO protects against radiation-induced vascular injury. We exposed 4-mo-old rats to a single dose of 0 or 5 Gy gamma radiation. These rats received normal drinking water or water containing 1 mM oxypurinol, an XO inhibitor. We measured XO activity and superoxide production in rat aorta and demonstrated that both were significantly elevated 2 wk after radiation exposure. However, oxypurinol treatment in irradiated rats prevented aortic XO activation and superoxide elevation. We next investigated endothelial function through fluorescent measurement of nitric oxide (NO) and vascular tension dose responses. Radiation reduced endothelium-dependent NO production in rat aorta. Similarly, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the aorta of irradiated rats was significantly attenuated compared with the control group. Dietary XO inhibition maintained NO production at control levels and prevented the development of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, pulse wave velocity, a measure of vascular stiffness, increased by 1 day postirradiation and remained elevated 2 wk after irradiation, despite unchanged blood pressures. In oxypurinol-treated rats, pulse wave velocities remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiment, signifying preserved vascular health. These findings demonstrate that XO inhibition can offer protection from radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular complications.

  5. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension☆

    PubMed Central

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M.; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice) received a 24 hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock. PMID:26276526

  6. Subclinical Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Patients with Diabetes: A Study from United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Aburawi, Elhadi H.; AlKaabi, Juma; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Shehab, Abdullah; Lessan, Nader; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Saadi, Hussain; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of obesity and dyslipidemia on cardiovascular health in adolescents and young adults with diabetes is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the effects of these co-morbidities on markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in young patients with the disease. Methods The study investigated sets of inflammatory, endothelial, and adipocyte biomarkers in 79 patients with type 1 diabetes, 55 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 47 controls. Results Mean (±SD) age was 20±6 y (median = 17, range = 12–31). Patients with diabetes had higher levels of cytoadhesive molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, p<0.001), adiponectin (p<0.001), and haptoglobin (p = 0.023). Their heart rate variability assessment revealed lower standard deviation of beat-to-beat intervals and lower total power (p≤0.019), reflecting autonomous nervous dysfunction. Hemoglobin A1c >8.0% (estimated average blood glucose >10 mmol/L) was associated with higher adiponectin (p<0.001) and obesity was associated with lower adiponectin (p<0.001); thus, obesity damped the effect of hyperglycemia on adiponectin. Obesity was associated with higher sICAM-1 (p≤0.015), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), p<0.001. Similarly, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) <1.02 mmol/L was associated with higher sICAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and hsCRP (p≤0.009) and lower adiponectin (p<0.001). Adiponectin correlated negatively with the inflammatory biomarkers in patients with diabetes. Conclusion Subclinical inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are common among young patients with diabetes. Poor diabetes control is associated with higher adiponectin. Obesity and dyslipidemia are associated with lower adiponectin and higher inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers. Intuitively, these predictors of cardiovascular disease are amenable to proper glycemic control, nutritional choices, and regular exercise. PMID:27459718

  7. Chronic hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial dysfunction and protects kidney in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Jiménez, Rosario; Romero, Miguel; Sánchez, Manuel; Zarzuelo, María José; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; O'Valle, Francisco; López-Farré, Antonio José; Algieri, Francesca; Gálvez, Julio; Pérez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Sabio, José Mario; Duarte, Juan

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxychloroquine has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydroxychloroquine-treated lupus patients showed a lower incidence of thromboembolic disease. Endothelial dysfunction, the earliest indicator of the development of cardiovascular disease, is present in lupus. Whether hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial function in lupus is not clear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of hydroxychloroquine on hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal injury in a female mouse model of lupus. NZBWF1 (lupus) and NZW/LacJ (control) mice were treated with hydroxychloroquine 10 mg/kg per day by oral gavage, or with tempol and apocynin in the drinking water, for 5 weeks. Hydroxychloroquine treatment did not alter lupus disease activity (assessed by plasma double-stranded DNA autoantibodies) but prevented hypertension, cardiac and renal hypertrophy, proteinuria, and renal injury in lupus mice. Aortae from lupus mice showed reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses to acetylcholine and enhanced contraction to phenylephrine, which were normalized by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidant treatments. No differences among all experimental groups were found in both the relaxant responses to acetylcholine and the contractile responses to phenylephrine in rings incubated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Vascular reactive oxygen species content and mRNA levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits NOX-1 and p47(phox) were increased in lupus mice and reduced by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidants. Chronic hydroxychloroquine treatment reduced hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and organ damage in severe lupus mice, despite the persistent elevation of anti-double-stranded DNA, suggesting the involvement of new additional mechanisms to improve cardiovascular complications.

  8. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-02-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice) received a 24hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1(fl/fl)Tie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock.

  9. Systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and activation in clinically healthy children exposed to air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, L; Villarreal-Calderon, R; Valencia-Salazar, G; Henríquez-Roldán, C; Gutiérrez-Castrellón, P; Torres-Jardón, R; Osnaya-Brizuela, N; Romero, L; Torres-Jardón, R; Solt, A; Reed, W

    2008-03-01

    Mexico City children are chronically exposed to significant concentrations of air pollutants and exhibit chronic respiratory-tract inflammation. Epidemiological, controlled human exposures, laboratory-based animal models, and in vitro/in vivo studies have shown that inflammatory, endothelial dysfunction, and endothelial damage mediators are upregulated upon exposure to particulate matter (PM). Endothelial dysfunction is a critical event in cardiovascular disease. The focus of this work was to investigate whether exposure to ambient air pollution including PM(2.5) produces systemic inflammation and endothelial injury in healthy children. We measured markers of endothelial activation, and inflammatory mediators in 52 children age 8.6+/-0.1 yr, residents of Mexico City (n: 28) or of Polotitlán (n: 24), a city with low levels of pollutants. Mexico City children had significant increases in inflammatory mediators and vasoconstrictors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, prostaglandin (PG) E2, C-reactive protein, interleukin-1beta, and endothelin-1. There was a significant anti-inflammatory response, and a downregulation of vascular adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and -2, and selectins sE and sL. Results from linear regression found TNF a positively associated with 24- and 48-h cumulative levels of PM(2.5), while the 7-d PM(2.5) value was negatively associated with the numbers of white blood cells in peripheral blood in highly exposed children. Systemic subclinical inflammation, increased endothelin- 1, and significant downregulation of soluble adhesion molecules are seen in Mexico City children. Children chronically exposed to fine PM above the standard could be at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, stroke, and other systemic effects later in life.

  10. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  11. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  12. Sulodexide improves endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Kristová, V; Lísková, S; Sotníková, R; Vojtko, R; Kurtanský, A

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with many complications including retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and angiopathy. Increased cardiovascular risk is accompanied with diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction. Pharmacological agents with endothelium-protective effects may decrease cardiovascular complications. In present study sulodexide (glycosaminoglycans composed from heparin-like and dermatan fractions) was chosen to evaluate its protective properties on endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Effect of sulodexide treatment (SLX, 100 UI/kg/day, i.p.) in 5 and 10 weeks lasting streptozotocin-induced diabetes (30 mg/kg/day, i.p. administered for three consecutive days) was investigated. Animals were divided into four groups: control (injected with saline solution), control-treated with sulodexide (SLX), diabetic (DM) and diabetic-treated with sulodexide (DM+SLX). The pre-prandial and postprandial plasma glucose levels, number of circulating endothelial cells (EC) and acetylcholine-induced relaxation of isolated aorta and mesenteric artery were evaluated. Streptozotocin elicited hyperglycemia irrespective of SLX treatment. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes enhanced the number of circulating endothelial cells compared to controls. SLX treatment decreased the number of EC in 10-week diabetes. Acetylcholine-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was significantly impaired in 5 and 10-week diabetes. SLX administration improved relaxation to acetylcholine in 5 and 10-week diabetes. Diabetes impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta irrespective of SLX treatment. Our results demonstrate that SLX treatment lowers the number of circulating endothelial cells and improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in small arteries. These findings suggest endothelium-protective effect of sulodexide in streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

  13. [Endothelial dysfunction and nonspecific immune reactions in development and progression of osteoarthrosis in women engaged into manual work].

    PubMed

    Maliutina, N N; Nevzorova, M S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers mechanisms of development and progression of osteoarthrosis as an occupationally conditioned disease in women of manual work. Women working in physical overstrain conditions are under occupational risk with dysfunction of many body systems. The authors set a hypothesis on association of endothelial dysfunction markers dysbalance and structural remodelling of cartilage matrix as a proof of degenerative changes.

  14. Glycation of paraoxonase 1 by high glucose instigates endoplasmic reticulum stress to induce endothelial dysfunction in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; Liu, Xiaoli; Feng, Liru; Yang, Hui; Yu, Weiye; Feng, Tiejian; Wang, Shuangxi; Wang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) modulates low-density lipoprotein and cell membrane oxidation through the action of paraoxonase-1 (PON1). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to a wide range of human pathologies including diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Previous studies have reported that PON1 is glycated in diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how PON1 glycation contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. ER stress markers were monitored by western blot. Endothelial function was determined by organ bath. Incubation of recombinant PON1 proteins with high glucose increased PON1 glycation and reduced PON1 activity. Exposure of HUVECs to glycated PON1 induced prolonged ER stress and reduced SERCA activity, which were abolished by tempol, apocynin, BAPTA, and p67 and p22 siRNAs. Chronic administration of amino guanidine or 4-PBA prevented endothelial dysfunction in STZ-injected rats. Importantly, injection of glycated PON1 but not native PON1 induced aberrant ER stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats, which were attenuated by tempol, BAPTA, and 4-PBA. In conclusion, glycation of PON1 by hyperglycemia induces endothelial dysfunction through ER stress. In perspectives, PON1 glycation is a novel risk factor of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, inhibition of oxidative stress, chelating intracellular Ca2+, and ER chaperone would be considered to reduce vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:28374834

  15. Evidence of endothelial dysfunction in the development of Alzheimer’s disease: Is Alzheimer’s a vascular disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Rory J; Soiza, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. The emerging view is that cerebrovascular dysfunction is a feature not only of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke, but also of neurodegenerative conditions, such as AD. In AD, there is impaired structure and function of cerebral blood vessels and cells in the neurovascular unit. These effects are mediated by vascular oxidative stress. Injury to the neurovascular unit alters cerebral blood flow regulation, depletes vascular reserves, disrupts the blood-brain barrier and reduces the brain’s repair capacity. Such injury can exacerbate the cognitive dysfunction exerted by incident ischemia and coexisting neurodegeneration. This article summarises data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, vascular abnormalities and brain endothelial damage in AD. In view of accumulating evidence of vascular pathology in AD, we also review the literature (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for clinical evidence of impaired endothelial function in AD. A total of 15 articles investigating endothelial dysfunction in AD were identified. 10 of these articles showed impaired endothelial function in AD patients. The current literature suggests endothelial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. This aspect of AD pathology is particularly interesting in view of its potential for therapeutic intervention. Future research on endothelial function in AD should concentrate on population-based analysis and combine multiple methods to evaluate endothelial function. PMID:24224133

  16. Endothelial Dysfunction: An Early Cardiovascular Risk Marker in Asymptomatic Obese Individuals with Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alok K.; Ravussin, Eric; Johannsen, Darcy L.; Stull, April J.; Cefalu, William T.; Johnson, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To elucidate if endothelial dysfunction is an early CV risk marker in obese men and women with prediabetes. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study Clinical Research Unit, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA. United States. Methodology Overweight and obese status denotes an increasing adipose tissue burden which spills over into ectopic locations, including the visceral compartment, muscle and liver. Associated co-morbidities enhance cardiovascular (CV) risk. Endothelium which is the largest receptor-effector end-organ in our bodies, while responding to numerous physical and chemical stimuli maintains vascular homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is the initial perturbation, which precedes fatty streak known to initiate atherosclerosis: insidious process which often culminates as sudden catastrophic CV adverse event. Asymptomatic men and women; [n=42] coming in after an overnight fast had demographic, anthropometric, clinical chemistry and resting endothelial function [EF: increased test finger peripheral arterial tone (PAT) relative to control; expressed as relative hyperemia index (RHI)] assessments. Results Adults with desirable weight [n=12] and overweight [n=8] state, had normal fasting plasma glucose [Mean(SD)]: FPG [91.1(4.5), 94.8(5.8) mg/dL], insulin [INS, 2.3(4.4), 3.1(4.8) μU/ml], insulin sensitivity by homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR, 0.62(1.2), 0.80(1.2)] and desirable resting clinic blood pressure [SBP/DBP, 118(12)/74(5), 118(13)/76(8) mmHg]. Obese adults [n=22] had prediabetes [FPG, 106.5(3.5) mg/dL], hyperinsulinemia [INS 18.0(5.2) μU/ml], insulin resistance [HOMA-IR 4.59(2.3)], prehypertension [PreHTN; SBP/DBP 127(13)/81(7) mmHg] and endothelial dysfunction [ED; reduced RHI 1.7(0.3) vs. 2.4(0.3); all p<0.05]. Age-adjusted RHI correlated with BMI [r=−0.53; p<0.001]; however, BMI-adjusted RHI was not correlated with age [r=−0.01; p=0.89]. Conclusion Endothelial dysfunction reflective of

  17. Natural Regulatory T Cells Control Coronary Arteriolar Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matrougui, Khalid; Zakaria, Abd Elmageed; Kassan, Modar; Choi, Sookyoung; Nair, Devika; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Kadowitz, Philip; Belmadani, Souad; Partyka, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease in patients with hypertension is increasing worldwide and leads to severe cardiovascular complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this pathologic condition are not well understood. Experimental and clinical research indicates that immune cells and inflammation play a central role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been reported that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) regulate heart fibrosis in hypertension. In this study, we determined the role of Tregs in coronary arteriolar endothelial dysfunction in angiotensin II–dependent hypertensive mice. Mice infused with angiotensin II had significantly increased blood pressure, as determined using telemetry, and apoptotic Treg numbers, as measured using flow cytometry. The mice displayed inflammation, assessed by macrophage activation/infiltration into coronary arterioles and the heart, and increased local tumor necrosis factor-α release, which participates in reduced coronary arteriolar endothelial-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine using an arteriograph. Hypertensive mice injected with Tregs isolated from control mice had significantly reduced macrophage activation and infiltration, reduced tumor necrosis factor-α release, and improved coronary arteriolar endothelium-dependent relaxation. Our novel data indicate that Tregs are important in the development of coronary arteriolar endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. These results suggest a new direction in the investigation of vascular disease in hypertension and could lead to a therapeutic strategy that involves immune system modulation using Tregs. PMID:21224080

  18. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and endothelial dysfunction: molecular insights and pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells are the major cell types in blood vessels. The principal function of vascular SMC in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through contraction and relaxation. The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity by achieving whole-organ metabolic homeostasis via the production of factors associated with vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. In this review, we have focused on the production of nitric oxide (NO), a vasorelaxation factor. The extent of NO production represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO is capable of inducing pathological conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Recent studies have strongly implicated the involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Vasculature which is affected by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes expresses high levels of GRK2, which may induce endothelial dysfunction by reducing intracellular NO. GRK2 activation also induces changes in the subcellular localization of GRK2 itself and also of β-arrestin 2, a downstream protein. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance and diabetes, focusing on the signal transduction for NO production via GRK2 and β-arrestin 2, providing novel insights into the potential field of translational investigation in the treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:26447102

  19. Evaluation the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Baktash, Forouz; Heshmat-Ghahdarijani, Kiyan; Zarean, Elahe; Bahrani, Saeide

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia complicates up to 3% of pregnancies in developing countries. Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients. Materials and Methods: in this triple-blind randomized clinical trial, enrolled patients were divided randomly into two groups. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 80 mg or placebo will be taken daily by oral administration from the initiation of diagnosis until 2 months after delivery. Every patient's flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were evaluated at the beginning of study and 2 months after delivery with the same experienced operator at a same period of the time (3–5 pm) by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic. T-test or Mann–Whitney test was used in the comparison of means between the intervention and placebo groups. To compare FMD in each group, before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Results: Mean value of FMD in intervention (9.61 ± 5.58) and control group (9.40 ± 4.33) have no significant differences before drug consumption (P = 0.089). FMD in intervention group significantly increased after ASA consumption ([9.61 ± 5.58 vs. 13.65 ± 7.91] [P = 0.044]). Conclusion: Increase mean of FMD in intervention group shows that this supplement can improve endothelial function. PMID:28331517

  20. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and endothelial dysfunction: molecular insights and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells are the major cell types in blood vessels. The principal function of vascular SMC in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through contraction and relaxation. The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity by achieving whole-organ metabolic homeostasis via the production of factors associated with vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. In this review, we have focused on the production of nitric oxide (NO), a vasorelaxation factor. The extent of NO production represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO is capable of inducing pathological conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Recent studies have strongly implicated the involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Vasculature which is affected by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes expresses high levels of GRK2, which may induce endothelial dysfunction by reducing intracellular NO. GRK2 activation also induces changes in the subcellular localization of GRK2 itself and also of β-arrestin 2, a downstream protein. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance and diabetes, focusing on the signal transduction for NO production via GRK2 and β-arrestin 2, providing novel insights into the potential field of translational investigation in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  1. Obesity/insulin resistance is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Implications for the syndrome of insulin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, H O; Chaker, H; Leaming, R; Johnson, A; Brechtel, G; Baron, A D

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that obesity/insulin resistance impairs both endothelium-dependent vasodilation and insulin-mediated augmentation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we studied leg blood flow (LBF) responses to graded intrafemoral artery infusions of methacholine chloride (MCh) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) during saline infusion and euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in lean insulin-sensitive controls (C), in obese insulin-resistant subjects (OB), and in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). MCh induced increments in LBF were approximately 40% and 55% lower in OB and NIDDM, respectively, as compared with C (P < 0.05). Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia augmented the LBF response to MCh by - 50% in C (P < 0.05 vs saline) but not in OB and NIDDM. SNP caused comparable increments in LBF in all groups. Regression analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation between the maximal LBF change in response to MCh and body fat content. Thus, obesity/insulin resistance is associated with (a) blunted endothelium-dependent, but normal endothelium-independent vasodilation and (b) failure of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia to augment endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Therefore, obese/insulin-resistant subjects are characterized by endothelial dysfunction and endothelial resistance to insulin's effect on enhancement of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This endothelial dysfunction could contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerosis in obese insulin-resistant subjects. PMID:8647954

  2. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ken; Takahari, Youko; Higashijima, Naoko; Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Ishizuka, Nobuhiko; Endo, Koichi; Fukuyama, Naoto; Hirano, Katsuya; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC), an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22(phox) mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  3. Metalloproteinase-9 contributes to endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis via protease activated receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Jon M.; Booshehri, Laela M.; Allen, Timothy C.; Kurdowska, Anna K.

    2017-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins when vascular endothelial cells undergo pro-inflammatory changes such as aberrant activation to dysfunctional phenotypes and apoptosis, leading to loss of vascular integrity. Our laboratory has demonstrated that exposure of mice to second hand smoke triggers an increase in expression of metalloproteinase-9. Further, metalloproteinase-9 released by second hand smoke—activated leukocytes may propagate pro-atherogenic alterations in endothelial cells. We have shown that levels of metalloproteinase-9 were increased in the plasma from apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice exposed to second hand smoke relative to non-exposed controls. Moreover, we have collected data from two different, but complementary, treatments of second hand smoke exposed atherosclerotic mice. Animals received either cell specific metalloproteinase-9 directed siRNA to minimize metalloproteinase-9 expression in neutrophils and endothelial cells, or a pharmacological inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase which indirectly limits metalloproteinase-9 production in neutrophils. These treatments reduced atherosclerotic changes in mice and improved overall vascular health. We also demonstrated that metalloproteinase-9 could activate endothelial cells and induce their apoptosis via cleavage of protease activated receptor-1. In summary, better understanding of metalloproteinase-9’s pathogenic capabilities as well as novel signaling pathways involved may lead to development of treatments which may provide additional benefits to atherosclerosis patients with a history of second hand smoke exposure. PMID:28166283

  4. Hypericin, a Naphthodianthrone Derivative, Prevents Methylglyoxal-Induced Human Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Do, Moon Ho; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2017-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive metabolite of glucose which is known to cause damage and induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Endothelial cell damage is implicated in the progression of diabetes-associated complications and atherosclerosis. Hypericin, a naphthodianthrone isolated from Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John’s Wort), is a potent and selective inhibitor of protein kinase C and is reported to reduce neuropathic pain. In this work, we investigated the protective effect of hypericin on MGO-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hypericin showed significant anti-apoptotic activity in MGO-treated HUVECs. Pretreatment with hypericin significantly inhibited MGO-induced changes in cell morphology, cell death, and production of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Hypericin prevented MGO-induced apoptosis in HUVECs by increasing Bcl-2 expression and decreasing Bax expression. MGO was found to activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Pretreatment with hypericin strongly inhibited the activation of MAPKs, including P38, JNK, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, hypericin also inhibited the formation of AGEs. These findings suggest that hypericin may be an effective regulator of MGO-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, hypericin downregulated the formation of AGEs and ameliorated MGO-induced dysfunction in human endothelial cells. PMID:27302958

  5. New insights into Shiga toxin-mediated endothelial dysfunction in hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petruzziello-Pellegrini, Tania N; Moslemi-Naeini, Mozhgan; Marsden, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli represents a significant global health concern, especially as hypervirulent pathogens surface amidst outbreaks of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin (Stx) is key in the microangiopathic events underlying the disease and its central role is underscored by the unprecedented HUS outbreak in Germany in 2011. The mechanisms of Stx-mediated endothelial dysfunction have been a major focus of research that has contributed to the current understanding of the pathogenic changes in endothelial phenotype leading to HUS. Among the newer concepts are Stx-mediated gene regulation in the absence of protein synthesis inhibition, a potential role for complement activation, and accumulating evidence for detectable serum markers before the onset of the classic clinical features of HUS. Further investigation of newer therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers is essential to assess their utility in mitigating disease and/or predicting outcomes and will provide an improved overall understanding of HUS pathogenesis. PMID:23955166

  6. Rutin protects endothelial dysfunction by disturbing Nox4 and ROS-sensitive NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Qiu-Hong; Sui, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qiu, Xin

    2017-02-01

    High glucose induced endothelial dysfunction is blamed for initiation of vascular complication in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Rutin has been described in possessing comprehensive pharmacological activities, but the mechanism involved in endothelial protection through regulating oxidative stress and damage is still ambiguous. In the present study, rutin was evaluated in high glucose stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and high glucose diet-treated SD rats were applied to explored the molecular mechanism in rutin counteracting oxidative stress and damage. Firstly, 30 and 100μM rutin effectively increased HUVECs viability in high glucose challenge. Then we found that rutin could dose-dependently reduced high glucose mediated mRNA and protein expressions of Nox4. With Nox4 and Nox2 inhibitors, we further confirm that Nox4, but not Nox2, was responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in high glucose environment. Moreover, rutin and Nox4 inhibitor significantly ameliorated ROS generation and TXNIP, NLRP3, caspase-1 and IL-1β proteins expression in vivo. Furthermore, rutin substantially recovered nitric oxide production in HUVECs under high glucose condition. However, rutin could not inhibited inflammasome protein expressions and improved nitric oxide production in Nox4-overexpressed HUVECs under high glucose challenges. Finally, we found that rutin restored phenylephrine-mediated contractions and acetylcholine induced relaxations in aortic tissue of high glucose diet treated rats. In vitro, expressions of TXNIP, NLRP3, and caspase-1 in aortic tissue of high glucose diet treated rats were decreased under rutin administration. In summary, rutin may protect endothelial dysfunction through inhibiting Nox4 responsive oxidative stress and ROS-sensitive NLRP3 signaling pathway under high glucose stress both in vivo and vitro.

  7. α-lipoic acid can improve endothelial dysfunction in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guangda; Pu, Jinhui; Yue, Ling; Hou, Jie; Sun, Huiling

    2011-04-01

    Several studies showed that impairment of endothelium-dependent arterial dilation (EDAD) exists in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). The crucial mechanism of this endothelial dysfunction remains unclear. We hypothesized that oxidative stress may be partially responsible for the impairment in EDAD in subjects with IFG. Thus, the present study was designed to assess whether the antioxidant α-lipoic acid can improve endothelial dysfunction in subjects with IFG. Sixty subjects with newly diagnosed IFG and 32 healthy individuals with normal glucose tolerance were enrolled. Subjects were randomized into 2 groups: untreated experimental group (n = 30) and α-lipoic acid treatment group (n = 30, α-lipoic acid 600 mg via intravenous infusion once a day for 3 weeks). We measured EDAD at baseline and after 3 weeks of intervention. At baseline, EDADs in α-lipoic acid and untreated experimental groups were 4.03% and 4.14%, respectively, which were significantly lower than that in controls (5.72%) (P < .001). After 3 weeks of intervention, there was a remarkable increase in EDAD (reaching 5.10%; ΔEDAD, 26.5%) (P < .01) and a significant decrease in plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (29.1%) (P < .05) in IFG subjects treated with α-lipoic acid. Endothelium-dependent arterial dilation and TBARS remained unchanged before and after intervention in the untreated experimental group. The absolute changes in EDAD showed a significant negative correlation with the changes in TBARS (r = -0.444, P = .014). Our data showed that IFG subjects have impaired endothelial function and that antioxidant α-lipoic acid can improve endothelial function through a decrease of oxygen-derived free radicals.

  8. Mechanisms of Endothelial Dysfunction in Resistance Arteries from Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luksha, Leanid; Stenvinkel, Peter; Hammarqvist, Folke; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Davidge, Sandra T.; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in the uremic milieu. Subcutaneous resistance arteries from 35 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and 28 matched controls were studied ex-vivo. Basal and receptor-dependent effects of endothelium-derived factors, expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), prerequisites for myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJ), and associations between endothelium-dependent responses and plasma levels of endothelial dysfunction markers were assessed. The contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired in uremic arteries after stimulation with bradykinin, but not acetylcholine, reflecting the agonist-specific differences. Diminished vasodilator influences of the endothelium on basal tone and enhanced plasma levels of asymmetrical dimethyl L-arginine (ADMA) suggest impairment in NO-mediated regulation of uremic arteries. eNOS expression and contribution of MEGJs to EDHF type responses were unaltered. Plasma levels of ADMA were negatively associated with endothelium-dependent responses in uremic arteries. Preserved responses of smooth muscle to pinacidil and NO-donor indicate alterations within the endothelium and tolerance of vasodilator mechanisms to the uremic retention products at the level of smooth muscle. We conclude that both EDHF and NO pathways that control resistance artery tone are impaired in the uremic milieu. For the first time, we validate the alterations in EDHF type responses linked to kinin receptors in ESRD patients. The association between plasma ADMA concentrations and endothelial function in uremic resistance vasculature may have diagnostic and future therapeutic implications. PMID:22563439

  9. CD14(+)CD16(++) "nonclassical" monocytes are associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, Karol; Ludew, Dominik; Filip, Grzegorz; Filip, Magdalena; Sagan, Agnieszka; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Grudzien, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Jasiewicz-Honkisz, Barbara; Sliwa, Tomasz; Kapelak, Boguslaw; McGinnigle, Eilidh; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2017-02-23

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation are key mechanisms of vascular disease. We hypothesised that heterogeneity of monocyte subpopulations may be related to the development of vascular dysfunction in coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, we examined the relationships between monocyte subsets (CD14(++)CD16(-) "classical - Mon1", CD14(++)CD16(+) "intermediate - Mon2" and CD14(+)CD16(++) "nonclassical - Mon3"), endothelial function and risk factor profiles in 130 patients with CAD undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. This allowed for direct nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability assessment using isometric tension studies ex vivo (acetylcholine; ACh- and sodium-nitropruside; SNP-dependent) in segments of internal mammary arteries. The expression of CD14 and CD16 antigens and activation markers were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. Patients with high CD14(+)CD16(++) "nonclassical" and low CD14(++)CD16(-) "classical" monocytes presented impaired endothelial function. High frequency of CD14(+)CD16(++) "nonclassical" monocytes was associated with increased vascular superoxide production. Furthermore, endothelial dysfunction was associated with higher expression of activation marker CD11c selectively on CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes. Nonclassical and classical monocyte frequencies remained independent predictors of endothelial dysfunction when major risk factors for atherosclerosis were taken into account (β=0.18 p=0.04 and β=-0.19 p=0.03, respectively). In summary, our data indicate that CD14(+)CD16(++) "nonclassical" monocytes are associated with more advanced vascular dysfunction measured as NO- bioavailability and vascular reactive oxygen species production.

  10. Endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress in obese children and adolescents: markers and effect of lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Montero, D; Walther, G; Perez-Martin, A; Roche, E; Vinet, A

    2012-05-01

    With an increasing prevalence, pediatric obesity is often a prelude to adulthood obesity, and represents a major public health issue. Comorbidities are very common and severe in obese adults, justifying the search for earlier markers or risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in obese children. Endothelial dysfunction has been found to be present in the early stages of atherosclerosis, and can be non-invasively assessed with widely accepted and well-standardized techniques at the macrocirculation level. Endothelial dysfunction at the microcirculation level is less documented in obese children. Obesity in children has been repeatedly and independently correlated to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and oxidative stress markers, although the relationship between these factors remains to be investigated. However, this would not only allow substantial improvements in risk stratification, but also provide essential data regarding the evolution of endothelial dysfunction in childhood obesity, especially during puberty when pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative changes, with relative insulin resistance, occur. Therapeutic strategies such as lifestyle interventions in early childhood obesity appear all the more necessary, optimally including both exercise and diet because of their known effects on inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, potentially reversing endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Parasite biomass-related inflammation, endothelial activation, microvascular dysfunction and disease severity in vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A; Price, Ric N; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  12. Albuminuria Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction and Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Derebail, Vimal K.; Caughey, Melissa; Elsherif, Laila; Shen, Jessica H.; Jones, Susan K.; Maitra, Poulami; Pollock, David M.; Cai, Jianwen; Archer, David R.; Hinderliter, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of albuminuria in SCD remains incompletely understood. We evaluated the association of albuminuria with measures of endothelial function, and explored associations of both albuminuria and measures of endothelial function with selected biological variables (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], endothelin-1 [ET-1], soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFLT-1], soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [soluble VCAM-1] and plasma hemoglobin). Methods Spot urine measurements for albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) and 24-hour urine protein were obtained. Endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery ultrasound with measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTMD) and hyperemic velocity. Results Twenty three subjects with varying degrees of albuminuria were evaluated. UACR was significantly correlated with FMD (ρ = -0.45, p = 0.031). In univariate analysis, UACR was correlated with VEGF (ρ = -0.49; 95% CI: -0.75 –-0.1, p = 0.015), plasma hemoglobin (ρ = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.11–0.75, p = 0.013) and ET-1 (ρ = 0.40; 95% CI: -0.03–0.69, p = 0.06). Multivariable analysis showed significant associations of ET-1 (estimate: 455.1 [SE: 198.3], p = 0.02), VEGF (estimate: -1.1 [SE: 0.53], p = 0.04) and sFLT-1 (estimate: -1.14 [SE: 0.49], p = 0.02) with UACR. Only ET-1 (estimate: -8.03 [SE: 3.87], p = 0.04) was significantly associated with FMD in multivariable analyses. Finally, UACR was correlated with both 24-hour urine protein (ρ = 0.90, p < 0.0001) and urine aliquots for albumin-creatinine ratio obtained from the 24-hour urine collection (ρ = 0.97, p < 0.0001). Conclusion This study provides more definitive evidence for the association of albuminuria with endothelial dysfunction in SCD. Elevated circulating levels of ET-1 may contribute to SCD-related glomerulopathy by mediating endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27669006

  13. Parasite Biomass-Related Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Bridget E.; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J.; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A.; Price, Ric N.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  14. Long-Term Exposure to AZT, but not d4T, Increases Endothelial Cell Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Bassit, Leda; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda I.; Detorio, Mervi A.; Liang, Bill; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Walp, Erik R.; Dikalov, Sergey; Jones, Dean P.; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), such as zidovudine (AZT) and stavudine (d4T), cause toxicities to numerous tissues, including the liver and vasculature. While much is known about hepatic NRTI toxicity, the mechanism of toxicity in endothelial cells is incompletely understood. Human aortic endothelial and HepG2 liver cells were exposed to 1 μM AZT or d4T for up to 5 weeks. Markers of oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, NRTI phosphorylation, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, and cytotoxicity were monitored over time. In endothelial cells, AZT significantly oxidized glutathione redox potential, increased total cellular and mitochondrial-specific superoxide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased lactate release, and caused cell death from weeks 3 through 5. Toxicity occurred in the absence of di- and tri-phosphorylated AZT and mtDNA depletion. These data show that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in endothelial cells occur with a physiologically relevant concentration of AZT, and require long-term exposure to develop. In contrast, d4T did not induce endothelial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, or cytotoxicity despite the presence of d4T-triphosphate. Both drugs depleted mtDNA in HepG2 cells without causing cell death. Endothelial cells are more susceptible to AZT-induced toxicity than HepG2 cells, and AZT caused greater endothelial dysfunction than d4T because of its pro-oxidative effects. PMID:19067249

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Moldobaeva, Nurgul

    2011-01-01

    Lung inflammation and alterations in endothelial cell (EC) permeability are key events to development of acute lung injury (ALI). Protective effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been shown against inflammatory signaling and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by gram-negative bacterial wall liposaccharide. We hypothesized that ANP may possess more general protective effects and attenuate lung inflammation and EC barrier dysfunction by suppressing inflammatory cascades and barrier-disruptive mechanisms shared by gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. C57BL/6J wild-type or ANP knockout mice (Nppa−/−) were treated with gram-positive bacterial cell wall compounds, Staphylococcus aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PepG) and/or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (intratracheal, 2.5 mg/kg each), with or without ANP (intravenous, 2 μg/kg). In vitro, human pulmonary EC barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis of gap formation and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. LTA and PepG markedly increased pulmonary EC permeability and activated p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Rho/Rho kinase signaling. EC barrier dysfunction was further elevated upon combined LTA and PepG treatment, but abolished by ANP pretreatment. In vivo, LTA and PepG-induced accumulation of protein and cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tissue neutrophil infiltration, and increased Evans blue extravasation in the lungs was significantly attenuated by intravenous injection of ANP. Accumulation of bronchoalveolar lavage markers of LTA/PepG-induced lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction was further augmented in ANP−/− mice and attenuated by exogenous ANP injection. These results strongly suggest a protective role of ANP in the in vitro and in vivo models of ALI associated with gram-positive infection. Thus ANP may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and ALI-induced gram-positive bacterial

  16. Xyloketal B Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Apolipoprotein E Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Li, Jie; Yuan, Feng; Li, Mei; Zhang, Quan; Huang, Yun-Ying; Pang, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Fang-Yun; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Li, Qian; Cao, Lu; Xie, Yu; Lin, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Tan, Hong-Mei; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that xyloketal B, a novel marine compound with a unique chemical structure, has strong antioxidant actions and can protect against endothelial injury in different cell types cultured in vitro and model organisms in vivo. The oxidative endothelial dysfunction and decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability are critical for the development of atherosclerotic lesion. We thus examined whether xyloketal B had an influence on the atherosclerotic plaque area in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found in our present study that the administration of xyloketal B dose-dependently decreased the atherosclerotic plaque area both in the aortic sinus and throughout the aorta in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat diet. In addition, xyloketal B markedly reduced the levels of vascular oxidative stress, as well as improving the impaired endothelium integrity and NO-dependent aortic vasorelaxation in atherosclerotic mice. Moreover, xyloketal B significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt without altering the expression of total eNOS and Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, it increased eNOS phosphorylation at the positive regulatory site of Ser-1177, while inhibiting phosphorylation at the negative regulatory site of Thr-495. Taken together, these findings indicate that xyloketal B has dramatic anti-atherosclerotic effects in vivo, which is partly due to its antioxidant features and/or improvement of endothelial function. PMID:25874925

  17. Long-term nicotine exposure induces dysfunction of mouse endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Du, Da-Yong; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Pan; Li, Yun-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have an important role in maintaining endothelial homeostasis. Previous studies reported that smoking has detrimental effects on EPCs; however, recent studies revealed that short-term nicotine exposure may benefit EPCs. As most smokers are exposed to nicotine over an extended time period, the present study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of nicotine on EPCs. Mice were administered nicotine orally for 1, 3 or 6 months. The mice exposed to nicotine for 1 month demonstrated increased EPC counts and telomerase activity and reduced cell senescence compared with control mice, consistent with previous reports. However, long-term nicotine exposure resulted in opposing effects on EPCs, causing decreased counts, functional impairment and reduced telomerase activity. Furthermore, the effects of nicotine exposure were correlated with changes in sirtuins type 1 (SIRT1) protein expression. The current study indicated that long-term nicotine exposure induces dysfunction and senescence of EPCs, which may be associated with impairment of telomerase activity through SIRT1 downregulation. The present results emphasize the necessity of smoking cessation to prevent dysfunction of EPCs. PMID:28123473

  18. Coffee bean polyphenols ameliorate postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Ryuji; Sugiura, Yoko; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Hashiguchi, Teruto

    2015-05-01

    To reveal the effect of coffee bean polyphenols (CBPs) on blood vessels, this study aimed to investigate the effect of CBPs on acute postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Thirteen healthy non-diabetic men (mean age, 44.9 ± 1.4 years) consumed a test beverage (active: containing CBPs, placebo: no CBPs) before a 554-kcal test meal containing 14 g of protein, 30 g of fat and 58 g of carbohydrates. Then, a crossover analysis was performed to investigate the time-dependent changes in flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the brachial artery. In the active group, the postprandial impairment of FMD was significantly improved, the two-hour postprandial nitric oxide metabolite levels were significantly increased and the six-hour postprandial urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α levels were significantly reduced compared to the placebo group. The test meal increased the levels of blood glucose, insulin and triglycerides in both groups with no significant intergroup differences. These findings indicate that CBPs intake ameliorates postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy men.

  19. Organic nitrates: update on mechanisms underlying vasodilation, tolerance and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Münzel, Thomas; Steven, Sebastian; Daiber, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Given acutely, organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide mono- and dinitrates (ISMN, ISDN), and pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN), have potent vasodilator and anti-ischemic effects in patients with acute coronary syndromes, acute and chronic congestive heart failure and arterial hypertension. During long-term treatment, however, side effects such as nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction occur, and therapeutic efficacy of these drugs rapidly vanishes. Recent experimental and clinical studies have revealed that organic nitrates per se are not just nitric oxide (NO) donors, but rather a quite heterogeneous group of drugs considerably differing for mechanisms underlying vasodilation and the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Based on this, we propose that the term nitrate tolerance should be avoided and more specifically the terms of GTN, ISMN and ISDN tolerance should be used. The present review summarizes preclinical and clinical data concerning organic nitrates. Here we also emphasize the consequences of chronic nitrate therapy on the supersensitivity of the vasculature to vasoconstriction and on the increased autocrine expression of endothelin. We believe that these so far rather neglected and underestimated side effects of chronic therapy with at least GTN and ISMN are clinically important.

  20. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Morena; Del Prato, Stefano; Pucci, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG), on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:28386305

  1. The Effects of Stress at Work and at Home on Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Non, Amy L.; Rimm, Eric B.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rewak, Marissa A.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether stress at work and at home may be related to dysregulation of inflammation and endothelial function, two important contributors to the development of cardiovascular disease. In order to explore potential biological mechanisms linking stress with cardiovascular health, we investigated cross-sectional associations between stress at work and at home with an inflammation score (n's range from 406–433) and with two endothelial biomarkers (intercellular and vascular adhesion molecules, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1; n's range from 205–235) in a cohort of healthy US male health professionals. No associations were found between stress at work or at home and inflammation. Men with high or medium levels of stress at work had significantly higher levels of sVCAM-1 (13% increase) and marginally higher levels of sICAM-1 (9% increase), relative to those reporting low stress at work, independent of health behaviors. Men with high levels of stress at home had marginally higher levels of both sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 than those with low stress at home. While lack of findings related to inflammation are somewhat surprising, if replicated in future studies, these findings may suggest that endothelial dysfunction is an important biological mechanism linking stress at work with cardiovascular health outcomes in men. PMID:24722508

  2. Endothelial dysfunction state in migraine headache and neutrally mediated syncope in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Dehghan, Bahar; Yaghini, Omid; Nasiri, Jafar; Mansourian, Marjan; Khalifehsoltani, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent evidences have supported migraine headache and neurally mediated syncope as the especial types of endotheliopathies. To determine endothelial function in patients with migraine headache or those with neurally mediated syncope, the present study was conducted. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 93 consecutive patients aged 5-20 years in four groups; neurally mediated syncope, migraine, both neurally mediated syncope and migraine, and control groups. All subjects were tested for basic biophysical and biochemical features including age, gender, body mass index, systolic, and diastolic blood pressures, intima-media thickness (IMT) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD), blood hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and E-selectin. Results: The mean levels of VCAM and ICAM were significantly higher in all groups when compared to control group (P < 0.05). FMD was significantly higher in syncope, migraine, and syncope and migraine groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mean IMT was significantly lower in migraine and also in syncope and migraine groups than in syncope group and control group (P < 0.05). Examining the association between IMT and other baseline parameters showed positive association of IMT with systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction is seen in both migraine headache and neurally mediated syncope. Changes in endothelial functional indices are also dependent on the blood pressure. PMID:26664425

  3. Oleanolic acid ameliorates high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction via PPARδ activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zihui; Jiang, Manli; Xie, Xinya; Yang, Haixia; Wang, Xinfeng; Xiao, Lei; Wang, Nanping

    2017-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a pentacyclic triterpenes widely distributed in food, medicinal plants and nutritional supplements. OA exhibits various pharmacological properties, such as hepatoprotective and anti-tumor effects. In this study, we analyzed the effect of OA on endothelial dysfunction induced by high glucose in human vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Western blotting showed that OA attenuated high glucose-reduced nitric production oxide (NO) as well as Akt-Ser473 and eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation in cultured human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Next, luciferase reporter assay showed that OA activated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) activity. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that OA increased the expressions of PPARδ target genes (PDK4, ADRP and ANGPTL4) in ECs. Meanwhile, the induced expressions of PDK4, ADRP and ANGPTL4 by OA were inhibited by GSK0660, a specific antagonist of PPARδ. In addition, inhibition of PPARδ abolished OA-induced the Akt-Ser473 and eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation, and NO production. Finally, by using Multi Myograph System, we showed that OA prevented high glucose-impaired vasodilation. This protective effect on vasodilation was inhibited in aortic rings pretreated with GSK0660. Collectively, we demonstrated that OA improved high glucose-impaired endothelial function via a PPARδ-mediated mechanism and through eNOS/Akt/NO pathway. PMID:28067284

  4. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from animal studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 30% to 50% of all deaths. In patients with RA, atherosclerosis lesions occur earlier and have a more rapid evolution than in the general population. Beyond mortality, the impact of CVD on quality of life, combined with the associated increase in health-care costs, renders CVD in RA a major public health problem. Recent studies showed that patients with RA are characterized by the presence of endothelial dysfunction (ED), which is recognized as a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. By definition, ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state and proliferative and prothrombotic properties. Although the improvement of endothelial function is becoming an important element of the global management of patients with RA, the mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. Animal models of RA provide the unique opportunity to unravel the pathophysiological features of ED in RA. The present review summarizes the available data on mechanisms underlying ED in animal models of RA and proposes attractive prospects in order to discover novel therapeutic strategies of RA-associated ED. PMID:24457026

  5. Does endothelial dysfunction correlate with endocrinal abnormalities in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Rajani

    2016-01-01

    To study and critically analyze the published evidence on correlation of hormonal abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction (ED) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through a systematic review. The databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, Up-To-Date, and Science Direct were searched using Medical subject handling terms and free text term keywords such as endocrine abnormalities in PCOS, ED assessment in PCOS, ED in combination with insulin resistance (IR), hyperandrogenism (HA), increased free testosterone, free androgen index (FAI), gonadotrophin levels, luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, estrogen, adipocytokines to search trials, and observational studies published from January 1987 to September 2015. Authors of original studies were contacted for additional data when necessary. PCOS increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. ED, which is a reliable indicator of cardiovascular risk in general population, is seen in most (but not all) women with PCOS. IR, seen in 70% patients with PCOS, is associated with ED in these women, but patients can have normal endothelial function even in the presence of IR. Free testosterone and FAI are consistently associated with ED, but endothelial function can be normal despite HA. Estradiol (not estrone) appears to be protective against ED though estrone is the predominant estrogen produced in PCOS. Increased levels of adipocytokines (visfatin) are promising in predicting ED and cardiovascular risk. However, more studies are required focusing on direct correlation of levels of prolactin, LH, estrone, and visfatin with ED in PCOS. PMID:27843797

  6. Acute Reversal of Endothelial Dysfunction in the Elderly Following Antioxidant Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Nishiyama, Steven K.; Harris, Ryan A.; Zhao, Jia; McDaniel, John; Fjeldstad, Anette S.; Witman, Melissa A.H.; Ives, Stephen J.; Barrett-O’Keefe, Zachary; Richardson, Russell S.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a pro-oxidant state and a decline in endothelial function. Whether acute, enteral antioxidant treatment can reverse this decrement in vascular function is not well known. Flow-mediated vasodilation and reactive hyperemia were evaluated following consumption of either placebo or an oral antioxidant cocktail (Vitamin C, 1000mg; Vitamin E, 600 I.U.; Alpha-lipoic acid, 600 mg) in 87 healthy volunteers (42 young, 25 ± 1 yrs; 45 older, 71 ± 1 yrs) using a double-blind, crossover design. Blood velocity and brachial artery diameter (ultrasound Doppler) were assessed before and after 5-min forearm circulatory arrest. Serum markers of lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, endogenous antioxidant activity, and Vitamin C were assayed, and plasma nitrate, nitrite, and 3-nitrotyrosine were determined. In the placebo trial, an age-related reduction in brachial artery vasodilation was evident (young: 7.4 ± 0.6 %; older: 5.2 ± 0.4 %). Following antioxidant consumption, flow-mediated vasodilation improved in older subjects (5.2 ± 0.4 %, placebo: 8.2 ± 0.6 %, antioxidant) but declined in the young (7.4 ± 0.6 %, placebo; 5.8 ± 0.6 %, antioxidant). Reactive hyperemia was reduced with age, but antioxidant administration did not alter the response in either group. Together, these data demonstrate that antioxidant consumption acutely restores endothelial function in the elderly, while disrupting normal endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the young, and suggest that this age-related impairment is due, at least in part, to free radicals. PMID:22353612

  7. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

    PubMed

    Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s(-1); P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s(-1); P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Restaino, Robert M.; Walsh, Lauren K.; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s−1; and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s−1; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s−1; and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s−1; P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress. PMID:26747508

  9. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  10. Acute restraint stress induces endothelial dysfunction: role of vasoconstrictor prostanoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carda, Ana P P; Marchi, Katia C; Rizzi, Elen; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute stress would induce endothelial dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were restrained for 2 h within wire mesh. Functional and biochemical analyses were conducted 24 h after the 2-h period of restraint. Stressed rats showed decreased exploration on the open arms of an elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone concentration. Acute restraint stress did not alter systolic blood pressure, whereas it increased the in vitro contractile response to phenylephrine and serotonin in endothelium-intact rat aortas. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor) did not alter the contraction induced by phenylephrine in aortic rings from stressed rats. Tiron, indomethacin and SQ29548 reversed the increase in the contractile response to phenylephrine induced by restraint stress. Increased systemic and vascular oxidative stress was evident in stressed rats. Restraint stress decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration and increased aortic expression of inducible (i) NOS, but not endothelial (e) NOS. Reduced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, but not COX-2, was observed in aortas from stressed rats. Restraint stress increased thromboxane (TX)B(2) (stable TXA(2) metabolite) concentration but did not affect prostaglandin (PG)F2α concentration in the aorta. Restraint reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, whereas concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected. The major new finding of our study is that restraint stress increases vascular contraction by an endothelium-dependent mechanism that involves increased oxidative stress and the generation of COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids. Such stress-induced endothelial dysfunction could predispose to the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment in cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress.

    PubMed

    Cicha, Iwona; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Yilmaz, Atilla; Daniel, Werner G; Garlichs, Christoph D

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from a combination of local blood flow patterns and systemic risk factors. We investigated whether non-uniform shear stress at bifurcations induces pro-atherogenic endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment. Bifurcating flow-through cell culture slides were used to expose HUVECs to laminar or non-uniform shear stress for 18 h at 10 dyne/cm(2). For the adhesion assay, HUVECs were subsequently perfused with medium containing THP-1 monocytes for 1 h. Protein expression was determined by immunofluorescence. In areas exposed to laminar shear stress, alignment of endothelial cells with the flow was observed, accompanied by upregulation of eNOS and downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In contrast, cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress near the outer walls of bifurcations were characterized by irregular, unaligned shape, induction of endothelin-1 and CTGF, as well as reduced eNOS expression. These atherogenic effects of non-uniform shear stress were prevented when cells were treated with statins (1 mumol/l) during flow. Under non-uniform shear stress, a slight induction of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-/P-selectin was observed. In agreement with this, monocyte recruitment, which was nearly undetectable under laminar shear stress, was moderately induced by non-uniform shear stress (P<0.02). In conclusion, inhibition of antioxidative eNOS and upregulation of atherogenic proteins is the first step in non-uniform shear stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction, which in vivo in the presence of atherogenic risk factors may further enhance monocyte recruitment into the artery wall.

  12. Intake of heat-expanded amaranth grain reverses endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Caselato-Sousa, Valeria Maria; Ozaki, Michiko Regina; de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2014-12-01

    This study reports the new functional property of amaranth grain against diet-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbits. Twenty-seven New Zealand rabbits were fed either a standard diet (SD/G1) or a hypercholesterolemic diet (Hichol) for 28 days. On day 29, the Hichol group was subdivided into four groups and begun receiving the following diets for 21 days: G2: SD + amaranth, G3: Hichol + amaranth, G4: SD alone, and G5: Hichol alone, while G1 continued to receive SD for 21 days. Amaranth intake restored endothelial function (G2, G3) to nearly normal during the 21-day recovery besides substantially lowering total and LDL blood cholesterol levels. This effect was not seen by simply correcting the diet (G4). Upon continuance of Hichol, however, amaranth supplementation did show some contribution to the cholesterol-lowering effect (G4 vs. G3). On day 49, feeding Hichol without the help of amaranth, harm was further magnified by lowering HDL-cholesterol (G5). Fecal cholesterol was found increased in groups that ingested amaranth (G2, G3), but no significant impact from either supplementation or diet reversal was found in fecal bile acids. Amaranth supplementation granted some protection against tissue cholesterol (G5) and tissue peroxidation (G3). It is concluded that even in concurrence with a hypercholesterolemic diet, intake of heat-expanded amaranth can revert an associated endothelial dysfunction besides incrementing fecal cholesterol excretion and lowering blood and tissue cholesterol oxidation in dyslipidemic rabbits. These results supported the notion of a lipid peroxidation process occurring with high cholesterol intakes.

  13. Advanced glycation inhibition and protection against endothelial dysfunction induced by coumarins and procyanidins from Mammea neurophylla.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bach Tai; Gény, Charlotte; Blanchard, Patricia; Rouger, Caroline; Tonnerre, Pierre; Charreau, Béatrice; Rakolomalala, Gilbertine; Randriamboavonjy, Joseph Iharinjaka; Loirand, Gervaise; Pacaud, Pierre; Litaudon, Marc; Richomme, Pascal; Séraphin, Denis; Derbré, Séverine

    2014-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are associated with many pathogenic disorders such as pathogenesis of diabetes or endothelial dysfunction leading to cardiovascular events. Therefore, the identification of new anti-AGE molecules or extracts aims at preventing such pathologies. Many Clusiaceae and Calophyllaceae species are used in traditional medicines to treat arterial hypertension as well as diabetes. Focusing on these plant families, an anti-AGE plant screening allowed us to select Mammea neurophylla for further phytochemical and biological studies. Indeed, both DCM and MeOH stem bark extracts demonstrated in vitro their ability to prevent inflammation in endothelial cells and to reduce vasoconstriction. A bioguided fractionation of these extracts allowed us to point out 4-phenyl- and 4-(1-acetoxypropyl)coumarins and procyanidins as potent inhibitors of AGE formation, potentially preventing endothelial dysfunction. The fractionation steps also led to the isolation of two new compounds, namely neurophyllols A and B from the DCM bark extract together with thirteen known mammea A and E coumarins (mammea A/AA, mammea A/AB, mammea A/BA, mammea A/BB, mammea A/AA cycloD, mammea A/AB cycloD, disparinol B, mammea A/AB cycloE, ochrocarpin A, mammea A/AA cycloF, mammea A/AB cycloF, mammea E/BA, mammea E/BB) as well as δ-tocotrienol, xanthones (1-hydroxy-7-methoxyxanthone, 2-hydroxyxanthone) and triterpenes (friedelin and betulinic acid). During this study, R,S-asperphenamate, previously described from fungal origin was also purified.

  14. Leptin promotes endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease through AKT/GSK3β and β-catenin signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nannan; Liu, Bing; Song, Jiaguang; Bao, Shougang; Zhen, Junhui; Lv, Zhimei; Wang, Rong

    2016-11-25

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a well-recognized instigator of cardiovascular diseases and develops in chronic kidney disease (CKD) with high rate. Recent studies have implicated that leptin is associated with endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the relationship between leptin and markers of ED in CKD patients and how leptin contributed to endothelial damage. 140 CKD patients and 140 healthy subjects were studied. Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in CKD than in controls and displayed significantly positive association with the increase levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 but negative correlation with flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) reduction in patients. Our in vitro study demonstrated that leptin induced overexpression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, led to f-actin reorganization and vinculin assembly, increased endothelial monolayer permeability for FITC-dextran, and accelerated endothelial cell migration; these changes were markedly reversed when the cells were transfected with AKT or β-catenin shRNA vectors. Notably, high leptin resulted in hyper-phosphorylation of AKT and GSK3β, along with nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In conclusion, serum leptin was elevated in CKD patients and it might contribute to endothelial dysfunction by disarrangement of f-actin cytoskeleton via a mechanism involving the AKT/GSK3β and β-catenin pathway.

  15. Neither Proteinuria Nor Albuminuria Is Associated With Endothelial Dysfunction in HIV-Infected Patients Without Diabetes or Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Changyu; Mather, Kieren J.; Agarwal, Rajiv; Dubé, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    It is unknown whether systemic endothelial dysfunction underlies the association between nephropathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Spot urine protein to creatinine ratio, spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio, creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery were evaluated in 123 study participants infected with HIV (58 receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART] and 65 not receiving ART) with no history of diabetes or hypertension. None of the renal markers, modeled as either continuous or categorical variables, correlated with FMD. Contrary to expectations, endothelial dysfunction may not be the link between nephropathy and CVD in HIV. PMID:22013226

  16. Aging-Related Hormone Changes in Men

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Men's health Aging-related hormone changes in men — sometimes called male menopause — are different from those ... to erectile dysfunction and other sexual issues. Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet and include physical ...

  17. Calcification of Human Saphenous Vein Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction: A Pilot Histopathophysiological and Demographical Study

    PubMed Central

    Pedigo, Sydney L.; Guth, Christy M.; Hocking, Kyle M.; Banathy, Alex; Li, Fan Dong; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Guzman, Raul J.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2017-01-01

    While the pathophysiology and clinical significance of arterial calcifications have been studied extensively, minimal focus has been placed on venous calcification deposition. In this study, we evaluated the association between calcium deposition in human saphenous vein (HSV), endothelial function, and patient demographic risk factors. Fifty-four HSV segments were collected at the time of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The presence or absence of calcium deposits was visualized using the Von Kossa staining method. Endothelial function was determined by measuring muscle tissue contraction with phenylephrine and relaxation with carbachol in a muscle bath. Additional segments of vein underwent histologic evaluation for preexisting intimal thickness and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Patient demographics data were obtained through our institution’s electronic medical record, with patient consent. Calcium was present in 16 of 54 samples (29.6%). Veins with calcium deposits had significantly greater intimal-to-medial thickness ratios (p = 0.0058) and increased extracellular collagen deposition (p = 0.0077). Endothelial relaxation was significantly compromised in calcified veins vs. those without calcium (p = 0.0011). Significant patient risk factors included age (p = 0.001) and preoperative serum creatinine (p = 0.017). Calcified veins can be characterized as having endothelial dysfunction with increased basal intimal thickness and increased ECM deposition. Patient risk factors for calcium deposits in veins were similar to those for arteries, namely, advanced age and kidney disease. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of preexisting vein calcification on short- and long-term graft patency. PMID:28232909

  18. Possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Uma; Kansal, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Goyal, Sandeep

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) interrupts the integrity and function of endothelial lining through enhanced markers of oxidative stress and decrease endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. The main aim of the present study has been designed to investigate the possible vasculoprotective role of linagliptin against sodium arsenite-induced VED. Sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 weeks) abrogated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by depicting the decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, reduced glutathione level, and simultaneously enhance the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, superoxide level, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These elevated markers interrupt the integrity of endothelial lining of thoracic aorta which was assessed histologically. The study elicits dose dependent effect of linagliptin (1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or atorvastatin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment, improved the endothelium-dependent independent relaxation, improve the integrity of endothelium lining which was assessed histologically by enhancing the serum nitrite/nitrate level, reduced glutathione level and simultaneously decreasing the TBARS level, superoxide anion level and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level. L-NAME (25 mg/kg, i.p.), eNOS inhibitor, abrogated the ameliorative potential of linagliptin. However, the ameliorative potential of linagliptin has been enhanced by l-arginine (200 mg/kg, i.p.) which elicits that ameliorative potential of linagliptin was through eNOS signaling cascade and it may be concluded that linagliptin 3 mg/kg, i.p. has more significantly activated the eNOS and decreased the oxidative markers than linagliptin 1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED.

  19. Caveolin1/protein arginine methyltransferase1/sirtuin1 axis as a potential target against endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Charles, Soniya; Raj, Vijay; Arokiaraj, Jesu; Mala, Kanchana

    2017-01-23

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), an established response to cardiovascular risk factors, is characterized by increased levels of soluble molecules secreted by endothelial cells (EC). Evidence suggest that ED is an independent predictor of cardiac events and that it is associated with a deficiency in production or bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and/or an imbalance in the relative contribution of endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors. ED can be reversed by treating cardiovascular risk factors, hence, beyond ambiguity, ED contributes to initiation and progression of atherosclerotic disease. Majority of cardiovascular risk factors act by a common pathway, oxidative stress (OS), characterized by an imbalance in bioavailability of NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS, through several mechanisms, alters competence of EC that leads to ED, reducing its potential to maintain homeostasis and resulting in development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Influential mechanisms that have been implicated in the development of ED include (i) presence of elevated levels of NOS inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) due to augmented enzyme activity of protein arginine methyl transferase-1 (PRMT1); (ii) decrease in NO generation by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, or by reaction of NO with free radicals and (iii) impaired post translational modification of protein (PTM) such as eNOS, caveolin-1 (cav1) and sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). However, the inter-related mechanisms that concur to developing ED is yet to be understood. The events that possibly overlay include OS-induced sequestration of SIRT1 to caveolae facilitating cav1-SIRT1 association; potential increase in lysine acetylation of enzymes such as eNOS and PRMT1 leading to enhanced ADMA formation; imbalance in acetylation-methylation ratio (AMR); diminished NO generation and ED. Here we review current literature from research showing interdependent association between cav1-PRMT1

  20. Urea-induced ROS cause endothelial dysfunction in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    D'Apolito, Maria; Du, Xueliang; Pisanelli, Daniela; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo; Giacco, Ferdinando; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Colia, Anna Laura; Brownlee, Michael; Giardino, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenic events responsible for accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) are poorly understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that concentrations of urea associated with CRF and increased ROS production in adipocytes might also increase ROS production directly in arterial endothelial cells, causing the same pathophysiologic changes seen with hyperglycemia. Methods Primary cultures of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to 20 mM urea for 48 hrs. C57BL/6J wild-type mice underwent 5/6 nephrectomy or a sham operation. Randomized groups of 5/6 nephrectomized mice and their controls were also injected i.p. with a SOD/catalase mimetic (MnTBAP) for 15 days starting immediately after the final surgical procedure. Results Urea at concentrations seen in CRF induced mitochondrial ROS production in cultured HAEC. Urea-induced ROS caused the activation of endothelial pro-inflammatory pathways through the inhibition of GAPDH, including increased protein kinase C isoforms activity, increased hexosamine pathway activity, and accumulation of intracellular AGEs (advanced glycation end products). Urea-induced ROS directly inactivated the anti-atherosclerosis enzyme PGI2 synthase and also caused ER stress. Normalization of mitochondrial ROS production prevented each of these effects of urea. In uremic mice, treatment with MnTBAP prevented aortic oxidative stress, PGI2 synthase activity reduction and increased expression of the pro-inflammatory proteins TNFα, IL-6, VCAM1, Endoglin, and MCP-1. Conclusions Taken together, these data show that urea itself, at levels common in patients with CRF, causes endothelial dysfunction and activation of proatherogenic pathways. PMID:25682038

  1. Overexpression of cellular glutathione peroxidase rescues homocyst(e)ine-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Weiss, N; Zhang, Y Y; Heydrick, S; Bierl, C; Loscalzo, J

    2001-10-23

    Homocyst(e)ine (Hcy) inhibits the expression of the antioxidant enzyme cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) in vitro and in vivo, which can lead to an increase in reactive oxygen species that inactivate NO and promote endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of GPx-1 can restore the normal endothelial phenotype in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic states. Heterozygous cystathionine beta-synthase-deficient (CBS((-/+))) mice and their wild-type littermates (CBS((+/+))) were crossbred with mice that overexpress GPx-1 [GPx-1((tg+)) mice]. GPx-1 activity was 28% lower in CBS((-/+))/GPx-1((tg-)) compared with CBS((+/+))/GPx-1((tg-)) mice (P < 0.05), and CBS((-/+)) and CBS((+/+)) mice overexpressing GPx-1 had 1.5-fold higher GPx-1 activity compared with GPx-1 nontransgenic mice (P < 0.05). Mesenteric arterioles of CBS((-/+))/GPx-1((tg-)) mice showed vasoconstriction to superfusion with beta-methacholine and bradykinin (P < 0.001 vs. all other groups), whereas nonhyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice [CBS((+/+))/GPx-1((tg-)) and CBS((+/+))/GPx-1((tg+)) mice] demonstrated dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. Overexpression of GPx-1 in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice restored the normal endothelium-dependent vasodilator response. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were transiently transfected with GPx-1 and incubated with dl-homocysteine (HcyH) or l-cysteine. HcyH incubation decreased GPx-1 activity in sham-transfected BAEC (P < 0.005) but not in GPx-1-transfected cells. Nitric oxide release from BAEC was significantly decreased by HcyH but not cysteine, and GPx-1 overexpression attenuated this decrease. These findings demonstrate that overexpression of GPx-1 can compensate for the adverse effects of Hcy on endothelial function and suggest that the adverse vascular effects of Hcy are at least partly mediated by oxidative inactivation of NO.

  2. Overexpression of cellular glutathione peroxidase rescues homocyst(e)ine-induced endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Norbert; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Heydrick, Stanley; Bierl, Charlene; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Homocyst(e)ine (Hcy) inhibits the expression of the antioxidant enzyme cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) in vitro and in vivo, which can lead to an increase in reactive oxygen species that inactivate NO and promote endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of GPx-1 can restore the normal endothelial phenotype in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic states. Heterozygous cystathionine β-synthase-deficient (CBS(−/+)) mice and their wild-type littermates (CBS(+/+)) were crossbred with mice that overexpress GPx-1 [GPx-1(tg+) mice]. GPx-1 activity was 28% lower in CBS(−/+)/GPx-1(tg−) compared with CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg−) mice (P < 0.05), and CBS(−/+) and CBS(+/+) mice overexpressing GPx-1 had 1.5-fold higher GPx-1 activity compared with GPx-1 nontransgenic mice (P < 0.05). Mesenteric arterioles of CBS(−/+)/GPx-1(tg−) mice showed vasoconstriction to superfusion with β-methacholine and bradykinin (P < 0.001 vs. all other groups), whereas nonhyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice [CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg−) and CBS(+/+)/GPx-1(tg+) mice] demonstrated dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. Overexpression of GPx-1 in hyperhomocyst(e)inemic mice restored the normal endothelium-dependent vasodilator response. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were transiently transfected with GPx-1 and incubated with dl-homocysteine (HcyH) or l-cysteine. HcyH incubation decreased GPx-1 activity in sham-transfected BAEC (P < 0.005) but not in GPx-1-transfected cells. Nitric oxide release from BAEC was significantly decreased by HcyH but not cysteine, and GPx-1 overexpression attenuated this decrease. These findings demonstrate that overexpression of GPx-1 can compensate for the adverse effects of Hcy on endothelial function and suggest that the adverse vascular effects of Hcy are at least partly mediated by oxidative inactivation of NO. PMID:11606774

  3. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  4. Age related vascular endothelial function following lifelong sedentariness: positive impact of cardiovascular conditioning without further improvement following low frequency high intensity interval training

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Fergal M.; Herbert, Peter; Ratcliffe, John W.; New, Karl J.; Baker, Julien S.; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with diffuse impairments in vascular endothelial function and traditional aerobic exercise is known to ameliorate these changes. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving vascular function in aging men with existing disease, but its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in otherwise healthy sedentary aging. However, the frequency of commonly used HIIT protocols may be poorly tolerated in older cohorts. Therefore, the present study investigated the effectiveness of lower frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) on vascular function in a cohort of lifelong sedentary (SED; n =22, age 62.7 ± 5.2 years) men compared with a positive control group of lifelong exercisers (LEX; n = 17, age 61.1 ± 5.4 years). The study consisted of three assessment phases; enrolment to the study (Phase A), following 6 weeks of conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B) and following 6 weeks of low frequency HIIT in both SED and LEX (LfHIIT; Phase C). Conditioning exercise improved FMD in SED (3.4 ± 1.5% to 4.9 ± 1.1%; P <0.01) such that the difference between groups on enrolment (3.4 ± 1.5% vs. 5.3 ± 1.4%; P <0.01) was abrogated. This was maintained but not further improved following LfHIIT in SED whilst FMD remained unaffected by LfHIIT in LEX. In conclusion, LfHIIT is effective at maintaining improvements in vascular function achieved during conditioning exercise in SED. LfHIIT is a well‐tolerated and effective exercise mode for reducing cardiovascular risk and maintaining but does not improve vascular function beyond that achieved by conditioning exercise in aging men, irrespective of fitness level. PMID:25626864

  5. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  6. Ameliorative effect of berberine on endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Li, Jing; Lv, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ming; Song, Yanfang; Chen, Li; Liu, Yanjun

    2009-10-12

    Berberine can improve insulin resistance, lower blood glucose, and regulate lipid metabolism disorders which cause endothelial dysfunction, leading to vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of berberine on endothelial dysfunction of aortas in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats and its mechanism. Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: diabetic rats, control rats, diabetic rats treated with berberine (100 mg/kg), and control rats treated with berberine. The serum fasting blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride and nitric oxide (NO) levels were tested. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation and sodium nitroprusside induced endothelium-independent relaxation were measured in aortas for estimating endothelial function. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA was measured by RT-PCR, and the protein expressions of eNOS and NADPH oxidase (NOX4) were analyzed by western blot. The results showed that berberine significantly decreased fasting blood glucose, and triglyceride levels in diabetic rats. Berberine also improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impaired in aorta. The expressions of eNOS mRNA and protein were significantly increased, while NOX4 protein expression was decreased in aortas from diabetic rats with berberine treatment. Moreover, serum NO levels were elevated after berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine restores diabetic endothelial dysfunction through enhanced NO bioavailability by up-regulating eNOS expression and down-regulating expression of NADPH oxidase.

  7. Protection against vascular endothelial dysfunction by polyphenols in sea buckthorn berries in rats with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Suo, Yourui; Chen, Dongli; Tong, Li

    2016-07-19

    Chronic hyperlipemia increases the incidence of vascular endothelial dysfunction and can even induce cardiovascular disease. Sea buckthorn contains a host of bioactives such as flavonoids and polyphenols that can prevent the development of cardiovascular disease. The current study isolated active ingredients, polyphenols, from sea buckthorn berries (SVP) and orally administered SVP at a dose of 7-28 mg/kg. This treatment significantly reduced serum lipids, it enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and it decreased the level of serum TNF-α and IL-6. SVP also alleviate vascular impairment by decreasing the expression of eNOS, ICAM-1, and LOX-1 mRNA and proteins in aortas of rats with hyperlipidemia. Based on these findings, SVP has antioxidant action and it protects endothelium.

  8. Gut hormones and endothelial dysfunction in patients with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are the fifth leading risk for global deaths and its prevalence has doubled since 1980. At least 2.8 million adults, worldwide, die each year as a result of being overweight or obese. The deleterious effects of obesity are tightly related to diabetes, as they are often clinically present in combination to confer increased cardiovascular mortality. Thus, patients with diabetes and obesity are known to develop accelerated atherosclerosis characterized by a dysfunctional endothelium and decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. Recent clinical studies support, indeed, the use of incretin-based antidiabetic therapies for vascular protection. Thus, attention has been focusing on gut hormones and their role, not only in the regulation of appetite but also in vascular health. Intervention directed at modulating these molecules has the potential to decrease mortality of patients with diabetes and obesity. This review will cover part of the ongoing research to understand the role of gut hormones on endothelial function and vascular health.

  9. Age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Avellis, Fernando Onofrio; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Souied, Eric H

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: Is there any new knowledge about the pathogenesis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Results: We now understand better the biochemical and pathological pathways involved in the genesis of AMD. Treatment of exudative AMD is based on intravitreal injection of new antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs for which there does not yet exist a unique recognized strategy of administration. No therapies are actually available for atrophic AMD, despite some experimental new pharmacological approaches. Implementation: strategy of administration, safety of intravitreal injection PMID:21654887

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  11. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  12. Glutathione-S-transferase P protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; Prough, Russell A; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke impairs endothelium-dependent arterial dilation. Reactive constituents of cigarette smoke are metabolized and detoxified by glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs). Although polymorphisms in GST genes are associated with the risk of cancer in smokers, the role of these enzymes in regulating the cardiovascular effects of smoking has not been studied. The P isoform of GST (GSTP), which catalyzes the conjugation of electrophilic molecules in cigarette smoke such as acrolein, was expressed in high abundance in the mouse lung and aorta. Exposure to tobacco smoke for 3 days (5 h/day) decreased total plasma protein. These changes were exaggerated in GSTP(-/-) mice. Aortic rings isolated from tobacco smoke-exposed GSTP(-/-) mice showed greater attenuation of ACh-evoked relaxation than those from GSTP(+/+) mice. The lung, plasma, and aorta of mice exposed to tobacco smoke or acrolein (for 5 h) accumulated more acrolein-adducted proteins than those tissues of mice exposed to air, indicating that exposure to tobacco smoke results in the systemic delivery of acrolein. Relative to GSTP(+/+) mice, modification of some proteins by acrolein was increased in the aorta of GSTP(-/-) mice. Aortic rings prepared from GSTP(-/-) mice that inhaled acrolein (1 ppm, 5 h/day for 3 days) or those exposed to acrolein in an organ bath showed diminished ACh-induced arterial relaxation more strongly than GSTP(+/+) mice. Acrolein-induced endothelial dysfunction was prevented by pretreatment of the aorta with N-acetylcysteine. These results indicate that GSTP protects against the endothelial dysfunction induced by tobacco smoke exposure and that this protection may be related to the detoxification of acrolein or other related cigarette smoke constituents.

  13. Flow-induced remodeling in resistance arteries from obese Zucker rats is associated with endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Céline; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Vessières, Emilie; Bocquet, Arnaud; Dumont, Odile; Jardel, Alain; Loufrani, Laurent; Moreau, Pierre; Henrion, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    Chronic increases in blood flow increase arterial diameter and NO-dependent dilation in resistance arteries. Because endothelial dysfunction accompanies metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that flow-mediated remodeling might be impaired in obese rat resistance arteries. Obese and lean Zucker rat mesenteric resistance arteries were exposed to chronic flow increases through arterial ligation in vivo: arteries exposed to high flow were compared with normal flow arteries. Diameter was measured in vitro in cannulated arteries using pressure arteriography. After 7 days, outward remodeling (diameter increased from 346+/-9 to 412+/-11 mum at 100 mm Hg) occurred in lean high-flow arteries. Endothelium-dependent tone was reduced in high-flow arteries from obese rats by contrast with lean animals. On the other hand, diameter enlargement occurred similarly in the 2 strains. The involvement of NO in endothelium-dependent dilation (evidenced by NO blockade) and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation was smaller in obese than in lean rats. Superoxide anion and reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit expression (p67phox and gp91phox) increased in obese rats and were higher in high-flow than in control arteries. Acute Tempol (a catalase mimetic), catalase plus superoxide dismutase, and l-arginine plus tetrahydrobiopterin restored endothelium-dependent dilation in obese rat normal and high-flow arteries to the level found in lean control arteries. Thus, flow-induced remodeling in obese resistance arteries was associated with a reduced endothelium-mediated dilation because of a decreased NO bioavailability and an excessive superoxide production. This dysfunction might have negative consequences in ischemic diseases in patients with obesity or metabolic syndrome.

  14. Cadmium and mercury cause an oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the ability of cadmium and mercury ions to cause endothelial dysfunction in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. Exposure of monolayers for 48 h to metal concentrations greater than 3-5 microM produced profound cytotoxicity (increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage), a permeability barrier failure, depletion of glutathione and ATP and almost complete inhibition of the activity of key thiol enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In contrast, metal concentrations less than 1-2 microM induced increases in glutathione and thiol-enzyme activities with minimal changes in LDH leakage, barrier function and ATP content. At shorter incubation times (24 h or less), high concentrations of cadmium caused glutathione induction rather than depletion. Thus, oxidative stress and cytotoxicity induced by lower concentrations of the metal ions stimulate compensatory responses, including increased synthesis of glutathione, which presumably preserved the activity of key thiol enzymes, however these responses were not sustainable at higher metal ion concentrations. We conclude, while high concentrations of heavy metals are cytotoxic, lower concentration induce a compensatory protective response, which may explain threshold effects in metal-ion toxicity.

  15. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in rats is associated with erectile dysfunction by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weijun; Xiong, Lei; Bin Yang; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCy) on penile erectile function in a rat model, a methionine-rich diet was used in which erectile function, the reproductive system, and nitric oxide synthase were characterized. The intracavernous pressure, apomorphine experiments, measurement of oxidative stress, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity were utilized. Our results showed that erections in the middle-dose, high-dose, and interference (INF) groups were significantly lower than the control (P < 0.05). INF group, being fed with vitamins B and folic acid, demonstrated markedly improved penile erections compared with the middle-dose group (P < 0.05). HHCy-induced eNOS and phospho-eNOS protein expression was reduced and the antioxidant effect was markedly impaired. The data of the present data provide evidence that HHCy is a vascular risk factor for erectile dysfunction by impairing cavernosa endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Intake of vitamins B can alleviate this abnormality. PMID:27221552

  16. Pinoresinol Diglucoside Alleviates oxLDL-Induced Dysfunction in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhipeng; Wang, Xiangfen; Ji, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Deposition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is one of the initiators and promoters of atherosclerosis. Eucommia lignans were shown to possess antihypertensive effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of pinoresinol diglucoside (PD), a Eucommia lignan, on oxLDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. HUVECs were treated with oxLDL and/or PD followed by assessing radical oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, nitrogen oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity with specific assays kits, mRNA levels with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and protein levels with western blot. PD abolished oxLDL-induced ROS and MDA production, apoptosis, upregulation of lectin-like oxidized LDL recptor-1 (LOX-1), intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB), and activation of p38MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases)/NF-κB signaling. Meanwhile, PD alleviated oxLDL-caused inhibition of SOD activity, eNOS expression, and NO production. These data demonstrated that PD was effective in protecting endothelial cells from oxLDL-caused injuries, which guarantees further investigation on the clinical benefits of PD on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28042303

  17. PPARδ Is Required for Exercise to Attenuate Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Cheang, Wai San; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jian; Wang, Li; Lau, Chi Wai; Chen, Zhen Yu; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Nanping; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity has profound benefits on health, especially on cardiometabolic wellness. Experiments in rodents with trained exercise have shown that exercise improves vascular function and reduces vascular inflammation by modulating the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress. However, the upstream regulator of exercise-induced vascular benefits is unclear. We aimed to investigate the involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) in exercise-induced vascular functional improvement. We show that PPARδ is a crucial mediator for exercise to exert a beneficial effect on the vascular endothelium in diabetic mice. In db/db mice and high-fat diet-induced obese mice, 4 weeks of treadmill exercise restored endothelium-dependent vasodilation of aortas and flow-mediated vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries, whereas genetic ablation of Ppard abolished such improvements. Exercise induces AMPK activation and subsequent PPARδ activation, which help to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, thus increasing NO bioavailability in endothelial cells and vascular tissues. Chemical chaperones 4-phenylbutyric acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid decrease ER stress and protect against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic mice. The results demonstrate that PPARδ-mediated inhibition of ER stress contributes to the vascular benefits of exercise and provides potentially effective targets for treating diabetic vasculopathy.

  18. Perindopril Induces TSP-1 Expression in Hypertensive Patients with Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Valentina; Andor, Minodora; Petrescu, Lucian; Cristescu, Carmen; Baibata, Dana Emilia; Voicu, Mirela; Munteanu, Melania; Citu, Ioana; Muntean, Calin; Cretu, Octavian; Tomescu, Mirela Cleopatra

    2017-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a potent endogenous inhibitor of both physiological and pathological angiogenesis, widely studied as a target in drug development for treating cancer. Several studies performed in the cardiovascular field on TSP-1 are contradictory, the role of TSP-1 in the physiopathology of cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) being, for the moment, incompletely understood and may be due to the presence of several domains in its structure which can stimulate many cellular receptors. It has been reported to inhibit NO-mediated signaling and to act on the angiogenesis, tissue perfusion, endothelial cell proliferation, and homeostasis, so we aimed to quantify the effect Perindopril has on TSP-1 plasma levels in hypertensive patients with endothelial dysfunction in comparison with other antihypertensive drugs, such as beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics, in a chronic treatment. As a conclusion, patients under treatment with Perindopril had increased plasma levels of TSP-1 compared with other hypertensive patients and with the control group. The results of this study confirms the pleiotropic properties of Perindopril: anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, with effects showed by quantifying a single biomarker: TSP-1. PMID:28178210

  19. Sirtuin 1 ablation in endothelial cells is associated with impaired angiogenesis and diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maizel, Julien; Xavier, Sandhya; Chen, Jun; Lin, Chi Hua Sarah; Vasko, Radovan; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-12-15

    Discordant myocardial growth and angiogenesis can explain left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy progressing toward heart failure with aging. Sirtuin 1 expression declines with age; therefore we explored the role played by angiogenesis and Sirtuin 1 in the development of cardiomyopathy. We compared the cardiac function of 10- to 15-wk-old (wo), 30-40 wo, and 61-70 wo endothelial Sirtuin 1-deleted (Sirt1(endo-/-)) mice and their corresponding knockout controls (Sirt1(Flox/Flox)). After 30-40 wk, Sirt1(endo-/-) animals exhibited diastolic dysfunction (DD), decreased mRNA expression of Serca2a in the LV, and decreased capillary density compared with control animals despite a similar VEGFa mRNA expression. However, LV fibrosis and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α expression were not different. The creation of a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) provoked more severe DD and LV fibrosis in Sirt1(endo-/-) compared with control TAC animals. Although the VEGFa mRNA expression was not different and the protein expression of HIF1α was higher in the Sirt1(endo-/-) TAC animals, capillary density remained reduced. In cultured endothelial cells administration of Sirtuin 1 inhibitor decreased mRNA expression of VEGF receptors FLT 1 and FLK 1. Ex vivo capillary sprouting from aortic explants showed impaired angiogenic response to VEGF in the Sirt1(endo-/-) mice. In conclusion, the data demonstrate 1) a defect in angiogenesis preceding development of DD; 2) dispensability of endothelial Sirtuin 1 under unstressed conditions and during normal aging; and 3) impaired angiogenic adaptation and aggravated DD in Sirt1(endo-/-) mice challenged with LV overload.

  20. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent “natural” antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47phox and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II–induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress–related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress–mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  1. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Jamaira A.; Clerici, Stefano P.; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rossoni, Luciana V.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase–derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue–derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  2. Lipid peroxidation as risk factor for endothelial dysfunction in antiphospholipid syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljevic, Natasa; Stojanovich, L; Marisavljevic, D; Djokovic, A; Dopsaj, V; Kotur-Stevuljevic, J; Martinovic, J; Memon, L; Radovanovic, S; Todic, B; Lisulov, D

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress markers and it relations to endothelial damage as risk factor for thrombosis in patients with primary (PAPS) and secondary (SAPS) antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in correlation to traditional risk factors. Flow-mediated (FMD) and nitroglycerine (NMD)-induced dilation of the brachial artery were studied in 140 APS patients (90 PAPS, 50 SAPS) and 40 controls matched by age, sex, and conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis. Markers of oxidative stress, lipid hydroperoxydes (LOOH), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), total sulfhydryl groups (tSHG), and paraoxonase 1 activity (PON1) were determined by spectrophotometric method. Oxidative stress dominates in APS patients. LOOH and AOPP correlate to lipid fractions (p < 0.05), unlike PON1, tSHG that correlated to antiphospholipid antibody positivity (p < 0.05). FMD was lower in APS patients comparing to controls (p < 0.001). Cholesterol is independent variable for FMD impairment in control group (p = 0.011); LOOH in PAPS (p = 0.004); LOOH, aCL, and triglycerides in SAPS patients (p = 0.009, p = 0.049, and p = 0.012, respectively). Combined predictive of aCL and LOOH is better for FMD impairment than LOOH alone in both PAPS and SAPS patients (AUC 0.727, p = 0.001, 95 % CI 0.616-0.837 and AUC 0.824, p˂0.001, 95 % CI 0.690-0.957, respectively). Lipid peroxidation is independent predictor for endothelial dysfunction in APS patients. We demonstrated synergistic effect of aCL and LOOH as risk for endothelial impairment in both PAPS and SAPS patients.

  3. Wavelet-analysis of skin temperature oscillations during local heating for revealing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, Sergey; Stepanov, Rodion; Smirnova, Elena; Loran, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    Skin microvessels have proven to be a model to investigate the mechanisms of vascular disease; in particular, endothelial dysfunction. To analyze skin blood flow, high-resolution thermometry can be used because low-amplitude skin temperature oscillations are caused by changes in the tone of skin vessels. The aim of our study was to test the possibilities of wavelet analysis of skin temperature (WAST) for the diagnosis of impaired regulation of microvascular tone in patients with type 2 diabetes. A local heating functional test was used for the assessment of microvascular tone regulation. A control group consisted of healthy male and female volunteers (n=5 each), aged 39.1±5.3years. A group of patients with type 2 diabetes comprised thirteen people, seven men and six women, aged 36 to 51years old (43.2±3.4years). The diagnosis of diabetes was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). The mean disease duration was 7.36±0.88years. Skin temperature oscillations, reflecting intrinsic myogenic activity (0.05-0.14Hz), neurogenic factors (0.02-0.05Hz) and endothelial activity (0.0095-0.02Hz) increase greatly during local heating for healthy subjects. In the group of patients with type 2 diabetes, no statistically significant differences in the amplitudes in the endothelial range were observed. Relative changes in the oscillation amplitudes in patients with type 2 diabetes were markedly lower compared to the control group. The latter indicates that the WAST method enables assessment of the state of vascular tone and the effects of mechanisms responsible for regulation of blood flow in the microvasculature.

  4. Asef mediates HGF protective effects against LPS-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Mutlu, Gokhan; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-03-01

    Increased vascular endothelial permeability and inflammation are major pathological mechanisms of pulmonary edema and its life-threatening complication, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have previously described potent protective effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) against thrombin-induced hyperpermeability and identified the Rac pathway as a key mechanism of HGF-mediated endothelial barrier protection. However, anti-inflammatory effects of HGF are less understood. This study examined effects of HGF on the pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) inflammatory activation and barrier dysfunction caused by the gram-negative bacterial pathogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We tested involvement of the novel Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in the HGF anti-inflammatory effects. HGF protected the pulmonary EC monolayer against LPS-induced hyperpermeability, disruption of monolayer integrity, activation of NF-kB signaling, expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and production of IL-8. These effects were critically dependent on Asef. Small-interfering RNA-induced downregulation of Asef attenuated HGF protective effects against LPS-induced EC barrier failure. Protective effects of HGF against LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak were also diminished in Asef knockout mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate potent anti-inflammatory effects by HGF and delineate a key role of Asef in the mediation of the HGF barrier protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Modulation of Asef activity may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS-induced gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  5. Myeloperoxidase amplified high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction in vasculature: Role of NADPH oxidase and hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rong; Ding, Yun; Peng, Yi-Yuan; Lu, Naihao

    2017-03-11

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), have emerged as important molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, neutrophils-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) and MPO-catalyzed hypochlorous acid (HOCl) play important roles in the vascular injury. However, it is unknown whether MPO can use vascular-derived ROS to induce diabetic endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we demonstrated that NADPH oxidase was the main source of ROS formation in high glucose-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and played a critical role in high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction such as cell apoptosis, loss of cell viability and reduction of nitric oxide (NO). However, the addition of MPO could amplify the high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction which was inhibited by the presence of apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), catalase (H2O2 scavenger), or methionine (HOCl scavenger), demonstrating the contribution of NADPH oxidase-H2O2-MPO-HOCl pathway in the MPO/high glucose-induced vascular injury. In high glucose-incubated rat aortas, MPO also exacerbated the NADPH oxidase-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation. Consistent with these in vitro data, in diabetic rat aortas, both MPO expresion and NADPH oxidase activity were increased while the endothelial function was simultaneously impaired. The results suggested that vascular-bound MPO could amplify high glucose-induced vascular injury in diabetes. MPO-NADPH oxidase-HOCl may represent an important pathogenic pathway in diabetic vascular diseases.

  6. Increased Rho-kinase expression and activity and pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in smokers with normal lung function.

    PubMed

    Duong-Quy, S; Dao, P; Hua-Huy, T; Guilluy, C; Pacaud, P; Dinh-Xuan, A T

    2011-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is one of the main consequences of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke on the vascular system. Increasing evidence suggests that the small G-protein RhoA and its downstream effectors, the Rho-kinases (ROCKs), are involved in systemic endothelial dysfunction induced by cigarette smoke. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the RhoA/ROCKs pathway in pulmonary artery endothelial function in current smokers with normal lung function. Lung tissues were obtained from nonsmokers and smokers who underwent lobectomy for lung carcinoma. Arterial relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh) was assessed in isolated pulmonary arterial rings. Protein expressions and activities of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), ROCKs and the myosin phosphatase subunit 1 (MYPT-1) were sought. Relaxation in response to ACh was significantly lower in smokers as compared with nonsmokers (n = 8 in each group), consistent with reduced eNOS activity in the former compared with the latter. eNOS protein expression remained, however, the same in both groups. Expression of ROCKs, guanosine triphosphate-RhoA and phosphorylated MYPT-1 were significantly increased in smokers compared with controls. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction is present in smokers whose lung function has not yet been impaired. Reduced activity of eNOS accounts at least in part for this endothelial dysfunction. Increased expression and activity of ROCKs accounts for another part through direct or indirect inhibition of the Rho-A/ROCKs pathway on nitric oxide synthesis and sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction through inhibition of myosin phosphatase.

  7. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves endothelial dysfunction in spontaneous hypertensive rats via down-regulation of caveolin-1 and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung-Won; Choi, Dong-Ju; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status.

  8. EFFECT OF AT1 RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ON INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Noah J.; Philippi, Nathan R.; Bird, Cynthia E.; Li, Yu-Long; Schultz, Harold D.; Morgan, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) raises arterial pressure, impairs vasodilator responsiveness, and increases circulating angiotensin II (Ang II); however, the role of Ang II in CIH-induced vascular dysfunction is unknown. Rats were exposed to CIH or room air (NORM), and a subset of these animals was treated with losartan (Los) during the exposure period. After 28 days, vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine or nitroprusside were measured in isolated gracilis arteries. Superoxide levels and Ang II receptor protein expression were measured in saphenous arteries. After 28 days, arterial pressure was increased and acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was blunted in CIH vs. NORM, and this was prevented by Los. Responses to nitroprusside and superoxide levels did not differ between CIH and NORM. Expression of AT2R was decreased and the AT1R:AT2R ratio was increased in CIH vs. NORM, but this was unaffected by Los. These results indicate that the blood pressure elevation and endothelial dysfunction associated with CIH is dependent, at least in part, on RAS signaling. PMID:22728949

  9. Phloretin ameliorates 2-chlorohexadecanal-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Üllen, Andreas; Fauler, Günter; Bernhart, Eva; Nusshold, Christoph; Reicher, Helga; Leis, Hans-Jörg; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    2-Chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA), a chlorinated fatty aldehyde, is formed via attack on ether-phospholipids by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that is generated by the myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride system of activated leukocytes. 2-ClHDA levels are elevated in atherosclerotic lesions, myocardial infarction, and neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammatory conditions are accompanied by accumulation of neutrophils (an ample source of myeloperoxidase) in the brain. Microvessel damage by inflammatory mediators and/or reactive oxidants can induce blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, a pathological condition leading to cerebral edema, brain hemorrhage, and neuronal death. In this in vitro study we investigated the impact of 2-ClHDA on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC), which constitute the morphological basis of the BBB. We show that exogenously added 2-ClHDA is subject to rapid uptake and metabolism by BMVEC. Using C16 structural analogues of 2-ClHDA we found that the cytotoxic potential decreases in the following order: 2-ClHDA>hexadecanal>palmitic acid>2-ClHDA-dimethylacetal. 2-ClHDA induces loss of barrier function, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis via activation of caspase 3, and altered intracellular redox balance. Finally we investigated potential protective effects of several natural polyphenols on in vitro BBB function. Of the compounds tested, phloretin almost completely abrogated 2-ClHDA-induced BMVEC barrier dysfunction and cell death. These data suggest that 2-ClHDA has the potential to induce BBB breakdown under inflammatory conditions and that phloretin confers protection in this experimental setting. PMID:22982051

  10. Miglitol improves postprandial endothelial dysfunction in patients with acute coronary syndrome and new-onset postprandial hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia, a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease, causes endothelial dysfunction. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (α-GIs) improve postprandial hyperglycemia (PPHG) and may have favorable effects on associated cardiovascular disease. Effects of α-GIs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and PPHG remain unclear; thus, we assessed the effect of α-GI miglitol on endothelial function in such patients by digital reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT). Methods Fifty-four patients with ACS who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled in the study: 36 with new-onset PPHG and 18 with normal glucose tolerance. Eighteen PPHG patients were given 50 mg of miglitol with each meal for 1 week. Endothelial function was assessed on the basis of the RH-PAT index (RHI) before and after the 1-week miglitol treatment. The other 18 PPHG patients and the 18 NGT patients were not given any anti-diabetic agent for 1 week, and endothelial function was assessed. Results Postprandial RHI decreased significantly in patients with PPHG. Miglitol improved PPHG significantly; postprandial RHI also improved (p = 0.007). Significant inverse correlation was found between the postprandial change in RHI and postprandial fasting-to-60-minutes surge in glucose (r = -0.382, p = 0.009). Moreover, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with the reduced postprandial glucose surge achieved with miglitol (r = -0.462, p = 0.001). Conclusions Postprandial changes in glucose are related to endothelial dysfunction in ACS. Miglitol-based improvement in PPHG appears to improve endothelial function. The effect of miglitol on glucose-dependent endothelial function might improve outcomes of ACS. PMID:23777506

  11. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes. PMID:23077100

  12. Effects of Oral L-Citrulline Supplementation on Lipoprotein Oxidation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Humans with Vasospastic Angina

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masahiko; Sakurada, Masami; Watanabe, Fumiko; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Doi, Hiroshi; Ezaki, Hirotaka; Morishita, Koji; Miyakex, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased lipid oxidation are associated with progressive endothelial dysfunction. L-Citrulline, the effective precursor of L-arginine which is essential as a substrate for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is effective in enhancing NO-dependent signaling. However, little is known about the efficacy of L-citrulline supplementation on lipoprotein oxidation and endothelial dysfunction. Methods: Twenty-two patients (aged 41 - 64 years old) diagnosed with vasospastic angina with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery (< 5.5 %) received 800 mg/day of L-citrulline for 8 weeks. FMD (%), blood NOx, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), small dense LDL, oxidized lipids, amino acids concentrations were measured before and after supplementation. Results: Compared with baseline values, FMD (%) was significantly improved at 4 and 8 weeks as well as at 4 weeks after the end of intake. L-Citrulline supplementation caused a significant lowering of plasma ADMA levels. Plasma L-arginine/ADMA ratio and NOx levels rose markedly throughout the study period. Moreover, significant reductions of serum oxidized LDL and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) ligand containing ApoB (LAB), an indicator of the biological activity of oxidized lipoprotein binding to LOX-1, were observed after L-citrulline intake. Conclusions: L-Citrulline supplementation improves endothelial dysfunction, probably due to potentiating NO-dependent reactions and decreasing the state of lipoprotein oxidation in humans. PMID:26005507

  13. Depletion of NADP(H) due to CD38 activation triggers endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Levy A.; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; De Pascali, Francesco; Hemann, Craig; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    In the postischemic heart, coronary vasodilation is impaired due to loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Although the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is depleted, its repletion only partially restores eNOS-mediated coronary vasodilation, indicating that other critical factors trigger endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, studies were performed to characterize the unidentified factor(s) that trigger endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart. We observed that depletion of the eNOS substrate NADPH occurs in the postischemic heart with near total depletion from the endothelium, triggering impaired eNOS function and limiting BH4 rescue through NADPH-dependent salvage pathways. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), depletion of the NADP(H) pool occurred and was most marked in the endothelium, with >85% depletion. Repletion of NADPH after I/R increased NOS-dependent coronary flow well above that with BH4 alone. With combined NADPH and BH4 repletion, full restoration of NOS-dependent coronary flow occurred. Profound endothelial NADPH depletion was identified to be due to marked activation of the NAD(P)ase-activity of CD38 and could be prevented by inhibition or specific knockdown of this protein. Depletion of the NADPH precursor, NADP+, coincided with formation of 2’-phospho-ADP ribose, a CD38-derived signaling molecule. Inhibition of CD38 prevented NADP(H) depletion and preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO generation with increased recovery of contractile function and decreased infarction in the postischemic heart. Thus, CD38 activation is an important cause of postischemic endothelial dysfunction and presents a novel therapeutic target for prevention of this dysfunction in unstable coronary syndromes. PMID:26297248

  14. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John A.; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W.; Alexander, M. Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  15. Synergistic effects of metformin with liraglutide against endothelial dysfunction through GLP-1 receptor and PKA signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Yang, Jin; Lu, Ran; Tian, Qing; Hou, Wenfang; Wang, Guang; Wei, Rui; Hong, Tianpei

    2017-01-01

    Metformin or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue liraglutide has cardiovascular benefits. However, it is not clear whether their combined treatment have additive or synergistic effects on the vasculature. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), exposed to palmitic acid (PA) to induce endothelial dysfunction, were incubated with metformin, liraglutide or their combination. High fat diet (HFD)-fed ApoE−/− mice were randomized into control, metformin, liraglutide, and combination treatment groups. Results showed that in PA-treated HUVECs and HFD-fed ApoE−/− mice, combination of metformin and liraglutide at lower dose significantly improved endothelial dysfunction compared with the single treatment. Metformin upregulated GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) level and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. However, PKA inhibition but not GLP-1R blockade eliminated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial function. Furthermore, AMPK inhibitor compound C abolished the metformin-mediated upregulation of GLP-1R level and PKA phosphorylation. In conclusion, combination of metformin and liraglutide has synergistic protective effects on endothelial function. Moreover, metformin stimulates GLP-1R and PKA signalling via AMPK-dependent pathway, which may account for its synergistic protective effects with liraglutide. Our findings provide new insights on the interaction between metformin and GLP-1, and provide important information for designing new GLP-1-based therapy strategies in treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:28145471

  16. Synergistic effects of metformin with liraglutide against endothelial dysfunction through GLP-1 receptor and PKA signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Yang, Jin; Lu, Ran; Tian, Qing; Hou, Wenfang; Wang, Guang; Wei, Rui; Hong, Tianpei

    2017-02-01

    Metformin or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue liraglutide has cardiovascular benefits. However, it is not clear whether their combined treatment have additive or synergistic effects on the vasculature. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), exposed to palmitic acid (PA) to induce endothelial dysfunction, were incubated with metformin, liraglutide or their combination. High fat diet (HFD)-fed ApoE(-/-) mice were randomized into control, metformin, liraglutide, and combination treatment groups. Results showed that in PA-treated HUVECs and HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice, combination of metformin and liraglutide at lower dose significantly improved endothelial dysfunction compared with the single treatment. Metformin upregulated GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) level and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. However, PKA inhibition but not GLP-1R blockade eliminated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial function. Furthermore, AMPK inhibitor compound C abolished the metformin-mediated upregulation of GLP-1R level and PKA phosphorylation. In conclusion, combination of metformin and liraglutide has synergistic protective effects on endothelial function. Moreover, metformin stimulates GLP-1R and PKA signalling via AMPK-dependent pathway, which may account for its synergistic protective effects with liraglutide. Our findings provide new insights on the interaction between metformin and GLP-1, and provide important information for designing new GLP-1-based therapy strategies in treating type 2 diabetes.

  17. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia.

  18. Inhibition of endocytosis exacerbates TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction via enhanced JNK and p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Nguyen, Hong N; Lamb, Fred S

    2014-04-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that causes endothelial dysfunction. Endocytosis of TNF-α receptors (TNFR) precedes endosomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which is required for NF-κB activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. It is unknown how endocytosis of TNFRs impacts signaling in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction is induced by both endosomal and cell surface events, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation, and endocytosis of the TNFR modifies signaling. Mesenteric artery segments from C57BL/6 mice were treated with TNF-α (10 ng/ml) for 22 h in tissue culture, with or without signaling inhibitors (dynasore for endocytosis, SP600125 for JNK, SB203580 for p38, U0126 for ERK), and vascular function was assessed. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired by TNF-α, and dynasore exacerbated this, whereas JNK or p38 inhibition prevented these effects. In cultured endothelial cells from murine mesenteric arteries, dynasore potentiated JNK and p38 but not ERK phosphorylation and promoted cell death. NF-κB activation by TNF-α was decreased by dynasore. JNK inhibition dramatically increased both the magnitude and duration of TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and potentiated intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) activation. Dynasore still inhibited NF-κB activation in the presence of SP600125. Thus TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction is both JNK and p38 dependent. Endocytosis modulates the balance of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, and inhibition of NF-κB activation by JNK limits this pro-proliferative signal, which may contribute to endothelial cell death in response to TNF-α.

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension.

  20. A Crucial Role for p90RSK-Mediated Reduction of ERK5 Transcriptional Activity in Endothelial Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Nhat-Tu; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Takei, Yuichiro; Lee, Hakjoo; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Chang, Eugene; McClain, Carolyn; Hurley, Cheryl; Wang, Xin; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong; Morrell, Craig; Sullivan, Mark A.; Cohen, Michael S.; Serafimova, Iana M.; Taunton, Jack; Fujiwara, Keigi; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality by increasing endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and subsequently accelerating atherosclerosis. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is activated by steady laminar flow and regulates EC function by increasing eNOS expression and inhibiting EC inflammation. However, the role and regulatory mechanisms of ERK5 in EC dysfunction and atherosclerosis are poorly understood. Here, we report the critical role of the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK)/ERK5 complex in EC dysfunction in DM and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Inducible EC-specific ERK5 knockout (ERK5-EKO) mice showed increased leukocyte rolling and impaired vessel reactivity. To examine the role of endothelial ERK5 in atherosclerosis, we used inducible ERK5-EKO-LDLR−/− mice and observed increased plaque formation. When activated, p90RSK associated with ERK5, and this association inhibited ERK5 transcriptional activity and up-regulated VCAM-1 expression. In addition, p90RSK directly phosphorylated ERK5 S496 and reduced eNOS expression. p90RSK activity was increased in diabetic mouse vessels, and FMK-MEA, a specific p90RSK inhibitor, ameliorated EC-leukocyte recruitment and diminished vascular reactivity in DM mice. Interestingly, in ERK-EKO mice, increased leukocyte rolling and impaired vessel reactivity were resistant to the beneficial effects of FMK-MEA, suggesting a critical role for endothelial ERK5 in mediating the salutary effects of FMK-MEA on endothelial dysfunction. FMK-MEA also inhibited atherosclerosis formation in ApoE−/− mice. Conclusions Our study highlights the importance of the p90RSK/ERK5 module as a critical mediator of EC dysfunction in DM and atherosclerosis formation, thus revealing a potential new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23243209

  1. Diesel exhaust particles induce endothelial dysfunction in apoE{sup -/-} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Christian S.; Sheykhzade, Majid; Moller, Peter; Folkmann, Janne Kjaergaard; Amtorp, Ole; Jonassen, Thomas; Loft, Steffen . E-mail: s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk

    2007-02-15

    Background: Particulate air pollution can aggravate cardiovascular disease by mechanisms suggested to involve translocation of particles to the bloodstream and impairment of endothelial function, possibly dependent on present atherosclerosis. Aim: We investigated the effects of exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in vivo and ex vivo on vasomotor functions in aorta from apoE{sup -/-} mice with slight atherosclerosis and from normal apoE{sup +/+} mice. Methods: DEP 0, 0.5 or 5 mg/kg bodyweight in saline was administered i.p. The mice were sacrificed 1 h later and aorta ring segments were mounted on wire myographs. Segments from unexposed mice were also incubated ex vivo with 0, 10 and 100 {mu}g DEP/ml before measurement of vasomotor functions. Results: Exposure to 0.5 mg/kg DEP in vivo caused a decrease in the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine elicited vasorelaxation in apoE{sup -/-} mice, whereas the response was enhanced in apoE{sup +/+} mice. No significant change was observed after administration of 5 mg/kg DEP. In vivo DEP exposure did not affect constriction induced by K{sup +} or phenylephrine. In vitro exposure to 100 {mu}g DEP/ml enhanced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and attenuated phenylephrine-induced constriction. Vasodilation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not affected by any DEP exposure. Conclusion: Exposure to DEP has acute effect on vascular functions. Endothelial dysfunction possibly due to decreased NO production as suggested by decreased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and unchanged sodium nitroprusside response can be induced by DEP in vivo only in vessels of mice with some atherosclerosis.

  2. [Effect of angioprotective therapy with bioflavonoids on endothelial dysfunction in patients with acute venous thromboses].

    PubMed

    Bryushkov, A Yu; Ershov, P V; Sergeeva, N A; Bogachev, V Yu

    The study was aimed at evaluating a possibility of correcting endothelial dysfunction by means of angioprotective therapy with natural-origin bioflavonoids in patients presenting with acute venous thromboses. Ours was an open comparative prospective study including a total of thirty 34-to-60-year-old patients suffering from lower limb deep vein thrombosis. The patients were subdivided into two groups. The Study Group was composed of 15 patients receiving on the background of anticoagulant therapy with direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran etexilate at a daily dose of 300 mg) natural-origin angioprotectors (red grape leaf extract). The Control Group also consisted of 15 patients undergoing anticoagulant therapy with direct thrombin inhibitors alone. Blood sampling for laboratory monitoring [the quantitative level of von Willebrand factor (vWF) in blood plasma, integral assessment of the links of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis by means of thromboelastography] and ultrasonographic angioscanning of lower extremities were carried out in both Group twice: at the beginning of the study and 3 months after the beginning of therapy. The absolute majority of patients demonstrated a quantitative increase in vWF (the median in the Study Group amounted to 208.3%, being 190.0% in the Control Group, with the cut-off level equaling 140.8%). Assessing dynamics of the vWF level after 3 months on the background of using natural-origin flavonoids (the Study Group) showed a more pronounced decrease in the vWF level in the Study Group patients as compared with the Control Group patients (98.4%). Comparing the dynamic composite indices of the thromboelastogram revealed that with similar parameters in patients from the Study and Control Groups at admission, in dynamics there was observed greater growth of the level of indices of the process of dissolution of the fibrin clot (lysis) in the Study Group as compared to the Control Group. Also noted was more pronounced recanalization of

  3. Endothelial dysfunction and metabolic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Angulo, J; Peiró, C; Llergo, J L; Sánchez-Ferrer, A; López-Dóriga, P; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-04-01

    1. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the metabolic control, estimated by the levels of glycosylated haemoglobin in total blood samples (HbA1c), in developing vascular endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Four groups of animals with different levels of insulin treatment were established, by determining HbA1c values in 5.5 to 7.4%, 7.5 to 9.4%, 9.5 to 12% and > 12%, respectively. 2. The parameters analysed were: (1) the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) in isolated aorta and mesenteric microvessels; (2) the vasodilator responses to exogenous nitric oxide (NO) in aorta: and (3) the existence of oxidative stress by studying the influence of the free radical scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the vasodilator responses to both ACh and NO. 3. In both isolated aortic segments and mesenteric microvessels, the endothelium-mediated concentration-dependent relaxant responses elicited by ACh were significantly decreased when the vessels were obtained from diabetic animals but only with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. There was a high correlation between HbA1c levels and the impairment of ACh-induced relaxations, measured by pD2 values. 4. The concentration-dependent vasorelaxant responses to NO in endothelium-denuded aortic segments were significantly reduced only in vessels from diabetic animals with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. Again, a very high correlation was found between the HbA1c values and pD2 for NO-evoked responses. 5. In the presence of SOD, the responses to ACh or NO were only increased in the segments from diabetic rats with HbA1c levels higher than 7.5%, but not in those from non-diabetic or diabetic rats with a good metabolic control (HbA1c levels <7.5%). 6. These results suggest the existence of: (1) a close relation between the degree of endothelial dysfunction and the metabolic control of diabetes, estimated by the levels of HbA1c; and (2) an increased production of superoxide anions in

  4. [New possibilities in the pharmacologic prevention of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2008-01-20

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown--endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, antiadhesive and anti-inflammatory functions; trimetazidine as an adjuvant agent helps to normalize, to restore the disturbed metabolism of the retinal tissue functioning insufficiently, in the end. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive--taking into consideration all possible side effects--ACE-inhibitor and/or AR blocker and statin and aspirin treatment, and trimetazidine as adjuvant medicine 1. those without maculopathy but being above the age of 50 and having risk factors inducing endothelial dysfunction; 2. those, who already developed AMD in one eye as a prevention in the second, unaffected eye; and 3. those patients who developed AMD in both eyes in order to ameliorate or merely slow the progression of the disease. Besides, it is advisory to

  5. Markers of endothelial dysfunction and evaluation of vascular reactivity tests in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Ozuguz, Pinar; Karabulut, Ayse Anil; Tulmac, Murat; Kisa, Ucler; Kocak, Mukadder; Gunduz, Ozgur

    2014-11-01

    We assessed endothelial dysfunction (ED) in patients with Behcet disease (BD; n=40) and healthy controls (n=20). Serum lipid, homocysteine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESRs), and ultrasonographic flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were measured. Mean hsCRP, ESR, homocysteine, and ADMA were significantly higher in the BD group (P<.001 for all). Patients with active BD had higher serum levels of hsCRP, homocysteine, and ESR compared with those in remission (P<.001, P<.001, and P=.005, respectively). Flow-mediated dilatation was significantly lower in patients with BD than in controls (P=.001). Flow-mediated dilatation correlated negatively with BD duration and serum ADMA levels (P<.001, r=-.745 and P<.001, r=-.682); a positive correlation was seen between serum ADMA levels and BD duration (P<.001, r=.552). Only stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed BD duration to have a significant effect on FMD. Flow-mediated dilatation, in conjunction with markers of inflammation, may evaluate ED in patients with BD.

  6. Advanced glycation end products: A link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Zhang, John; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a heterogeneous syndrome of reproductive and metabolic alterations, is associated with increased long-term risk of cardiovascular complications. This phenomenon has been linked to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are pro-inflammatory molecules that trigger a state of intracellular oxidative stress and inflammation after binding to their cell membrane receptors RAGE. The activation of the AGE-RAGE axis has been well known to play a role in atherosclerosis in both men and women. Women with PCOS have systemic chronic inflammatory condition even at the ovarian level as represented by elevated levels of serum/ovarian AGEs and increased expression of the pro-inflammatory RAGE in ovarian tissue. Data also showed the presence of sRAGE in the follicular fluid and its potential protective role against the harmful effect of AGEs on ovarian function. Thus, whether AGE-RAGE axis constitutes a link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in women with PCOS is addressed in this review. Additionally, we discuss the role of hormonal changes observed in PCOS and how they are linked with the AGE-RAGE axis in order to better understand the nature of this complex syndrome whose consequences extend well beyond reproduction.

  7. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure increased fibronectin (FN) expression, decreased Robo4 expression, and enhanced the permeability of L-LEC monolayers. Moreover, incubating L-LECs with both cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 exacerbated hyperpermeability, significantly enhanced apoptosis, and further impaired in vitro wound healing as compared with cocaine alone. Our studies also suggested that the sigma-1 receptor (Sigma-1R) and the dopamine-4 receptor (D4R) are involved in cocaine-induced pathology in L-LECs. Seeking clinical correlation, we found that FN levels in sera and lung tissue of HIV+ donors were significantly elevated as compared to HIV− donors. Our in vitro data demonstrate that cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 induce dysfunction and damage of lung lymphatics, and suggest that cocaine use may exacerbate pulmonary edema and fibrosis associated with HIV infection. Continued exploration of the interplay between cocaine and HIV should assist the design of therapeutics to ameliorate HIV-induced pulmonary disorders within the drug using population. PMID:26311830

  8. Serum from Diesel Exhaust-Exposed Rats with Cardiac Dysfunction Alters Aortic Endothelial Cell Function In Vitro: Circulating Mediators as Causative Factors?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although circulating inflammatory mediators are strongly associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes triggered by inhaled air pollution, direct cause-effect linkage has not been established. Given that endothelial toxicity often precedes and precipitates cardiac dysfunction, ...

  9. Arterial endothelial barrier dysfunction: actions of homocysteine and the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase free radical generating system.

    PubMed

    Berman, R S; Martin, W

    1993-04-01

    1. Endothelial barrier function was assessed by use of an in vitro model in which transfer of trypan blue-labelled albumin was measured across monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells grown on polycarbonate membranes. 2. Addition of either hypoxanthine (0.2 mM) or xanthine oxidase (20 mu ml-1) alone during a 90 min incubation did not affect albumin transfer across endothelial cell monolayers, but a combination of both increased transfer. 3. The increase in albumin transfer induced by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase was abolished by catalase (3 u ml-1), reduced by allopurinol (4 mM), but unaffected by superoxide dismutase (6000 u ml-1), the hydroxyl radical scavengers, mannitol (15 mM), dimethylthiourea (10 mM) and N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (1 mM), the iron chelator, deferoxamine (0.5 mM), ferric chloride (50 microM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine (30 microM), or the antioxidant, dithiothreitol (3 mM). 4. Hydrogen peroxide (0.1-30 mM) itself increased albumin transfer across endothelial cell monolayers, exhibiting a biphasic concentration-response curve. The increase induced by 0.1 mM hydrogen peroxide was abolished in the presence of 0.3 u ml-1 catalase whilst that induced by 10 mM hydrogen peroxide was abolished by 3000 u ml-1 catalase. 5. Homocysteine (0.5-1.5 mM) did not affect albumin transfer across endothelial monolayers when added alone, but when added in combination with copper sulphate (50 microM), which catalyses its oxidation, a significant increase in albumin transfer was observed. 6. The increase in albumin transfer induced by the combination of homocysteine (1.5 mM) and copper sulphate was abolished by catalase (1 u ml-1), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (6000 u ml-1), mannitol (15 mM), dimethylthiourea (1 mM) or deferoxamine (0.5 mM).7. The data suggest that the endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by the combination of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase is mediated solely by the action of

  10. Doppler assessment of brachial artery flow as a measure of endothelial dysfunction in pediatric chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Gehan; Bughdady, Yasser; Kandil, Manal E; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Taher, Heba

    2008-11-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and has been demonstrated in all stages of renal failure. Non-invasive techniques to assess endothelial function have been recently developed and have been proven to predict future mortality in adults. We aimed to assess endothelial function in children with stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD 4) on conservative treatment, using a-non invasive, high-resolution, ultrasound Doppler study of the brachial artery flow, correlating it with other clinical and laboratory parameters. This study included 34 children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment who were compared with 30 healthy controls. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NTG-MD) and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were estimated. FMD was abnormal (< 5%) in 24 patients (71%). FMD and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were significantly lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). FMD correlated positively with serum calcium and negatively with alkaline phosphatase. We concluded that endothelial dysfunction is present in children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment and may reflect increased atherogenic and thrombogenic properties of the endothelium, contributing to subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcome.

  11. Aspalatone Prevents VEGF-Induced Lipid Peroxidation, Migration, Tube Formation, and Dysfunction of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sonowal, Himangshu; Pal, Pabitra B.; Shukla, Kirtikar

    2017-01-01

    Although aspalatone (acetylsalicylic acid maltol ester) is recognized as an antithrombotic agent with antioxidative and antiplatelet potential; its efficacy in preventing endothelial dysfunction is not known. In this study, we examined the antiangiogenic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory effect of aspalatone in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Specifically, the effect of aspalatone on VEGF-induced HAECs growth, migration, tube formation, and levels of lipid peroxidation-derived malondialdehyde (MDA) was examined. Our results indicate that the treatment of HAECs with aspalatone decreased VEGF-induced cell migration, tube formation, and levels of MDA. Aspalatone also inhibited VEGF-induced decrease in the expression of eNOS and increase in the expression of iNOS, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. Aspalatone also prevented the VEGF-induced adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. Furthermore, aspalatone also prevented VEGF-induced release of inflammatory markers such as Angiopoietin-2, Leptin, EGF, G-CSF, HB-EGF, and HGF in HAECs. Thus, our results suggest that aspalatone could be used to prevent endothelial dysfunction, an important process in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28243353

  12. TMEM16A Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction by Facilitating Nox2 NADPH Oxidase-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-Ming; Gao, Min; Guo, Kai-Min; Wang, Mi; Li, Xiang-Yu; Zeng, Xue-Lin; Sun, Lu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Du, Yan-Hua; Wang, Guan-Lei; Zhou, Jia-Guo; Guan, Yong-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels play a crucial role in various physiological processes. However, the role of TMEM16A in vascular endothelial dysfunction during hypertension is unclear. In this study, we investigated the specific involvement of TMEM16A in regulating endothelial function and blood pressure and the underlying mechanism. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, confocal imaging, patch-clamp recordings, and TMEM16A endothelial-specific transgenic and knockout mice were used. We found that TMEM16A was expressed abundantly and functioned as a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel in endothelial cells. Angiotensin II induced endothelial dysfunction with an increase in TMEM16A expression. The knockout of endothelial-specific TMEM16A significantly lowered the blood pressure and ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, whereas the overexpression of endothelial-specific TMEM16A resulted in the opposite effects. These results were related to the increased reactive oxygen species production, Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase activation, and Nox2 and p22phox protein expression that were facilitated by TMEM16A on angiotensin II-induced hypertensive challenge. Moreover, TMEM16A directly bound with Nox2 and reduced the degradation of Nox2 through the proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Therefore, TMEM16A is a positive regulator of endothelial reactive oxygen species generation via Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase, which induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Modification of TMEM16A may be a novel therapeutic strategy for endothelial dysfunction-associated diseases.

  13. Proton Pump Inhibitors Decrease Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 and Soluble Endoglin Secretion, Decrease Hypertension, and Rescue Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kenji; Tong, Stephen; Beard, Sally; Binder, Natalie; Muto, Masanaga; Senadheera, Sevvandi N; Parry, Laura; Dilworth, Mark; Renshall, Lewis; Brownfoot, Fiona; Hastie, Roxanne; Tuohey, Laura; Palmer, Kirsten; Hirano, Toshihiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha; Hannan, Natalie J

    2017-03-01

    Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy. Antiangiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin are secreted in excess from the placenta, causing hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and multiorgan injury. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation exacerbate the endothelial injury. A drug that can block these pathophysiological steps would be an attractive treatment option. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are safe in pregnancy where they are prescribed for gastric reflux. We performed functional studies on primary human tissues and animal models to examine the effects of PPIs on sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion, vessel dilatation, blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction. PPIs decreased sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion from trophoblast, placental explants from preeclamptic pregnancies, and endothelial cells. They also mitigated tumor necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial dysfunction: PPIs blocked endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression, leukocyte adhesion to endothelium, and disruption of endothelial tube formation. PPIs decreased endothelin-1 secretion and enhanced endothelial cell migration. Interestingly, the PPI esomeprazole vasodilated maternal blood vessels from normal pregnancies and cases of preterm preeclampsia, but its vasodilatory effects were lost when the vessels were denuded of their endothelium. Esomeprazole decreased blood pressure in a transgenic mouse model where human sFlt-1 was overexpressed in placenta. PPIs upregulated endogenous antioxidant defenses and decreased cytokine secretion from placental tissue and endothelial cells. We have found that PPIs decrease sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion and endothelial dysfunction, dilate blood vessels, decrease blood pressure, and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. They have therapeutic potential for preeclampsia and other diseases where endothelial dysfunction is involved.

  14. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  15. Acute Exposure to Low Glucose Rapidly Induces Endothelial Dysfunction and Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress: Role for AMP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingli; Alexanian, Anna; Ying, Rong; Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J.; Dharmashankar, Kodlipet; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeanette; Gutterman, David D.; Widlansky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality. The reasons for this remain unclear and the effects of low glucose exposure on vascular endothelial function remain largely unknown. We endeavored to determine the effects of low glucose on endothelial cells and intact human arterioles. Methods and Results We exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells to low glucose conditions in a clinically relevant range (40–70 mg/dL) and found rapid and marked reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability (P<0.001). This was associated with concomitantly increased mitochondrial superoxide production (P<0.001) and NO-dependent mitochondrial hyperpolarization (P<0.001). Reduced NO bioavailability was rapid and attributable to reduced eNOS activity and destruction of NO. Low glucose rapidly activated AMP Kinase but physiological activation failed to restore NO bioavailability. Pharmacological AMP Kinase activation led to phosphorylation of eNOS’s Ser633 activation site, reversing the adverse effects of low glucose, and this protective effect was prevented by L-NAME. Intact human arterioles exposed to low glucose demonstrated marked endothelial dysfunction which was prevented by either metformin or TEMPOL. Conclusions Our data suggest that moderate low glucose exposure rapidly impairs NO bioavailability and endothelial function in the human endothelium, and that pharmacological AMP Kinase activation can inhibit this effect in an NO-dependent manner. PMID:22207730

  16. Nafamostat Mesilate Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Hee-Jung; Kang, Shin Kwang; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Saet-Byel; Jee, Sungju; Moon, Jae Young; Suh, Kwang-Sun; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2015-05-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM) is a serine protease inhibitor with anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory effects. NM has been used in Asia for anticoagulation during extracorporeal circulation in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. Oxidative stress is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and is associated with vascular endothelial function. We investigated whether NM could inhibit endothelial dysfunction induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with TNF-α for 24 h. The effects of NM on monocyte adhesion, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, and intracellular superoxide production were then examined. NM (0.01~100 µg/mL) did not affect HUVEC viability; however, it inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and p66shc expression elicited by TNF-α (3 ng/mL), and it dose dependently prevented the TNF-α-induced upregulation of endothelial VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In addition, it mitigated TNF-α-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and the adhesion of U937 monocytes. These data suggest that NM mitigates TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion and the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules, and that the anti-adhesive effect of NM is mediated through the inhibition of p66shc, ROS production, and p38 MAPK activation.

  17. Vitamin K{sub 1} (phylloquinone) induces vascular endothelial dysfunction: Role of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tirapelli, Carlos R.; De Andrade, Claudia R.; Lieberman, Marcel; Laurindo, Francisco R.; De Souza, Heraldo P.; Oliveira, Ana M. de . E-mail: amolive@usp.br

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects induced by phylloquinone (Vitamin K{sub 1}; VK{sub 1}). Vascular reactivity experiments, using standard muscle bath procedures, showed that VK{sub 1} (5 and 50 {mu}M) enhances the contractile response of endothelium-intact, but not denuded, rat carotid rings to phenylephrine. Similarly, maximal contraction induced by phenylephrine was enhanced in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N {sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The combination of L-NAME and VK{sub 1} did not produce any further additional effect. Pre-incubation of intact-rings with VK{sub 1} reduced both acetylcholine- and bradykinin-induced relaxation. VK{sub 1} induced an increment in tension on carotid rings submaximally pre-contracted with phenylephrine. VK{sub 1}-induced increment in tension was completely abolished by endothelial removal or incubation of intact rings with L-NAME and L-NNA. Conversely, 7-nitroindazole, 1400 W, or indomethacin did not affect VK{sub 1}-induced contraction. Moreover, VK{sub 1} reduced L-arginine-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact rings. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence assays showed that VK{sub 1} induced an increase in the level of superoxide anions in endothelium-intact but not denuded rings. Measurement of nitrite and nitrate generation showed that VK{sub 1} did not alter nitrate formation but strongly inhibited the generation of nitrite. Finally, the superoxide anions scavenger tiron prevented the endothelial vasomotor dysfunction caused by VK{sub 1} on phenyleprine-induced contraction and acetylcholine or bradykinin-induced relaxation. In conclusion, our data show that VK{sub 1} disrupts the vasomotor function of rat carotid. Our results suggest that VK{sub 1}-induced oxidative stress through production of superoxide anion is interfering with the NO pathway, which in turn is responsible for the altered vascular reactivity induced by VK{sub 1}.

  18. Macro-microangiopathy and endothelial dysfunction in NIDDM patients with and without diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Parving, H H; Nielsen, F S; Bang, L E; Smidt, U M; Svendsen, T L; Chen, J W; Gall, M A; Rossing, P

    1996-12-01

    The Steno hypothesis suggests that albuminuria reflects widespread vascular damage (proliferative retinopathy and severe macroangiopathy) due to a generalized vascular (endothelial) dysfunction. We assessed this concept in NIDDM (non-insulin-dependent diabetic) patients with (13 female/ 39 male, age 60 +/- 7 years, group 1) and without (12 female /41 male, age 61 +/- 7 years, group 2) diabetic nephropathy compared to matched non-diabetic subjects (7 female/15 male, age 58 +/- 8 years, group 3). A 12-lead ECG was recorded and coded blindly using the Minnesota Rating Scale; the World Health Organization cardiovascular questionnaire was used to assess past and present evidence of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (digital systolic blood pressure determination). The degree of diabetic retinopathy was scored from fundus photography. The following variables were measured: transcapillary escape rate of albumin (initial disappearance of intravenously injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin), plasma concentrations of prorenin (radioimmunoassay) and serum concentrations of von Willebrand factor (enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay). Prevalence of ischaemic heart disease (ECG reading) (49/20/5)% and peripheral vascular disease as indicated by reduced systolic blood pressure on big toe (69/30/ 14)% was significantly higher in group 1 vs group 2 (p < 0.01) and in group 2 vs group 3 (p < 0.01), respectively. The prevalence and severity of retinopathy was higher in group 1 vs 2 (p < 0.01). Transcapillary escape rate of albumin (%/h) was elevated in group 1 and 2 as compared to control subjects: 7.9 (4.3-13.7); 7.4 (3.7-16.4) vs 6.0 (3.4-8.7), (p < 0.005), respectively. Plasma prorenin activity (IU/ml) was raised in group 1 and group 2 as compared to group 3: 272 (59-2405); 192 (18-813), and 85 (28-246), p < 0.001, respectively. Serum von Willebrand factor (IU/ ml) was elevated in group 1 as compared to group 2 and 3: 2.07 (0

  19. Noninvasive interrogation of microvasculature for signs of endothelial dysfunction in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian; Kohen, Adam; Brouder, Daniel; Rahim, Fahim; Adler, Stephen; Garrick, Renee; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2004-12-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) has been demonstrated in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who have cardiovascular disease (CD) or diabetes mellitus (DM). While techniques to examine conduit arteries have been adapted to these patients, evaluation of microvascular function has lagged behind. Therefore, we used laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and scanned laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to quantify parameters of the postocclusion reactive hyperemia and thermal hyperemic responses (local heating to 43 degrees C) in ESRD patients (n=63) and healthy individuals (n=33). Patients with ESRD were partitioned among those with either CD or DM or both (designated CDorDM, n=30), patients with both CD and DM (designated CD+DM, n=12, statistically similar to CDorDM), and patients with neither CD or DM (designated approximately CDor DM, n=33). LDF during thermal hyperemia showed a decrease in the thermal peaks and plateau as well as a delay in plateau compared with control, consistent with ECD. LDF during reactive hyperemia showed a decrease in the pay-back area under the curve, also consistent with ECD. approximately CDorDM were heterogeneous: almost 50% contained flow abnormalities similar to CDorDM. There was also a reduction in the number of functional arterioles on LDI images. Fourier analysis of LDF oscillations showed that low-frequency oscillations characterizing endothelial function were impaired in CDorDM and in many approximately CDorDM. The data demonstrate that ESRD patients with expected ECD (CDorDM) are characterized by distinct abnormalities in LDF parameters. However, similar abnormalities are found in approximately one-half of ESRD patients without evidence for CD or DM. Postocclusive and thermal interrogation of the microvasculature with laser Doppler-resolved parameters of the microcirculation, followed by Fourier analysis of the very slow oscillations, may provide a valuable adjunct to early noninvasive diagnosis of ECD in ESRD, especially important in

  20. Combination therapy with losartan and L-carnitine protects against endothelial dysfunction of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sleem, Mostafa; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Mangoura, Safwat A

    2014-12-05

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of diabetic cardiovascular complications and angiotensin II appears to play a pivotal role in this setting. The present study aimed to investigate whether the combination therapy with losartan and the nutritional supplement, L-carnitine can provide an additional protection against diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction and elucidate the possible mechanism(s) underlying this effect. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) in rat. Effects of losartan (20 mg/kg, orally, 3 months) and L-carnitine (200 mg/kg, orally, 3 months) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, oxidative stress parameters, endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression (eNOS), and vascular function were evaluated. Our results showed a marked increase in aortic superoxide anion (O2(-)) production and serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level alongside attenuating antioxidant enzyme capacities in diabetic rats. This was associated with a significant increase in anigiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression and TNF-α serum level of diabetic rats alongside reducing aortic eNOS gene expression and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The single or combined administration of losartan and L-carnitine significantly inhibited these changes. Additionally, the vascular endothelium-dependent relaxation with acetylcholine (ACh) in aortic diabetic rat was significantly ameliorated by the single and combined administration of losartan or L-carnitine. Noteworthy, the combination therapy exhibited a more profound response over the monotherapy. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the combined therapy of losartan and L-carnitine affords additive beneficial effects against diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction, possibly via normalizing the dysregulated eNOS and reducing the inflammation and oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  1. Attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits by allicin.

    PubMed

    El-Sheakh, Ahmed R; Ghoneim, Hamdy A; Suddek, Ghada M; Ammar, El Sayed M

    2015-08-14

    Allicin, the active substance of garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have potential therapeutic applications. The present study was designed to investigate the possible beneficial effects of allicin against oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Male New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Rabbits randomly received 1 of the following treatments: normal chow diet for 4 weeks, 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD), HCD plus allicin (10 mg/kg/day), or HCD plus atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected at the end of experimental diets for measurement of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), C-reactive protein (CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, the aorta was removed for measurement of vascular reactivity, histopathological changes, intima/media (I/M) ratio, and immunohistochemical staining of both tumor necrosis-alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. HCD induced significant increases in serum TC, TGs, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), CRP, and MDA. Moreover, HCD caused significant decrease in serum GSH and SOD. In addition, aortic relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic specimens from HCD-fed rabbits revealed high expression levels of both TNF-α and the oxidant-induced transcription factor, NF-κB. Allicin supplementation significantly decreased serum MDA and CRP, increased serum HDL-C, GSH, and SOD levels while nonsignificantly affecting HCD-induced elevations in serum TC and LDL-C. Additionally, allicin significantly protected against HCD-induced attenuation of rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh and elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by histopathological examination of the aorta. Moreover, allicin has substantially

  2. HZE ⁵⁶Fe-ion irradiation induces endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta: role of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Kim, Jae Hyung; Oh, Young; Attarzadeh, David O; Sevinc, Baris; Kuo, Maggie M; Shoukas, Artin A; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2011-10-01

    Ionizing radiation has been implicated in the development of significant cardiovascular complications. Since radiation exposure is associated with space exploration, astronauts are potentially at increased risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) iron-ion radiation on vascular and endothelial function as a model of space radiation. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body dose of iron-ion radiation at doses of 0, 0.5 or 1 Gy. In vivo aortic stiffness and ex vivo aortic tension responses were measured 6 and 8 months after exposure as indicators of chronic vascular injury. Rats exposed to 1 Gy iron ions demonstrated significantly increased aortic stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity. Aortic rings from irradiated rats exhibited impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Acute xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging restored endothelial-dependent responses to normal. In addition, XO activity was significantly elevated in rat aorta 4 months after whole-body irradiation. Furthermore, XO inhibition, initiated immediately after radiation exposure and continued until euthanasia, completely inhibited radiation-dependent XO activation. ROS production was elevated after 1 Gy irradiation while production of nitric oxide (NO) was significantly impaired. XO inhibition restored NO and ROS production. Finally, dietary XO inhibition preserved normal endothelial function and vascular stiffness after radiation exposure. These results demonstrate that radiation induced XO-dependent ROS production and nitroso-redox imbalance, leading to chronic vascular dysfunction. As a result, XO is a potential target for radioprotection. Enhancing the understanding of vascular radiation injury could lead to the development of effective methods to ameliorate radiation-induced vascular damage.

  3. Swimming training prevents coronary endothelial dysfunction in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, E.R.G.; Almeida, S.A.; Mengal, V.; Brasil, G.A.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Tiradentes, R.V.; Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Santos, R.L.; Abreu, G.R.

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency and hypertension are considered major risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease. On the other hand, exercise training is considered an effective form to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of swimming training (SW) on coronary vascular reactivity in female ovariectomized hypertensive rats are not known. We aimed to evaluate the effects of SW on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. Three-month old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=50) were divided into four groups: sham (SH), sham plus swimming training (SSW), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized plus swimming training (OSW). The SW protocol (5 times/week, 60 min/day) was conducted for 8 weeks. The vasodilatory response was measured in isolated hearts in the absence and presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME, 100 µM). Cardiac oxidative stress was evaluated in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence, while the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-2 and catalase) and their activities were assessed by western blotting and spectrophotometry, respectively. Vasodilation in SHR was significantly reduced by OVX, even in the presence of L-NAME, in conjunction with an increased oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by SW, and were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) and catalase expression increased only in the OSW group. However, no significant difference was found in the activity of these enzymes. In conclusion, SW prevented the endothelial dysfunction in the coronary bed of ovariectomized SHR associated with an increase in the expression of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore may prevent coronary heart disease in hypertensive postmenopausal women. PMID:28099583

  4. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces endothelial dysfunctions in rats.

    PubMed

    de Belchior, Aucelia C S; Angeli, Jhuli K; Faria, Thaís de O; Siman, Fabiana D M; Silveira, Edna A; Meira, Eduardo F; da Costa, Carlos P; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10(-10)-3.10(-4) M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10(-4) M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001-300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10(-10)-10(-3) M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model.

  5. Post-Weaning Protein Malnutrition Increases Blood Pressure and Induces Endothelial Dysfunctions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Fabiana D. M.; Silveira, Edna A.; Meira, Eduardo F.; da Costa, Carlos P.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Padilha, Alessandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10−10–3.10−4 M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10−4 M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001–300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10−10–10−3 M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model. PMID:22529948

  6. Erosive Hand Osteoarthritis is Associated with Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpas, Athanasios; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Zintzaras, Elias; Exarchou, Ekaterini; Baliakos, Aris; Makaritsis, Konstantinos; Sakkas, Lazaros I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorders have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. Recent evidence suggests that erosive hand osteoarthritis (EOA) has considerable inflammation; therefore, we examined the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in EOA. Twenty-four patients with EOA and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals without clinical OA were included in the study. No subject had a history of CV disease. Intima-media thickness (IMT) and atheromatous plaques in the common carotid and common femoral arteries were measured by Doppler ultrasonography. The endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and endothelium-independent, sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (NTG)-induced dilatation (NMD) of the brachial artery were assessed. The EOA patients had significantly elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001 for both). The 10-year risk of general CV disease, as predicted with the Framingham Risk Score, was similar in patients and controls (p=0.18). IMT of both common carotid and common femoral artery were increased in EOA (p=0.01 and p<0.01, respectively), but the frequency of atherosclerotic plaques was not increased. There was no difference in FMD and NMD between the two groups, but the difference between FMD and NMD was increased in EOA. In conclusion, this small controlled study showed an association between EOA and subclinical atherosclerosis that cannot be fully attributed to traditional CV risk factors, as assessed by the Framingham score. These results suggest that chronic, low-grade inflammation is implicated in atherosclerosis in EOA. PMID:24711757

  7. 2,3,7,8-TCDD exposure, endothelial dysfunction and impaired microvascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pelclová, Daniela; Prázny, Martin; Skrha, Jan; Fenclová, Zdenka; Kalousová, Marta; Urban, Pavel; Navrátil, Tomás; Senholdová, Zdenka; Smerhovsky, Zdenek

    2007-09-01

    Vascular function was examined in subjects with long-term high level of serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) during their follow-up visits. Their earlier mean peak TCDD level at the time of exposure in 1965-1968 was estimated in the range of 3300-74 000 pg/g lipids. Ten former pesticide production workers heavily exposed to TCDD (age 57 +/- 2 years, TCDD about 170 pg/g lipids) were examined in 2001. Extended group of 15 TCDD-exposed men (age 59 +/- 3 years, TCDD about 130 pg/g lipids) underwent the same examination in 2004. Findings were compared with a control group of 14 healthy men (age 54 +/- 2 years). Skin microvascular reactivity (MVR) was measured by laser Doppler perfusion monitoring in the forearm during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and thermal hyperemia (TH). Several parameters of MVR in men exposed to TCDD were significantly impaired, compared with the control group and further progression of the impairment of MVR has been observed between years 2001 and 2004. Serum concentration of E-selectin and inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator 1 (PAI-1) was significantly higher in exposed subjects (56.0 +/- 18.4 ng/mL versus 40.0 +/- 12.0 ng/mL, P = 0.022 and 90.9 +/- 33.3 ng/mL versus 45.0 +/- 18.0, P = 0.002, respectively). In addition, PORH in the forearm was significantly negatively associated with SOD activity (r = -0.77, P = 0.009) as well as the velocity of perfusion increase during TH (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) and TH% (r = -0.78, P = 0.008). Our data document the presence of endothelial dysfunction in TCDD-exposed men.

  8. Nigella sativa seed decreases endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Abbasnezhad, Abbasali; Niazmand, Saeed; Mahmoudabady, Maryam; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is an important risk factor for cardiovascular events. The great percent of morbidity in patients with diabetes is due to endothelial dysfunction. The present study investigated the effects of hydroalcholic extract of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) on contractile and dilatation response of isolated aorta in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into six experimental groups (control, untreated STZ-diabetic, and N. sativa hydroalcholic extract or metformin-treated diabetic rats). Treated rats received N. sativa extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) or metformin (300 mg/kg) by gavage, daily for 6 weeks. Isolated rat thoracic rings were mounted in an organ bath system then contractile and dilatation responses induced by phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine (ACh), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were evaluated in different situations. Results: The lower concentrations of N. sativa seed extract (DE 100 and DE 200) and metformin significantly reduced the contractile responses to higher concentrations of PE (10-6 - 10-5 M) compared to diabetic group (p<0.05 to p<0.01). The relaxation response to Ach 10-8 M, was increased in DE 200 and metformin groups compared to diabetic group (p<0.05). The relaxation responses to Ach 10-7 - 10-5 M were significantly higher in all treated groups compared to diabetic group (p<0.05 to p<0.001). Conclusion: Chronic administration of N. sativa seed extract has a significant hypoglycemic effect and improves aortic reactivity to vasoconstrictor and vasodilator agents in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:27247923

  9. MicroRNA-200a is up-regulated in aged rats with erectile dysfunction and could attenuate endothelial function via SIRT1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Feng; Qiu, Xue-Feng; Yu, Wen; Zhang, Qi-Peng; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Yun; Pan, Lian-Jun; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Dai, Yu-Tian

    2016-01-01

    MiR-200a was shown to be upregulated in the corpus cavernosum (CC) of rats with aging-related erectile dysfunction (A-ED) in our previous study. Among its target genes, SIRT1 was also reported as a protective factor in erectile function by our groups previously. Thus, miR-200a might attenuate the erectile function in A-ED via SIRT1 inhibition. In the present study, three animal groups were included: aged rats with ED (group AE, n = 8), aged rats with normal erectile function (group AN, n = 8), and young rats as normal controls (group YN, n = 8). CCs from each group were collected for histological and molecular measurements to validate the dysregulation of miR-200a and SIRT1. After that, the cavernous endothelial cells (CECs) from CC of aged rats with normal erectile function were transfected with miR-200a in vitro. Then the expression of SIRT1 and molecules within the eNOS/NO/PKG pathway were measured to investigate whether the transfection could imitate the attenuated process of erectile function in the aged. As a result, miR-200a was upregulated while the SIRT1, the levels of eNOS and cGMP were all downregulated in the CCs from AE group. After transfection in vitro, the miR-200a was upregulated while the SIRT1 and levels of eNOS and cGMP were obviously downregulated. Finally, based on the results of our previous study, we further verify that up-regulation of miR-200a could participate in the mechanisms of A-ED via SIRT1 inhibition, and mainly attenuate endothelial function via influencing the eNOS/NO/PKGpathway. PMID:25966629

  10. COX-2 is involved in vascular oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction of renal interlobar arteries from obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mercedes; Sánchez, Ana; Pilar Martínez, María; Benedito, Sara; López-Oliva, Maria-Elvira; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is related to vascular dysfunction through inflammation and oxidative stress and it has been identified as a risk factor for chronic renal disease. In the present study, we assessed the specific relationships among reactive oxygen species (ROS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and endothelial dysfunction in renal interlobar arteries from a genetic model of obesity/insulin resistance, the obese Zucker rats (OZR). Relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) were significantly reduced in renal arteries from OZR compared to their counterpart, the lean Zucker rat (LZR), suggesting endothelial dysfunction. Blockade of COX with indomethacin and with the selective blocker of COX-2 restored the relaxations to ACh in obese rats. Selective blockade of the TXA2/PGH2 (TP) receptor enhanced ACh relaxations only in OZR, while inhibition of the prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP) enhanced basal tone and inhibited ACh vasodilator responses only in LZR. Basal production of superoxide was increased in arteries of OZR and involved NADPH and xanthine oxidase activation and NOS uncoupling. Under conditions of NOS blockade, ACh induced vasoconstriction and increased ROS generation that were augmented in arteries from OZR and blunted by COX-2 inhibition and by the ROS scavenger tempol. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked both endothelium- and vascular smooth muscle (VSM)-dependent contractions, as well as ROS generation that was reduced by COX-2 inhibition. In addition, COX-2 expression was enhanced in both VSM and endothelium of renal arteries from OZR. These results suggest that increased COX-2-dependent vasoconstriction contributes to renal endothelial dysfunction through enhanced (ROS) generation in obesity. COX-2 activity is in turn upregulated by ROS.

  11. Connection between telomerase activity in PBMC and markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rentoukas, Elias; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Kaplanis, Ioannis; Korou, Eleni; Nikolaou, Maria; Marathonitis, George; Kokkinou, Stavroula; Haliassos, Alexander; Mamalaki, Avgi; Kouretas, Demetrios; Tsitsimpikou, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of metabolic derangements associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress and is widely regarded as an inflammatory condition, accompanied by an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The present study tried to investigate the implications of telomerase activity with inflammation and impaired endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome. Telomerase activity in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), TNF-α, IL-6 and ADMA were monitored in 39 patients with MS and 20 age and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Telomerase activity in PBMC, TNF-α, IL-6 and ADMA were all significantly elevated in patients with MS compared to healthy volunteers. PBMC telomerase was negatively correlated with HDL and positively correlated with ADMA, while no association between TNF-α and IL-6 was observed. IL-6 was increasing with increasing systolic pressure both in the patients with MS and in the healthy volunteers, while smoking and diabetes were positively correlated with IL-6 only in the patients' group. In conclusion, in patients with MS characterised by a strong dyslipidemic profile and low diabetes prevalence, significant telomerase activity was detected in circulating PBMC, along with elevated markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. These findings suggest a prolonged activity of inflammatory cells in the studied state of this metabolic disorder that could represent a contributory pathway in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  12. Role of the endothelial-derived endogenous anti-inflammatory factor Del-1 in inflammation-mediated adrenal gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Sprott, David; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation in the course of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis often results in dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The adrenal gland is highly vascularized; thus, we hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction may actively participate in inflammation-related adrenal insufficiency. To address this hypothesis, we used the properties of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), which is an endothelial-derived anti-inflammatory factor that antagonizes integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we identified that Del-1 is expressed in the adrenal gland and that its expression was down-regulated upon SIRS induction by systemic lipopolysaccharide administration. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte accumulation, inflammation, and higher apoptosis in the adrenal glands of Del-1-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. Strikingly, Del-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced corticosterone and ACTH levels 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide administration. Together, these data suggest that Del-1 may act as a gatekeeper of adrenal gland inflammation and may regulate the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress response, thereby modulating adrenal (dys)function in the course of SIRS.

  13. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  14. Glutathione regulation of redox-sensitive signals in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Jein-Wen; Chiang, Huai-Chih

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the regulatory role of glutathione in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by using vascular endothelial adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Since TNF-alpha induces various biological effects on vascular cells, TNF-alpha dosage could be a determinant factor directing vascular cells into different biological fates. Based on the adhesion molecule expression patterns responding to different TNF-alpha concentrations, we adopted the lower TNF-alpha (0.2 ng/ml) to rule out the possible involvement of other TNF-alpha-induced biological effects. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in down-regulations of the TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. BSO attenuated the TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, however, with no detectable effect on AP-1 and its related mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Deletion of an AP-1 binding site in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) promoter totally abolished its constitutive promoter activity and its responsiveness to TNF-alpha. Inhibition of ERK, JNK, or NF-kappaB attenuates TNF-alpha-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Our study indicates that TNF-alpha induces adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding mainly via activation of NF-kappaB in a glutathione-sensitive manner. We also demonstrated that intracellular glutathione does not modulate the activation of MAPKs and/or their downstream AP-1 induced by lower TNF-alpha. Although AP-1 activation by the lower TNF-alpha was not detected in our systems, we could not rule out the possible involvement of transiently activated MAPKs/AP-1 in the regulation of TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression.

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P): A Potential Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Endothelial Dysfunction and Sepsis?

    PubMed

    Winkler, Martin S; Nierhaus, Axel; Poppe, Annika; Greiwe, Gillis; Gräler, Markus; Daum, Guenter

    2016-12-02

    Sepsis is an acute life-threatening multiple organ failure caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Endothelial dysfunction, particularly barrier disruption leading to increased vascular permeability, edema and insufficient tissue oxygenation is critical to sepsis pathogenesis. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling lipid that regulates important pathophysiological processes including vascular endothelial cell permeability, inflammation and coagulation. It is present at high concentrations in blood and lymph and at very low concentrations in tissues due to the activity of the S1P-degrading enzyme S1P-lyase in tissue cells. Recently, four preclinical observational studies determined S1P levels in serum or plasma of sepsis patients, and all found reduced S1P levels associated with the disease. Based on these findings, this review summarizes S1P-regulated processes pertaining to endothelial functions, discusses the possible use of S1P as a marker and possibilities how to manipulate S1P levels and S1P receptor activation to restore endothelial integrity, dampen the inflammatory host response, and improve organ function in sepsis.

  16. miR-155 Modifies Inflammation, Endothelial Activation and Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction in Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Kevin R; Lu, Ziyue; Kim, Hani; Zheng, Ying; Chen, Junmei; Conroy, Andrea L; Hawkes, Michael; Cheng, Henry S; Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Fish, Jason E; Harlan, John M; López, Jose A; Liles, W Conrad; Kain, Kevin C

    2017-01-01

    miR-155 has been shown to participate in host response to infection and neuroinflammation via negative regulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and T cell function. We hypothesized that miR-155 may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM). To test this hypothesis, we used a genetic approach to modulate miR-155 expression in an experimental model of cerebral malaria (ECM). In addition, an engineered endothelialized microvessel system and serum samples from Ugandan children with CM were used to examine anti–miR-155 as a potential adjunctive therapeutic for severe malaria. Despite higher parasitemia, survival was significantly improved in miR-155-/- mice versus wild-type littermate mice in ECM. Improved survival was associated with preservation of BBB integrity and reduced endothelial activation, despite increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Pretreatment with antagomir-155 reduced vascular leak induced by human CM sera in an ex vivo endothelial microvessel model. These data provide evidence supporting a mechanistic role for miR-155 in host response to malaria via regulation of endothelial activation, microvascular leak and BBB dysfunction in CM. PMID:28182191

  17. Chorioretinal thinning in chronic kidney disease links to inflammation and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, Craig; van Bragt, Job J.M.H.; Ruijs, Titia; Cameron, James R.; Kimmitt, Robert; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Czopek, Alicja; Hu, May Khei; Gallacher, Peter J.; Dear, James W.; Borooah, Shyamanga; MacIntyre, Iain M.; Pearson, Tom M.C.; Willox, Laura; Talwar, Dinesh; Tafflet, Muriel; Roubeix, Christophe; Sennlaub, Florian; Chandran, Siddharthan; Dhillon, Baljean; Webb, David J.

    2016-01-01

    the presence of renal injury. CONCLUSIONS. Chorioretinal thinning in CKD is associated with lower eGFR and greater proteinuria, but not BP. Larger studies, in more targeted groups of patients, are now needed to clarify whether these eye changes reflect the natural history of CKD. Similarly, the associations with arterial stiffness, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction warrant further examination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration number at www.clinicalTrials.gov: NCT02132741. SOURCE OF FUNDING. TR was supported by a bursary from the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam. JJMHvB was supported by a bursary from the Utrecht University. JRC is supported by a Rowling Scholarship. SB was supported by a Wellcome Trust funded clinical research fellowship from the Scottish Translational Medicine and Therapeutics Initiative, and by a Rowling Scholarship, at the time of this work. ND is supported by a British Heart Foundation Intermediate Clinical Research Fellowship (FS/13/30/29994). PMID:27942587

  18. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 up-regulation by PPAR-β/δ prevents lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Mahmoud, Ayman Moawad; Barroso, Emma; Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Sánchez, Manuel; Cogolludo, Ángel; García-Redondo, Ana B; Briones, Ana M; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acids cause endothelial dysfunction involving increased ROS (reactive oxygen species) and reduced NO (nitric oxide) bioavailability. We show that in MAECs (mouse aortic endothelial cells), the PPARβ/δ (peroxisome- proliferator-activated receptor β/δ) agonist GW0742 prevented the decreased A23187-stimulated NO production, phosphorylation of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) at Ser1177 and increased intracellular ROS levels caused by exposure to palmitate in vitro. The impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine in mouse aorta induced by palmitate was restored by GW0742. In vivo, GW0742 treatment prevented the reduced aortic relaxation, phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177, and increased ROS production and NADPH oxidase in mice fed on a high-fat diet. The PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK0660 abolished all of these protective effects induced by GW0742. This agonist enhanced the expression of CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase)-1. The effects of GW0742 on acetylcholine- induced relaxation in aorta and on NO and ROS production in MAECs exposed to palmitate were abolished by the CPT-1 inhibitor etomoxir or by siRNA targeting CPT-1. GW0742 also inhibited the increase in DAG (diacylglycerol), PKCα/βII (protein kinase Cα/βII) activation, and phosphorylation of eNOS at Thr495 induced by palmitate in MAECs, which were abolished by etomoxir. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ activation restored the lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction by up-regulation of CPT-1, thus reducing DAG accumulation and the subsequent PKC-mediated ROS production and eNOS inhibition.

  19. Rosiglitazone via PPARγ-dependent suppression of oxidative stress attenuates endothelial dysfunction in rats fed homocysteine thiolactone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu-Hong; Li, Peng; Yin, Ya-Ling; Tu, Jiang-Hua; Dai, Wen; Liu, Li-Ying; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2015-04-01

    To explore whether rosiglitazone (RSG), a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, exerts beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction induced by homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) and to investigate the potential mechanisms. Incubation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells with HTL (1 mM) for 24 hrs significantly reduced cell viabilities assayed by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide, as well as enhanced productions of reactive oxygen species, activation of nuclear factor kappa B, and increased intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 secretion. Pre-treatment of cells with RSG (0.001-0.1 mM), pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 0.1 mM) or apocynin (0.1 mM) for 1 hr reversed these effects induced by HTL. Furthermore, co-incubation with GW9662 (0.01 mM) abolished the protective effects of RSG on HTL-treated cells. In ex vivo experiments, exposure of isolated aortic rings from. rats to HTL (1 mM) for 1 hr dramatically impaired acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, reduced release of nitric oxide and activity of superoxide dismutase, and increased malondialdehyde content in aortic tissues. Preincubation of aortic rings with RSG (0.1, 0.3, 1 mM), PDTC or apocynin normalized the disorders induced by HTL. In vivo analysis indicated that administration of RSG (20 mg/kg/d) remarkably suppressed oxidative stress and prevented endothelial dysfunction in rats fed HTL (50 mg/kg/d) for 8 weeks. RSG improves endothelial functions in rats fed HTL, which is related to PPARγ-dependent suppression of oxidative stress.

  20. Involvement of RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway in hyperglycemia-induced microvascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qian-Yi; Chen, Wei; Lu, Li; Zheng, Zhi; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a well-known serious complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), and can eventually advance to end-stage blindness. In the early stage of DR, endothelial cell barrier disorganized primarily and tight junction (TJ) protein composition transformed subsequently. The small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effector Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) regulate a mass of cellular processes, including cell adherence, proliferation, permeability and apoptosis. Although RhoA inhibitors have provided substantial clinical benefit as hypertonicity therapeutics, their use is limited by complex microenvironment as DR. While ample evidence indicates that TJ can be influenced by the RhoA/ROCK1 signaling, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we have uncovered a significant signaling network involved in diabetic retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction (RMVED). Our results indicated that the activation of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway due to high glucose played a key role in microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction (MVED) by way of directly inducing TJ proteins over-expression during DR. We demonstrated that inhibition of RhoA/ROCK1 may attenuate the hypertonicity of endothelial cell caused by high glucose microenvironment meanwhile. Besides, chemical and pharmacological inhibitors of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway may partly block inflammation due to DR. Simultaneously, the apoptosis aroused by high glucose was also prevented considerably by fasudil, a kind of pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway. These findings indicate that RhoA/ROCK1 signaling directly modulates MVED, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for DR. PMID:25400825

  1. Red wine polyphenols prevent endothelial dysfunction induced by endothelin-1 in rat aorta: role of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    López-Sepúlveda, Rocío; Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Zarzuelo, Maria José; Romero, Miguel; Sánchez, Manuel; Quintela, Ana María; Galindo, Pilar; O'Valle, Francisco; Tamargo, Juan; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan; Jiménez, Rosario

    2011-04-01

    RWPs (red wine polyphenols) exert antihypertensive effects and improve endothelial function by reducing the plasma levels of ET-1 (endothelin-1) and the subsequent vascular production of O(2)(•-) (superoxide anion). Our present study was designed to evaluate whether RWPs act directly in the vascular wall improving endothelial dysfunction and O(2)(•-) production induced by ET-1 and to analyse the compounds responsible for these protective effects. We incubated rat isolated aortic rings in the presence or absence of ET-1 (10 nM) and RWPs (10(-4) to 10(-2) g/l) or catechin (0.2 μM), epicatechin (10 μM) and resveratrol (0.1 μM). ET-1 reduced the relaxant responses to acetylcholine, increased intracellular O(2)(•-) production, NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox. All these changes were prevented by RWPs. The preventive effects of RWPs were unaffected by co-incubation with either ICI-182780, an ER (oestrogen receptor) antagonist, or GW9662, a PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) antagonist. RWPs inhibited the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2), a key regulator of p47phox expression in response to ET-1. When the isolated polyphenols were tested, at the concentrations found in 10(-2) g/l RWPs, only epicatechin prevented endothelial dysfunction and all biochemical changes induced by ET-1 in the vascular wall. Taken together, these results indicate that RWPs prevent ET-1-induced vascular O(2)(•-) production by reducing overexpression of p47phox and the subsequent increased NADPH oxidase activity, leading to improvement in endothelial function. The effects of RWPs appear to be independent of ER and PPARγ activation and are related to ERK1/2 inhibition.

  2. Role of Rho-kinase signaling and endothelial dysfunction in modulating blood flow distribution in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Daryl O; Pearson, James T; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Shimouchi, Akito; Kangawa, Kenji; Umetani, Keiji; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2011-04-01

    Rho-kinase-mediated vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction are considered two primary instigators of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, their contribution to the adverse changes in pulmonary blood flow distribution associated with PAH has not been addressed. This study utilizes synchrotron radiation microangiography to assess the specific role, and contribution of, Rho-kinase-mediated vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction in PAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with saline (Cont-rats) or monocrotaline (MCT-rats) 3 wk before microangiography was performed on the left lung. We assessed dynamic changes in vessel internal diameter (ID) in response to 1) the Rho-kinase inhibitor fasudil (10 mg/kg iv); or 2) ACh (3 μg · kg⁻¹ · min⁻¹), sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 5 μg · kg⁻¹ · min⁻¹), and N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 50 mg/kg iv). We observed that MCT-rats had fewer vessels of the microcirculation compared with Cont-rats. The fundamental result of this study is that fasudil improved pulmonary blood flow distribution and reduced pulmonary pressure in PAH rats, not only by dilating already-perfused vessels (ID > 100 μm), but also by restoring blood flow to vessels that had previously been constricted closed (ID < 100 μm). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was impaired in MCT-rats primarily in vessels with an ID < 200 μm. Moreover the vasoconstrictor response to l-NAME was accentuated in MCT-rats, but only in the 200- to 300-μm vessels. These results highlight the importance of Rho-kinase-mediated control and endothelial control of pulmonary vascular tone in PAH. Indeed, an effective therapeutic strategy for treating PAH should target both the smooth muscle Rho-kinase and endothelial pathways.

  3. The NRF2 knockout rat: a new animal model to study endothelial dysfunction, oxidant stress, and microvascular rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, Jessica R. C.; Kautenburg, Katie E.; Casati, Marc C.; Endres, Bradley T.; Geurts, Aron M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like-2 (NRF2) is a master antioxidant and cell protective transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. In this study we developed a strain of Nrf2 null mutant rats to evaluate the role of reduced NRF2-regulated antioxidant defenses in contributing to endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenic responses during salt-induced ANG II suppression. Nrf2−/− mutant rats were developed using transcription activator-like effector nuclease technology in the Sprague-Dawley genetic background, and exhibited a 41-bp deletion that included the start codon for Nrf2 and an absence of immunohistochemically detectable NRF2 protein. Expression of mRNA for the NRF2-regulated indicator enzymes heme oxygenase-1, catalase, superoxide dismutase 1, superoxide dismutase 2, and glutathione reductase was significantly lower in livers of Nrf2−/− mutant rats fed high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) for 2 wk compared with wild-type controls. Endothelium-dependent dilation to acetylcholine was similar in isolated middle cerebral arteries (MCA) of Nrf2−/− mutant rats and wild-type littermates fed low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet, and was eliminated by short-term (3 days) HS diet in both strains. Low-dose ANG II infusion (100 ng/kg sc) reversed salt-induced endothelial dysfunction in MCA and prevented microvessel rarefaction in wild-type rats fed HS diet, but not in Nrf2−/− mutant rats. The results of this study indicate that suppression of NRF2 antioxidant defenses plays an essential role in the development of salt-induced oxidant stress, endothelial dysfunction, and microvessel rarefaction in normotensive rats and emphasize the potential therapeutic benefits of directly upregulating NRF2-mediated antioxidant defenses to ameliorate vascular oxidant stress in humans. PMID:26637559

  4. Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Endothelial and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, M.S.; Hirschi, K.

    2016-01-01

    This brief overview of premature senescence of dysfunctional endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells provides information on endothelial cell differentiation and specialization, their ontogeny, and controversies related to endothelial stem and progenitor cells. Stressors responsible for the dysfunction of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells, as well as cellular mechanisms and consequences of endothelial cell dysfunction are presented. Metabolic signatures of dysfunctional endothelial cells and senescence pathways are described. Emerging strategies to rejuvenate endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells conclude the review. PMID:27451101

  5. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease.

  6. Vitamin D status and circulating biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in non-diabetic obese individuals: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Stokić, Edita; Stošić, Zoran; Kojić, Nevena Eremić; Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Isenovic, Esma R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and inadequate vitamin D status are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We evaluated the associations between vitamin D status (i.e. serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D)), biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction (i.e. serum concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin)), inflammatory markers (i.e. high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and fibrinogen) and cardiometabolic risk factors. Material and methods Fifty obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2) non-diabetic adults (mean age: 36.2 ±5.4 years) without pre-existing cardiovascular abnormalities and 25 clinically healthy, normal weight and age-matched individuals were included. Anthropometric parameters, markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, and serum levels of inflammatory and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers were assessed in all subjects. Results The mean serum 25(OH)D level was significantly lower in the obese group than in controls (33.5 ±15.2 vs. 60.1 ±23.1 nmol/l; p < 0.001). In the obese group, sE-selectin (36.4 (32.1–47.2) vs. 32.4 (24.6–35.5) ng/ml, p < 0.05) and hsCRP (6.0 ±3.4 vs. 3.5 ±1.0 mg/l, p < 0.05) were significantly higher in individuals with lower than median vitamin D levels (i.e. 31 nmol/l) compared with those with higher vitamin D levels. In multivariable linear regression analysis, hsCRP (β = –0.43; p < 0.001) and sE-selectin (β = –0.30; p = 0.03) were independently and significantly associated with serum 25(OH)D levels in the obese group. Conclusions Vitamin D levels may be related to increased levels of biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in obese non-diabetic individuals. PMID:28144255

  7. CD36 and Fyn kinase mediate malaria-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Anidi, Ifeanyi U; Servinsky, Laura E; Rentsendorj, Otgonchimeg; Stephens, R Scott; Scott, Alan L; Pearse, David B

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria can trigger acute lung injury characterized by pulmonary edema resulting from increased endothelial permeability. However, the mechanism through which lung fluid conductance is altered during malaria remains unclear. To define the role that the scavenger receptor CD36 may play in mediating this response, C57BL/6J (WT) and CD36-/- mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA and monitored for changes in pulmonary endothelial barrier function employing an isolated perfused lung system. WT lungs demonstrated a >10-fold increase in two measures of paracellular fluid conductance and a decrease in the albumin reflection coefficient (σalb) compared to control lungs indicating a loss of barrier function. In contrast, malaria-infected CD36-/- mice had near normal fluid conductance but a similar reduction in σalb. In WT mice, lung sequestered iRBCs demonstrated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine whether knockout of CD36 could protect against ROS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, mouse lung microvascular endothelial monolayers (MLMVEC) from WT and CD36-/- mice were exposed to H2O2. Unlike WT monolayers, which showed dose-dependent decreases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) from H2O2 indicating loss of barrier function, CD36-/- MLMVEC demonstrated dose-dependent increases in TER. The differences between responses in WT and CD36-/- endothelial cells correlated with important differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of the CD36-associated Fyn kinase. Malaria infection increased total lung Fyn levels in CD36-/- lungs compared to WT, but this increase was due to elevated production of the inactive form of Fyn further suggesting a dysregulation of Fyn-mediated signaling. The importance of Fyn in CD36-dependent endothelial signaling was confirmed using in vitro Fyn knockdown as well as Fyn-/- mice, which were also protected from H2O2- and malaria-induced lung endothelial leak, respectively. Our results demonstrate

  8. Hyperandrogenism and Insulin Resistance, Not Changes in Body Weight, Mediate the Development of Endothelial Dysfunction in a Female Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Hurliman, Amanda; Keller Brown, Jennifer; Maille, Nicole; Mandala, Maurizio; Casson, Peter; Osol, George

    2015-11-01

    This study was designed to differentiate the contributions of hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance (IR), and body weight to the development of endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome and determine the effectiveness of insulin sensitization and antiandrogenic therapy after the establishment of vascular and metabolic dysfunction using a rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome. We hypothesized that the observed endothelial dysfunction was a direct steroidal effect, as opposed to changes in insulin sensitivity or body weight. Prepubertal female rats were randomized to the implantation of a pellet containing DHT or sham procedure. In phase 1, DHT-exposed animals were randomized to pair feeding to prevent weight gain or metformin, an insulin-sensitizing agent, from 5 to 14 weeks. In phase 2, DHT-exposed animals were randomized to treatment with metformin or flutamide, a nonsteroidal androgen receptor blocker from 12 to 16 weeks. Endothelial function was assessed by the vasodilatory response of preconstricted arteries to acetylcholine. Serum steroid levels were analyzed in phase 1 animals. Fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin were analyzed and homeostasis model assessment index calculated in all animals. Our data confirm the presence of endothelial dysfunction as well as increased body weight, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, and greater IR among DHT-treated animals. Even when normal weight was maintained through pair feeding, endothelial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia, and IR still developed. Furthermore, despite weight gain, treatment with metformin and flutamide improved insulin sensitivity and blood pressure and restored normal endothelial function. Therefore, the observed endothelial dysfunction is most likely a direct result of hyperandrogenism-induced reductions in insulin sensitivity, as opposed to weight gain.

  9. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  10. Diabetes, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Vascular Repair: What Should a Diabetologist Keep His Eye on?

    PubMed Central

    Altabas, V.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common complications of diabetes mellitus. A prominent attribute of diabetic cardiovascular complications is accelerated atherosclerosis, considered as a still incurable disease, at least at more advanced stages. The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), able to replace old and injured mature endothelial cells and capable of differentiating into healthy and functional endothelial cells, has offered the prospect of merging the traditional theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with evolving concepts of vascular biology. The literature supports the notion that EPC alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases in diabetics, but at present many questions remain unanswered. In this review the aspects linking endothelial progenitor cells to the altered vascular biology in diabetes mellitus are discussed. PMID:26089898

  11. Curcumin supplementation could improve diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction associated with decreased vascular superoxide production and PKC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Curcumin, an Asian spice and food-coloring agent, is known for its anti-oxidant properties. We propose that curcumin can improve diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction through superoxide reduction. Methods Diabetes (DM) was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ). Daily curcumin oral feeding was started six weeks after the STZ injection. Twelve weeks after STZ injection, mesenteric arteriolar responses were recorded in real time using intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Superoxide and vascular protein kinase C (PKC-βII) were examined by hydroethidine and immunofluorescence, respectively. Results The dilatory response to acetylcholine (ACh) significantly decreased in DM arterioles as compared to control arterioles. There was no difference among groups when sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used. ACh responses were significantly improved by both low and high doses (30 and 300 mg/kg, respectively) of curcumin supplementation. An oxygen radical-sensitive fluorescent probe, hydroethidine, was used to detect intracellular superoxide anion (O2●-) production. O2●- production was markedly increased in DM arterioles, but it was significantly reduced by supplementation of either low or high doses of curcumin. In addition, with a high dose of curcumin, diabetes-induced vascular PKC-βII expression was diminished. Conclusion Therefore, it is suggested that curcumin supplementation could improve diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction significantly in relation to its potential to decrease superoxide production and PKC inhibition. PMID:20946622

  12. Diabetic nephropathy and endothelial dysfunction: Current and future therapies, and emerging of vascular imaging for preclinical renal-kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wilson Kc; Gao, L; Siu, Parco M; Lai, Christopher Wk

    2016-12-01

    An explosion in global epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus poses major rise in cases with vascular endothelial dysfunction ranging from micro- (retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) to macro-vascular (atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy) conditions. Functional destruction of endothelium is regarded as an early event that lays the groundwork for the development of renal microangiopathy and subsequent clinical manifestation of nephropathic symptoms. Recent research has shed some light on the molecular mechanisms of type 2 diabetes-associated comorbidity of endothelial dysfunction and nephropathy. Stemming from currently proposed endothelium-centered therapeutic strategies for diabetic nephropathy, this review highlighted some most exploited pathways that involve the intricate coordination of vasodilators, vasoconstrictors and vaso-modulatory molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. We also emphasized the emerging roles of oxidative and epigenetic modifications of microvasculature as our prospective therapeutics for diabetic renal diseases. Finally, this review in particular addressed the potential use of multispectral optoacoustic tomography in real-time, minimally-invasive vascular imaging of small experimental animals for preclinical renal-kinetic drug trials.

  13. Endothelial dysfunction and enhanced contractility in microvessels from ovariectomized rats: roles of oxidative stress and perivascular adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Xie; Zheng, Wei; Sandberg, Kathryn; Ji, Hong; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian hormone loss increases reactive oxidative species, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease. Because perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) regulates endothelial function, we hypothesized that reactive oxidative species in PVAT mediate adverse microvascular effects of ovarian hormone deficiency. Rats were ovariectomized or sham operated and given vehicle or tempol for 6 weeks. Mesenteric resistance arterioles from ovariectomized compared with sham-operated rats had dysfunctional responses to acetylcholine (ACh) including decreased ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation (50±6% versus 72±2%) and endothelium-dependent relaxation factor (17±4% versus 37±2%) and increased endothelium-dependent contracting factor (27±5% versus 9±3%). OVX rat mesenteric arterioles had increased contractions to the thromboxane/prostanoid receptor agonist U-46 619 (58±3% versus 40±5%) and increased reactive oxidative species (tempo-9-AC fluorescence) with U-46 619 (0.65±0.17 versus 0.14±0.06 Δ unit) or ACh (0.49±0.09 versus 0.09±0.05 Δ unit) and increased p22(phox) protein expression (0.89±0.05 versus 0.18±0.04 Δ unit), whereas nitric oxide activity (DAF-FM [4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate] fluorescence) with ACh was reduced (0.39±0.1 versus 0.70±0.10 Δ unit). No differences were found in endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor or contractile responses to phenylephrine. PVAT enhanced ACh-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent relaxation factor, and nitric oxide only in sham-operated rats. Tempol prevented ovariectomy-induced endothelial dysfunction and restored the enhancing effects of PVAT on ACh-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent relaxation factor, and nitric oxide in ovariectomized rat vessels, but both tempol and PVAT were required to normalize the enhanced U-46 619 contractions after ovariectomy. In conclusion, ovariectomy redirects endothelial responses from relaxation to contraction by reducing vascular

  14. Endothelial dysfunction exacerbates renal interstitial fibrosis through enhancing fibroblast Smad3 linker phosphorylation in the mouse obstructed kidney.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu Bo Yang; Qu, Xinli; Li, Xueling; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad3 signalling are common features of progressive renal fibrosis. This study investigated a potential link between these mechanisms. In unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) we observed an acute (6 hr) down-regulation of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3/eNOS) levels and increased phosphorylation of the linker region of Smad3 at T179 and S208 in Smad3/JNK complexes. These events preceded Smad3 C-terminal domain phosphorylation and the induction of myofibroblast proliferation at 48 hrs. Mice deficient in NOS3 showed enhanced myofibroblast proliferation and collagen accumulation compared to wild type mice in a 7 day UUO model. This was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 92% and 88%, respectively, whereas Smad3-C-terminal phosphorylation was not affected. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) can suppress renal fibrosis in the UUO model, and further analysis herein showed that RvD1 protected against endothelial dysfunction and suppressed Smad3/JNK complex formation with a consequent reduction in phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 78% and 65%, respectively, while Smad3 C-terminal phosphorylation was unaltered. In vitro, conditioned media from mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMEC) treated with a general inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) augmented the proliferation and collagen production of renal fibroblasts (NRK49F cells) compared to control MMEC media and this was associated with increased phosphorylation of JNK and Smad3 T179 and S208, whereas Smad3-C-terminal domain phosphorylation was unaffected. The addition of RvD1 to L-NAME treated MMEC abrogated these effects of the conditioned media on renal fibroblasts. Finally, Smad3 T179/V and S208/A mutations significantly inhibit TGF-β1 induced up-regulation collagen I promoter. In conclusion, these data suggest that endothelial dysfunction can exacerbate renal interstitial fibrosis through increased fibroblast

  15. Chemical Structures of 4-Oxo-Flavonoids in Relation to Inhibition of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-Induced Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Long; Jin, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ye; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Ting; Chang, Hui; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2011-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction induced by oxidative stress has been demonstrated to be the initiation step of atherosclerosis (AS), and flavonoids may play an important role in AS prevention and therapy. Twenty-three flavonoids categorized into flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, and flavanones, all with 4-oxo-pyronenucleus, were examined for what structural characteristics are required for the inhibitory effects on endothelial dysfunction induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Human vascular endothelial cells EA.hy926 were pretreated with different 4-oxo-flavonoids for 2 hs, and then exposed to oxLDL for another 24 hs. Cell viability and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) were measured, respectively. Then, correlation analysis and paired comparison were used to analyze the structure–activity relationships. Significant correlations were observed between the number of −OH moieties in total or in B-ring and the inhibitory effectson endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, 3′,4′-ortho-dihydroxyl on B-ring, 3-hydroxyl on C-ring and 2,3-double bondwere correlated closely to the inhibitory effects of flavonolson cell viability decrease and lipid peroxidation. 5,7-meta-dihydroxyl group on A-ring was crucial for the anti-inflammatory effects of flavones and isoflavones in endothelial cells. Moreover, the substituted position of B-ring on C3 rather than C2 was important for NO release. Additionally, hydroxylation at C6 position significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of 4-oxo-flavonoids on endothelial dysfunction. Our findings indicated that the effective agents in inhibiting endothelial dysfunction include myricetin, quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, genistein and daidzein. Our work might provide some evidence for AS prevention and a strategy for the design of novel AS preventive agents. PMID:22016603

  16. Chemical structures of 4-oxo-flavonoids in relation to inhibition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yi, Long; Jin, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ye; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Ting; Chang, Hui; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2011-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction induced by oxidative stress has been demonstrated to be the initiation step of atherosclerosis (AS), and flavonoids may play an important role in AS prevention and therapy. Twenty-three flavonoids categorized into flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, and flavanones, all with 4-oxo-pyronenucleus, were examined for what structural characteristics are required for the inhibitory effects on endothelial dysfunction induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Human vascular endothelial cells EA.hy926 were pretreated with different 4-oxo-flavonoids for 2 hs, and then exposed to oxLDL for another 24 hs. Cell viability and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) were measured, respectively. Then, correlation analysis and paired comparison were used to analyze the structure-activity relationships. Significant correlations were observed between the number of -OH moieties in total or in B-ring and the inhibitory effectson endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, 3',4'-ortho-dihydroxyl on B-ring, 3-hydroxyl on C-ring and 2,3-double bondwere correlated closely to the inhibitory effects of flavonolson cell viability decrease and lipid peroxidation. 5,7-meta-dihydroxyl group on A-ring was crucial for the anti-inflammatory effects of flavones and isoflavones in endothelial cells. Moreover, the substituted position of B-ring on C3 rather than C2 was important for NO release. Additionally, hydroxylation at C6 position significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of 4-oxo-flavonoids on endothelial dysfunction. Our findings indicated that the effective agents in inhibiting endothelial dysfunction include myricetin, quercetin, luteolin, apigenin, genistein and daidzein. Our work might provide some evidence for AS prevention and a strategy for the design of novel AS preventive agents.

  17. Effects of cyclic intermittent hypoxia on ET-1 responsiveness and endothelial dysfunction of pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Ai-Ying; Guo, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Jian-Ping; An, Qi; Guo, Ya-jing; Chu, Li; Weiss, J Woodrow; Ji, En-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and in some cases is complication of pulmonary hypertension. We simulated OSA by exposing rats to cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) to investigate its effect on pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley Rats were exposed to CIH (FiO2 9% for 1 min, repeated every 2 min for 8 h/day, 7 days/wk for 3 wk), and the pulmonary arteries of normoxia and CIH treated rats were analyzed for expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET receptors by histological, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR and Western Blot analyses, as well as for contractility in response to ET-1. In the pulmonary arteries, ET-1 expression was increased, and ET-1 more potently elicited constriction of the pulmonary artery in CIH rats than in normoxic rats. Exposure to CIH induced marked endothelial cell damage associated with a functional decrease of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the pulmonary artery. Compared with normoxic rats, ETA receptor expression was increased in smooth muscle cells of the CIH rats, while the expression of ETB receptors was decreased in endothelial cells. These results demonstrated endothelium-dependent vasodilation was impaired and the vasoconstrictor responsiveness increased by CIH. The increased responsiveness to ET-1 induced by intermittent hypoxia in pulmonary arteries of rats was due to increased expression of ETA receptors predominantly, meanwhile, decreased expression of ETB receptors in the endothelium may also participate in it.

  18. Endosulfan induces autophagy and endothelial dysfunction via the AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway triggered by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianshuang; Wei, Jialiu; Ren, Lihua; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Ji; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Yu, Yang; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhou, Xianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases is related to environmental pollution. Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide and its toxicity has been reported. However, the relationship between oxidative stress and autophagy induced by endosulfan and its underlying mechanism remain confusing. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were chosen to explore the toxicity mechanism and were treated with 0, 1, 6, 12 μg/mL(-1) endosulfan for 24 h, respectively. The present results showed that autophagy could be induced by endosulfan, which was verified by the monodansylcadaverine staining, autophagic ultrastructural observation, and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion. In addition, the levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent way. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6) were significantly elevated, and the index of endothelial function such as monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) increased. Moreover, endosulfan had an activation effect on the 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrated that endosulfan could induce oxidative stress and mitochondria injury, activate autophagy, induce inflammatory response, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction via the AMPK/mTOR pathway. This indicates that exposure to endosulfan is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  20. Short-term calorie restriction reverses vascular endothelial dysfunction in old mice by increasing nitric oxide and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Catarina; Lesniewski, Lisa; Connell, Melanie; LaRocca, Thomas; Donato, Anthony; Seals, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    To determine if short-term calorie restriction reverses vascular endothelial dysfunction in old mice, old (O, n = 30) and young (Y, n = 10) male B6D2F1 mice were fed ad libitum (AL) or calorie restricted (CR, approximately 30%) for 8 weeks. Ex vivo carotid artery endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) was impaired in old ad libitum (OAL) vs. young ad libitum (YAL) (74 +/- 5 vs. 95 +/- 2% of maximum dilation, P < 0.05), whereas old calorie-restricted (OCR) and YCR did not differ (96 +/- 1 vs. 94 +/- 3%). Impaired EDD in OAL was mediated by reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability associated with decreased endothelial NO synthase expression (aorta) (P < 0.05), both of which were restored in OCR. Nitrotyrosine, a cellular marker of oxidant modification, was markedly elevated in OAL (P < 0.05), whereas OCR was similar to Y. Aortic superoxide production was 150% greater in OAL vs. YAL (P < 0.05), but normalized in OCR, and TEMPOL, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic that restored EDD in OAL (to 97 +/- 2%), had no effect in Y or OCR. OAL had increased expression and activity of the oxidant enzyme, NADPH oxidase, and its inhibition (apocynin) improved EDD, whereas NADPH oxidase in OCR was similar to Y. Manganese SOD activity and sirtuin1 expression were reduced in OAL (P < 0.05), but restored to Y in OCR. Inflammatory cytokines were greater in OAL vs. YAL (P < 0.05), but unaffected by CR. Carotid artery endothelium-independent dilation did not differ among groups. Short-term CR initiated in old age reverses age-associated vascular endothelial dysfunction by restoring NO bioavailability, reducing oxidative stress (via reduced NADPH oxidase-mediated superoxide production and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzyme activity), and upregulation of sirtuin-1.

  1. Improved Endothelial Dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice Fed a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)−/− mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE−/− mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE−/− mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  2. Short-term Calorie Restriction Reverses Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Old Mice by Increasing Nitric Oxide and Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rippe, Catarina; Lesniewski, Lisa; Connell, Melanie; LaRocca, Thomas; Donato, Anthony; Seals, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Summary To determine if short-term calorie restriction reverses vascular endothelial dysfunction in old mice, old (O, n=30) and young (Y, n=10) male B6D2F1 mice were fed ad libitum (AL) or calorie restricted (CR, ∼30%) for 8 weeks. Ex vivo carotid artery endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) was impaired in OAL vs. YAL (74±5 vs. 95±2% of maximum dilation, P<0.05), whereas OCR and YCR did not differ (96±1 vs. 94±3%). Impaired EDD in OAL was mediated by reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability associated with decreased endothelial NO synthase expression (aorta) (P<0.05), both of which were restored in OCR. Nitrotyrosine, a cellular marker of oxidant modification, was markedly elevated in OAL (P<0.05), whereas OCR was similar to Y. Aortic superoxide production was 150% greater in OAL vs. YAL (P<0.05), but normalized in OCR, and TEMPOL, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic that restored EDD in OAL (to 97±2%), had no effect in Y or OCR. OAL had increased expression and activity of the oxidant enzyme, NADPH oxidase, and its inhibition (apocynin) improved EDD, whereas NADPH oxidase in OCR was similar to Y. Manganese SOD activity and sirtuin1 expression were reduced in OAL (P<0.05), but restored to Y in OCR. Inflammatory cytokines were greater in OAL vs. YAL (P<0.05), but unaffected by CR. Carotid artery endothelium-independent dilation did not differ among groups. Short-term CR initiated in old age reverses age-associated vascular endothelial dysfunction by restoring NO bioavailability and reducing oxidation stress via reduced NADPH oxidase-mediated superoxide production and stimulation of anti-oxidant enzyme activity, and upregulates sirtuin1. PMID:20121721

  3. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor teneligliptin improved endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in the SHR/NDmcr-cp rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Pang, Zhengda; Shimosato, Takashi; Moritani, Toshinori; Kurinami, Hitomi; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Tenma, Akiko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and metabolic syndrome are major risk factors for the occurrence of cardiovascular events. In this study, we used spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR)/NDmcr-cp (cp/cp) (SHRcp) rats as a model for metabolic syndrome to examine the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibition on hypertension, glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. First, we confirmed that SHRcp rats showed very severe obesity, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction phenotypes from 14 to 54 weeks of age. Next, we examined whether the DPP-4 inhibitor teneligliptin (10 mg kg(-1) per day per os for 12 weeks) could modify any of these phenotypes. Treatment with teneligliptin significantly improved hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, as evidenced by an oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, respectively. Teneligliptin showed no effects on systolic blood pressure or heart rate. In regard to endothelial function, the vasodilator response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in SHRcp rats when compared with WKY rats. Long-term treatment with teneligliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction through the upregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthase mRNA. These results demonstrate that long-term treatment with teneligliptin significantly improved endothelial dysfunction and glucose metabolism in a rat model of metabolic syndrome, suggesting that teneligliptin treatment might be beneficial for patients with hypertension and/or diabetes.

  4. Deficiency of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Associates with Graft Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy of Dysfunctional Dialysis Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Yan; Lin, Lin; Hsieh, Mu-Yang; Kuo, Jui-Cheng; Wang, Chia-Ling; Wang, Ren-Huei; Lai, Chao-Lun; Huang, Po-Hsun; Wu, Chih-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Background The deficiency of endothelial progenitor cells has been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular events in patients undergoing dialysis. However, their correlation with dialysis graft outcomes remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cells and dialysis graft outcomes. Methods After excluding 14 patients with acute coronary syndrome, decompensated heart failure or graft thrombosis in the prior three months, a total of 120 patients undergoing dialysis who underwent endovascular therapy of dysfunctional dialysis grafts were prospectively enrolled. Blood was sampled from study subjects in the morning of a mid-week non-dialysis day. Surface makers of CD34, KDR, and CD133 were used in combination to determine the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. All participants were prospectively followed until June 2013. Results The median follow-up duration was 13 months, within which 62 patients experienced at least one episode of graft thrombosis. Patients with graft thrombosis had lower CD34+KDR+ cell counts compared with patients without graft thrombosis (median 4.5 vs. 8 per 105 mononuclear cells, p = 0.02). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated thrombosis-free survival was lower in the low CD34+KDR+ cell count group (30%) than in the high CD34+KDR+ cell count group (61%; p = 0.007). Univariate analysis showed diabetes, high sensitive C-reactive protein, lesion length and CD34+KDR+ cell counts associated with graft thrombosis. Multivariate analyses confirmed an independent association between low CD34+KDR+ cell counts and graft thrombosis (hazard ratio, 2.52; confidence interval, 1.43-4.44; p = 0.001). Conclusions Our study demonstrated an independent association between low circulating endothelial progenitor cell counts and dialysis graft thrombosis. PMID:28115811

  5. Beneficial effects of apple peel polyphenols on vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in high choline-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mengfan; Ren, Daoyuan; Nie, Yan; Yang, Xingbin

    2017-03-22

    This study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of Red Fuji apple peel polyphenolic extract (APP) on vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice fed a high choline diet. The mice were fed 3% dietary choline in drinking water for 8 weeks and displayed vascular dysfunction and liver damage (p < 0.01). The administration of APP at 600 and 900 mg per kg bw significantly elevated serum NO, HDL and 6-Keto-PGF1a levels and lowered serum TC, TG, LDL, ET-1 and TXB2 levels in the HC-fed mice. Besides, APP also caused the reduction of AST, ALT activities and MDA, CRP, TNF-α levels, and increased the hepatic GSH-Px and SOD activities of the HC-fed mice. Furthermore, the histopathology of the liver by conventional H&E and oil red O staining confirmed the liver steatosis induced by a choline diet and the hepatoprotective effect of APP. The experiment results indicated that the polyphenolic extract from apple peel might be regarded as a preventive and therapeutic product for the amelioration of HC diet-induced vascular dysfunction and hepatic injury.

  6. Hyperglycemia and Endothelial Dysfunction in Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Steven Daniel; Yurdagul, Arif; Orr, A. Wayne

    2012-01-01

    A clear relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease has been established for decades. Despite this, the mechanisms by which diabetes contributes to plaque formation remain in question. Some of this confusion derives from studies in type 2 diabetics where multiple components of metabolic syndrome show proatherosclerotic effects independent of underlying diabetes. However, the hyperglycemia that defines the diabetic condition independently affects atherogenesis in cell culture systems, animal models, and human patients. Endothelial cell biology plays a central role in atherosclerotic plaque formation regulating vessel permeability, inflammation, and thrombosis. The current paper highlights the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia affects endothelial cell biology to promote plaque formation. PMID:22489274

  7. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-06-30

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity.

  8. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction are attenuated by dietary polyphenols in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols possess anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cytotoxic brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, OS and pro-inflammatory cytokines also damage the endothelial cells and the neurovascular uni...

  9. Urine albumin to creatinine ratio: A marker of early endothelial dysfunction in youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) is a useful predictor of cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Its relationship to vascular function in children is not clear. We investigated whether UACR was related to insulin resistance and endothelial function, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis...

  10. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  11. Reduction of obesity, as induced by leptin, reverses endothelial dysfunction in obese (Lep(ob)) mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, B.; Mo, Z.; Brooks-Asplund, E.; Kim, S.; Shoukas, A.; Li, D.; Nyhan, D.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Obesity is a major health care problem and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. Leptin, a neuroendocrine hormone released by adipose tissue, is important in modulating obesity by signaling satiety and increasing metabolism. Moreover, leptin receptors are expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and mediate angiogenesis. We hypothesized that leptin may also play an important role in vasoregulation. We investigated vasoregulatory mechanisms in the leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mouse model and determined the influence of leptin replacement on endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses. The direct effect of leptin on EC nitric oxide (NO) production was also tested by using 4, 5-diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate staining and measurement of nitrate and nitrite concentrations. Vasoconstrictor responses to phenylephrine, norepinephrine, and U-46619 were markedly enhanced in aortic rings from ob/ob mice and were modulated by NO synthase inhibition. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were markedly attenuated in mesenteric microvessels from ob/ob mice. Leptin replacement resulted in significant weight loss and reversal of the impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses observed in ob/ob mice. Preincubation of ECs with leptin enhanced the release of NO production. Thus leptin-deficient ob/ob mice demonstrate marked abnormalities in vasoregulation, including impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilation, which is reversed by leptin replacement. These findings may be partially explained by the direct effect of leptin on endothelial NO production. These vascular abnormalities are similar to those observed in obese, diabetic, leptin-resistant humans. The ob/ob mouse may, therefore, be an excellent new model for the study of the cardiovascular effects of obesity.

  12. Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Bruno, Aldo; Mastrangelo, Diego; De Vizia, Marcella; Bernardo, Benedetto; Rosa, Buonagura; De Lucia, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent of patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed. Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  14. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  15. Evaluation of coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers: Cold pressor test using [(15)O]H(2)O PET.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Byeong-Il; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate coronary endothelial dysfunction in young healthy smokers by measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) using [(15)O]H(2)O-PET. The study population was 18 young male volunteers consisted of 9 smokers (age: 23.8+/-1.1yr) and 9 non-smokers (age: 25.0+/-2.5yr). The smokers had been smoking cigarettes for 6.6+/-2.5 pack years. Myocardial [(15)O]H(2)O-PET was performed at rest, during cold (5 degrees C) pressor stimulation and during adenosine infusion. Left ventricular (LV) input function and tissue time-activity curves were obtained by drawing region of interest (ROI) on the LV blood pool and myocardium images obtained by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) of dynamic [(15)O]H(2)O-PET data, and MBF was calculated using these time-activity curves and single compartmental model. There were no significant difference in resting MBF between two groups (smokers: 1.43+/-0.41 and non-smokers: 1.37+/-0.41ml/g/min; P=NS). However, during cold pressor stimulation, MBF in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers (1.25+/-0.33 vs. 1.59+/-0.29ml/g/min; P=0.019). MBF changed to 90+/-24% of resting MBF in smokers and 122+/-28% in non-smokers. The difference in the ratio of cold pressor MBF to basal MBF between two groups was also significant (P=0.024). During adenosine infusion, however, hyperemic MBF did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (5.81+/-1.99 vs. 5.03+/-1.27ml/g/min; P=NS). This study shows that [(15)O]H(2)O PET analysis can reveal that endothelial dysfunction occurs in even young smokers of about 6 pack years.

  16. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  17. Cell-Based Screening Identifies Paroxetine as an Inhibitor of Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Módis, Katalin; Oláh, Gabor; Coletta, Ciro; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a phenotypic screening in endothelial cells exposed to elevated extracellular glucose (an in vitro model of hyperglycemia) to identify compounds that prevent hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation without adversely affecting cell viability. From a focused library of >6,000 clinically used drug-like and pharmacologically active compounds, several classes of active compounds emerged, with a confirmed hit rate of <0.5%. Follow-up studies focused on paroxetine, a clinically used antidepressant compound that has not been previously implicated in the context of hyperglycemia or diabetes. Paroxetine reduced hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial ROS formation, mitochondrial protein oxidation, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage, without interfering with mitochondrial electron transport or cellular bioenergetics. The ability of paroxetine to improve hyperglycemic endothelial cell injury was unique among serotonin reuptake blockers and can be attributed to its antioxidant effect, which primarily resides within its sesamol moiety. Paroxetine maintained the ability of vascular rings to respond to the endothelium-dependent relaxant acetylcholine, both during in vitro hyperglycemia and ex vivo, in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thus, the current work identifies a novel pharmacological action of paroxetine as a protector of endothelial cells against hyperglycemic injury and raises the potential of repurposing of this drug for the experimental therapy of diabetic cardiovascular complications. PMID:23223176

  18. Differential impact of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on subsequent cardiovascular events following percutaneous coronary intervention between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and non-CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Noriaki; Hokimoto, Seiji; Akasaka, Tomonori; Arima, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) status might modify the predictive effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to examine the differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients. We conducted a cohort study of 435 patients following PCI. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Peripheral endothelial dysfunction was examined using reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry index (RHI), and we divided patients into low- and high-natural logarithmic RHI (Ln-RHI) group. The endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris, and coronary revascularization. A total of 56 patients had a cardiovascular event. Patients who suffered a cardiovascular event had significantly lower Ln-RHI than other patients in the non-CKD group (0.46 ± 0.18 versus 0.60 ± 0.25; P = 0.002). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significantly higher probability of cardiovascular events in low Ln-RHI patients in the non-CKD group (log-rank test: P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified Ln-RHI as an independent and significant predictor of future cardiovascular events in the non-CKD group (HR: 0.096; 95 % CI 0.02-0.47; P = 0.004) but not in the CKD group. There was a differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients, and peripheral endothelial dysfunction significantly correlates with subsequent cardiovascular events after PCI in non-CKD patients.

  19. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  20. Statins prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis by reverting neuroinflammation, and microcirculatory/endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reis, Patricia A; Alexandre, Pedro C B; D'Avila, Joana C; Siqueira, Luciana D; Antunes, Barbara; Estato, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo V; Verdonk, Franck; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Fernando A

    2017-02-01

    Acute brain dysfunction is a frequent condition in sepsis patients and is associated with increased mortality and long-term neurocognitive consequences. Impaired memory and executive function are common findings in sepsis survivors. Although neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been associated with acute brain dysfunction and its consequences, no specific treatments are available that prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis. Experimental sepsis was induced in Swiss Webster mice by intraperitoneal injection of cecal material (5mg/kg, 500μL). Control groups (n=5/group each experiment) received 500μL of saline. Support therapy recover (saline 0.9%, 1mL and imipenem 30mg/kg) were applied (6, 24 and 48h post injection, n=5-10/group, each experiment), together or not with additive orally treatment with statins (atorvastatin/simvastatin 20mg/kg b.w.). Survival rate was monitored at 6, 24 and 48h. In a setting of experiments, animals were euthanized at 6 and 24h after induction for biochemical, immunohistochemistry and intravital analysis. Statins did not prevented mortality in septic mice, however survivors presented lower clinical score. At another setting of experiments, after 15days, mice survivors from fecal supernatant peritoneal sepsis presented cognitive dysfunction for contextual hippocampal and aversive amygdala-dependent memories, which was prevented by atorvastatin/simvastatin treatment. Systemic and brain tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and activation of microglial were lower in septic mice treated with statins. Brain lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase levels were also reduced by statins treatment. Intravital examination of the brain vessels of septic animals revealed decreased functional capillary density and increased rolling and adhesion of leukocytes, and blood flow impairment, which were reversed by treatment with statins. In addition, treatment with statins restored the cholinergic vasodilator response

  1. [Pulmonary hypertension and lung edema at high altitude. Role of endothelial dysfunction and fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Allemann, Yves; Rexhaj, Emrush; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2012-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. While initially, the aim of high-altitude research was to understand the adaptation of the organism to hypoxia and find treatments for altitude-related diseases, over the past decade or so, the scope of this research has broadened considerably. Two important observations led to the foundation for the broadening of the scientific scope of high-altitude research. First, high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) represents a unique model which allows studying fundamental mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension and lung edema in humans. Secondly, the ambient hypoxia associated with high-altitude exposure facilitates the detection of pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction at an early stage. Here, we review studies that, by capitalizing on these observations, have led to the description of novel mechanisms underpinning lung edema and pulmonary hypertension and to the first direct demonstration of fetal programming of vascular dysfunction in humans.

  2. The effect of melatonin on endothelial dysfunction in patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Heshmat-Ghahdarijani, Kiyan; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Mohsen; Sonbolestan, Sayed Ali; Ziayi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this study, we investigated the effect of melatonin administration on four markers of endothelial cell function including intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), C-reactive protein (CRP), and nitric oxide (NO) on patients with three vessels coronary disease. Materials and Methods: This double-blind, randomized, controlled trial study was conducted on 39 patients (32 men and 7 women) with three vessels coronary disease. The case group included 20 patients who received 10 mg oral melatonin 1 h before sleeping for 1 month. The control group included 19 patients who received placebo 1 h before sleeping for 1 month. The serum levels of CRP, ICAM, VCAM, and NO were compared after 1 month treatment. Results: After 1 month of melatonin treatment, the mean level of ICAM, VCAM, and CRP showed a statistically significant decrease in the case group. On the other hand, the mean level of VCAM increased significantly in the control group. The mean levels of CRP and ICAM were also increased in the control group, but the difference did not reach the significant threshold. With respect to NO, there was a statistically significant increase in the case group, while there was a statistically significant decrease in serum NO in the control group. Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that melatonin may have beneficial effects on endothelial oxidative stress even in patient with severe and advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:28028514

  3. Intravenous administration of piceatannol, an arginase inhibitor, improves endothelial dysfunction in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Cong

    2017-01-01

    Advanced age is one of the risk factors for vascular diseases that are mainly caused by impaired nitric oxide (NO) production. It has been demonstrated that endothelial arginase constrains the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and limits NO generation. Hence, arginase inhibition is suggested to be vasoprotective in aging. In this study, we examined the effects of intravenous injection of Piceatannol, an arginase inhibitor, on aged mice. Our results show that Piceatannol administration reduced the blood pressure in aged mice by inhibiting arginase activity, which was associated with NO production and reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, Piceatannol administration recovered Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylation, eNOS phosphorylation and eNOS dimer stability in the aged mice. The improved NO signaling was shown to be effective in attenuating the phenylephrine-dependent contractile response and in enhancing the acetylcholine-dependent vasorelaxation response in aortic rings from the aged mice. These data suggest Piceatannol as a potential treatment for vascular disease. PMID:28066144

  4. Increased Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction in Mice Bearing Constitutively Deacetylated Alleles of Foxo1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Li; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Kim-Muller, Ja-Young; Lin, Hua V.; Welch, Carrie; Accili, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Complications of atherosclerosis are the leading cause of death of patients with type 2 (insulin-resistant) diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms by which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia contribute to atherogenesis in key target tissues (liver, vessel wall, hematopoietic cells) can assist in the design of therapeutic approaches. We have shown that hyperglycemia induces FoxO1 deacetylation and that targeted knock-in of alleles encoding constitutively deacetylated FoxO1 in mice (Foxo1KR/KR) improves hepatic lipid metabolism and decreases macrophage inflammation, setting the stage for a potential anti-atherogenic effect of this mutation. Surprisingly, we report here that when Foxo1KR/KR mice are intercrossed with low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice (Ldlr−/−), they develop larger aortic root atherosclerotic lesions than Ldlr−/− controls despite lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The phenotype is unaffected by transplanting bone marrow from Ldlr−/− mice into Foxo1KR/KR mice, indicating that it is independent of hematopoietic cells and suggesting that the primary lesion in Foxo1KR/KR mice occurs in the vessel wall. Experiments in isolated endothelial cells from Foxo1KR/KR mice indicate that deacetylation favors FoxO1 nuclear accumulation and exerts target gene-specific effects, resulting in higher Icam1 and Tnfα expression and increased monocyte adhesion. The data indicate that FoxO1 deacetylation can promote vascular endothelial changes conducive to atherosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:22389493

  5. Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation in atherosclerosis: beneficial effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Lahera, Vicente; Goicoechea, Marian; de Vinuesa, Soledad García; Miana, María; de las Heras, Natalia; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Luño, José

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its complications represent the major cause of death in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A [HMGCoA] reductase and consequently inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. Statins have been described as the most potent class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. In clinical trials, statins are beneficial in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Statins, were initially designed as cholesterol-lowering drugs. However, these drugs, besides their lipid-lowering properties, exert a number of protective effects on the cardiovascular system that emerged over the past years. The benefits observed with statin treatment appear to be greater than that might be expected from reduction in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. These cholesterol-independent effects have been called "pleiotropic". The cholesterol-independent or "pleiotropic" effects of statins involve improvement of endothelial function, stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decrease of oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibition of thrombogenic response. These pleiotropic effects of statins have been proposed as key properties of these drugs to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review will emphasize the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins on endothelial function and oxidative stress. In particular, inhibition of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho, Ras and Rac, which are regulated by isoprenoids [farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate], seems to play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Biology of Aging Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J.; Morgan, R. Garrett; Walker, Ashley E.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage have been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway that results in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current

  7. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  8. Tryptophan depletion under conditions that imitate insulin resistance enhances fatty acid oxidation and induces endothelial dysfunction through reactive oxygen species-dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Sounidaki, Maria; Antoniadi, Georgia; Rountas, Christos; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Loannis

    2017-04-01

    In atherosclerosis-associated pathologic entities characterized by malnutrition and inflammation, L-tryptophan (TRP) levels are low. Insulin resistance is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and induces endothelial dysfunction by increasing fatty acid oxidation. It is also associated with inflammation and low TRP levels. Low TRP levels have been related to worse cardiovascular outcome. This study evaluated the effect of TRP depletion on endothelial dysfunction under conditions that imitate insulin resistance. Fatty acid oxidation, harmful pathways due to increased fatty acid oxidation, and endothelial dysfunction were assessed in primary human aortic endothelial cells cultured under normal glucose, low insulin conditions in the presence or absence of TRP. TRP depletion activated general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and inhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor. It increased fatty acid oxidation by increasing expression and activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1. Elevated fatty acid oxidation increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the polyol and hexosamine pathways, and enhancing protein kinase C activity and methylglyoxal production. TRP absence inhibited nitric oxide synthase activity in a ROS-dependent way, whereas it increased the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in a ROS independent and possibly p53-dependent manner. Thus, TRP depletion, an amino acid whose low levels have been related to worse cardiovascular outcome and to inflammatory atherosclerosis-associated pathologic entities, under conditions that imitate insulin resistance enhances fatty acid oxidation and induces endothelial dysfunction through ROS-dependent and independent pathways. These findings may offer new insights at the molecular mechanisms involved in accelerated atherosclerosis that frequently accompanies malnutrition and inflammation.

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and perivascular adipose oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to vascular dysfunction in a rodent model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Chiara; Ebrahimian, Talin; Angulo, Orlando; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome represents a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress is a mediator of endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling. We investigated vascular dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome and the oxidant mechanisms involved. New Zealand obese (NZO) mice with metabolic syndrome and New Zealand black control mice were studied. NZO mice showed insulin resistance and increased visceral fat and blood pressure compared with New Zealand black mice. Mesenteric resistance arteries from NZO mice exhibited increased media:lumen ratio and media cross-sectional area, demonstrating hypertrophic vascular remodeling. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine, assessed by pressurized myography, was impaired in NZO mice, not affected by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase, and improved by the antioxidant Tempol, suggesting reduced NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. Dimer:monomer ratio of endothelial NO synthase was decreased in NZO mice compared with New Zealand black mice, suggesting endothelial NO synthase uncoupling. Furthermore, vascular superoxide and peroxynitrite production was increased, as well as adhesion molecule expression. Perivascular adipose tissue of NZO mice showed increased superoxide production and NADPH oxidase activity, as well as adipocyte hypertrophy, associated with inflammatory Mac-3-positive cell infiltration. Vasoconstriction to norepinephrine decreased in the presence of perivascular adipose tissue in New Zealand black mice but was unaffected by perivascular adipose tissue in NZO mice, suggesting loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile properties. Our data suggest that this rodent model of metabolic syndrome is associated with perivascular adipose inflammation and oxidative stress, hypertrophic resistance artery remodeling, and endothelial dysfunction, the latter a result of decreased NO

  10. Inactivation of Endothelial Small/Intermediate Conductance of Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Contributes to Coronary Arteriolar Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhong; Xie, An; Singh, Arun K; Ehsan, Afshin; Choudhary, Gaurav; Dudley, Samuel; Sellke, Frank W; Feng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with coronary arteriolar endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the role of the small/intermediate (SKCa/IKCa) conductance of calcium-activated potassium channels in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Coronary arterioles (80 to 150 μm in diameter) were dissected from discarded right atrial tissues of diabetic (glycosylated hemoglobin = 9.6±0.25) and nondiabetic patients (glycosylated hemoglobin 5.4±0.12) during coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n=8/group). In-vitro relaxation response of precontracted arterioles was examined in the presence of the selective SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 and other vasodilatory agents. The channel density and membrane potential of diabetic and nondiabetic endothelial cells was measured by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The protein expression and distribution of the SKCa/IKCa in the human myocardium and coronary arterioles was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that diabetes significantly reduced the coronary arteriolar response to the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 compared to the respective responses of nondiabetic vessels (P<0.05 versus nondiabetes). The relaxation response of diabetic arterioles to NS309 was prevented by denudation of endothelium (P=0.001 versus endothelium-intact). Diabetes significantly decreased endothelial SKCa/IKCa currents and hyperpolarization induced by the SKCa/IKCa activator NS309 as compared with that of nondiabetics. There were no significant differences in the expression and distribution of SKCa/IKCa proteins in the coronary microvessels. Conclusions Diabetes is associated with inactivation of endothelial SKCa/IKCa channels, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients. PMID:26304940

  11. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = – 0.325, p <  0.05), HDL cholesterol (r = – 0.393, p <  0.05), body mass index (BMI; r = 0.530, p <  0.01), and plasma fibrinogen concentration (r = 0.335, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained significantly associated with BMI and fibrinogen, but not with FMD, in healthy controls. In patients with coronary risk factors, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = – 0.331, p <  0.01), HDL cholesterol (r = – 0.241, p <  0.05), BMI (r = 0.290, p <  0.01), hematocrit (r = 0.422, p <  0.001), white blood cell count (r = 0.295, p <  0.01), platelet count (r = 0.204, p <  0.05), and insulin (r = 0.210, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained strongly associated with FMD and hematocrit in patients with coronary risk factors. These data indicate that BPT is closely associated with FMD in patients with coronary risk factors and suggest that the measurement of blood rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients. PMID:26444592

  12. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = - 0.325, p <  0.05), HDL cholesterol (r = - 0.393, p <  0.05), body mass index (BMI; r = 0.530, p <  0.01), and plasma fibrinogen concentration (r = 0.335, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained significantly associated with BMI and fibrinogen, but not with FMD, in healthy controls. In patients with coronary risk factors, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = - 0.331, p <  0.01), HDL cholesterol (r = - 0.241, p <  0.05), BMI (r = 0.290, p <  0.01), hematocrit (r = 0.422, p <  0.001), white blood cell count (r = 0.295, p <  0.01), platelet count (r = 0.204, p <  0.05), and insulin (r = 0.210, p <  0.05). In a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for all clinical variables, BPT remained strongly associated with FMD and hematocrit in patients with coronary risk factors. These data indicate that BPT is closely associated with FMD in patients with coronary risk factors and suggest that the measurement of blood rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients.

  13. Intravital Microscopy in the Cremaster Muscle Microcirculation for Endothelial Dysfunction Studies.

    PubMed

    Rius, Cristina; Sanz, María J

    2015-01-01

    The intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation is a method widely used to visualize in vivo blood cells interacting with the endothelium and within the vessels. Therefore, it is a suitable technique to study leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions along every stage of the canonical leukocyte recruitment cascade: rolling, adhesion, intravascular crawling, and migration both in postcapillary venules and arterioles of the mouse cremasteric microcirculation. This technique also enables to assess vessel functionality, since hemodynamic parameters such as shear stress, flow rate, and vasodilatation/vasoconstriction, among other vascular events, can be additionally determined. Furthermore, response to multiple drugs and mechanisms underlying blood cells interactions within the vascular system can be studied in a real scenario. This chapter describes a protocol for intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation.

  14. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Pei; Lin, Feng-Yen; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Liao, Wen-Ling; Huang, Huey-Chun; Liu, Po-Len; Chen, Yung-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) move towards injured endothelium or inflamed tissues and incorporate into foci of neovascularisation, thereby improving blood flow and tissue repair. Patients with cardiovascular diseases have been shown to exhibit reduced EPC number and function. It has become increasingly apparent that these changes may be effected in response to enhanced oxidative stress, possibly as a result of systemic and localised inflammatory responses. The interplay between inflammation and oxidative stress affects the initiation, progression, and complications of cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies suggest that inflammation and oxidative stress modulate EPC bioactivity. Clinical medications with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, such as statins, thiazolidinediones, angiotensin II receptor 1 blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, are currently administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. These medications appear to exert beneficial effects on EPC biology. This review focuses on EPC biology and explores the links between oxidative stress, inflammation, and development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23484163

  15. Effects of Complementary Creatine Monohydrate and Physical Training on Inflammatory and Endothelial Dysfunction Markers Among Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Farajollah; Rahmani, Asghar; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Soleimannejad, Koroush; Khalighi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory cytokine in heart failure patients (HF). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of creatine monohydrate and exercise on inflammatory and endothelial dysfunction markers among HF patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients were prospectively randomized into two groups: Intervention group which received 5 grams/day creatine monohydrate and exercised for 8 weeks; and control group which did not receive any interventions. Interleukine-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) were measured at the start and end of the study for both groups. Results: In total, 100 patients including 50 controls and 50 intervention group (54% male, mean EF of 34.2 ± 10.5% and 52% male, mean EF of 35.6 ± 12.7%, respectively) were analyzed. The serum levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 increased at the end of the study in the control group compared to the baseline, (7.5 ± 1.5 mg/L vs. 6.9 ± 1.3 mg/L, P < 0.05 and 3.0 ± 0.75 ng/L vs. 2.55 ± 0.9 ng/L, P < 0.05, respectively). However, compared to the baseline, the level of both markers decreased at the end of the study in the intervention group (6.3 ± 1.6 mg/L vs.7.5 ± 1.5 mg/L, P < 0.05 and 2.1 ± 0.8 ng/L vs.2.5 ± 0.5 ng/L, P < 0.05). Also, P-selectin and ICAM-1 levels increased at the end of study (56.9 ± 1.8 ng/L vs. 51.9 ± 1.5 ng/L, P < 0.05 and 368.1 ± 25.4 µg/L vs. 353.1 ± 10.4 µg/L, P < 0.05 respectively). Inversely, the levels of these markers decreased in the intervention group, at the end of study (49.7 ± 1.9 ng/l vs. 51.4 ± 2.1 ng/l, P < 0.05 and 342.7 ± 16.5 µg/l vs. 350.4 ± 14.7 µg/l, P < 0.05, respectively). VCAM-1 level was not decreased significantly at the end of the study in the intervention group (570.5 ± 78.4 µg/L vs. 575.3 ± 86.5 µg/L, P > 0.05). Conclusions: Combination

  16. Effects of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate on high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Ridgeway, Simone D.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance, a hallmark of metabolic disorders, is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Impairment of insulin responsiveness in vascular endothelium contributes to insulin resistance. The reciprocal relationship between insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction augments the pathophysiology of metabolism and cardiovascular functions. The most abundant green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have vasodilator action in vessels by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). However, it is not known whether EGCG has a beneficial effect in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NCD) or HFD with or without EGCG supplement (50 mg·kg−1·day−1) for 10 wk. Mice fed a HFD with EGCG supplement gained less body weight and showed improved insulin sensitivity. In vehicle-treated HFD mice, endothelial function was impaired in response to insulin but not to acetylcholine, whereas the EGCG-treated HFD group showed improved insulin-stimulated vasodilation. Interestingly, EGCG intake reduced macrophage infiltration into aortic tissues in HFD mice. Treatment with EGCG restored the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), and protein kinase B (Akt), which was inhibited by palmitate (200 μM, 5 h) in primary bovine aortic endothelial cells. From these results, we conclude that supplementation of EGCG improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function. The results suggest that EGCG may have beneficial health effects in glucose metabolism and endothelial function through modulating HFD-induced inflammatory response. PMID:24148349

  17. l-arginine and l-NMMA for assessing cerebral endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, William K; Sørensen, Caspar G; Kruuse, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), in particular cerebral ED, may be an essential biomarker for ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on methods to best estimate cerebral ED. In this systematic review, we evaluate the use of l-arginine and N(G) -monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) for assessment of cerebral ED. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was done. We included studies investigating cerebrovascular response to l-arginine or l-NMMA in human subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Seven studies (315 subjects) were eligible according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies investigated the effect of age (n=2), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=1), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) (n=1), leukoaraiosis (n=1), and prior ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (n=2) on cerebral ED. Most studies applied transcranial Doppler to quantify cerebral ED. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) induced by l-arginine was impaired in elderly and subjects with leukoaraiosis, but enhanced in CADASIL patients. Studies including subjects with prior ischaemic stroke or TIA reported both enhanced and impaired EDV to l-arginine. Responses to l-NMMA deviated between subjects with type 2 DM and the elderly. We found only few studies investigating cerebral endothelial responses to l-arginine and l-NMMA in subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Inconsistencies in results were most likely due to variations in methods and included subject populations. In order to use cerebral ED as a prognostic marker, further studies are required to evaluate the association to cerebrovascular disease.

  18. B7-H1 shapes T-cell–mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction and regional encephalitogenicity in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Luisa; Kuzmanov, Ivan; Hucke, Stephanie; Gross, Catharina C.; Posevitz, Vilmos; Dreykluft, Angela; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Janoschka, Claudia; Lindner, Maren; Herold, Martin; Schwab, Nicholas; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; Meuth, Sven G.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that determine lesion localization or phenotype variation in multiple sclerosis are mostly unidentified. Although transmigration of activated encephalitogenic T cells across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the disease pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity, the consequences on brain endothelial barrier integrity upon interaction with such T cells and subsequent lesion formation and distribution are largely unknown. We made use of a transgenic spontaneous mouse model of CNS autoimmunity characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions confined to optic nerves and spinal cord (OSE mice). Genetic ablation of a single immune-regulatory molecule in this model [i.e., B7-homolog 1 (B7-H1, PD-L1)] not only significantly increased incidence of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity and aggravated disease course, especially in the later stages of disease, but also importantly resulted in encephalitogenic T-cell infiltration and lesion formation in normally unaffected brain regions, such as the cerebrum and cerebellum. Interestingly, B7-H1 ablation on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4+ T cells, but not on antigen-presenting cells, amplified T-cell effector functions, such as IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Therefore, these T cells were rendered more capable of eliciting cell contact-dependent brain endothelial cell dysfunction and increased barrier permeability in an in vitro model of the BBB. Our findings suggest that a single immune-regulatory molecule on T cells can be ultimately responsible for localized BBB breakdown, and thus substantial changes in lesion topography in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27671636

  19. Ibuprofen arginate retains eNOS substrate activity and reverses endothelial dysfunction: implications for the COX-2/ADMA axis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Tesfai, Abel; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Gashaw, Hime H.; Sampaio, Walkyria; Etelvino, Gisele; Leão, Nádia Miricéia; Santos, Robson A.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen, are among the most commonly used medications and produce their antiinflammatory effects by blocking cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. Their use is associated with increased risk of heart attacks caused by blocking COX-2 in the vasculature and/or kidney, with our recent work implicating the endogenous NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a cardiotoxic hormone whose effects can be prevented by l-arginine. The ibuprofen salt ibuprofen arginate (Spididol) was created to increase solubility but we suggest that it could also augment the NO pathway through codelivery of arginine. Here we investigated the idea that ibuprofen arginate can act to simultaneously inhibit COX-2 and preserve the NO pathway. Ibuprofen arginate functioned similarly to ibuprofen sodium for inhibition of mouse/human COX-2, but only ibuprofen arginate served as a substrate for NOS. Ibuprofen arginate but not ibuprofen sodium also reversed the inhibitory effects of ADMA and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester on inducible NOS (macrophages) and endothelial NOS in vitro (aorta) and in vivo (blood pressure). These observations show that ibuprofen arginate provides, in one preparation, a COX-2 inhibitor and NOS substrate that could act to negate the harmful cardiovascular consequences mediated by blocking renal COX-2 and increased ADMA. While remarkably simple, our findings are potentially game-changing in the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug arena.—Kirkby, N. S., Tesfai, A., Ahmetaj-Shala, B., Gashaw, H. H., Sampaio, W., Etelvino, G., Leão, N. M., Santos, R. A., Mitchell, J. A. Ibuprofen arginate retains eNOS substrate activity and reverses endothelial dysfunction: implications for the COX-2/ADMA axis. PMID:27601438

  20. Long-term effects of oral vitamin C supplementation on the endothelial dysfunction in the iris microvessels of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jariyapongskul, Amporn; Rungjaroen, Tippawan; Kasetsuwan, Ngamjit; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Seki, Junji; Niimi, Hideyukii

    2007-07-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate effects of long-term supplementation of vitamin C on the iris microcirculation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar-Furth rats by intravenous injection of STZ (55 mg/kg b.w.). The rats were divided into three groups: control rats (CON), STZ-induced diabetic rats (STZ), and STZ rats supplemented with vitamin C (STZ-vitC). For supplementation of vitamin C, ascorbic acid (1 g/l) was added into the drinking water. The experiments were performed at different periods (8, 12, 24 and 36 weeks) after injection of STZ. Blood glucose, tissue lipid peroxidation and plasma vitamin C were measured. To examine the endothelial function, leukocyte adhesion to the venular endothelium was evaluated in the iris post-capillaries by means of counting the number of leukocytes labeled with rhodamine 6G. Blood flow perfusion in the iris was monitored using a laser Doppler flow meter. In the STZ rats, hyperglycemia was induced with an increase in HbA(1c) and lipid peroxidation but with a decrease in the plasma vitamin C level which improved by vitamin C supplementation. The number of adherent leukocytes increased significantly, associated with reduction in the iris blood flow perfusion, at 8, 12, 24 and 36 weeks after injection of STZ. In the STZ-vitC rats, the iris blood flow perfusion was significantly increased in comparison with the STZ rats, while the leukocyte adhesion was decreased at 24 and 36 weeks. The statistical analysis shows that the leukocyte adhesion decreased with increase in the iris blood flow perfusion in STZ and STZ-vitC rats. In conclusion, vitamin supplementation suppressed leukocyte adhesion and thus endothelial dysfunction, associated with increase in iris blood flow perfusion in diabetes. The antioxidant vitamin C may be a therapeutic agent for preventing diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction of Bypass Graft: Direct Comparison of In Vitro and In Vivo Models of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Gábor; Hegedűs, Péter; Barnucz, Enikő; Zöller, Raphael; Klein, Stephanie; Schmidt, Harald; Radovits, Tamás; Korkmaz, Sevil; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Background Although, ischemia/reperfusion induced vascular dysfunction has been widely described, no comparative study of in vivo- and in vitro-models exist. In this study, we provide a direct comparison between models (A) ischemic storage and in-vitro reoxygenation (B) ischemic storage and in vitro reperfusion (C) ischemic storage and in-vivo reperfusion. Methods and Results Aortic arches from rats were stored for 2 hours in saline. Arches were then (A) in vitro reoxygenated (B) in vitro incubated in hypochlorite for 30 minutes (C) in vivo reperfused after heterotransplantation (2, 24 hours and 7 days reperfusion). Endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxations were assessed in organ bath. DNA strand breaks were assessed by TUNEL-method, mRNA expressions (caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, eNOS) by quantitative real-time PCR, proteins by Western blot analysis and the expression of CD-31 by immunochemistry. Endothelium-dependent maximal relaxation was drastically reduced in the in-vivo models compared to ischemic storage and in-vitro reperfusion group, and no difference showed between ischemic storage and control group. CD31-staining showed significantly lower endothelium surface ratio in-vivo, which correlated with TUNEL-positive ratio. Increased mRNA and protein levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic gens indicated a significantly higher damage in the in-vivo models. Conclusion Even short-period of ischemia induces severe endothelial damage (in-vivo reperfusion model). In-vitro models of ischemia-reperfusion injury can be limitedly suited for reliable investigations. Time course of endothelial stunning is also described. PMID:25875813

  2. Investigating the role of acute mental stress on endothelial dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi-Tao; Tan, Qi-Wen; Li, Ping; Mou, Shan-Fang; Liu, Shu-Juan; Bao, Yue; Jiao, Hua-Chen; Su, Wen-Ge

    2015-04-01

    Chronic stress is a known risk factor for both endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), but less is known of how acute mental stress affects the vasculature. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we analyzed the impact of acute mental stress on flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an indicator of endothelial function. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through May 2014, to identify publications in English-language journals. The primary outcome was the change in FMD from baseline to the time of measurement. We also assessed the risk of bias and the heterogeneity of included studies. Our search identified eight prospective studies, which displayed significant heterogeneity. Four studies measured FMD while the subject was performing the task; six measured FMD after the task had been completed. The total number of participants was 164. The pooled results indicate that FMD did not change significantly while the task was being performed (pooled difference in means: -0.853; 95 % confidence interval (CI), -3.926/2.220; P = 0.586); however, FMD measured after the task was completed was significantly less than baseline (pooled difference in means: -2.450; 95 %CI, -3.925/-0.975; P = 0.001). In conclusions, our findings provide evidence that an acute stressful experience has a delayed, negative impact on the function of the endothelium. Repeated exposure to short-term stress may lead to permanent injury of the vasculature. Therefore, assessment of patients' exposure to both repeated acute mental stress and chronic stress may be useful in determining their risk of developing CVD.

  3. Effects of Campomanesia xanthocarpa on inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid biomarkers in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

    PubMed

    Viecili, Paulo Ricardo Nazário; Borges, Diego Olschowsky; Kirsten, Karina; Malheiros, Jênifer; Viecili, Eduardo; Melo, Rodolfo Dahlem; Trevisan, Gabriela; da Silva, Mariane Arnoldi; Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Klafke, Jonatas Zeni

    2014-05-01

    In Brazil, the edible plant Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg. (Myrtaceae), popularly known as "guavirova," has been studied in hypercholesterolemic individuals. The present work investigated the effects of C. xanthocarpa on inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid biomarkers in hypercholesterolemic individuals. A total of 156 individuals were selected in a double-blind fashion and randomly divided into two groups in accordance with the intervals used in the criteria for hypercholesterolemia: individuals with total cholesterol (TC) levels between 200 and 240 mg/dL (undesirable level individuals - UL) and individuals with TC levels >240 mg/dL (hypercholesterolemic individuals - HL). Both groups had a control group (CG), which received placebo treatment, an encapsulated excipient group (lactose) and an experimental group that received 500 mg (EG 500), 750 mg (EG 750) or 1000 mg (EG 1000) of encapsulated C. xanthocarpa. The inflammatory processes (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein - hs-CRP), oxidative stress (advanced oxidation protein products-AOPPs; ischemia-modified albumin-IMA), endothelial dysfunction (nitric oxide - NOx) and biochemical (TC, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein - HDL, low-density lipoproteins - LDL, and very low-density lipoprotein - VLDL) parameters were measured before and 90 days after the initiation of treatment. A significant decrease in TC and LDL levels was observed in HL individuals from the EG 500 group (reduction of 29 ± 3% and 41 ± 5% to levels before treatment) compared to the CG group individuals. A significant reduction in oxidative stress and inflammatory process components (reduction of 52 ± 11% in AOPPs, 32 ± 10% in IMA and 57 ± 7% in hs-CRP) and a significant increase in NOx (increase of 84 ± 27%) was observed in HL individuals in the EG 1000 group when compared to the CG group individuals. Treatment with encapsulated C. xanthocarpa reduced blood TC and LDL levels in

  4. Relations of Dietary Magnesium Intake to Biomarkers of Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in an Ethnically Diverse Cohort of Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Sara A.; Song, Yiqing; Nathan, Lauren; Tinker, Lesley; de Boer, Ian H.; Tylavsky, Fran; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although magnesium may favorably affect metabolic outcomes, few studies have investigated the role of magnesium intake in systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Among 3,713 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at baseline, we measured plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), turnor necrosis factor-α receptor 2 (TNF-α-R2), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and E-selectin. Magnesium intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS After adjustment for age, ethnicity, clinical center, time of blood draw, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, energy intake, BMI, and diabetes status, magnesium intake was inversely associated with hs-CRP (P for linear trend = 0.003), IL-6 (P < 0.0001), TNF-α-R2 (P = 0.0006), and sVCAM-1 (P = 0.06). Similar findings remained after further adjustment for dietary fiber, fruit,