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Sample records for age-related gray matter

  1. Exercise boosts hippocampal volume by preventing early age-related gray matter loss.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Johannes; Biedermann, Sarah V; Falfán-Melgoza, Claudia; Auer, Matthias K; Zheng, Lei; Steinle, Jörg; Hörner, Felix; Sartorius, Alexander; Ende, Gabriele; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Gass, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Recently, a larger hippocampus was found in exercising mice and men. Here we studied the morphological underpinnings in wheel running mice by longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry revealed that running increases hippocampal volume by inhibiting an early age-related gray matter loss. Disruption of neurogenesis-related neuroplasticity by focalized irradiation is sufficient to block positive effects of exercise on macroscopic brain morphology. PMID:24178895

  2. Effect of Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism on age-related gray matter volume changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu-En; Huang, Chu-Chung; Yang, Albert C; Tu, Pei-Chi; Yeh, Heng-Liang; Hong, Chen-Jee; Chen, Jin-Fan; Liou, Ying-Jay; Lin, Ching-Po; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) gene is a major regulator of neural plasticity and cellular resilience. Recently, the Bcl-2 rs956572 single nucleotide polymorphism was proposed to be a functional allelic variant that modulates cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. Our cross-sectional study investigated the genetic effect of this Bcl-2 polymorphism on age-related decreases in gray matter (GM) volume across the adult lifespan. Our sample comprised 330 healthy volunteers (191 male, 139 female) with a mean age of 56.2±22.0 years (range: 21-92). Magnetic resonance imaging and genotyping of the Bcl-2 rs956572 were performed for each participant. The differences in regional GM volumes between G homozygotes and A-allele carriers were tested using optimized voxel-based morphometry. The association between the Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism and age was a predictor of regional GM volumes in the right cerebellum, bilateral lingual gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and right parahippocampal gyrus. We found that the volume of these five regions decreased with increasing age (all P<.001). Moreover, the downward slope was steeper among the Bcl-2 rs956572 A-allele carriers than in the G-homozygous participants. Our data provide convergent evidence for the genetic effect of the Bcl-2 functional allelic variant in brain aging. The rs956572 G-allele, which is associated with significantly higher Bcl-2 protein expression and diminished cellular sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis, conferred a protective effect against age-related changes in brain GM volume, particularly in the cerebellum. PMID:23437205

  3. Normal age-related brain morphometric changes: nonuniformity across cortical thickness, surface area and gray matter volume?

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Herve; Goldman, Aaron L; Sambataro, Fabio; Verchinski, Beth A; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2012-03-01

    Normal aging is accompanied by global as well as regional structural changes. While these age-related changes in gray matter volume have been extensively studied, less has been done using newer morphological indexes, such as cortical thickness and surface area. To this end, we analyzed structural images of 216 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, using a surface-based automated parcellation approach. Linear regressions of age revealed a concomitant global age-related reduction in cortical thickness, surface area and volume. Cortical thickness and volume collectively confirmed the vulnerability of the prefrontal cortex, whereas in other cortical regions, such as in the parietal cortex, thickness was the only measure sensitive to the pronounced age-related atrophy. No cortical regions showed more surface area reduction than the global average. The distinction between these morphological measures may provide valuable information to dissect age-related structural changes of the brain, with each of these indexes probably reflecting specific histological changes occurring during aging. PMID:20739099

  4. A voxel-based morphometric magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain detects age-related gray matter volume changes in healthy subjects of 21-45 years old.

    PubMed

    Bourisly, Ali K; El-Beltagi, Ahmed; Cherian, Jigi; Gejo, Grace; Al-Jazzaf, Abrar; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Previous and more recent work of analyzing structural changes in the brain suggest that certain brain regions such as the frontal lobe are among the brain regions profoundly affected by the aging process across males and females. Also, a unified model of structural changes in a normally aging brain is still lacking. The present study investigated age-related structural brain changes in gray matter from young to early middle-age adulthood for males and females. Magnetic resonance images of 215 normal and healthy participants between the ages of 21-45 years were acquired. Changes in gray matter were assessed using voxel-based morphometry and gray matter volumetric analysis. The results showed significant decrease in gray matter volume between the youngest and oldest groups in the following brain regions: frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Grey matter loss in the frontal lobe was among the most widespread of all brain regions across the comparison groups that showed significant age-related changes in grey matter for both males and females. This work provides a unique pattern of age-related decline of normal and healthy adult males and females that can aid in the future development of a unified model of normal brain aging.

  5. Effect of Alzheimer's Disease Risk Variant rs3824968 at SORL1 on Regional Gray Matter Volume and Age-Related Interaction in Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Chung; Liu, Mu-En; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Yang, Albert C.; Wang, Ying-Hsiu; Chen, Tong-Ru; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Lin, Ching-Po

    2016-01-01

    Sortilin receptor 1 (SORL1) is involved in cellular trafficking of amyloid precursor protein and plays an essential role in amyloid-beta peptide generation in Alzheimer disease (AD). The major A allele in a SORL1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs3824968, is associated with an increased AD risk. However, the role of SORL1 rs3824968 in the normal ageing process has rarely been examined in relation to brain structural morphology. This study investigated the association between SORL1 rs3824968 and grey matter (GM) volume in a nondemented Chinese population of 318 adults within a wide age range (21–92 years). Through voxel-based morphometry, we found that participants carrying SORL1 allele A exhibited significantly smaller GM volumes in the right posterior cingulate, left middle occipital, medial frontal, and superior temporal gyri. Considerable interaction between age and SORL1 suggested a detrimental and accelerated ageing effect of allele A on putamen. These findings provide evidence that SORL1 rs3824968 modulates regional GM volume and is associated with brain trajectory during the adult lifespan. PMID:26996954

  6. Heterogeneity in age-related white matter changes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Haybaeck, Johannes; Loitfelder, Marisa; Weis, Serge; Cavalieri, Margherita; Seiler, Stephan; Enzinger, Christian; Ropele, Stefan; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Pantoni, Leonardo; Scheltens, Philip; Fazekas, Franz; Jellinger, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    White matter changes occur endemically in routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of elderly persons. MRI appearance and histopathological correlates of white matter changes are heterogeneous. Smooth periventricular hyperintensities, including caps around the ventricular horns, periventricular lining and halos are likely to be of non-vascular origin. They relate to a disruption of the ependymal lining with subependymal widening of the extracellular space and have to be differentiated from subcortical and deep white matter abnormalities. For the latter a distinction needs to be made between punctate, early confluent and confluent types. Although punctate white matter lesions often represent widened perivascular spaces without substantial ischemic tissue damage, early confluent and confluent lesions correspond to incomplete ischemic destruction. Punctate abnormalities on MRI show a low tendency for progression, while early confluent and confluent changes progress rapidly. The causative and modifying pathways involved in the occurrence of sporadic age-related white matter changes are still incompletely understood, but recent microarray and genome-wide association approaches increased the notion of pathways that might be considered as targets for therapeutic intervention. The majority of differentially regulated transcripts in white matter lesions encode genes associated with immune function, cell cycle, proteolysis, and ion transport. Genome-wide association studies identified six SNPs mapping to a locus on chromosome 17q25 to be related to white matter lesion load in the general population. We also report first and preliminary data that demonstrate apolipoprotein E (ApoE) immunoreactivity in white matter lesions and support epidemiological findings indicating that ApoE is another factor possibly related to white matter lesion occurrence. Further insights come from modern MRI techniques, such as diffusion tensor and magnetization transfer imaging, as they

  7. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients.

  8. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  9. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  10. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore the association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6-months to 1-year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  11. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we explore the association among physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6 months-1 year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume.

  12. Aging in deep gray matter and white matter revealed by diffusional kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nan-Jie; Wong, Chun-Sing; Chan, Chun-Chung; Leung, Lam-Ming; Chu, Yiu-Ching

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging has already been extensively used to probe microstructural alterations in white matter tracts, and scarcely, in deep gray matter. However, results in literature regarding age-related degenerative mechanisms in white matter tracts and parametric changes in the putamen are inconsistent. Diffusional kurtosis imaging is a mathematical extension of diffusion tensor imaging, which could more comprehensively mirror microstructure, particularly in isotropic tissues such as gray matter. In this study, we used the diffusional kurtosis imaging method and a white-matter model that provided metrics of explicit neurobiological interpretations in healthy participants (58 in total, aged from 25 to 84 years). Tract-based whole-brain analyses and regions-of-interest (anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fornix, genu and splenium of corpus callosum, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, putamen, caudate nucleus, and thalamus) analyses were performed to examine parametric differences across regions and correlations with age. In white matter tracts, evidence was found supportive for anterior-posterior gradient and not completely supportive for retrogenesis theory. Age-related degenerations appeared to be broadly driven by axonal loss. Demyelination may also be a major driving mechanism, although confined to the anterior brain. In terms of deep gray matter, higher mean kurtosis and fractional anisotropy in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus reflected higher microstructural complexity and directionality compared with the putamen, caudate nucleus, and thalamus. In particular, the unique age-related positive correlations for fractional anisotropy, mean kurtosis, and radial kurtosis in the putamen opposite to those in other regions call for further investigation of exact underlying mechanisms. In summary, the results suggested that diffusional kurtosis can provide measurements in a new dimension that

  13. Causes and consequences of gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Watrin, Françoise; Manent, Jean-Bernard; Cardoso, Carlos; Represa, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiological bases of gray matter heterotopia and to appreciate their involvement in brain cortical development and functional consequences, namely epilepsy. The development of the cerebral cortex results from complex sequential processes including cell proliferation, cell migration, cortical organization, and formation of neuronal networks. Disruption of these steps yields different types of cortical malformations including gray matter heterotopia, characterized by the ectopic position of neurons along the ventricular walls or in the deep white matter. Cortical malformations are major causes of epilepsy, being responsible for up to 40% of drug-resistant epilepsy, and the cognitive level of affected patients varies from normal to severely impaired. This review reports data from human patients and animal models highlighting the genetic causes for these disorders affecting not only neuronal migration but also the proliferation of cortical progenitors. Therefore, gray matter heterotopias should not be considered as solely due to an abnormal neuronal migration and classifying them as such may be too restrictive. The review will also summarize literature data indicating that besides ectopic neurons, neighbor cortical areas also play a consistent role in epileptogenesis, supporting the notion that plastic changes secondary to the initial malformation are instrumental in the pathophysiology of epilepsy in affected patients.

  14. Predicting language lateralization from gray matter

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Goulven; Kherif, Ferath; Flandin, Guillaume; Seghier, Mohamed L; Price, Cathy J

    2009-01-01

    It has long been predicted that the degree to which language is lateralized to the left or right hemisphere might be reflected in the underlying brain anatomy. We investigated this relationship on a voxel by voxel basis across the whole brain using structural and functional MRI images from 86 healthy participants. Structural images were converted to gray matter probability images and language activation was assessed during naming and semantic decision. All images were spatially normalized to the same symmetrical template and lateralization images were generated by subtracting right from left hemisphere signal at each voxel. We show that the degree to which language was left or right lateralized was positively correlated with the degree to which gray matter density was lateralized. Post-hoc analyses revealed a general relationship between gray matter probability and BOLD signal. This is the first demonstration that structural brain scans can be used to predict language lateralization on a voxel by voxel basis in the normal healthy brain. PMID:19864564

  15. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, M Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-03-01

    The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm³ × 10³, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter tissue.

  16. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, Mª Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm3 × 103, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter

  17. Age-related body mass and reproductive measurements of gray wolves in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Based on 65 free-ranging gray wolves (Canis lupus) of known age and 25 of estimated age examined during summers of 1970-2004 in northeastern Minnesota, body mass of both males and females peaked at 5 or 6 years of age, with mean masses of 40.8 kg and 31.2 kg, respectively. Testis size varied as a function of age and month through at least 8 years of age, with length plus width ranging from 1.9 to 7.8 cm. Most females aged 4-9 years bred based on assessment of nipple sizes; those that had not bred had average lower body mass than those that had. This is the 1st report of such data from known-aged wolves.

  18. Synergistic Effects of Age on Patterns of White and Gray Matter Volume across Childhood and Adolescence1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Krongold, Mark; Cooper, Cassandra; Lebel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The human brain develops with a nonlinear contraction of gray matter across late childhood and adolescence with a concomitant increase in white matter volume. Across the adult population, properties of cortical gray matter covary within networks that may represent organizational units for development and degeneration. Although gray matter covariance may be strongest within structurally connected networks, the relationship to volume changes in white matter remains poorly characterized. In the present study we examined age-related trends in white and gray matter volume using T1-weighted MR images from 360 human participants from the NIH MRI study of Normal Brain Development. Images were processed through a voxel-based morphometry pipeline. Linear effects of age on white and gray matter volume were modeled within four age bins, spanning 4-18 years, each including 90 participants (45 male). White and gray matter age-slope maps were separately entered into k-means clustering to identify regions with similar age-related variability across the four age bins. Four white matter clusters were identified, each with a dominant direction of underlying fibers: anterior–posterior, left–right, and two clusters with superior–inferior directions. Corresponding, spatially proximal, gray matter clusters encompassed largely cerebellar, fronto-insular, posterior, and sensorimotor regions, respectively. Pairs of gray and white matter clusters followed parallel slope trajectories, with white matter changes generally positive from 8 years onward (indicating volume increases) and gray matter negative (decreases). As developmental disorders likely target networks rather than individual regions, characterizing typical coordination of white and gray matter development can provide a normative benchmark for understanding atypical development. PMID:26464999

  19. Synergistic Effects of Age on Patterns of White and Gray Matter Volume across Childhood and Adolescence(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Bray, Signe; Krongold, Mark; Cooper, Cassandra; Lebel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The human brain develops with a nonlinear contraction of gray matter across late childhood and adolescence with a concomitant increase in white matter volume. Across the adult population, properties of cortical gray matter covary within networks that may represent organizational units for development and degeneration. Although gray matter covariance may be strongest within structurally connected networks, the relationship to volume changes in white matter remains poorly characterized. In the present study we examined age-related trends in white and gray matter volume using T1-weighted MR images from 360 human participants from the NIH MRI study of Normal Brain Development. Images were processed through a voxel-based morphometry pipeline. Linear effects of age on white and gray matter volume were modeled within four age bins, spanning 4-18 years, each including 90 participants (45 male). White and gray matter age-slope maps were separately entered into k-means clustering to identify regions with similar age-related variability across the four age bins. Four white matter clusters were identified, each with a dominant direction of underlying fibers: anterior-posterior, left-right, and two clusters with superior-inferior directions. Corresponding, spatially proximal, gray matter clusters encompassed largely cerebellar, fronto-insular, posterior, and sensorimotor regions, respectively. Pairs of gray and white matter clusters followed parallel slope trajectories, with white matter changes generally positive from 8 years onward (indicating volume increases) and gray matter negative (decreases). As developmental disorders likely target networks rather than individual regions, characterizing typical coordination of white and gray matter development can provide a normative benchmark for understanding atypical development.

  20. Synergistic Effects of Age on Patterns of White and Gray Matter Volume across Childhood and Adolescence(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Bray, Signe; Krongold, Mark; Cooper, Cassandra; Lebel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The human brain develops with a nonlinear contraction of gray matter across late childhood and adolescence with a concomitant increase in white matter volume. Across the adult population, properties of cortical gray matter covary within networks that may represent organizational units for development and degeneration. Although gray matter covariance may be strongest within structurally connected networks, the relationship to volume changes in white matter remains poorly characterized. In the present study we examined age-related trends in white and gray matter volume using T1-weighted MR images from 360 human participants from the NIH MRI study of Normal Brain Development. Images were processed through a voxel-based morphometry pipeline. Linear effects of age on white and gray matter volume were modeled within four age bins, spanning 4-18 years, each including 90 participants (45 male). White and gray matter age-slope maps were separately entered into k-means clustering to identify regions with similar age-related variability across the four age bins. Four white matter clusters were identified, each with a dominant direction of underlying fibers: anterior-posterior, left-right, and two clusters with superior-inferior directions. Corresponding, spatially proximal, gray matter clusters encompassed largely cerebellar, fronto-insular, posterior, and sensorimotor regions, respectively. Pairs of gray and white matter clusters followed parallel slope trajectories, with white matter changes generally positive from 8 years onward (indicating volume increases) and gray matter negative (decreases). As developmental disorders likely target networks rather than individual regions, characterizing typical coordination of white and gray matter development can provide a normative benchmark for understanding atypical development. PMID:26464999

  1. Deformation-based surface morphometry applied to gray matter deformation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Worsley, Keith J; Robbins, Steve; Paus, Tomás; Taylor, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Evans, Alan C

    2003-02-01

    We present a unified statistical approach to deformation-based morphometry applied to the cortical surface. The cerebral cortex has the topology of a 2D highly convoluted sheet. As the brain develops over time, the cortical surface area, thickness, curvature, and total gray matter volume change. It is highly likely that such age-related surface changes are not uniform. By measuring how such surface metrics change over time, the regions of the most rapid structural changes can be localized. We avoided using surface flattening, which distorts the inherent geometry of the cortex in our analysis and it is only used in visualization. To increase the signal to noise ratio, diffusion smoothing, which generalizes Gaussian kernel smoothing to an arbitrary curved cortical surface, has been developed and applied to surface data. Afterward, statistical inference on the cortical surface will be performed via random fields theory. As an illustration, we demonstrate how this new surface-based morphometry can be applied in localizing the cortical regions of the gray matter tissue growth and loss in the brain images longitudinally collected in the group of children and adolescents. PMID:12595176

  2. Gray matter and white matter abnormalities in online game addiction.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chuan-Bo; Qian, Ruo-Bing; Fu, Xian-Ming; Lin, Bin; Han, Xiao-Peng; Niu, Chao-Shi; Wang, Ye-Han

    2013-08-01

    Online game addiction (OGA) has attracted greater attention as a serious public mental health issue. However, there are only a few brain magnetic resonance imaging studies on brain structure about OGA. In the current study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate the microstructural changes in OGA and assessed the relationship between these morphology changes and the Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) scores within the OGA group. Compared with healthy subjects, OGA individuals showed significant gray matter atrophy in the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula, and right supplementary motor area. According to TBSS analysis, OGA subjects had significantly reduced FA in the right genu of corpus callosum, bilateral frontal lobe white matter, and right external capsule. Gray matter volumes (GMV) of the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula and FA values of the right external capsule were significantly positively correlated with the YIAS scores in the OGA subjects. Our findings suggested that microstructure abnormalities of gray and white matter were present in OGA subjects. This finding may provide more insights into the understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms of OGA.

  3. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  4. Aging and large-scale functional networks: white matter integrity, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, L; Williams, M; Rich, A; Savage, G; Burianová, H

    2015-04-01

    Healthy aging is accompanied by neurobiological changes that affect the brain's functional organization and the individual's cognitive abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of global age-related differences in the cortical white and gray matter on neural activity in three key large-scale networks. We used functional-structural covariance network analysis to assess resting state activity in the default mode network (DMN), the fronto-parietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN) of young and older adults. We further related this functional activity to measures of cortical thickness and volume derived from structural MRI, as well as to measures of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], and radial diffusivity [RD]) derived from diffusion-weighted imaging. First, our results show that, in the direct comparison of resting state activity, young but not older adults reliably engage the SN and FPN in addition to the DMN, suggesting that older adults recruit these networks less consistently. Second, our results demonstrate that age-related decline in white matter integrity and gray matter volume is associated with activity in prefrontal nodes of the SN and FPN, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms. We suggest that age-related differences in gray and white matter properties differentially affect the ability of the brain to engage and coordinate large-scale functional networks that are central to efficient cognitive functioning.

  5. Mapping gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two important indices widely used to detect neuropathological changes in brain structural magnetic resonance imaging. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) protocol and surface-based cortical thickness measure, this study comprehensively investigated the regional changes in cortical gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and fourteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that voxel-based gray matter volume and cortical thickness reductions were highly correlated in the temporal lobe and its medial structure in AD. Moreover significant reduced cortical regions of gray matter volume were obviously more than that of cortical thickness. These findings suggest that gray matter volume and cortical thickness, as two important imaging markers, are effective indices for detecting the neuroanatomical alterations and help us understand the neuropathology from different views in AD.

  6. Age-related effects of smoking on coronary artery disease assessed by gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo-Jin; Mintz, Gary S; Weisz, Giora; Mehran, Roxana; Rabbani, LeRoy E; Verheye, Stefan; Serruys, Patrick W; Xu, Ke; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-04-15

    Although smoking is a risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis, the age-related impact on lesion morphology has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the age-related impact of smoking on the extent of atherosclerosis and arterial remodeling. In Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree, 687 patients with acute coronary syndrome underwent 3-vessel gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound imaging of 3,185 nonculprit lesions. In 207 patients ≤65 years, current (smoking within 1 month) and former (no smoking for >1 month) smokers showed significantly smaller normalized volumes of external elastic membrane (EEM), lumen, and P + M (plaque + media) compared with nonsmokers. At the minimal lumen area site, current and former smokers had significantly smaller EEM, lumen, and P + M areas than nonsmokers. Conversely, in 480 patients >65 years, current smokers had greater normalized P + M volumes than nonsmokers with no difference in normalized EEM or lumen volumes. Finally, in patients >65 years (but not in patients ≤65 years), current smokers showed more plaque ruptures (4.7% vs 1.8%, p = 0.05) and echolucent plaques (8.3% vs 3.9%, p = 0.05) compared with nonsmokers. On multivariable analysis, a history of smoking (combining current and former smoking) predicted smaller normalized EEM volumes compared with nonsmokers ≤65 years. In conclusion, in patients ≤65 years, but not in patients >65 years, smoking had a vascular constrictive effect that contributed to severe luminal stenosis. Conversely, smokers >65 years had more plaque with greater plaque instability. PMID:25726380

  7. Age-related effects of smoking on coronary artery disease assessed by gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo-Jin; Mintz, Gary S; Weisz, Giora; Mehran, Roxana; Rabbani, LeRoy E; Verheye, Stefan; Serruys, Patrick W; Xu, Ke; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-04-15

    Although smoking is a risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis, the age-related impact on lesion morphology has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the age-related impact of smoking on the extent of atherosclerosis and arterial remodeling. In Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree, 687 patients with acute coronary syndrome underwent 3-vessel gray scale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound imaging of 3,185 nonculprit lesions. In 207 patients ≤65 years, current (smoking within 1 month) and former (no smoking for >1 month) smokers showed significantly smaller normalized volumes of external elastic membrane (EEM), lumen, and P + M (plaque + media) compared with nonsmokers. At the minimal lumen area site, current and former smokers had significantly smaller EEM, lumen, and P + M areas than nonsmokers. Conversely, in 480 patients >65 years, current smokers had greater normalized P + M volumes than nonsmokers with no difference in normalized EEM or lumen volumes. Finally, in patients >65 years (but not in patients ≤65 years), current smokers showed more plaque ruptures (4.7% vs 1.8%, p = 0.05) and echolucent plaques (8.3% vs 3.9%, p = 0.05) compared with nonsmokers. On multivariable analysis, a history of smoking (combining current and former smoking) predicted smaller normalized EEM volumes compared with nonsmokers ≤65 years. In conclusion, in patients ≤65 years, but not in patients >65 years, smoking had a vascular constrictive effect that contributed to severe luminal stenosis. Conversely, smokers >65 years had more plaque with greater plaque instability.

  8. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  9. Cognitive decline is mediated by gray matter changes during middle age.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Molina, Yaiza; Machado, Alejandra; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Nieto, Antonieta; Correia, Rut; Junqué, Carme; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Barroso, José

    2014-05-01

    The present theoretical framework of Alzheimer's disease proposes that pathophysiological changes occur 10-20 years before the diagnosis of dementia. We addressed the question of how age-related changes in gray matter mediate the cognitive performance during middle age. Eighty-two participants (40-50 years, ±2) were assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery covering a broad spectrum of cognitive domains and components. Mediation effects were studied with hierarchical regression and bootstrapping analysis. Results showed that more vulnerable cognitive components were related to executive functioning and in a lesser degree to processing speed. Age-related differences in gray matter mainly involved the frontal lobes. Moreover, age-related differences in visuoconstructive, visuospatial functions, reaction time, and mental flexibility and executive control were mediated by several gray matter regions. It is important to increase the knowledge of the impact of brain changes on cognitive function during middle age. To define the early stages of the aging process may allow early detection of pathologic changes and therapeutic interventions.

  10. Gray-matter atrophy after chronic complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Stephan, Thomas; Hamilton, Derek A; Kalla, Roger; Glasauer, Stefan; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    It has been shown in blind patients that the abolition of sensory input can lead to changes in white- and cortical gray-matter volumes. Here the white- and gray-matter changes found with whole brain voxel-based morphometry in 16 patients with complete chronic unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) due to vestibular schwannoma removal several years prior are reported on. Subtle deficits in spatial memory and navigation were previously shown in patients with right UVD. Images of the brains of right-UVD patients were flipped, standard preprocessing steps were performed, and the data were modulated. Patients showed a gray-matter volume reduction in the cerebellum due to schwannoma removal, in the supramarginal gyrus ipsilateral to the lesion, as well as in the postcentral and superior temporal gyrus, areas involved in the vestibular cortical network, and in the motion-sensitive area MT/V5. There was no correlation with behavioral navigational abilities. No gray-matter atrophy was found in the insular cortical vestibular region or the hippocampus, both of which receive bilateral vestibular projections. The thalamus and tegmentum of the mesencephalon showed gray-matter reduction on the opposite side; this was possibly due to reduced auditory input, which is known to cross at this level. In comparison to healthy controls, no regional increases in gray-matter volume were seen. No white-matter changes were detected at the selected threshold.

  11. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo'; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  12. Strategic white matter tracts for processing speed deficits in age-related small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Duering, Marco; Gesierich, Benno; Seiler, Stephan; Pirpamer, Lukas; Gonik, Mariya; Hofer, Edith; Jouvent, Eric; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cerebral small vessel disease is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment and typically manifests with slowed processing speed. We investigated the impact of lesion location on processing speed in age-related small vessel disease. Methods: A total of 584 community-dwelling elderly underwent brain MRI followed by segmentation of white matter hyperintensities. Processing speed was determined by the timed measure of the Trail Making Test part B. The impact of the location of white matter hyperintensities was assessed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and graph-based statistical models on regional lesion volumes in major white matter tracts. Results: Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping identified multiple voxel clusters where the presence of white matter hyperintensities was associated with slower performance on the Trail Making Test part B. Clusters were located bilaterally in the forceps minor and anterior thalamic radiation. Region of interest–based Bayesian network analyses on lesion volumes within major white matter tracts depicted the same tracts as direct predictors for an impaired Trail Making Test part B performance. Conclusions: Our findings highlight damage to frontal interhemispheric and thalamic projection fiber tracts harboring frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits as a predictor for processing speed performance in age-related small vessel disease. PMID:24793184

  13. Gray Matter Characteristics in Mid and Old Aged Adults with ASD.

    PubMed

    Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Geurts, Hilde M

    2016-08-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the brain anatomy of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows a different developmental pattern then typical age-matched peers. There is however, a paucity of studies examining gray matter in mid and late adulthood in ASD. In this cross-sectional neuroimaging study, we, performed vertex-wise whole-brain and region-of-interest analyses of cortical volume, thickness, surface area, and gyrification index in 51 adults with and 49 without ASD, between 30 and 75 years. There was significant age-related volume loss and cortical thinning, but there were no group differences. The lack of significant anatomical differences between intellectual able individuals with and without ASD, suggests that ASD is not (strongly) related to gray matter morphology in mid and late adulthood.

  14. Superficial white matter as a novel substrate of age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Arash; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Rajji, Tarek K; Felsky, Daniel; Rotenberg, David J; Mason, Mikko; Xu, Li N; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Mulsant, Benoit H; Voineskos, Aristotle N

    2015-06-01

    Studies of diffusion tensor imaging have focused mainly on the role of deep white matter tract microstructural abnormalities associated with aging and age-related cognitive decline. However, the potential role of superficial white matter (SWM) in aging and, by extension, cognitive-aging, is less clear. Healthy individuals (n = 141; F/M: 66/75 years) across the adult lifespan (18-86 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a battery of cognitive testing. SWM was assessed via a combination of probabilistic tractography and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). A widespread inverse relationship of fractional anisotropy (FA) values in SWM with age was observed. SWM-FA adjacent to the precentral gyri was associated with fine-motor-speed, whereas performance in visuomotor-attention/processing speed correlated with SWM-FA in all 4 lobes of the left-hemisphere and in right parieto-occipital SWM-FA (family-wise error corrected p < 0.05). Independent of deep white matter-FA, right frontal and right occipital SWM-FA-mediated age effects on motor-speed and visuomotor-attention/processing speed, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that SWM-FA contributes uniquely to age-related cognitive performance, and should be considered as a novel biomarker of cognitive-aging. PMID:25834938

  15. Genetics of ageing-related changes in brain white matter integrity - a review.

    PubMed

    Kanchibhotla, Sri C; Mather, Karen A; Wen, Wei; Schofield, Peter R; Kwok, John B J; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2013-01-01

    White matter (WM) plays a vital role in the efficient transfer of information between grey matter regions. Modern imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have enabled the examination of WM microstructural changes across the lifespan, but there is limited knowledge about the role genetics plays in the pattern and aetiology of age-related WM microstructural changes. Family and twin studies suggest that the heritability of WM integrity measures changes over the lifespan, with the common DTI measure, fractional anisotropy (FA), showing moderate to high heritability in adults. However, few heritability studies have been undertaken in older adults. Linkage studies in middle-aged adults suggest that specific regions on chromosomes 3 and 15 may harbour genetic variants for WM integrity. A number of studies have investigated candidate genes, with the APOE ɛ4 polymorphism being the most frequently studied. Although these candidate gene studies suggest associations of particular genes with WM integrity measures in some specific brain regions, the findings remain inconsistent due to differences in their methodologies, samples and the outcome measures used. The APOE ɛ4 allele has been associated with decreased WM integrity (FA) in the cingulum, corpus callosum and parahippocampal gyrus. Only one genome-wide association study of global WM integrity measures in older adults has been published, and reported suggestive single nucleotide polymorphisms await replication. Overall, genetic age-related WM integrity studies are lacking and a concerted effort to examine the genetic determinants of age-related decline in WM integrity is clearly needed to improve our understanding of the ageing brain.

  16. Gray Matter Volume Changes in the Apathetic Elderly.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongjie; Onoda, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that apathy in healthy participants is closely related to the prefrontal-basal-ganglia circuit and associated structural changes. We selected 36 healthy aged participants with (n = 18) or without apathy (n = 18) from our database. Participants underwent structural MRI scanning, providing data for voxel-based morphometric analysis to explore gray matter changes associated with apathy. Compared to the non-apathy group, the apathy group showed reduced gray matter volume of the right putamen, whereas volumes of the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left inferior occipital gyrus showed increase. When depression scores were included in a regression model as a covariate, apathetic participants showed decreased gray matter volume in the right precentral gyrus compared to the non-apathetic participants. These findings suggest that apathy is associated with the gray matter volume in the prefrontal-basal-ganglia network, and may have a neuroanatomical basis distinct from depression in healthy elderly.

  17. Gray Matter Volume Changes in the Apathetic Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongjie; Onoda, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that apathy in healthy participants is closely related to the prefrontal-basal-ganglia circuit and associated structural changes. We selected 36 healthy aged participants with (n = 18) or without apathy (n = 18) from our database. Participants underwent structural MRI scanning, providing data for voxel-based morphometric analysis to explore gray matter changes associated with apathy. Compared to the non-apathy group, the apathy group showed reduced gray matter volume of the right putamen, whereas volumes of the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left inferior occipital gyrus showed increase. When depression scores were included in a regression model as a covariate, apathetic participants showed decreased gray matter volume in the right precentral gyrus compared to the non-apathetic participants. These findings suggest that apathy is associated with the gray matter volume in the prefrontal-basal-ganglia network, and may have a neuroanatomical basis distinct from depression in healthy elderly. PMID:26082708

  18. Age effects on gray matter volume and attentional performance in Zen meditation.

    PubMed

    Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Cekic, Milos

    2007-10-01

    Zen meditation, a Buddhist practice centered on attentional and postural self-regulation, has been speculated to bring about beneficial long-term effects for the individual, ranging from stress reduction to improvement of cognitive function. In this study, we examined how the regular practice of meditation may affect the normal age-related decline of cerebral gray matter volume and attentional performance observed in healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry for MRI anatomical brain images and a computerized sustained attention task were employed in 13 regular practitioners of Zen meditation and 13 matched controls. While control subjects displayed the expected negative correlation of both gray matter volume and attentional performance with age, meditators did not show a significant correlation of either measure with age. The effect of meditation on gray matter volume was most prominent in the putamen, a structure strongly implicated in attentional processing. These findings suggest that the regular practice of meditation may have neuroprotective effects and reduce the cognitive decline associated with normal aging.

  19. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  20. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  1. Regional gray matter variation in male-to-female transsexualism

    PubMed Central

    Luders, Eileen; Sánchez, Francisco J.; Gaser, Christian; Toga, Arthur W.; Narr, Katherine L.; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Vilain, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Gender identity—one's sense of being a man or a woman—is a fundamental perception experienced by all individuals that extends beyond biological sex. Yet, what contributes to our sense of gender remains uncertain. Since individuals who identify as transsexual report strong feelings of being the opposite sex and a belief that their sexual characteristics do not reflect their true gender, they constitute an invaluable model to understand the biological underpinnings of gender identity. We analyzed MRI data of 24 male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals not yet treated with cross-sex hormones in order to determine whether gray matter volumes in MTF transsexuals more closely resemble people who share their biological sex (30 control men), or people who share their gender identity (30 control women). Results revealed that regional gray matter variation in MTF transsexuals is more similar to the pattern found in men than in women. However, MTF transsexuals show a significantly larger volume of regional gray matter in the right putamen compared to men. These findings provide new evidence that transsexualism is associated with distinct cerebral pattern, which supports the assumption that brain anatomy plays a role in gender identity. PMID:19341803

  2. Comparative Aspects of Microglia Reaction in White and Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Cătălin, B.; Mitran, Smaranda; Albu, Carmen; Iancău, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Microglia are considered as the primary immune effector cells in the brain and have a critical role in all brain lesions. We wanted to find out if there is any difference in the way that white and gray matter microglia react to the same type of lesion. Material and Method: We used 14-16 weeks old single transgenic CX3CR1-EGFP mice, whereon microglia were labeled by expression of the green fluorescent protein EGFP and the L1-L2 dorsal spinal columns were exposed. After 10 min of continuous base line image acquisition, we made a micro-lesion by focusing and raising the power of the laser and, than, we monitored it for an additional hour. Laser-lesion and image recording were also made in the right somato-sensory cortex. We quantified microglial response and compared white vs. grey matter. Results: 5-10 min after the lesion, microglia already showed signs of polarization by extending their processes both in white and gray matter. Processes were sent by the microglial bodies situated at a distance of 50 to 100 µm, depending on the lesion size. Microglial processes did not display a preferred target site from the lesion; in contrast, they formed a uniform “shielding” ring around the lesion. Conclusions: Microglia showed targeted responses to acute injuries in grey and white matter also; no major differences were observed besides the speed of the process, due probably to particular cortex and spine architecture. PMID:24778858

  3. Correlations among brain gray matter volumes, age, gender, and hemisphere in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between age and gray matter structure and how interactions between gender and hemisphere impact this relationship, we examined correlations between global or regional gray matter volume and age, including interactions of gender and hemisphere, using a general linear model with voxel-based and region-of-interest analyses. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 1460 healthy individuals aged 20-69 years; the images were linearly normalized and segmented and restored to native space for analysis of global gray matter volume. Linearly normalized images were then non-linearly normalized and smoothed for analysis of regional gray matter volume. Analysis of global gray matter volume revealed a significant negative correlation between gray matter ratio (gray matter volume divided by intracranial volume) and age in both genders, and a significant interaction effect of age × gender on the gray matter ratio. In analyzing regional gray matter volume, the gray matter volume of all regions showed significant main effects of age, and most regions, with the exception of several including the inferior parietal lobule, showed a significant age × gender interaction. Additionally, the inferior temporal gyrus showed a significant age × gender × hemisphere interaction. No regional volumes showed significant age × hemisphere interactions. Our study may contribute to clarifying the mechanism(s) of normal brain aging in each brain region.

  4. Linking white matter and deep gray matter alterations in premanifest Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Faria, Andreia V; Ratnanather, J Tilak; Tward, Daniel J; Lee, David Soobin; van den Noort, Frieda; Wu, Dan; Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S; Ross, Christopher A; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment is available. A better understanding of the pathology, and identification of biomarkers will facilitate the development of disease-modifying treatments. HD is potentially a good model of a neurodegenerative disease for development of biomarkers because it is an autosomal-dominant disease with complete penetrance, caused by a single gene mutation, in which the neurodegenerative process can be assessed many years before onset of signs and symptoms of manifest disease. Previous MRI studies have detected abnormalities in gray and white matter starting in premanifest stages. However, the understanding of how these abnormalities are related, both in time and space, is still incomplete. In this study, we combined deep gray matter shape diffeomorphometry and white matter DTI analysis in order to provide a better mapping of pathology in the deep gray matter and subcortical white matter in premanifest HD. We used 296 MRI scans from the PREDICT-HD database. Atrophy in the deep gray matter, thalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens was analyzed by surface based morphometry, and while white matter abnormalities were analyzed in (i) regions of interest surrounding these structures, using (ii) tractography-based analysis, and using (iii) whole brain atlas-based analysis. We detected atrophy in the deep gray matter, particularly in putamen, from early premanifest stages. The atrophy was greater both in extent and effect size in cases with longer exposure to the effects of the CAG expansion mutation (as assessed by greater CAP-scores), and preceded detectible abnormalities in the white matter. Near the predicted onset of manifest HD, the MD increase was widespread, with highest indices in the deep and posterior white matter. This type of in-vivo macroscopic mapping of HD brain abnormalities can potentially indicate when and where therapeutics could be targeted to delay

  5. Linking white matter and deep gray matter alterations in premanifest Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Andreia V.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Tward, Daniel J.; Lee, David Soobin; van den Noort, Frieda; Wu, Dan; Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S.; Ross, Christopher A.; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment is available. A better understanding of the pathology, and identification of biomarkers will facilitate the development of disease-modifying treatments. HD is potentially a good model of a neurodegenerative disease for development of biomarkers because it is an autosomal-dominant disease with complete penetrance, caused by a single gene mutation, in which the neurodegenerative process can be assessed many years before onset of signs and symptoms of manifest disease. Previous MRI studies have detected abnormalities in gray and white matter starting in premanifest stages. However, the understanding of how these abnormalities are related, both in time and space, is still incomplete. In this study, we combined deep gray matter shape diffeomorphometry and white matter DTI analysis in order to provide a better mapping of pathology in the deep gray matter and subcortical white matter in premanifest HD. We used 296 MRI scans from the PREDICT-HD database. Atrophy in the deep gray matter, thalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens was analyzed by surface based morphometry, and while white matter abnormalities were analyzed in (i) regions of interest surrounding these structures, using (ii) tractography-based analysis, and using (iii) whole brain atlas-based analysis. We detected atrophy in the deep gray matter, particularly in putamen, from early premanifest stages. The atrophy was greater both in extent and effect size in cases with longer exposure to the effects of the CAG expansion mutation (as assessed by greater CAP-scores), and preceded detectible abnormalities in the white matter. Near the predicted onset of manifest HD, the MD increase was widespread, with highest indices in the deep and posterior white matter. This type of in-vivo macroscopic mapping of HD brain abnormalities can potentially indicate when and where therapeutics could be targeted to delay

  6. Source-Based Morphometry: The Use of Independent Component Analysis to Identify Gray Matter Differences With Application to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lai; Groth, Karyn M.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Schretlen, David J.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a multivariate alternative to the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach called source-based morphometry (SBM), to study gray matter differences between patients and healthy controls. The SBM approach begins with the same preprocessing procedures as VBM. Next, independent component analysis is used to identify naturally grouping, maximally independent sources. Finally, statistical analyses are used to determine the significant sources and their relationship to other variables. The identified “source networks,” groups of spatially distinct regions with common covariation among subjects, provide information about localization of gray matter changes and their variation among individuals. In this study, we first compared VBM and SBM via a simulation and then applied both methods to real data obtained from 120 chronic schizophrenia patients and 120 healthy controls. SBM identified five gray matter sources as significantly associated with schizophrenia. These included sources in the bilateral temporal lobes, thalamus, basal ganglia, parietal lobe, and frontotemporal regions. None of these showed an effect of sex. Two sources in the bilateral temporal and parietal lobes showed age-related reductions. The most significant source of schizophrenia-related gray matter changes identified by SBM occurred in the bilateral temporal lobe, while the most significant change found by VBM occurred in the thalamus. The SBM approach found changes not identified by VBM in basal ganglia, parietal, and occipital lobe. These findings show that SBM is a multivariate alternative to VBM, with wide applicability to studying changes in brain structure. PMID:18266214

  7. Neurofeedback training induces changes in white and gray matter.

    PubMed

    Ghaziri, Jimmy; Tucholka, Alan; Larue, Vanessa; Blanchette-Sylvestre, Myriam; Reyburn, Gabrielle; Gilbert, Guillaume; Lévesque, Johanne; Beauregard, Mario

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of this structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was to investigate, using diffusion tensor imaging, whether a neurofeedback training (NFT) protocol designed to improve sustained attention might induce structural changes in white matter (WM) pathways, purportedly implicated in this cognitive ability. Another goal was to examine whether gray matter (GM) volume (GMV) might be altered following NFT in frontal and parietal cortical areas connected by these WM fiber pathways. Healthy university students were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EXP), a sham group, or a control group. Participants in the EXP group were trained to enhance the amplitude of their β1 waves at F4 and P4. Measures of attentional performance and MRI data were acquired one week before (Time 1) and one week after (Time 2) NFT. Higher scores on visual and auditory sustained attention were noted in the EXP group at Time 2 (relative to Time 1). As for structural MRI data, increased fractional anisotropy was measured in WM pathways implicated in sustained attention, and GMV increases were detected in cerebral structures involved in this type of attention. After 50 years of research in the field of neurofeedback, our study constitutes the first empirical demonstration that NFT can lead to microstructural changes in white and gray matter.

  8. Dynamic cortical gray matter volume changes after botulinum toxin in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Pasman, Jaco W; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2015-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in focal dystonia have reported on cerebral reorganization after botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections. With the exception of microstructural changes, alterations in gray matter volume after BoNT have not been explored. In this study, we sought to determine whether BoNT influences gray matter volume in a group of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. We analyzed whole brain gray matter volume in a sample of CD patients with VBM analysis. In patients, scans were repeated immediately before and some weeks after BoNT injections; controls were only scanned once. We analyzed 1) BoNT-related gray matter volume changes within patients; 2) gray matter volume differences between patients and controls; and 3) correlations between gray matter volume and disease duration and disease severity. The pre- and post-BoNT treatment analysis revealed an increase of gray matter volume within the right precentral sulcus, at the lateral border of the premotor cortex. In comparison to healthy controls, CD patients had reduced gray matter volume in area 45 functionally corresponding to the left ventral premotor cortex. No gray matter volume increase was found for CD patients in comparison to controls. Gray matter volume of the left supramarginal gyrus and left premotor cortex correlated positively with disease duration, and that of the right inferior parietal lobule correlated negatively with disease severity. We have identified structural, yet dynamic gray matter volume changes in CD. There were specific gray matter volume changes related to BoNT injections, illustrating indirect central consequences of modified peripheral sensory input. As differences were exclusively seen in higher order motor areas relevant to motor planning and spatial cognition, these observations support the hypothesis that deficits in these cognitive processes are crucial in the pathophysiology of CD.

  9. [Volumetry of cerebral gray and white matter using VSRAD®].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using structural brain MRI has been widely used for the early and differential diagnosis and evaluation of disease progression in neuropsychiatric diseases. VBM of MRI data comprises segmentation into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid partitions; anatomical standardization of all the images to the same stereotactic space using linear affine transformation and further non-linear warping and smoothing; and finally performing statistical analysis. Stand-alone VBM software using SPM8 plus DARTEL running on Windows (Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for Alzheimer's disease, VSRAD®) has been developed as an adjunct to the clinical assessment. This software provides a Z-score map as a result of the comparison of the patient's MRI with a normal database.

  10. Mapping Gray Matter Development: Implications for Typical Development and Vulnerability to Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogtay, Nitin; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have scanned large numbers of children and adolescents repeatedly over time, as their brains develop, tracking volumetric changes in gray and white matter in remarkable detail. Focusing on gray matter changes specifically, here we explain how earlier studies using lobar volumes of specific…

  11. Subcortical Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in Healthy Bipolar Offspring: Potential Neuroanatomical Risk Marker for Bipolar Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Nau, Sharon; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to examine the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with gray matter volume abnormalities in brain regions in healthy bipolar offspring relative to age-matched controls. Results show increased gray matter volume in the parahippocampus/hippocampus in healthy offspring at genetic risk for BD.

  12. Regional Gray Matter Volume Deficits in Adolescents with First-Episode Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Joost; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Graell, Montserrat; Fraguas, David; Zabala, Arantzazu; Vazquez, Veronica Garcia; Desco, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2008-01-01

    The regional gray matter volumes of adolescents with first-episode psychosis are compared with those of a control group. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on 70 patients with early onset FEP and on 51 individuals without FEP. Findings revealed that volume deficits in the left medial frontal gray matter were common in individuals with…

  13. Differential regional gray matter volumes in patients with on-line game addiction and professional gamers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Doug Hyun; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with on-line game addiction (POGA) and professional video game players play video games for extended periods of time, but experience very different consequences for their on-line game play. Brain regions consisting of anterior cingulate, thalamus and occpito-temporal areas may increase the likelihood of becoming a pro-gamer or POGA. Twenty POGA, seventeen pro-gamers, and eighteen healthy comparison subjects (HC) were recruited. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a 1.5 Tesla Espree MRI scanner (SIEMENS, Erlangen, Germany). Voxel-wise comparisons of gray matter volume were performed between the groups using the two-sample t-test with statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Compared to HC, the POGA group showed increased impulsiveness and perseverative errors, and volume in left thalamus gray matter, but decreased gray matter volume in both inferior temporal gyri, right middle occipital gyrus, and left inferior occipital gyrus, compared with HC. Pro-gamers showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus, but decreased gray matter volume in left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus compared with HC. Additionally, the pro-gamer group showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus and decreased left thalamus gray matter volume compared with the POGA group. The current study suggests that increased gray matter volumes of the left cingulate gyrus in pro-gamers and of the left thalamus in POGA may contribute to the different clinical characteristics of pro-gamers and POGA. PMID:22277302

  14. Differential regional gray matter volumes in patients with on-line game addiction and professional gamers.

    PubMed

    Han, Doug Hyun; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F

    2012-04-01

    Patients with on-line game addiction (POGA) and professional video game players play video games for extended periods of time, but experience very different consequences for their on-line game play. Brain regions consisting of anterior cingulate, thalamus and occpito-temporal areas may increase the likelihood of becoming a pro-gamer or POGA. Twenty POGA, seventeen pro-gamers, and eighteen healthy comparison subjects (HC) were recruited. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a 1.5 Tesla Espree MRI scanner (SIEMENS, Erlangen, Germany). Voxel-wise comparisons of gray matter volume were performed between the groups using the two-sample t-test with statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Compared to HC, the POGA group showed increased impulsiveness and perseverative errors, and volume in left thalamus gray matter, but decreased gray matter volume in both inferior temporal gyri, right middle occipital gyrus, and left inferior occipital gyrus, compared with HC. Pro-gamers showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus, but decreased gray matter volume in left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus compared with HC. Additionally, the pro-gamer group showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus and decreased left thalamus gray matter volume compared with the POGA group. The current study suggests that increased gray matter volumes of the left cingulate gyrus in pro-gamers and of the left thalamus in POGA may contribute to the different clinical characteristics of pro-gamers and POGA.

  15. Gray- and white-matter anatomy of absolute pitch possessors.

    PubMed

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Mads; Lerch, Jason P; Vuust, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP), the ability to identify a musical pitch without a reference, has been examined behaviorally in numerous studies for more than a century, yet only a few studies have examined the neuroanatomical correlates of AP. Here, we used MRI and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate structural differences in brains of musicians with and without AP, by means of whole-brain vertex-wise cortical thickness (CT) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. APs displayed increased CT in a number of areas including the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. Furthermore, we found higher fractional anisotropy in APs within the path of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The findings in gray matter support previous studies indicating an increased left lateralized posterior STG in APs, yet they differ from previous findings of thinner cortex for a number of areas in APs. Finally, we found a relation between the white-matter results and the CT in the right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, we present novel findings in AP research that may have implications for the understanding of the neuroanatomical underpinnings of AP ability.

  16. Gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis: Impact on clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Munster, Caspar E P; Jonkman, Laura E; Weinstein, Henry C; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Geurts, Jeroen J G

    2015-09-10

    Traditionally, multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a disease primarily affecting the white matter (WM). However, the development of some clinical symptoms such as cognitive impairment cannot be fully explained by the severity of WM pathology alone. During the past decades it became clear that gray matter (GM) damage of the brain is also of major importance in patients with MS. Thanks to improved magnetic resonance imaging techniques, the in vivo detection of GM pathology became possible, enabling a better understanding of the manifestation of various clinical symptoms, such as cognitive impairment. Using higher field strengths and specific sequences, detection of cortical lesions was increased. However, despite these improvements, visualization of cortical MS lesions remains difficult (only about 30-50% of histopathologically confirmed lesions can be detected at 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Furthermore, more research is needed to understand the exact interplay of cortical lesions, GM atrophy and WM pathology in the development of clinical symptoms. In this review, we summarize the historical background that preceded current research and provide an overview of the current knowledge on clinical consequences of GM pathology in MS in terms of disability, cognitive impairment and other clinically important signs such as epileptic seizures. PMID:26164500

  17. Forever Young(er): potential age-defying effects of long-term meditation on gray matter atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Kurth, Florian

    2015-01-01

    While overall life expectancy has been increasing, the human brain still begins deteriorating after the first two decades of life and continues degrading further with increasing age. Thus, techniques that diminish the negative impact of aging on the brain are desirable. Existing research, although scarce, suggests meditation to be an attractive candidate in the quest for an accessible and inexpensive, efficacious remedy. Here, we examined the link between age and cerebral gray matter re-analyzing a large sample (n = 100) of long-term meditators and control subjects aged between 24 and 77 years. When correlating global and local gray matter with age, we detected negative correlations within both controls and meditators, suggesting a decline over time. However, the slopes of the regression lines were steeper and the correlation coefficients were stronger in controls than in meditators. Moreover, the age-affected brain regions were much more extended in controls than in meditators, with significant group-by-age interactions in numerous clusters throughout the brain. Altogether, these findings seem to suggest less age-related gray matter atrophy in long-term meditation practitioners. PMID:25653628

  18. Permutation and parametric tests for effect sizes in voxel-based morphometry of gray matter volume in brain structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Dickie, David A; Mikhael, Shadia; Job, Dominic E; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Laidlaw, David H; Bastin, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Permutation testing has been widely implemented in voxel-based morphometry (VBM) tools. However, this type of non-parametric inference has yet to be thoroughly compared with traditional parametric inference in VBM studies of brain structure. Here we compare both types of inference and investigate what influence the number of permutations in permutation testing has on results in an exemplar study of how gray matter proportion changes with age in a group of working age adults. High resolution T1-weighted volume scans were acquired from 80 healthy adults aged 25-64years. Using a validated VBM procedure and voxel-based permutation testing for Pearson product-moment coefficient, the effect sizes of changes in gray matter proportion with age were assessed using traditional parametric and permutation testing inference with 100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10000 and 20000 permutations. The statistical significance was set at P<0.05 and false discovery rate (FDR) was used to correct for multiple comparisons. Clusters of voxels with statistically significant (PFDR<0.05) declines in gray matter proportion with age identified with permutation testing inference (N≈6000) were approximately twice the size of those identified with parametric inference (N=3221voxels). Permutation testing with 10000 (N=6251voxels) and 20000 (N=6233voxels) permutations produced clusters that were generally consistent with each other. However, with 1000 permutations there were approximately 20% more statistically significant voxels (N=7117voxels) than with ≥10000 permutations. Permutation testing inference may provide a more sensitive method than traditional parametric inference for identifying age-related differences in gray matter proportion. Based on the results reported here, at least 10000 permutations should be used in future univariate VBM studies investigating age related changes in gray matter to avoid potential false findings. Additional studies using permutation testing in large imaging databanks

  19. Age related changes in microglial phenotype vary between CNS regions: grey versus white matter differences.

    PubMed

    Hart, Adam D; Wyttenbach, Andreas; Perry, V Hugh; Teeling, Jessica L

    2012-07-01

    Subtle regional differences in microglial phenotype exist in the adult mouse brain. We investigated whether these differences were amplified during ageing and following systemic challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We studied microglial morphology and phenotype in young (4mo) and aged (21mo) C57/BL6 mice using immunohistochemistry and quantified the expression levels of surface molecules on microglia in white and grey matter along the rostral-caudal neuraxis. We detected significant regional, age dependent differences in microglial phenotypes, with the microglia of white matter and caudal areas of the CNS exhibiting greater upregulation of CD11b, CD68, CD11c, F4/80 and FcγRI than grey matter and rostral CNS areas. Upregulation of CD11c with age was restricted to the white matter, as was the appearance of multinucleated giant cells. Systemic LPS caused a subtle upregulation of FcγRI after 24 h, but the other markers examined were not affected. Burrowing behaviour and static rod assays were used to assess hippocampal and cerebellar integrity. Aged mice exhibited exaggerated and prolonged burrowing deficits following systemic LPS injection, while in the absence of an inflammatory challenge aged mice performed significantly worse than young mice in the static rod test. Taken together, these findings show that the effects of age on microglial phenotype and functional integrity vary significantly between CNS compartments, as do, albeit to a lesser extent, the effects of systemic LPS.

  20. Gray Matter Features of Reading Disability: A Combined Meta-Analytic and Direct Analysis Approach1234

    PubMed Central

    Berninger, Virginia W.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Tsu, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry dyslexia studies and direct analysis of 293 reading disability and control cases from six different research sites were performed to characterize defining gray matter features of reading disability. These analyses demonstrated consistently lower gray matter volume in left posterior superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus regions and left orbitofrontal gyrus/pars orbitalis regions. Gray matter volume within both of these regions significantly predicted individual variation in reading comprehension after correcting for multiple comparisons. These regional gray matter differences were observed across published studies and in the multisite dataset after controlling for potential age and gender effects, and despite increased anatomical variance in the reading disability group, but were not significant after controlling for total gray matter volume. Thus, the orbitofrontal and posterior superior temporal sulcus gray matter findings are relatively reliable effects that appear to be dependent on cases with low total gray matter volume. The results are considered in the context of genetics studies linking orbitofrontal and superior temporal sulcus regions to alleles that confer risk for reading disability. PMID:26835509

  1. Gray Matter Volumes of Pain Related Brain Areas are Decreased in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael E.; Craggs, Jason G.; Price, Donald D.; Perlstein, William M.; Staud, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain disorder that is very prevalent in the general population (approx. 5%). Accumulating evidence suggests that FM is associated with central pain processing abnormalities, i.e. central sensitization. Several previous studies of chronic pain patients, including FM, have shown gray matter atrophy of brain areas associated with sensory and affective pain processing. These findings, however, have not been confirmed in all FM studies. In this study, we investigated gray matter volumes of brain areas associated with pain-related areas of FM patients identified by functional brain imaging. Using voxel-based morphometric (VBM) analysis of magnetic resonance brain images, we compared 19 pain related brain areas of 14 female FM patients and 11 healthy controls (NC). We found that FM patients had significantly less gray matter volumes than NC in three of these brain regions, including the anterior and mid-cingulate, as well as mid-insular cortices. Importantly, FM patients neither demonstrated global gray matter atrophy nor gray matter changes associated with depression, as shown in some studies. Using a more stringent analysis than other VBM studies, we provide evidence for decreased gray matter volumes in a number of pain related brain areas in FM. Although the mechanisms for these gray matter changes are presently unclear, they may contribute to some of the core features of this chronic disorder including affective disturbances and chronic widespread pain PMID:21146463

  2. Age-related changes in the topological organization of the white matter structural connectome across the human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tengda; Cao, Miao; Niu, Haijing; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Evans, Alan; He, Yong; Dong, Qi; Shu, Ni

    2015-10-01

    Lifespan is a dynamic process with remarkable changes in brain structure and function. Previous neuroimaging studies have indicated age-related microstructural changes in specific white matter tracts during development and aging. However, the age-related alterations in the topological architecture of the white matter structural connectome across the human lifespan remain largely unknown. Here, a cohort of 113 healthy individuals (ages 9-85) with both diffusion and structural MRI acquisitions were examined. For each participant, the high-resolution white matter structural networks were constructed by deterministic fiber tractography among 1024 parcellation units and were quantified with graph theoretical analyses. The global network properties, including network strength, cost, topological efficiency, and robustness, followed an inverted U-shaped trajectory with a peak age around the third decade. The brain areas with the most significantly nonlinear changes were located in the prefrontal and temporal cortices. Different brain regions exhibited heterogeneous trajectories: the posterior cingulate and lateral temporal cortices displayed prolonged maturation/degeneration compared with the prefrontal cortices. Rich-club organization was evident across the lifespan, whereas hub integration decreased linearly with age, especially accompanied by the loss of frontal hubs and their connections. Additionally, age-related changes in structural connections were predominantly located within and between the prefrontal and temporal modules. Finally, based on the graph metrics of structural connectome, accurate predictions of individual age were obtained (r = 0.77). Together, the data indicated a dynamic topological organization of the brain structural connectome across human lifespan, which may provide possible structural substrates underlying functional and cognitive changes with age.

  3. Method for combining information from white matter fiber tracking and gray matter parcellation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Talos, Ion-Florin; Brun, Anders; Peiper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ference A; McCarley, Robert W; Shenton, Martha E

    2004-09-01

    We introduce a method for combining fiber tracking from diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging with cortical gray matter parcellation from structural high-spatial-resolution 3D spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state images. We applied this method to a tumor case to determine the impact of the tumor on white matter architecture. We conclude that this new method for combining structural and DT imaging data is useful for understanding cortical connectivity and the localization of fiber tracts and their relationship with cortical anatomy and brain abnormalities.

  4. Exposing asymmetric gray matter vulnerability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Matthew S.; Pannek, Kerstin; Coulthard, Alan; McCombe, Pamela A.; Rose, Stephen E.; Henderson, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Limb weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically asymmetric. Previous studies have identified an effect of limb dominance on onset and spread of weakness, however relative atrophy of dominant and non-dominant brain regions has not been investigated. Our objective was to use voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to explore gray matter (GM) asymmetry in ALS, in the context of limb dominance. 30 ALS subjects were matched with 17 healthy controls. All subjects were right-handed. Each underwent a structural MRI sequence, from which GM segmentations were generated. Patterns of GM atrophy were assessed in ALS subjects with first weakness in a right-sided limb (n = 15) or left-sided limb (n = 15). Within each group, a voxelwise comparison was also performed between native and mirror GM images, to identify regions of hemispheric GM asymmetry. Subjects with ALS showed disproportionate atrophy of the dominant (left) motor cortex hand area, irrespective of the side of first limb weakness (p < 0.01). Asymmetric atrophy of the left somatosensory cortex and temporal gyri was only observed in ALS subjects with right-sided onset of limb weakness. Our VBM protocol, contrasting native and mirror images, was able to more sensitively detect asymmetric GM pathology in a small cohort, compared with standard methods. These findings indicate particular vulnerability of dominant upper limb representation in ALS, supporting previous clinical studies, and with implications for cortical organisation and selective vulnerability. PMID:25844330

  5. Exposing asymmetric gray matter vulnerability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Devine, Matthew S; Pannek, Kerstin; Coulthard, Alan; McCombe, Pamela A; Rose, Stephen E; Henderson, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Limb weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically asymmetric. Previous studies have identified an effect of limb dominance on onset and spread of weakness, however relative atrophy of dominant and non-dominant brain regions has not been investigated. Our objective was to use voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to explore gray matter (GM) asymmetry in ALS, in the context of limb dominance. 30 ALS subjects were matched with 17 healthy controls. All subjects were right-handed. Each underwent a structural MRI sequence, from which GM segmentations were generated. Patterns of GM atrophy were assessed in ALS subjects with first weakness in a right-sided limb (n = 15) or left-sided limb (n = 15). Within each group, a voxelwise comparison was also performed between native and mirror GM images, to identify regions of hemispheric GM asymmetry. Subjects with ALS showed disproportionate atrophy of the dominant (left) motor cortex hand area, irrespective of the side of first limb weakness (p < 0.01). Asymmetric atrophy of the left somatosensory cortex and temporal gyri was only observed in ALS subjects with right-sided onset of limb weakness. Our VBM protocol, contrasting native and mirror images, was able to more sensitively detect asymmetric GM pathology in a small cohort, compared with standard methods. These findings indicate particular vulnerability of dominant upper limb representation in ALS, supporting previous clinical studies, and with implications for cortical organisation and selective vulnerability. PMID:25844330

  6. Brain gray matter phenotypes across the psychosis dimension

    PubMed Central

    Ivleva, Elena I.; Bidesi, Anup S.; Thomas, Binu P.; Meda, Shashwath A.; Francis, Alan; Moates, Amanda F.; Witte, Bradley; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to examine whole brain and regional gray matter (GM) phenotypes across the schizophrenia (SZ)–bipolar disorder psychosis dimension using voxel-based morphometry (VBM 8.0 with DARTEL segmentation/normalization) and semi-automated regional parcellation, FreeSurfer (FS 4.3.1/64 bit). 3T T1 MPRAGE images were acquired from 19 volunteers with schizophrenia (SZ), 16 with schizoaffective disorder (SAD), 17 with psychotic bipolar I disorder (BD-P) and 10 healthy controls (HC). Contrasted with HC, SZ showed extensive cortical GM reductions, most pronounced in fronto-temporal regions; SAD had GM reductions overlapping with SZ, albeit less extensive; and BD-P demonstrated no GM differences from HC. Within the psychosis dimension, BD-P showed larger volumes in fronto-temporal and other cortical/subcortical regions compared with SZ, whereas SAD showed intermediate GM volumes. The two volumetric methodologies, VBM and FS, revealed highly overlapping results for cortical GM, but partially divergent results for subcortical volumes (basal ganglia, amygdala). Overall, these findings suggest that individuals across the psychosis dimension show both overlapping and unique GM phenotypes: decreased GM, predominantly in fronto-temporal regions, is characteristic of SZ but not of psychotic BD-P, whereas SAD display GM deficits overlapping with SZ, albeit less extensive. PMID:23177922

  7. Differences in gray matter structure correlated to nationalism and patriotism

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Nationalism and patriotism both entail positive evaluations of one’s nation. However, the former inherently involves derogation of other nations, whereas the latter is independent of comparisons with other nations. We used voxel-based morphometry and psychological measures and determined nationalism and patriotism’s association with gray matter density (rGMD) and their cognitive nature in healthy individuals (433 men and 344 women; age, 20.7 ± 1.9 years) using whole-brain multiple regression analyses and post hoc analyses. We found higher nationalism associated with greater rGMD in (a) areas of the posterior cingulate cortex and greater rGMD in (b) the orbitofrontal cortex, and smaller rGMD in (c) the right amygdala area. Furthermore, we found higher patriotism associated with smaller rGMD in the (d) rostrolateral prefrontal cortex. Post hoc analyses revealed the mean rGMD of the cluster (a) associated with compassion, that of (b) associated with feeling of superiority, that of (c) associated with suicide ideation, and that of (d) associated with quality of life. These results indicate that individual nationalism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in social-related areas and limbic neural mechanisms, whereas patriotism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in areas related to well-being. PMID:27418362

  8. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl’s gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl’s gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain’s plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  9. Differences in gray matter structure correlated to nationalism and patriotism.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-07-15

    Nationalism and patriotism both entail positive evaluations of one's nation. However, the former inherently involves derogation of other nations, whereas the latter is independent of comparisons with other nations. We used voxel-based morphometry and psychological measures and determined nationalism and patriotism's association with gray matter density (rGMD) and their cognitive nature in healthy individuals (433 men and 344 women; age, 20.7 ± 1.9 years) using whole-brain multiple regression analyses and post hoc analyses. We found higher nationalism associated with greater rGMD in (a) areas of the posterior cingulate cortex and greater rGMD in (b) the orbitofrontal cortex, and smaller rGMD in (c) the right amygdala area. Furthermore, we found higher patriotism associated with smaller rGMD in the (d) rostrolateral prefrontal cortex. Post hoc analyses revealed the mean rGMD of the cluster (a) associated with compassion, that of (b) associated with feeling of superiority, that of (c) associated with suicide ideation, and that of (d) associated with quality of life. These results indicate that individual nationalism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in social-related areas and limbic neural mechanisms, whereas patriotism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in areas related to well-being.

  10. Differences in gray matter structure correlated to nationalism and patriotism.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Nationalism and patriotism both entail positive evaluations of one's nation. However, the former inherently involves derogation of other nations, whereas the latter is independent of comparisons with other nations. We used voxel-based morphometry and psychological measures and determined nationalism and patriotism's association with gray matter density (rGMD) and their cognitive nature in healthy individuals (433 men and 344 women; age, 20.7 ± 1.9 years) using whole-brain multiple regression analyses and post hoc analyses. We found higher nationalism associated with greater rGMD in (a) areas of the posterior cingulate cortex and greater rGMD in (b) the orbitofrontal cortex, and smaller rGMD in (c) the right amygdala area. Furthermore, we found higher patriotism associated with smaller rGMD in the (d) rostrolateral prefrontal cortex. Post hoc analyses revealed the mean rGMD of the cluster (a) associated with compassion, that of (b) associated with feeling of superiority, that of (c) associated with suicide ideation, and that of (d) associated with quality of life. These results indicate that individual nationalism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in social-related areas and limbic neural mechanisms, whereas patriotism may be mediated by neurocognitive mechanisms in areas related to well-being. PMID:27418362

  11. Mechanical properties of gray and white matter brain tissue by indentation

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Nay, Richard; de Rooij, Rijk; Steinmann, Paul; Wyrobek, Thomas; Ovaert, Timothy C.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of an outer layer of gray matter, consisting of cell bodies, dendrites, and unmyelinated axons, and an inner core of white matter, consisting primarily of myelinated axons. Recent evidence suggests that microstructural differences between gray and white matter play an important role during neurodevelopment. While brain tissue as a whole is rheologically well characterized, the individual features of gray and white matter remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the mechanical properties of gray and white matter using a robust, reliable, and repeatable method, flat-punch indentation. To systematically characterize gray and white matter moduli for varying indenter diameters, loading rates, holding times, post-mortem times, and locations we performed a series of n=192 indentation tests. We found that indenting thick, intact coronal slices eliminates the common challenges associated with small specimens: it naturally minimizes boundary effects, dehydration, swelling, and structural degradation. When kept intact and hydrated, brain slices maintained their mechanical characteristics with standard deviations as low as 5% throughout the entire testing period of five days post mortem. White matter, with an average modulus of 1.895kPa±0.592kPa, was on average 39% stiffer than gray matter, p<0.01, with an average modulus of 1.389kPa±0.289kPa, and displayed larger regional variations. It was also more viscous than gray matter and responded less rapidly to mechanical loading. Understanding the rheological differences between gray and white matter may have direct implications on diagnosing and understanding the mechanical environment in neurodevelopment and neurological disorders. PMID:25819199

  12. Mechanical properties of gray and white matter brain tissue by indentation.

    PubMed

    Budday, Silvia; Nay, Richard; de Rooij, Rijk; Steinmann, Paul; Wyrobek, Thomas; Ovaert, Timothy C; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of an outer layer of gray matter, consisting of cell bodies, dendrites, and unmyelinated axons, and an inner core of white matter, consisting primarily of myelinated axons. Recent evidence suggests that microstructural differences between gray and white matter play an important role during neurodevelopment. While brain tissue as a whole is rheologically well characterized, the individual features of gray and white matter remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the mechanical properties of gray and white matter using a robust, reliable, and repeatable method, flat-punch indentation. To systematically characterize gray and white matter moduli for varying indenter diameters, loading rates, holding times, post-mortem times, and locations we performed a series of n=192 indentation tests. We found that indenting thick, intact coronal slices eliminates the common challenges associated with small specimens: it naturally minimizes boundary effects, dehydration, swelling, and structural degradation. When kept intact and hydrated, brain slices maintained their mechanical characteristics with standard deviations as low as 5% throughout the entire testing period of five days post mortem. White matter, with an average modulus of 1.89 5kPa ± 0.592 kPa, was on average 39% stiffer than gray matter, p<0.01, with an average modulus of 1.389 kPa ± 0.289 kPa, and displayed larger regional variations. It was also more viscous than gray matter and responded less rapidly to mechanical loading. Understanding the rheological differences between gray and white matter may have direct implications on diagnosing and understanding the mechanical environment in neurodevelopment and neurological disorders.

  13. Abnormal gray matter and white matter volume in 'Internet gaming addicts'.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Dong, Guangheng; Wang, Qiandong; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is usually defined as the inability of an individual to control his/her use of the Internet with serious negative consequences. It is becoming a prevalent mental health concern around the world. To understand whether Internet gaming addiction contributes to cerebral structural changes, the present study examined the brain gray matter density and white matter density changes in participants suffering IGA using voxel-based morphometric analysis. Compared with the healthy controls (N=36, 22.2 ± 3.13 years), IGA participants (N=35, 22.28 ± 2.54 years) showed significant lower gray matter density in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, insula, right precuneus, and right hippocampus (all p<0.05). IGA participants also showed significant lower white matter density in the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, amygdala, and anterior cingulate than healthy controls (all p<0.05). Previous studies suggest that these brain regions are involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and emotional regulation. Current findings might provide insight in understanding the biological underpinnings of IGA.

  14. Gray matter atrophy patterns of mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wen, Wei; Kochan, Nicole A; Crawford, John D; Brodaty, Henry; Slavin, Melissa J; Reppermund, Simone; Draper, Brian; Zhu, Wanlin; Kang, Kristan; Trollor, Julian N

    2012-04-15

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous neurocognitive disorder that can be classified into various subtypes. The present study aims to examine the gray matter (GM) atrophy patterns of MCI subtypes in comparison with a cognitively healthy group. Participants, including 135 MCI subjects and 120 cognitively healthy controls, were drawn from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The MCI subjects were first categorized into amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) subtypes, which were then divided into single-domain (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) and multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD). Furthermore, naMCI-SD was divided into three subgroups (language, processing speed, and executive function) according to individual cognitive impairment. Voxel-wise GM volumes were then compared between MCI subtypes and controls. The aMCI group had significantly lower GM volumes in the bilateral hippocampi and temporal cortices than the controls. This was mainly due to GM reduction of aMCI-MD but not aMCI-SD, as the latter did not show any significant GM reduction. GM reduction of naMCI and its two subdivisions was shown in widespread brain regions compared to controls. GM volumes of the multiple-domain subtypes (aMCI-MD and naMCI-MD) were lower than their single-domain counterparts (aMCI-SD and naMCI-SD) in the frontal and temporal lobes, respectively. Moreover, the language subgroup of naMCI-SD showed GM reduction in the frontal and temporal lobes compared to controls. MCI subtypes displayed specific patterns of GM atrophy that appear to be related to their various clinical presentations, which implies that underlying mechanisms of MCI subtypes are different.

  15. Cannabis, Cigarettes, and Their Co-Occurring Use: Disentangling Differences in Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Hager, Nathan; Childress, Anna Rose; Rao, Hengyi; Franklin, Teresa R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Structural magnetic resonance imaging techniques are powerful tools for examining the effects of drug use on the brain. The nicotine and cannabis literature has demonstrated differences between nicotine cigarette smokers and cannabis users compared to controls in brain structure; however, less is known about the effects of co-occurring cannabis and tobacco use. Methods: We used voxel-based morphometry to examine gray matter volume differences between four groups: (1) cannabis-dependent individuals who do not smoke tobacco (Cs); (2) cannabis-dependent individuals who smoke tobacco (CTs); (3) cannabis-naïve, nicotine-dependent individuals who smoke tobacco (Ts); and (4) healthy controls (HCs). We also explored associations between gray matter volume and measures of cannabis and tobacco use. Results: A significant group effect was observed in the left putamen, thalamus, right precentral gyrus, and left cerebellum. Compared to HCs, the Cs, CTs, and Ts exhibited larger gray matter volumes in the left putamen. Cs also had larger gray matter volume than HCs in the right precentral gyrus. Cs and CTs exhibited smaller gray matter volume than HCs in the thalamus, and CTs and Ts had smaller left cerebellar gray matter volume than HCs. Conclusions: This study extends previous research that independently examined the effects of cannabis or tobacco use on brain structure by including an examination of co-occurring cannabis and tobacco use, and provides evidence that cannabis and tobacco exposure are associated with alterations in brain regions associated with addiction. PMID:26045474

  16. Age related differences in reaction time components and diffusion properties of normal-appearing white matter in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqin; Bender, Andrew R; Raz, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    Deterioration of the white matter (WM) is viewed as the neural substrate of age differences in speed of information processing (reaction time, RT). However, the relationship between WM and RT components is rarely examined in healthy aging. We assessed the relationship between RT components derived from the Ratcliff diffusion model and micro-structural properties of normal-appearing WM (NAWM) in 90 healthy adults (age 18-82 years). We replicated all major extant findings pertaining to age differences in RT components and WM: lower drift rate, greater response conservativeness, longer non-decision time, lower fractional anisotropy (FA), greater mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity were associated with advanced age. Age differences in anterior regions of the cerebral WM exceeded those in posterior regions. However, the only relationship between RT components and WM was the positive association between DR in the body of the corpus callosum and non-decision time. Thus, in healthy adults, age differences in NAWM diffusion properties are not a major contributor to age differences in RT components. Longitudinal studies with more precise and specific estimates of regional myelin content and evaluation of the contribution of age-related vascular risk factors are necessary to understand cerebral substrates of age-related cognitive slowing.

  17. Gray Matter Volume Decreases in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia: A Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Caroline; Schuller, Anne Marie; Paulos, Carlos; Namer, Izzie; Pull, Charles; Danion, Jean Marie; Foucher, Jack René

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aged patients (>50 years old) with residual schizophrenic symptoms differ from young patients. They represent a subpopulation with a more unfavorable Kraepelinian course and have an increased risk (up to 30%) for dementia of unknown origin. However, our current understanding of age-related brain changes in schizophrenia is derived from studies that included less than 17% of patients who were older than 50 years of age. This study investigated the anatomical distribution of gray matter (GM) brain deficits in aged patients with ongoing schizophrenia. Methods: Voxel-based morphometry was applied to 3D-T1 magnetic resonance images obtained from 27 aged patients with schizophrenia (mean age of 60 years) and 40 age-matched normal controls. Results: Older patients with schizophrenia showed a bilateral reduction of GM volume in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex, and in a large posterior region centered on the occipito-temporo-parietal junction. Only the latter region showed accelerated GM volume loss with increasing age. None of these results could be accounted for by institutionalization, antipsychotic medication, or cognitive scores. Conclusions: This study replicated most common findings in patients with schizophrenia with regard to thalamic and frontal GM deficits. However, it uncovered an unexpected large region of GM atrophy in the posterior tertiary cortices. The latter observation may be specific to this aged and chronically symptomatic subpopulation, as atrophy in this region is rarely reported in younger patients and is accelerated with age. PMID:21205677

  18. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C.; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference—misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action—is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7–54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9–51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07–2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15–2.23, p<0.001; Cohen’s effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05–2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12–2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40–2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM

  19. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guihu; Denisova, Kristina; Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference-misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action-is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7-54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9-51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07-2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15-2.23, p<0.001; Cohen's effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05-2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12-2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40-2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM surface detected in

  20. Female Adolescents with Severe Substance and Conduct Problems Have Substantially Less Brain Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Dalwani, Manish S.; McMahon, Mary Agnes; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Young, Susan E.; Regner, Michael F.; Raymond, Kristen M.; McWilliams, Shannon K.; Banich, Marie T.; Tanabe, Jody L.; Crowley, Thomas J; Sakai, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Structural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated lower regional gray matter volume in adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems. These research studies, including ours, have generally focused on male-only or mixed-sex samples of adolescents with conduct and/or substance problems. Here we compare gray matter volume between female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems and female healthy controls of similar ages. Hypotheses: Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems will show significantly less gray matter volume in frontal regions critical to inhibition (i.e. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex), conflict processing (i.e., anterior cingulate), valuation of expected outcomes (i.e., medial orbitofrontal cortex) and the dopamine reward system (i.e. striatum). Methods We conducted whole-brain voxel-based morphometric comparison of structural MR images of 22 patients (14-18 years) with severe substance and conduct problems and 21 controls of similar age using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and voxel-based morphometric (VBM8) toolbox. We tested group differences in regional gray matter volume with analyses of covariance, adjusting for age and IQ at p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons at whole-brain cluster-level threshold. Results Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems compared to controls showed significantly less gray matter volume in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, medial orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, bilateral somatosensory cortex, left supramarginal gyrus, and bilateral angular gyrus. Considering the entire brain, patients had 9.5% less overall gray matter volume compared to controls. Conclusions Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems in comparison to similarly aged female healthy controls showed substantially lower gray matter volume in brain regions involved in

  1. Association of white matter hyperintensities and gray matter volume with cognition in older individuals without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Arvanitakis, Zoe; Fleischman, Debra A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Leurgans, Sue E; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A

    2016-05-01

    Both presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and smaller total gray matter volume on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are common findings in old age, and contribute to impaired cognition. We tested whether total WMH volume and gray matter volume had independent associations with cognition in community-dwelling individuals without dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We used data from participants of the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Brain MRI was available in 209 subjects without dementia or MCI (mean age 80; education = 15 years; 74 % women). WMH and gray matter were automatically segmented, and the total WMH and gray matter volumes were measured. Both MRI-derived measures were normalized by the intracranial volume. Cognitive data included composite measures of five different cognitive domains, based on 19 individual tests. Linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, and education, were used to examine the relationship of logarithmically-transformed total WMH volume and of total gray matter volume to cognition. Larger total WMH volumes were associated with lower levels of perceptual speed (p < 0.001), but not with episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, or visuospatial abilities (all p > 0.10). Smaller total gray matter volumes were associated with lower levels of perceptual speed (p = 0.013) and episodic memory (p = 0.001), but not with the other three cognitive domains (all p > 0.14). Larger total WMH volume was correlated with smaller total gray matter volume (p < 0.001). In a model with both MRI-derived measures included, the relation of WMH to perceptual speed remained significant (p < 0.001), while gray matter volumes were no longer related (p = 0.14). This study of older community-dwelling individuals without overt cognitive impairment suggests that the association of larger total WMH volume with lower perceptual speed is independent of total gray matter volume. These results help elucidate the

  2. Attentional Control and Intelligence: MRI Orbital Frontal Gray Matter and Neuropsychological Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Paul G.; Nakamura, Motoaki; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Levitt, James J.; Newell, Dominick T.; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Attentional control is a key function of working memory that is hypothesized to play an important role in psychometric intelligence. To test the neuropsychological underpinnings of this hypothesis, we examined full-scale IQ, as measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), and attentional control, as measured by Trails B response time and Wisconsin Card Sorting (WCS) test perseverative errors in 78 healthy participants, 25 of whom also had available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray matter volume studies of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) parcellated into three regions: gyrus rectus, middle orbital gyrus, and lateral orbital gyrus. Hierarchical regression indicated that Trails B response time specifically explained 15.13% to 19.18% of the variation in IQ and WCS perseverative errors accounted for an additional 8.12% to 11.29% of the variance. Full-scale IQ correlated very strongly with right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = 0.610, p = 0.002), as did Trails B response time with left middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume (r = −0.608, p = 0.003). Trails B response time and right middle orbital gyrus gray matter volume jointly accounted for approximately 32.95% to 54.82% of the variance in IQ scores. These results provided evidence of the unique contributions of attentional control and OFC gray matter to intelligence. PMID:26101457

  3. Externalizing personality traits, empathy, and gray matter volume in healthy young drinkers.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Judith; Dzemidzic, Mario; West, John; Oberlin, Brandon G; Eiler, William J A; Saykin, Andrew J; Kareken, David A

    2016-02-28

    Externalizing psychopathology has been linked to prefrontal abnormalities. While clinically diagnosed subjects show altered frontal gray matter, it is unknown if similar deficits relate to externalizing traits in non-clinical populations. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to retrospectively analyze the cerebral gray matter volume of 176 young adult social to heavy drinkers (mean age=24.0±2.9, male=83.5%) from studies of alcoholism risk. We hypothesized that prefrontal gray matter volume and externalizing traits would be correlated. Externalizing personality trait components-Boredom Susceptibility-Impulsivity (BS/IMP) and Empathy/Low Antisocial Behaviors (EMP/LASB)-were tested for correlations with gray matter partial volume estimates (gmPVE). Significantly large clusters (pFWE<0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected) of gmPVE correlated with EMP/LASB in dorsolateral and medial prefrontal regions, and in occipital cortex. BS/IMP did not correlate with gmPVE, but one scale of impulsivity (Eysenck I7) correlated positively with bilateral inferior frontal/orbitofrontal, and anterior insula gmPVE. In this large sample of community-dwelling young adults, antisocial behavior/low empathy corresponded with reduced prefrontal and occipital gray matter, while impulsivity correlated with increased inferior frontal and anterior insula cortical volume. These findings add to a literature indicating that externalizing personality features involve altered frontal architecture.

  4. Regional gray matter abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia determined with optimized voxel-based morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, XiaoJuan; Yao, Li; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei

    2006-03-01

    This study examined regional gray matter abnormalities across the whole brain in 19 patients with schizophrenia (12 males and 7 females), comparing with 11 normal volunteers (7 males and 4 females). The customized brain templates were created in order to improve spatial normalization and segmentation. Then automated preprocessing of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was conducted using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The statistical voxel based analysis was implemented in terms of two-sample t-test model. Compared with normal controls, regional gray matter concentration in patients with schizophrenia was significantly reduced in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus, right insula, precentral and parahippocampal areas, left thalamus and hypothalamus as well as, however, significant increases in gray matter concentration were not observed across the whole brain in the patients. This study confirms and extends some earlier findings on gray matter abnormalities in schizophrenic patients. Previous behavior and fMRI researches on schizophrenia have suggested that cognitive capacity decreased and self-conscious weakened in schizophrenic patients. These regional gray matter abnormalities determined through structural MRI with optimized VBM may be potential anatomic underpinnings of schizophrenia.

  5. Comparison of gray matter volume and thickness for analysis of cortical changes in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kunchen; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2011-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two indices of concern in brain structure magnetic resonance imaging research. Gray matter volume reflects mixed-measurement information of cerebral cortex, while cortical thickness reflects only the information of distance between inner surface and outer surface of cerebral cortex. Using Scaled Subprofile Modeling based on Principal Component Analysis (SSM_PCA) and Pearson's Correlation Analysis, this study further provided quantitative comparisons and depicted both global relevance and local relevance to comprehensively investigate morphometrical abnormalities in cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and thirteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that factor scores from the first 8 principal components accounted for ~53.38% of the total variance for gray matter volume, and ~50.18% for cortical thickness. Factor scores from the fifth principal component showed significant correlation. In addition, gray matter voxel-based volume was closely related to cortical thickness alterations in most cortical cortex, especially, in some typical abnormal brain regions such as insula and the parahippocampal gyrus in AD. These findings suggest that these two measurements are effective indices for understanding the neuropathology in AD. Studies using both gray matter volume and cortical thickness can separate the causes of the discrepancy, provide complementary information and carry out a comprehensive description of the morphological changes of brain structure.

  6. Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Ferencz, Beata; Mangialasche, Francesca; Mecocci, Patrizia; Cecchetti, Roberta; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n = 414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-α) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3462-3473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gray matter atrophy in narcolepsy: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Meng; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-12-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on the use of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in narcolepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies via the use of a meta-analysis of neuroimaging to identify concordant and specific structural deficits in patients with narcolepsy as compared with healthy subjects. We used PubMed to retrieve articles published between January 2000 and March 2014. The authors included all VBM research on narcolepsy and compared the findings of the studies by using gray matter volume (GMV) or gray matter concentration (GMC) to index differences in gray matter. Stereotactic data were extracted from 8 VBM studies of 149 narcoleptic patients and 162 control subjects. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) technique and found significant regional gray matter reduction in the bilateral hypothalamus, thalamus, globus pallidus, extending to nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left mid orbital and rectal gyri (BAs 10 and 11), right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47), and the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 41) in patients with narcolepsy. The significant gray matter deficits in narcoleptic patients occurred in the bilateral hypothalamus and frontotemporal regions, which may be related to the emotional processing abnormalities and orexin/hypocretin pathway common among populations of patients with narcolepsy.

  8. Gray matter heterotopias: MR characteristics and correlation with developmental and neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A J; Kjos, B O

    1992-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical records of 20 patients with gray matter heterotopias were retrospectively reviewed to correlate MR characteristics of the heterotopias with clinical findings. On the basis of the MR images, patients were divided into three groups: those with subependymal heterotopias (eight patients), focal subcortical gray matter heterotopias (six patients), and diffuse subcortical heterotopias (six patients). Patients with subependymal heterotopias had a significantly higher prevalence of normal development than patients in the other two groups (P = .02). When all patients with gray matter heterotopias were considered, patients with thick heterotopias and those with overlying cortical gyral anomalies, which correlated with one another, had a significantly higher prevalence of developmental delay (P = .002). Patients with thick focal gray matter heterotopias had a substantially increased prevalence of motor dysfunction. In three cases, gray matter heterotopias were associated with infoldings of dysplastic cortex containing blood vessels or cerebrospinal fluid. If not properly analyzed, these anomalies can be mistaken for vascular or cystic tumors. PMID:1732969

  9. Externalizing personality traits, empathy, and gray matter volume in healthy young drinkers.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Judith; Dzemidzic, Mario; West, John; Oberlin, Brandon G; Eiler, William J A; Saykin, Andrew J; Kareken, David A

    2016-02-28

    Externalizing psychopathology has been linked to prefrontal abnormalities. While clinically diagnosed subjects show altered frontal gray matter, it is unknown if similar deficits relate to externalizing traits in non-clinical populations. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to retrospectively analyze the cerebral gray matter volume of 176 young adult social to heavy drinkers (mean age=24.0±2.9, male=83.5%) from studies of alcoholism risk. We hypothesized that prefrontal gray matter volume and externalizing traits would be correlated. Externalizing personality trait components-Boredom Susceptibility-Impulsivity (BS/IMP) and Empathy/Low Antisocial Behaviors (EMP/LASB)-were tested for correlations with gray matter partial volume estimates (gmPVE). Significantly large clusters (pFWE<0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected) of gmPVE correlated with EMP/LASB in dorsolateral and medial prefrontal regions, and in occipital cortex. BS/IMP did not correlate with gmPVE, but one scale of impulsivity (Eysenck I7) correlated positively with bilateral inferior frontal/orbitofrontal, and anterior insula gmPVE. In this large sample of community-dwelling young adults, antisocial behavior/low empathy corresponded with reduced prefrontal and occipital gray matter, while impulsivity correlated with increased inferior frontal and anterior insula cortical volume. These findings add to a literature indicating that externalizing personality features involve altered frontal architecture. PMID:26778367

  10. Behavioral correlates of changes in hippocampal gray matter structure during acquisition of foreign vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Bellander, Martin; Berggren, Rasmus; Mårtensson, Johan; Brehmer, Yvonne; Wenger, Elisabeth; Li, Tie-Qiang; Bodammer, Nils C; Shing, Yee-Lee; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Lövdén, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Experience can affect human gray matter volume. The behavioral correlates of individual differences in such brain changes are not well understood. In a group of Swedish individuals studying Italian as a foreign language, we investigated associations among time spent studying, acquired vocabulary, baseline performance on memory tasks, and gray matter changes. As a way of studying episodic memory training, the language learning focused on acquiring foreign vocabulary and lasted for 10weeks. T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive testing were performed before and after the studies. Learning behavior was monitored via participants' use of a smartphone application dedicated to the study of vocabulary. A whole-brain analysis showed larger changes in gray matter structure of the right hippocampus in the experimental group (N=33) compared to an active control group (N=23). A first path analyses revealed that time spent studying rather than acquired knowledge significantly predicted change in gray matter structure. However, this association was not significant when adding performance on baseline memory measures into the model, instead only the participants' performance on a short-term memory task with highly similar distractors predicted the change. This measure may tap similar individual difference factors as those involved in gray matter plasticity of the hippocampus.

  11. Behavioral correlates of changes in hippocampal gray matter structure during acquisition of foreign vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Bellander, Martin; Berggren, Rasmus; Mårtensson, Johan; Brehmer, Yvonne; Wenger, Elisabeth; Li, Tie-Qiang; Bodammer, Nils C; Shing, Yee-Lee; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Lövdén, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Experience can affect human gray matter volume. The behavioral correlates of individual differences in such brain changes are not well understood. In a group of Swedish individuals studying Italian as a foreign language, we investigated associations among time spent studying, acquired vocabulary, baseline performance on memory tasks, and gray matter changes. As a way of studying episodic memory training, the language learning focused on acquiring foreign vocabulary and lasted for 10weeks. T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive testing were performed before and after the studies. Learning behavior was monitored via participants' use of a smartphone application dedicated to the study of vocabulary. A whole-brain analysis showed larger changes in gray matter structure of the right hippocampus in the experimental group (N=33) compared to an active control group (N=23). A first path analyses revealed that time spent studying rather than acquired knowledge significantly predicted change in gray matter structure. However, this association was not significant when adding performance on baseline memory measures into the model, instead only the participants' performance on a short-term memory task with highly similar distractors predicted the change. This measure may tap similar individual difference factors as those involved in gray matter plasticity of the hippocampus. PMID:26477659

  12. Gray and white matter distribution in dyslexia: a VBM study of superior temporal gyrus asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Dole, Marjorie; Meunier, Fanny; Hoen, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated brain morphological signatures of dyslexia by using a voxel-based asymmetry analysis. Dyslexia is a developmental disorder that affects the acquisition of reading and spelling abilities and is associated with a phonological deficit. Speech perception disabilities have been associated with this deficit, particularly when listening conditions are challenging, such as in noisy environments. These deficits are associated with known neurophysiological correlates, such as a reduction in the functional activation or a modification of functional asymmetry in the cortical regions involved in speech processing, such as the bilateral superior temporal areas. These functional deficits have been associated with macroscopic morphological abnormalities, which potentially include a reduction in gray and white matter volumes, combined with modifications of the leftward asymmetry along the perisylvian areas. The purpose of this study was to investigate gray/white matter distribution asymmetries in dyslexic adults using automated image processing derived from the voxel-based morphometry technique. Correlations with speech-in-noise perception abilities were also investigated. The results confirmed the presence of gray matter distribution abnormalities in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the superior temporal Sulcus (STS) in individuals with dyslexia. Specifically, the gray matter of adults with dyslexia was symmetrically distributed over one particular region of the STS, the temporal voice area, whereas normal readers showed a clear rightward gray matter asymmetry in this area. We also identified a region in the left posterior STG in which the white matter distribution asymmetry was correlated to speech-in-noise comprehension abilities in dyslexic adults. These results provide further information concerning the morphological alterations observed in dyslexia, revealing the presence of both gray and white matter distribution anomalies and the

  13. Cortical Gray and Adjacent White Matter Demonstrate Synchronous Maturation in Very Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Smyser, Tara A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; Gillespie, Sarah K; Inder, Terrie E; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and functional gradients of development have been described for the maturation of cerebral gray and white matter using histological and radiological approaches. We evaluated these patterns in very preterm (VPT) infants using diffusion tensor imaging. Data were obtained from 3 groups: 1) 22 VPT infants without white matter injury (WMI), of whom all had serial MRI studies during the neonatal period, 2) 19 VPT infants with WMI, of whom 3 had serial MRI studies and 3) 12 healthy, term-born infants. Regions of interest were placed in the cortical gray and adjacent white matter in primary motor, primary visual, visual association, and prefrontal regions. From the MRI data at term-equivalent postmenstrual age, differences in mean diffusivity were found in all areas between VPT infants with WMI and the other 2 groups. In contrast, minimal differences in fractional anisotropy were found between the 3 groups. These findings suggest that cortical maturation is delayed in VPT infants with WMI when compared with term control infants and VPT infants without WMI. From the serial MRI data from VPT infants, synchronous development between gray and white matter was evident in all areas and all groups, with maturation in primary motor and sensory regions preceding that of association areas. This finding highlights the regionally varying but locally synchronous nature of the development of cortical gray matter and its adjacent white matter.

  14. White and gray matter contributions to executive function recovery after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wanting; Chau, Aileen; Solomon, Jeffrey; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between regional white and gray matter volume loss and performance on executive functions (EFs) in patients with penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI). Methods: We studied 164 pTBI patients and 43 healthy controls from the Vietnam Head Injury Study. We acquired CT scans for pTBI patients and divided them according to lesion localization (left and right prefrontal cortex [PFC]). We administered EF tests (Verbal Fluency, Trail Making, Twenty Questions) and used voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) and group-based correlational and multiple regression analyses to examine the relative influence of gray and white matter lesions on EF recovery. Results: The VLSM analysis revealed that white and gray white matter lesions were associated with impaired EFs. In the left PFC lesion group, damage to the PFC gray matter, anterior corona radiata, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) were most correlated with functional recovery. Verbal Fluency, which involves a broad fronto-temporo-parietal network, was best predicted by SLF lesion volume. Trail Making and Twenty Questions, which is associated with more focal left frontal damage, was better predicted by PFC lesions. Conclusions: Our results indicated that white matter volume loss can be a superior predictor of recovery and a crucial factor driving clinical outcome in functions involving a broad network such as Verbal Fluency. White matter damage may place additional burden on recovery by deteriorating signal transmission between cortical areas within a functional network. PMID:25746558

  15. Breakfast staple types affect brain gray matter volume and cognitive function in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    Childhood diet is important for brain development. Furthermore, the quality of breakfast is thought to affect the cognitive functioning of well-nourished children. To analyze the relationship among breakfast staple type, gray matter volume, and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 290 healthy children, we used magnetic resonance images and applied voxel-based morphometry. We divided subjects into rice, bread, and both groups according to their breakfast staple. We showed that the rice group had a significantly larger gray matter ratio (gray matter volume percentage divided by intracranial volume) and significantly larger regional gray matter volumes of several regions, including the left superior temporal gyrus. The bread group had significantly larger regional gray and white matter volumes of several regions, including the right frontoparietal region. The perceptual organization index (POI; IQ subcomponent) of the rice group was significantly higher than that of the bread group. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, intracranial volume, socioeconomic status, average weekly frequency of having breakfast, and number of side dishes eaten for breakfast. Although several factors may have affected the results, one possible mechanism underlying the difference between the bread and the rice groups may be the difference in the glycemic index (GI) of these two substances; foods with a low GI are associated with less blood-glucose fluctuation than are those with a high GI. Our study suggests that breakfast staple type affects brain gray and white matter volumes and cognitive function in healthy children; therefore, a diet of optimal nutrition is important for brain maturation during childhood and adolescence. PMID:21170334

  16. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy Coexistent with Occipital Periventricular White Matter Hyper Intensities.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dazhi; Li, Congyang; Shen, Lin; Cui, Chun; Shu, Tongsheng; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and brain atrophy often coexist in the elderly. Additionally, WMH is often observed as occipital periventricular hyperintensities (OPVHs) with low-grade periventricular (PV) white matter (WM) lesions and is usually confined within an anatomical structure. However, the effects of OPVHs on gray matter (GM) atrophy remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated GM atrophy in OPVHs patients and explored the relationship between such atrophy and clinical risk factors. T1-weighted and T2-weighted Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were acquired, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was applied. The clinical (demographic and cardiovascular) risk factors of the OPVHs patients and healthy controls were then compared. Lastly, scatter plots and correlation analysis were applied to explore the relationship between the MRI results and clinical risk factors in the OPVHs patients. OPVHs patients had significantly reduced GM in the right supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, right anterior cingulum and left insula compared to healthy controls. Additionally, OPVHs patients had GM atrophy in the left precentral gyrus and left insula cortex, and such atrophy is associated with a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein-B (Apo-B). PMID:27656141

  17. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy Coexistent with Occipital Periventricular White Matter Hyper Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dazhi; Li, Congyang; Shen, Lin; Cui, Chun; Shu, Tongsheng; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and brain atrophy often coexist in the elderly. Additionally, WMH is often observed as occipital periventricular hyperintensities (OPVHs) with low-grade periventricular (PV) white matter (WM) lesions and is usually confined within an anatomical structure. However, the effects of OPVHs on gray matter (GM) atrophy remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated GM atrophy in OPVHs patients and explored the relationship between such atrophy and clinical risk factors. T1-weighted and T2-weighted Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were acquired, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was applied. The clinical (demographic and cardiovascular) risk factors of the OPVHs patients and healthy controls were then compared. Lastly, scatter plots and correlation analysis were applied to explore the relationship between the MRI results and clinical risk factors in the OPVHs patients. OPVHs patients had significantly reduced GM in the right supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, right anterior cingulum and left insula compared to healthy controls. Additionally, OPVHs patients had GM atrophy in the left precentral gyrus and left insula cortex, and such atrophy is associated with a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein-B (Apo-B).

  18. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy Coexistent with Occipital Periventricular White Matter Hyper Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dazhi; Li, Congyang; Shen, Lin; Cui, Chun; Shu, Tongsheng; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and brain atrophy often coexist in the elderly. Additionally, WMH is often observed as occipital periventricular hyperintensities (OPVHs) with low-grade periventricular (PV) white matter (WM) lesions and is usually confined within an anatomical structure. However, the effects of OPVHs on gray matter (GM) atrophy remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated GM atrophy in OPVHs patients and explored the relationship between such atrophy and clinical risk factors. T1-weighted and T2-weighted Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were acquired, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was applied. The clinical (demographic and cardiovascular) risk factors of the OPVHs patients and healthy controls were then compared. Lastly, scatter plots and correlation analysis were applied to explore the relationship between the MRI results and clinical risk factors in the OPVHs patients. OPVHs patients had significantly reduced GM in the right supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, right anterior cingulum and left insula compared to healthy controls. Additionally, OPVHs patients had GM atrophy in the left precentral gyrus and left insula cortex, and such atrophy is associated with a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein-B (Apo-B). PMID:27656141

  19. Fusion of white and gray matter geometry: a framework for investigating brain development.

    PubMed

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Smith, Alex R; Schultz, Robert T; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-12-01

    Current neuroimaging investigation of the white matter typically focuses on measurements derived from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). In contrast, imaging studies of the gray matter oftentimes focus on morphological features such as cortical thickness, folding and surface curvature. As a result, it is not clear how to combine findings from these two types of approaches in order to obtain a consistent picture of morphological changes in both gray and white matter. In this paper, we propose a joint investigation of gray and white matter morphology by combining geometrical information from white and the gray matter. To achieve this, we first introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale white matter tract geometry. Its formulation is based on the differential geometry of curve sets and is easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We then incorporate this method into a novel framework for "fusing" white and gray matter geometrical information. Given a set of fiber tracts originating in a particular cortical region, the key idea is to compute two scalar fields that represent geometrical characteristics of the white matter and of the surface of the cortical region. A quantitative marker is created by combining the distributions of these scalar values using Mutual Information. This marker can be then used in the study of normal and pathological brain structure and development. We apply this framework to a study on autism spectrum disorder in children. Our preliminary results support the view that autism may be characterized by early brain overgrowth, followed by reduced or arrested growth (Courchesne, 2004).

  20. Slowing Down: Age-Related Neurobiological Predictors of Processing Speed

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-related cognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed – dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging. PMID:21441995

  1. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  2. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  3. Effect of Simulated Microgravity on Human Brain Gray Matter and White Matter – Evidence from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Ouyang, Xin; Zeng, Yawei; Feng, Jinsheng; Wang, Yu; Yao, Li; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited and inconclusive evidence that space environment, especially microgravity condition, may affect microstructure of human brain. This experiment hypothesized that there would be modifications in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the brain due to microgravity. Method Eighteen male volunteers were recruited and fourteen volunteers underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 30 days simulated microgravity. High-resolution brain anatomical imaging data and diffusion tensor imaging images were collected on a 3T MR system before and after HDBR. We applied voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics analysis to investigate the structural changes in GM and WM of brain. Results We observed significant decreases of GM volume in the bilateral frontal lobes, temporal poles, parahippocampal gyrus, insula and right hippocampus, and increases of GM volume in the vermis, bilateral paracentral lobule, right precuneus gyrus, left precentral gyrus and left postcentral gyrus after HDBR. Fractional anisotropy (FA) changes were also observed in multiple WM tracts. Conclusion These regions showing GM changes are closely associated with the functional domains of performance, locomotion, learning, memory and coordination. Regional WM alterations may be related to brain function decline and adaption. Our findings provide the neuroanatomical evidence of brain dysfunction or plasticity in microgravity condition and a deeper insight into the cerebral mechanisms in microgravity condition. PMID:26270525

  4. Selective gray matter staining of human brain slices: optimized use of cadaver materials.

    PubMed

    Loftspring, M C; Smanik, J; Gardner, C; Pixley, S K

    2008-06-01

    We report a novel staining technique for human brain slices that distinguishes clearly gray from white matter. Previously described techniques using either Prussian blue (Berlin blue) or phthalocyanine dyes usually have included a hot phenol pretreatment to prevent white matter staining. The technique we describe here does not require hot phenol pretreatment and allows the use of brains stored for postmortem periods of one to two years prior to staining. Our technique involves staining with copper(II) phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt 1% in water for 2 h followed by acetic acid treatment; this produces excellent blue staining of gray matter with little white matter staining. The stained brain slices are excellent for teaching human brain anatomy and/or pathology, or for research purposes.

  5. Higher homocysteine associated with thinner cortical gray matter in 803 ADNI subjects

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Sarah K.; Rajagopalan, Priya; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of our risk for dementia in old age is associated with lifestyle factors (diet, exercise, and cardiovascular health) that are modifiable, at least in principle. One such risk factor – high homocysteine levels in the blood – is known to increase risk for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disorders. Here we set out to understand how homocysteine levels relate to 3D surface-based maps of cortical gray matter distribution (thickness, volume, surface area) computed from brain MRI in 803 elderly subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Individuals with higher plasma levels of homocysteine had lower gray matter thickness in bilateral frontal, parietal, occipital and right temporal regions; and lower gray matter volumes in left frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital regions, after controlling for diagnosis, age, and sex, and after correcting for multiple comparisons. No significant within-group associations were found in cognitively healthy people, mild cognitive impairment, or Alzheimer’s disease. These regional differences in gray matter structure may be useful biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of interventions, such as vitamin B supplements, that aim to prevent homocysteine-related brain atrophy by normalizing homocysteine levels. PMID:25444607

  6. Gray-matter macrostructure in cognitively healthy older persons: Associations with age and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Debra A.; Leurgans, Sue; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Barnes, Lisa L.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Han, S. Duke; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    A deeper understanding of brain macrostructure and its associations with cognition in persons who are considered cognitively healthy is critical to the early detection of persons at risk of developing dementia. Few studies have examined the associations of all three gray-matter macrostructural brain indices (volume, thickness, surface area) with age and cognition, in the same persons who are over the age of 65 and do not have cognitive impairment. We performed automated morphometric reconstruction of total gray matter, cortical gray matter, subcortical gray matter and 84 individual regions in 186 participants (60% over the age of 80) without cognitive impairment. Morphometric measures were scaled and expressed as difference per decade of age and an adjusted score was created to identify those regions in which there was greater atrophy per decade of age compared to cortical or subcortical brain averages. The results showed that there is substantial total volume loss and cortical thinning in cognitively healthy older persons. Thinning was more widespread than volume loss, but volume loss, particularly in temporoparietal and hippocampal regions, was more strongly associated with cognition. PMID:23955313

  7. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients. PMID:25263602

  8. Brain gray and white matter differences in healthy normal weight and obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare brain gray and white matter development in healthy normal weight and obese children. Twenty-four healthy 8- to 10-year-old children whose body mass index was either <75th percentile (normal weight) or >95th percentile (obese) completed an MRI examination which included T1-weighted three-d...

  9. Normalization of Cortical Gray Matter Deficits in Nonpsychotic Siblings of Patients with Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattai, Anand A.; Weisinger, Brian; Greenstein, Deanna; Stidd, Reva; Clasen, Liv; Miller, Rachel; Tossell, Julia W.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Gogtay, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cortical gray matter (GM) abnormalities in patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) progress during adolescence ultimately localizing to prefrontal and temporal cortices by early adult age. A previous study of 52 nonpsychotic siblings of COS probands had significant prefrontal and temporal GM deficits that appeared to…

  10. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients.

  11. Gray Matter Characteristics in Mid and Old Aged Adults with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koolschijn, P. Cédric M. P.; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2016-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the brain anatomy of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows a different developmental pattern then typical age-matched peers. There is however, a paucity of studies examining gray matter in mid and late adulthood in ASD. In this cross-sectional neuroimaging study, we, performed vertex-wise…

  12. Mindfulness practice leads to increases in regional brain gray matter density.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Britta K; Carmody, James; Vangel, Mark; Congleton, Christina; Yerramsetti, Sita M; Gard, Tim; Lazar, Sara W

    2011-01-30

    Therapeutic interventions that incorporate training in mindfulness meditation have become increasingly popular, but to date little is known about neural mechanisms associated with these interventions. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), one of the most widely used mindfulness training programs, has been reported to produce positive effects on psychological well-being and to ameliorate symptoms of a number of disorders. Here, we report a controlled longitudinal study to investigate pre-post changes in brain gray matter concentration attributable to participation in an MBSR program. Anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) images from 16 healthy, meditation-naïve participants were obtained before and after they underwent the 8-week program. Changes in gray matter concentration were investigated using voxel-based morphometry, and compared with a waiting list control group of 17 individuals. Analyses in a priori regions of interest confirmed increases in gray matter concentration within the left hippocampus. Whole brain analyses identified increases in the posterior cingulate cortex, the temporo-parietal junction, and the cerebellum in the MBSR group compared with the controls. The results suggest that participation in MBSR is associated with changes in gray matter concentration in brain regions involved in learning and memory processes, emotion regulation, self-referential processing, and perspective taking.

  13. Cortical Gray Matter in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batty, Martin J.; Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Pitiot, Alain; Toro, Roberto; Groom, Madeleine J.; Scerif, Gaia; Liotti, Mario; Liddle, Peter F.; Paus, Tomas; Hollis, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have shown smaller brain volume and less gray matter in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Relatively few morphological studies have examined structures thought to subserve inhibitory control, one of the diagnostic features of ADHD. We examined one such region, the pars opercularis,…

  14. Correlation between Gray/White Matter Volume and Cognition in Healthy Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    This study applied volumetric analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images to assess whether correlations exist between global and regional gray/white matter volume and the cognitive functions of semantic memory and short-term memory, which are relatively well preserved with aging, using MR image data from 109…

  15. Impact of Interacting Functional Variants in COMT on Regional Gray Matter Volume in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth A.; Pezawas, Lukas; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional variants in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene have been shown to impact cognitive function, cortical physiology and risk for schizophrenia. A recent study showed that previously reported effects of the functional val158met SNP (rs4680) on brain function are modified by other functional SNPs and haplotypes in the gene, though it was unknown if these effects are also seen in brain structure. Methods We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the impact of multiple functional variants in COMT on gray matter volume in a large group of 151 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia. Results We found that the previously described rs4680 val risk variant affects hippocampal and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) gray matter volume. In addition, we found that this SNP interacts with a variant in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603) in predicting changes in hippocampal gray matter volume consistent with a nonlinear effect of extracellular dopamine. Conclusions We report evidence that interacting functional variants in COMT affect gray matter regional volume in hippocampus and DLPFC, providing further in vivo validation of the biological impact of complex genetic variation in COMT on neural systems relevant for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and extending observations of nonlinear dependence of prefrontal neurons on extracellular dopamine to the domain of human brain structure. PMID:19071221

  16. Latent-variable modeling of brain gray-matter volume and psychopathy in incarcerated offenders.

    PubMed

    Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R; Neumann, Craig S; Cope, Lora M; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-08-01

    Advanced statistical modeling has become a prominent feature in psychological science and can be a useful approach for representing the neural architecture linked to psychopathology. Psychopathy, a disorder characterized by dysfunction in interpersonal-affective and impulsive-antisocial domains, is associated with widespread neural abnormalities. Several imaging studies suggest that underlying structural deficits in paralimbic regions are associated with psychopathy. Although these studies are useful, they make assumptions about the organization of the brain and its relevance to individuals displaying psychopathic features. Capitalizing on statistical modeling, in the present study (N = 254), we used latent-variable methods to examine the structure of gray-matter volume in male offenders, and assessed the latent relations between psychopathy and gray-matter factors reflecting paralimbic and nonparalimbic regions. Results revealed good fit for a 4-factor gray-matter paralimbic model and these first-order factors were accounted for by a superordinate paralimbic "system" factor. Moreover, a superordinate psychopathy factor significantly predicted the paralimbic, but not the nonparalimbic factor. The latent-variable paralimbic model, specifically linked with psychopathy, goes beyond understanding single brain regions within the system and provides evidence for psychopathy-related gray-matter volume reductions in the paralimbic system as a whole. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27269123

  17. Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Price, Catherine C.; Tanner, Jared; Nguyen, Peter T.; Schwab, Nadine A.; Mitchell, Sandra; Slonena, Elizabeth; Brumback, Babette; Okun, Michael S.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Bowers, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Objective This prospective investigation examined: 1) processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, and 2) the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory. Methods Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vascular contributors. Within group a priori anatomical contributors included bilateral frontal thickness, caudate nuclei volume, and prefrontal white matter fractional anisotropy. Results Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (n = 40; Hoehn & Yahr stages 1–3) and non-Parkinson’s disease ‘control’ peers (n = 40) matched on demographics, general cognition, comorbidity, and imaging/blood vascular metrics. Cognitively, individuals with Parkinson’s disease were significantly more impaired than controls on tests of processing speed, secondary deficits on working memory, with subtle impairments in memory, abstract reasoning, and visuoperceptual/spatial abilities. Anatomically, Parkinson’s disease individuals were not statistically different in cortical gray thickness or subcortical gray volumes with the exception of the putamen. Tract Based Spatial Statistics showed reduced prefrontal fractional anisotropy for Parkinson’s disease relative to controls. Within Parkinson’s disease, prefrontal fractional anisotropy and caudate nucleus volume partially explained processing speed. For controls, only prefrontal white matter was a significant contributor to processing speed. There were no significant anatomical predictors of working memory for either group. Conclusions Caudate nuclei volume and prefrontal fractional anisotropy, not frontal gray matter thickness, showed unique and combined significance for processing speed in Parkinson’s disease. Findings underscore the

  18. Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  19. Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  20. Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Ferencz, Beata; Mangialasche, Francesca; Mecocci, Patrizia; Cecchetti, Roberta; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n = 414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-α) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3462-3473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27159568

  1. Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  2. Surface-based reconstruction and diffusion MRI in the assessment of gray and white matter damage in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffini, Matteo; Bergsland, Niels; LaganÃ, Marcella; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Tortorella, Paola; Rovaris, Marco; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in the application of nonconventional MRI techniques in furthering the understanding of multiple sclerosis pathogenic mechanisms, there are still many unanswered questions, such as the relationship between gray and white matter damage. We applied a combination of advanced surface-based reconstruction and diffusion tensor imaging techniques to address this issue. We found significant relationships between white matter tract integrity indices and corresponding cortical structures. Our results suggest a direct link between damage in white and gray matter and contribute to the notion of gray matter loss relating to clinical disability.

  3. Iron efflux from oligodendrocytes is differentially regulated in gray and white matter.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Katrin; Vulpe, Chris D; Harris, Leah Z; David, Samuel

    2011-09-14

    Accumulation of iron occurs in the CNS in several neurodegenerative diseases. Iron is essential for life but also has the ability to generate toxic free radicals if not properly handled. Iron homeostasis at the cellular level is therefore important to maintain proper cellular function, and its dysregulation can contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Iron export, a key mechanism to maintain proper levels in cells, occurs via ferroportin, a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that partners with a ferroxidase. A membrane-bound form of the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin is expressed by astrocytes in the CNS and regulates iron efflux. We now show that oligodendrocytes use another ferroxidase, called hephaestin, which was first identified in enterocytes in the gut. Mice with mutations in the hephaestin gene (sex-linked anemia mice) show iron accumulation in oligodendrocytes in the gray matter, but not in the white matter, and exhibit motor deficits. This was accompanied by a marked reduction in the levels of the paranodal proteins contactin-associated protein 1 (Caspr) and reticulon-4 (Nogo A). We show that the sparing of iron accumulation in white matter oligodendrocytes in sex-linked anemia mice is due to compensatory upregulation of ceruloplasmin in these cells. This was further confirmed in ceruloplasmin/hephaestin double-mutant mice, which show iron accumulation in both gray and white matter oligodendrocytes. These data indicate that gray and white matter oligodendrocytes can use different iron efflux mechanisms to maintain iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of such efflux mechanisms leads to iron accumulation in the CNS. PMID:21917813

  4. Variation of selective gray and white matter atrophy in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Jech, Robert; Klempír, Jirí; Vymazal, Josef; Zidovská, Jana; Klempírová, Olga; Růzicka, Evzen; Roth, Jan

    2007-09-15

    The relationship between the extent of local gray/white matter atrophy, genetic load, and clinical impairment was studied in Huntington's disease (HD) by means of voxel-based morphometry. T1-weighted brain images from 33 patients (mean age 49.5, range 25-73 years) with HD duration of 1 to 15 years were analyzed by correlation of each voxel intensity with the number of CAG triplets and the UHDRS-motor score (P < 0.001). The CAG number correlated inversely with gray matter intensity in the caudate nuclei and with white matter intensity in the both postcentral gyri and the right cerebellum. The UHDRS-motor score correlated inversely with the atrophy of both caudates, right hippocampus, calcarine fissure, and with the white matter along the fourth and lateral ventricles. While atrophy of the caudate nucleus was related to a higher number of CAG triplets and higher UHDRS-motor score, atrophy in other parts of the brain covaried with the two parameters differently: higher genetic load was associated with greater loss of cortical somatosensory projections and the worse UHDRS-motor score was accompanied by increased atrophy of the internal capsule, lower brainstem, hippocampus, and visual cortex. According to our results, the genetic load in HD predicts partially the extent of selective gray/white brain matter atrophy, which is then reflected in the severity of motor impairment.

  5. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L; L, Reed; S, Williams; A, Lourdusamy; S, Costafreda; A, Cattrell; C, Nymberg; L, Topper; L, Smith; S, Havatzias; K, Stueber; C, Mallik; TK, Clarke; D, Stacey; Wong C, Peng; H, Werts; S, Williams; C, Andrew; S, Desrivieres; S, Zewdie; I, Häke; N, Ivanov; A, Klär; J, Reuter; C, Palafox; C, Hohmann; C, Schilling; K, Lüdemann; A, Romanowski; A, Ströhle; E, Wolff; M, Rapp; R, Brühl; A, Ihlenfeld; B, Walaszek; F, Schubert; C, Connolly; J, Jones; E, Lalor; E, McCabe; A, Ní Shiothcháin; R, Whelan; R, Spanagel; F, Leonardi-Essmann; W, Sommer; S, Vollstaedt-Klein; F, Nees; S, Steiner; M, Buehler; E, Stolzenburg; C, Schmal; F, Schirmbeck; P, Gowland; N, Heym; C, Newman; T, Huebner; S, Ripke; E, Mennigen; K, Muller; V, Ziesch; C, Büchel; U, Bromberg; L, Lueken; J, Yacubian; J, Finsterbusch; N, Bordas; S, de Bournonville; Z, Bricaud; Briand F, Gollier; J, Massicotte; JB, Poline; H, Vulser; Y, Schwartz; C, Lalanne; V, Frouin; B, Thyreau; J, Dalley; A, Mar; N, Subramaniam; D, Theobald; N, Richmond; M, de Rover; A, Molander; E, Jordan; E, Robinson; L, Hipolata; M, Moreno; M, Arroyo; D, Stephens; T, Ripley; H, Crombag; Y, Pena; M, Lathrop; D, Zelenika; S, Heath; D, Lanzerath; B, Heinrichs; T, Spranger; B, Fuchs; C, Speiser; F, Resch; J, Haffner; P, Parzer; R, Brunner; A, Klaassen; I, Klaassen; P, Constant; X, Mignon; T, Thomsen; S, Zysset; A, Vestboe; J, Ireland; J, Rogers

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  6. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders. PMID:27199831

  7. Elevated protein carbonylation in the brain white matter and gray matter of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, Oscar A; DeJesus, Gisela; Callahan, Kelly; Pastuszyn, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from infiltrating macrophages and microglial cells have been shown to reduce the levels of endogenous antioxidants and to cause the oxidation of various substrates within the MS plaque. To determine whether oxidative damage takes place beyond visible MS plaques, the occurrence of total carbonyls (TCOs) and protein carbonyls (PCOs) in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and gray matter (NAGM) of eight MS brains was assessed and compared with those of four control brains. The data show that most (7/8) of the MS-WM samples contain increased amounts of PCOs as determined by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and Western blot analysis. These samples also have high levels of glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that oxidative damage is related to the presence of small lesions. In contrast, we detected no evidence of protein thiolation (glutathionylation and cysteinylation) in the diseased tissue. To our surprise, MS-NAGM specimens with high GFAP content also showed three times the concentration of TCOs and PCOs as the controls. The increase in PCOs is likely to be a consequence of reduced levels of antioxidants, in that the concentration of nonprotein thiols in both MS-WM and -GM decreased by 30%. Overall, our data support the current view that both NAWM and -GM from MS brains contain considerable biochemical alterations. The involvement of GM in MS was also supported by the decrease in the levels of neurofilament light protein in all the specimens analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the presence of increased protein carbonylation in post-mortem WM and GM tissue of MS patients.

  8. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders. PMID:27199831

  9. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders.

  10. A comprehensive assessment of gray and white matter volumes and their relationship to outcome and severity in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mitelman, Serge A.; Brickman, Adam M.; Shihabuddin, Lina; Newmark, Randall E.; Hazlett, Erin A.; Haznedar, M. Mehmet; Buchsbaum, Monte S.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary data suggest an association of posterior cortical gray matter reduction with poor outcome in schizophrenia. We made a systematic MRI assessment of regional gray and white matter volumes, parcellated into 40 Brodmann’s areas, in 104 patients with schizophrenia (51 with good outcomes, 53 with poor outcomes) and 41 normal comparison subjects, and investigated correlations of regional morphometry with outcome and severity of the illness. Schizophrenia patients displayed differential reductions in frontal and to a lesser degree temporal gray matter volumes in both hemispheres, most pronounced in the frontal pole and lateral temporal cortex. White matter volumes in schizophrenia patients were bilaterally increased, primarily in the frontal, parietal, and isolated temporal regions, with volume reductions confined to anterior cingulate gyrus. In patients with schizophrenia as a group, higher illness severity was associated with reduced temporal gray matter volumes and expanded frontal white matter volumes in both hemispheres. In comparison to good-outcome group, patients with poor outcomes had lower temporal, occipital, and to a lesser degree parietal gray matter volumes in both hemispheres and temporal, parietal, occipital, and posterior cingulate white matter volumes in the right hemisphere. While gray matter deficits in the granular cortex were observed in all schizophrenia patients, agranular cortical deficits in the left hemisphere were peculiar to patients with poor outcomes. These results provide support for frontotemporal gray matter reduction and frontoparietal white matter expansion in schizophrenia. Poor outcome is associated with more posterior distribution (posteriorization) of both gray and white matter changes, and with preferential impairment in the unimodal visual and paralimbic cortical regions. PMID:17587598

  11. Brain Gray Matter Changes Associated with Mindfulness Meditation in Older Adults: An Exploratory Pilot Study using Voxel-based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Florian; Luders, Eileen; Wu, Brian; Black, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have previously been associated with structural gray matter changes in normal healthy adults. However, it remains unknown if standardized MBIs can induce similar changes in older adults and those with health complaints as well. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effect of a standardized MBI on the gray matter tissue of older adults with sleep disturbances. Methods This exploratory single-group pilot longitudinal study examined local gray matter changes over a six-week MBI period. Participants included six older adult community volunteers (M=66.5 years of age, SD=5.5, range=58–75; 66% female) with sleep disturbances recruited through advertisement in local newspapers/flyers posted at a university medical center and affiliated clinics in Los Angeles, CA. The MBI was delivered as a weekly, two-hour, six-session, group-based course in mindfulness meditation. Gray matter was measured voxel-wise pre- and post-intervention. Results A significant gray matter increase was identified within the precuneus, possibly implicating meditation-induced changes of the default mode network. In contrast, observed significant gray matter decreases may have been driven by MBI-related remediation of brain architecture subserving sleep complaints. Conclusions Exploratory findings suggest that mindfulness meditation practice is associated with a detectable alteration of cerebral gray matter in older adults. PMID:25632405

  12. Emotion recognition and theory of mind are related to gray matter volume of the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maat, Arija; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Bartholomeusz, Cali F; Kahn, René S; Cahn, Wiepke

    2016-02-01

    Investigations of social cognition in schizophrenia have demonstrated consistent impairments compared to healthy controls. Functional imaging studies in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls have revealed that social cognitive processing depends critically on the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, the relationship between social cognition and structural brain abnormalities in these regions in schizophrenia patients is less well understood. Measures of facial emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM), two key social cognitive abilities, as well as face perception and IQ, were assessed in 166 patients with schizophrenia and 134 healthy controls. MRI brain scans were acquired. Automated parcellation of the brain to determine gray matter volume of the amygdala and the superior, middle, inferior and orbital PFC was performed. Between-group analyses showed poorer recognition of angry faces and ToM performance, and decreased amygdala and PFC gray matter volumes in schizophrenia patients as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, in schizophrenia patients, recognition of angry faces was associated with inferior PFC gray matter volume, particularly the pars triangularis (p=0.006), with poor performance being related to reduced pars triangularis gray matter volume. In addition, ToM ability was related to PFC gray matter volume, particularly middle PFC (p=0.001), in that poor ToM skills in schizophrenia patients were associated with reduced middle PFC gray matter volume. In conclusion, reduced PFC, but not amygdala, gray matter volume is associated with social cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  13. Gray Matter Features of Reading Disability: A Combined Meta-Analytic and Direct Analysis Approach(1,2,3,4).

    PubMed

    Eckert, Mark A; Berninger, Virginia W; Vaden, Kenneth I; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Tsu, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry dyslexia studies and direct analysis of 293 reading disability and control cases from six different research sites were performed to characterize defining gray matter features of reading disability. These analyses demonstrated consistently lower gray matter volume in left posterior superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus regions and left orbitofrontal gyrus/pars orbitalis regions. Gray matter volume within both of these regions significantly predicted individual variation in reading comprehension after correcting for multiple comparisons. These regional gray matter differences were observed across published studies and in the multisite dataset after controlling for potential age and gender effects, and despite increased anatomical variance in the reading disability group, but were not significant after controlling for total gray matter volume. Thus, the orbitofrontal and posterior superior temporal sulcus gray matter findings are relatively reliable effects that appear to be dependent on cases with low total gray matter volume. The results are considered in the context of genetics studies linking orbitofrontal and superior temporal sulcus regions to alleles that confer risk for reading disability.

  14. Periaqueductal gray matter modulates the hypercapnic ventilatory response.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luana T; Patrone, Luis G A; Bícego, Kênia C; Coimbra, Norberto C; Gargaglioni, Luciane H

    2012-08-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a midbrain structure directly involved in the modulation of defensive behaviors. It has direct projections to several central nuclei that are involved in cardiorespiratory control. Although PAG stimulation is known to elicit respiratory responses, the role of the PAG in the CO(2)-drive to breathe is still unknown. The present study assessed the effect of chemical lesion of the dorsolateral and dorsomedial and ventrolateral/lateral PAG (dlPAG, dmPAG, and vPAG, respectively) on cardiorespiratory and thermal responses to hypercapnia. Ibotenic acid (IBO) or vehicle (PBS, Sham group) was injected into the dlPAG, dmPAG, or vPAG of male Wistar rats. Rats with lesions outside the dlPAG, dmPAG, or vPAG were considered as negative controls (NC). Pulmonary ventilation (VE: ), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and body temperature (Tb) were measured in unanesthetized rats during normocapnia and hypercapnic exposure (5, 15, 30 min, 7 % CO(2)). IBO lesioning of the dlPAG/dmPAG caused 31 % and 26.5 % reductions of the respiratory response to CO(2) (1,094.3 ± 115 mL/kg/min) compared with Sham (1,589.5 ± 88.1 mL/kg/min) and NC groups (1,488.2 ± 47.7 mL/kg/min), respectively. IBO lesioning of the vPAG caused 26.6 % and 21 % reductions of CO(2) hyperpnea (1,215.3 ± 108.6 mL/kg/min) compared with Sham (1,657.3 ± 173.9 mL/kg/min) and NC groups (1,537.6 ± 59.3). Basal VE: , MAP, HR, and Tb were not affected by dlPAG, dmPAG, or vPAG lesioning. The results suggest that dlPAG, dmPAG, and vPAG modulate hypercapnic ventilatory responses in rats but do not affect MAP, HR, or Tb regulation in resting conditions or during hypercapnia.

  15. Current smoking and reduced gray matter volume-a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Hans-Christian; Wittfeld, Katrin; Schmidt, Carsten O; Domin, Martin; Grabe, Hans J; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Hosten, Norbert; Lotze, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Nicotine modulates prefrontal processing when tested with functional imaging. Previous studies on changes in regional brain volumes in small samples, reporting different life-time exposure to nicotine, identified reduced volume in smokers in prefrontal areas but reported controversial results for other areas. We investigated the association of cigarette smoking and regional gray and white matter volume by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for T1-weighted high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in 315 current-smokers and 659 never-smokers from the representative Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Our study showed that in current-smokers smoking is significantly associated with gray matter volume loss in the prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the insula, and the olfactory gyrus. White matter volumes were not relevantly reduced in current-smokers. In current-smokers, we found associations of gray matter loss and smoking exposure (pack-years) in the prefrontal cortex, the anterior and middle cingulate cortex, and the superior temporal and angular gyrus, which however did not stand corrections for multiple testing. We confirmed associations between smoking and gray matter differences in the prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex and the insula in the general population of Pomerania (Germany). For the first time, we identified differences in brain volumes in the olfactory gyrus. Other cerebral regions did not show significant differences when correcting for multiple comparisons within the whole brain. The regions of structural deficits might be involved in addictive behavior and withdrawal symptoms, whereas further investigations have to show if the observed atrophies were caused by smoking itself or are preexisting differences between smoking and non-smoking individuals.

  16. Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessing Brain Gray and White Matter Abnormalities in a Feline Model of α-Mannosidosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Duda, Jeff T; Yoon, Sea Young; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Vite, Charles; Pickup, Stephen; Gee, James C; Wolfe, John H; Poptani, Harish

    2016-01-01

    α-Mannosidosis (AMD) is an autosomal recessively inherited lysosomal storage disorder affecting brain function and structure. We performed ex vivo and in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on the brains of AMD-affected cats to assess gray and white matter abnormalities. A multi-atlas approach was used to generate a brain template to process the ex vivo DTI data. The probabilistic label method was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity values from gray and white matter regions from ex vivo DTI. Regional analysis from various regions of the gray matter (frontal cortex, cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, thalamus, and occipital cortex), and white matter (corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, cerebral peduncle, external and internal capsule) was also performed on both ex vivo and in vivo DTI. Ex vivo DTI revealed significantly reduced FA from both gray and white matter regions in AMD-affected cats compared to controls. Significantly reduced FA was also observed from in vivo DTI of AMD-affected cats compared to controls, with lower FA values observed in all white matter regions. We also observed significantly increased axial and radial diffusivity values in various gray and white matter regions in AMD cats from both ex vivo and in vivo DTI data. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic analyses suggesting that DTI studies can further aid in the characterization of AMD by assessing the microstructural abnormalities in both white and gray matter.

  17. APOL1 renal-risk variants associate with reduced cerebral white matter lesion volume and increased gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Bryan, R Nick; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Ma, Lijun; Rocco, Michael V; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Whitlow, Christopher T; Wagner, Benjamin C; Langefeld, Carl D; Hawfield, Amret T; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lerner, Alan J; Raj, Dominic S; Sadaghiani, Mohammad S; Toto, Robert D; Wright, Jackson T; Bowden, Donald W; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-08-01

    To assess apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk-variant effects on the brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral volumes and cognitive function were assessed in 517 African American-Diabetes Heart Study (AA-DHS) Memory IN Diabetes (MIND) and 2568 hypertensive African American Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) participants without diabetes. Within these cohorts, 483 and 197 had cerebral MRI, respectively. AA-DHS participants were characterized as follows: 60.9% female, mean age of 58.6 years, diabetes duration 13.1 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 88.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and a median spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 10.0 mg/g. In additive genetic models adjusting for age, sex, ancestry, scanner, intracranial volume, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, statins, nephropathy, smoking, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, APOL1 renal-risk-variants were positively associated with gray matter volume (β = 3.4 × 10(-3)) and negatively associated with white matter lesion volume (β = -0.303) (an indicator of cerebral small vessel disease) and cerebrospinal fluid volume (β= -30707) (all significant), but not with white matter volume or cognitive function. Significant associations corresponding to adjusted effect sizes (β/SE) were observed with gray matter volume (0.16) and white matter lesion volume (-0.208), but not with cerebrospinal fluid volume (-0.251). Meta-analysis results with SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) participants who had cerebral MRI were confirmatory. Thus, APOL1 renal-risk-variants are associated with larger gray matter volume and lower white matter lesion volume suggesting lower intracranial small vessel disease.

  18. APOL1 renal-risk variants associate with reduced cerebral white matter lesion volume and increased gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Bryan, R Nick; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Ma, Lijun; Rocco, Michael V; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Whitlow, Christopher T; Wagner, Benjamin C; Langefeld, Carl D; Hawfield, Amret T; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lerner, Alan J; Raj, Dominic S; Sadaghiani, Mohammad S; Toto, Robert D; Wright, Jackson T; Bowden, Donald W; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-08-01

    To assess apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk-variant effects on the brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral volumes and cognitive function were assessed in 517 African American-Diabetes Heart Study (AA-DHS) Memory IN Diabetes (MIND) and 2568 hypertensive African American Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) participants without diabetes. Within these cohorts, 483 and 197 had cerebral MRI, respectively. AA-DHS participants were characterized as follows: 60.9% female, mean age of 58.6 years, diabetes duration 13.1 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 88.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and a median spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 10.0 mg/g. In additive genetic models adjusting for age, sex, ancestry, scanner, intracranial volume, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, statins, nephropathy, smoking, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, APOL1 renal-risk-variants were positively associated with gray matter volume (β = 3.4 × 10(-3)) and negatively associated with white matter lesion volume (β = -0.303) (an indicator of cerebral small vessel disease) and cerebrospinal fluid volume (β= -30707) (all significant), but not with white matter volume or cognitive function. Significant associations corresponding to adjusted effect sizes (β/SE) were observed with gray matter volume (0.16) and white matter lesion volume (-0.208), but not with cerebrospinal fluid volume (-0.251). Meta-analysis results with SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) participants who had cerebral MRI were confirmatory. Thus, APOL1 renal-risk-variants are associated with larger gray matter volume and lower white matter lesion volume suggesting lower intracranial small vessel disease. PMID:27342958

  19. Correlating Gray Matter Volume with Individual Difference in the Flanker Interference Effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changming; Yang, Jiemin; Lai, Jiayu; Li, Hong; Yuan, Jiajin; Abbasi, Najam ul Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The Eriksen Flanker task has been widely used as a measurement of cognitive control, however till now information is still scarce about how the neuroanatomical properties are related to performance in this task. Using voxel-based morphometry technique (VBM), the current study identified a set of distributed areas where the gray matter volume (GM) correlated positively with participants’ efficiency in interference inhibition. These areas included the bilateral prefrontal gyri, left insula and inferior temporal gyrus, the left inferior parietal lobule. Further analysis using a novel machine learning algorithm with balanced cross-validation procedure confirmed that in these areas the GM-behavioral association was unlikely a byproduct of outlier values, instead, the gray matter volume could predict reliably participants’ interference inhibition efficiency. These results underscore the importance of the fronto-parietal and insula systems to the brain functioning of interference inhibition from the neuroanatomical perspective. PMID:26322974

  20. Extensive learning is associated with gray matter changes in the right hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kathrin; Reess, Tim Jonas; Rus, Oana Georgiana; Zimmer, Claus

    2016-01-15

    Longitudinal voxel-based morphometry studies have demonstrated increases in gray matter volume in hippocampal areas following extensive cognitive learning. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for the relevance of the subiculum in the context of learning and memory. Using longitudinal FreeSurfer analyses and hippocampus subfield segmentation the present study investigated the effects of 14weeks of intensive learning on hippocampal and subicular gray matter volume in a sample of medical students compared to control subjects not engaged in any cognitive learning activities. We found that extensive learning resulted in a significant increase of right hippocampal volume. Volume of the left hippocampus and the subiculum remained unchanged. The current findings emphasize the role of the hippocampus in semantic learning and memory processes and provide further evidence for the neuroplastic ability of the hippocampus in the context of cognitive learning.

  1. Gray matter correlates of dispositional optimism: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyi; Wei, Dongtao; Wang, Kangcheng; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-10-11

    Dispositional optimism is an important product of human evolution. This individual difference variable plays a core role in human experience. Dispositional optimism is beneficial to physical and psychological wellbeing. Previous task-related neuroimaging studies on dispositional optimism were limited by small sample sizes, and did not examine individual differences in dispositional optimism related to brain structure. Thus, the current study used voxel-based morphometry and the revised Life Orientation Test to investigate individual dispositional optimism and its association with brain structure in 361 healthy participants. The results showed that individual dispositional optimism was associated with larger gray matter volume of a cluster of areas that included the left thalamus/left pulvinar that extended to the left parahippocampal gyrus. These findings suggest a biological basis for individual dispositional optimism, distributed across different gray matter regions of the brain.

  2. Physical activity and memory functions: are neurotrophins and cerebral gray matter volume the missing link?

    PubMed

    Flöel, A; Ruscheweyh, R; Krüger, K; Willemer, C; Winter, B; Völker, K; Lohmann, H; Zitzmann, M; Mooren, F; Breitenstein, C; Knecht, S

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal better cognitive function in physically active individuals. Possible mediators for this effect are neurotrophins, which are up-regulated through physical exercise and induce neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the animal model. Here we cross-sectionally assessed 75 healthy older individuals for levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and memory encoding, as well as neurotrophin levels and cerebral gray matter volume. We found that physical activity, but not cardiovascular fitness, was associated with better memory encoding after controlling for age, sex, education, depression, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with higher levels of the neurotrophin granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and increased cerebral gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex as assessed by magnetic resonance voxel-based morphometry. While mediating factors will need to be further elucidated, these findings indicate that even low-level physical activity exerts beneficial effects on memory functions in older individuals.

  3. Alcohol exposure in utero is associated with decreased gray matter volume in neonates.

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten A; Fouche, J P; Roos, Annerine; Koen, Nastassja; Howells, Fleur M; Riley, Edward P; Woods, Roger P; Zar, Heather J; Narr, Katherine L; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have indicated that prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with alterations in the structure of specific brain regions. However, the temporal specificity of such changes and their behavioral consequences are less known. Here we explore the brain structure of infants with in utero exposure to alcohol shortly after birth. T2 structural MRI images were acquired from 28 alcohol-exposed infants and 45 demographically matched healthy controls at 2-4 weeks of age on a 3T Siemens Allegra system as part of large birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS). Neonatal neurobehavior was assessed at this visit; early developmental outcome assessed on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III at 6 months of age. Volumes of gray matter regions were estimated based on the segmentations of the University of North Carolina neonatal atlas. Significantly decreased total gray matter volume was demonstrated for the alcohol-exposed cohort compared to healthy control infants (p < 0.001). Subcortical gray matter regions that were significantly different between groups after correcting for overall gray matter volume included left hippocampus, bilateral amygdala and left thalamus (p < 0.01). These findings persisted even when correcting for infant age, gender, ethnicity and maternal smoking status. Both early neurobehavioral and developmental adverse outcomes at 6 months across multiple domains were significantly associated with regional volumes primarily in the temporal and frontal lobes in infants with prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure during the prenatal period has potentially enduring neurobiological consequences for exposed children. These findings suggest the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on brain growth is present very early in the first year of life, a period during which the most rapid growth and maturation occurs. PMID:26616173

  4. Individual differences in local gray matter density are associated with differences in affective and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Eres, Robert; Decety, Jean; Louis, Winnifred R; Molenberghs, Pascal

    2015-08-15

    The understanding of empathy from a neuroscientific perspective has recently developed quickly, with numerous functional MRI studies associating different brain regions with different components of empathy. A recent meta-analysis across 40 fMRI studies revealed that affective empathy is most often associated with increased activity in the insula, whereas cognitive empathy is most often associated with activity in the midcingulate cortex and adjacent dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (MCC/dmPFC). To date, however, it remains unclear whether individual differences in brain morphometry in these regions underlie different dispositions in affective and cognitive empathy. In order to test this hypothesis, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to examine the extent to which gray matter density predicts scores from an established empathy measure (Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy; QCAE). One hundred and seventy-six participants completed the QCAE and underwent MRI in order to acquire a high-resolution, three-dimensional T1-weighted structural scans. A factor analysis of the questionnaire scores revealed two distinct factors of empathy, affective and cognitive, which confirmed the validity of the QCAE. VBM results revealed gray matter density differences associated with the distinct components of empathy. Higher scores on affective empathy were associated with greater gray matter density in the insula cortex and higher scores of cognitive empathy were associated with greater gray matter density in the MCC/dmPFC. Taken together, these results provide validation for empathy being a multi-component construct, suggesting that affective and cognitive empathy are differentially represented in brain morphometry as well as providing convergent evidence for empathy being represented by different neural and structural correlates. PMID:26008886

  5. Alcohol exposure in utero is associated with decreased gray matter volume in neonates.

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten A; Fouche, J P; Roos, Annerine; Koen, Nastassja; Howells, Fleur M; Riley, Edward P; Woods, Roger P; Zar, Heather J; Narr, Katherine L; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have indicated that prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with alterations in the structure of specific brain regions. However, the temporal specificity of such changes and their behavioral consequences are less known. Here we explore the brain structure of infants with in utero exposure to alcohol shortly after birth. T2 structural MRI images were acquired from 28 alcohol-exposed infants and 45 demographically matched healthy controls at 2-4 weeks of age on a 3T Siemens Allegra system as part of large birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS). Neonatal neurobehavior was assessed at this visit; early developmental outcome assessed on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III at 6 months of age. Volumes of gray matter regions were estimated based on the segmentations of the University of North Carolina neonatal atlas. Significantly decreased total gray matter volume was demonstrated for the alcohol-exposed cohort compared to healthy control infants (p < 0.001). Subcortical gray matter regions that were significantly different between groups after correcting for overall gray matter volume included left hippocampus, bilateral amygdala and left thalamus (p < 0.01). These findings persisted even when correcting for infant age, gender, ethnicity and maternal smoking status. Both early neurobehavioral and developmental adverse outcomes at 6 months across multiple domains were significantly associated with regional volumes primarily in the temporal and frontal lobes in infants with prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure during the prenatal period has potentially enduring neurobiological consequences for exposed children. These findings suggest the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on brain growth is present very early in the first year of life, a period during which the most rapid growth and maturation occurs.

  6. Gene by Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Alia-Klein, N.; Alia-Klein, N.; Parvaz, M.A.; Woicik, P.A.; Konova, A.; Maloney, T.; Shumay, E.; Wang, R.; Telang, F.; Biegon, A.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-12-05

    Chronic cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine receptive neurons. However, the concomitant use of other drugs and common genetic variability in monoamine regulation present additional structural variability. We therefore examined variations in gray matter volume (GMV) as a function of lifetime drug use and the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype in cocaine use disorders (CUD) and healthy controls.

  7. Individual differences in local gray matter density are associated with differences in affective and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Eres, Robert; Decety, Jean; Louis, Winnifred R; Molenberghs, Pascal

    2015-08-15

    The understanding of empathy from a neuroscientific perspective has recently developed quickly, with numerous functional MRI studies associating different brain regions with different components of empathy. A recent meta-analysis across 40 fMRI studies revealed that affective empathy is most often associated with increased activity in the insula, whereas cognitive empathy is most often associated with activity in the midcingulate cortex and adjacent dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (MCC/dmPFC). To date, however, it remains unclear whether individual differences in brain morphometry in these regions underlie different dispositions in affective and cognitive empathy. In order to test this hypothesis, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to examine the extent to which gray matter density predicts scores from an established empathy measure (Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy; QCAE). One hundred and seventy-six participants completed the QCAE and underwent MRI in order to acquire a high-resolution, three-dimensional T1-weighted structural scans. A factor analysis of the questionnaire scores revealed two distinct factors of empathy, affective and cognitive, which confirmed the validity of the QCAE. VBM results revealed gray matter density differences associated with the distinct components of empathy. Higher scores on affective empathy were associated with greater gray matter density in the insula cortex and higher scores of cognitive empathy were associated with greater gray matter density in the MCC/dmPFC. Taken together, these results provide validation for empathy being a multi-component construct, suggesting that affective and cognitive empathy are differentially represented in brain morphometry as well as providing convergent evidence for empathy being represented by different neural and structural correlates.

  8. Jacobian integration method increases the statistical power to measure gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kunio; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Narayanan, Sridar; Collins, D. Louis; Arnold, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy provides important insights into neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can be used as a marker of neuroprotection in clinical trials. Jacobian integration is a method for measuring volume change that uses integration of the local Jacobian determinants of the nonlinear deformation field registering two images, and is a promising tool for measuring gray matter atrophy. Our main objective was to compare the statistical power of the Jacobian integration method to commonly used methods in terms of the sample size required to detect a treatment effect on gray matter atrophy. We used multi-center longitudinal data from relapsing–remitting MS patients and evaluated combinations of cross-sectional and longitudinal pre-processing with SIENAX/FSL, SPM, and FreeSurfer, as well as the Jacobian integration method. The Jacobian integration method outperformed these other commonly used methods, reducing the required sample size by a factor of 4–5. The results demonstrate the advantage of using the Jacobian integration method to assess neuroprotection in MS clinical trials. PMID:24266007

  9. Regional gray matter reduction correlates with subjective quality of life in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Miyata, Jun; Yoshizumi, Miho; Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Murai, Toshiya

    2013-04-01

    Subjective quality of life (QOL) has been recognized as an important consideration in schizophrenia. Several symptoms and neurocognitive functions were shown to be correlated with subjective QOL; however its determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and subjective QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Forty-five schizophrenia patients and 48 age, sex, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS) was used to rate subjective QOL. We performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate regional brain alterations. Relative to normal controls, schizophrenia patients exhibited gray matter reductions mainly in the frontal and temporal regions. Worse psychosocial subscale of SQLS was associated with gray matter (GM) reduction in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and worse motivation/energy subscale was associated with gray matter reduction in the left superior frontal sulcus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and the left inferior temporal gyrus. The correlation between DLPFC GM volume and psychosocial subscale of SQLS disappeared after controlling for severity of psychopathology, while the other correlations remained significant when controlled by demographic and clinical variables. Combining imaging techniques with psychosocial methods would help to elucidate those factors that are associated with QOL.

  10. Regional gray matter density associated with emotional intelligence: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to monitor one's own and others' emotions and the ability to use the gathered information to guide one's thinking and action. EI is thought to be important for social life making it a popular subject of research. However, despite the existence of previous functional imaging studies on EI, the relationship between regional gray matter morphology and EI has never been investigated. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and a questionnaire (Emotional Intelligence Scale) to measure EI to identify the gray matter correlates of each factor of individual EI (Intrapersonal factor, Interpersonal factor, Situation Management factor). We found significant negative relationships between the Intrapersonal factor and regional gray matter density (rGMD) (1-a) in an anatomical cluster that included the right anterior insula, (1-b) in the right cerebellum, (1-c) in an anatomical cluster that extends from the cuneus to the precuneus, (1-d) and in an anatomical cluster that extends from the medial prefrontal cortex to the left lateral fronto-polar cortex. We also found significant positive correlations between the Interpersonal factor and rGMD in the right superior temporal sulcus, and significant negative correlations between the Situation Management factor and rGMD in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that each factor of EI in healthy young people is related to the specific brain regions known to be involved in the networks of social cognition and self-related recognition, and in the somatic marker circuitry.

  11. Gray matter density in relation to different facets of verbal creativity.

    PubMed

    Fink, Andreas; Koschutnig, Karl; Hutterer, Lisa; Steiner, Elisabeth; Benedek, Mathias; Weber, Bernhard; Reishofer, Gernot; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Neuroscience studies on creativity have revealed highly variegated findings that often seem to be inconsistent. As recently argued in Fink and Benedek (Neurosci Biobehav Rev, 2012), this might be primarily due to the broad diversity in defining and measuring creativity as well as to the diversity of experimental procedures and methodologies used in this field of research. In specifically focusing on one measure of brain activation and on the well-established process of creative ideation (i.e., divergent thinking), EEG studies revealed a quite consistent and replicable pattern of right-lateralized brain activity over posterior parietal and occipital sites. In this study, we related regional gray matter density (as assessed by means of voxel-based morphometry) to different facets of psychometrically determined verbal creativity in a sample of 71 participants. Results revealed that verbal creativity was significantly and positively associated with gray matter density in clusters involving the right cuneus and the right precuneus. Enhanced gray matter density in these regions may be indicative of vivid imaginative abilities in more creative individuals. These findings complement existing functional studies on creative ideation which are, taken as a whole, among the most consistent findings in this field.

  12. Insular Gray Matter Volume and Objective Quality of Life in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Yoshizumi, Miho; Miyata, Jun; Ubukata, Shiho; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life has been recognized as an important outcome for schizophrenia treatment, although the fundamental determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-three schizophrenia patients and 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The Quality of Life Scale was used to measure objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify regional brain alterations that correlate with Quality of Life Scale score in the patient group. Schizophrenia patients showed gray matter reductions in the frontal, temporal, limbic, and subcortical regions. We then performed voxel-based multiple regression analysis in these regions to identify any correlations between regional gray matter volume and Quality of Life Scale scores. We found that among four subcategories of the scale, the Instrumental Role category score correlated with gray matter volume in the right anterior insula in schizophrenia patients. In addition, this correlation was shown to be mediated by negative symptoms. Our findings suggest that the neural basis of objective quality of life might differ topographically from that of subjective QOL in schizophrenia. PMID:26544607

  13. Longitudinal development of cortical and subcortical gray matter from birth to 2 years.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, John H; Shi, Feng; Woolson, Sandra L; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Short, Sarah J; Lin, Weili; Zhu, Hongtu; Hamer, Robert M; Styner, Martin; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-11-01

    Very little is known about cortical development in the first years of life, a time of rapid cognitive development and risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. We studied regional cortical and subcortical gray matter volume growth in a group of 72 children who underwent magnetic resonance scanning after birth and at ages 1 and 2 years using a novel longitudinal registration/parcellation approach. Overall, cortical gray matter volumes increased substantially (106%) in the first year of life and less so in the second year (18%). We found marked regional differences in developmental rates, with primary motor and sensory cortices growing slower in the first year of life with association cortices growing more rapidly. In the second year of life, primary sensory regions continued to grow more slowly, while frontal and parietal regions developed relatively more quickly. The hippocampus grew less than other subcortical structures such as the amygdala and thalamus in the first year of life. It is likely that these patterns of regional gray matter growth reflect maturation and development of underlying function, as they are consistent with cognitive and functional development in the first years of life. PMID:22109543

  14. Regional gray matter density associated with emotional intelligence: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to monitor one's own and others' emotions and the ability to use the gathered information to guide one's thinking and action. EI is thought to be important for social life making it a popular subject of research. However, despite the existence of previous functional imaging studies on EI, the relationship between regional gray matter morphology and EI has never been investigated. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and a questionnaire (Emotional Intelligence Scale) to measure EI to identify the gray matter correlates of each factor of individual EI (Intrapersonal factor, Interpersonal factor, Situation Management factor). We found significant negative relationships between the Intrapersonal factor and regional gray matter density (rGMD) (1-a) in an anatomical cluster that included the right anterior insula, (1-b) in the right cerebellum, (1-c) in an anatomical cluster that extends from the cuneus to the precuneus, (1-d) and in an anatomical cluster that extends from the medial prefrontal cortex to the left lateral fronto-polar cortex. We also found significant positive correlations between the Interpersonal factor and rGMD in the right superior temporal sulcus, and significant negative correlations between the Situation Management factor and rGMD in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that each factor of EI in healthy young people is related to the specific brain regions known to be involved in the networks of social cognition and self-related recognition, and in the somatic marker circuitry. PMID:20740644

  15. Detection of microscopic anisotropy in gray matter and in a novel tissue phantom using double Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo MR.

    PubMed

    Komlosh, M E; Horkay, F; Freidlin, R Z; Nevo, U; Assaf, Y; Basser, P J

    2007-11-01

    A double Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo (d-PGSE) MR experiment was used to measure and assess the degree of local diffusion anisotropy in brain gray matter, and in a novel "gray matter" phantom that consists of randomly oriented tubes filled with water. In both samples, isotropic diffusion was observed at a macroscopic scale while anisotropic diffusion was observed at a microscopic scale, however, the nature of the resulting echo attenuation profiles were qualitatively different. Gray matter, which contains multiple cell types and fibers, exhibits a more complicated echo attenuation profile than the phantom. Since microscopic anisotropy was observed in both samples in the low q regime comparable to that achievable in clinical scanner, it may offer a new potential contrast mechanism for characterizing gray matter microstructure in medical and biological applications. PMID:17869147

  16. Age-related changes in the neurophysiology of language in adults: relationship to regional cortical thinning and white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Kemmotsu, Nobuko; Girard, Holly M; Kucukboyaci, N Erkut; McEvoy, Linda K; Hagler, Donald J; Dale, Anders M; Halgren, Eric; McDonald, Carrie R

    2012-08-29

    Although reading skill remains relatively stable with advancing age in humans, neurophysiological measures suggest potential reductions in efficiency of lexical information processing. It is unclear whether these age-related changes are secondary to decreases in regional cortical thickness and/or microstructure of fiber tracts essential to language. Magnetoencephalography, volumetric MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging were performed in 10 young (18-33 years) and 10 middle-aged (42-64 years) human individuals to evaluate the spatiotemporal dynamics and structural correlates of age-related changes in lexical-semantic processing. Increasing age was associated with reduced activity in left temporal lobe regions from 250 to 350 ms and in left inferior prefrontal cortex from 350 to 450 ms (i.e., N400). Hierarchical regression indicated that age no longer predicted left inferior prefrontal activity after cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) were considered. Interestingly, FA of the UF was a stronger predictor of the N400 response than cortical thickness. Age-related reductions in left-lateralization of language responses were observed between 250 and 350 ms, and were associated with left temporal thinning and frontotemporal FA reductions. N400 reductions were not associated with poorer task performance. Rather, increasing age was associated with reduction in the left prefrontal N400, which in turn was also associated with slower response time. These results reveal that changes in the neurophysiology of language occur by middle age and appear to be partially mediated by structural brain loss. These neurophysiological changes may reflect an adaptive process that ensues as communication between left perisylvian regions declines.

  17. Topology of genetic associations between regional gray matter volume and intellectual ability: Evidence for a high capacity network.

    PubMed

    Bohlken, Marc M; Brouwer, Rachel M; Mandl, René C W; Hedman, Anna M; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Kahn, René S; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence is associated with a network of distributed gray matter areas including the frontal and parietal higher association cortices and primary processing areas of the temporal and occipital lobes. Efficient information transfer between gray matter regions implicated in intelligence is thought to be critical for this trait to emerge. Genetic factors implicated in intelligence and gray matter may promote a high capacity for information transfer. Whether these genetic factors act globally or on local gray matter areas separately is not known. Brain maps of phenotypic and genetic associations between gray matter volume and intelligence were made using structural equation modeling of 3T MRI T1-weighted scans acquired in 167 adult twins of the newly acquired U-TWIN cohort. Subsequently, structural connectivity analyses (DTI) were performed to test the hypothesis that gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability form a densely connected core. Gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability were situated in the right prefrontal, bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, right occipital and subcortical regions. Regions implicated in intelligence had high structural connectivity density compared to 10,000 reference networks (p=0.031). The genetic association with intelligence was for 39% explained by a genetic source unique to these regions (independent of total brain volume), this source specifically implicated the right supramarginal gyrus. Using a twin design, we show that intelligence is genetically represented in a spatially distributed and densely connected network of gray matter regions providing a high capacity infrastructure. Although genes for intelligence have overlap with those for total brain volume, we present evidence that there are genes for intelligence that act specifically on the subset of brain areas that form an efficient brain network.

  18. Gray matter alterations in visual cortex of patients with loss of central vision due to hereditary retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Plank, Tina; Frolo, Jozef; Brandl-Rühle, Sabine; Renner, Agnes B; Hufendiek, Karsten; Helbig, Horst; Greenlee, Mark W

    2011-06-01

    In patients with central visual field scotomata a large part of visual cortex is not adequately stimulated. Over time this lack of input could lead to a reduction of gray matter in the affected cortical areas. We used Voxel Based Morphometry to investigate structural brain changes in patients with central scotomata due to hereditary retinal dystrophies and compared their results to those of normal sighted subjects. Additionally we correlated clinical and demographic characteristics like duration of disease, scotoma size, visual acuity, fixation stability and reading speed to the amount of gray matter in whole brain analyses within the patient group. We found a decrease in gray matter around the lesion projection zone in visual cortex of patients in comparison to controls. Gray matter loss along the posterior and middle portions of the calcarine sulcus is also correlated with scotoma size, indicating that indeed the lack of functional input provokes the gray matter alterations. In whole brain regression analyses within the patient group we found an additional cluster in the right superior and middle frontal gyri, slightly anterior to the frontal eye fields, where gray matter correlated positively with fixation stability. This could be regarded as a consequence of oculomotor learning.

  19. A Large Scale (N=400) Investigation of Gray Matter Differences in Schizophrenia Using Optimized Voxel-based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Shashwath A.; Giuliani, Nicole R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Schretlen, David J.; Pulver, Anne; Cascella, Nicola; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kates, Wendy; Buchanan, Robert; Sharma, Tonmoy; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies have employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of MRI images as an automated method of investigating cortical gray matter differences in schizophrenia. However, results from these studies vary widely, likely due to different methodological or statistical approaches. Objective To use VBM to investigate gray matter differences in schizophrenia in a sample significantly larger than any published to date, and to increase statistical power sufficiently to reveal differences missed in smaller analyses. Methods Magnetic resonance whole brain images were acquired from four geographic sites, all using the same model 1.5T scanner and software version, and combined to form a sample of 200 patients with both first episode and chronic schizophrenia and 200 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and scanner location. Gray matter concentration was assessed and compared using optimized VBM. Results Compared to the healthy controls, schizophrenia patients showed significantly less gray matter concentration in multiple cortical and subcortical regions, some previously unreported. Overall, we found lower concentrations of gray matter in regions identified in prior studies, most of which reported only subsets of the affected areas. Conclusions Gray matter differences in schizophrenia are most comprehensively elucidated using a large, diverse and representative sample. PMID:18378428

  20. Regional cingulum disruption, not gray matter atrophy, detects cognitive changes in amnestic mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Ta-Fu; Shih, Yao-Chia; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Yan, Sui-Hing; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), which has a high risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD), can be classified into single domain (S-aMCI) and multiple domain (M-aMCI) subtypes. We investigated the integrity of regional gray matter and segments of the cingulum bundle with diffusion spectrum imaging tract-specific analysis, and their relationships to neuropsychological functioning, in 46 individuals with aMCI (S-aMCI n = 24; M-aMCI n = 22) and 36 healthy controls (HC). Results demonstrated that although both aMCI groups were impaired on all memory measures relative to HCs, the M-aMCI group demonstrated worse performance on paired association memory and on selective executive function relative to the S-aMCI group. The two aMCI groups did not show significant atrophy in regional gray matter indices as compared to the HC group, but the M-aMCI group showed significant disruption in white matter of the left anterior and inferior cingulum bundles relative to the S-aMCI and HC groups. Furthermore, disruption in the inferior cingulum bundles was significantly associated with executive function and attention/processing speed in all aMCI participants above and beyond the contribution of bilateral hippocampal volumes. Overall, these results indicate that the degeneration of cingulum fibers did not appear to arise from degeneration of the corresponding cerebral cortex. It also suggests relatively greater sensitivity of a white matter biomarker and comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation over gray matter biomarkers in early detection of AD.

  1. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Gray Matter Volume in Typically Developing Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Fukui, Kento; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Yokota, Susumu; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with psychiatric disorders and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in adults. However, the relationship between BDNF and rGMV in children has not been clarified. In this 3-year cross-sectional/longitudinal (2 time points) study, we investigated the effects of BDNF genotypes on rGMV in 185 healthy Japanese children aged 5.7–18.4 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We found that the volume of the right cuneus in Met homozygotes (Met/Met) was greater than in Val homozygotes (Val/Val) in both exams, and the left insula and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex volumes were greater in Val homozygotes versus Met homozygotes in Exam l. In addition, Met homozygous subjects exhibited higher processing speed in intelligence indices than Val homozygotes and Val/Met heterozygotes at both time points. Longitudinal analysis showed that the left temporoparietal junction volume of Val/Met heterozygotes increased more substantially over the 3-year study period than in Val homozygotes, and age-related changes were observed for the Val/Met genotype. Our findings suggest that the presence of 2 Met alleles may have a positive effect on rGMV at the developmental stages analyzed in this study. PMID:26830347

  2. Morphometric analysis of gray matter integrity in individuals with early-treated phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Christ, Shawn E; Price, Mason H; Bodner, Kimberly E; Saville, Christopher; Moffitt, Amanda J; Peck, Dawn

    2016-05-01

    The most widely-reported neurologic finding in individuals with early-treated phenylketonuria (PKU) is abnormality in the white matter of the brain. In contrast, much less is known regarding the impact of PKU on cortical gray matter (GM) structures. Presently, we applied advanced morphometric methods to the analysis of high-resolution structural MRI images from a sample of 19 individuals with early-treated PKU and an age- and gender-matched comparison group of 22 healthy individuals without PKU. Data analysis revealed decreased GM volume in parietal cortex for the PKU group compared with the non-PKU group. A similar trend was observed for occipital GM volume. There was no evidence of group-related differences in frontal or temporal GM volume. Within the PKU group, we also found a significant relationship between blood phenylalanine levels and GM volume for select posterior cortical sub-regions. Taken together with previous research on white matter and gray matter abnormalities in PKU, the present findings point to the posterior cortices as the primary site of neurostructural changes related to early-treated PKU.

  3. The Role of White Matter Hyperintensities and Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy in Age-Related Executive Dysfunctioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterman, Joukje M.; Vogels, Raymond L. C.; van Harten, Barbera; Gouw, Alida A.; Scheltens, Philip; Poggesi, Anna; Weinstein, Henry C.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Various studies support an association between white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and deficits in executive function in nondemented ageing. Studies examining executive functions and WMH have generally adopted executive function as a phrase including various functions such as flexibility, inhibition, and working memory. However, these functions…

  4. Early gray-matter and white-matter concentration in infancy predict later language skills: A whole brain voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Can, Dilara Deniz; Richards, Todd; Kuhl, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain scans were obtained from 19 infants at 7 months. Expressive and receptive language performance was assessed at 12 months. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) identified brain regions where gray-matter and white-matter concentrations at 7 months correlated significantly with children’s language scores at 12 months. Early gray-matter concentration in the right cerebellum, early white-matter concentration in the right cerebellum, and early white-matter concentration in the left posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC)/cerebral peduncle were positively and strongly associated with infants’ receptive language ability at 12 months. Early gray-matter concentration in the right hippocampus was positively and strongly correlated with infants’ expressive language ability at 12 months. Our results suggest that the cerebellum, PLIC/cerebral peduncle, and the hippocampus may be associated with early language development. Potential links between these structural predictors and infants’ linguistic functions are discussed. PMID:23274797

  5. Age-Related Modifications of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters and White Matter Hyperintensities as Inter-Dependent Processes

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Periot, Olivier; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Hiba, Bassem; Bordessoules, Martine; Chanraud, Sandra; Pérès, Karine; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Microstructural changes of White Matter (WM) associated with aging have been widely described through Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) parameters. In parallel, White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) as observed on a T2-weighted MRI are extremely common in older individuals. However, few studies have investigated both phenomena conjointly. The present study investigates aging effects on DTI parameters in absence and in presence of WMH. Diffusion maps were constructed based on 21 directions DTI scans of young adults (n = 19, mean age = 33 SD = 7.4) and two age-matched groups of older adults, one presenting low-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 78, SD = 3.2) and one presenting high-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 79, SD = 5.4). Older subjects with low-level-WMH presented modifications of DTI parameters in comparison to younger subjects, fitting with the DTI pattern classically described in aging, i.e., Fractional Anisotropy (FA) decrease/Radial Diffusivity (RD) increase. Furthermore, older subjects with high-level-WMH showed higher DTI modifications in Normal Appearing White Matter (NAWM) in comparison to those with low-level-WMH. Finally, in older subjects with high-level-WMH, FA, and RD values of NAWM were associated with to WMH burden. Therefore, our findings suggest that DTI modifications and the presence of WMH would be two inter-dependent processes but occurring within different temporal windows. DTI changes would reflect the early phase of white matter changes and WMH would appear as a consequence of those changes. PMID:26834625

  6. Prefrontal Gray Matter and Motivation for Treatment in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals with and without Personality Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-López, Laura; Albein-Urios, Natalia; Martinez-Gonzalez, José Miguel; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Addiction treatment is a long-term goal and therefore prefrontal–striatal regions regulating goal-directed behavior are to be associated with individual differences on treatment motivation. We aimed at examining the association between gray matter volumes in prefrontal cortices and striatum and readiness to change at treatment onset in cocaine users with and without personality disorders. Participants included 17 cocaine users without psychiatric comorbidities, 17 cocaine users with Cluster B disorders, and 12 cocaine users with Cluster C disorders. They completed the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale, which measures four stages of treatment change (precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance) and overall readiness to change, and were scanned in a 3 T MRI scanner. We defined three regions of interest (ROIs): the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (including medial orbitofrontal cortex and subgenual and rostral anterior cingulate cortex), the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (i.e., superior medial frontal cortex), and the neostriatum (caudate and putamen). We found that readiness to change correlated with different aspects of ventromedial prefrontal gray matter as a function of diagnosis. In cocaine users with Cluster C comorbidities, readiness to change positively correlated with gyrus rectus gray matter, whereas in cocaine users without comorbidities it negatively correlated with rostral anterior cingulate cortex gray matter. Moreover, maintenance scores positively correlated with dorsomedial prefrontal gray matter in cocaine users with Cluster C comorbidities, but negatively correlated with this region in cocaine users with Cluster B and cocaine users without comorbidities. Maintenance scores also negatively correlated with dorsal striatum gray matter in cocaine users with Cluster C comorbidities. We conclude that the link between prefrontal–striatal gray matter and treatment motivation is modulated by co-existence of personality

  7. Gray Matter Loss and Related Functional Connectivity Alterations in A Chinese Family With Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Long, Lili; Shen, Hui; Fang, Peng; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Lin; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Dewen

    2015-10-01

    Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a non-progressive monogenic epilepsy syndrome. So far, the structural and functional brain reorganizations in BAFME remain uncharacterized. This study aims to investigate gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity alterations in patients with BAFME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Eleven BAFME patients from a Chinese pedigree and 15 matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Optimized voxel-based morphometric and resting-state functional MRI approaches were performed to measure gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity, respectively. The Trail-Making Test-part A and part B, Digit Symbol Test (DST), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) were carried out to evaluate attention and executive functions.The BAFME patients exhibited significant gray matter loss in the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, left orbitofrontal cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. With these regions selected as seeds, the voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the right hippocampus showed significantly enhanced connectivity with the right inferior parietal lobule, bilateral middle cingulate cortex, left precuneus, and left precentral gyrus. Moreover, the BAFME patients showed significant lower scores in DST and VFT tests compared with the healthy controls. The gray matter densities of the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, and left orbitofrontal cortex were significantly positively correlated with the DST scores. In addition, the gray matter density of the right temporal pole was significantly positively correlated with the VFT scores, and the gray matter density of the right hippocampus was significantly negatively correlated with the duration of illness in the patients.The current study demonstrates gray matter loss and related functional connectivity alterations in the BAFME patients, perhaps underlying deficits in attention and executive functions in the BAFME.

  8. Gray Matter Loss and Related Functional Connectivity Alterations in A Chinese Family With Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Long, Lili; Shen, Hui; Fang, Peng; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Lin; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a non-progressive monogenic epilepsy syndrome. So far, the structural and functional brain reorganizations in BAFME remain uncharacterized. This study aims to investigate gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity alterations in patients with BAFME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eleven BAFME patients from a Chinese pedigree and 15 matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Optimized voxel-based morphometric and resting-state functional MRI approaches were performed to measure gray matter atrophy and related functional connectivity, respectively. The Trail-Making Test-part A and part B, Digit Symbol Test (DST), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) were carried out to evaluate attention and executive functions. The BAFME patients exhibited significant gray matter loss in the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, left orbitofrontal cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. With these regions selected as seeds, the voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the right hippocampus showed significantly enhanced connectivity with the right inferior parietal lobule, bilateral middle cingulate cortex, left precuneus, and left precentral gyrus. Moreover, the BAFME patients showed significant lower scores in DST and VFT tests compared with the healthy controls. The gray matter densities of the right hippocampus, right temporal pole, and left orbitofrontal cortex were significantly positively correlated with the DST scores. In addition, the gray matter density of the right temporal pole was significantly positively correlated with the VFT scores, and the gray matter density of the right hippocampus was significantly negatively correlated with the duration of illness in the patients. The current study demonstrates gray matter loss and related functional connectivity alterations in the BAFME patients, perhaps underlying deficits in attention and executive functions in the

  9. Simultaneous changes in gray matter volume and white matter fractional anisotropy in Alzheimer's disease revealed by multimodal CCA and joint ICA.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, X; Chen, K; Yao, L; Hu, B; Wu, X; Ye, Q; Guo, X

    2015-08-20

    The prominent morphometric alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occur both in gray matter and in white matter. Multimodal fusion can examine joint information by combining multiple neuroimaging datasets to identify the covariant morphometric alterations in AD in greater detail. In the current study, we conducted a multimodal canonical correlation analysis and joint independent component analysis to identify the covariance patterns of the gray and white matter by fusing structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 39 AD patients (23 males and 16 females, mean age: 74.91±8.13years) and 41 normal controls (NCs) (20 males and 21 females, mean age: 73.97±6.34years) derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The results revealed 25 joint independent components (ICs), of which three joint ICs exhibited strong links between the gray matter volume and the white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and significant differences between the AD and NC group. The joint IC maps revealed that the simultaneous changes in the gray matter and FA values primarily involved the following areas: (1) the temporal lobe/hippocampus-cingulum, (2) the frontal/cingulate gyrus-corpus callosum, and (3) the temporal/occipital/parietal lobe-corpus callosum/corona radiata. Our findings suggest that gray matter atrophy is associated with reduced white matter fiber integrity in AD and possibly expand the understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms in AD.

  10. Impulsivity relates to striatal gray matter volumes in humans: evidence from a delay discounting paradigm.

    PubMed

    Tschernegg, Melanie; Pletzer, Belinda; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Hoffmann, Uta; Kronbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Time-stable personality traits, such as impulsivity and its relationship with functional and structural brain alterations, have gained much attention in the recent literature. Evidence from functional neuroimaging data implies an association between impulsivity and cortical as well as subcortical areas of the reward system. Discounting future rewards during impulsive decisions can be related to activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and striatum. Cortical structural changes in prefrontal regions have been found for introspective impulsivity measures. The present study focuses on brain regions associated with delay discounting to investigate structural manifestations of trait impulsivity. To test this, seventy subjects underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by a behavioral delay discounting task outside of the scanner to measure impulsivity with questions like: "Would you like to have 3€ immediately or 10€ in 5 days?". The amount of smaller-but-sooner decisions was calculated and used as a measure of behavioral impulsivity. Furthermore, we estimated subject's individual delay discounting parameter K reflecting the tendency to discount future rewards. Behaviorally, we found strong evidence in favor of a discounting utility model compared to a standard hyperbolic model of choice valuation. Neuronally, we focused on cortical and subcortical brain structure and investigated the association of behavioral impulsivity with delay discounting tendencies and gray matter volume. Voxel-based morphometric analyses showed positive correlations between delay discounting and gray matter volume in the striatum. Additional analyses using Freesurfer provided evidence for a positive correlation between delay discounting and gray matter volume of the caudate. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence for a structural manifestation of time-stable trait impulsivity in the human brain.

  11. Gene x Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Alia-Klein, N.; Alia-Klein, N.; Parvaz, M.A.; Woicik, P.A.; Konova, A.B.; Maloney, T.; Shumay, E.; Wang, R.; Telang, F.; Biegon, A.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-03-07

    Long-term cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine-receptive neurons. However, the concomitant use of other drugs and common genetic variability in monoamine regulation present additional structural variability. The objective is to examine variations in gray matter volume (GMV) as a function of lifetime drug use and the genotype of the monoamine oxidase A gene, MAOA, in men with cocaine use disorders (CUD) and healthy male controls. Forty individuals with CUD and 42 controls who underwent magnetic resonance imaging to assess GMV and were genotyped for the MAOA polymorphism (categorized as high- and low-repeat alleles). The impact of cocaine addiction on GMV, tested by (1) comparing the CUD group with controls, (2) testing diagnosis x MAOA interactions, and (3) correlating GMV with lifetime cocaine, alcohol, and cigarette smoking, and testing their unique contribution to GMV beyond other factors. The results are: (1) Individuals with CUD had reductions in GMV in the orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and temporal cortex and the hippocampus compared with controls; (2) The orbitofrontal cortex reductions were uniquely driven by CUD with low- MAOA genotype and by lifetime cocaine use; and (3) The GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was driven by lifetime alcohol use beyond the genotype and other pertinent variables. Long-term cocaine users with the low-repeat MAOA allele have enhanced sensitivity to gray matter loss, specifically in the orbitofrontal cortex, indicating that this genotype may exacerbate the deleterious effects of cocaine in the brain. In addition, long-term alcohol use is a major contributor to gray matter loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and is likely to further impair executive function and learning in cocaine addiction.

  12. APOE2 Is Associated with Spatial Navigational Strategies and Increased Gray Matter in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Kyoko; Bhat, Venkat; Banner, Harrison; Poirier, Judes; Joober, Ridha; Bohbot, Véronique D.

    2016-01-01

    The Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has a strong association with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The ε4 allele is a well-documented genetic risk factor of AD. In contrast, the ε2 allele of the APOE gene is known to be protective against AD. Much of the focus on the APOE gene has been on the ε4 allele in both young and older adults and few studies have looked into the cognitive and brain structure correlates of the ε2 allele, especially in young adults. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between APOE genotype, navigation behavior, and hippocampal gray matter in healthy young adults. One-hundred and twenty-four healthy young adults were genotyped and tested on the 4on8 virtual maze, a task that allows for the assessment of navigation strategy. The task assesses the spontaneous use of either a hippocampus-dependent spatial strategy or a caudate nucleus-dependent response strategy. Of the 124 participants, 37 underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We found that ε2 carriers use a hippocampus-dependent spatial strategy to a greater extent than ε3 homozygous individuals and ε4 carriers. We also found that APOE ε2 allele carriers have more gray matter in the hippocampus compared to ε3 homozygous individuals and ε4 carriers. Our findings suggest that the protective effects of the ε2 allele may, in part, be expressed through increased hippocampus gray matter and increased use of hippocampus-dependent spatial strategies. The current article demonstrates the relationship between brain structure, navigation behavior, and APOE genotypes in healthy young adults. PMID:27468260

  13. Exercise Effects on the Course of Gray Matter Changes Over 70 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight affects posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes through direct effects on peripheral changes that result from reduced vestibular stimulation and body unloading. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on earth using bed rest studies. Long duration bed rest serves as a space-flight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. It has been hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that has been observed in microgravity could potentially affect central nervous system function and structure, and thereby indirectly affect sensorimotor or cognitive functioning. Preliminary results of one of our ongoing studies indeed showed that 70 days of long duration head down-tilt bed rest results in focal changes in gray matter volume from pre-bed rest to various time points during bed rest. These gray matter changes that could reflect fluid shifts as well as neuroplasticity were related to decrements in motor skills such as maintenance of equilibrium. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both inand post-flight we are currently conducting a study that investigates the potential preventive effects of exercise on gray matter and motor performance changes that we observed over the course of bed rest. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain structure and cognitive performance in healthy and demented subjects over a large age range. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention in bed rest could potentially mitigate or prevent the effects of bed rest on the central nervous system. Here we present preliminary outcomes of our study.

  14. Multimodal evidence of regional midcingulate gray matter volume underlying conflict monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parvaz, Muhammad A; Maloney, Thomas; Moeller, Scott J; Malaker, Pias; Konova, Anna B; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have long implicated the mid-cingulate cortex (MCC) in conflict monitoring, but it is not clear whether its structural integrity (i.e., the gray matter volume) influences its conflict monitoring function. In this multimodal study, we used T1-weighted MRI scans as well as event-related potentials (ERPs) to test whether the MCC gray matter volume is associated with the electrocortical marker (i.e., No-go N200 ERP component) of conflict monitoring in healthy individuals. The specificity of such a relationship in health was determined in two ways: by (A) acquiring the same data from individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD), known to have deficits in executive function including behavioral monitoring; and (B) acquiring the P300 ERP component that is linked with attention allocation and not specifically with conflict monitoring. Twenty-five (39.1 ± 8.4 years; 8 females) healthy individuals and 25 (42.7 ± 5.9 years; 6 females) individuals with CUD underwent a rewarded Go/No-go task during which the ERP data was collected, and they also underwent a structural MRI scan. The whole brain regression analysis showed a significant correlation between MCC structural integrity and the well-known ERP measure of conflict monitoring (N200, but not the P300) in healthy individuals, which was absent in CUD who were characterized by reduced MCC gray matter volume, N200 abnormalities as well as reduced task accuracy. In individuals with CUD instead, the N200 amplitude was associated with drug addiction symptomatology. These results show that the integrity of MCC volume is directly associated with the electrocortical correlates of conflict monitoring in healthy individuals, and such an association breaks down in psychopathologies that impact these brain processes. Taken together, this MCC-N200 association may serve as a biomarker of improved behavioral monitoring processes in diseased populations.

  15. The Relation between Gray Matter Morphology and Divergent Thinking in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zanolie, Kiki; Kleibeuker, Sietske W.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence and early adulthood are developmental time periods during which creative cognition is highly important for adapting to environmental changes. Divergent thinking, which refers to generating novel and useful solutions to open-ended problems, has often been used as a measure of creative cognition. The first goal of this structural neuroimaging study was to elucidate the relationship between gray matter morphology and performance in the verbal (AUT; alternative uses task) and visuo-spatial (CAT; creative ability test) domain of divergent thinking in adolescents and young adults. The second goal was to test if gray matter morphology is related to brain activity during AUT performance. Neural and behavioral data were combined from a cross-sectional study including 25 adolescents aged 15–17 and 20 young adults aged 25–30. Brain-behavior relationships were assessed without a priori location assumptions and within areas that were activated during an AUT-scanner task. Gray matter volume and cortical thickness were not significantly associated with verbal divergent thinking. However, visuo-spatial divergent thinking (CAT originality and fluency) was positively associated with cortical thickness of the right middle temporal gyrus and left brain areas including the superior frontal gyrus and various occipital, parietal, and temporal areas, independently of age. AUT brain activity was not associated with cortical thickness. The results support an important role of a widespread brain network involved in flexible visuo-spatial divergent thinking, providing evidence for a relation between cortical thickness and visuo-spatial divergent thinking in adolescents and young adults. However, studies including visuo-spatial divergent thinking tasks in the scanner are warranted. PMID:25514366

  16. Skeleton-based region competition for automated gray matter and white matter segmentation of human brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yong; Chen, Ya-Fang; Su, Min-Ying; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2005-04-01

    Image segmentation is an essential process for quantitative analysis. Segmentation of brain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) images is very important for understanding the structural-functional relationship for various pathological conditions, such as dementia vs. normal brain aging. Different brain regions are responsible for certain functions and may have specific implication for diagnosis. Segmentation may facilitate the analysis of different brain regions to aid in early diagnosis. Region competition has been recently proposed as an effective method for image segmentation by minimizing a generalized Bayes/MDL criterion. However, it is sensitive to initial conditions - the "seeds", therefore an optimal choice of "seeds" is necessary for accurate segmentation. In this paper, we present a new skeleton-based region competition algorithm for automated gray and white matter segmentation. Skeletons can be considered as good "seed regions" since they provide the morphological a priori information, thus guarantee a correct initial condition. Intensity gradient information is also added to the global energy function to achieve a precise boundary localization. This algorithm was applied to perform gray and white matter segmentation using simulated MRI images from a realistic digital brain phantom. Nine different brain regions were manually outlined for evaluation of the performance in these separate regions. The results were compared to the gold-standard measure to calculate the true positive and true negative percentages. In general, this method worked well with a 96% accuracy, although the performance varied in different regions. We conclude that the skeleton-based region competition is an effective method for gray and white matter segmentation.

  17. [Age-related changes of the brain].

    PubMed

    Paltsyn, A A; Komissarova, S V

    2015-01-01

    The first morphological signs of aging of the brain are found in the white matter already at a young age (20-40 years), and later (40-50 years) in a gray matter. After the 40-50 years appear and in subsequently are becoming more pronounced functional manifestations of morphological changes: the weakening of sensory-motor and cognitive abilities. While in principle this dynamic of age-related changes is inevitable, the rate of their development to a large extent determined by the genetic characteristics and lifestyle of the individual. According to modem concepts age-related changes in the number of nerve cells are different in different parts of the brain. However, these changes are not large and are not the main cause of senile decline brain. The main processes that contribute to the degradation of the brain develop as in the bodies of neurons and in neuropil. In the bodies of neurons--it is a damage (usually decrease) of the level of expression of many genes, and especially of the genes determining cell communication. In neuropil: reduction in the number of synapses and the strength of synaptic connections, reduction in the number of dendritic spines and axonal buttons, reduction in the number and thickness of the dendritic branches, demyelination of axons. As the result of these events, it becomes a violation of the rate of formation and rebuilding neuronal circuits. It is deplete associative ability, brain plasticity, and memory. PMID:27116888

  18. Long-term meditation is associated with increased gray matter density in the brain stem.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; van Beek, Martijn; Skewes, Joshua; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Stubberup, Michael; Bertelsen, Jes; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2009-01-28

    Extensive practice involving sustained attention can lead to changes in brain structure. Here, we report evidence of structural differences in the lower brainstem of participants engaged in the long-term practice of meditation. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed higher gray matter density in lower brain stem regions of experienced meditators compared with age-matched nonmeditators. Our findings show that long-term practitioners of meditation have structural differences in brainstem regions concerned with cardiorespiratory control. This could account for some of the cardiorespiratory parasympathetic effects and traits, as well as the cognitive, emotional, and immunoreactive impact reported in several studies of different meditation practices.

  19. Dyslexia and Voxel-Based Morphometry: Correlations between Five Behavioural Measures of Dyslexia and Gray and White Matter Volumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboer, Peter; Scholte, H. Steven; Vorst, Harrie C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In voxel-based morphometry studies of dyslexia, the relation between causal theories of dyslexia and gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations is still under debate. Some alterations are consistently reported, but others failed to reach significance. We investigated GM alterations in a large sample of Dutch students (37 dyslexics…

  20. Quantitative receptor autoradiography: tissue defatting eliminates differential self-absorption of tritium radiation in gray and white matter of brain.

    PubMed

    Herkenham, M; Sokoloff, L

    1984-11-12

    A four-fold greater absorption (quenching) of tritium emissions by white matter relative to gray matter produces a false 'contrast' effect in autoradiographs of 3H-ligand binding to brain sections. The differential absorption is eliminated by tissue defatting prior to autoradiographic exposure.

  1. Genetic markers of cholesterol transport and gray matter diffusion: a preliminary study of the CETP I405V polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Lauren E; Schofield, Peter R; Pierce, Kerrie D; Luo, Xi; Zhao, Yi; Laidlaw, David H; Cabeen, Ryan P; Conturo, Thomas E; Lane, Elizabeth M; Heaps, Jodi M; Bolzenius, Jacob D; Baker, Laurie M; Cooley, Sarah A; Scott, Staci; Cagle, Lee M; Paul, Robert H

    2015-11-01

    Variations of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein polymorphism (CETP I405V/rs5882) have been associated with an increased risk for neurodegeneration, particularly when examined in conjunction with the epsilon 4 isoform of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4). Despite these identified relationships, the impact of I405V on gray matter microstructure remains unknown. The present study examined the impact of the CETP I405V polymorphism on gray matter integrity among 52 healthy adults between ages 51 and 85. Gray matter was measured bilaterally using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). Participants were grouped according to a dominant statistical model (II genotype vs. IV/VV genotypes) and secondary analyses were completed to examine the interactive effects of CETP and ApoE4 on DTI metrics. Compared to individuals with the IV/VV genotypes, II homozygotes demonstrated significantly higher MD in bilateral temporal, parietal, and occipital gray matter. Secondary analyses revealed higher FA and AD in the left temporal lobe of IV/VV genotypes with an ApoE4 allele. Our results provide preliminary evidence that CETP II homozygosity is a predisposing risk factor for gray matter abnormalities in posterior brain regions in healthy older adults, independent of an ApoE4 allele.

  2. Perfusion Shift from White to Gray Matter May Account for Processing Speed Deficits in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Susan N.; Hong, L. Elliot; Winkler, Anderson M.; Chiappelli, Joshua; Nugent, Katie; Muellerklein, Florian; Du, Xioming; Rowland, Laura M.; Wang, Danny J. J.; Kochunov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Reduced speed of cerebral information processing is a cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia. Normal information processing speed (PS) requires intact white matter (WM) physiology to support information transfer. In a cohort of 107 subjects (47/60 patients/controls), we demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia patients are explained by reduced WM integrity, which is measured using diffusion tensor imaging, mediated by the mismatch in WM/gray matter blood perfusion, and measured using arterial spin labeling. Our findings are specific to PS, and testing this hypothesis for patient-control differences in working memory produces no explanation. We demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia can be explained by neurophysiological alterations in cerebral WM. Whether the disproportionately low WM integrity in schizophrenia is due to illness or secondary due to this disorder deserves further examination. PMID:26108347

  3. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Bedrest: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; De Dios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. It is unknown whether and how spaceflight impacts sensorimotor brain structure and function, and whether such changes may potentially underlie behavioral effects. Long duration head down tilt bed rest has been used repeatedly as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system [1]. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. We are currently testing sensorimotor function, brain structure, and brain function pre and post a 70-day bed rest period. We will acquire the same measures on NASA crewmembers starting in 2014. Here we present the results of the first eight bed rest subjects. Subjects were assessed at 12 and 7 days before-, at 7, 30, and 70 days in-, and at 8 and 12 days post 70 days of bed rest at the NASA bed rest facility, UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA. At each time point structural MRI scans (i.e., high resolution T1-weighted imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)) were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in gray matter density were assessed using the voxel based morphometry 8 (VBM8) toolbox under SPM. Focal changes in white matter microstructural integrity were assessed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) as part of the FMRIB software library (FSL). TBSS registers all DTI scans to standard space. It subsequently creates a study specific white matter skeleton of the major white matter tracts. Non-parametric permutation based t-tests and ANOVA's were used for voxel-wise comparison of the skeletons. For both VBM and TBSS, comparison of the two pre bed rest measurements did not show significant differences. VBM analysis revealed decreased gray matter density in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate nucleus

  4. Perfusion shift from white to gray matter may account for processing speed deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Winkler, Anderson M; Chiappelli, Joshua; Nugent, Katie; Muellerklein, Florian; Du, Xioming; Rowland, Laura M; Wang, Danny J J; Kochunov, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Reduced speed of cerebral information processing is a cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia. Normal information processing speed (PS) requires intact white matter (WM) physiology to support information transfer. In a cohort of 107 subjects (47/60 patients/controls), we demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia patients are explained by reduced WM integrity, which is measured using diffusion tensor imaging, mediated by the mismatch in WM/gray matter blood perfusion, and measured using arterial spin labeling. Our findings are specific to PS, and testing this hypothesis for patient-control differences in working memory produces no explanation. We demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia can be explained by neurophysiological alterations in cerebral WM. Whether the disproportionately low WM integrity in schizophrenia is due to illness or secondary due to this disorder deserves further examination. PMID:26108347

  5. Reduced anterior cingulate gray matter volume in treatment-naïve clinically depressed adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Pannekoek, Justine Nienke; van der Werff, Steven J.A.; van den Bulk, Bianca G.; van Lang, Natasja D.J.; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Vermeiren, Robert R.J.M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent depression is associated with increased risk for suicidality, social and educational impairment, smoking, substance use, obesity, and depression in adulthood. It is of relevance to further our insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this disorder in the developing brain, as this may be essential to optimize treatment and prevention of adolescent depression and its negative clinical trajectories. The equivocal findings of the limited number of studies on neural abnormalities in depressed youth stress the need for further neurobiological investigation of adolescent depression. We therefore performed a voxel-based morphometry study of the hippocampus, amygdala, superior temporal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in 26 treatment-naïve, clinically depressed adolescents and 26 pair-wise matched healthy controls. Additionally, an exploratory whole-brain analysis was performed. Clinically depressed adolescents showed a volume reduction of the bilateral dorsal ACC compared to healthy controls. However, no association was found between gray matter volume of the ACC and clinical severity scores for depression or anxiety. Our finding of a smaller ACC in clinically depressed adolescents is consistent with literature on depressed adults. Future research is needed to investigate if gray matter abnormalities precede or follow clinical depression in adolescents. PMID:24501702

  6. Regional gray matter density associated with emotional conflict resolution: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z; Wei, D; Xue, S; Du, X; Hitchman, G; Qiu, J

    2014-09-01

    Successful emotion regulation is a fundamental prerequisite for well-being and dysregulation may lead to psychopathology. The ability to inhibit spontaneous emotions while behaving in accordance with desired goals is an important dimension of emotion regulation and can be measured using emotional conflict resolution tasks. Few studies have investigated the gray matter correlates underlying successful emotional conflict resolution at the whole-brain level. We had 190 adults complete an emotional conflict resolution task (face-word task) and examined the brain regions significantly correlated with successful emotional conflict resolution using voxel-based morphometry. We found successful emotional conflict resolution was associated with increased regional gray matter density in widely distributed brain regions. These regions included the dorsal anterior cingulate/dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, ventral medial prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, amygdala, ventral striatum, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal lobule, superior temporal gyrus and fusiform face area. Together, our results indicate that individual differences in emotional conflict resolution ability may be attributed to regional structural differences across widely distributed brain regions.

  7. Learning new color names produces rapid increase in gray matter in the intact adult human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Veronica; Niu, Zhendong; Kay, Paul; Zhou, Ke; Mo, Lei; Jin, Zhen; So, Kwok-Fai; Tan, Li Hai

    2011-01-01

    The human brain has been shown to exhibit changes in the volume and density of gray matter as a result of training over periods of several weeks or longer. We show that these changes can be induced much faster by using a training method that is claimed to simulate the rapid learning of word meanings by children. Using whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) we show that learning newly defined and named subcategories of the universal categories green and blue in a period of 2 h increases the volume of gray matter in V2/3 of the left visual cortex, a region known to mediate color vision. This pattern of findings demonstrates that the anatomical structure of the adult human brain can change very quickly, specifically during the acquisition of new, named categories. Also, prior behavioral and neuroimaging research has shown that differences between languages in the boundaries of named color categories influence the categorical perception of color, as assessed by judgments of relative similarity, by response time in alternative forced-choice tasks, and by visual search. Moreover, further behavioral studies (visual search) and brain imaging studies have suggested strongly that the categorical effect of language on color processing is left-lateralized, i.e., mediated by activity in the left cerebral hemisphere in adults (hence “lateralized Whorfian” effects). The present results appear to provide a structural basis in the brain for the behavioral and neurophysiologically observed indices of these Whorfian effects on color processing. PMID:21464316

  8. Characterization of tau pathologies in gray and white matter of Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex.

    PubMed

    Winton, Matthew J; Joyce, Sonali; Zhukareva, Victoria; Practico, Domenico; Perl, Daniel P; Galasko, Douglas; Craig, Ula; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2006-05-01

    Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy in ethnic Chamorro residents of the Mariana Islands that manifests clinically with parkinsonism as well as dementia and is characterized neuropathologically by prominent cortical neuron loss in association with extensive telencephalic neurofibrillary tau pathology. To further characterize cortical gray and white matter tau, alpha-synuclein and lipid peroxidation pathologies in Guam PDC, we examined the brains of 17 Chamorro PDC and control subjects using biochemical and immunohistological techniques. We observed insoluble tau pathology in both gray and white matter of PDC and Guam control cases, with frontal and temporal lobes being most severely affected. Using phosphorylation dependent anti-tau antibodies, abundant tau inclusions were detected by immunohistochemistry in both neuronal and glial cells of the neocortex, while less alpha-synuclein pathology was observed in more limited brain regions. Further, in sharp contrast to Alzheimer's disease (AD), levels of the lipid peroxidation product 8, 12-iso-iPF(2alpha)-VI isoprostane were not elevated in Guam PDC brains relative to controls. Thus, although the tau pathologies of Guam PDC share similarities with AD, the composite Guam PDC neuropathology profile of tau, alpha-synuclein and 8, 12-iso-iPF(2alpha)-VI isoprostane reported here more closely resembles that seen in other tauopathies including frontotemporal dementias (FTDs), which may imply that Guam PDC and FTD tauopathies share underlying mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

  9. Effect of the XbaI polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha on postmenopausal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Scassellati, Catia; Ghidoni, Roberta; Testa, Cristina; Benussi, Luisa; Bonetti, Matteo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Gennarelli, Massimo; Binetti, Giuliano; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2008-04-01

    The frequent polymorphism XbaI (A351G) in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) gene has been associated with some postmenopausal pathologies' risk such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or cognitive decline. In the present study, we explored whether the XbaI polymorphism leads to different gray matter volumes using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on 20 magnetic resonance images of healthy postmenopausal women. Subjects carrying the less common XbaI/X allele were contrasted to non-carriers in groups well balanced by relevant confounding variables. The XbaI/X allele carriers displayed clusters ranging from 9 to 28% of tissue reductions in the cerebellar (cluster size, z, stereotactic coordinates: 16 mm(3); 3.17; 14, -94, -38) and cerebral cortex, in particular in the occipital lobe (272 mm(3); 3.76; -38,-68,-16), in the middle frontal gyrus (192 mm(3); 3.71; 38, 12, 38) and in the middle temporal gyrus, while the opposite comparison was negative. The XbaI/X allele in ERalpha gene is associated to smaller gray matter volumes of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex. This allele might increase the susceptibility for senile neurodegenerative conditions, being associated to smaller cerebral reserve.

  10. Morphometric gray matter differences of the medial frontal cortex influence the Social Simon Effect.

    PubMed

    Dolk, Thomas; Liepelt, Roman; Villringer, Arno; Prinz, Wolfgang; Ragert, Patrick

    2012-07-16

    Interacting with others plays a fundamental role in human life. Although several brain regions have recently been associated with complex cognitive control processes, surprisingly little is known about the structural correlates underlying cognitive control processes involved in social interactions. In the present study we used gray matter voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate structural brain correlates of individual performance differences in a social Simon task. Here, two people share a Simon task, which requires each participant to respond to only one of two possible stimuli, rendering the paradigm a go-nogo task, so that a Simon effect - known as the Social Simon Effect (SSE) - is observable across both participants. Using a whole brain approach, we found that inter-individual differences in the SSE are negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of the medial frontal cortex (MFC). The present data indicate that individuals with larger MFC GM volume were those with better conflict resolution in a social Simon task and vice versa. This brain-behavior relationship between cognitive control processes and individual GM volume differences might help to improve our understanding of social interactions in joint task performance.

  11. Effect of Experimental Thyrotoxicosis on Brain Gray Matter: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Anna; Heldmann, Marcus; Göttlich, Martin; Dirk, Anna-Luise; Brabant, Georg; Münte, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-as well hypothyroidism have an effect on behavior and brain function. Moreover, during development thyroid hormones influence brain structure. Objectives This study aimed to demonstrate an effect of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on brain gray matter in healthy adult humans. Methods High-resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired in 29 healthy young subjects prior to as well as after receiving 250 µg of T4 per day for 8 weeks. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8). Results Laboratory testing confirmed the induction of hyperthyroidism. In the hyperthyroid condition, gray matter volumes were increased in the right posterior cerebellum (lobule VI) and decreased in the bilateral visual cortex and anterior cerebellum (lobules I-IV) compared to the euthyroid condition. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that short periods of hyperthyroidism induce distinct alterations in brain structures of cerebellar regions that have been associated with sensorimotor functions as well as working memory in the literature. PMID:26601082

  12. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects.

  13. The correlation between gray matter volume and perceived social support: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Che, XianWei; Wei, DongTao; Li, WenFu; Li, HaiJiang; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, QingLin; Liu, YiJun

    2014-01-01

    Social support refers to interpersonal exchanges that include the combinations of aid, affirmation and affection. Perceived social support is a kind of subjective judgment of one's availability of social support. In spite of the importance of perceived social support to health, however, its neural substrate remains unknown. To address this question, voxel-based morphometry was employed to investigate the neural bases of individual differences in responses to the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS) in healthy volunteers (144 men and 203 women; mean age = 19.9; SD = 1.33, age range : 17-27). As a result, multiple regression analysis revealed that the PSSS scores were significantly and positively correlated with gray matter volume in a cluster that mainly included areas in posterior parts of posterior cingulate cortex, bilateral lingual cortex, left occipital lobe and cuneus. Highly-supported individuals had larger gray matter volume in these brain regions, implying a relatively high level of ability to engage in self-referential processes and social cognition. Our results provide a biological basis for exploring perceived social support particularly in relationship to various health parameters and outcomes.

  14. Age-Related Differences in White Matter Integrity in Healthy Human Brain: Evidence from Structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Rishu; Rallabandi, V.P. Subramanyam; Roy, Prasun K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to investigate the relationship between microstructural white matter (WM) diffusivity indices and macrostructural WM volume (WMV) among healthy individuals (20–85 years). Whole-brain diffusion measures were calculated from diffusion tensor imaging using FMRIB software library while WMV was estimated through voxel-based morphometry, and voxel-based analysis was carried out using tract-based spatial statistics. Our results revealed that mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity had shown good correlation with WMV but not for fractional anisotropy (FA). Voxel-wise tract-based spatial statistics analysis for FA showed a significant decrease in four regions for middle-aged group compared to young-aged group, in 22 regions for old-aged group compared to middle-aged group, and in 26 regions for old-aged group compared to young-aged group (P < 0.05). We found significantly lower WMV, FA, and mean diffusivity values in females than males and inverted-U trend for FA in males. We conclude differential age- and gender-related changes for structural WMV and WM diffusion indices. PMID:27279747

  15. Regional brain gray and white matter changes in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Manoj K; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Keller, Margaret A; Kumar, Rajesh; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Michalik, David E; Deville, Jaime; Church, Joseph A; Thomas, M Albert

    2014-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), perinatally infected HIV remains a major health problem worldwide. Although advance neuroimaging studies have investigated structural brain changes in HIV-infected adults, regional gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume changes have not been reported in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated regional GM and WM changes in 16 HIV-infected youths receiving ART (age 17.0 ± 2.9 years) compared with age-matched 14 healthy controls (age 16.3 ± 2.3 years) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based high-resolution T1-weighted images with voxel based morphometry (VBM) analyses. White matter atrophy appeared in perinatally HIV-infected youths in brain areas including the bilateral posterior corpus callosum (CC), bilateral external capsule, bilateral ventral temporal WM, mid cerebral peduncles, and basal pons over controls. Gray matter volume increase was observed in HIV-infected youths for several regions including the left superior frontal gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus, gyrus rectus, right mid cingulum, parahippocampal gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus compared with controls. Global WM and GM volumes did not differ significantly between groups. These results indicate WM injury in perinatally HIV-infected youths, but the interpretation of the GM results, which appeared as increased regional volumes, is not clear. Further longitudinal studies are needed to clarify if our results represent active ongoing brain infection or toxicity from HIV treatment resulting in neuronal cell swelling and regional increased GM volume. Our findings suggest that assessment of regional GM and WM volume changes, based on VBM procedures, may be an additional measure to assess brain integrity in HIV-infected youths and to evaluate success of current ART therapy for efficacy in the brain.

  16. Early Gray-Matter and White-Matter Concentration in Infancy Predict Later Language Skills: A Whole Brain Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Dilara Deniz; Richards, Todd; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain scans were obtained from 19 infants at 7 months. Expressive and receptive language performance was assessed at 12 months. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) identified brain regions where gray-matter and white-matter concentrations at 7 months correlated significantly with children's language scores at 12 months.…

  17. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  18. Longitudinal Relationships between Caloric Expenditure and Gray Matter in the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Raji, Cyrus A.; Merrill, David A.; Eyre, Harris; Mallam, Sravya; Torosyan, Nare; Erickson, Kirk I.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Gach, H. Michael; Thompson, Paul M.; Longstreth, W.T.; Kuller, Lewis H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) can be neuroprotective and reduce the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In assessing physical activity, caloric expenditure is a proxy marker reflecting the sum total of multiple physical activity types conducted by an individual. Objective:To assess caloric expenditure, as a proxy marker of PA, as a predictive measure of gray matter (GM) volumes in the normal and cognitively impaired elderly persons. Methods: All subjects in this study were recruited from the Institutional Review Board approved Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a multisite population-based longitudinal study in persons aged 65 and older. We analyzed a sub-sample of CHS participants 876 subjects (mean age 78.3, 57.5% F, 42.5% M) who had i) energy output assessed as kilocalories (kcal) per week using the standardized Minnesota Leisure-Time Activities questionnaire, ii) cognitive assessments for clinical classification of normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD, and iii) volumetric MR imaging of the brain. Voxel-based morphometry modeled the relationship between kcal/week and GM volumes while accounting for standard covariates including head size, age, sex, white matter hyperintensity lesions, MCI or AD status, and site. Multiple comparisons were controlled using a False Discovery Rate of 5 percent. Results: Higher energy output, from a variety of physical activity types, was associated with larger GM volumes in frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes, as well as hippocampus, thalamus, and basal ganglia. High levels of caloric expenditure moderated neurodegeneration-associated volume loss in the precuneus, posterior cingulate, and cerebellar vermis. Conclusion:Increasing energy output from a variety of physical activities is related to larger gray matter volumes in the elderly, regardless of cognitive status. PMID:26967227

  19. Self-reported physical activity and objective aerobic fitness: differential associations with gray matter density in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z; McGregor, Keith M; Towler, Stephen; Nocera, Joe R; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic fitness (AF) and self-reported physical activity (srPA) do not represent the same construct. However, many exercise and brain aging studies interchangeably use AF and srPA measures, which may be problematic with regards to how these metrics are associated with brain outcomes, such as morphology. If AF and PA measures captured the same phenomena, regional brain volumes associated with these measures should directly overlap. This study employed the general linear model to examine the differential association between objectively-measured AF (treadmill assessment) and srPA (questionnaire) with gray matter density (GMd) in 29 cognitively unimpaired community-dwelling older adults using voxel based morphometry. The results show significant regional variance in terms of GMd when comparing AF and srPA as predictors. Higher AF was associated with greater GMd in the cerebellum only, while srPA displayed positive associations with GMd in occipito-temporal, left perisylvian, and frontal regions after correcting for age. Importantly, only AF level, and not srPA, modified the relationship between age and GMd, such that higher levels of AF were associated with increased GMd in older age, while decreased GMd was seen in those with lower AF as a function of age. These results support existing literature suggesting that both AF and PA exert beneficial effects on GMd, but only AF served as a buffer against age-related GMd loss. Furthermore, these results highlight the need for use of objective PA measurement and comparability of tools across studies, since results vary dependent upon the measures used and whether these are objective or subjective in nature.

  20. Gray matter textural heterogeneity as a potential in-vivo biomarker of fine structural abnormalities in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, E; Ganeshan, B; Minati, L; Beacher, F D C C; Gray, M A; Chatwin, C; Young, R C D; Harrison, N A; Critchley, H D

    2013-02-01

    Brain imaging studies contribute to the neurobiological understanding of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Herein, we tested the prediction that distributed neurodevelopmental abnormalities in brain development impact on the homogeneity of brain tissue measured using texture analysis (TA; a morphological method for surface pattern characterization). TA was applied to structural magnetic resonance brain scans of 54 adult participants (24 with Asperger syndrome (AS) and 30 controls). Measures of mean gray-level intensity, entropy and uniformity were extracted from gray matter images at fine, medium and coarse textures. Comparisons between AS and controls identified higher entropy and lower uniformity across textures in the AS group. Data reduction of texture parameters revealed three orthogonal principal components. These were used as regressors-of-interest in a voxel-based morphometry analysis that explored the relationship between surface texture variations and regional gray matter volume. Across the AS but not control group, measures of entropy and uniformity were related to the volume of the caudate nuclei, whereas mean gray-level was related to the size of the cerebellar vermis. Similar to neuropathological studies, our study provides evidence for distributed abnormalities in the structural integrity of gray matter in adults with ASC, in particular within corticostriatal and corticocerebellar networks. Additionally, this in-vivo technique may be more sensitive to fine microstructural organization than other more traditional magnetic resonance approaches and serves as a future testable biomarker in AS and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT. PMID:27752250

  2. Increased regional gray matter atrophy and enhanced functional connectivity in male multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, C; Cruz-Gómez, A J; Belenguer, A; Fittipaldi Márquez, M S; Ávila, C; Forn, C

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that sex/gender is an important factor for understanding multiple sclerosis (MS) and that some of its neuropathological consequences might manifest earlier in males. In the present study, we assessed gray matter (GM) volume and functional connectivity (FC) in a sample of female and male MS patients (MSp) and female and male healthy controls (HCs). As compared to female MSp, male MSp showed decreased GM volume in the bilateral frontal areas and increased FC between different brain regions. Because both sets of changes correlated significantly and no differences in cognitive performance were observed, we suggest that the FC increase observed in male MSp acts as a compensatory mechanism for their more extensive GM loss and that it promotes a functional convergence between male- and female-MSp.

  3. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  4. Increased regional gray matter atrophy and enhanced functional connectivity in male multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, C; Cruz-Gómez, A J; Belenguer, A; Fittipaldi Márquez, M S; Ávila, C; Forn, C

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that sex/gender is an important factor for understanding multiple sclerosis (MS) and that some of its neuropathological consequences might manifest earlier in males. In the present study, we assessed gray matter (GM) volume and functional connectivity (FC) in a sample of female and male MS patients (MSp) and female and male healthy controls (HCs). As compared to female MSp, male MSp showed decreased GM volume in the bilateral frontal areas and increased FC between different brain regions. Because both sets of changes correlated significantly and no differences in cognitive performance were observed, we suggest that the FC increase observed in male MSp acts as a compensatory mechanism for their more extensive GM loss and that it promotes a functional convergence between male- and female-MSp. PMID:27436479

  5. Particulate matter characterization by gray level co-occurrence matrix based support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, K; Aggarwal, P; Devabhaktuni, V; Kumar, A; Nims, D; Bhattacharya, P

    2012-07-15

    An efficient and highly reliable automatic selection of optimal segmentation algorithm for characterizing particulate matter is presented in this paper. Support vector machines (SVMs) are used as a new self-regulating classifier trained by gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) of the image. This matrix is calculated at various angles and the texture features are evaluated for classifying the images. Results show that the performance of GLCM-based SVMs is drastically improved over the previous histogram-based SVMs. Our proposed GLCM-based approach of training SVM predicts a robust and more accurate segmentation algorithm than the standard histogram technique, as additional information based on the spatial relationship between pixels is incorporated for image classification. Further, the GLCM-based SVM classifiers were more accurate and required less training data when compared to the artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. PMID:22595545

  6. Stimulation of the periaqueductal gray matter of the rat produces a preferential ipsilateral antinociception.

    PubMed

    Levine, R; Morgan, M M; Cannon, J T; Liebeskind, J C

    1991-12-13

    The few studies analyzing somatotopic organization of stimulation-produced antinociception (SPA) from the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) have reported contradictory results. In the present study, the distribution of SPA on the hindquarters was assessed by measuring the threshold for inhibition of withdrawal reflexes to noxious heat applied to the hindpaws and tail in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Of the 3 body regions tested, the hindpaw contralateral to the stimulating electrode required the highest level of PAG stimulation to inhibit withdrawal. Reducing the intensity of the heat stimulus applied to the hindpaws caused a concomitant reduction in SPA threshold. As before, a higher stimulation current was needed to inhibit the withdrawal reflex in the contralateral than in the ipsilateral paw. These data indicate the antinociception from PAG stimulation is not equally distributed throughout the body, and that the intensity of the noxious stimulus influences the threshold for SPA. PMID:1815821

  7. A multidistance probe arrangement NIRS for detecting absorption changes in cerebral gray matter layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Umeyama, Shinji; Matsuda, Keiji

    2010-02-01

    We provide theoretical validation of the brain-functional detection using multidistance probe arrangement based on Monte Carlo simulations of five-layered model in which both scattering and absorption changes occur. It shows that optimized multidistance probe arrangement can be effective in removing interferences by scattering and absorption changes in upper layers and extracting absorption change in the gray matter layer. Using newly designed probes and their holder system, both conventional and proposed fNIRS measurements were implemented with non-functional (body and head movements and respiratory change) and functional (finger opposition) tasks. Artifacts, even if it correlate with task sequence, were well reduced. Functional signals were well localized at lateralized cerebral functional area.

  8. A longitudinal study of age- and gender-related annual rate of volume changes in regional gray matter in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze correlations among the annual rate of gray matter volume change, age, gender, and cerebrovascular risk factors in 381 healthy community-dwelling subjects with a large age range by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years using brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Brain MRI data were processed with voxel-based morphometry using a custom template by applying diffeomorphic anatomical registration using the exponentiated lie algebra procedure. The annual rate of regional gray matter volume change showed significant positive correlations with age in several regions, including the bilateral temporal pole, caudate nucleus, ventral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, insula, hippocampus, and temporoparietal cortex, whereas significant negative correlations with age were observed in several regions including the bilateral cingulate gyri and anterior lobe of the cerebellum. Additionally, a significant age-by-gender interaction was found for the annual rate of regional gray matter volume change in the bilateral hippocampus. No significant correlations were observed between the annual rate of regional gray matter volume change and body mass index or systolic blood pressure. A significant positive correlation between the annual rate of gray matter volume change and age indicates that the region shows not linear but accelerated gray matter loss with age. Therefore, evaluating the annual rate of the gray matter volume change with age in healthy subjects is important in understanding how gray matter volume changes with aging in each brain region and in anticipating what cognitive functions are likely to show accelerated decline with aging.

  9. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D.; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E.; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G. M.; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C.; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R.; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E.; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects. PMID:25548384

  10. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects. PMID:25548384

  11. Automatic identification of gray and white matter components in polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Dammers, Jürgen; Breuer, Lukas; Axer, Markus; Kleiner, Melanie; Eiben, Björn; Grässel, David; Dickscheid, Timo; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Shah, N Joni; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2012-01-16

    Polarized light imaging (PLI) enables the visualization of fiber tracts with high spatial resolution in microtome sections of postmortem brains. Vectors of the fiber orientation defined by inclination and direction angles can directly be derived from the optical signals employed by PLI analysis. The polarization state of light propagating through a rotating polarimeter is varied in such a way that the detected signal of each spatial unit describes a sinusoidal signal. Noise, light scatter and filter inhomogeneities, however, interfere with the original sinusoidal PLI signals, which in turn have direct impact on the accuracy of subsequent fiber tracking. Recently we showed that the primary sinusoidal signals can effectively be restored after noise and artifact rejection utilizing independent component analysis (ICA). In particular, regions with weak intensities are greatly enhanced after ICA based artifact rejection and signal restoration. Here, we propose a user independent way of identifying the components of interest after decomposition; i.e., components that are related to gray and white matter. Depending on the size of the postmortem brain and the section thickness, the number of independent component maps can easily be in the range of a few ten thousand components for one brain. Therefore, we developed an automatic and, more importantly, user independent way of extracting the signal of interest. The automatic identification of gray and white matter components is based on the evaluation of the statistical properties of the so-called feature vectors of each individual component map, which, in the ideal case, shows a sinusoidal waveform. Our method enables large-scale analysis (i.e., the analysis of thousands of whole brain sections) of nerve fiber orientations in the human brain using polarized light imaging. PMID:21875673

  12. Gray matter structural compromise is equally distributed in left and right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Bernhardt, Boris C; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2016-02-01

    In drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), MRI studies have shown consistent mesiotemporal and neocortical structural alterations when comparing patients to healthy controls. It remains, however, relatively unclear whether the side of seizure focus differentially impacts the degree of structural damage. This work performed a comprehensive surface-based analysis of mesiotemporal and neocortical morphology on preoperative 1.5 T MRI in 25/35 LTLE/RTLE patients that achieved seizure freedom after surgery (i.e., Engel-I outcome; 7 ± 2 years follow-up), an imaging-independent confirmation of focus lateralization. Compared to 46 age- and sex-matched controls, both TLE groups displayed marked ipsilateral atrophy in mesiotemporal regions, while cortical thinning was bilateral. Direct contrasts between LTLE and RTLE did not reveal significant differences. Bootstrap simulations indicated low reproducibility of observing a between-cohort difference; power analysis revealed that more than 110 patients would be necessary to detect subtle differences. No difference between LTLE and RTLE was confirmed when using voxel-based morphometry, an independent proxy of gray matter volume. Similar results were obtained analyzing a separate 3 T dataset (15/15 LTLE/RTLE patients; Engel-I after 4 ± 2 years follow-up; 42 controls). Our results strongly support equivalent gray matter compromise in left and right TLE. The morphological profile of seizure-free patients, presenting with ipsilateral mesiotemporal and bilateral cortical atrophy, motivates the development of neuromarkers of outcome that consider both mesiotemporal and neocortical structures. Hum Brain Mapp 37:515-524, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26526187

  13. Automatic identification of gray and white matter components in polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Dammers, Jürgen; Breuer, Lukas; Axer, Markus; Kleiner, Melanie; Eiben, Björn; Grässel, David; Dickscheid, Timo; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Shah, N Joni; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2012-01-16

    Polarized light imaging (PLI) enables the visualization of fiber tracts with high spatial resolution in microtome sections of postmortem brains. Vectors of the fiber orientation defined by inclination and direction angles can directly be derived from the optical signals employed by PLI analysis. The polarization state of light propagating through a rotating polarimeter is varied in such a way that the detected signal of each spatial unit describes a sinusoidal signal. Noise, light scatter and filter inhomogeneities, however, interfere with the original sinusoidal PLI signals, which in turn have direct impact on the accuracy of subsequent fiber tracking. Recently we showed that the primary sinusoidal signals can effectively be restored after noise and artifact rejection utilizing independent component analysis (ICA). In particular, regions with weak intensities are greatly enhanced after ICA based artifact rejection and signal restoration. Here, we propose a user independent way of identifying the components of interest after decomposition; i.e., components that are related to gray and white matter. Depending on the size of the postmortem brain and the section thickness, the number of independent component maps can easily be in the range of a few ten thousand components for one brain. Therefore, we developed an automatic and, more importantly, user independent way of extracting the signal of interest. The automatic identification of gray and white matter components is based on the evaluation of the statistical properties of the so-called feature vectors of each individual component map, which, in the ideal case, shows a sinusoidal waveform. Our method enables large-scale analysis (i.e., the analysis of thousands of whole brain sections) of nerve fiber orientations in the human brain using polarized light imaging.

  14. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses — whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas — to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8–13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317

  15. Anatomical Abnormalities in Gray and White Matter of the Cortical Surface in Persons with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Colibazzi, Tiziano; Wexler, Bruce E.; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Liu, Jun; Sanchez-Peña, Juan; Corcoran, Cheryl; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although schizophrenia has been associated with abnormalities in brain anatomy, imaging studies have not fully determined the nature and relative contributions of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) disturbances underlying these findings. We sought to determine the pattern and distribution of these GM and WM abnormalities. Furthermore, we aimed to clarify the contribution of abnormalities in cortical thickness and cortical surface area to the reduced GM volumes reported in schizophrenia. Methods We recruited 76 persons with schizophrenia and 57 healthy controls from the community and obtained measures of cortical and WM surface areas, of local volumes along the brain and WM surfaces, and of cortical thickness. Results We detected reduced local volumes in patients along corresponding locations of the brain and WM surfaces in addition to bilateral greater thickness of perisylvian cortices and thinner cortex in the superior frontal and cingulate gyri. Total cortical and WM surface areas were reduced. Patients with worse performance on the serial-position task, a measure of working memory, had a higher burden of WM abnormalities. Conclusions Reduced local volumes along the surface of the brain mirrored the locations of abnormalities along the surface of the underlying WM, rather than of abnormalities of cortical thickness. Moreover, anatomical features of white matter, but not cortical thickness, correlated with measures of working memory. We propose that reductions in WM and smaller total cortical surface area could be central anatomical abnormalities in schizophrenia, driving, at least partially, the reduced regional GM volumes often observed in this illness. PMID:23418459

  16. Comparing Prefrontal Gray and White Matter Contributions to Intelligence and Decision Making in Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Paul G.; Kubicki, Marek; Nakamura, Motoaki; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationship between neuropsychological performance and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the cingulum bundle (CB) within groups of patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants. We analyzed data from subjects, who had participated in prior MRI, DTI, and neuropsychological studies (Nakamura et al., 2008; Nestor et al., 2008). In comparison to healthy participants, patients showed the expected reductions across CB fractional anisotropy (white matter) and OFC gray matter volume as well as lower neuropsychological scores. In addition, in comparison to healthy participants, patients showed a very different pattern of functional-anatomical correlates. For patients, CB white matter but not OFC gray matter correlated with various aspects of intelligence, including general abilities and working memory. For controls, OFC gray matter but not CB white matter correlated with scores on tests of intelligence and decision making. These results point to the potentially important role of CB white matter in the neuropsychological disturbance in schizophrenia. PMID:20063953

  17. Volume changes and brain-behavior relationships in white matter and subcortical gray matter in children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prapti; Lebel, Catherine; Narr, Katherine L; Mattson, Sarah N; May, Philip A; Adnams, Colleen M; Riley, Edward P; Jones, Kenneth L; Kan, Eric C; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2015-06-01

    Children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) may have cognitive, behavioral and brain abnormalities. Here, we compare rates of white matter and subcortical gray matter volume change in PAE and control children, and examine relationships between annual volume change and arithmetic ability, behavior, and executive function. Participants (n = 75 PAE/64 control; age: 7.1-15.9 years) each received two structural magnetic resonance scans, ~2 years apart. Assessments included Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), the Child Behavior Checklist and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function. Subcortical white and gray volumes were extracted for each hemisphere. Group volume differences were tested using false discovery rate (q < 0.05). Analyses examined group-by-age interactions and group-score interactions for correlations between change in volume and raw behavioral scores. Results showed that subjects with PAE had smaller volumes than control subjects across the brain. Significant group-score interactions were found in temporal and parietal regions for WISC arithmetic scores and in frontal and parietal regions for behavioral measures. Poorer cognitive/ behavioral outcomes were associated with larger volume increases in PAE, while control subjects generally showed no significant correlations. In contrast with previous results demonstrating different trajectories of cortical volume change in PAE, our results show similar rates of subcortical volume growth in subjects with PAE and control subjects. We also demonstrate abnormal brain-behavior relationships in subjects with PAE, suggesting different use of brain resources. Our results are encouraging in that, due to the stable volume differences, there may be an extended window of opportunity for intervention in children with PAE.

  18. Volume changes and brain-behavior relationships in white matter and subcortical gray matter in children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prapti; Lebel, Catherine; Narr, Katherine L; Mattson, Sarah N; May, Philip A; Adnams, Colleen M; Riley, Edward P; Jones, Kenneth L; Kan, Eric C; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2015-06-01

    Children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) may have cognitive, behavioral and brain abnormalities. Here, we compare rates of white matter and subcortical gray matter volume change in PAE and control children, and examine relationships between annual volume change and arithmetic ability, behavior, and executive function. Participants (n = 75 PAE/64 control; age: 7.1-15.9 years) each received two structural magnetic resonance scans, ~2 years apart. Assessments included Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), the Child Behavior Checklist and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function. Subcortical white and gray volumes were extracted for each hemisphere. Group volume differences were tested using false discovery rate (q < 0.05). Analyses examined group-by-age interactions and group-score interactions for correlations between change in volume and raw behavioral scores. Results showed that subjects with PAE had smaller volumes than control subjects across the brain. Significant group-score interactions were found in temporal and parietal regions for WISC arithmetic scores and in frontal and parietal regions for behavioral measures. Poorer cognitive/ behavioral outcomes were associated with larger volume increases in PAE, while control subjects generally showed no significant correlations. In contrast with previous results demonstrating different trajectories of cortical volume change in PAE, our results show similar rates of subcortical volume growth in subjects with PAE and control subjects. We also demonstrate abnormal brain-behavior relationships in subjects with PAE, suggesting different use of brain resources. Our results are encouraging in that, due to the stable volume differences, there may be an extended window of opportunity for intervention in children with PAE. PMID:25711175

  19. Gray Matter Density Negatively Correlates with Duration of Heroin Use in Young Lifetime Heroin-Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Yi; Zhu, Zude; Shi, Jinfu; Zou, Zhiling; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Yijun; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Weng, Xuchu

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented cognitive impairments and hypoactivity in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in drug users. However, the relationships between opiate dependence and brain structure changes in heroin users are largely unknown. In the present study, we measured the density of gray matter (DGM) with voxel-based…

  20. Surface area accounts for the relation of gray matter volume to reading-related skills and history of dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E; Liederman, Jacqueline; Malmberg, Benjamin; McLean, John; Strickland, David; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2010-11-01

    It is unknown whether the abnormalities in brain structure and function observed in dyslexic readers are congenital or arise later in development. Analyzing the 2 components of gray matter volume separately may help in differentiating these possibilities. Gray matter volume is the product of cortical surface area, determined during prenatal brain development, and cortical thickness, determined during postnatal development. For this study, 16 adults with a history of phonological dyslexia and 16 age- and gender-matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive battery of tests of reading-related skills. Cortical surface area and gray matter volume measures of the whole brain, the inferior frontal gyrus, and the fusiform gyrus were similarly related to phonological skills and a history of dyslexia. There was no relationship between cortical thickness and phonological skills or history of dyslexia. Because cortical surface area reflects cortical folding patterns determined prenatally, this suggests that brain differences in dyslexia are rooted in early cortical development and are not due to compensatory changes that occur during postnatal development and would be expected to influence cortical thickness. This study demonstrates the importance of examining the separate components of gray matter volume when studying developmental abnormalities. PMID:20154011

  1. Individual Differences in Verbal Abilities Associated with Regional Blurring of the Left Gray and White Matter Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Karen; Halgren, Eric; Barr, William B.; Carlson, Chad; Devinsky, Orrin; DuBois, Jonathan; Quinn, Brian T.; French, Jacqueline; Kuzniecky, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    Blurring of the cortical gray and white matter border on MRI is associated with normal aging, pathological aging, and the presence of focal cortical dysplasia. However, it remains unclear whether normal variations in signal intensity contrast at the gray and white matter junction reflect the functional integrity of subjacent tissue. This study explores the relationship between verbal abilities and gray and white matter contrast (GWC) in healthy human adults. Participants were scanned at 3 T MRI and administered standardized measures of verbal expression and verbal working memory. GWC was estimated by calculating the non-normalized T1 image intensity contrast above and below the cortical gray/white matter interface. Spherical averaging and whole-brain correlational analyses were performed. Sulcal regions exhibited higher contrast compared to gyral regions. We found a strongly lateralized and regionally specific profile with reduced verbal expression abilities associated with blurring in left hemisphere inferior frontal cortex and temporal pole. Reduced verbal working memory was associated with blurring in widespread left frontal and temporal cortices. Such lateralized and focal results provide support for GWC as a measure of regional functional integrity and highlight its potential role in probing the neuroanatomical substrates of cognition in healthy and diseased populations. PMID:22031871

  2. Gray Matter Atrophy Associated with Extrapyramidal Signs in the Lewy Body Variant of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Hye; Olabarrieta, Mikel; Lopez, Oscar L.; Maruca, Victoria; DeKosky, Steven T.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Becker, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Up to 60% of the patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can have cortical or brainstem Lewy bodies (LB), and extrapyramidal signs (EPS) have been found to be associated with LB in AD patients. However, the relationship between EPS and brain volumes has not been studied in the LB variant of AD using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between patterns of brain atrophy and clinical EPS in patients with pathologically confirmed AD. We compared gray matter structure using voxel-based morphometry in 29 Definite AD cases, 16 (55%) of whom also had LBs identified with α-synuclein immunohistochemistry. Multivariate models analyzed brain volume at a voxel level accounting for subject group, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), EPS, total brain volume, and the time from MRI scan to death. There was no significant difference in gray matter volume in the Definite AD patients as a function of LB. There was a significant association between gray matter volumes and the MMSE in AD patients, both with and without LBs. There was a significant correlation between gray matter volume and EPS only in the group of AD patients with LBs, and not in those with pure AD. These findings suggest that that the etiology of EPS in patients with the LB variant of AD is associated with neuronal loss in the nigrostriatal tracts. By contrast, the source of the EPS in AD alone appears to be less well localized. PMID:22886020

  3. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  4. Is Gray Matter Volume an Intermediate Phenotype for Schizophrenia? A VBM Study of Patients with Schizophrenia and their Healthy Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Hobbs, Katherine B.; Pezawas, Lukas; Mattay, Venkata S.; Egan, Michael F.; Verchinski, Beth; Passingham, Richard E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Callicott, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Shared neuropathological characteristics of patients with schizophrenia and their siblings may represent intermediate phenotypes that could be used to investigate genetic susceptibility to the illness. We sought to discover previously unidentified gray matter volume differences in patients with schizophrenia and their siblings using optimized Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM). Methods: We studied 169 patients with schizophrenia, 213 of their unaffected siblings, and 212 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Patients with schizophrenia had significant regional gray matter decreases in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices compared with healthy volunteers. Their unaffected siblings tended to share gray matter decreases in the medial frontal, superior temporal and insular cortices, but these decreases were not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, even when we looked at a subgroup of siblings with a past history of mood disorder. As an exploratory analysis, we estimated heritability using regions of interest from the VBM analysis, as well as from the hippocampus. Hippocampal volume was significantly correlated within sibling-pairs. Conclusions: Our findings confirm and extend previous VBM analyses in ill subjects with schizophrenia. Furthermore, these data argue that while siblings may share some regional gray matter decreases with their affected siblings, the pattern of regional differences may be a weak intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. PMID:17689500

  5. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moran, C; Tapp, R J; Hughes, A D; Magnussen, C G; Blizzard, L; Phan, T G; Beare, R; Witt, N; Venn, A; Münch, G; Amaratunge, B C; Srikanth, V

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  6. Set-Shifting Ability Is Associated with Gray Matter Volume in Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims An understanding of the association between gray matter volume and executive functioning could provide strategies to reduce dementia risk in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods In a cross-sectional analysis, we assessed executive functioning in 83 older people with MCI using three standard neuropsychological tests: set shifting (difference between Trail Making Test Parts B and A), working memory (difference between Digit Span forward and backward from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV), and selective attention/response inhibition (difference between the second and third conditions of the color- and picture-word Stroop test). Gray matter volume was computed from brain MRIs and SIENAX from FSL software. Results Gray matter volume was significantly associated with set-shifting performance after accounting for age, gender, body mass index, education, and global cognition (standardized β = −0.376, p = 0.001), but not with working memory or selective attention/response inhibition. Conclusion The executive function of set-shifting ability was correlated with gray matter volume in older people with MCI. PMID:26628898

  7. Prolonged gray matter disease without demyelination caused by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus with a mutation in VP2 puff B.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, I; Wada, Y; Libbey, J E; Cannon, T S; Whitby, F G; Fujinami, R S

    2001-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is divided into two subgroups based on neurovirulence. During the acute phase, DA virus infects cells in the gray matter of the central nervous system (CNS). Throughout the chronic phase, DA virus infects glial cells in the white matter, causing demyelinating disease. Although GDVII virus also infects neurons in the gray matter, infected mice developed a severe polioencephalomyelitis, and no virus is detected in the white matter or other areas in the CNS in rare survivors. Several sequence differences between the two viruses are located in VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II, which are located near each other, close to the proposed receptor binding site. We constructed a DA virus mutant, DApBL2M, which has the VP1 loop II of GDVII virus and a mutation at position 171 in VP2 puff B. While DApBL2M virus replicated less efficiently than DA virus during the acute phase, DApBL2M-induced acute polioencephalitis was comparable to that in DA virus infection. Interestingly, during the chronic phase, DApBL2M caused prolonged gray matter disease in the brain without white matter involvement in the spinal cord. This is opposite what is observed during wild-type DA virus infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that conformational differences via interaction of VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II between GDVII and DA viruses can play an important role in making the transition of infection from the gray matter in the brain to the spinal cord white matter during TMEV infection. PMID:11462022

  8. Gray matter and intrinsic network changes in the posterior cingulate cortex after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor intake.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christoph; Ganger, Sebastian; Losak, Jan; Hahn, Andreas; Savli, Markus; Kranz, Georg S; Baldinger, Pia; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) challenge changes neuronal circuitries and microarchitecture. However, evidence in human subjects is missing. Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) applying selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and high-resolution structural and functional brain assessment is able to demonstrate the impact of 5-HT challenge on neuronal network morphology and functional activity. To determine how SSRIs induce changes in gray matter and neuronal activity, we conducted a longitudinal study using citalopram and escitalopram. Seventeen healthy subjects completed a structural and functional phMRI study with randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Significant gray matter increases were observed (among other regions) in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the ventral precuneus after SSRI intake of 10days, while decreases were observed within the pre- and postcentral gyri (all P<0.05, family-wise error [FWE] corrected). Furthermore, enhanced resting functional connectivity (rFC) within the ventral precuneus and PCC was associated with gray matter increases in the PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Corroborating these results, whole-brain connectivity density, measuring the brain's functional network hubs, was significantly increased after SSRI-intake in the ventral precuneus and PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Short-term administration of SSRIs changes gray matter structures, consistent with previous work reporting enhancement of neuroplasticity by serotonergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, increased gray matter in the PCC is associated with increased functional connectivity in one of the brain's metabolically most active regions. Our novel findings provide convergent evidence for dynamic alterations of brain structure and function associated with SSRI pharmacotherapy.

  9. Gray-matter volume, midbrain dopamine D2/D3 receptors and drug craving in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Morales, A M; Kohno, M; Robertson, C L; Dean, A C; Mandelkern, M A; London, E D

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic system has a critical role in clinical features of addiction. Despite evidence suggesting that midbrain dopamine receptors influence amphetamine-induced dopamine release and that dopamine is involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, associations between dopamine receptors and gray-matter volume have been unexplored in methamphetamine users. Here we used magnetic resonance imaging and [(18)F]fallypride positron emission tomography, respectively, to measure gray-matter volume (in 58 methamphetamine users) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (binding potential relative to nondisplaceable uptake of the radiotracer, BPnd) (in 31 methamphetamine users and 37 control participants). Relationships between these measures and self-reported drug craving were examined. Although no difference in midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was detected between methamphetamine and control groups, midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was positively correlated with gray-matter volume in the striatum, prefrontal cortex, insula, hippocampus and temporal cortex in methamphetamine users, but not in control participants (group-by-midbrain D2/D3 BPnd interaction, P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). Craving for methamphetamine was negatively associated with gray-matter volume in the insula, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, cerebellum and thalamus (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). A relationship between midbrain D2/D3 BPnd and methamphetamine craving was not detected. Lower midbrain D2/D3 BPnd may increase vulnerability to deficits in gray-matter volume in mesocorticolimbic circuitry in methamphetamine users, possibly reflecting greater dopamine-induced toxicity. Identifying factors that influence prefrontal and limbic volume, such as midbrain BPnd, may be important for understanding the basis of drug craving, a key factor in the maintenance of substance-use disorders.

  10. Selective brain gray matter atrophy associated with APOE ε4 and MAPT H1 in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Joaquín; Cervantes, Sebastián; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Lamet, Isabel; Pastor, Pau; Pastor, María A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to elucidate whether specific patterns of gray matter loss were associated with apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)-H1) genetic variants in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at a baseline visit. Gray matter voxel-based morphometry analysis of T1 magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed in 65 amnestic-MCI subjects. MCI APOE ε4 carriers compared with non-carriers showed increased brain atrophy in right hippocampus and rostral amygdala, superior and middle temporal gyrus, and right parietal operculum, including inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal, and supramarginal gyrus. MAPT-H1/H1 MCI carriers showed an increased bilateral atrophy in superior frontal gyri (including frontal eye fields and left prefrontal cortex) and precentral gyrus but also unilateral left atrophy in the inferior temporal gyrus and calcarine gyrus. In addition, MCI subjects carrying both APOE ε4 and MAPT-H1/H1 variants showed gray matter loss in the supplementary motor area and right pre- and postcentral gyri. The effect of APOE ε4 on gray matter loss in right hippocampus suggests that, at least in some AD sub-types, the neuronal vulnerability could be increased in the right hemisphere. The pattern of frontal gray matter loss observed among MCI MAPT H1/H1 carriers has also been found in other tauopathies, suggesting that MCI may share etiological factors with other tauopathies. Frontal and parietal cortex vulnerability was found when adding MAPT H1/H1 and APOE ε4 effects, suggesting a synergistic effect of these variants. These results could be due to changes in APOE ε4 and MAPT expression.

  11. Gray matter and intrinsic network changes in the posterior cingulate cortex after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor intake.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christoph; Ganger, Sebastian; Losak, Jan; Hahn, Andreas; Savli, Markus; Kranz, Georg S; Baldinger, Pia; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) challenge changes neuronal circuitries and microarchitecture. However, evidence in human subjects is missing. Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) applying selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and high-resolution structural and functional brain assessment is able to demonstrate the impact of 5-HT challenge on neuronal network morphology and functional activity. To determine how SSRIs induce changes in gray matter and neuronal activity, we conducted a longitudinal study using citalopram and escitalopram. Seventeen healthy subjects completed a structural and functional phMRI study with randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Significant gray matter increases were observed (among other regions) in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the ventral precuneus after SSRI intake of 10days, while decreases were observed within the pre- and postcentral gyri (all P<0.05, family-wise error [FWE] corrected). Furthermore, enhanced resting functional connectivity (rFC) within the ventral precuneus and PCC was associated with gray matter increases in the PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Corroborating these results, whole-brain connectivity density, measuring the brain's functional network hubs, was significantly increased after SSRI-intake in the ventral precuneus and PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Short-term administration of SSRIs changes gray matter structures, consistent with previous work reporting enhancement of neuroplasticity by serotonergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, increased gray matter in the PCC is associated with increased functional connectivity in one of the brain's metabolically most active regions. Our novel findings provide convergent evidence for dynamic alterations of brain structure and function associated with SSRI pharmacotherapy. PMID:23988273

  12. Spectral Exploration of Calcium Accumulation in Organic Matter in Gray Desert Soil from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Ma, Yucui; Wang, Xihe; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Hua; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) in the fringes of the mid-latitude desert. In this paper, soil samples from a long-term field experiment conducted from 1990 to 2013 at a research station in Urumqi, China by different fertilizer treatments, were used to determine soil properties and soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) by chemical analysis, fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The binding features of DOM under the addition of Ca(2+) were analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer further to explore the response of the DOM to increasing concentrations of Ca(2+). Long-term application of chemical fertilizers and goat manure increased soil organic carbon (SOC) by 1.34- and 1.86-fold, respectively, relative to the non-fertilized control (8.95 g.kg(-1)). Compared with the control, application of chemical fertilizers and manure significantly increased the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, humic and fulvic acid-like substances in DOM but decreased the amounts of trivalent metals (Al and Fe) and protein-like substances. Although crystalline Al/Fe nanoparticles and amorphous or short-range-order Si/Al nanoparticles existed in all DOM samples, crystalline Ca/Si nanoparticles were predominant in the samples treated with goat manure. Although organic matter and Si-O-containing nanoparticles were involved in the binding of Ca(2+) to DOM, application of chemical fertilizers weakened Ca(2+) association with components of the amide II group (1510 cm(-1)) and Si-O linkage (1080 cm(-1)), whereas application of goat manure enhanced the affinity of Ca(2+) for Si-O linkage. Our results suggested that the enrichment of Ca in gray desert soil possibly helps accumulate SOM by forming crystalline Ca/Si nanoparticles in addition to Ca(2+) and organic matter complexes.

  13. Spectral Exploration of Calcium Accumulation in Organic Matter in Gray Desert Soil from Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Ma, Yucui; Wang, Xihe; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Hua; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) in the fringes of the mid-latitude desert. In this paper, soil samples from a long-term field experiment conducted from 1990 to 2013 at a research station in Urumqi, China by different fertilizer treatments, were used to determine soil properties and soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) by chemical analysis, fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The binding features of DOM under the addition of Ca2+ were analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer further to explore the response of the DOM to increasing concentrations of Ca2+. Long-term application of chemical fertilizers and goat manure increased soil organic carbon (SOC) by 1.34- and 1.86-fold, respectively, relative to the non-fertilized control (8.95g.kg-1). Compared with the control, application of chemical fertilizers and manure significantly increased the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, humic and fulvic acid-like substances in DOM but decreased the amounts of trivalent metals (Al and Fe) and protein-like substances. Although crystalline Al/Fe nanoparticles and amorphous or short-range-order Si/Al nanoparticles existed in all DOM samples, crystalline Ca/Si nanoparticles were predominant in the samples treated with goat manure. Although organic matter and Si-O-containing nanoparticles were involved in the binding of Ca2+ to DOM, application of chemical fertilizers weakened Ca2+ association with components of the amide II group (1510 cm-1) and Si-O linkage (1080 cm-1), whereas application of goat manure enhanced the affinity of Ca2+ for Si-O linkage. Our results suggested that the enrichment of Ca in gray desert soil possibly helps accumulate SOM by forming crystalline Ca/Si nanoparticles in addition to Ca2+ and organic matter complexes. PMID:26751962

  14. Volumetric and fiber-tracing MRI methods for gray and white matter.

    PubMed

    Larvie, Mykol; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of generating high-resolution brain images with fine anatomic detail and unique tissue contrasts that reveal structures that are not visible to the eye. Sharply defined gray- and white-matter interfaces allow for quantitative anatomic analysis that can be accurately performed with largely automated segmentation methods. In an analogous fashion, diffusion MRI in the brain provides structural information based on contrasts derived from the diffusivity of water in brain tissue, which can highlight the orientation of neuronal axons. Also using largely automated methods, diffusion MRI can be used to generate models of white-matter tracts throughout the brain, a method known as tractography, as well as characterize the microstructural integrity of neuronal axons. Tractographic analysis has helped to define connectivity in the brain that powerfully informs understanding of brain function, and, together with other diffusion metrics, is useful in evaluation of the normal and diseased brain. The quantitative methods of brain segmentation, tractography, and diffusion MRI extend MRI into a realm beyond visual inspection and provide otherwise unachievable sensitivity and specificity in the analysis of brain structure and function.

  15. Volumetric and fiber-tracing MRI methods for gray and white matter.

    PubMed

    Larvie, Mykol; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of generating high-resolution brain images with fine anatomic detail and unique tissue contrasts that reveal structures that are not visible to the eye. Sharply defined gray- and white-matter interfaces allow for quantitative anatomic analysis that can be accurately performed with largely automated segmentation methods. In an analogous fashion, diffusion MRI in the brain provides structural information based on contrasts derived from the diffusivity of water in brain tissue, which can highlight the orientation of neuronal axons. Also using largely automated methods, diffusion MRI can be used to generate models of white-matter tracts throughout the brain, a method known as tractography, as well as characterize the microstructural integrity of neuronal axons. Tractographic analysis has helped to define connectivity in the brain that powerfully informs understanding of brain function, and, together with other diffusion metrics, is useful in evaluation of the normal and diseased brain. The quantitative methods of brain segmentation, tractography, and diffusion MRI extend MRI into a realm beyond visual inspection and provide otherwise unachievable sensitivity and specificity in the analysis of brain structure and function. PMID:27432659

  16. Extensive and interrelated subcortical white and gray matter alterations in preterm-born adults.

    PubMed

    Meng, C; Bäuml, J G; Daamen, M; Jaekel, J; Neitzel, J; Scheef, L; Busch, B; Baumann, N; Boecker, H; Zimmer, C; Bartmann, P; Wolke, D; Wohlschläger, A M; Sorg, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause for impaired neurocognitive development with an increased risk for persistent cognitive deficits in adulthood. In newborns, preterm birth is associated with interrelated white matter (WM) alterations and deep gray matter (GM) loss; however, little is known about the persistence and relevance of these subcortical brain changes. We tested the hypothesis that the pattern of correspondent subcortical WM and GM changes is present in preterm-born adults and has a brain-injury-like nature, i.e., it predicts lowered general cognitive performance. Eighty-five preterm-born and 69 matched term-born adults were assessed by diffusion- and T1-weighted MRI and cognitive testing. Main outcome measures were fractional anisotropy of water diffusion for WM property, GM volume for GM property, and full-scale IQ for cognitive performance. In preterm-born adults, reduced fractional anisotropy was widely distributed ranging from cerebellum to brainstem to hemispheres. GM volume was reduced in the thalamus, striatum, temporal cortices, and increased in the cingulate cortices. Fractional anisotropy reductions were specifically associated with GM loss in thalamus and striatum, with correlation patterns for both regions extensively overlapping in the WM of brainstem and hemispheres. For overlap regions, fractional anisotropy was positively related with both gestational age and full-scale IQ. Results provide evidence for extensive, interrelated, and adverse WM and GM subcortical changes in preterm-born adults. Data suggest persistent brain-injury-like changes of subcortical-cortical connectivity after preterm delivery.

  17. Decreased activity of the 20S proteasome in the brain white matter and gray matter of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzheng; Bizzozero, Oscar A

    2011-04-01

    Carbonylated (oxidized) proteins are known to accumulate in the cerebral white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although oxidative stress is necessary for carbonyl generation, it is the failure of the degradation systems that ultimately leads to the build-up of carbonylated proteins within tissues. In this study, we measured the activity of the 20S proteasome and other proteolytic systems in the cerebral WM and GM of 13 MS patients and 13 controls. We report that the activities of the three peptidases of the 20S proteasome (i.e. chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like and trypsin-like) in both MS-WM and MS-GM are greatly reduced. Interestingly, neither the amount of proteasome nor the levels of the catalytic subunits (β1, β2, and β5) are diminished in this disease. Proteins containing Lys-48 poly-ubiquitin also accumulate in MS tissues, indicating failure of the 26S proteasome as well. Levels of the regulatory caps 11S α and 19S are also lower in MS than in controls, suggesting that the activity of the more complex proteasomes may be reduced further. Finally, the activities of other proteases that might also remove oxidized proteins (calpain, cathepsin B, mitochondrial LonP) are not lessened in MS. Together, these studies suggest that direct inactivation of proteolytic centers in the 20S particle and/or the presence of specific inhibitors is the underlying cause of proteasomal dysfunction in MS.

  18. Differential age-dependent associations of gray matter volume and white matter integrity with processing speed in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhaoping; Ng, Kwun Kei; Sim, Sam K Y; Ngeow, Mei Yi; Zheng, Hui; Lo, June C; Chee, Michael W L; Zhou, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Slower processing speed (PS), a highly robust feature of cognitive aging, is associated with white matter (WM) deterioration and gray matter volume (GMV) loss. Traditional linear regression models assume a constant relationship between brain structure and cognition over time. To probe for variation in the association between WM and GMV and PS over time, we used a novel sparse varying coefficient model on data collected from 126 relatively healthy older adults (67 females, aged 58-85years) evaluated with MRI and a standardized neuropsychological test-battery. We found that WM microstructural differences indexed by fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-striatal tracts (internal and external capsule) showed a stronger association with PS before the age of 70years. Contrastingly, GMV values of the left putamen and middle occipital gyrus were more strongly correlated with PS after 70years. Additionally, within GM and WM compartments, there was heterogeneity in the temporal sequence in which different cortical and subcortical elements were most strongly associated with PS. Together, these observations provide a more nuanced account of the relationships between different structural components of the aging brain and processing speed, a key cognitive domain affected in relatively healthy older adults. PMID:26302672

  19. Gray and White Matter Structures in the Midcingulate Cortex Region Contribute to Body Mass Index in Chinese Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). VBM results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and Gray Matter Volumes (GMV) in the MCC, left OFC, and left VMPFC. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal-weights. Finally, we found that decision making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  20. Development of superficial white matter and its structural interplay with cortical gray matter in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjie; Lu, Lisa H; Lowes, Allison; Yang, Shaolin; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Zhou, Xiaohong J; Pavuluri, Mani N

    2014-06-01

    Healthy human brain undergoes significant changes during development. The developmental trajectory of superficial white matter (SWM) is less understood relative to cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter. In this study, a multimodal imaging strategy was applied to vertexwise map SWM microstructure and cortical thickness to characterize their developmental pattern and elucidate SWM-GM associations in children and adolescents. Microscopic changes in SWM were evaluated with water diffusion parameters including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in 133 healthy subjects aged 10-18 years. Results demonstrated distinct maturational patterns in SWM and GM. SWM showed increasing FA and decreasing MD and RD underneath bilateral motor sensory cortices and superior temporal auditory cortex, suggesting increasing myelination. A second developmental pattern in SWM was increasing FA and AD in bilateral orbitofrontal regions and insula, suggesting improved axonal coherence. These SWM patterns diverge from the more widespread GM maturation, suggesting that cortical thickness changes in adolescence are not explained by the encroachment of SWM myelin into the GM-WM boundary. Interestingly, age-independent intrinsic association between SWM and cortical GM seems to follow functional organization of polymodal and unimodal brain regions. Unimodal sensory areas showed positive correlation between GM thickness and FA whereas polymodal regions showed negative correlation. Axonal coherence and differences in interstitial neuron composition between unimodal and polymodal regions may account for these SWM-GM association patterns. Intrinsic SWM-GM relationships unveiled by neuroimaging in vivo can be useful for examining psychiatric disorders with known WM/GM disturbances.

  1. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  2. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C.; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  3. In vivo evaluation of gray and white matter volume loss in the parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy using SPM8 plus DARTEL for VBM.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Yoko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Kouhei; Maikusa, Norihide; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kimiteru; Ota, Miho; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Sato, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    In multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P), several voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have revealed gray matter loss; however, the white matter volume changes have been rarely reported. We investigated the volume changes of white matter as well as gray matter by VBM. A retrospective MRI study was performed in 20 patients with MSA-P and 30 age-matched healthy controls. We applied VBM with statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) plus diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) to explore the regional atrophy of gray and white matter in all of the MSA-P patients, 14 patients with left-side dominant and 6 patients with right-side dominant onset as compared to controls. In all of the MSA-P patients, VBM revealed a significant volume reduction of gray matter in the bilateral putamina, cerebellums and dorsal midbrain. White matter loss was located in bilateral globus pallidi, external capsules extending to the midbrain, right subcortical to precentral area through internal capsule, the pons, bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles and left cerebellum. In left-side dominant MSA-P patients, the gray and white matter volume loss was detected predominantly on the right side and vice versa in right-side dominant MSA-P patients. A correlation with disease duration and severity was not detected. VBM using SPM8 plus DARTEL detected significant volume loss not only in the gray but also in the white matter of the area affected by MSA-P.

  4. Fos immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain induced by electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Blokland, Arjan; Steinbusch, Harry

    2009-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter induces panic- or fear-like responses with intense emotional distress and severe anxiety. In this study, we evoked panic-like behaviour by dlPAG stimulation and evaluated the effect on neuronal activation in different brain regions. The number of c-Fos immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir) cells was measured semi-quantitatively through series of stained rat brain sections. Our results demonstrate strong neural activation in the medial prefrontal cortex, orbital cortex, anterior olfactory nuclei, secondary motor cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Moderate increases in the number of c-Fos-ir cells were detected in various regions, including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and striatum. Additionally, there was mild expression of c-Fos-ir cells in the hippocampus, thalamus, and habenula regions. In conclusion, we have shown that deep brain stimulation of the dlPAG produced a distinctive pattern of neuronal activation across forebrain regions as compared to the sham and control animals.

  5. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems.

  6. The Relationship between Gray Matter Quantitative MRI and Disability in Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gracien, René-Maxime; Jurcoane, Alina; Wagner, Marlies; Reitz, Sarah C.; Mayer, Christoph; Volz, Steffen; Hof, Stephanie-Michelle; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Droby, Amgad; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Zipp, Frauke; Hattingen, Elke; Deichmann, Ralf; Klein, Johannes C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS), global neurodegeneration as a driver of disability gains importance in comparison to focal inflammatory processes. However, clinical MRI does not visualize changes of tissue composition outside MS lesions. This quantitative MRI (qMRI) study investigated cortical and deep gray matter (GM) proton density (PD) values and T1 relaxation times to explore their potential to assess neuronal damage and its relationship to clinical disability in SPMS. Materials and Methods 11 SPMS patients underwent quantitative T1 and PD mapping. Parameter values across the cerebral cortex and deep GM structures were compared with 11 healthy controls, and correlation with disability was investigated for regions exhibiting significant group differences. Results PD was increased in the whole GM, cerebral cortex, thalamus, putamen and pallidum. PD correlated with disability in the whole GM, cerebral cortex, putamen and pallidum. T1 relaxation time was prolonged and correlated with disability in the whole GM and cerebral cortex. Conclusion Our study suggests that the qMRI parameters GM PD (which likely indicates replacement of neural tissue with water) and cortical T1 (which reflects cortical damage including and beyond increased water content) are promising qMRI candidates for the assessment of disease status, and are related to disability in SPMS. PMID:27513853

  7. Gray and white matter volume abnormalities in generalized anxiety disorder by categorical and dimensional characterization.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Kevin; Pine, Daniel S; Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-12-30

    Increasing efforts have been made to investigate the underlying pathophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but only limited consistent information is available on gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volume changes in affected adults. Additionally, few studies employed dimensional approaches to GAD pathology. This study compares structural brain imaging data from n=19 GAD subjects and n=24 healthy comparison (HC) subjects, all medication-free and matched on age, sex and education. Separate categorical and dimensional models were employed using voxel-based morphometry for GM and WM. Significantly higher GM volumes were found in GAD subjects mainly in basal ganglia structures and less consistently in the superior temporal pole. For WM, GAD subjects showed significantly lower volumes in the dlPFC. Largely consistent findings in dimensional and categorical models point toward these structural alterations being reliable and of importance for GAD. While lower volume in the dlPFC could reflect impaired emotional processing and control over worry in GAD, basal ganglia alterations may be linked to disturbed gain and loss anticipation as implicated in previous functional GAD studies. As perturbations in anticipation processes are central to GAD, these areas may warrant greater attention in future studies. PMID:26490569

  8. Cognitive correlates of gray matter abnormalities in adolescent siblings of patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wagshal, Dana; Knowlton, Barbara Jean; Cohen, Jessica Rachel; Bookheimer, Susan Yost; Bilder, Robert Martin; Fernandez, Vindia Gisela; Asarnow, Robert Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Patients with childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) display widespread gray matter (GM) structural brain abnormalities. Healthy siblings of COS patients share some of these structural abnormalities, suggesting that GM abnormalities are endophenotypes for schizophrenia. Another possible endophenotype for schizophrenia that has been relatively unexplored is corticostriatal dysfunction. The corticostriatal system plays an important role in skill learning. Our previous studies have demonstrated corticostriatal dysfunction in COS siblings with a profound skill learning deficit and abnormal pattern of brain activation during skill learning. This study investigated whether structural abnormalities measured using volumetric brain morphometry (VBM) were present in siblings of COS patients and whether these were related to deficits in cognitive skill learning. Results revealed smaller GM volume in COS siblings relative to controls in a number of regions, including occipital, parietal, and subcortical regions including the striatum, and greater GM volume relative to controls in several subcortical regions. Volume in the right superior frontal gyrus and cerebellum were related to performance differences between groups on the weather prediction task, a measure of cognitive skill learning. Our results support the idea that corticostriatal and cerebellar impairment in unaffected siblings of COS patients are behaviorally relevant and may reflect genetic risk for schizophrenia. PMID:25541139

  9. Regulation of extinction-related plasticity by opioid receptors in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Ryan G; Gafford, Georgette M; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has led to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning. Long-term synaptic changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are critical for extinction learning, but very little is currently known about how the mPFC and other brain areas interact during extinction. The current study examined the effect of drugs that impair the extinction of fear conditioning on the activation of the extracellular-related kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) in brain regions that likely participate in the consolidation of extinction learning. Inhibitors of opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors were applied to the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG) and amygdala shortly before extinction training. Results from these experiments show that blocking opioid receptors in the vlPAG prevented the formation of extinction memory, whereas NMDA receptor blockade had no effect. Conversely, blocking NMDA receptors in the amygdala disrupted the formation of fear extinction memory, but opioid receptor blockade in the same brain area did not. Subsequent experiments tested the effect of these drug treatments on the activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in various brain regions following extinction training. Only opioid receptor blockade in the vlPAG disrupted ERK phosphorylation in the mPFC and amygdala. These data support the idea that opiodergic signaling derived from the vlPAG affects plasticity across the brain circuit responsible for the formation of extinction memory.

  10. Gray & white matter tissue contrast differentiates Mild Cognitive Impairment converters from non-converters.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Angela L; Gifford, Katherine A; Damon, Stephen; Chapman, G William; Liu, Dandan; Sparling, Jamie; Dobromyslin, Vitaly; Salat, David

    2015-06-01

    The clinical relevance of gray/white matter contrast ratio (GWR) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) remains unknown. This study examined baseline GWR and 3-year follow-up diagnostic status in MCI. Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative MCI participants with baseline 1.5 T MRI and 3-year follow-up clinical data were included. Participants were categorized into two groups based on 3-year follow-up diagnoses: 1) non-converters (n = 69, 75 ± 7, 26 % female), and 2) converters (i.e., dementia at follow-up; n = 69, 75 ± 7, 30 % female) who were matched on baseline age and Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Groups were compared on FreeSurfer generated baseline GWR from structural images in which higher values represent greater tissue contrast. A general linear model, adjusting for APOE-status, scanner type, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness, revealed that converters evidenced lower GWR values than non-converters (i.e., more degradation in tissue contrast; p = 0.03). Individuals with MCI who convert to dementia have lower baseline GWR values than individuals who remain diagnostically stable over a 3-year period, statistically independent of cortical thickness or hippocampal volume.

  11. The alteration of gray matter volume and cognitive control in adolescents with internet gaming disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Jin, Chenwang; Yuan, Kai; Shakir, Tahir Mehmood; Mao, Cuiping; Niu, Xuan; Niu, Chen; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has been investigated by many behavioral and neuroimaging studies, for it has became one of the main behavior disorders among adolescents. However, few studies focused on the relationship between alteration of gray matter volume (GMV) and cognitive control feature in IGD adolescents. Methods: Twenty-eight participants with IAD and twenty-eight healthy age and gender matched controls participated in the study. Brain morphology of adolescents with IGD and healthy controls was investigated using an optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) technique. Cognitive control performances were measured by Stroop task, and correlation analysis was performed between brain structural change and behavioral performance in IGD group. Results: The results showed that GMV of the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), precuneus, supplementary motor area (SMA), superior parietal cortex, left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), left insula, and bilateral cerebellum decreased in the IGD participants compared with healthy controls. Moreover, GMV of the ACC was negatively correlated with the incongruent response errors of Stroop task in IGD group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the alteration of GMV is associated with the performance change of cognitive control in adolescents with IGD, which indicating substantial brain image effects induced by IGD. PMID:25852507

  12. Alterations of Regional Spontaneous Brain Activity and Gray Matter Volume in the Blind

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Aili; Tian, Jing; Li, Rui; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Tianzi; Qin, Wen; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-01-01

    Visual deprivation can induce alterations of regional spontaneous brain activity (RSBA). However, the effects of onset age of blindness on the RSBA and the association between the alterations of RSBA and brain structure are still unclear in the blind. In this study, we performed resting-state functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging on 50 sighted controls and 91 blind subjects (20 congenitally blind, 27 early blind, and 44 late blind individuals). Compared with the sighted control, we identified increased RSBA in the blind in primary and high-level visual areas and decreased RSBA in brain regions which are ascribed to sensorimotor and salience networks. In contrast, blind subjects exhibited significantly decreased gray matter volume (GMV) in the visual areas, while they exhibited significantly increased GMV in the sensorimotor areas. Moreover, the onset age of blindness was negatively correlated with the GMV of visual areas in blind subjects, whereas it exerted complex influences on the RSBA. Finally, significant negative correlations were shown between RSBA and GMV values. Our results demonstrated system-dependent, inverse alterations in RSBA and GMV after visual deprivation. Furthermore, the onset age of blindness has different effects on the reorganizations in RSBA and GMV. PMID:26568891

  13. Gray matter correlates of creative potential: A latent variable voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Jauk, Emanuel; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.; Dunst, Beate; Fink, Andreas; Benedek, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing research interest in the structural and functional brain correlates underlying creative potential. Recent investigations found that interindividual differences in creative potential relate to volumetric differences in brain regions belonging to the default mode network, such as the precuneus. Yet, the complex interplay between creative potential, intelligence, and personality traits and their respective neural bases is still under debate. We investigated regional gray matter volume (rGMV) differences that can be associated with creative potential in a heterogeneous sample of N = 135 individuals using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). By means of latent variable modeling and consideration of recent psychometric advancements in creativity research, we sought to disentangle the effects of ideational originality and fluency as two independent indicators of creative potential. Intelligence and openness to experience were considered as common covariates of creative potential. The results confirmed and extended previous research: rGMV in the precuneus was associated with ideational originality, but not with ideational fluency. In addition, we found ideational originality to be correlated with rGMV in the caudate nucleus. The results indicate that the ability to produce original ideas is tied to default-mode as well as dopaminergic structures. These structural brain correlates of ideational originality were apparent throughout the whole range of intellectual ability and thus not moderated by intelligence. In contrast, structural correlates of ideational fluency, a quantitative marker of creative potential, were observed only in lower intelligent individuals in the cuneus/lingual gyrus. PMID:25676914

  14. The Cortical Signature of Central Poststroke Pain: Gray Matter Decreases in Somatosensory, Insular, and Prefrontal Cortices.

    PubMed

    Krause, T; Asseyer, S; Taskin, B; Flöel, A; Witte, A V; Mueller, K; Fiebach, J B; Villringer, K; Villringer, A; Jungehulsing, G J

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that cortical structural plasticity plays a crucial role in the emergence and maintenance of chronic pain. Various distinct pain syndromes have accordingly been linked to specific patterns of decreases in regional gray matter volume (GMV). However, it is not known whether central poststroke pain (CPSP) is also associated with cortical structural plasticity. To determine this, we employed T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T and voxel-based morphometry in 45 patients suffering from chronic subcortical sensory stroke with (n = 23) and without CPSP (n = 22), and healthy matched controls (n = 31). CPSP patients showed decreases in GMV in comparison to healthy controls, involving secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), anterior as well as posterior insular cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, and nucleus accumbens. Comparing CPSP patients to nonpain patients revealed a similar but more restricted pattern of atrophy comprising S2, ventrolateral prefrontal and temporal cortex. Additionally, GMV in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex negatively correlated to pain intensity ratings. This shows for the first time that CPSP is accompanied by a unique pattern of widespread structural plasticity, which involves the sensory-discriminative areas of insular/somatosensory cortex, but also expands into prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum, where emotional aspects of pain are processed.

  15. Global and regional gray matter reductions in ADHD: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Carmona, S; Vilarroya, O; Bielsa, A; Trèmols, V; Soliva, J C; Rovira, M; Tomàs, J; Raheb, C; Gispert, J D; Batlle, S; Bulbena, A

    2005-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder characterized by inattentiveness, motor hyperactivity and impulsivity. According to neuroimaging data, the neural substrate underlying ADHD seems to involve fronto-striatal circuits and the cerebellum. However, there are important discrepancies between various studies, probably due to the use of different techniques. The aim of this study is to examine cerebral gray (GM) and white (WM) matter abnormalities in a group of ADHD children using a voxel-based morphometry protocol. The sample consisted of 25 children/adolescents with DSM-IV TR diagnosis of ADHD (medicated, aged 6-16 years) who were compared with 25 healthy volunteer children/adolescents. ADHD brains on an average showed a global volume decrease of 5.4% as compared to controls. Additionally, there were regionally specific effects in the left fronto-parietal areas (left motor, premotor and somatosensory cortex), left cingulate cortex (anterior/middle/posterior cingulate), parietal lobe (precuneus bilaterally), temporal cortices (right middle temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus), and the cerebellum (bilateral posterior). There were no differences in WM volume between ADHD children and control subjects. The results are consistent with previous studies that used different techniques, and may represent a possible neural basis for some of the motor and attentional deficits commonly found in ADHD.

  16. Alterations of Regional Spontaneous Brain Activity and Gray Matter Volume in the Blind.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Aili; Tian, Jing; Li, Rui; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Tianzi; Qin, Wen; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-01-01

    Visual deprivation can induce alterations of regional spontaneous brain activity (RSBA). However, the effects of onset age of blindness on the RSBA and the association between the alterations of RSBA and brain structure are still unclear in the blind. In this study, we performed resting-state functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging on 50 sighted controls and 91 blind subjects (20 congenitally blind, 27 early blind, and 44 late blind individuals). Compared with the sighted control, we identified increased RSBA in the blind in primary and high-level visual areas and decreased RSBA in brain regions which are ascribed to sensorimotor and salience networks. In contrast, blind subjects exhibited significantly decreased gray matter volume (GMV) in the visual areas, while they exhibited significantly increased GMV in the sensorimotor areas. Moreover, the onset age of blindness was negatively correlated with the GMV of visual areas in blind subjects, whereas it exerted complex influences on the RSBA. Finally, significant negative correlations were shown between RSBA and GMV values. Our results demonstrated system-dependent, inverse alterations in RSBA and GMV after visual deprivation. Furthermore, the onset age of blindness has different effects on the reorganizations in RSBA and GMV. PMID:26568891

  17. Executive dysfunction and gray matter atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongming; Sun, Hongzan; Dong, Xiaoyu; Liu, Baiwei; Xu, Yongchuan; Chen, Sipan; Song, Lichun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that impairment in executive function (EF) is common in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However, the neuroanatomic basis of executive impairment in patients with aMCI remains unclear. In this study, multiple regression voxel-based morphometry analyses were used to examine the relationship between regional gray matter volumes and EF performance in 50 patients with aMCI and 48 healthy age-matched controls. The core EF components (response inhibition, working memory and task switching, based on the EF model of Miyake et al) were accessed with computerized tasks. Atrophic brain areas related to decreases in the three EF components in patients with aMCI were located in the frontal and temporal cortices. Within the frontal cortex, the brain region related to response inhibition was identified in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Brain regions related to working memory were located in the left anterior cingulate gyrus, left premotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus, and brain regions related to task shifting were distributed in the bilateral frontal cortex. Atrophy in the right inferior frontal gyrus was most closely associated with a decrease in all three EF components in patients with aMCI. Our data, from the perspective of brain morphology, contribute to a better understanding of the role of these brain areas in the neural network of EF.

  18. Cadherin expression by embryonic divisions and derived gray matter structures in the telencephalon of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Redies, C; Medina, L; Puelles, L

    2001-09-24

    The expression of three cadherins (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was studied by immunohistochemistry in the telencephalon of chicken embryos at intermediate stages of development (11 and 15 days of incubation). Expression patterns were related to cytoarchitecture and to previously published data on functional connections and on the expression of gene regulatory proteins. Our results indicate that, like in other regions of the embryonic chicken brain, the expression of each cadherin is restricted to parts of embryonic divisions as well as to particular nuclei, areas or their subdivisions. The expression patterns are largely complementary with partial overlap. The regional expression of the cadherins respects the boundary between the pallium and the subpallium as well as between various pallial and subpallial subdivisions. Novel subdivisions were found in several telencephalic areas. For example, subjacent to the hyperstriatum, the neostriatum contains multiple islands of cells with a profile of cadherin expression that differs from the surrounding matrix ("island fields"). Moreover, the expression of each cadherin is apparently associated with parts of intratelencephalic neural circuits and of thalamopallial and basal ganglia pathways. These results support a role for cadherins in the aggregation and differentiation of gray matter structures within embryonic brain divisions. The cadherin immunostaining patterns are interpreted in the context of a recently proposed divisional scheme of the avian pallium that postulates medial, dorsal, lateral, and ventral divisions as complete radial histogenetic units (Puelles et al. [2000]).

  19. Cognitive impairment and gray matter volume abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Lan; Xiang, Mingqing; Luo, Wei; Huang, Jinbai; Li, Maokun; Xiong, Xunbo; Wang, Hua

    2015-10-21

    To investigate the association between cognitive impairment and gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction (SCI) patients, the GMV of 62 pairs of patients and well-matched healthy controls was calculated. All participants underwent a P300 test, a Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test. Compared with controls, the patients showed decreased GMV in the left superior frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus; no significantly increasing GMV was found. The volumes of the frontal and temporal lobes were positively correlated with the score of the MoCA scale and P300 amplitudes (r≥0.62, P<0.01). The P300 latency was negatively correlated with the volumes of the frontal lobe, the temporal lobe, and the hippocampus (r≤-0.71, P<0.05). No significant correlations between the GMV of the abnormal brain regions and four clinical characteristics in SCI patients were found, suggesting that cognitive deficiency existed in SCI patients and the reduced GMV might contribute to the pathology of cognitive deficiency in SCI patients. PMID:26313037

  20. A Voxel Based Morphometry Study of Brain Gray Matter Volumes in Juvenile Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jayarajan, Rajan Nishanth; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Viswanath, Biju; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Srinath, Shoba; Chandrashekar, C.R.; Janardhan Reddy, Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adult patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have been shown to have gray matter (GM) volume differences from healthy controls in multiple regions – the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial frontal gyri (MFG), striatum, thalamus, and superior parietal lobule. However, there is paucity of data with regard to juvenile OCD. Hence, we examined GM volume differences between juvenile OCD patients and matched healthy controls using voxel based morphometry (VBM) with the above apriori regions of interest. Method: Fifteen right handed juvenile patients with OCD and age- sex- handedness- matched healthy controls were recruited after administering the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-KID and the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, and scanned using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. VBM methodology was followed. Results: In comparison with healthy controls, patients had significantly smaller GM volumes in left ACC. YBOCS total score (current) showed significant negative correlation with GM volumes in bilateral OFC, and left superior parietal lobule. Conclusion: These findings while reiterating the important role of the orbito-fronto-striatal circuitry, also implicate in the parietal lobe – especially the superior parietal lobule as an important structure involved in the pathogenesis of OCD. PMID:26379719

  1. Connectivity-based segmentation of the periaqueductal gray matter in human with brainstem optimized diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ezra, Martyn; Faull, Olivia Kate; Jbabdi, Saad; Pattinson, Kyle Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a midbrain structure, involved in key homeostatic neurobiological functions, such as pain modulation and cardiorespiratory control. Animal research has identified four subdivisional columns that differ in both connectivity and function. Until now these findings have not been replicated in humans. This study used high-resolution brainstem optimized diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and probabilistic tractography to segment the human PAG into four subdivisions, based on voxel connectivity profiles. We identified four distinct subdivisions demonstrating high spatial concordance with the columns of the animal model. The resolution of these subdivisions for individual subjects permitted detailed examination of their structural connectivity without the requirement of an a priori starting location. Interestingly patterns of forebrain connectivity appear to be different to those found in nonhuman studies, whereas midbrain and hindbrain connectivity appears to be maintained. Although there are similarities in the columnar structure of the PAG subdivisions between humans and nonhuman animals, there appears to be different patterns of cortical connectivity. This suggests that the functional organization of the PAG may be different between species, and as a consequence, functional studies in nonhumans may not be directly translatable to humans. This highlights the need for focused functional studies in humans. PMID:26138504

  2. The relationship between inflammatory markers and voxel-based gray matter volumes in nondemented older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wen, Wei; Crawford, John D; Brodaty, Henry; Baune, Bernard T; Kochan, Nicole A; Slavin, Melissa J; Reppermund, Simone; Kang, Kristan; Trollor, Julian N

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by chronically elevated inflammatory markers (IMs). Peripheral IM levels have been found in negative correlations with brain structural measures including global and lobar volumes and the hippocampus. This study investigated the relationship between 10 peripheral IMs and voxel-based gray matter (GM) volumes in nondemented older adults (n = 463). Two proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α] and interleukin-1β) and 2 vascular IMs (vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) were negatively correlated with regional GM volumes. TNF-α and interleukin-1β were both significantly correlated with GM volumes in the left occipitotemporal area, left superior occipital gyrus, and left inferior parietal lobule; TNF-α was also significantly correlated with the bilateral medial prefrontal cortices and approached significance for the correlations with the bilateral hippocampi. Significant GM correlations with vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 were located in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices, and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the cerebellum and right hippocampus. The neuroanatomical correlation patterns of 2 proinflammatory cytokines and 2 vascular IMs might be reflective of the effects of neurodegenerative and vascular pathological processes in the ageing brain.

  3. Altered Gray Matter Structural Covariance Networks in Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Montembeault, Maxime; Rouleau, Isabelle; Provost, Jean-Sébastien; Brambati, Simona Maria

    2016-06-01

    Clinical symptoms observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients may reflect variations within specific large-scale brain networks, modeling AD as a disconnection syndrome. The present magnetic resonance imaging study aims to compare the organization of gray matter structural covariance networks between 109 cognitively unimpaired controls (CTRL) and 109 AD patients positive to beta-amyloid at the early stages of the disease, using voxel-based morphometry. The default-mode network (DMN; medial temporal lobe subsystem) was less extended in AD patients in comparison with CTRL, with a significant decrease in the structural association between the entorhinal cortex and the medial prefrontal and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. The DMN (midline core subsystem) was also less extended in AD patients. Trends toward increased structural association were observed in the salience and executive control networks. The observed changes suggest that early disruptions in structural association between heteromodal association cortices and the entorhinal cortex could contribute to an isolation of the hippocampal formation, potentially giving rise to the clinical hallmark of AD, progressive memory impairment. It also provides critical support to the hypothesis that the reduced connectivity within the DMN in early AD is accompanied by an enhancement of connectivity in the salience and executive control networks.

  4. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems. PMID:25282329

  5. Sleep reverts changes in human gray and white matter caused by wake-dependent training.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Giulio; Cecchetti, Luca; Siclari, Francesca; Buchmann, Andreas; Yu, Xiaoqian; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bellesi, Michele; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Kecskemeti, Steven R; Riedner, Brady A; Alexander, Andrew L; Benca, Ruth M; Ghilardi, M Felice; Pietrini, Pietro; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Learning leads to rapid microstructural changes in gray (GM) and white (WM) matter. Do these changes continue to accumulate if task training continues, and can they be reverted by sleep? We addressed these questions by combining structural and diffusion weighted MRI and high-density EEG in 16 subjects studied during the physiological sleep/wake cycle, after 12 h and 24 h of intense practice in two different tasks, and after post-training sleep. Compared to baseline wake, 12 h of training led to a decline in cortical mean diffusivity. The decrease became even more significant after 24 h of task practice combined with sleep deprivation. Prolonged practice also resulted in decreased ventricular volume and increased GM and WM subcortical volumes. All changes reverted after recovery sleep. Moreover, these structural alterations predicted cognitive performance at the individual level, suggesting that sleep's ability to counteract performance deficits is linked to its effects on the brain microstructure. The cellular mechanisms that account for the structural effects of sleep are unknown, but they may be linked to its role in promoting the production of cerebrospinal fluid and the decrease in synapse size and strength, as well as to its recently discovered ability to enhance the extracellular space and the clearance of brain metabolites. PMID:26812659

  6. Effects of multitasking-training on gray matter structure and resting state neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Multitasking (MT) constitutes engaging in two or more cognitive activities at the same time. MT-training improves performance on untrained MT tasks and alters the functional activity of the brain during MT. However, the effects of MT-training on neural mechanisms beyond MT-related functions are not known. We investigated the effects of 4 weeks of MT-training on regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and functional connectivity during rest (resting-FC) in young human adults. MT-training was associated with increased rGMV in three prefrontal cortical regions (left lateral rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), and left inferior frontal junction), the left posterior parietal cortex, and the left temporal and lateral occipital areas as well as decreased resting-FC between the right DLPFC and an anatomical cluster around the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Our findings suggest that participation in MT-training is as a whole associated with task-irrelevant plasticity (i.e., neural changes are not limited to certain specific task conditions) in regions and the network that are assumed to play roles in MT as well as diverse higher-order cognitive functions. We could not dissociate the effects of each task component and the diverse cognitive processes involved in MT because of the nature of the study, and these remain to be investigated.

  7. HIV-Associated Distal Neuropathic Pain is Associated with Smaller Total Cerebral Cortical Gray Matter

    PubMed Central

    Keltner, John R.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Vaida, Florin; Wang, Dongzhe; Franklin, Donald R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Sanders, Chelsea; McCutchan, J. Allen; Archibald, Sarah L.; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Cushman, Clint; Kim, Sung Min; Abramson, Ian; Taylor, Michael J.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Julaton, Michelle D.; Notestine, Randy J.; Corkran, Stephanie; Cherner, Mariana; Duarte, Nichole A.; Alexander, Terry; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Simpson, David M.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Morgello, Susan; Brown, Greg; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Jernigan, Terry L.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients. The clinical expression of HIV neuropathy is highly variable: many individuals report few symptoms, but about half report distal neuropathic pain (DNP), making it one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage, making it unclear why some patients do, and others do not, report pain. To better understand central nervous system contributions to HIV DNP, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes in 241 HIV-infected participants from an observational multi-site cohort study at five US sites (CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects Research Study, CHARTER). The association between DNP and the structural imaging outcomes was investigated using both linear and nonlinear (Gaussian Kernel support vector) multivariable regression, controlling for key demographic and clinical variables. Severity of DNP symptoms was correlated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volume (R = −0.24; p = 0.004). Understanding the mechanisms for this association between smaller total cortical volumes and DNP may provide insight into HIV DNP chronicity and treatment-resistance. PMID:24549970

  8. Interindividual differences in cognitive flexibility: influence of gray matter volume, functional connectivity and trait impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Robert; Cieslik, Edna C.; Rottschy, Claudia; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility, a core aspect of executive functioning, is required for the speeded shifting between different tasks and sets. Using an interindividual differences approach, we examined whether cognitive flexibility, as assessed by the Delis–Kaplan card-sorting test, is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) and functional connectivity (FC) of regions of a core network of multiple cognitive demands as well as with different facets of trait impulsivity. The core multiple-demand network was derived from three large-scale neuroimaging meta-analyses and only included regions that showed consistent associations with sustained attention, working memory as well as inhibitory control. We tested to what extent self-reported impulsivity as well as GMV and resting-state FC in this core network predicted cognitive flexibility independently and incrementally. Our analyses revealed that card-sorting performance correlated positively with GMV of the right anterior insula, FC between bilateral anterior insula and midcingulate cortex/supplementary motor area as well as the impulsivity dimension “Premeditation.” Importantly, GMV, FC and impulsivity together accounted for more variance of card-sorting performance than every parameter alone. Our results therefore indicate that various factors contribute individually to cognitive flexibility, underlining the need to search across multiple modalities when aiming to unveil the mechanisms behind executive functioning. PMID:24878823

  9. Concordance of white matter and gray matter abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: a voxel-based meta-analysis study.

    PubMed

    Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso; Palermo, Sara; D'Agata, Federico; Diano, Matteo; Bianco, Francesca; Duca, Sergio; Keller, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    There are at least two fundamental unanswered questions in the literature on autism spectrum disorders (ASD): Are abnormalities in white (WM) and gray matter (GM) consistent with one another? Are WM morphometric alterations consistent with alterations in the GM of regions connected by these abnormal WM bundles and vice versa? The aim of this work is to bridge this gap. After selecting voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging studies comparing autistic and normally developing groups of subjects, we conducted an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to estimate consistent brain alterations in ASD. Multidimensional scaling was used to test the similarity of the results. The ALE results were then analyzed to identify the regions of concordance between GM and WM areas. We found statistically significant topological relationships between GM and WM abnormalities in ASD. The most numerous were negative concordances, found bilaterally but with a higher prevalence in the right hemisphere. Positive concordances were found in the left hemisphere. Discordances reflected the spatial distribution of negative concordances. Thus, a different hemispheric contribution emerged, possibly related to pathogenetic factors affecting the right hemisphere during early developmental stages. Besides, WM fiber tracts linking the brain structures involved in social cognition showed abnormalities, and most of them had a negative concordance with the connected GM regions. We interpreted the results in terms of altered brain networks and their role in the pervasive symptoms dramatically impairing communication and social skills in ASD patients.

  10. Fast, shape-directed, landmark-based deep gray matter segmentation for quantification of iron deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin, Ahmet; Jasinschi, Radu; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Buchem, Mark A.; van Muiswinkel, Arianne

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces image processing methods to automatically detect the 3D volume-of-interest (VOI) and 2D region-of-interest (ROI) for deep gray matter organs (thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus) of patients with suspected iron deposition from MR dual echo images. Prior to the VOI and ROI detection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) region is segmented by a clustering algorithm. For the segmentation, we automatically determine the cluster centers with the mean shift algorithm that can quickly identify the modes of a distribution. After the identification of the modes, we employ the K-Harmonic means clustering algorithm to segment the volumetric MR data into CSF and non-CSF. Having the CSF mask and observing that the frontal lobe of the lateral ventricle has more consistent shape accross age and pathological abnormalities, we propose a shape-directed landmark detection algorithm to detect the VOI in a speedy manner. The proposed landmark detection algorithm utilizes a novel shape model of the front lobe of the lateral ventricle for the slices where thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus are expected to appear. After this step, for each slice in the VOI, we use horizontal and vertical projections of the CSF map to detect the approximate locations of the relevant organs to define the ROI. We demonstrate the robustness of the proposed VOI and ROI localization algorithms to pathologies, including severe amounts of iron accumulation as well as white matter lesions, and anatomical variations. The proposed algorithms achieved very high detection accuracy, 100% in the VOI detection , over a large set of a challenging MR dataset.

  11. Adaptive Modulation of Adult Brain Gray and White Matter to High Altitude: Structural MRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Jinqiang; Chen, Ji; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate brain structural alterations in adult immigrants who adapted to high altitude (HA). Voxel-based morphometry analysis of gray matter (GM) volumes, surface-based analysis of cortical thickness, and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) based on MRI images were conducted on 16 adults (20–22 years) who immigrated to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300–4400 m) for 2 years. They had no chronic mountain sickness. Control group consisted of 16 matched sea level subjects. A battery of neuropsychological tests was also conducted. HA immigrants showed significantly decreased GM volumes in the right postcentral gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus, and increased GM volumes in the right middle frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior and middle temporal gyri, bilateral inferior ventral pons, and right cerebellum crus1. While there was some divergence in the left hemisphere, surface-based patterns of GM changes in the right hemisphere resembled those seen for VBM analysis. FA changes were observed in multiple WM tracts. HA immigrants showed significant impairment in pulmonary function, increase in reaction time, and deficit in mental rotation. Parahippocampal and middle frontal GM volumes correlated with vital capacity. Superior frontal GM volume correlated with mental rotation and postcentral GM correlated with reaction time. Paracentral lobule and frontal FA correlated with mental rotation reaction time. There might be structural modifications occurred in the adult immigrants during adaptation to HA. The changes in GM may be related to impaired respiratory function and psychological deficits. PMID:23874692

  12. NCAN Cross-Disorder Risk Variant Is Associated With Limbic Gray Matter Deficits in Healthy Subjects and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Dannlowski, Udo; Kugel, Harald; Grotegerd, Dominik; Redlich, Ronny; Suchy, Janina; Opel, Nils; Suslow, Thomas; Konrad, Carsten; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Kircher, Tilo; Krug, Axel; Jansen, Andreas; Baune, Bernhard T; Heindel, Walter; Domschke, Katharina; Forstner, Andreas J; Nöthen, Markus M; Treutlein, Jens; Arolt, Volker; Hohoff, Christa; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies have reported an association between NCAN rs1064395 genotype and bipolar disorder. This association was later extended to schizophrenia and major depression. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of these associations are poorly understood. NCAN is implicated in neuronal plasticity and expressed in subcortical brain areas, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are critically involved in dysfunctional emotion processing and regulation across diagnostic boundaries. We hypothesized that the NCAN risk variant is associated with reduced gray matter volumes in these areas. Gray matter structure was assessed by voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI data in two independent German samples (healthy subjects, n=512; depressed inpatients, n=171). All participants were genotyped for NCAN rs1064395. Hippocampal and amygdala region-of-interest analyses were performed within each sample. In addition, whole-brain data from the combined sample were analyzed. Risk (A)-allele carriers showed reduced amygdala and hippocampal gray matter volumes in both cohorts with a remarkable spatial overlap. In the combined sample, genotype effects observed for the amygdala and hippocampus survived correction for entire brain volume. Further effects were also observed in the left orbitofrontal cortex and the cerebellum/fusiform gyrus. We conclude that NCAN genotype is associated with limbic gray matter alterations in healthy and depressed subjects in brain areas implicated in emotion perception and regulation. The present data suggest that NCAN forms susceptibility to neurostructural deficits in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal areas independent of disease, which might lead to disorder onset in the presence of other genetic or environmental risk factors. PMID:25801500

  13. Differential prefrontal gray matter correlates of treatment response to fluoxetine or cognitive-behavioral therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoexter, Marcelo Q; Dougherty, Darin D; Shavitt, Roseli G; D'Alcante, Carina C; Duran, Fabio L S; Lopes, Antonio C; Diniz, Juliana B; Batistuzzo, Marcelo C; Evans, Karleyton C; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Busatto, Geraldo F; Miguel, Euripedes C

    2013-07-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) fail to respond to adequate therapeutic approaches such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and/or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). This study investigated structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates as potential pre-treatment brain markers to predict treatment response in treatment-naïve OCD patients randomized between trials of fluoxetine or CBT. Treatment-naïve OCD patients underwent structural MRI scans before randomization to a 12-week clinical trial of either fluoxetine or group-based CBT. Voxel-based morphometry was used to identify correlations between pretreatment regional gray matter volume and changes in symptom severity on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Brain regional correlations of treatment response differed between treatment groups. Notably, symptom improvement in the fluoxetine treatment group (n=14) was significantly correlated with smaller pretreatment gray matter volume within the right middle lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), whereas symptom improvement in the CBT treatment group (n=15) was significantly correlated with larger pretreatment gray matter volume within the right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). No significant a priori regional correlations of treatment response were identified as common between the two treatment groups when considering the entire sample (n=29). These findings suggest that pretreatment gray matter volumes of distinct brain regions within the lateral OFC and mPFC were differentially correlated to treatment response to fluoxetine versus CBT in OCD patients. This study further implicates the mPFC in the fear/anxiety extinction process and stresses the importance of lateral portions of the OFC in mediating fluoxetine's effectiveness in OCD. Clinical registration information: http://clinicaltrials.gov-NCT00680602.

  14. Prefrontal Gray Matter Morphology Mediates the Association Between Serum Anticholinergicity and Cognitive Functioning in Early Course Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalik, Jessica A.; Eack, Shaun M.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic and other medications used in the treatment of schizophrenia place a burden on the cholinergic subsystems of the brain, which have been associated with increased cognitive impairment in the disorder. This study sought to examine the neurobiologic correlates of the association between serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) and cognitive impairments in early schizophrenia. Neurocognitive performance on measures of memory and executive function, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and SAA assays were collected from 47 early course, stabilized outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Voxel-based morphometry analyses employing general linear models, adjusting for demographic and illness-related confounds, were used to investigate the associations between SAA, gray matter morphology, and neurocognitive impairment. SAA was related to working memory and executive function impairments. Higher SAA was significantly associated with lower gray matter density in broad regions of the frontal and medial-temporal lobes, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), hippocampus, and striatum. Lower gray matter volume in the left DLPFC was found to significantly mediate the association between SAA and working memory impairment. Disease and/or medication-related cholinergic dysfunction may be associated with brain volume abnormalities in early course schizophrenia, which may account for the association between SAA and cognitive dysfunction in the disorder. PMID:23158779

  15. Puberty influences medial temporal lobe and cortical gray matter maturation differently in boys than girls matched for sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Bramen, Jennifer E; Hranilovich, Jennifer A; Dahl, Ronald E; Forbes, Erika E; Chen, Jessica; Toga, Arthur W; Dinov, Ivo D; Worthman, Carol M; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2011-03-01

    Sex differences in age- and puberty-related maturation of human brain structure have been observed in typically developing age-matched boys and girls. Because girls mature 1-2 years earlier than boys, the present study aimed at assessing sex differences in brain structure by studying 80 adolescent boys and girls matched on sexual maturity, rather than age. We evaluated pubertal influences on medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamic, caudate, and cortical gray matter volumes utilizing structural magnetic resonance imaging and 2 measures of pubertal status: physical sexual maturity and circulating testosterone. As predicted, significant interactions between sex and the effect of puberty were observed in regions with high sex steroid hormone receptor densities; sex differences in the right hippocampus, bilateral amygdala, and cortical gray matter were greater in more sexually mature adolescents. Within sex, we found larger volumes in MTL structures in more sexually mature boys, whereas smaller volumes were observed in more sexually mature girls. Our results demonstrate puberty-related maturation of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortical gray matter that is not confounded by age, and is different for girls and boys, which may contribute to differences in social and cognitive development during adolescence, and lasting sexual dimorphisms in the adult brain.

  16. Regional volumes and spatial volumetric distribution of gray matter in the gender dysphoric brain.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Schagen, Sebastian E E; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Veltman, Dick J; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette; Bakker, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The sexual differentiation of the brain is primarily driven by gonadal hormones during fetal development. Leading theories on the etiology of gender dysphoria (GD) involve deviations herein. To examine whether there are signs of a sex-atypical brain development in GD, we quantified regional neural gray matter (GM) volumes in 55 female-to-male and 38 male-to-female adolescents, 44 boys and 52 girls without GD and applied both univariate and multivariate analyses. In girls, more GM volume was observed in the left superior medial frontal cortex, while boys had more volume in the bilateral superior posterior hemispheres of the cerebellum and the hypothalamus. Regarding the GD groups, at whole-brain level they differed only from individuals sharing their gender identity but not from their natal sex. Accordingly, using multivariate pattern recognition analyses, the GD groups could more accurately be automatically discriminated from individuals sharing their gender identity than those sharing their natal sex based on spatially distributed GM patterns. However, region of interest analyses indicated less GM volume in the right cerebellum and more volume in the medial frontal cortex in female-to-males in comparison to girls without GD, while male-to-females had less volume in the bilateral cerebellum and hypothalamus than natal boys. Deviations from the natal sex within sexually dimorphic structures were also observed in the untreated subsamples. Our findings thus indicate that GM distribution and regional volumes in GD adolescents are largely in accordance with their respective natal sex. However, there are subtle deviations from the natal sex in sexually dimorphic structures, which can represent signs of a partial sex-atypical differentiation of the brain. PMID:25720349

  17. Regional gray matter volume is associated with empathizing and systemizing in young adults.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others for predicting their behavior and responding with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern the system in order to predict its behavior. Using voxel-based morphometry and questionnaires in a large sample of normal, right-handed young adults, we investigated the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) correlates of empathizing and systemizing and additionally those of the D score, which is the difference between systemizing and empathizing, to reveal the comprehensive picture of those correlates. Negative rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive rGMV correlates of the D score (formed by the negative correlation between rGMV and empathizing), were found primarily in nodes in the default mode network, mirror neuron system, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex together with other areas. Positive rGMV correlates of systemizing and of the D score (formed by the positive correlation between rGMV and systemizing) were found primarily in nodes in the external attention system, middle cingulate cortex, and other regions. Negative rGMV correlates of systemizing were found in an area close to the left posterior insula and putamen. These findings reconcile some previously inconsistent findings, provide other new findings and suggest that these areas contribute to empathizing-systemizing. Furthermore, the negative/positive rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive/negative rGMV correlates of systemizing overlapped substantially. This may be in line with the notion that empathizing and systemizing compete neurally in the brain. PMID:24409308

  18. Gray matter volume abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiuquan; Liu, Chen; Yuan, Qiaoying; Yin, Xuntao; Wei, Luqing; Cui, Jinguo; Tao, Ran; Wei, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential brain gray matter (GM) volume changes that occur with the transition from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). VBM analyses of brain GM based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were performed on 28 T2DM patients with MCI, 25 T2DM patients without MCI, 28 MCI patients and 29 healthy controls (HC). Compared with the HC, the T2DM patients both with and without MCI showed significantly decreased total GM volume. Furthermore, the VBM results indicated that the T2DM patients without MCI exhibited extensively decreased GM volume compared with the HC in certain brain regions, including the superior and middle temporal gyrus (MTG), the superior and medial frontal gyrus and the middle occipital gyrus. In addition to more extensive GM atrophy in the aforementioned brain regions, the medial temporal lobe also exhibited GM loss in the T2DM patients with MCI. Furthermore, relative to the patients without MCI, only the left MTG exhibited a lower GM volume in the T2DM patients with MCI, which was positively correlated with the total MoCA score (r=0.699, P<0.01). Finally, relative to MCI, the left MTG atrophy was also found in the T2DM patients with MCI. Our findings suggest that MTG atrophy was associated with an increased risk for MCI in T2DM patients. The brain structural changes in many brain regions may underlie the transition from normal cognition to MCI in T2DM patients.

  19. Sex-specific Gray Matter Volume Differences in Females with Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tanya M.; Flowers, D. Lynn; Napoliello, Eileen M.; Eden, Guinevere F.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia, characterized by unexpected reading difficulty, is associated with anomalous brain anatomy and function. Previous structural neuroimaging studies have converged in reports of less gray matter volume (GMV) in dyslexics within left hemisphere regions known to subserve language. Due to the higher prevalence of dyslexia in males, these studies are heavily weighted towards males, raising the question whether studies of dyslexia in females only and using the same techniques, would generate the same findings. In a replication study of men we obtained the same findings of less GMV in dyslexics in left middle/inferior temporal gyri and right postcentral/supramarginal gyri as reported in the literature. However, comparisons in women with and without dyslexia did not yield left hemisphere differences and instead we found less GMV in right precuneus and paracentral lobule/medial frontal gyrus. In boys, we found less GMV in left inferior parietal cortex (supramarginal/angular gyri), again consistent with previous work, while in girls differences were within right central sulcus, spanning adjacent gyri, and left primary visual cortex. Our investigation into anatomical variants in dyslexia replicates existing studies in males, but at the same time shows that dyslexia in females is not characterized by involvement of left hemisphere language regions but rather early sensory and motor cortices (i.e. motor and premotor cortex, primary visual cortex). Our findings suggest that models on the brain basis of dyslexia, primarily developed through the study of males, may not be appropriate for females and suggest a need for more sex-specific investigations into dyslexia. PMID:23625146

  20. Galanin microinjection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter produces paradigm-dependent anxiolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Soares, F R C; Silote, G P; Almeida-Santos, A F; Aguiar, D C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-03-01

    Galanin is a peptide that is present in the central nervous system in mammals, including rodents and humans. The actions of galanin are mediated by three types of metabotropic receptors: GAL1, GAL2, and GAL3. GAL1 and GAL3 increase K(+) efflux, and GAL2 increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The distribution of galanin and its receptors suggests its involvement in fear and/or anxiety. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a key mediator of defensive behaviors that is both targeted by galaninergic projections and supplied with GAL1 receptors and, less markedly, GAL2 receptors. We examined the effects of galanin microinjections in the dorsal PAG (dPAG) on the performance of rats in different models of anxiety. Male Wistar rats (n=7-12) were implanted with guide cannulae in the dPAG. They received microinjections of either galanin (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 nmol) or vehicle and were tested in the Vogel conflict test (VCT), elevated plus maze (EPM), and elevated T-maze (ETM). Rats that were tested in the ETM were further evaluated for exploratory activity in the open field test (OFT). Galanin microinjections had no effects on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM or VCT or exploratory activity in the EPM or OFT. In the ETM, however, microinjections of 3 nmol galanin impaired learned anxiety (i.e., avoidance of the open arms) without changing unconditioned fear (i.e., escape from the open arms). The present data suggest that galanin transmission in the dPAG inhibits the acquisition of anxiety-like responses in the ETM. PMID:26751815

  1. Reduced cerebellar gray matter is a neural signature of physical frailty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Liu, Li-Kuo; Lee, Pei-Lin; Lee, Wei-Ju; Chen, Liang-Kung; Wang, Pei-Ning; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-09-01

    Physical frailty has been recognized as a clinical syndrome resulting from declines in various physiological systems; however, the role of the central nervous system in the pathophysiology of frailty remains unclear. The I-Lan Longitudinal Aging Study randomly sampled community-dwelling people aged 50 or older for a brain magnetic resonance imaging study. All participants were assessed for frailty status (robust, prefrail, and frail) based on the presence of five frailty components: slow walking speed, muscle weakness, low physical activity, exhaustion and weight loss (Fried criteria). Gray matter volume (GMV) changes associated with frailty status and individual frailty components were examined. Overall, 456 participants (64.0 ± 8.5 years, 47.6% women) were included in this study. The prefrail (n = 178, 39.0%) and frail (n = 19, 4.2%) subjects were grouped for analysis. The prefrail-frail group showed reduced GMV, compared to the robust group (n = 259, 56.8%), in the cerebellum, hippocampi, middle frontal gyri, and several other cerebral regions (corrected P < 0.05). Each frailty component was associated with GMV changes in functionally related brain areas. Hierarchical cluster analysis categorized these components into three subsets. Motor-related components, including weakness, low activity, and slowness, comprised one subset with a common cerebellar involvement. Exhaustion and weight loss were the other two subsets without cerebellar changes. To conclude, physical frailty is associated with a decreased reserve in specific brain regions, especially cerebellum. Further longitudinal studies are needed to explore if the cerebellum- and noncerebellum-based frailty components reflect a distinctive future risk for developing frailty. PMID:26096356

  2. Parcellation of the human orbitofrontal cortex based on gray matter volume covariance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaigui; Qin, Wen; Qi, Haotian; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-02-01

    The human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is an enigmatic brain region that cannot be parcellated reliably using diffusional and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) because there is signal dropout that results from an inherent defect in imaging techniques. We hypothesise that the OFC can be reliably parcellated into subregions based on gray matter volume (GMV) covariance patterns that are derived from artefact-free structural images. A total of 321 healthy young subjects were examined by high-resolution structural MRI. The OFC was parcellated into subregions-based GMV covariance patterns; and then sex and laterality differences in GMV covariance pattern of each OFC subregion were compared. The human OFC was parcellated into the anterior (OFCa), medial (OFCm), posterior (OFCp), intermediate (OFCi), and lateral (OFCl) subregions. This parcellation scheme was validated by the same analyses of the left OFC and the bilateral OFCs in male and female subjects. Both visual observation and quantitative comparisons indicated a unique GMV covariance pattern for each OFC subregion. These OFC subregions mainly covaried with the prefrontal and temporal cortices, cingulate cortex and amygdala. In addition, GMV correlations of most OFC subregions were similar across sex and laterality except for significant laterality difference in the OFCl. The right OFCl had stronger GMV correlation with the right inferior frontal cortex. Using high-resolution structural images, we established a reliable parcellation scheme for the human OFC, which may provide an in vivo guide for subregion-level studies of this region and improve our understanding of the human OFC at subregional levels.

  3. Regional Gray Matter Volume Is Associated with Empathizing and Systemizing in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others for predicting their behavior and responding with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern the system in order to predict its behavior. Using voxel-based morphometry and questionnaires in a large sample of normal, right-handed young adults, we investigated the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) correlates of empathizing and systemizing and additionally those of the D score, which is the difference between systemizing and empathizing, to reveal the comprehensive picture of those correlates. Negative rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive rGMV correlates of the D score (formed by the negative correlation between rGMV and empathizing), were found primarily in nodes in the default mode network, mirror neuron system, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex together with other areas. Positive rGMV correlates of systemizing and of the D score (formed by the positive correlation between rGMV and systemizing) were found primarily in nodes in the external attention system, middle cingulate cortex, and other regions. Negative rGMV correlates of systemizing were found in an area close to the left posterior insula and putamen. These findings reconcile some previously inconsistent findings, provide other new findings and suggest that these areas contribute to empathizing–systemizing. Furthermore, the negative/positive rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive/negative rGMV correlates of systemizing overlapped substantially. This may be in line with the notion that empathizing and systemizing compete neurally in the brain. PMID:24409308

  4. Subclinical Albuminuria is linked to Gray Matter Atrophy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Disha; Pimentel, Daniela A.; Núñez, Maria-Zunilda; Abduljalil, Amir; Novak, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Objective Microalbuminuria (MA), a marker of renal microvascular disease, is associated with brain atrophy and neurovascular changes in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). We evaluated the relationship between urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and regional brain volumes determine whether subclinical albuminuria may indicate early structural brain changes in type 2 DM. Materials/Methods We studied UACR and brain volumes in 85 type 2 DM patients (64.8 ± 8.3 years) and 40 age-matched controls using 3D magnetization prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MP-RAGE) MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at 3 Tesla. The relationship between UACR and brain volumes was analyzed using the least square models. Results In DM patients, UACR ≥ 5 mg/g, UACR ≥ 10 mg/g and clinically significant MA (UACR ≥ 17 mg/g [males] and 25 mg/g [females]) were associated with lower gray matter (GM) volume in the frontal lobe (r2 adj = 0.2-0.4, P= 0.01-0.05) and UACR ≥ 5mg/g was also related to global GM atrophy (r2 adj= 0.1, P= 0.04), independent of DM duration, glucose levels, HbA1c and hypertension. For UACR ≥ 5mg/g, a lower global GM volume was related to worse executive function (P= 0.04) in the DM group. No associations were found for UACR (< 5 mg/g) and controls. Conclusions Subclinical albuminuria (UACR ≥ 5 mg/g) is associated with lower GM volume that has clinical impact on cognitive function in older diabetic patients, and these relationships are independent of DM control and hypertension. Therefore, UACR levels may serve as an additional marker of DM-related brain structural changes. PMID:25216926

  5. Patterns of Co-Occurring Gray Matter Concentration Loss across the Huntington Disease Prodrome

    PubMed Central

    Ciarochi, Jennifer Ashley; Calhoun, Vince D.; Lourens, Spencer; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Liu, Jingyu; Plis, Sergey M.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an abnormally expanded cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene. Age and CAG-expansion number are related to age at diagnosis and can be used to index disease progression. However, observed onset-age variability suggests that other factors also modulate progression. Indexing prodromal (pre-diagnosis) progression may highlight therapeutic targets by isolating the earliest-affected factors. We present the largest prodromal HD application of the univariate method voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the first application of the multivariate method source-based morphometry (SBM) to, respectively, compare gray matter concentration (GMC) and capture co-occurring GMC patterns in control and prodromal participants. Using structural MRI data from 1050 (831 prodromal, 219 control) participants, we characterize control-prodromal, whole-brain GMC differences at various prodromal stages. Our results provide evidence for (1) regional co-occurrence and differential patterns of decline across the prodrome, with parietal and occipital differences commonly co-occurring, and frontal and temporal differences being relatively independent from one another, (2) fronto-striatal circuits being among the earliest and most consistently affected in the prodrome, (3) delayed degradation in some movement-related regions, with increasing subcortical and occipital differences with later progression, (4) an overall superior-to-inferior gradient of GMC reduction in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes, and (5) the appropriateness of SBM for studying the prodromal HD population and its enhanced sensitivity to early prodromal and regionally concurrent differences. PMID:27708610

  6. Gray matter volume and executive functioning correlate with time since injury following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Singh, Prabhjyot; Kipman, Maia; Pisner, Derek; Fridman, Andrew; Weber, Mareen

    2016-01-26

    Most people who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) will recover to baseline functioning within a period of several days to weeks. A substantial minority of patients, however, will show persistent symptoms and mild cognitive complaints for much longer. To more clearly delineate how the duration of time since injury (TSI) is associated with neuroplastic cortical volume changes and cognitive recovery, we employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and select neuropsychological measures in a cross-sectional sample of 26 patients with mTBI assessed at either two-weeks, one-month, three-months, six-months, or one-year post injury, and a sample of 12 healthy controls. Longer duration of TSI was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and right fusiform gyrus, and better neurocognitive performance on measures of visuospatial design fluency and emotional functioning. In particular, volume within the vmPFC was positively correlated with design fluency and negatively correlated with symptoms of anxiety, whereas GMV of the fusiform gyrus was associated with greater design fluency and sustained visual psychomotor vigilance performance. Moreover, the larger GMV seen among the more chronic individuals was significantly greater than healthy controls, suggesting possible enlargement of these regions with time since injury. These findings are interpreted in light of burgeoning evidence suggesting that cortical regions often exhibit structural changes following experience or practice, and suggest that with greater time since an mTBI, the brain displays compensatory remodeling of cortical regions involved in emotional regulation, which may reduce distractibility during attention demanding visuo-motor tasks. PMID:26711488

  7. Preventing Alzheimer's disease-related gray matter atrophy by B-vitamin treatment.

    PubMed

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Refsum, Helga; de Jager, Celeste A; Jacoby, Robin; Nichols, Thomas E; Smith, Stephen M; Smith, A David

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to prevent atrophy of key brain regions related to cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD)? One approach is to modify nongenetic risk factors, for instance by lowering elevated plasma homocysteine using B vitamins. In an initial, randomized controlled study on elderly subjects with increased dementia risk (mild cognitive impairment according to 2004 Petersen criteria), we showed that high-dose B-vitamin treatment (folic acid 0.8 mg, vitamin B6 20 mg, vitamin B12 0.5 mg) slowed shrinkage of the whole brain volume over 2 y. Here, we go further by demonstrating that B-vitamin treatment reduces, by as much as seven fold, the cerebral atrophy in those gray matter (GM) regions specifically vulnerable to the AD process, including the medial temporal lobe. In the placebo group, higher homocysteine levels at baseline are associated with faster GM atrophy, but this deleterious effect is largely prevented by B-vitamin treatment. We additionally show that the beneficial effect of B vitamins is confined to participants with high homocysteine (above the median, 11 µmol/L) and that, in these participants, a causal Bayesian network analysis indicates the following chain of events: B vitamins lower homocysteine, which directly leads to a decrease in GM atrophy, thereby slowing cognitive decline. Our results show that B-vitamin supplementation can slow the atrophy of specific brain regions that are a key component of the AD process and that are associated with cognitive decline. Further B-vitamin supplementation trials focusing on elderly subjets with high homocysteine levels are warranted to see if progression to dementia can be prevented.

  8. APE1/Ref-1 facilitates recovery of gray and white matter and neurological function after mild stroke injury.

    PubMed

    Stetler, R Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K; Weng, Zhongfang; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Hassan, Sulaiman; Ferguson, Carolyn; Homanics, Gregg E; Cao, Guodong; Bennett, Michael V L; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-21

    A major hallmark of oxidative DNA damage after stroke is the induction of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and strand breaks. To mitigate cell loss after oxidative DNA damage, ischemic cells rapidly engage the base excision-repair proteins, such as the AP site-repairing enzyme AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), also named redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). Although forced overexpression of APE1 is known to protect against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, there is no concrete evidence demonstrating a role for endogenous APE1 in the long-term recovery of gray and white matter following ischemic injury. To address this gap, we generated, to our knowledge, the first APE1 conditional knockout (cKO) mouse line under control of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase. Using a well-established model of transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI), we show that induced deletion of APE1 dramatically enlarged infarct volume and impaired the recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. APE1 cKO markedly increased postischemic neuronal and oligodendrocyte degeneration, demonstrating that endogenous APE1 preserves both gray and white matter after tFCI. Because white matter repair is instrumental in behavioral recovery after stroke, we also examined the impact of APE1 cKO on demyelination and axonal conduction and discovered that APE1 cKO aggravated myelin loss and impaired neuronal communication following tFCI. Furthermore, APE1 cKO increased AP sites and activated the prodeath signaling proteins, PUMA and PARP1, after tFCI in topographically distinct manners. Our findings provide evidence that endogenous APE1 protects against ischemic infarction in both gray and white matter and facilitates the functional recovery of the central nervous system after mild stroke injury.

  9. APE1/Ref-1 facilitates recovery of gray and white matter and neurological function after mild stroke injury

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, R. Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Weng, Zhongfang; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Hassan, Sulaiman; Ferguson, Carolyn; Homanics, Gregg E.; Cao, Guodong; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of oxidative DNA damage after stroke is the induction of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and strand breaks. To mitigate cell loss after oxidative DNA damage, ischemic cells rapidly engage the base excision-repair proteins, such as the AP site-repairing enzyme AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), also named redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). Although forced overexpression of APE1 is known to protect against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, there is no concrete evidence demonstrating a role for endogenous APE1 in the long-term recovery of gray and white matter following ischemic injury. To address this gap, we generated, to our knowledge, the first APE1 conditional knockout (cKO) mouse line under control of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase. Using a well-established model of transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI), we show that induced deletion of APE1 dramatically enlarged infarct volume and impaired the recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. APE1 cKO markedly increased postischemic neuronal and oligodendrocyte degeneration, demonstrating that endogenous APE1 preserves both gray and white matter after tFCI. Because white matter repair is instrumental in behavioral recovery after stroke, we also examined the impact of APE1 cKO on demyelination and axonal conduction and discovered that APE1 cKO aggravated myelin loss and impaired neuronal communication following tFCI. Furthermore, APE1 cKO increased AP sites and activated the prodeath signaling proteins, PUMA and PARP1, after tFCI in topographically distinct manners. Our findings provide evidence that endogenous APE1 protects against ischemic infarction in both gray and white matter and facilitates the functional recovery of the central nervous system after mild stroke injury. PMID:27274063

  10. APE1/Ref-1 facilitates recovery of gray and white matter and neurological function after mild stroke injury.

    PubMed

    Stetler, R Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K; Weng, Zhongfang; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Hassan, Sulaiman; Ferguson, Carolyn; Homanics, Gregg E; Cao, Guodong; Bennett, Michael V L; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-21

    A major hallmark of oxidative DNA damage after stroke is the induction of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and strand breaks. To mitigate cell loss after oxidative DNA damage, ischemic cells rapidly engage the base excision-repair proteins, such as the AP site-repairing enzyme AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), also named redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). Although forced overexpression of APE1 is known to protect against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, there is no concrete evidence demonstrating a role for endogenous APE1 in the long-term recovery of gray and white matter following ischemic injury. To address this gap, we generated, to our knowledge, the first APE1 conditional knockout (cKO) mouse line under control of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase. Using a well-established model of transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI), we show that induced deletion of APE1 dramatically enlarged infarct volume and impaired the recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. APE1 cKO markedly increased postischemic neuronal and oligodendrocyte degeneration, demonstrating that endogenous APE1 preserves both gray and white matter after tFCI. Because white matter repair is instrumental in behavioral recovery after stroke, we also examined the impact of APE1 cKO on demyelination and axonal conduction and discovered that APE1 cKO aggravated myelin loss and impaired neuronal communication following tFCI. Furthermore, APE1 cKO increased AP sites and activated the prodeath signaling proteins, PUMA and PARP1, after tFCI in topographically distinct manners. Our findings provide evidence that endogenous APE1 protects against ischemic infarction in both gray and white matter and facilitates the functional recovery of the central nervous system after mild stroke injury. PMID:27274063

  11. Neurodevelopmental sequelae associated with gray and white matter changes and their cellular basis: A comparison between Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Lagopoulos, J

    2015-11-01

    Many psychiatric diseases, such as major depression and schizophrenia, are accompanied by patterns of gray matter and white matter changes in the cortex that may be due to structural pathologies of synapses and their dendrites in the gray matter on the one hand and to pathologies in myelinating oligodendrocytes on the other. Here the possibility has been briefly examined that such a generalization might also hold for Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Evidence is presented that gray matter changes that accompany ASD may in fact reflect changes in synapses and subsequently of their dendrites, whereas those in the white matter reflect changes in myelination due to pathologies of oligodendrocytes. It is proposed that such structural pathologies during development provide a coherent biological model not only for the onset and course of ASD but also provide the basis for development and systematic evaluation of new treatment strategies.

  12. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., > or = 22 days) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, experimental studies revealed changes in the gray matter (GM) of the brain after simulated microgravity. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning and motor behavior. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on the brain. VBM analysis revealed a progressive decrease from pre- to in- bed rest in GM volume in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate. Over the same time period, there was a progressive increase in GM volume in the cerebellum, occipital-, and parietal cortex, including the precuneus. The majority of these changes did not fully recover during the post-bed rest period. Analysis of lobular GM volumes obtained with BRAINS showed significantly increased volume from pre-bed rest to in-bed rest in GM of the parietal lobe and the third ventricle. Temporal GM volume at 70 days in bed rest was smaller than that at the first pre-bed rest measurement. Trend analysis showed significant positive linear and negative quadratic relationships between parietal GM and time, a positive linear relationship between third ventricle volume and time, and a negative linear

  13. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernstock, Joshua D.; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one’s genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25802011

  14. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mallucci, Giulia; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Bernstock, Joshua D; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one's genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis.

  15. The role of immune cells, glia and neurons in white and gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mallucci, Giulia; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Bernstock, Joshua D; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common causes of chronic neurological disability beginning in early to middle adult life. Multiple sclerosis is idiopathic in nature, yet increasing correlative evidence supports a strong association between one's genetic predisposition, the environment and the immune system. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis have primarily been shown to result from a disruption in the integrity of myelinated tracts within the white matter of the central nervous system. However, recent research has also highlighted the hitherto underappreciated involvement of gray matter in multiple sclerosis disease pathophysiology, which may be especially relevant when considering the accumulation of irreversible damage and progressive disability. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of the interplay between inflammation, glial/neuronal damage and regeneration throughout the course of multiple sclerosis via the analysis of both white and gray matter lesional pathology. Further, we describe the common pathological mechanisms underlying both relapsing and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, and analyze how current (as well as future) treatments may interact and/or interfere with its pathology. Understanding the putative mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis will be key in helping to develop effective therapeutic strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the diverse morbidities associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25802011

  16. The temptation of suicide: striatal gray matter, discounting of delayed rewards, and suicide attempts in late-life depression

    PubMed Central

    Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Siegle, Greg J.; Szanto, Katalin; Clark, Luke; Reynolds, Charles F.; Aizenstein, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Background Converging evidence implicates basal ganglia alterations in impulsivity and suicidal behavior. For example, D2/D3 agonists and subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson’s disease trigger impulse control disorders and possibly suicidal behavior. Further, suicidal behavior has been associated with structural basal ganglia abnormalities. Finally, low-lethality, unplanned suicide attempts are associated with increased discounting of delayed rewards, a behavior dependent upon the striatum. Thus, we tested whether, in late-life depression, changes in the basal ganglia were associated with suicide attempts and with increased delay discounting. Methods Fifty-two persons aged ≥60 underwent extensive clinical and cognitive characterization: 33 with major depression (13 suicide attempters [SA], 20 non-suicidal depressed elderly), and 19 non-depressed controls. Participants had high-resolution T1-weighted MPRAGE MRI scans. Basal ganglia gray matter voxel counts were estimated using atlas-based segmentation, with a highly-deformable automated algorithm. Discounting of delayed rewards was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire, and delay aversion with the Cambridge Gamble Task. Results SA had lower putamen but not caudate or pallidum gray matter voxel counts, compared to the control groups. This difference persisted after accounting for substance use disorders and possible brain injury from suicide attempts. SA with lower putamen gray matter voxel counts displayed higher delay discounting on the MCQ, but not delay aversion on the CGT. Secondary analyses revealed that SA had lower voxel counts in associative and possibly ventral, but not sensorimotor striatum. Conclusions Our findings, while limited by small sample size and case-control design, suggest that striatal lesions could contribute to suicidal behavior by increasing impulsivity. PMID:21999930

  17. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca’s area is abnormal in people who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Lerch, Jason P.; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca’s area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter

  18. Mineralization of organic matter in gray forest soil and typical chernozem with degraded structure due to physical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. M.; Zhuravlev, N. S.; Tulina, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of the organic matter mineralization in the gray forest soil and typical chernozem with structure disturbed by physical impacts (grinding and extraction of water-soluble substances) were studied in two long-term experiments at the constant temperature and moisture. The grinding of soil to particles of < 1 mm or < 0.25 mm promoted the mobilization of a small part of the formerly aggregated and protected organic matter, along with a short-term increase in the C-CO2 production. The dispersion of the soils with water and leaching of water-soluble organic matter resulted in the significant decrease of the content of potentially mineralizable organic matter in the soils. The physical disturbance caused changes in the ratio of easily mineralizable ( k 1 > 0.1, day-1) and difficultly mineralizable (0.01 > k 3 > 0.001, day-1) fractions in the active pool of soil organic matter. The results of the studies show that the destruction of the structural-aggregate status is one of the reasons for the active soil organic matter depletion and, as a consequence, for the degradation of the properties inherent to the undisturbed soils.

  19. Anterior cingulate cortex gray matter volume mediates an association between 2D:4D ratio and trait aggression in women but not men.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Adam X; Norman, Rachel E; Radtke, Spenser R; Carré, Justin M; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2015-06-01

    Previous research demonstrates that prenatal testosterone exposure increases aggression, possibly through its effects on the structure and function of neural circuits supporting threat detection and emotion regulation. Here we examined associations between regional gray matter volume, trait aggression, and the ratio of the second and fourth digit of the hand (2D:4D ratio) as a putative index of prenatal testosterone exposure in 464 healthy young adult volunteers. Our analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between 2D:4D ratio and gray matter volume of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), a brain region supporting emotion regulation, conflict monitoring, and behavioral inhibition. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that reduced (i.e., masculinized) gray matter volume in the dACC mediated the relationship between 2D:4D ratio and aggression in women, but not men. Expanding on this gender-specific mediation, additional analyses demonstrated that the shared variance between 2D:4D ratio, dACC gray matter volume, and aggression in women reflected the tendency to engage in cognitive reappraisal of emotionally provocative stimuli. Our results provide novel evidence that 2D:4D ratio is associated with masculinization of dACC gray matter volume, and that this neural phenotype mediates, in part, the expression of trait aggression in women.

  20. Is there any difference in Amide and NOE CEST effects between white and gray matter at 7 T?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Vitaliy; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wijnen, Jannie; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is providing tissue physiology dependent contrast, e.g. by looking at Amide and NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement) effects. CEST is unique in providing quantitative metabolite information at high imaging resolution. However, direct comparison of Amide and NOE effects between different tissues may result in wrong conclusions on the metabolite concentration due to the additional contributors to the observed CEST contrast, such as water content (WC) and water T1 relaxation (T1w). For instance, there are multiple contradictory reports in the literature on Amide and NOE effects in white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) at 7 T. This study shows that at 7 T, tissue water T1 relaxation is a stronger contributor to CEST contrasts than WC. After water T1 correction, there was no difference in Amide effects between WM and GM, whereas WM/GM contrast was enhanced for NOE effects.

  1. Subcortical and cortical gray matter differences between Kraepelinian and non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients identified using voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, Vicente; Hernández, Juan A; Sanz, Javier; Paniagua, Juan C; Hernández, Ana I; Martín, Carmen; Matías, Juan; Calama, Julia; Bote, Berta

    2010-10-30

    The long-term outcome of schizophrenia patients may differ depending on their brain structure. This would be reflected in significant structural differences between poor-outcome (i.e., Kraepelinian) and non-Kraepelinian patients. To assess this possibility, we have evaluated the degree of deviation in brain structure in Kraepelinian patients with respect to controls and non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients. We used voxel-brain morphometry (VBM) to assess the differences in gray matter volume across the brain in the Kraepelinian group with respect to the healthy controls and non-Kraepelinian patients. Twenty-six Kraepelinian and 18 non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients and 41 healthy controls were included. With respect to the healthy controls, the Kraepelinian patients showed a very significant decrease in gray matter in the frontal, occipital, and limbic cortices, and, at a subcortical level, bilaterally in the striatum and thalamus. In comparison with the non-Kraepelinian patients, the Kraepelinian individuals continued to show a similar subcortical decrease. Thus, Kraepelinian patients may be characterized by a distinct pattern of brain abnormalities, in particular, in subcortical regions.

  2. Voxel-based morphometry in opera singers: Increased gray-matter volume in right somatosensory and auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Boris; Veit, Ralf; Moll, Christina Valérie; Gaser, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Lotze, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to instrumental musicians, professional singers do not train on a specific instrument but perfect a motor system that has already been extensively trained during speech motor development. Previous functional imaging studies suggest that experience with singing is associated with enhanced somatosensory-based vocal motor control. However, experience-dependent structural plasticity in vocal musicians has rarely been studied. We investigated voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 27 professional classical singers and compared gray matter volume in regions of the "singing-network" to an age-matched group of 28 healthy volunteers with no special singing experience. We found right hemispheric volume increases in professional singers in ventral primary somatosensory cortex (larynx S1) and adjacent rostral supramarginal gyrus (BA40), as well as in secondary somatosensory (S2) and primary auditory cortices (A1). Moreover, we found that earlier commencement with vocal training correlated with increased gray-matter volume in S1. However, in contrast to studies with instrumental musicians, this correlation only emerged in singers who began their formal training after the age of 14years, when speech motor development has reached its first plateau. Structural data thus confirm and extend previous functional reports suggesting a pivotal role of somatosensation in vocal motor control with increased experience in singing. Results furthermore indicate a sensitive period for developing additional vocal skills after speech motor coordination has matured.

  3. Brain Gray Matter Abnormalities in First-Episode, Treatment-Naive Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bochao; Cai, Wu; Wang, Xiuli; Lei, Du; Guo, Yingkun; Yang, Xun; Wu, Qizhu; Gong, Jianping; Gong, Qiyong; Ning, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have been conducted in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the brain structural abnormalities in OCD, especially in children, are not yet well characterized. We aimed to identify gray matter (GM) abnormalities in the early stage of pediatric OCD and examine the relationship between these structural abnormalities with clinical characteristics. Examinations of 30 first-episode, treatment-naive pediatric OCD patients without any comorbidities and 30 matched healthy controls (HCs) were performed with 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) was used to conduct voxel-wise tests for group differences in regional gray matter volume (GMV). Compared to HCs, the patient group exhibited more GMV in the bilateral putamen and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and less GMV in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL). The GMV alternation in the right putamen of OCD patients was positively correlated with Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores, while the GMV alternation in the left IPL exhibited a trend to negatively correlate with HAM-A scores. Our current results suggest that the GM abnormalities were defined in the early stage of pediatric OCD. Moreover, these findings provided further evidence of brain GM abnormalities that are not only present in the classical fronto-striatal-thalamic circuit but also in the default mode network (DMN), which may represent the interaction of abnormally functional organization of both network in pediatric OCD. PMID:27445736

  4. Sex differences in socioemotional functioning, attentional bias, and gray matter volume in maltreated children: A multilevel investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Philip A; Viding, Essi; Puetz, Vanessa B; Palmer, Amy L; Mechelli, Andrea; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Samuel, Sophie; McCrory, Eamon J

    2015-11-01

    While maltreatment is known to impact social and emotional functioning, threat processing, and neural structure, the potentially dimorphic influence of sex on these outcomes remains relatively understudied. We investigated sex differences across these domains in a large community sample of children aged 10 to 14 years (n = 122) comprising 62 children with verified maltreatment experience and 60 well-matched nonmaltreated peers. The maltreated group relative to the nonmaltreated comparison group exhibited poorer social and emotional functioning (more peer problems and heightened emotional reactivity). Cognitively, they displayed a pattern of attentional avoidance of threat in a visual dot-probe task. Similar patterns were observed in males and females in these domains. Reduced gray matter volume was found to characterize the maltreated group in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobes, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus; sex differences were observed only in the supramarginal gyrus. In addition, a disordinal interaction between maltreatment exposure and sex was found in the postcentral gyrus. Finally, attentional avoidance to threat mediated the relationship between maltreatment and emotional reactivity, and medial orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume mediated the relationship between maltreatment and peer functioning. Similar mediation patterns were observed across sexes. This study highlights the utility of combining multiple levels of analysis when studying the "latent vulnerability" engendered by childhood maltreatment and yields tentative findings regarding a neural basis of sex differences in long-term outcomes for maltreated children. PMID:26535946

  5. Brain Gray Matter Abnormalities in First-Episode, Treatment-Naive Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bochao; Cai, Wu; Wang, Xiuli; Lei, Du; Guo, Yingkun; Yang, Xun; Wu, Qizhu; Gong, Jianping; Gong, Qiyong; Ning, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have been conducted in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the brain structural abnormalities in OCD, especially in children, are not yet well characterized. We aimed to identify gray matter (GM) abnormalities in the early stage of pediatric OCD and examine the relationship between these structural abnormalities with clinical characteristics. Examinations of 30 first-episode, treatment-naive pediatric OCD patients without any comorbidities and 30 matched healthy controls (HCs) were performed with 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) was used to conduct voxel-wise tests for group differences in regional gray matter volume (GMV). Compared to HCs, the patient group exhibited more GMV in the bilateral putamen and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and less GMV in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL). The GMV alternation in the right putamen of OCD patients was positively correlated with Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores, while the GMV alternation in the left IPL exhibited a trend to negatively correlate with HAM-A scores. Our current results suggest that the GM abnormalities were defined in the early stage of pediatric OCD. Moreover, these findings provided further evidence of brain GM abnormalities that are not only present in the classical fronto–striatal–thalamic circuit but also in the default mode network (DMN), which may represent the interaction of abnormally functional organization of both network in pediatric OCD. PMID:27445736

  6. A pilot study of gray matter volume changes associated with paroxetine treatment and response in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Talati, Ardesheer; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Hirsch, Joy; Schneier, Franklin

    2015-03-30

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) has received relatively little attention in neurobiological studies. We sought to identify neuro-anatomical changes associated with successful treatment for the disorder. Fourteen patients (31 years; 57% female) with DSM-IV generalized SAD were imaged before and after 8-weeks of paroxetine treatment on a 1.5 T GE Signa MRI scanner. Symptoms were assessed by a clinician using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Longitudinal changes in voxel based morphometry (VBM) were determined using the VBM8 Toolbox for SPM8. Symptom severity decreased by 46% following treatment (p<0.001). At week 8, significant gray matter reductions were detected in bilateral caudate and putamen, and right thalamus, and increases in the cerebellum. Gray matter decreases in left thalamus were correlated with clinical response. This is the first study to our knowledge to identify treatment related correlates of symptom improvement for SAD. Replication in larger samples with control groups is needed to confirm these findings, as well as to test their specificity and temporal stability.

  7. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  8. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head Down Tilted Bed Rest: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes are solely related to peripheral changes from reduced vestibular stimulation, body unloading, body fluid shifts or that they may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, a recent study reported associations between microgravity and flattening of the posterior eye globe and protrusion of the optic nerve [1] possibly as the result of increased intracranial pressure due to microgravity induced bodily fluid shifts [3]. Moreover, elevated intracranial pressure has been related to white matter microstructural damage [2]. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system [4]. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure [5]. Here we present results of the first six subjects. Six subjects were assessed at 12 and 7 days before-, at 7, 30, and 70 days in-, and at 8 and 12 days post 70 days of bed rest at the NASA bed rest facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, USA. At each time point structural MRI scans (i.e., high resolution T1-weighted imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)) were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in gray matter density were assessed using the voxel based morphometry 8 (VBM8) toolbox under SPM

  9. Association of Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2) Genotype with Gray Matter Volume Shrinkage in Chronic Alcohol Users: Replication and Further Evaluation of an Addiction Gene Panel

    PubMed Central

    Gitik, Miri; Srivastava, Vibhuti; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in brain volume, especially gray matter volume, has been shown to be one of the many deleterious effects of prolonged alcohol consumption. High variance in the degree of gray matter tissue shrinkage among alcohol-dependent individuals and a previous neuroimaging genetics report suggest the involvement of environmental and/or genetic factors, such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). Identification of such underlying factors will help in the clinical management of alcohol dependence. Methods: We analyzed quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and genotype data from 103 alcohol users, including both light drinkers and treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. Genotyping was performed using a custom gene array that included genes selected from 8 pathways relevant to chronic alcohol-related brain volume loss. Results: We replicated a significant association of a functional SOD2 single nucleotide polymorphism with normalized gray matter volume, which had been reported previously in an independent smaller sample of alcohol-dependent individuals. The SOD2-related genetic protection was observed only at the cohort’s lower drinking range. Additional associations between normalized gray matter volume and other candidate genes such as alcohol dehydrogenase gene cluster (ADH), GCLC, NOS3, and SYT1 were observed across the entire sample but did not survive corrections for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: Converging independent evidence for a SOD2 gene association with gray matter volume shrinkage in chronic alcohol users suggests that SOD2 genetic variants predict differential brain volume loss mediated by free radicals. This study also provides the first catalog of genetic variations relevant to gray matter loss in chronic alcohol users. The identified gene-brain structure relationships are functionally pertinent and merit replication. PMID:27207918

  10. Optimism and the brain: trait optimism mediates the protective role of the orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume against anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dolcos, Sanda; Hu, Yifan; Iordan, Alexandru D; Moore, Matthew; Dolcos, Florin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence identifies trait optimism and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as personality and brain factors influencing anxiety, but the nature of their relationships remains unclear. Here, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of trait optimism and of increased OFC volume against symptoms of anxiety were investigated in 61 healthy subjects, who completed measures of trait optimism and anxiety, and underwent structural scanning using magnetic resonance imaging. First, the OFC gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety. Second, trait optimism mediated the relation between the left OFC volume and anxiety, thus demonstrating that increased GMV in this brain region protects against symptoms of anxiety through increased optimism. These results provide novel evidence about the brain-personality mechanisms protecting against anxiety symptoms in healthy functioning, and identify potential targets for preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing susceptibility and increasing resilience against emotional disturbances.

  11. NPY Y1 receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter regulate anxiety in the social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Kask, A; Rägo, L; Harro, J

    1998-08-24

    We have reported previously that the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP3226 applied into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) has an anxiogenic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. In the present study the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor antagonists BIBP3226 (500 pmol) and 1229U91 (formerly also GR231118, GW1229 and EXBP68, 100 and 500 pmol) administered into the DPAG were investigated in the social interaction test in rats. BIBP3226 and 1229U91 (both 500 pmol) significantly decreased the time spent in active social interaction. These results provide additional evidence that NPY-ergic neurotransmission in the DPAG may be involved in the modulation of anxiety-related behaviour and suggest that endogenous NPY, released under stressful conditions in the DPAG, relieves anxiety via the NPY Y1 receptors. This is the first report demonstrating the effect of NPY receptor active agent on social behaviour.

  12. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease. PMID:26836412

  13. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.

  14. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE PAGES

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; Patel, V.; Calhoun, V. D.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J. R.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N. I.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  15. Gray Matter-Specific Changes in Brain Bioenergetics after Acute Sleep Deprivation: A 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.; Harper, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Interventions: Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation, and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. Measurements and Results: PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to sleep deprivation with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in phosphocreatine after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. Citation: Plante DT, Trksak GH, Jensen JE, Penetar DM, Ravichandran C, Riedner BA, Tartarini WL, Dorsey CM, Renshaw PF, Lukas SE, Harper DG. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla. SLEEP 2014

  16. White matter (dis)connections and gray matter (dys)functions in visual neglect: gaining insights into the brain networks of spatial awareness.

    PubMed

    Doricchi, Fabrizio; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    Seminal case reports collected during the middle part of the XX century, designated the parietal lobe as the principal area of damage in patients suffering from contralesional spatial neglect (Brain WC. Visual disorientation with special reference to lesions of the right cerebral hemisphere. Brain 1941;64:224-72; Paterson A, Zangwill O. Disorders of visual space perception associated with lesions of the right cerebral hemisphere. Brain 1944;67:331-58; McFie J, Piercy MF, Zangwill O. Visual spatial agnosia associated with lesions of the right hemisphere. Brain 1950;73:167-90). Based on this evidence, textbooks of neurology have traditionally referred to neglect as a "parietal sign". This view found complete accomplishment in the 1986 group study by Vallar and Perani, who confirmed that the inferior parietal lobe was the area most frequently involved in neglect patients with lesions confined to the cerebral cortex and lesions involving subcortical gray matter nuclei. In the same study, it was found that lesions limited to subcortical white matter were rarely associated with neglect. Here, we reconsider recent accumulating evidence, gathered from investigations in animals and human patients, supporting the partially different view that damage involvement of long-range white matter bundles connecting the parietal to the frontal lobe, importantly influence the occurrence and severity of spatial neglect. These findings do not dispute the role of the parietal and frontal cortex in spatial attention and space-related behaviour, but call for a reappraisal of the respective roles of disruption of white matter connections and damage of gray matter cortical modules in the pathophysiology of neglect. Disentangling the connectional and modular anatomical correlates of neglect may be crucial to better understand the pathophysiology of this syndrome, to explain the manifold clinical dissociations often encountered in clinical practice and to increase the impact of behavioural and

  17. Dorsolateral and ventral regions of the periaqueductal gray matter are involved in distinct types of fear.

    PubMed

    Vianna, D M; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Brandão, M L

    2001-12-01

    Stepwise increases in the electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) produces alertness, then freezing and finally escape. This paper examines whether this freezing is (i) caused by Pavlovian fear conditioning to the contextual cues present during stimulation and (ii) the result of the stimulation of neurons located inside the dlPAG or elsewhere. To this end, freezing behavior was assessed in rats exposed either to the same or a different environment (context shift test) following the application of either footshocks or stimulation of the dlPAG at the freezing threshold. Rats submitted to footshocks presented freezing to the context 24h later whereas rats submitted to the dlPAG stimulation showed freezing only immediately after the stimulation, regardless of the context. In the second experiment, aversive states generated by activation of the dlPAG were assessed either by measuring the thresholds for freezing and escape responses or the duration of these responses following microinjections of semicarbazide inside the dlPAG. The duration of freezing behavior was also measured in rats submitted to a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm using footshocks as unconditioned stimulus. Lesions of the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) disrupted conditioned freezing to contextual cues associated to footshocks but vPAG lesions did not change the threshold of either freezing or escape responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlPAG. Lesions of the vPAG did not change the amount of freezing or escape responses produced by microinjections of semicarbazide into the dlPAG. These results indicate that stimulation of dlPAG neurons produce freezing behavior independent of any contextual fear conditioning and add to previously reported evidence showing that the vPAG is a critical structure for the expression of conditioned fear. In contrast, the neural substrate of unconditioned dlPAG stimulation-induced freezing is likely to elaborate

  18. Gray Matter Volume in Adolescent Anxiety: An Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val[superscript 66]Met Polymorphism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Sven C.; Aouidad, Aveline; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Minimal research links anxiety disorders in adolescents to regional gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities and their modulation by genetic factors. Prior research suggests that a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) Val[superscript 66]Met polymorphism may modulate such brain morphometry profiles. Method: Using voxel-based…

  19. Auditory Short-Term Memory Capacity Correlates with Gray Matter Density in the Left Posterior STS in Cognitively Normal and Dyslexic Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Ramsden, Sue; Ellis, Caroline; Burnett, Stephanie; Megnin, Odette; Catmur, Caroline; Schofield, Tom M.; Leff, Alex P.; Price, Cathy J.

    2011-01-01

    A central feature of auditory STM is its item-limited processing capacity. We investigated whether auditory STM capacity correlated with regional gray and white matter in the structural MRI images from 74 healthy adults, 40 of whom had a prior diagnosis of developmental dyslexia whereas 34 had no history of any cognitive impairment. Using…

  20. Mapping an intrinsic MR property of gray matter in auditory cortex of living humans: a possible marker for primary cortex and hemispheric differences.

    PubMed

    Sigalovsky, Irina S; Fischl, Bruce; Melcher, Jennifer R

    2006-10-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance properties of cerebral gray matter have been spatially mapped--in vivo--over the cortical surface. In one of the first neuroscientific applications of this approach, this study explores what can be learned about auditory cortex in living humans by mapping longitudinal relaxation rate (R1), a property related to myelin content. Gray matter R1 (and thickness) showed repeatable trends, including the following: (1) Regions of high R1 were always found overlapping posteromedial Heschl's gyrus. They also sometimes occurred in planum temporale and never in other parts of the superior temporal lobe. We hypothesize that the high R1 overlapping Heschl's gyrus (which likely indicates dense gray matter myelination) reflects auditory koniocortex (i.e., primary cortex), a heavily myelinated area that shows comparable overlap with the gyrus. High R1 overlapping Heschl's gyrus was identified in every instance suggesting that R1 may ultimately provide a marker for koniocortex in individuals. Such a marker would be significant for auditory neuroimaging, which has no standard means (anatomic or physiologic) for localizing cortical areas in individual subjects. (2) Inter-hemispheric comparisons revealed greater R1 on the left on Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, superior temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus. This asymmetry suggests greater gray matter myelination in left auditory cortex, which may be a substrate for the left hemisphere's specialized processing of speech, language, and rapid acoustic changes. These results indicate that in vivo R1 mapping can provide new insights into the structure of human cortical gray matter and its relation to function. PMID:16806989

  1. Dorsolateral and ventral regions of the periaqueductal gray matter are involved in distinct types of fear.

    PubMed

    Vianna, D M; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Brandão, M L

    2001-12-01

    Stepwise increases in the electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) produces alertness, then freezing and finally escape. This paper examines whether this freezing is (i) caused by Pavlovian fear conditioning to the contextual cues present during stimulation and (ii) the result of the stimulation of neurons located inside the dlPAG or elsewhere. To this end, freezing behavior was assessed in rats exposed either to the same or a different environment (context shift test) following the application of either footshocks or stimulation of the dlPAG at the freezing threshold. Rats submitted to footshocks presented freezing to the context 24h later whereas rats submitted to the dlPAG stimulation showed freezing only immediately after the stimulation, regardless of the context. In the second experiment, aversive states generated by activation of the dlPAG were assessed either by measuring the thresholds for freezing and escape responses or the duration of these responses following microinjections of semicarbazide inside the dlPAG. The duration of freezing behavior was also measured in rats submitted to a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm using footshocks as unconditioned stimulus. Lesions of the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) disrupted conditioned freezing to contextual cues associated to footshocks but vPAG lesions did not change the threshold of either freezing or escape responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlPAG. Lesions of the vPAG did not change the amount of freezing or escape responses produced by microinjections of semicarbazide into the dlPAG. These results indicate that stimulation of dlPAG neurons produce freezing behavior independent of any contextual fear conditioning and add to previously reported evidence showing that the vPAG is a critical structure for the expression of conditioned fear. In contrast, the neural substrate of unconditioned dlPAG stimulation-induced freezing is likely to elaborate

  2. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood. PMID:26106338

  3. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood.

  4. Brain Swelling and Loss of Gray and White Matter Differentiation in Human Postmortem Cases by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shirota, Go; Gonoi, Wataru; Ishida, Masanori; Okuma, Hidemi; Shintani, Yukako; Abe, Hiroyuki; Takazawa, Yutaka; Ikemura, Masako; Fukayama, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) versus antemortem computed tomography (AMCT) using brains from the same patients. We studied 36 nontraumatic subjects who underwent AMCT, PMCT, and pathological autopsy in our hospital between April 2009 and December 2013. PMCT was performed within 20 h after death, followed by pathological autopsy including the brain. Autopsy confirmed the absence of intracranial disorders that might be related to the cause of death or might affect measurements in our study. Width of the third ventricle, width of the central sulcus, and attenuation in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) from the same area of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, and high convexity were statistically compared between AMCT and PMCT. Both the width of the third ventricle and the central sulcus were significantly shorter in PMCT than in AMCT (P < 0.0001). GM attenuation increased after death at the level of the centrum semiovale and high convexity, but the differences were not statistically significant considering the differences in attenuation among the different computed tomography scanners. WM attenuation significantly increased after death at all levels (P<0.0001). The differences were larger than the differences in scanners. GM/WM ratio of attenuation was significantly lower by PMCT than by AMCT at all levels (P<0.0001). PMCT showed an increase in WM attenuation, loss of GM–WM differentiation, and brain swelling, evidenced by a decrease in the size of ventricles and sulci. PMID:26618492

  5. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S.; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that – at least with respect to language acquisition – early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood. PMID:26106338

  6. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded.

  7. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. PMID:26370651

  8. White matter injury and microglia/macrophage polarization are strongly linked with age-related long-term deficits in neurological function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Hassan, Sulaiman Habib; Xu, Mingyue; Leak, Rehana K; Stetler, R Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Most of the successes in experimental models of stroke have not translated well to the clinic. One potential reason for this failure is that stroke mainly afflicts the elderly and the majority of experimental stroke studies rely on data gathered from young adult animals. Therefore, in the present study we established a reliable, reproducible model of stroke with low mortality in aged (18month) male mice and contrasted their pathophysiological changes with those in young (2month) animals. To this end, mice were subjected to permanent tandem occlusion of the left distal middle cerebral artery (dMCAO) with ipsilateral common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was evaluated repeatedly during and after stroke. Reduction of CBF was more dramatic and sustained in aged mice. Aged mice exhibited more severe long-term sensorimotor deficits, as manifested by deterioration of performance in the Rotarod and hanging wire tests up to 35d after stroke. Aged mice also exhibited significantly worse long-term cognitive deficits after stroke, as measured by the Morris water maze test. Consistent with these behavioral observations, brain infarct size and neuronal tissue loss after dMCAO were significantly larger in aged mice at 2d and 14d, respectively. The young versus aged difference in neuronal tissue loss, however, did not persist until 35d after dMCAO. In contrast to the transient difference in neuronal tissue loss, we found significant and long lasting deterioration of white matter in aged animals, as revealed by the loss of myelin basic protein (MBP) staining in the striatum at 35d after dMCAO. We further examined the expression of M1 (CD16/CD32) and M2 (CD206) markers in Iba-1(+) microglia by double immunofluorescent staining. In both young and aged mice, the expression of M2 markers peaked around 7d after stroke whereas the expression of M1 markers peaked around 14d after stroke, suggesting a progressive M2-to-M1 phenotype shift in both groups. However

  9. White matter injury and microglia/macrophage polarization are strongly linked with age-related long-term deficits in neurological function after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Hassan, Sulaiman Habib; Xu, Mingyue; Leak, Rehana K.; Stetler, R. Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Most of the successes in experimental models of stroke have not translated well to the clinic. One potential reason for this failure is that stroke mainly afflicts the elderly and the majority of experimental stroke studies rely on data gathered from young adult animals. Therefore, in the present study we established a reliable, reproducible model of stroke with low mortality in aged (18 month) male mice and contrasted their pathophysiological changes with those in young (2 month) animals. To this end, mice were subjected to permanent tandem occlusion of the left distal middle cerebral artery (dMCAO) with ipsilateral common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was evaluated repeatedly during and after stroke. Reduction of CBF was more dramatic and sustained in aged mice. Aged mice exhibited more severe long-term sensorimotor deficits, as manifested by deterioration of performance in the Rotarod and hanging wire tests up to 35d after stroke. Aged mice also exhibited significantly worse long-term cognitive deficits after stroke, as measured by the Morris water maze test. Consistent with these behavioral observations, brain infarct size and neuronal tissue loss after dMCAO were significantly larger in aged mice at 2d and 14d, respectively. The young versus aged difference in neuronal tissue loss, however, did not persist until 35d after dMCAO. In contrast to the transient difference in neuronal tissue loss, we found significant and long lasting deterioration of white matter in aged animals, as revealed by the loss of myelin basic protein (MBP) staining in the striatum at 35d after dMCAO. We further examined the expression of M1 (CD16/CD32) and M2 (CD206) markers in Iba-1+ microglia by double immunofluorescent staining. In both young and aged mice, the expression of M2 markers peaked around 7d after stroke whereas the expression of M1 markers peaked around 14d after stroke, suggesting a progressive M2-to-M1 phenotype shift in both groups. However

  10. The contribution of white and gray matter differences to developmental dyslexia: insights from DTI and VBM at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Steinbrink, C; Vogt, K; Kastrup, A; Müller, H-P; Juengling, F D; Kassubek, J; Riecker, A

    2008-11-01

    Developmental dyslexia is one of the most common neuropsychological disorders in children and adults. Only few data are available on the pathomechanisms of this specific dysfunction, assuming--among others--that dyslexia might be a disconnection syndrome of anterior and posterior brain regions involved in phonological and orthographic aspects of the reading process, as well as in the integration of phonemes and graphemes. Therefore, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to verify the hypothesis of altered white and gray matter structure in German dyslexic adults. DTI revealed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in bilateral fronto-temporal and left temporo-parietal white matter regions (inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculus). Significant correlations between white matter anisotropy and speed of pseudoword reading were found. In dyslexics, gray matter volumes (as measured by VBM) were reduced in the superior temporal gyrus of both hemispheres. So far, our results, based on a combined analysis of white and gray matter abnormalities, provide exceedingly strong evidence for a disconnection syndrome or dysfunction of cortical areas relevant for reading and spelling. Thus, we suggest that this imbalance of neuronal communication between the respective brain areas might be the crucial point for the development of dyslexia.

  11. Higher Adolescent Body Mass Index Is Associated with Lower Regional Gray and White Matter Volumes and Lower Levels of Positive Emotionality

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, James T.; Collins, Paul F.; Luciana, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity is associated with an increased chance of developing serious health risks later in life. Identifying the neurobiological and personality factors related to increases in adiposity is important to understanding what drives maladaptive consummatory and exercise behaviors that result in obesity. Previous research has largely focused on adults with few findings published on interactions among adiposity, brain structure, and personality. In this study, Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) was used to identify associations between gray and white matter volumes and increasing adiposity, as measured by Body Mass Index percentile (BMI%), in 137 adolescents (age range: 9–20 years, BMI% range: 5.16–99.56). Variations in gray and white matter volume and BMI% were then linked to individual differences in personality measures from the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). After controlling for age and other covariates, BMI% correlated negatively with gray matter volume in the bilateral caudate (right: partial r = −0.338, left: r = −0.404), medial prefrontal cortex (partial r = −0.339), anterior cingulate (partial r = −0.312), bilateral frontal pole (right: partial r = −0.368, left: r = −0.316), and uncus (partial r = −0.475) as well as white matter volume bilaterally in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (right: partial r = −0.34, left: r = −0.386), extending to the left middle frontal subgyral white matter. Agentic Positive Emotionality (PEM-AG) was correlated negatively with BMI% (partial r = −0.384). PEM-AG was correlated positively with gray matter volume in the right uncus (partial r = 0.329). These results suggest that higher levels of adiposity in adolescents are associated with lower trait levels in reward-related personality domains, as well as structural variations in brain regions associated with reward processing, control, and sensory integration.

  12. Higher Adolescent Body Mass Index Is Associated with Lower Regional Gray and White Matter Volumes and Lower Levels of Positive Emotionality.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, James T; Collins, Paul F; Luciana, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity is associated with an increased chance of developing serious health risks later in life. Identifying the neurobiological and personality factors related to increases in adiposity is important to understanding what drives maladaptive consummatory and exercise behaviors that result in obesity. Previous research has largely focused on adults with few findings published on interactions among adiposity, brain structure, and personality. In this study, Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) was used to identify associations between gray and white matter volumes and increasing adiposity, as measured by Body Mass Index percentile (BMI%), in 137 adolescents (age range: 9-20 years, BMI% range: 5.16-99.56). Variations in gray and white matter volume and BMI% were then linked to individual differences in personality measures from the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). After controlling for age and other covariates, BMI% correlated negatively with gray matter volume in the bilateral caudate (right: partial r = -0.338, left: r = -0.404), medial prefrontal cortex (partial r = -0.339), anterior cingulate (partial r = -0.312), bilateral frontal pole (right: partial r = -0.368, left: r = -0.316), and uncus (partial r = -0.475) as well as white matter volume bilaterally in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (right: partial r = -0.34, left: r = -0.386), extending to the left middle frontal subgyral white matter. Agentic Positive Emotionality (PEM-AG) was correlated negatively with BMI% (partial r = -0.384). PEM-AG was correlated positively with gray matter volume in the right uncus (partial r = 0.329). These results suggest that higher levels of adiposity in adolescents are associated with lower trait levels in reward-related personality domains, as well as structural variations in brain regions associated with reward processing, control, and sensory integration. PMID:27660604

  13. Higher Adolescent Body Mass Index Is Associated with Lower Regional Gray and White Matter Volumes and Lower Levels of Positive Emotionality

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, James T.; Collins, Paul F.; Luciana, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity is associated with an increased chance of developing serious health risks later in life. Identifying the neurobiological and personality factors related to increases in adiposity is important to understanding what drives maladaptive consummatory and exercise behaviors that result in obesity. Previous research has largely focused on adults with few findings published on interactions among adiposity, brain structure, and personality. In this study, Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) was used to identify associations between gray and white matter volumes and increasing adiposity, as measured by Body Mass Index percentile (BMI%), in 137 adolescents (age range: 9–20 years, BMI% range: 5.16–99.56). Variations in gray and white matter volume and BMI% were then linked to individual differences in personality measures from the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). After controlling for age and other covariates, BMI% correlated negatively with gray matter volume in the bilateral caudate (right: partial r = −0.338, left: r = −0.404), medial prefrontal cortex (partial r = −0.339), anterior cingulate (partial r = −0.312), bilateral frontal pole (right: partial r = −0.368, left: r = −0.316), and uncus (partial r = −0.475) as well as white matter volume bilaterally in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (right: partial r = −0.34, left: r = −0.386), extending to the left middle frontal subgyral white matter. Agentic Positive Emotionality (PEM-AG) was correlated negatively with BMI% (partial r = −0.384). PEM-AG was correlated positively with gray matter volume in the right uncus (partial r = 0.329). These results suggest that higher levels of adiposity in adolescents are associated with lower trait levels in reward-related personality domains, as well as structural variations in brain regions associated with reward processing, control, and sensory integration. PMID:27660604

  14. The Empowering Role of Mobile Apps in Behavior Change Interventions: The Gray Matters Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Chris D; McClean, Sally I; Cleland, Ian; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Clark, Christine J; Norton, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Background Health education and behavior change programs targeting specific risk factors have demonstrated their effectiveness in reducing the development of future diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) shares many of the same risk factors, most of which can be addressed via behavior change. It is therefore theorized that a behavior change intervention targeting these risk factors would likely result in favorable rates of AD prevention. Objective The objective of this study was to reduce the future risk of developing AD, while in the short term promoting vascular health, through behavior change. Methods The study was an interventional randomized controlled trial consisting of subjects who were randomly assigned into either treatment (n=102) or control group (n=42). Outcome measures included various blood-based biomarkers, anthropometric measures, and behaviors related to AD risk. The treatment group was provided with a bespoke “Gray Matters” mobile phone app designed to encourage and facilitate behavior change. The app presented evidence-based educational material relating to AD risk and prevention strategies, facilitated self-reporting of behaviors across 6 behavioral domains, and presented feedback on the user’s performance, calculated from reported behaviors against recommended guidelines. Results This paper explores the rationale for a mobile phone–led intervention and details the app’s effect on behavior change and subsequent clinical outcomes. Via the app, the average participant submitted 7.3 (SD 3.2) behavioral logs/day (n=122,719). Analysis of these logs against primary outcome measures revealed that participants who improved their high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels during the study duration answered a statistically significant higher number of questions per day (mean 8.30, SD 2.29) than those with no improvement (mean 6.52, SD 3.612), t97.74=−3.051, P=.003. Participants who decreased their body mass index (BMI) performed significantly

  15. Gray matter volume alterations in first-episode drug-naïve patients with deficit and nondeficit schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; He, Zongling; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chaohua; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Yinfei; Jiang, Lijun; Gong, Qiyong; Hu, Xun; Zhang, Nanyin; Li, Tao

    2015-11-30

    Different patterns of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been reported between chronic patients with deficit schizophrenia (DS), relative to nondeficit schizophrenia (NDS) patients. However, it is not clear whether these differences are characteristic to the pathophysiology of DS or due to the effects of medications or illness durations. To address this issue, GMV in 88 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia (44 DS and 44 NDS), 67 of their first-degree relatives and 84 healthy controls were assessed using voxel- based morphometry (VBM) and compared between groups. Correlations between GMV and clinical symptoms in patients were also assessed. Compared to controls, DS patients displayed more severe GMV reduction in the cerebellar culmen than NDS patients. GMV reduction in culmen was also observed in the first-degree relatives of DS (but not NDS) patients, suggesting possible different genetic risk in DS and NDS. The left insula was significantly smaller in DS patients than both NDS patients and controls, and smaller GMV of this region was associated with more severe negative symptoms in patients. Our results collectively indicate that DS might represent a distinct subtype of schizophrenia from NDS and the GMV change in left insula may be a morphological signature of DS. PMID:26409573

  16. Decreased bilateral thalamic gray matter volume in first-episode schizophrenia with prominent hallucinatory symptoms: A volumetric MRI study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Xi, Yibin; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Yunchun; Li, Xiangrui; Li, Weiguo; Zhu, Xia; Cui, Long-Biao; Tan, Qingrong; Liu, Wenming; Li, Chen; Miao, Danmin; Yin, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies comparing gray matter (GM) volume of schizophrenic patients with or without auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) to that of normal controls remain controversial. This project aims to investigate changes of GM volumes of drug-naïve schizophrenic patients with and without AVHs. Eighteen first episode schizophrenic (FES) patients with AVHs, 18 FES patients without AVHs, and 18 healthy controls were scanned using structural MRI. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was conducted to investigate changes of GM volume among the three groups. Patients with and without AVHs exhibited reduced GM volumes relative to normal controls in the left superior temporal gyrus, frontal regions, cerebellum and caudate. Further analysis of the GM of subcortical structures found that patients with AVHs had reduced thalamic volume than healthy controls. No significant difference was found between patients with and without AVHs. Significant correlation was found between the total scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and bilateral thalamic volume. ROC analysis of thalamic volumes of the patients with AVHs and normal controls showed that the area under the curve was 0.698 (P = 0.043). The decreased thalamic volumes might serve as a biomarker for discriminating FES AVHs patients from normals. PMID:26403064

  17. Ebf2 is required for development of dopamine neurons in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter of mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaoqiao; Liu, Shuxi; Yin, Min; Yin, Yanqing; Zhou, Guomin; Zhou, Jiawei

    2015-11-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain ventral periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) play critical roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes including sleep-wake rhyme, antinociception, and drug addiction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their development are poorly understood. Here, we showed that PAG DA neurons arose as early as E15.5 in mouse embryos. During the prenatal period, the majority of PAG DA neurons was distributed in the intermediate and caudal regions of the PAG. In the postnatal brain, ∼50% of PAG DA neurons were preferentially located in the caudal portion of the PAG. Moreover, transcription factor early B-cell factor 2 (Ebf2) was transiently expressed in a subset of DA neurons in embryonic ventral mesencephalon. Functional analysis revealed that loss of Ebf2 in vivo caused a marked reduction in the number of DA neurons in the midbrain PAG but not in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Thus, Ebf2 is identified as a novel and important regulator selectively required for midbrain PAG DA neuron development.

  18. Relationship between personality and gray matter volume in healthy young adults: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fengmei; Huo, Yajun; Li, Meiling; Chen, Heng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yifeng; Long, Zhiliang; Duan, Xujun; Zhang, Jiang; Zeng, Ling; Chen, Huafu

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the neurostructural foundations of the human personality in young adults. High-resolution structural T1-weighted MR images of 71 healthy young individuals were processed using voxel-based morphometric (VBM) approach. Multiple regression analyses were performed to identify the associations between personality traits and gray matter volume (GMV). The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised, Short Scale for Chinese was chosen to assess the personality traits. This scale includes four dimensions, namely, extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie. Particularly, we studied on two dimensions (extraversion and neuroticism) of Eysenck's personality. Our results showed that extraversion was negatively correlated with GMV of the bilateral amygdala, the bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, the right middle temporal gyrus, and the left superior frontal gyrus, all of which are involved in emotional and social cognitive processes. These results might suggest an association between extraversion and affective processing. In addition, a positive correlation was detected between neuroticism and GMV of the right cerebellum, a key brain region for negative affect coordination. Meanwhile, a negative association was revealed between GMV of the left superior frontal gyrus and neuroticism. These results may prove that neuroticism is related to several brain regions involved in regulating negative emotions. Based on those findings, we concluded that brain regions involved in social cognition and affective process accounted for modulation and shaping of personality traits among young individuals. Results of this study may serve as a basis for elucidating the anatomical factors of personality.

  19. Relative activity of cerebral subcortical gray matter in varying states of attention and awareness in normal subjects and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Levy, J.; Wagner, N.; Spire, J.P.; Jacobsen, J.; Meltzer, H.; Metz, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    An important aspect of the study of brain function involves measurement of the relationships; between activities in the subcortical gray matter of the caudate and of the thalamus; and between these structures and functional cortical areas. The authors have studied these relationships in 22 subjects under different conditions of activation, sleep and sensory deprivation using a PET VI system and F-18-2DG to determine regional cerebral metabolism. Subject activating conditions were maintained throughout the period of equilibration of F-18-2DG and E.E.G.'s were monitored. Multiple tomographic slices of 1-2 million counts were obtained simultaneously with slice separation of 14mm and each plane parallel to the cantho-meatal line. In activated and non-activated awake conditions for normal subjects, left and right thalmus-to-caudate ratios were similar and greater than unity. This relationship was maintained in non-REM sleep, but was reversed and divergent in REM sleep and sensory deprivation; this was also evident in 3/4 narcoleptics awake and asleep in non-REM and REM and 2/3 schizophrenics and affective disorder, subjects. This approach appears to have potential for characterizating normal and disordered regional cerebral function.

  20. Gray matter volume alterations in first-episode drug-naïve patients with deficit and nondeficit schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; He, Zongling; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chaohua; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Yinfei; Jiang, Lijun; Gong, Qiyong; Hu, Xun; Zhang, Nanyin; Li, Tao

    2015-11-30

    Different patterns of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been reported between chronic patients with deficit schizophrenia (DS), relative to nondeficit schizophrenia (NDS) patients. However, it is not clear whether these differences are characteristic to the pathophysiology of DS or due to the effects of medications or illness durations. To address this issue, GMV in 88 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia (44 DS and 44 NDS), 67 of their first-degree relatives and 84 healthy controls were assessed using voxel- based morphometry (VBM) and compared between groups. Correlations between GMV and clinical symptoms in patients were also assessed. Compared to controls, DS patients displayed more severe GMV reduction in the cerebellar culmen than NDS patients. GMV reduction in culmen was also observed in the first-degree relatives of DS (but not NDS) patients, suggesting possible different genetic risk in DS and NDS. The left insula was significantly smaller in DS patients than both NDS patients and controls, and smaller GMV of this region was associated with more severe negative symptoms in patients. Our results collectively indicate that DS might represent a distinct subtype of schizophrenia from NDS and the GMV change in left insula may be a morphological signature of DS.

  1. Pharmacological evidence for the mediation of the panicolytic effect of fluoxetine by dorsal periaqueductal gray matter μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-12-01

    Previously reported results have shown that the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine on escape behavior, interpreted as a panicolytic-like effect, is blocked by pretreatment with either the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) antagonist WAY100635 via injection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG). Additionally, reported evidence indicates that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) interacts with the 5-HT1A-R in the dPAG. In the present work, pretreatment of the dPAG with the selective MOR blocker CTOP antagonized the anti-escape effect of chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 21 days), as measured in the elevated T-maze (ETM) test, indicating mediation of this effect by the MOR. In addition, the combined administration of sub-effective doses of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (intra-dPAG) and sub-effective doses of chronic as well as subchronic (7 days) fluoxetine increased avoidance and escape latencies, suggesting that the activation of MORs may facilitate and accelerate the effects of fluoxetine. The current observation that MORs located in the dPAG mediate the anti-escape effect of fluoxetine may open new perspectives for the development of more efficient and fast-acting panic-alleviating drugs.

  2. The underlying anatomical correlates of long-term meditation: larger hippocampal and frontal volumes of gray matter.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen; Toga, Arthur W; Lepore, Natasha; Gaser, Christian

    2009-04-15

    Although the systematic study of meditation is still in its infancy, research has provided evidence for meditation-induced improvements in psychological and physiological well-being. Moreover, meditation practice has been shown not only to benefit higher-order cognitive functions but also to alter brain activity. Nevertheless, little is known about possible links to brain structure. Using high-resolution MRI data of 44 subjects, we set out to examine the underlying anatomical correlates of long-term meditation with different regional specificity (i.e., global, regional, and local). For this purpose, we applied voxel-based morphometry in association with a recently validated automated parcellation approach. We detected significantly larger gray matter volumes in meditators in the right orbito-frontal cortex (as well as in the right thalamus and left inferior temporal gyrus when co-varying for age and/or lowering applied statistical thresholds). In addition, meditators showed significantly larger volumes of the right hippocampus. Both orbito-frontal and hippocampal regions have been implicated in emotional regulation and response control. Thus, larger volumes in these regions might account for meditators' singular abilities and habits to cultivate positive emotions, retain emotional stability, and engage in mindful behavior. We further suggest that these regional alterations in brain structures constitute part of the underlying neurological correlate of long-term meditation independent of a specific style and practice. Future longitudinal analyses are necessary to establish the presence and direction of a causal link between meditation practice and brain anatomy.

  3. Cerebral gray matter volume variation in female-to-male transsexuals: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    Several studies seem to support the hypothesis that brain anatomy is associated with transsexualism. However, these studies were still limited because few neuroanatomical findings have been obtained from female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals. This study compared the cerebral regional volumes of gray matter (GM) between FtM transsexuals and female controls using a voxel-based morphometry. Twelve FtM transsexuals who had undergone sex-reassignment surgery and 15 female controls participated in this study. Both groups were age matched and right-handed, with no history of neurological illness. Fifteen female controls were recruited to determine whether GM volumes in FtM transsexuals more closely resembled individuals who shared their biological sex. MRI data were processed using SPM 8 with the diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL). FtM transsexuals showed significantly larger volumes of the thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, gyrus rectus, head of caudate nucleus, precentral gyrus, and subcallosal area compared with the female controls. However, the female controls showed a significantly larger volume in the superior temporal gyrus including Heschl's gyrus and Rolandic operculum. These findings confirm that the volume difference in brain substructures in FtM transsexuals is likely to be associated with transsexualism and that transsexualism is probably associated with distinct cerebral structures, determining gender identity. PMID:26559725

  4. Maternal history of reading difficulty is associated with reduced language-related gray matter in beginning readers.

    PubMed

    Black, Jessica M; Tanaka, Hiroko; Stanley, Leanne; Nagamine, Masanori; Zakerani, Nahal; Thurston, Alexandra; Kesler, Shelli; Hulme, Charles; Lyytinen, Heikki; Glover, Gary H; Serrone, Christine; Raman, Mira M; Reiss, Allan L; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2012-02-01

    Family history and poor preliteracy skills (referred to here as familial and behavioral risk, respectively) are critical predictors of developmental dyslexia. This study systematically investigated the independent contribution of familial and behavioral risks on brain structures, which had not been explored in past studies. We also examined the differential effects of maternal versus paternal history on brain morphometry, and familial risk dimensionally versus categorically, which were also novel aspects of the study. We assessed 51 children (5 to 6 years of age) with varying degrees of familial and behavioral risks for developmental dyslexia and examined associations with brain morphometry. We found that greater maternal history of reading disability was associated with smaller bilateral prefrontal and parieto-temporal gray, but not white matter volumes. Regressing out behavioral risk, socioeconomic status, and maternal education and other confounds did not change the results. No such relationship was observed for paternal reading history and behavioral risk. Results of cortical surface area and thickness further showed that there was a significant negative relationship between cortical surface area (but not thickness) and greater severity of maternal history, in particular within the left inferior parietal lobule, suggesting prenatal influence of maternal history on children's brain morphometry. The results suggested greater maternal, possibly prenatal, influence on language-related brain structures. These results help to guide future neuroimaging research focusing on environmental and genetic influences and provide new information that may help predict which child will develop dyslexia in the future.

  5. Odor identification deficit in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease is associated with hippocampal and deep gray matter atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Jesper; Woodward, Matthew R; Rafique, Usama A; Amrutkar, Chaitanya V; Bergsland, Niels; Dwyer, Michael G; Benedict, Ralph; Zivadinov, Robert; Szigeti, Kinga

    2016-09-30

    Even in early stages, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with olfactory deficit. We assess the association of volumetric differences in subcortical deep gray matter (DGM) structures and odor identification deficit (OID) in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), AD and normal controls (NCs), and relate findings to the current gold standard right sided memory measure, visual reproduction. Eighty subjects (19 aMCI; 42 CE; 19 NC) were included in this study. We obtained olfactory testing and normalized structural brain volumes from 3T T1 MRI scans. Associations between MRI, olfactory- and memory impairment were studied using Pearson- and partial-correlation adjusted for age. AD patients had significantly higher olfactory deficits, lower visual reproduction scores, and reduced brain volumes (p<0.05). Within aMCI, OID was associated with lower right hippocampal- and left amygdala volume (p<0.05). In AD, OID was associated with bilaterally lower hippocampus and left amygdala volumes. In contrast, visual reproduction was associated with bilateral volume loss regardless of study group. OID is a more specific marker of early pathological right mesial-temporal involvement than the currently regarded gold standard of right sided-memory (visual reproduction). OID may be valuable in the longitudinal evaluation of disease modifying treatments in early disease course. PMID:27567325

  6. Gray matter increases in fronto-parietal regions of depression patients with aripiprazole monotherapy: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Hou, Yi-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the treatment effects of aripiprazole monotherapy in first-episode medication-naïve patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The accompanying changes in the gray matter volume (GMV) were also explored.Fifteen patients completed the trial and received structural scans by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and partially responding state (sixth week). To account for the test-retest bias, 27 healthy controls were scanned twice within 6 weeks. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry with different comparisons between groups.The partially responding patients with MDD had greater GMV in left middle frontal gyrus and left superior parietal gyrus when compared with baseline. However, they had decreases in the GMV of right orbitofrontal gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus after response. The partially responding patients with MDD still had residual GMV deficits in right superior frontal gyrus when compared with controls. However, the lack of second patient group without aripiprazole intervention would be a significant limitation to interpret the aripiprazole-specific effects on GMV.The changes in the GMV of fronto-parieto-temporal regions and residual GMV deficits in the superior frontal gyrus might represent "state-dependent brain changes" and "residual-deficit brain regions," respectively, for aripiprzole monotherapy in MDD. PMID:27559967

  7. Examining gray matter structures associated with individual differences in global life satisfaction in a large sample of young adults.

    PubMed

    Kong, Feng; Ding, Ke; Yang, Zetian; Dang, Xiaobin; Hu, Siyuan; Song, Yiying; Liu, Jia

    2015-07-01

    Although much attention has been directed towards life satisfaction that refers to an individual's general cognitive evaluations of his or her life as a whole, little is known about the neural basis underlying global life satisfaction. In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the structural neural correlates of life satisfaction in a large sample of young healthy adults (n = 299). We showed that individuals' life satisfaction was positively correlated with the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), and negatively correlated with the rGMV in the left precuneus and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of results remained significant even after controlling for the effect of general positive and negative affect, suggesting a unique structural correlates of life satisfaction. Furthermore, we found that self-esteem partially mediated the association between the PHG volume and life satisfaction as well as that between the precuneus volume and global life satisfaction. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for the structural neural basis of life satisfaction, and highlight that self-esteem might play a crucial role in cultivating an individual's life satisfaction.

  8. Examining gray matter structures associated with individual differences in global life satisfaction in a large sample of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng; Ding, Ke; Yang, Zetian; Dang, Xiaobin; Hu, Siyuan; Song, Yiying

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been directed towards life satisfaction that refers to an individual’s general cognitive evaluations of his or her life as a whole, little is known about the neural basis underlying global life satisfaction. In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the structural neural correlates of life satisfaction in a large sample of young healthy adults (n = 299). We showed that individuals’ life satisfaction was positively correlated with the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), and negatively correlated with the rGMV in the left precuneus and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of results remained significant even after controlling for the effect of general positive and negative affect, suggesting a unique structural correlates of life satisfaction. Furthermore, we found that self-esteem partially mediated the association between the PHG volume and life satisfaction as well as that between the precuneus volume and global life satisfaction. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for the structural neural basis of life satisfaction, and highlight that self-esteem might play a crucial role in cultivating an individual’s life satisfaction. PMID:25406366

  9. Higher Media Multi-Tasking Activity Is Associated with Smaller Gray-Matter Density in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kep Kee; Kanai, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Media multitasking, or the concurrent consumption of multiple media forms, is increasingly prevalent in today’s society and has been associated with negative psychosocial and cognitive impacts. Individuals who engage in heavier media-multitasking are found to perform worse on cognitive control tasks and exhibit more socio-emotional difficulties. However, the neural processes associated with media multi-tasking remain unexplored. The present study investigated relationships between media multitasking activity and brain structure. Research has demonstrated that brain structure can be altered upon prolonged exposure to novel environments and experience. Thus, we expected differential engagements in media multitasking to correlate with brain structure variability. This was confirmed via Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses: Individuals with higher Media Multitasking Index (MMI) scores had smaller gray matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Functional connectivity between this ACC region and the precuneus was negatively associated with MMI. Our findings suggest a possible structural correlate for the observed decreased cognitive control performance and socio-emotional regulation in heavy media-multitaskers. While the cross-sectional nature of our study does not allow us to specify the direction of causality, our results brought to light novel associations between individual media multitasking behaviors and ACC structure differences. PMID:25250778

  10. Gray Matter Alterations in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bochao; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Shiguang; Hu, Xinyu; Luo, Ya; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Xun; Qiu, Changjian; Yang, Yanchun; Zhang, Wei; Bi, Feng; Roberts, Neil; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD) all bear the core symptom of anxiety and are separately classified in the new DSM-5 system. The aim of the present study is to obtain evidence for neuroanatomical difference for these disorders. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie to compare gray matter volume (GMV) in magnetic resonance images obtained for 30 patients with PTSD, 29 patients with OCD, 20 patients with SAD, and 30 healthy controls. GMV across all four groups differed in left hypothalamus and left inferior parietal lobule and post hoc analyses revealed that this difference is primarily due to reduced GMV in the PTSD group relative to the other groups. Further analysis revealed that the PTSD group also showed reduced GMV in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and cerebellum compared to the OCD group, and reduced GMV in frontal lobes bilaterally compared to SAD group. A significant negative correlation with anxiety symptoms is observed for GMV in left hypothalamus in three disorder groups. We have thus found evidence for brain structure differences that in future could provide biomarkers to potentially support classification of these disorders using MRI. PMID:26347628

  11. A 12-step user guide for analyzing voxel-wise gray matter asymmetries in statistical parametric mapping (SPM).

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florian; Gaser, Christian; Luders, Eileen

    2015-02-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has been proven capable of capturing cerebral gray matter asymmetries with a high (voxel-wise) regional specificity. However, a standardized reference on how to conduct voxel-wise asymmetry analyses is missing. This protocol provides the scientific community with a carefully developed guide describing, in 12 distinct steps, how to take structural images from data pre-processing, via statistical analysis, to the final interpretation of the significance maps. Key adaptations compared with the standard VBM workflow involve establishing a voxel-wise hemispheric correspondence, capturing the direction and degree of asymmetry and preventing a blurring of information across hemispheres. The workflow incorporates the most recent methodological developments, including high-dimensional spatial normalization and partial volume estimations. Although the protocol is primarily designed to enable relatively inexperienced users to conduct a voxel-based asymmetry analysis on their own, it may also be useful to experienced users who wish to efficiently adapt their existing scripts or pipelines.

  12. Gray Matter Alterations in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder, and Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bochao; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Shiguang; Hu, Xinyu; Luo, Ya; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Xun; Qiu, Changjian; Yang, Yanchun; Zhang, Wei; Bi, Feng; Roberts, Neil; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD) all bear the core symptom of anxiety and are separately classified in the new DSM-5 system. The aim of the present study is to obtain evidence for neuroanatomical difference for these disorders. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie to compare gray matter volume (GMV) in magnetic resonance images obtained for 30 patients with PTSD, 29 patients with OCD, 20 patients with SAD, and 30 healthy controls. GMV across all four groups differed in left hypothalamus and left inferior parietal lobule and post hoc analyses revealed that this difference is primarily due to reduced GMV in the PTSD group relative to the other groups. Further analysis revealed that the PTSD group also showed reduced GMV in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and cerebellum compared to the OCD group, and reduced GMV in frontal lobes bilaterally compared to SAD group. A significant negative correlation with anxiety symptoms is observed for GMV in left hypothalamus in three disorder groups. We have thus found evidence for brain structure differences that in future could provide biomarkers to potentially support classification of these disorders using MRI. PMID:26347628

  13. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans. PMID:25072322

  14. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals.

    PubMed

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans.

  15. Cortical and subcortical gray matter shrinkage in alcohol-use disorders: a voxel-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Tian, Fangfang; Zhang, Handi; Zeng, Jianguang; Chen, Taolin; Wang, Song; Jia, Zhiyun; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-07-01

    Although gray matter (GM) damages caused by long term and excessive alcohol consumption have long been reported, the structural neuroimaging findings on alcohol-use disorders (AUD) are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis, using a novel voxel-based meta-analytic method effect-size signed differential mapping (ES-SDM), to characterize GM changes in AUD patients. Twelve studies including 433 AUD patients and 498 healthy controls (HCs) were retrieved. The AUD group demonstrated significant GM reductions in the corticostriatal-limbic circuits, including bilateral insula, superior temporal gyrus, striatum, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left thalamus and right hippocampus compared to HCs. GM reduction in the right striatum is significantly negatively related to duration of alcohol dependence, while GM shrinkage of the left superior, middle frontal gyrus, and left thalamus is related to lifetime alcohol consumption. The findings demonstrate that the GM abnormalities caused by AUD are in corticostriatal-limbic circuits whose dysfunctions may involve in craving and observed functional deficits. PMID:27108216

  16. Gray matter volume is associated with rate of subsequent skill learning after a long term training intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio-Baptista, Cassandra; Scholz, Jan; Jenkinson, Mark; Thomas, Adam G.; Filippini, Nicola; Smit, Gabrielle; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The ability to predict learning performance from brain imaging data has implications for selecting individuals for training or rehabilitation interventions. Here, we used structural MRI to test whether baseline variations in gray matter (GM) volume correlated with subsequent performance after a long-term training of a complex whole-body task. 44 naïve participants were scanned before undertaking daily juggling practice for 6 weeks, following either a high intensity or a low intensity training regime. To assess performance across the training period participants' practice sessions were filmed. Greater GM volume in medial occipito-parietal areas at baseline correlated with steeper learning slopes. We also tested whether practice time or performance outcomes modulated the degree of structural brain change detected between the baseline scan and additional scans performed immediately after training and following a further 4 weeks without training. Participants with better performance had higher increases in GM volume during the period following training (i.e., between scans 2 and 3) in dorsal parietal cortex and M1. When contrasting brain changes between the practice intensity groups, we did not find any straightforward effects of practice time though practice modulated the relationship between performance and GM volume change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that practice time and performance modulate the degree of structural brain change evoked by long-term training regimes. PMID:24680712

  17. A voxel-based morphometry study of gray matter correlates of facial emotion recognition in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Neves, Maila de Castro L; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Silva Neves, Fernando; de Souza-Duran, Fábio Luis; Busatto, Geraldo; Corrêa, Humberto

    2015-08-30

    Facial emotion recognition (FER) is one of the many cognitive deficits reported in bipolar disorder (BD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate neuroanatomical correlates of FER impairments in BD type I (BD-I). Participants comprised 21 euthymic BD-I patients without Axis I DSM IV-TR comorbidities and 21 healthy controls who were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and the Penn Emotion Recognition Test (ER40). Preprocessing of images used DARTEL (diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra) for optimized voxel-based morphometry in SPM8. Compared with healthy subjects, BD-I patients performed poorly in on the ER40 and had reduced gray matter volume (GMV) in the left orbitofrontal cortex, superior portion of the temporal pole and insula. In the BD-I group, the statistical maps indicated a direct correlation between FER on the ER40 and right middle cingulate gyrus GMV. Our findings are consistent with the previous studies regarding the overlap of multiple brain networks of social cognition and BD neurobiology, particularly components of the anterior-limbic neural network.

  18. Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

    2014-02-01

    Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease.

  19. Association of AKT1 with verbal learning, verbal memory, and regional cortical gray matter density in twins.

    PubMed

    Pietiläinen, Olli P H; Paunio, Tiina; Loukola, Anu; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Kieseppä, Tuula; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur W; van Erp, Theo G M; Silventoinen, Karri; Soronen, Pia; Hennah, William; Turunen, Joni A; Wedenoja, Juho; Palo, Outi M; Silander, Kaisa; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Cannon, Tyrone D; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-07-01

    AKT1, encoding the protein kinase B, has been associated with the genetic etiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, minuscule data exist on the role of different alleles of AKT1 in measurable quantitative endophenotypes, such as cognitive abilities and neuroanatomical features, showing deviations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We evaluated the contribution of AKT1 to quantitative cognitive traits and 3D high-resolution neuroanatomical images in a Finnish twin sample consisting of 298 twins: 61 pairs with schizophrenia (8 concordant), 31 pairs with bipolar disorder (5 concordant) and 65 control pairs matched for age, sex and demographics. An AKT1 allele defined by the SNP rs1130214 located in the UTR of the gene revealed association with cognitive traits related to verbal learning and memory (P = 0.0005 for a composite index). This association was further fortified by a higher degree of resemblance of verbal memory capacity in pairs sharing the rs1130214 genotype compared to pairs not sharing the genotype. Furthermore, the same allele was also associated with decreased gray matter density in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (P < 0.05). Our findings support the role of AKT1 in the genetic background of cognitive and anatomical features, known to be affected by psychotic disorders. The established association of the same allelic variant of AKT1 with both cognitive and neuroanatomical aberrations could suggest that AKT1 exerts its effect on verbal learning and memory via neural networks involving prefrontal cortex. PMID:19051289

  20. Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

    2014-02-01

    Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24166407

  1. Higher media multi-tasking activity is associated with smaller gray-matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kep Kee; Kanai, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Media multitasking, or the concurrent consumption of multiple media forms, is increasingly prevalent in today's society and has been associated with negative psychosocial and cognitive impacts. Individuals who engage in heavier media-multitasking are found to perform worse on cognitive control tasks and exhibit more socio-emotional difficulties. However, the neural processes associated with media multi-tasking remain unexplored. The present study investigated relationships between media multitasking activity and brain structure. Research has demonstrated that brain structure can be altered upon prolonged exposure to novel environments and experience. Thus, we expected differential engagements in media multitasking to correlate with brain structure variability. This was confirmed via Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses: Individuals with higher Media Multitasking Index (MMI) scores had smaller gray matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Functional connectivity between this ACC region and the precuneus was negatively associated with MMI. Our findings suggest a possible structural correlate for the observed decreased cognitive control performance and socio-emotional regulation in heavy media-multitaskers. While the cross-sectional nature of our study does not allow us to specify the direction of causality, our results brought to light novel associations between individual media multitasking behaviors and ACC structure differences.

  2. Antidepressant treatment reduces Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by swim stress in different columns of the periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene; de Oliveira, Rúbia M W; Pádua Carobrez, Antonio; de Lima, Thereza C M; del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2006-10-16

    Antidepressant treatment attenuates behavioral changes induced by uncontrollable stress. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is proposed to be a brain site involved in the behavioral responses to uncontrollable stress and antidepressant effects. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of antidepressant treatment on the pattern of neural activation of the PAG along its mediolateral and rostrocaudal subregions after a forced swim stress episode. Male Wistar rats were sub-acutely treated with desipramine (a selective noradrenaline re-uptake blocker, three injections of 10 mg/kg in 24 h) or clomipramine (a non-selective serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake blocker, three injections of 10 mg/kg in 24 h) and submitted to the forced swimming test (FST). Two hours after the test their brain were removed for Fos immunohistochemistry. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in rostral, intermediate and caudal portions of dorsomedial (dmPAG), dorsolateral (dlPAG), lateral (lPAG) and ventrolateral (vlPAG) PAG were quantified by a computerized system. The FST session increased FLI in most parts of the PAG. Previous treatment with desipramine or clomipramine reduced FLI in all columns of the PAG. FLI in the PAG correlated positively with to the immobility time and negatively with to climbing behavior scored during the test. These results indicate that neurons in the PAG are activated by uncontrollable stress. Moreover, inhibitory action of antidepressants on this activity may be associated with the anti-immobility effects of these drugs in the FST.

  3. Cortical complexity as a measure of age-related brain atrophy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Christopher R; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the human brain changes in a variety of ways as we age. While a sizeable literature has examined age-related differences in cortical thickness, and to a lesser degree, gyrification, here we examined differences in cortical complexity, as indexed by fractal dimensionality in a sample of over 400 individuals across the adult lifespan. While prior studies have shown differences in fractal dimensionality between patient populations and age-matched, healthy controls, it is unclear how well this measure would relate to age-related cortical atrophy. Initially computing a single measure for the entire cortical ribbon, i.e., unparcellated gray matter, we found fractal dimensionality to be more sensitive to age-related differences than either cortical thickness or gyrification index. We additionally observed regional differences in age-related atrophy between the three measures, suggesting that they may index distinct differences in cortical structure. We also provide a freely available MATLAB toolbox for calculating fractal dimensionality. PMID:27103141

  4. Improved longitudinal gray and white matter atrophy assessment via application of a 4-dimensional hidden Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Michael G; Bergsland, Niels; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-04-15

    SIENA and similar techniques have demonstrated the utility of performing "direct" measurements as opposed to post-hoc comparison of cross-sectional data for the measurement of whole brain (WB) atrophy over time. However, gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) atrophy are now widely recognized as important components of neurological disease progression, and are being actively evaluated as secondary endpoints in clinical trials. Direct measures of GM/WM change with advantages similar to SIENA have been lacking. We created a robust and easily-implemented method for direct longitudinal analysis of GM/WM atrophy, SIENAX multi-time-point (SIENAX-MTP). We built on the basic halfway-registration and mask composition components of SIENA to improve the raw output of FMRIB's FAST tissue segmentation tool. In addition, we created LFAST, a modified version of FAST incorporating a 4th dimension in its hidden Markov random field model in order to directly represent time. The method was validated by scan-rescan, simulation, comparison with SIENA, and two clinical effect size comparisons. All validation approaches demonstrated improved longitudinal precision with the proposed SIENAX-MTP method compared to SIENAX. For GM, simulation showed better correlation with experimental volume changes (r=0.992 vs. 0.941), scan-rescan showed lower standard deviations (3.8% vs. 8.4%), correlation with SIENA was more robust (r=0.70 vs. 0.53), and effect sizes were improved by up to 68%. Statistical power estimates indicated a potential drop of 55% in the number of subjects required to detect the same treatment effect with SIENAX-MTP vs. SIENAX. The proposed direct GM/WM method significantly improves on the standard SIENAX technique by trading a small amount of bias for a large reduction in variance, and may provide more precise data and additional statistical power in longitudinal studies.

  5. Dyslexia and voxel-based morphometry: correlations between five behavioural measures of dyslexia and gray and white matter volumes.

    PubMed

    Tamboer, Peter; Scholte, H Steven; Vorst, Harrie C M

    2015-10-01

    In voxel-based morphometry studies of dyslexia, the relation between causal theories of dyslexia and gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations is still under debate. Some alterations are consistently reported, but others failed to reach significance. We investigated GM alterations in a large sample of Dutch students (37 dyslexics and 57 non-dyslexics) with two analyses: group differences in local GM and total GM and WM volume and correlations between GM and WM volumes and five behavioural measures. We found no significant group differences after corrections for multiple comparisons although total WM volume was lower in the group of dyslexics when age was partialled out. We presented an overview of uncorrected clusters of voxels (p < 0.05, cluster size k > 200) with reduced or increased GM volume. We found four significant correlations between factors of dyslexia representing various behavioural measures and the clusters found in the first analysis. In the whole sample, a factor related to performances in spelling correlated negatively with GM volume in the left posterior cerebellum. Within the group of dyslexics, a factor related to performances in Dutch-English rhyme words correlated positively with GM volume in the left and right caudate nucleus and negatively with increased total WM volume. Most of our findings were in accordance with previous reports. A relatively new finding was the involvement of the caudate nucleus. We confirmed the multiple cognitive nature of dyslexia and suggested that experience greatly influences anatomical alterations depending on various subtypes of dyslexia, especially in a student sample.

  6. Human brain atlas for automated region of interest selection in quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to determine iron content in deep gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Lim, Issel Anne L; Faria, Andreia V; Li, Xu; Hsu, Johnny T C; Airan, Raag D; Mori, Susumu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the single-subject Eve atlas from Johns Hopkins University, which currently contains diffusion tensor and T1-weighted anatomical maps, by including contrast based on quantitative susceptibility mapping. The new atlas combines a "deep gray matter parcellation map" (DGMPM) derived from a single-subject quantitative susceptibility map with the previously established "white matter parcellation map" (WMPM) from the same subject's T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging data into an MNI coordinate map named the "Everything Parcellation Map in Eve Space," also known as the "EvePM." It allows automated segmentation of gray matter and white matter structures. Quantitative susceptibility maps from five healthy male volunteers (30 to 33 years of age) were coregistered to the Eve Atlas with AIR and Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM), and the transformation matrices were applied to the EvePM to produce automated parcellation in subject space. Parcellation accuracy was measured with a kappa analysis for the left and right structures of six deep gray matter regions. For multi-orientation QSM images, the Kappa statistic was 0.85 between automated and manual segmentation, with the inter-rater reproducibility Kappa being 0.89 for the human raters, suggesting "almost perfect" agreement between all segmentation methods. Segmentation seemed slightly more difficult for human raters on single-orientation QSM images, with the Kappa statistic being 0.88 between automated and manual segmentation, and 0.85 and 0.86 between human raters. Overall, this atlas provides a time-efficient tool for automated coregistration and segmentation of quantitative susceptibility data to analyze many regions of interest. These data were used to establish a baseline for normal magnetic susceptibility measurements for over 60 brain structures of 30- to 33-year-old males. Correlating the average susceptibility with age-based iron concentrations in gray

  7. Human brain atlas for automated region of interest selection in quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to determine iron content in deep gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Lim, Issel Anne L; Faria, Andreia V; Li, Xu; Hsu, Johnny T C; Airan, Raag D; Mori, Susumu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the single-subject Eve atlas from Johns Hopkins University, which currently contains diffusion tensor and T1-weighted anatomical maps, by including contrast based on quantitative susceptibility mapping. The new atlas combines a "deep gray matter parcellation map" (DGMPM) derived from a single-subject quantitative susceptibility map with the previously established "white matter parcellation map" (WMPM) from the same subject's T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging data into an MNI coordinate map named the "Everything Parcellation Map in Eve Space," also known as the "EvePM." It allows automated segmentation of gray matter and white matter structures. Quantitative susceptibility maps from five healthy male volunteers (30 to 33 years of age) were coregistered to the Eve Atlas with AIR and Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM), and the transformation matrices were applied to the EvePM to produce automated parcellation in subject space. Parcellation accuracy was measured with a kappa analysis for the left and right structures of six deep gray matter regions. For multi-orientation QSM images, the Kappa statistic was 0.85 between automated and manual segmentation, with the inter-rater reproducibility Kappa being 0.89 for the human raters, suggesting "almost perfect" agreement between all segmentation methods. Segmentation seemed slightly more difficult for human raters on single-orientation QSM images, with the Kappa statistic being 0.88 between automated and manual segmentation, and 0.85 and 0.86 between human raters. Overall, this atlas provides a time-efficient tool for automated coregistration and segmentation of quantitative susceptibility data to analyze many regions of interest. These data were used to establish a baseline for normal magnetic susceptibility measurements for over 60 brain structures of 30- to 33-year-old males. Correlating the average susceptibility with age-based iron concentrations in gray

  8. Numerical Transcoding Proficiency in 10-Year-Old Schoolchildren is Associated with Gray Matter Inter-Individual Differences: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Amélie; Rossi, Sandrine; Simon, Grégory; Lanoë, Céline; Leroux, Gaëlle; Poirel, Nicolas; Pineau, Arlette; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Are individual differences in numerical performance sustained by variations in gray matter volume in schoolchildren? To our knowledge, this challenging question for neuroeducation has not yet been investigated in typical development. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry method to search for possible structural brain differences between two groups of 10-year-old schoolchildren (N = 22) whose performance differed only in numerical transcoding between analog and symbolic systems. The results indicated that children with low numerical proficiency have less gray matter volume in the parietal (particularly in the left intraparietal sulcus and the bilateral angular gyri) and occipito-temporal areas. All the identified regions have previously been shown to be functionally involved in transcoding between analog and symbolic numerical systems. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the intertwined relationships between mathematics learning and brain structure in healthy schoolchildren. PMID:23630510

  9. Numerical Transcoding Proficiency in 10-Year-Old Schoolchildren is Associated with Gray Matter Inter-Individual Differences: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Amélie; Rossi, Sandrine; Simon, Grégory; Lanoë, Céline; Leroux, Gaëlle; Poirel, Nicolas; Pineau, Arlette; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Are individual differences in numerical performance sustained by variations in gray matter volume in schoolchildren? To our knowledge, this challenging question for neuroeducation has not yet been investigated in typical development. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry method to search for possible structural brain differences between two groups of 10-year-old schoolchildren (N = 22) whose performance differed only in numerical transcoding between analog and symbolic systems. The results indicated that children with low numerical proficiency have less gray matter volume in the parietal (particularly in the left intraparietal sulcus and the bilateral angular gyri) and occipito-temporal areas. All the identified regions have previously been shown to be functionally involved in transcoding between analog and symbolic numerical systems. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the intertwined relationships between mathematics learning and brain structure in healthy schoolchildren.

  10. Cortex mapping reveals regionally specific patterns of genetic and disease-specific gray-matter deficits in twins discordant for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Tyrone D; Thompson, Paul M; van Erp, Theo G M; Toga, Arthur W; Poutanen, Veli-Pekka; Huttunen, Matti; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Standerskjold-Nordenstam, Carl-Gustav; Narr, Katherine L; Khaledy, Mohammad; Zoumalan, Chris I; Dail, Rajneesh; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2002-03-01

    The symptoms of schizophrenia imply disruption to brain systems supporting higher-order cognitive activity, but whether these systems are impacted differentially against a background of diffuse cortical gray-matter deficit remains ambiguous. Some unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenics also manifest cortical gray-matter deficits, but it is unclear whether these changes are isomorphic with those in patients, and the answer is critical to understanding the neurobiological conditions necessary for disease expression given a predisposing genotype. Here we report three-dimensional cortical surface maps (probabilistic atlases matching subjects' anatomy point by point throughout cortex) in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins discordant for chronic schizophrenia along with demographically matched control twins. A map encoding the average differences between schizophrenia patients and their unaffected MZ co-twins revealed deficits primarily in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. A map encoding variation associated with genetic proximity to a patient (MZ co-twins > DZ co-twins > control twins) isolated deficits primarily in polar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In each case, the statistical significance was confirmed through analysis of 10,000 Monte Carlo permutations, and the remaining cortex was shown to be significantly less affected by contrast analysis. The disease-related deficits in gray matter were correlated with measures of symptom severity and cognitive dysfunction but not with duration of illness or antipsychotic drug treatment. Genetic and disease-specific influences thus affect gray matter in partially nonoverlapping areas of predominantly heteromodal association cortex, changes that may act synergistically in producing overt behavioral features of the disorder. PMID:11867725

  11. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Erdeniz, Burak; DeDios, Yiri; Wood, Scott; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, increased intracranial pressure that by itself has been related to microgravity-induced bodily fluid shifts: [1] has been associated with white matter microstructural damage, [2] Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system, [3] Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure, and [4] Here we present results of the first eight subjects.

  12. Cortical spreading depression decreases Fos expression in rat periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Borysovych Bogdanov, Volodymyr; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Lombard, Arnaud; Chauvel, Virginie; Multon, Sylvie; Kot, Larysa Ivanivna; Makarchuk, Mykola Yukhymovych; Schoenen, Jean

    2015-01-12

    The migraine headache involves activation and central sensitization of the trigeminovascular pain pathway. The migraine aura is likely due to cortical spreading depression (CSD), a propagating wave of brief neuronal depolarization followed by prolonged inhibition. The precise link between CSD and headache remains controversial. Our objectives were to study the effect of CSD on neuronal activation in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), an area known to control pain and autonomic functions, and to be involved in migraine pathogenesis. Fos-immunoreactive nuclei were counted in rostral PAG and Edinger-Westphal nuclei (PAG-EWn bregma -6.5 mm), and caudal PAG (bregma -8 mm) of 17 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after KCl-induced CSD under chloral hydrate anesthesia. Being part of a pharmacological study, six animals had received, for the preceding 4 weeks daily, intraperitoneal injections of lamotrigine (15 mg/kg), six others had been treated with saline, while five sham-operated animals served as controls. We found that the number of Fos-immunoreactive nuclei in the PAG decreased after CSD provocation. There was no difference between lamotrigine- and saline-treated animals. The number of CSDs correlated negatively with Fos-immunoreactive counts. CSD-linked inhibition of neuronal activity in the PAG might play a role in central sensitization during migraine attacks and contribute to a better understanding of the link between the aura and the headache.

  13. Comparison of regional gray matter atrophy, white matter alteration, and glucose metabolism as a predictor of the conversion to Alzheimer's disease in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Bo Kyung; Yi, Dahyun; Seo, Eun Hyun; Choe, Young Min; Kim, Jee Wook; Kim, Shin Gyeom; Choi, Hyo Jung; Byun, Min Soo; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Woo, Jong Inn; Lee, Dong Young

    2015-06-01

    We compared the predictive ability of the various neuroimaging tools and determined the most cost-effective, non-invasive Alzheimer's disease (AD) prediction model in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals. Thirty-two MCI subjects were evaluated at baseline with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and neuropsychological tests, and then followed up for 2 yr. After a follow up period, 12 MCI subjects converted to AD (MCIc) and 20 did not (MCInc). Of the voxel-based statistical comparisons of baseline neuroimaging data, the MCIc showed reduced cerebral glucose metabolism (CMgl) in the temporo-parietal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, and frontal regions, and gray matter (GM) density in multiple cortical areas including the frontal, temporal and parietal regions compared to the MCInc, whereas regional fractional anisotropy derived from DTI were not significantly different between the two groups. The MCIc also had lower Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score than the MCInc. Through a series of model selection steps, the MMSE combined with CMgl model was selected as a final model (classification accuracy 93.8%). In conclusion, the combination of MMSE with regional CMgl measurement based on FDG-PET is probably the most efficient, non-invasive method to predict AD in MCI individuals after a two-year follow-up period.

  14. Burning odor-elicited anxiety in OEF/OIF combat veterans: Inverse relationship to gray matter volume in olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Bernadette M; McConnell, Patrick A; Froeliger, Brett; Leslie, Kimberly; Uhde, Thomas W

    2015-11-01

    Despite the anatomical overlap between the brain's fear/threat and olfactory systems, a very limited number of investigations have considered the role of odors and the central olfactory system in the pathophysiology of PTSD. The goal of the present study was to assess structural differences in primary and secondary olfactory cortex between combat veterans with and without PTSD (CV + PTSD, CV-PTSD, respectively). An additional goal was to determine the relationship between gray matter volume (GMV) in olfactory cortex and the distressing properties of burning-related odors. A region of interest voxel-based morphometric (VBM) approach was used to measure GMV in olfactory cortex in a well-characterized group of CV + PTSD (n = 20) and CV-PTSD (n = 25). Prior to the MRI exam, combat-related (i.e., burning rubber) and control odors were systematically sampled and rated according to their potential for eliciting PTSD symptoms. Results showed that CV + PTSD exhibited significantly reduced GMV in anterior piriform (primary olfactory) and orbitofrontal (secondary olfactory) cortices compared to CV-PTSD (both p < .01). For the entire group, GMV in bilateral anterior piriform cortex was inversely related to burning rubber odor-elicited memories of trauma (p < .05). GMV in orbitofrontal cortex was inversely related to both clinical and laboratory measures of PTSD symptoms (all p < .05). In addition to replicating an established inverse relationship between GMV in anxiety-associated brain structures and PTSD symptomatology, the present study extends those findings by being the first report of volumetric decreases in olfactory cortex that are inversely related to odor-elicited PTSD symptoms. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:26424424

  15. Similar cortical but not subcortical gray matter abnormalities in women with posttraumatic stress disorder with versus without dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Chalavi, Sima; Vissia, Eline M; Giesen, Mechteld E; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Draijer, Nel; Barker, Gareth J; Veltman, Dick J; Reinders, Antje A T S

    2015-03-30

    Neuroanatomical evidence on the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociative disorders is still lacking. We acquired brain structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans from 17 patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and co-morbid PTSD (DID-PTSD) and 16 patients with PTSD but without DID (PTSD-only), and 32 healthy controls (HC), and compared their whole-brain cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) morphological measurements. Associations between GM measurements and severity of dissociative and depersonalization/derealization symptoms or lifetime traumatizing events were evaluated in the patient groups. DID-PTSD and PTSD-only patients, compared with HC, had similarly smaller cortical GM volumes of the whole brain and of frontal, temporal and insular cortices. DID-PTSD patients additionally showed smaller hippocampal and larger pallidum volumes relative to HC, and larger putamen and pallidum volumes relative to PTSD-only. Severity of lifetime traumatizing events and volume of the hippocampus were negatively correlated. Severity of dissociative and depersonalization/derealization symptoms correlated positively with volume of the putamen and pallidum, and negatively with volume of the inferior parietal cortex. Shared abnormal brain structures in DID-PTSD and PTSD-only, small hippocampal volume in DID-PTSD, more severe lifetime traumatizing events in DID-PTSD compared with PTSD-only, and negative correlations between lifetime traumatizing events and hippocampal volume suggest a trauma-related etiology for DID. Our results provide neurobiological evidence for the side-by-side nosological classification of PTSD and DID in the DSM-5. PMID:25670646

  16. Similar cortical but not subcortical gray matter abnormalities in women with posttraumatic stress disorder with versus without dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Chalavi, Sima; Vissia, Eline M; Giesen, Mechteld E; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Draijer, Nel; Barker, Gareth J; Veltman, Dick J; Reinders, Antje A T S

    2015-03-30

    Neuroanatomical evidence on the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociative disorders is still lacking. We acquired brain structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans from 17 patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and co-morbid PTSD (DID-PTSD) and 16 patients with PTSD but without DID (PTSD-only), and 32 healthy controls (HC), and compared their whole-brain cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) morphological measurements. Associations between GM measurements and severity of dissociative and depersonalization/derealization symptoms or lifetime traumatizing events were evaluated in the patient groups. DID-PTSD and PTSD-only patients, compared with HC, had similarly smaller cortical GM volumes of the whole brain and of frontal, temporal and insular cortices. DID-PTSD patients additionally showed smaller hippocampal and larger pallidum volumes relative to HC, and larger putamen and pallidum volumes relative to PTSD-only. Severity of lifetime traumatizing events and volume of the hippocampus were negatively correlated. Severity of dissociative and depersonalization/derealization symptoms correlated positively with volume of the putamen and pallidum, and negatively with volume of the inferior parietal cortex. Shared abnormal brain structures in DID-PTSD and PTSD-only, small hippocampal volume in DID-PTSD, more severe lifetime traumatizing events in DID-PTSD compared with PTSD-only, and negative correlations between lifetime traumatizing events and hippocampal volume suggest a trauma-related etiology for DID. Our results provide neurobiological evidence for the side-by-side nosological classification of PTSD and DID in the DSM-5.

  17. Reduced visual cortex gray matter volume and thickness in young adults who witnessed domestic violence during childhood.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18-25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11-13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  18. Reduced Visual Cortex Gray Matter Volume and Thickness in Young Adults Who Witnessed Domestic Violence during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18–25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11–13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  19. Reduced visual cortex gray matter volume and thickness in young adults who witnessed domestic violence during childhood.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18-25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11-13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure.

  20. Exploring the brains of Baduk (Go) experts: gray matter morphometry, resting-state functional connectivity, and graph theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, Sung Nyun; Lee, Tae Young; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2013-01-01

    One major characteristic of experts is intuitive judgment, which is an automatic process whereby patterns stored in memory through long-term training are recognized. Indeed, long-term training may influence brain structure and function. A recent study revealed that chess experts at rest showed differences in structure and functional connectivity (FC) in the head of caudate, which is associated with rapid best next-move generation. However, less is known about the structure and function of the brains of Baduk experts (BEs) compared with those of experts in other strategy games. Therefore, we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FC analyses in BEs to investigate structural brain differences and to clarify the influence of these differences on functional interactions. We also conducted graph theoretical analysis (GTA) to explore the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Compared to novices, BEs exhibited decreased and increased gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NA), respectively. We also found increased FC between the amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and decreased FC between the NA and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Further GTA revealed differences in measures of the integration of the network and in the regional nodal characteristics of various brain regions activated during Baduk. This study provides evidence for structural and functional differences as well as altered topological organization of the whole-brain functional networks in BEs. Our findings also offer novel suggestions about the cognitive mechanisms behind Baduk expertise, which involves intuitive decision-making mediated by somatic marker circuitry and visuospatial processing. PMID:24106471

  1. Exploring the brains of Baduk (Go) experts: gray matter morphometry, resting-state functional connectivity, and graph theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, Sung Nyun; Lee, Tae Young; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2013-01-01

    One major characteristic of experts is intuitive judgment, which is an automatic process whereby patterns stored in memory through long-term training are recognized. Indeed, long-term training may influence brain structure and function. A recent study revealed that chess experts at rest showed differences in structure and functional connectivity (FC) in the head of caudate, which is associated with rapid best next-move generation. However, less is known about the structure and function of the brains of Baduk experts (BEs) compared with those of experts in other strategy games. Therefore, we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FC analyses in BEs to investigate structural brain differences and to clarify the influence of these differences on functional interactions. We also conducted graph theoretical analysis (GTA) to explore the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Compared to novices, BEs exhibited decreased and increased gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NA), respectively. We also found increased FC between the amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and decreased FC between the NA and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Further GTA revealed differences in measures of the integration of the network and in the regional nodal characteristics of various brain regions activated during Baduk. This study provides evidence for structural and functional differences as well as altered topological organization of the whole-brain functional networks in BEs. Our findings also offer novel suggestions about the cognitive mechanisms behind Baduk expertise, which involves intuitive decision-making mediated by somatic marker circuitry and visuospatial processing. PMID:24106471

  2. Imaging Neuroinflammation in Gray and White Matter in Schizophrenia: An In-Vivo PET Study With [18F]-FEPPA

    PubMed Central

    Kenk, Miran; Selvanathan, Thiviya; Rao, Naren; Suridjan, Ivonne; Rusjan, Pablo; Remington, Gary; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Wilson, Alan A.; Houle, Sylvain; Mizrahi, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation and abnormal immune responses have been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZ). Past studies using positron emission tomography (PET) that examined neuroinflammation in patients with SCZ in vivo using the translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) target were limited by the insensitivity of the first-generation imaging agent [11C]-PK11195, scanners used, and the small sample sizes studied. Present study uses a novel second-generation TSPO PET radioligand N-acetyl-N-(2-[18F]fluoroethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxy-5-pyridinamine ([18F]-FEPPA) to evaluate whether there is increased neuroinflammation in patients with SCZ. A cross-sectional study was performed using [18F]-FEPPA and a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). Eighteen patients with SCZ with ongoing psychotic symptoms and 27 healthy volunteers (HV) were recruited from a tertiary psychiatric clinical setting and the community, respectively. All participants underwent [18F]-FEPPA PET and magnetic resonance imaging, and PET data were analyzed to obtain [18F]-FEPPA total volume of distribution (V T) using a 2-tissue compartment model with an arterial plasma input function, as previously validated. All subjects were classified as high-, medium- or low-affinity [18F]-FEPPA binders on the basis of rs6971 polymorphism, and genotype information was incorporated into the analyses of imaging outcomes. No significant differences in neuroinflammation indexed as [18F]-FEPPA V T were observed between groups in either gray (F (1,39) = 0.179, P = .674) or white matter regions (F (1,38) = 0.597, P = .445). The lack of significant difference in neuroinflammation in treated patients with SCZ in the midst of a psychotic episode and HV suggests that neuroinflammatory processes may take place early in disease progression or are affected by antipsychotic treatment. PMID:25385788

  3. Voxelwise meta-analysis of gray matter anomalies in progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease using anatomic likelihood estimation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Na; Yang, Jing; Li, Jianpeng; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on gray matter (GM) of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease (PD) have been conducted separately. Identifying the different neuroanatomical changes in GM resulting from PSP and PD through meta-analysis will aid the differential diagnosis of PSP and PD. In this study, a systematic review of VBM studies of patients with PSP and PD relative to healthy control (HC) in the Embase and PubMed databases from January 1995 to April 2013 was conducted. The anatomical distribution of the coordinates of GM differences was meta-analyzed using anatomical likelihood estimation. Separate maps of GM changes were constructed and subtraction meta-analysis was performed to explore the differences in GM abnormalities between PSP and PD. Nine PSP studies and 24 PD studies were included. GM reductions were present in the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, midbrain, insular cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, and left precentral gyrus and anterior cingulate gyrus in PSP. Atrophy of GM was concentrated in the bilateral middle and inferior frontal gyrus, precuneus, left precentral gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, right superior parietal lobule, and right cuneus in PD. Subtraction meta-analysis indicated that GM volume was lesser in the bilateral midbrain, thalamus, and insula in PSP compared with that in PD. Our meta-analysis indicated that PSP and PD shared a similar distribution of neuroanatomical changes in the frontal lobe, including inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus, and that atrophy of the midbrain, thalamus, and insula are neuroanatomical markers for differentiating PSP from PD. PMID:24600372

  4. Dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter CB1 and TRPV1 receptors exert opposite modulation on expression of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Uliana, D L; Hott, S C; Lisboa, S F; Resstel, L B M

    2016-04-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and Transient Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter are involved in the modulation of conditioned response. Both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are related to glutamate release and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It was previously demonstrated that both NMDA glutamate receptors and NO are involved in the conditioned emotional response. Therefore, one aim of this work was to verify whether dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors modulate the expression of contextual conditioned emotional response. Moreover, we also investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors and the NO pathway in this response. Male Wistar rats with local dlPAG guide cannula were submitted to contextual fear conditioning. Following 24 h, a polyethylene catheter was implanted in the femoral artery for cardiovascular recordings. After an additional 24 h, drugs were administered in the dlPAG and freezing behavior and autonomic responses were recorded during chamber re-exposure. Both a CB1 antagonist (AM251) and a TRPV1 agonist (Capsaicin; CPS) increased the expression of a conditioned emotional response. This response was prevented by an NMDA antagonist, a preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, an NO scavenger and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGC). Furthermore, pretreatment with a TRPV1 antagonist also prevented the increased conditioned emotional response induced by AM251. Considering that GABA can counterbalance glutamate effects, we also investigated whether GABAA receptors were involved in the effect of a higher dose of AM251. Pretreatment with a GABAA receptor antagonist caused an increased conditioned emotional response by AM251. Our results support the possibility that dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are involved in the expression of conditioned emotional response through the NMDA/NO/sGC pathway. Moreover, the opposite effects exerted by GABA and glutamate could produce different outcomes of drugs modulating eCBs.

  5. Shared and distinct gray matter abnormalities in schizophrenia, schizophrenia relatives and bipolar disorder in association with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Knöchel, Christian; Stäblein, Michael; Prvulovic, David; Ghinea, Denisa; Wenzler, Sofia; Pantel, Johannes; Alves, Gilberto; Linden, David E J; Harrison, Octavia; Carvalho, Andre; Reif, Andreas; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive impairments have been linked to structural and functional alterations in frontal and subcortical brain regions, ultimately leading to fronto-thalamic connectivity disturbances. We hypothesized that such neuronal disruptions in frontal and subcortical structures may account for neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia (SZ), schizophrenia relatives and bipolar disorder (BD). We acquired T1-weighted anatomical MRI sequences in 209 participants: 57 SZ patients, 47 first-degree relatives of SZ patients, 48 BD I patients and 57 healthy controls. We computed group comparisons of gray matter (GM) volume in frontal and basal ganglia regions-of-interest, followed by correlation analysis between psychomotor speed, executive functioning and learning and GM volumes in candidate regions. Several frontal GM volume reductions as well as GM increases in the thalamus and the putamen were exhibited in SZ patients as compared to controls. The same finding was observed - less pronounced - when comparing SZ relatives and controls. BD patients presented GM volume increases in the basal ganglia in comparison to controls. In SZ patients, increases in bilateral thalamus GM volume and decreases in left middle and superior frontal gyrus volume were significantly associated with worse cognitive performance. In summary, our results indicate distinct imbalances across frontal-subcortical circuits in BD, SZ relatives and SZ. The functional relevance of the findings were mainly limited to the SZ patients group: in this group, abnormalities were directly associated with cognitive performance. This result is in line with the finding that the volume alterations were strongest in SZ patients and followed by BD patients and SZ relatives. PMID:26833265

  6. Voxel-based meta-analysis of gray matter volume reductions associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaqian; Yang, Jing; Hu, Xinyu; Shang, Huifang

    2016-06-01

    Brain gray matter volume (GMV) reduction has been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and in PD patients with dementia (PDD) with cumulative evidence using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). However, the findings of these studies have not been entirely concordant. Whole-brain VBM studies comparing PD-MCI with PD patients without cognitive impairment (PD-NCI) and comparing PDD with PD patients without dementia (PDND) were systematically searched in PubMed and EMBASE databases from January 1995 to December 2015. Coordinates with significant differences were extracted from each cluster. Meta-analysis was performed using AES-SDM to quantitatively evaluate the GMV changes. Five studies comparing 92 PD-MCI with 192 PD-NCI patients were included in the PD-MCI vs. PD-NCI meta-analysis. Ten studies with 168 PDD and 233 PDND patients were included in the PDD vs. PDND meta-analysis. Compared with PD-NCI, GMV reductions were observed in left superior temporal lobe, left insula and left superior frontal lobe in PD-MCI patients. Significant GMV reduction were found in bilateral superior temporal lobe extending to hippocampus, and left superior frontal lobe in PDD patients comparing with PDND. Meta-regression of PDD studies showed that disease duration was negatively correlated with GMV in the left superior frontal lobe. GMV reductions in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions were main features of cognitive decline in PD. Unilateral-to-bilateral development of GMV reduction in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions is a possible indicator for PD-MCI to PDD progression, whereas significant hippocampal GMV reduction may not be a marker for early cognitive decline in PD. PMID:27113603

  7. Differential effects of androgenic and anti-androgenic progestins on fusiform and frontal gray matter volume and face recognition performance.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Kerschbaum, Hubert

    2015-01-30

    Effects of oral hormonal contraceptives (OC) on human brain structure and behavior have only recently become a focus of research. Two explorative reports observed larger regional gray matter (GM) volumes in OC users within the prefrontal cortex, ACC and fusiform gyri, as well as parahippocampal gyri, hippocampus and cerebellum. These studies did however not control for the androgenicity of the progestin compound of OC, did not take into consideration how long OC users had been on their OC, and did not control for age differences between the OC group and the naturally cycling group. We compared 20 naturally cycling women during their early follicular cycle phase to 18 users of OC containing androgenic progestins and 22 users of OC containing anti-androgenic progestins. When controlling for age, we found that in users of anti-androgenic progestins relative GM volumes within the bilateral fusiform gyri, fusiform face area (FFA), parahippocampal place area (PPA) and cerebellum, were significantly larger than in naturally cycling women, while in users of androgenic progestins, relative as well as absolute volumes within the bilateral middle and superior frontal gyri were significantly smaller compared to naturally cycling women. These morphological changes were related to performance in a face recognition task. Face recognition performance was significantly better in users of anti-androgenic progestins compared to the other groups and significantly related to absolute as well as relative GM volumes in the FFA and PPA. Total GM volume, as well as absolute GM volumes within the bilateral fusiform gyri, FFA, hippocampus, parahippocampus, PPA, middle frontal gyri and ACC were significantly larger, the longer the duration of OC use, particularly in users of androgenic progestins. Morphological differences between active and inactive pill phase were observed in users of androgenic progestins. These findings suggest differential effects of androgenic and anti

  8. Gray matter oligodendrocyte progenitors and neurons die caspase-3 mediated deaths subsequent to mild perinatal hypoxic/ischemic insults.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Raymond P; Levison, Steven W

    2005-01-01

    With significant improvements in neonatal care, fewer infants sustain severe injury as a consequence of hypoxia/ischemia (H/I). However, the majority of experimental studies have inflicted moderate to severe injuries, or they have assessed damage to the caudal forebrain; therefore, to better understand how a mild H/I episode affects the structures and cells of the rostral forebrain, we assessed the relative vulnerabilities of cells in the neocortex, striatum, corpus callosum, choroid plexus and subventricular zone (SVZ). To inflict mild H/I injury, the right common carotid artery was ligated followed by 1 h of hypoxia (8% O(2)) at 37 degrees C. Regional vulnerabilities were assessed using TUNEL, active caspase-3 and hematoxylin and eosin staining at 24 and 48 h of recovery. Scattered columns of cell death were observed in the neocortex with deep-layer neurons more vulnerable than more superficial neurons. The majority of these dying neurons appeared to be dying apoptotic rather than necrotic deaths. In addition, approximately 1/3 of the apoptotic cells in the neocortex were O4+ oligodendrocyte progenitors. We also observed a decrease in NG2 staining within the affected regions of the forebrain. By contrast, active caspase-3+/S-100beta+ astrocytes were not observed. Neurons and O4+ oligodendrocyte progenitors also died apoptotic deaths within the striatum. The lining cells of the choroid plexus also sustained damage. Elevated numbers of apoptotic cells were observed in the most lateral region of the SVZ and some of these dying cells were O4+. The most novel finding of this study, that oligodendrocyte progenitors in the gray matter are damaged and eliminated as a consequence of perinatal H/I, provides new insights into the histopathology and neurological deficits observed in infants who sustain mild H/I brain injuries.

  9. Imaging neuroinflammation in gray and white matter in schizophrenia: an in-vivo PET study with [18F]-FEPPA.

    PubMed

    Kenk, Miran; Selvanathan, Thiviya; Rao, Naren; Suridjan, Ivonne; Rusjan, Pablo; Remington, Gary; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Mizrahi, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation and abnormal immune responses have been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZ). Past studies using positron emission tomography (PET) that examined neuroinflammation in patients with SCZ in vivo using the translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) target were limited by the insensitivity of the first-generation imaging agent [(11)C]-PK11195, scanners used, and the small sample sizes studied. Present study uses a novel second-generation TSPO PET radioligand N-acetyl-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxy-5-pyridinamine ([(18)F]-FEPPA) to evaluate whether there is increased neuroinflammation in patients with SCZ. A cross-sectional study was performed using [(18)F]-FEPPA and a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). Eighteen patients with SCZ with ongoing psychotic symptoms and 27 healthy volunteers (HV) were recruited from a tertiary psychiatric clinical setting and the community, respectively. All participants underwent [(18)F]-FEPPA PET and magnetic resonance imaging, and PET data were analyzed to obtain [(18)F]-FEPPA total volume of distribution (VT) using a 2-tissue compartment model with an arterial plasma input function, as previously validated. All subjects were classified as high-, medium- or low-affinity [(18)F]-FEPPA binders on the basis of rs6971 polymorphism, and genotype information was incorporated into the analyses of imaging outcomes. No significant differences in neuroinflammation indexed as [(18)F]-FEPPA VT were observed between groups in either gray (F(1,39) = 0.179, P = .674) or white matter regions (F(1,38) = 0.597, P = .445). The lack of significant difference in neuroinflammation in treated patients with SCZ in the midst of a psychotic episode and HV suggests that neuroinflammatory processes may take place early in disease progression or are affected by antipsychotic treatment. PMID:25385788

  10. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  11. Sensitivity of different MRI-techniques to assess gray matter atrophy patterns in Alzheimer's disease is region-specific.

    PubMed

    Clerx, L; Jacobs, H I L; Burgmans, S; Gronenschild, E H B M; Uylings, H B M; Echávarri, C; Visser, P J; Verhey, F R J; Aalten, P

    2013-11-01

    The present study compares four different structural magnetic resonance imaging techniques used to measure gray matter (GM) atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD): manual and automated volumetry, cortical thickness (CT) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). These techniques are used interchangeably in AD research and thus far it is unclear which technique is superior in detecting abnormalities early in the disease process. 18 healthy participants without any memory impairment, 18 patients with MCI, and 17 patients with mild AD were included and between-group differences were investigated in AD signature regions (areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), medial temporal lobe (MTL) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC)). Both manual volumetric measurements and VBM were able to detect GM atrophy in the early stages (differentiation controls and MCI), mainly in the MTL. In the early phase, automated volumetric measurements showed GM differences in the PPC but not in the MTL. In our sample, CT measurements were not sensitive for group differences in the early stages. PFC regions showed abnormalities in the later stages (controls vs AD) when manual volumetric measurements or VBM are employed. Manual volumetric measurements together with VBM are preferred techniques for assessing GM differences showing abnormalities in most of the investigated regions, with a predominance of the MTL in the early phase. Automated FreeSurfer volumetric measurements show similar performances in the early phase, displaying group differences in the PPC but not in MTL regions. Measurements of CT are less sensitive in the MCI stage and its sensitivity is restricted to the MTL and PPC regions in later stages of the disease (AD).

  12. Density abnormalities in normal-appearing gray matter in the middle-aged brain with white matter hyperintense lesions: a DARTEL-enhanced voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Li, Shenhong; Zhuang, Ying; Liu, Xiaojia; Wu, Lin; Gong, Honghan; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Fuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is known about the structural alterations within gray matter (GM) in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH) lesions. Here, we aimed to examine the anatomical changes within the GM and their relationship to WMH lesion loads in middle-aged subjects. Participants and methods Twenty-three middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group) and 23 demographically matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. A Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Liealgebra-enhanced voxel-based morphometry was used to measure the GM density, and the correlations between WMH lesion volume and extracted GM values in abnormal regions were identified by voxel-based morphometry analysis. Results Compared with the healthy control subjects, the WMH group had a significantly decreased GM density in the left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left and right premotor cortex, and left and right middle cingulate cortex and an increased GM density in the bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right temporoparietal junction, left and right prefrontal cortex (PFC), and left inferior parietal lobule. A relationship was observed between the normalized WMH lesion volume and the decreased GM density, including the left middle frontal gyrus (ρ=−0.629, P=0.002), bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.507, P=0.019), right middle cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), and right premotor cortex (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). The WMH lesion loads also negatively correlated with increased GM density in the right temporoparietal junction (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), left PFC (ρ=−0.469, P=0.032), and right PFC (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). Conclusion We observed that lesion load-associated structural plasticity corresponds to bidirectional changes in regional GM density in the WMH group. PMID:27274211

  13. Early musical training is linked to gray matter structure in the ventral premotor cortex and auditory-motor rhythm synchronization performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jennifer Anne; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2014-04-01

    Evidence in animals and humans indicates that there are sensitive periods during development, times when experience or stimulation has a greater influence on behavior and brain structure. Sensitive periods are the result of an interaction between maturational processes and experience-dependent plasticity mechanisms. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that adult musicians who begin training before the age of 7 show enhancements in behavior and white matter structure compared with those who begin later. Plastic changes in white matter and gray matter are hypothesized to co-occur; therefore, the current study investigated possible differences in gray matter structure between early-trained (ET; <7) and late-trained (LT; >7) musicians, matched for years of experience. Gray matter structure was assessed using voxel-wise analysis techniques (optimized voxel-based morphometry, traditional voxel-based morphometry, and deformation-based morphometry) and surface-based measures (cortical thickness, surface area and mean curvature). Deformation-based morphometry analyses identified group differences between ET and LT musicians in right ventral premotor cortex (vPMC), which correlated with performance on an auditory motor synchronization task and with age of onset of musical training. In addition, cortical surface area in vPMC was greater for ET musicians. These results are consistent with evidence that premotor cortex shows greatest maturational change between the ages of 6-9 years and that this region is important for integrating auditory and motor information. We propose that the auditory and motor interactions required by musical practice drive plasticity in vPMC and that this plasticity is greatest when maturation is near its peak. PMID:24236696

  14. Developmental expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in human white and gray matter: potential mechanism of increased vulnerability in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Talos, Delia M; Jackson, Michele C; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Graham, Dionne A; Lechpammer, Mirna; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury is multifactorial and involves hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and inflammation. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are present on neurons and glia in immature rodents, and NMDAR antagonists are protective in HI models. To enhance clinical translation of rodent data, we examined protein expression of 6 NMDAR subunits in postmortem human brains without injury from 20 postconceptional weeks through adulthood and in cases of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). We hypothesized that the developing brain is intrinsically vulnerable to excitotoxicity via maturation-specific NMDAR levels and subunit composition. In normal white matter, NR1 and NR2B levels were highest in the preterm period compared with adult. In gray matter, NR2A and NR3A expression were highest near term. NR2A was significantly elevated in PVL white matter, with reduced NR1 and NR3A in gray matter compared with uninjured controls. These data suggest increased NMDAR-mediated vulnerability during early brain development due to an overall upregulation of individual receptors subunits, in particular, the presence of highly calcium permeable NR2B-containing and magnesium-insensitive NR3A NMDARs. These data improve understanding of molecular diversity and heterogeneity of NMDAR subunit expression in human brain development and supports an intrinsic prenatal vulnerability to glutamate-mediated injury; validating NMDAR subunit-specific targeted therapies for PVL.

  15. Differences in age-related effects on brain volume in Down syndrome as compared to Williams syndrome and typical development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) are reported to experience early onset of brain aging. However, it is not well understood how pre-existing neurodevelopmental effects versus neurodegenerative processes might be contributing to the observed pattern of brain atrophy in younger adults with DS. The aims of the current study were to: (1) to confirm previous findings of age-related changes in DS compared to adults with typical development (TD), (2) to test for an effect of these age-related changes in a second neurodevelopmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS), and (3) to identify a pattern of regional age-related effects that are unique to DS. Methods High-resolution T1-weighted MRI of the brains of subjects with DS, WS, and TD controls were segmented, and estimates of regional brain volume were derived using FreeSurfer. A general linear model was employed to test for age-related effects on volume between groups. Secondary analyses in the DS group explored the relationship between brain volume and neuropsychological tests and APOE. Results Consistent with previous findings, the DS group showed significantly greater age-related effects relative to TD controls in total gray matter and in regions of the orbitofrontal cortex and the parietal cortex. Individuals with DS also showed significantly greater age-related effects on volume of the left and right inferior lateral ventricles (LILV and RILV, respectively). There were no significant differences in age-related effects on volume when comparing the WS and TD groups. In the DS group, cognitive tests scores measuring signs of dementia and APOE ϵ4 carrier status were associated with LILV and RILV volume. Conclusions Individuals with DS demonstrated a unique pattern of age-related effects on gray matter and ventricular volume, the latter of which was associated with dementia rating scores in the DS group. Results may indicate that early onset of brain aging in DS is primarily due to DS

  16. Gray Matter Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Relationships with Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Episodic Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Gaelle E.; He, Xiaosong; Sperling, Michael; Sharan, Ashwini; Tracy, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affects multiple brain regions through evidence from both structural (gray matter; GM) and functional connectivity (FC) studies. We tested whether these structural abnormalities were associated with FC abnormalities, and assessed the ability of these measures to explain episodic memory impairments in this population. A resting-state and T1 sequences were acquired on 94 (45 with mesial temporal pathology) TLE patients and 50 controls, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. A voxel-based morphometry analysis was computed to determine the GM volume differences between groups (right, left TLE, controls). Resting-state FC between the abnormal GM volume regions was computed, and compared between groups. Finally, we investigated the relation between EM, GM and FC findings. Patients with and without temporal pathology were analyzed separately. The results revealed reduced GM volume in multiple regions in the patients relative to the controls. Using FC, we found the abnormal GM regions did not display abnormal functional connectivity. Lastly, we found in left TLE patients, verbal episodic memory was associated with abnormal left posterior hippocampus volume, while in right TLE, non-verbal episodic memory was better predicted by resting-state FC measures. This study investigated TLE abnormalities using a multi-modal approach combining GM, FC and neurocognitive measures. We did not find that the GM abnormalities were functionally or abnormally connected during an inter-ictal resting state, which may reflect a weak sensitivity of functional connectivity to the epileptic network. We provided evidence that verbal and non-verbal episodic memory in left and right TLE patients may have distinct relationships with structural and functional measures. Lastly, we provide data suggesting that in the setting of occult, non-lesional right TLE pathology, a coupling of structural and functional abnormalities in extra-temporal/non-ictal regions is

  17. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision.

  18. Henry Gray, plagiarist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    The first edition of Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical (1858) was greeted with accolades, but also provoked serious controversy concerning Henry Gray's failure to acknowledge the work of earlier anatomists. A review in the Medical Times (1859) accused Gray of intellectual theft. The journal took the unusual step of substantiating its indictment by publishing twenty parallel texts from Gray and from a pre-existing textbook, Quain's Anatomy. At the recent "Vesalius Continuum" conference in Zakynthos, Greece (2014) Professor Brion Benninger disputed the theft by announcing from the floor the results of a computer analysis of both texts, which he reported exonerated Gray by revealing no evidence of plagiarism. The analysis has not been forthcoming, however, despite requests. Here the historian of Gray's Anatomy supplements the argument set out in the Medical Times 150 years ago with data suggesting unwelcome personality traits in Henry Gray, and demonstrating the utility of others' work to his professional advancement. Fair dealing in the world of anatomy and indeed the genuineness of the lustre of medical fame are important matters, but whether quantitative evidence has anything to add to the discussion concerning Gray's probity can be assessed only if Benninger makes public his computer analysis. PMID:26696521

  19. Label-fusion-segmentation and deformation-based shape analysis of deep gray matter in multiple sclerosis: the impact of thalamic subnuclei on disability.

    PubMed

    Magon, Stefano; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Amann, Michael; Weier, Katrin; Naegelin, Yvonne; Andelova, Michaela; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stippich, Christoph; Lerch, Jason P; Kappos, Ludwig; Sprenger, Till

    2014-08-01

    Deep gray matter (DGM) atrophy has been reported in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) already at early stages of the disease and progresses throughout the disease course. We studied DGM volume and shape and their relation to disability in a large cohort of clinically well-described MS patients using new subcortical segmentation methods and shape analysis. Structural 3D magnetic resonance images were acquired at 1.5 T in 118 patients with relapsing remitting MS. Subcortical structures were segmented using a multiatlas technique that relies on the generation of an automatically generated template library. To localize focal morphological changes, shape analysis was performed by estimating the vertex-wise displacements each subject must undergo to deform to a template. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the volume of specific thalamic nuclei (the ventral nuclear complex) together with normalized gray matter volume explains a relatively large proportion of expanded disability status scale (EDSS) variability. The deformation-based displacement analysis confirmed the relation between thalamic shape and EDSS scores. Furthermore, white matter lesion volume was found to relate to the shape of all subcortical structures. This novel method for the analysis of subcortical volume and shape allows depicting specific contributions of DGM abnormalities to neurological deficits in MS patients. The results stress the importance of ventral thalamic nuclei in this respect.

  20. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Guillou, F.

    2005-04-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter.

  1. Reduced gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex and thalamus as a function of mild depressive symptoms: a voxel-based morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, C. A.; Weber, M.; Mundy, E. A.; Killgore, W. D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies investigating structural brain abnormalities in depression have typically employed a categorical rather than dimensional approach to depression [i.e. comparing subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined major depressive disorder (MDD) v. healthy controls]. The National Institute of Mental Health, through their Research Domain Criteria initiative, has encouraged a dimensional approach to the study of psychopathology as opposed to an over-reliance on categorical (e.g. DSM-based) diagnostic approaches. Moreover, subthreshold levels of depressive symptoms (i.e. severity levels below DSM criteria) have been found to be associated with a range of negative outcomes, yet have been relatively neglected in neuroimaging research. Method To examine the extent to which depressive symptoms – even at subclinical levels – are linearly related to gray matter volume reductions in theoretically important brain regions, we employed whole-brain voxel-based morphometry in a sample of 54 participants. Results The severity of mild depressive symptoms, even in a subclinical population, was associated with reduced gray matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, thalamus, superior temporal gyrus/temporal pole and superior frontal gyrus. A conjunction analysis revealed concordance across two separate measures of depression. Conclusions Reduced gray matter volume in theoretically important brain regions can be observed even in a sample that does not meet DSM criteria for MDD, but who nevertheless report relatively elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight the need for additional research using dimensional conceptual and analytic approaches, as well as further investigation of subclinical populations. PMID:25066703

  2. Single-subject gray matter graph properties and their relationship with cognitive impairment in early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Yeung, Hiu M; Sikkes, Sietske A M; Möller, Christiane; Smits, Lieke L; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Barkhof, Frederik

    2014-06-01

    Abstract We investigated the relationships between gray matter graph properties and cognitive impairment in a sample of 215 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and also whether age of disease onset modifies such relationships. We expected that more severe cognitive impairment in AD would be related to more random graph topologies. Single-subject gray matter graphs were constructed from T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. The following global and local graph properties were calculated: betweenness centrality, normalized clustering coefficient γ, and normalized path length λ. Local clustering, path length, and betweenness centrality measures were determined for 90 anatomically defined areas. Regression models with as interaction term age of onset (i.e., early onset when patients were ≤65 years old and late onset when they were >65 years old at the time of diagnosis)×graph property were used to assess the relationships between cognitive functioning in five domains (memory, language, visuospatial, attention, and executive). Worse cognitive impairment was associated with more random graphs, as indicated by low γ, λ, and betweenness centrality values. Three interaction effects for age of onset×global graph property were found: Low γ and λ values more strongly related to memory impairment in early-onset patients; low beta values were significantly related to impaired visuospatial functioning in late-onset patients. For the local graph properties, language impairment showed the strongest relationship with decreased clustering coefficient in the left superior temporal gyrus across the entire sample. Our study shows that single-subject gray matter graph properties are associated with individual differences in cognitive impairment.

  3. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  4. Significance of enhanced cerebral gray-white matter contrast at 80 kVp compared to conventional 120 kVp CT scan in the evaluation of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Eliel; Cohen, Jose E; Nahum Goldberg, S; Sosna, Jacob; Levinson, Reuven; Leichter, Isaac S; Gomori, John M

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine whether 80 kVp conventional nonenhanced head CT scans have better gray-white matter contrast than standard 120 kVp scans performed on the same patients. Thirty head CT scans acquired at 80 kVp (CT dose index [CTDI]vol 46) were compared to prior studies in the same patients performed at 120 kVp (CTDIvol 59). Signal (Hounsfield units [HU]), noise (sd HU), and contrast-to-noise ratio per dose (CNRD) were assessed in multiple cerebral gray and white matter regions of interest. A noise correction factor was used to compensate for scanning at different CTDIvol values. Average gray matter signal at 80 kVp and 120 kVP was 33.9 ± 3.5 HU and 29 ± 4.6 HU, respectively (p<0.0001); the averages for white matter were 22.5 ± 3.1 HU and 21.6 ± 4.6 HU, respectively (p=0.11). Corrected noise was 3 ± 0.6 and 2.7 ± 0.6, respectively, for gray matter (p=0.0001), and 2.8 ± 0.6 and 2.6 ± 0.5, respectively, for white matter (p=0.00001). The gray-white matter CNRD was 4.0 ± 1.2 at 80 kVp and 2.8 ± 1 at 120 kVp (p<0.00001). Cerebral gray-white matter CNRD is increased by 40% at 80 kVp compared to conventional 120 kVp CT scans. These findings justify further clinical evaluation in the acute stroke setting.

  5. Uniform distributions of glucose oxidation and oxygen extraction in gray matter of normal human brain: No evidence of regional differences of aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Herman, Peter; Bailey, Christopher J; Møller, Arne; Globinsky, Ronen; Fulbright, Robert K; Rothman, Douglas L; Gjedde, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Regionally variable rates of aerobic glycolysis in brain networks identified by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) imply regionally variable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration. When regional glucose utilization is not matched to oxygen delivery, affected regions have correspondingly variable rates of ATP and lactate production. We tested the extent to which aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation power R-fMRI networks by measuring quantitative differences between the oxygen to glucose index (OGI) and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in normal human brain (resting awake, eyes closed). Regionally uniform and correlated OEF and OGI estimates prevailed, with network values that matched the gray matter means, regardless of size, location, and origin. The spatial agreement between oxygen delivery (OEF≈0.4) and glucose oxidation (OGI ≈ 5.3) suggests that no specific regions have preferentially high aerobic glycolysis and low oxidative phosphorylation rates, with globally optimal maximum ATP turnover rates (VATP ≈ 9.4 µmol/g/min), in good agreement with (31)P and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements. These results imply that the intrinsic network activity in healthy human brain powers the entire gray matter with ubiquitously high rates of glucose oxidation. Reports of departures from normal brain-wide homogeny of oxygen extraction fraction and oxygen to glucose index may be due to normalization artefacts from relative PET measurements. PMID:26755443

  6. Use of Anisotropy, 3D Segmented Atlas, and Computational Analysis to Identify Gray Matter Subcortical Lesions Common to Concussive Injury from Different Sites on the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Praveen; Kenkel, William; Finklestein, Seth P.; Barchet, Thomas M.; Ren, JingMei; Davenport, Mathew; Shenton, Martha E.; Kikinis, Zora; Nedelman, Mark; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can occur anywhere along the cortical mantel. While the cortical contusions may be random and disparate in their locations, the clinical outcomes are often similar and difficult to explain. Thus a question that arises is, do concussions at different sites on the cortex affect similar subcortical brain regions? To address this question we used a fluid percussion model to concuss the right caudal or rostral cortices in rats. Five days later, diffusion tensor MRI data were acquired for indices of anisotropy (IA) for use in a novel method of analysis to detect changes in gray matter microarchitecture. IA values from over 20,000 voxels were registered into a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas covering 150 brain areas. Comparisons between left and right hemispheres revealed a small population of subcortical sites with altered IA values. Rostral and caudal concussions were of striking similarity in the impacted subcortical locations, particularly the central nucleus of the amygdala, laterodorsal thalamus, and hippocampal complex. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of these sites showed significant neuroinflammation. This study presents three significant findings that advance our understanding and evaluation of TBI: 1) the introduction of a new method to identify highly localized disturbances in discrete gray matter, subcortical brain nuclei without postmortem histology, 2) the use of this method to demonstrate that separate injuries to the rostral and caudal cortex produce the same subcortical, disturbances, and 3) the central nucleus of the amygdala, critical in the regulation of emotion, is vulnerable to concussion. PMID:25955025

  7. Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy Detecting the Evolution of Huntingtons Disease Neuropathology and Suggesting Unique Correlates of Dysfunction in White versus Gray Brain Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bonda M.; Miller L.; Perrin V.; Vileno B.; Runne H.; Kretlow A.; Forro L.; Luthi-Carter R. and Jeney S.

    2011-09-02

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a mutation of the corresponding gene encoding the protein huntingtin (htt), is characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions, paralleled by extensive loss of striatal neurons. At the cellular level, pathogenesis involves an early and prolonged period of neuronal dysfunction followed by neuronal death. Understanding the molecular events driving these deleterious processes is critical to the successful development of therapies to slow down or halt the progression of the disease. Here, we examined biochemical processes in a HD ex vivo rat model, as well as in a HD model for cultured neurons using synchrotron-assisted Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIRM). The model, based on lentiviral-mediated delivery of a fragment of the HD gene, expresses a mutant htt fragment in one brain hemisphere and a wild-type htt fragment in the control hemisphere. S-FTIRM allowed for high spatial resolution and distinction between spectral features occurring in gray and white matter. We measured a higher content of {beta}-sheet protein in the striatal gray matter exposed to mutant htt as early as 4 weeks following the initiation of mutant htt exposure. In contrast, white matter tracts did not exhibit any changes in protein structure but surprisingly showed reduced content of unsaturated lipids and a significant increase in spectral features associated with phosphorylation. The former is reminiscent of changes consistent with a myelination deficiency, while the latter is characteristic of early pro-apoptotic events. These findings point to the utility of the label-free FTIRM method to follow mutant htt's {beta}-sheet-rich transformation in striatal neurons ex vivo, provide further evidence for mutant htt amyloidogenesis in vivo, and demonstrate novel chemical features indicative of white matter changes in HD. Parallel studies in cultured neurons expressing the same htt fragments showed similar changes.

  8. Decreased gray matter volume is associated with the subtypes of psychotic symptoms in patients with antipsychotic-naïve mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Min; Chung, Young-In; Park, Je-Min; Lee, Byung-Dae; Moon, Eunsoo; Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hak-Jin; Mun, Chi-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between brain regional gray matter volume and two subtypes of psychotic symptoms, namely paranoid and misidentification subtypes, in antipsychotic-naïve mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Forty AD patients with psychotic symptoms and 25 AD patients without psychotic symptoms were assessed for cognitive and functional impairment. Presence and subtype of psychotic symptoms were assessed by using the delusion and hallucination subscale of the Korean Neuropsychiatric Inventory (K-NPI). Structural MRI images were acquired on a 3 T scanner, and were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for automated analysis. The misidentification subtype is associated with more severe gray matter atrophy, and paranoid subtype is associated with less severe gray matter atrophy compared to non-psychosis group. These results suggest that the misidentification, the paranoid subtype and the non-psychosis group have a distinct neural correlation. PMID:27000306

  9. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients.

  10. Organohalogen contaminants and metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins and Atlantic white-sided dolphins from the western North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Montie, Eric W; Reddy, Christopher M; Gebbink, Wouter A; Touhey, Katie E; Hahn, Mark E; Letcher, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of several congeners and classes of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) and/or their metabolites, namely organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated-PCBs (OH-PCBs), methylsulfonyl-PCBs (MeSO(2)-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, and OH-PBDEs, were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of short-beaked common dolphins (n = 2), Atlantic white-sided dolphins (n = 8), and gray seal (n = 1) from the western North Atlantic. In three Atlantic white-sided dolphins, cerebellum gray matter (GM) was also analyzed. The levels of OCs, PCBs, MeSO(2)-PCBs, PBDEs, and OH-PBDEs in cerebellum GM were higher than the concentrations in CSF. 4-OH-2,3,3',4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB107) was the only detectable OH-PCB congener present in CSF. The sum (Sigma) OH-PCBs/Sigma PCB concentration ratio in CSF was approximately two to three orders of magnitude greater than the ratio in cerebellum GM for dolphins. PMID:19375836

  11. [Role of the Periaqueductal Gray Matter of the Midbrain in Regulation of Somatic Pain Sensitivity During Stress: Participation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Glucocorticoid Hormones].

    PubMed

    Yarushkina, N I; Filaretova, L P

    2015-01-01

    Periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain (PAGM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of pain sensitivity under stress, involving in the stress-induced analgesia. A key hormonal system of adaptation under stress is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. HPA axis's hormones, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and glucocorticoids, are involved in stress-induced analgesia. Exogenous hormones of the HPA axis, similarly to the hormones produced under stress, may cause an analgesic effect. CRF-induced analgesia may be provided by glucocorticoid hormones. CRF and glucocorticoids-induced effects on somatic pain sensitivity may be mediated by PAGM. The aim of the review was to analyze the data of literature on the role of PAGM in the regulation of somatic pain sensitivity under stress and in providing of CRF and glucocorticoid-induced analgesia.

  12. Oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with reduced volumes of hippocampus and subcortical gray matter in chronically HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Brooks I.; LiButti, Daniel E.; Umaki, Tracie M.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Chow, Dominic C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional relationships were examined between regional brain volumes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 47 HIV patients [mean age 51 years; 81% with HIV RNA ≤50 copies/mL] on combination antiretroviral therapy. The gene-specific DNA damage and repair assay measured mtDNA 8-oxo-dG break frequency. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 3 T. Higher mtDNA 8-oxo-dG was associated with lateral ventricular enlargement and with decreased volumes of hippocampus, pallidum, and total subcortical gray matter, suggesting the involvement of systemic mitochondrial-specific oxidative stress in chronic HIV-related structural brain changes and cognitive difficulties. Clarification of the mechanism may provide potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26923169

  13. Neural systems for social cognition: gray matter volume abnormalities in boys at high genetic risk of autism symptoms, and a comparison with idiopathic autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Marcia N; Swaab, Hanna; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van Rijn, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) is associated with several physical, cognitive, and behavioral consequences. In terms of social development, there is an increased risk of autism symptomatology. However, it remains unclear how social deficits are related to abnormal brain development and to what degree underlying mechanisms of social dysfunction in 47, XXY are similar to, or different from, those in idiopathic autism (ASD). This study was aimed at investigating the neural architecture of brain structures related to social information processing in boys with 47, XXY, also in comparison with boys with idiopathic ASD. MRI scans of 16 boys with 47, XXY, 16 with ASD, and 16 nonclinical, male controls were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A region of interest mask containing the superior temporal cortex, amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insular cortex, and medial frontal cortex was used. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) was used to assess degree of autism spectrum symptoms. The 47, XXY group could not be distinguished from the ASD group on mean SRS scores, and their scores were significantly higher than in controls. VBM showed that boys with 47, XXY have significant gray matter volume reductions in the left and right insula, and the left OFC, compared with controls and boys with ASD. Additionally, boys with 47, XXY had significantly less gray matter in the right superior temporal gyrus than controls. These results imply social challenges associated with 47, XXY may be rooted in neural anatomy, and autism symptoms in boys with 47, XXY and boys with ASD might have, at least partially, different underlying etiologies.

  14. Normalization of similarity-based individual brain networks from gray matter MRI and its association with neurodevelopment in infants with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Batalle, Dafnis; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Figueras, Francesc; Bargallo, Nuria; Eixarch, Elisenda; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-12-01

    Obtaining individual biomarkers for the prediction of altered neurological outcome is a challenge of modern medicine and neuroscience. Connectomics based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) stands as a good candidate to exhaustively extract information from MRI by integrating the information obtained in a few network features that can be used as individual biomarkers of neurological outcome. However, this approach typically requires the use of diffusion and/or functional MRI to extract individual brain networks, which require high acquisition times and present an extreme sensitivity to motion artifacts, critical problems when scanning fetuses and infants. Extraction of individual networks based on morphological similarity from gray matter is a new approach that benefits from the power of graph theory analysis to describe gray matter morphology as a large-scale morphological network from a typical clinical anatomic acquisition such as T1-weighted MRI. In the present paper we propose a methodology to normalize these large-scale morphological networks to a brain network with standardized size based on a parcellation scheme. The proposed methodology was applied to reconstruct individual brain networks of 63 one-year-old infants, 41 infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and 22 controls, showing altered network features in the IUGR group, and their association with neurodevelopmental outcome at two years of age by means of ordinal regression analysis of the network features obtained with Bayley Scale for Infant and Toddler Development, third edition. Although it must be more widely assessed, this methodology stands as a good candidate for the development of biomarkers for altered neurodevelopment in the pediatric population.

  15. White and Gray Matter Volume Changes and Correlation with Visual Evoked Potential in Patients with Optic Neuritis: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Pei-Hong; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Rong; Xu, Ting-Ting; Shao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate potential morphological alterations of gray and white matter in patients with optic neuritis (ON) and their relationship with behavioral performance, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Material/Methods Twelve (4 males, 8 females) patients with ON and 12 (4 males, 8 females) age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging data were analyzed using two-sample t tests to identify group differences in gray and white matter volume (GMV, WMV). Correlation analysis was used to explore relationships between observed GMV and WMV of different areas and visual evoked potential (VEP) in ON. Results Compared with HCs, ON patients had: significantly decreased GMV in the left postcentral gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate, left and right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule; decreased WMV in the left middle frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule; and increased WMV in the left fusiform gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule. VEP latency of the right eye in ON correlated positively with WMV signal value of the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.726, p=0.008), and negatively with GMV signal value of the right inferior parietal lobule (r=−0.611, p=0.035). Duration of ON correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the right superior frontal gyrus (r=−0.662, p=0.019), while best-corrected visual acuity (VA) of the right eye correlated negatively with WMV signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus (r=−0.704, p=0.011). Conclusions These results suggest significant brain involvement in ON, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism. Correlational results demonstrate that VEP in ON is closely associated with WMV and GMV atrophy in many brain regions. PMID:27045330

  16. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  17. Occipital sources of resting-state alpha rhythms are related to local gray matter density in subjects with amnesic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Boccardi, Marina; Lizio, Roberta; Lopez, Susanna; Carducci, Filippo; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Prestia, Annapaola; Salinari, Serenella; Rasser, Paul E; Basar, Erol; Famà, Francesco; Nobili, Flavio; Yener, Görsev; Emek-Savaş, Derya Durusu; Gesualdo, Loreto; Mundi, Ciro; Thompson, Paul M; Rossini, Paolo M; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2015-02-01

    Occipital sources of resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms are abnormal, at the group level, in patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that amplitude of these occipital sources is related to neurodegeneration in occipital lobe as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Resting-state eyes-closed EEG rhythms were recorded in 45 healthy elderly (Nold), 100 MCI, and 90 AD subjects. Neurodegeneration of occipital lobe was indexed by weighted averages of gray matter density, estimated from structural MRIs. EEG rhythms of interest were alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz) and alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography. Results showed a positive correlation between occipital gray matter density and amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources in Nold, MCI, and AD subjects as a whole group (r = 0.3, p = 0.000004, N = 235). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources and cognitive status as revealed by Mini Mental State Examination score across all subjects (r = 0.38, p = 0.000001, N = 235). Finally, amplitude of occipital alpha 1 sources allowed a moderate classification of individual Nold and AD subjects (sensitivity: 87.8%; specificity: 66.7%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.81). These results suggest that the amplitude of occipital sources of resting-state alpha rhythms is related to AD neurodegeneration in occipital lobe along pathologic aging.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to a 100-kd protein reveal abundant A beta-negative plaques throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. L.; Lee, V. M.; Forman, M.; Chiu, T. S.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1997-01-01

    Here we describe the initial characterization of a 100-kd protein recognized by four new monoclonal antibodies that reveal abundant and unique plaque-like lesions throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains. This 100-kd protein and these new plaque-like lesions were identified by four monoclonal antibodies raised to immunogens extracted from Alzheimer's disease neurofibrillary abnormalities. However, these antibodies did not recognize hyperphosphorylated tau in Western blots or neurofibrillary lesions by immunohistochemistry. As all of these antibodies displayed similar properties, one, AMY117, was used to characterize the new plaque-like lesions in detail. These studies demonstrated that AMY117-positive plaques were not visualized by amyloid stains and never co-localized with A beta deposits, although AMY117-positive and A beta-positive lesions frequently occurred in the same cortical and subcortical gray matter regions. Abundant AMY117-positive plaques were found in the brains of all 32 sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients and all 6 elderly Down's syndrome subjects. Although AMY117-positive plaques also were seen in the brains of nondemented patients with numerous A beta deposits. AMY117-positive plaques were rare or absent in the brains of other elderly controls and patients with other neurodegenerative or neuropsychiatric disorders. We conclude that the AMY117-positive plaques described here for the first time are major lesions of the Alzheimer's disease brain. Thus, it will be important to elucidate the role played by the 100-kd protein and the AMY117 plaques in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9212733

  19. Relationship between Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Frontoinsular Gray Matter and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Children at the Age of 4

    PubMed Central

    Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Urbanik, Andrzej; Klimek, Małgorzata; Karcz, Paulina; Dutkowska, Grażyna; Nitecka, Magdalena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Very low birth weight is associated with long term neurodevelopmental complications. Macroscopic brain abnormalities in prematurity survivors have been investigated in several studies. However, there is limited data regarding local cerebral metabolic status and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between proton magnetic resonance spectra in basal ganglia, frontal white matter and frontoinsular gray matter, neurodevelopmental outcomes assessed with the Leiter scale and the Developmental Test of Visual Perception and selected socioeconomic variables in a cohort of very low birth weight children at the age of four. Children were divided in three groups based on the severity of neurodevelopmental impairment. There were no differences in spectroscopy in basal ganglia and frontal white matter between the groups. Lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and myoinositol (mI) were observed in the frontoinsular cortex of the left hemisphere in children with neurodevelopmental impairment compared to children with normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Higher parental education, daycare attendance and breastfeeding after birth were associated with more favorable neurodevelopmental prognosis, whereas rural residence was more prevalent in children with moderate and severe impairment. Our study demonstrates the role of long term neurometabolic disruption in the left frontoinsular cortex and selected socioeconomic variables in determination of neurodevelopmental prognosis in prematurity survivors. PMID:27223474

  20. Age-related atrial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gramley, Felix; Lorenzen, Johann; Knackstedt, Christian; Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Frechen, Dirk; Stanzel, Sven; Pezzella, Francesco; Koellensperger, Eva; Weiss, Christian; Münzel, Thomas; Schauerte, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Many age-related diseases are associated with, and may be promoted by, cardiac fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF), and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system have been implicated in fibrogenesis. Thus, we investigated whether age is related to these systems and to atrial fibrosis. Right atrial appendages (RAA) obtained during heart surgery (n = 115) were grouped according to patients' age (<50 years, 51-60 years, 61-70 years, or >70 years). Echocardiographic ejection fractions (EF) and fibrosis using Sirius-red-stained histological sections were determined. TGF-beta was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and hypoxia-related factors [HIF1 alpha, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-receptor, CD34 (a surrogate marker for microvessel density), the factor inhibiting HIF (FIH), and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD 3)] were detected by immunostaining. MMP-2 and -9 activity were determined zymographically, and mRNA levels of their common tissue inhibitor TIMP-1 were determined by RT-PCR. Younger patients (<50 years) had significantly less fibrosis (10.1% +/- 4.4% vs 16.6% +/- 8.3%) than older individuals (>70 years). While HIF1 alpha, FIH, the VEGF-receptor, and CD34 were significantly elevated in the young, TGF-beta and PHD3 were suppressed in these patients. MMP-2 and -9 activity was found to be higher while TIMP-1 levels were lower in older patients. Statistical analysis proved age to be the only factor influencing fibrogenesis. With increasing age, RAAs develop significantly more fibrosis. An increase of fibrotic and decrease of hypoxic signalling and microvessel density, coupled with differential expression of MMPs and TIMP-1 favouring fibrosis may have helped promote atrial fibrogenesis. PMID:19234766

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype is associated with brain gray and white matter tissue volumes recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mon, A.; Durazzo, T. C.; Gazdzinski, S.; Hutchison, K. E.; Pennington, D.; Meyerhoff, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have linked the methionine (Met) allele of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF ) gene to abnormal regional brain volumes in several psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, no neuroimaging studies assessed the effects of this allele on brain morphology in alcohol use disorders and its demonstrated change during abstinence from alcohol. Here we assessed the effects of the BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism on regional brain tissue volumes and their recovery during short-term abstinence in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. 3D T1 weighted magnetic resonance images from 62 individuals were acquired at 1.5 T at one week of abstinence from alcohol; 41 of the participants were rescanned at 5 weeks of abstinence. The images were segmented into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid and parcellated into regional volumes. The BDNF genotype was determined from blood samples using the TaqMan technique. Alcohol-dependent Val (Valine)/Met heterozygotes and Val homozygotes had similar regional brain volumes at either time point. However, Val homozygotes had significant GM volume increases, while Val/Met heterozygotes increased predominantly in WM volumes over the scan interval. Longitudinal increases in GM but not WM volumes were related to improvements in neurocognitive measures during abstinence. The findings suggest that functionally significant brain tissue volume recovery during abstinence from alcohol is influenced by BDNF genotype. PMID:22989210

  2. Reversible laminar signal intensity in deep cortical gray matter in T1-weighted images and FLAIR after mild acute hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Treusch, N A; van de Loo, S; Hattingen, E

    2012-12-01

    Soporific acute hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy (aHE) can induce considerable changes in cerebral white and gray matter. This report describes a patient in the subacute phase of aHE grade I without disturbed consciousness and with reversible fine laminar cortical involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 59-year-old patient had esophageal varices bleeding due to primary biliary cirrhosis (ammonium blood level: 140 mmoL/L) and presented with sensory Jacksonian seizures, dysarthria, and increased drowsiness and fatigue. MRI revealed patchy hyperintense (T2-weighted, T2w) white-matter lesions and bilateral signal intensities in the striatum (T1w). During a rise of ammonium blood level to 220 mmoL/L, the patient had increased drowsiness, persistent dysarthria and mild temporary hemiparesis without loss of consciousness. Two weeks later, the patient was asymptomatic and blood ammonium level had reverted to normal value. MRI at that time revealed bihemispheric fine laminar subcortical hyperintensities on T2w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging, and partially on T1w sequences, with no swelling or restricted diffusion; the hyperintensities were fully reversible a month later. Such a distinct cortical signal increase not only on T2w images, but also on T1w, in a patient after a mild form of aHE is a new MR finding.

  3. Follow-up study on histogenesis of microcephaly associated with ectopic gray matter induced by prenatal {gamma}-irradiation in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xue-Zhi; Inouye, Monoru; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    1996-03-01

    Brain malformation with ectopic gray matter was visualized with magnetic resonance imaging in small-sized heads of prenatally exposed atomic bomb survivors. The identical brain malformation was reproduced in mice and its histogenesis was studied in the present experiment. Pregnant mice were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation at a single dose of 1.5 Gy on embryonic day 13 (E13), and then injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg/kg BrdU on E15. The extensive dead cells appeared throughout the brain mantle at 6 hours (h) after exposure. On E16 cell aggregations formed rosettes. On E18 a high proportion of BrdU-labeled cells reached the superficial layers of the cortical plate with the remaining cells located in the ectopic neuronal masses. The quantitative study showed that labeled cells in layers II to III were fewer and those in layers IV to VI more numerous in the prenatally irradiated adult mice than in controls. The anti-GFAP immunostaining revealed that the glial fibers in the irradiated mice were preserved, but disorganized. These findings suggested that the majority of migrating neurons were able to arrive at their normal layers, but some neurons remained due to the interrupted migratory pathway and eventually formed ectopic neuronal masses beneath the subcortical white matter. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Female Rats Demonstrate Improved Locomotor Recovery and Greater Preservation of White and Gray Matter after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Compared to Males

    PubMed Central

    Datto, Jeffrey P.; Bastidas, Johana C.; Miller, Nicole L.; Shah, Anna K.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Marcillo, Alexander E.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of a gender-related difference in recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a controversial subject. Current empirical animal research lacks sizable test groups to definitively determine whether significant differences exist. Evaluating locomotor recovery variances between sexes following a precise, clinically relevant spinal cord contusion model can provide valuable insight into a possible gender-related advantage in outcome post-SCI. In the current study, we hypothesized that by employing larger sample sizes in a reproducible contusive SCI paradigm, subtle distinctions in locomotor recovery between sexes, if they exist, would be elucidated through a broad range of behavioral tests. During 13 weeks of functional assessment after a thoracic (T8) contusive SCI in rat, significant differences owing to gender existed for the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score and CatWalk hindlimb swing, support four, and single stance analyses. Significant differences in locomotor performance were noticeable as early as 4 weeks post-SCI. Stereological tissue-volume analysis determined that females, more so than males, also exhibited greater volumes of preserved gray and white matter within the injured cord segment as well as more spared ventral white matter area at the center of the lesion. The stereological tissue analysis differences favoring females directly correlated with the female rats' greater functional improvement observed at endpoint. PMID:25715192

  5. Individual differences in the Behavioral Inhibition System are associated with orbitofrontal cortex and precuneus gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Paola; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell, Patricia; Costumero, Víctor; Ávila, César

    2012-09-01

    The Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) is described in Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory as a hypothetical construct that mediates anxiety in animals and humans. The neuroanatomical correlates of this system are not fully clear, although they are known to involve the amygdala, the septohippocampal system, and the prefrontal cortex. Previous neuroimaging research has related individual differences in BIS with regional volume and functional variations in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampal formation. The aim of the present work was to study BIS-related individual differences and their relationship with brain regional volume. BIS sensitivity was assessed through the BIS/BAS questionnaire in a sample of male participants (N = 114), and the scores were correlated with brain regional volume in a voxel-based morphometry analysis. The results show a negative correlation between the BIS and the volume of the right and medial orbitofrontal cortices and the precuneus. Our results and previous findings suggest that individual differences in anxiety-related personality traits and their related psychopathology may be associated with reduced brain volume in certain structures relating to emotional control (i.e., the orbitofrontal cortex) and self-consciousness (i.e., the precuneus), as shown by our results.

  6. Individual differences in regional prefrontal gray matter morphometry and fractional anisotropy are associated with different constructs of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Smolker, H. R.; Reineberg, A. E.; Orr, J. M.; Banich, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the relationship between structural differences within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) has been widely explored in cognitively impaired populations, little is known about this relationship in healthy young adults. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), surface-based morphometry (SBM), and fractional anisotropy (FA) we determined the association between regional PFC grey matter (GM) morphometry and white matter tract diffusivity with performance on tasks that tap different aspects of EF as drawn from Miyake et al.’s three-factor model of EF. Reductions in both GM volume (VBM) and cortical folding (SBM) in the ventromedial PFC (vmPFC), ventrolateral PFC (vlPFC), and dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) predicted better common EF, shifting-specific, and updating-specific performance, respectively. Despite capturing different components of GM morphometry, voxel- and surface-based findings were highly related, exhibiting regionally overlapping relationships with EF. Increased white matter FA in fiber tracts that connect the vmPFC and vlPFC with posterior regions of the brain also predicted better common EF and shifting-specific performance, respectively. These results suggest that the neural mechanisms supporting distinct aspects of EF may differentially rely on distinct regions of the PFC, and at least in healthy young adults, are influenced by regional morphometry of the PFC and the FA of major white matter tracts that connect the PFC with posterior cortical and subcortical regions. PMID:24562372

  7. Prefrontal Ischemia in the Rat Leads to Secondary Damage and Inflammation in Remote Gray and White Matter Regions

    PubMed Central

    Weishaupt, Nina; Zhang, Angela; Deziel, Robert A.; Tasker, R. Andrew; Whitehead, Shawn N.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary damage processes, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, can exacerbate an ischemic lesion and spread to adjacent brain regions. Yet, few studies investigate how regions remote from the infarct could also suffer from degeneration and inflammation in the aftermath of a stroke. To find out to what extent far-remote brain regions are affected after stroke, we used a bilateral endothelin-1-induced prefrontal infarct rat model. Brain regions posterior to the prefrontal cortical infarct were analyzed for ongoing neurodegeneration using FluoroJadeB (FJB) and for neuroinflammation using Iba1 and OX-6 immunohistochemistry 28 days post-stroke. The FJB-positive dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus (DMN) and retrosplenial area (RSA) of the cortex displayed substantial neuroinflammation. Significant neuronal loss was only observed within the cortex. Significant microglia recruitment and activation in the FJB-positive internal capsule indicates remote white matter pathology. These findings demonstrate that even regions far remote from an infarct are affected predictably based on anatomical connectivity, and that white matter inflammation is an integral part of remote pathology. The delayed nature of this pathology makes it a valid target for preventative treatment, potentially with an extended time window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention using anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26973455

  8. Prefrontal Ischemia in the Rat Leads to Secondary Damage and Inflammation in Remote Gray and White Matter Regions.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Nina; Zhang, Angela; Deziel, Robert A; Tasker, R Andrew; Whitehead, Shawn N

    2016-01-01

    Secondary damage processes, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, can exacerbate an ischemic lesion and spread to adjacent brain regions. Yet, few studies investigate how regions remote from the infarct could also suffer from degeneration and inflammation in the aftermath of a stroke. To find out to what extent far-remote brain regions are affected after stroke, we used a bilateral endothelin-1-induced prefrontal infarct rat model. Brain regions posterior to the prefrontal cortical infarct were analyzed for ongoing neurodegeneration using FluoroJadeB (FJB) and for neuroinflammation using Iba1 and OX-6 immunohistochemistry 28 days post-stroke. The FJB-positive dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus (DMN) and retrosplenial area (RSA) of the cortex displayed substantial neuroinflammation. Significant neuronal loss was only observed within the cortex. Significant microglia recruitment and activation in the FJB-positive internal capsule indicates remote white matter pathology. These findings demonstrate that even regions far remote from an infarct are affected predictably based on anatomical connectivity, and that white matter inflammation is an integral part of remote pathology. The delayed nature of this pathology makes it a valid target for preventative treatment, potentially with an extended time window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention using anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26973455

  9. The Heterogeneity in Retrieved Relations between the Personality Trait ‘Harm Avoidance’ and Gray Matter Volumes Due to Variations in the VBM and ROI Labeling Processing Settings

    PubMed Central

    Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; De Mey, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Concerns are raising about the large variability in reported correlations between gray matter morphology and affective personality traits as ‘Harm Avoidance’ (HA). A recent review study (Mincic 2015) stipulated that this variability could come from methodological differences between studies. In order to achieve more robust results by standardizing the data processing procedure, as a first step, we repeatedly analyzed data from healthy females while changing the processing settings (voxel-based morphology (VBM) or region-of-interest (ROI) labeling, smoothing filter width, nuisance parameters included in the regression model, brain atlas and multiple comparisons correction method). The heterogeneity in the obtained results clearly illustrate the dependency of the study outcome to the opted analysis settings. Based on our results and the existing literature, we recommended the use of VBM over ROI labeling for whole brain analyses with a small or intermediate smoothing filter (5-8mm) and a model variable selection step included in the processing procedure. Additionally, it is recommended that ROI labeling should only be used in combination with a clear hypothesis and that authors are encouraged to report their results uncorrected for multiple comparisons as supplementary material to aid review studies. PMID:27096608

  10. Serotonin-1A receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter mediate the panicolytic-like effect of pindolol and paroxetine combination in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Sela, Vânia Ramos; Biesdorf, Carla; Ramos, Diego Henrique; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2011-05-01

    The β-adrenergic blocker and 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist pindolol has been combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders to shorten the onset of the clinical action and/or increase the proportion of responders. The results of a previous study have shown that pindolol potentiates the panicolytic effect of paroxetine in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM). Since reported evidence has implicated the 5-HT(1A) receptors of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) in the panicolytic effect of antidepressants, rats treated with pindolol (5.0mg/kg, i.p.) and paroxetine (1.5mg/kg, i.p.) received a previous intra-DPAG injection of the selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist, WAY-100635 (0.4 μg) and were submitted to the ETM. Pretreatment with WAY-100635 reversed the increase in escape latency, a panicolytic effect, determined by the pindolol-paroxetine combination. These results implicate the 5-HT(1A) receptors of the DPAG in the panicolytic effect of the pindolol-paroxetine combination administered systemically. They also give further preclinical support for the use of this drug combination in the treatment of panic disorder.

  11. Individual differences in local gray and white matter volumes reflect differences in temperament and character: a voxel-based morphometry study in healthy young females.

    PubMed

    Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; De Raedt, Rudi; De Mey, Johan; Luypaert, Rob

    2011-01-31

    The psychobiological personality model of Cloninger distinguishes four heritable temperament traits (harm avoidance (HA), novelty seeking (NS), reward dependence (RD) and persistence (P)) and three character traits (self-directedness (SD), cooperativeness (CO) and self-transcendence (ST)) which develop during lifetime. Prior research already showed that individual differences in temperament are reflected in structural variances in specific brain areas. In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to correlate the different temperament and character traits with local gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) in young healthy female volunteers. We found correlations between the temperament traits and GMV and WMV in the frontal, temporal and limbic regions involved in controlling and generating the corresponding behavior as proposed in Cloninger's theory: anxious for HA, impulsive for NS, reward-directed for RD and goal-directed for P. The character traits correlated with GMV and WMV in the frontal, temporal and limbic regions involved in the corresponding cognitive tasks: self-reflection for SD, mentalizing and empathizing with others for CO and religious belief for ST. This study shows that individual variations in brain morphology can be related to the temperament and character dimensions, and lends support to the hypothesis of a neurobiological basis of personality traits.