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Sample records for age-related macular disease

  1. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration.

  2. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  3. [Age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  4. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  5. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lim, Laurence S; Mitchell, Paul; Seddon, Johanna M; Holz, Frank G; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-05-05

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness worldwide. With ageing populations in many countries, more than 20% might have the disorder. Advanced age-related macular degeneration, including neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet) and geographic atrophy (late dry), is associated with substantial, progressive visual impairment. Major risk factors include cigarette smoking, nutritional factors, cardiovascular diseases, and genetic markers, including genes regulating complement, lipid, angiogenic, and extracellular matrix pathways. Some studies have suggested a declining prevalence of age-related macular degeneration, perhaps due to reduced exposure to modifiable risk factors. Accurate diagnosis combines clinical examination and investigations, including retinal photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Dietary anti-oxidant supplementation slows progression of the disease. Treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration incorporates intraocular injections of anti-VEGF agents, occasionally combined with other modalities. Evidence suggests that two commonly used anti-VEGF therapies, ranibizumab and bevacizumab, have similar efficacy, but possible differences in systemic safety are difficult to assess. Future treatments include inhibition of other angiogenic factors, and regenerative and topical therapies.

  6. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  8. Does eating particular diets alter risk of age-related macular degeneration in users of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study supplements?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Recent information suggests that the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) supplement, enhanced intake of omega-3 fatty acids, and diminishing dietary glycemic index (dGI) are protective against advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Dietary information was collected a...

  9. What can we learn about age-related macular degeneration from other retinal diseases?

    PubMed

    Zack, D J; Dean, M; Molday, R S; Nathans, J; Redmond, T M; Stone, E M; Swaroop, A; Valle, D; Weber, B H

    1999-11-03

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is increasingly recognized as a complex genetic disorder in which one or more genes contribute to an individual's susceptibility for developing the condition. Twin and family studies as well as population-based genetic epidemiologic methods have convincingly demonstrated the importance of genetics in AMD, though the extent of heritability, the number of genes involved, and the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of the condition remain unresolved. The extent to which other hereditary macular dystrophies such as Stargardts disease, familial radial drusen (malattia leventinese), Best's disease, and peripherin/RDS-related dystrophy are related to AMD remains unclear. Alzheimer's disease, another late onset, heterogeneous degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, offers a valuable model for identifying the issues that confront AMD genetics.

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision.

  11. Aging is not a disease: distinguishing age-related macular degeneration from aging.

    PubMed

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD.

  12. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease.

  13. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Low Vision Age-Related Macular Degeneration Vision Simulator AMD Pictures and Videos: What Does Macular Degeneration ... degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. There are different kinds of macular problems, but ...

  14. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  15. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy.

  16. Genetic studies of Age-related macular degeneration: lessons, challenges and opportunities for disease management

    PubMed Central

    Ratna Priya, Rinki; Chew, Emily Y.; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual impairment in individuals over 55 years of age worldwide. The varying clinical phenotypes of AMD result from contributions of genetic, epigenetic and non-genetic (environmental) factors. Genetic studies of AMD have come of age as a direct result of tremendous gains from human genome project, genomewide association studies and identification of numerous susceptibility loci. These findings have implicated immune response, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism, extracellular matrix, and angiogenesis signaling pathways in disease pathophysiology. Here, we address how the wealth of genetic findings in AMD is expected to impact the practice of medicine, providing opportunities for improved risk assessment, molecular diagnosis, preventive and therapeutic intervention. We propose that the potential of using genetic variants for monitoring treatment response (pharmacogenetics) may usher a new era of personalized medicine in the clinical management of AMD. PMID:23009893

  17. Unraveling a Multifactorial Late-Onset Disease: From Genetic Susceptibility to Disease Mechanisms for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2012-01-01

    Aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases significantly influence the quality of life of affected individuals. Genetic approaches, combined with genomic technology, have provided powerful insights into common late-onset diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we discuss current findings on the genetics of AMD to highlight areas of rapid progress and new challenges. We also attempt to integrate available genetic and biochemical data with cellular pathways involved in aging to formulate an integrated model of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:19405847

  18. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Avellis, Fernando Onofrio; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Souied, Eric H

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: Is there any new knowledge about the pathogenesis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Results: We now understand better the biochemical and pathological pathways involved in the genesis of AMD. Treatment of exudative AMD is based on intravitreal injection of new antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs for which there does not yet exist a unique recognized strategy of administration. No therapies are actually available for atrophic AMD, despite some experimental new pharmacological approaches. Implementation: strategy of administration, safety of intravitreal injection PMID:21654887

  20. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  1. Disturbed Matrix Metalloproteinase Pathway in Both Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunhee; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Francis, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Abnormal protein deposits including β-amyloid, found in ageing Bruch's membrane and brain, are susceptible to degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In ageing Bruch's membrane, these MMPs become less effective due to polymerisation and aggregation reactions (constituting the MMP Pathway), a situation much advanced in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The likely presence of this MMP Pathway in brain with the potential to compromise the degradation of β-amyloid associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been investigated. Methods. Presence of high molecular weight MMP species (HMW1 and HMW2) together with the much larger aggregate termed LMMC was determined by standard zymographic techniques. Centrigugation and gel filtration techniques were used to separate and quantify the distribution between bound and free MMP species. Results. The MMP Pathway, initially identified in Bruch's membrane, was also present in brain tissue. The various MMP species displayed bound-free equilibrium and in AD samples, the amount of bound HMW1 and pro-MMP9 species was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). The abnormal operation of the MMP Pathway in AD served to reduce the degradation potential of the MMP system. Conclusion. The presence and abnormalities of the MMP Pathway in both brain and ocular tissues may therefore contribute to the anomalous deposits associated with AD and AMD. PMID:28197357

  2. Search for age-related macular degeneration risk variants in Alzheimer disease genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Logue, Mark W; Schu, Matthew; Vardarajan, Badri N; Farrell, John; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Jun, Gyungah; Baldwin, Clinton T; Deangelis, Margaret M; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2014-06-01

    Several lines of inquiry point to overlapping molecular mechanisms between late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We evaluated summarized results from large genome-wide association studies for AD and AMD to test the hypothesis that AD susceptibility loci are also associated with AMD. We observed association of both disorders with genes in a region of chromosome 7, including PILRA and ZCWPW1 (peak AMD SNP rs7792525, minor allele frequency [MAF] = 19%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.14, p = 2.34 × 10(-6)), and with ABCA7 (peak AMD SNP rs3752228, MAF = 0.054, OR = 1.22, p = 0.00012). Next, we evaluated association of AMD with genes in AD-related pathways identified by canonical pathway analysis of AD-associated genes. Significant associations were observed with multiple previously identified AMD risk loci and 2 novel genes: HGS (peak SNP rs8070488, MAF = 0.23, OR = 0.91, p = 7.52 × 10(-5)), which plays a role in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis signaling pathway, and TNF (peak SNP rs2071590, MAF = 0.34, OR = 0.89, p = 1.17 × 10(-5)), which is a member of the atherosclerosis signaling and the LXR/RXR activation pathways. Our results suggest that AMD and AD share genetic mechanisms.

  3. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: genetic and environmental factors of disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhong; Bedell, Matthew; Zhang, Kang

    2010-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among the elderly in developed countries, and its prevalence is thus increasing as the population ages; however, treatment options remain limited because the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD are incompletely defined. Recently, much progress has been made in gene discovery and mechanistic studies, which clearly indicate that AMD involves the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The identification of genes that have a substantial impact on the risk for AMD is not only facilitating the diagnosis and screening of populations at risk but is also elucidating key molecular pathways of pathogenesis. Pharmacogenetic studies of treatment responsiveness among patients with the "wet" form of AMD are increasingly proving to be clinically relevant; pharmacogenetic approaches hold great promise for both identifying patients with the best chance for vision recovery as well as tailoring individualized therapies.

  5. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depression, and summarizes interventions for preventing depression in this high-risk group.

  6. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula. PMID:20862519

  7. DIETARY CARBOHYDRATE AND PROGRESSION OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION, A PROSPECTIVE STUDY FROM THE AGE-RELATED EYE DISEASE STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Cross-sectional studies indicate that diets that provide a higher dietary glycemic index (dGI) are associated with increased risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). No prospective studies have addressed this issue. Methods dGI was calculated as the weighted average of GIs from foo...

  8. Is age-related macular degeneration a manifestation of systemic disease? New prospects for early intervention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C M G; Wong, T Y

    2014-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common vision-threatening condition affecting the elderly. AMD shares common risk factors and processes, including vascular and inflammatory pathways, with many systemic disorders. Associations have been reported between AMD and hypertension, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, chronic kidney disease and neurodegenerative disorders. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that individuals with AMD are also at risk of systemic diseases such as stroke. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence to support the notion that AMD is an ocular manifestation of systemic disease processes, and discuss the potential systemic side effects of ocular AMD therapy of which general physicians should be aware. Recent genetic discoveries and understanding of the pathogenic pathways in AMD in relation to systemic disorders are also highlighted.

  9. The Association of Statin Use with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 9

    PubMed Central

    Al-Holou, Shaza N.; Tucker, William R.; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E.; Cukras, Catherine; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/purpose To evaluate the association of statin use with progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Preplanned, prospective cohort study within a controlled clinical trial of oral supplementation for age-related eye diseases. Subjects Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 participants, aged 50 to 85 years. Methods Factors, including age, gender, smoking status, aspirin use, and history of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, angina, and stroke, all known to be associated with statin use, were included in a logistic regression model to estimate propensity scores for each participant. Age-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, with and without propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the association of statin use with progression to late AMD. Analyses were also performed adjusting for the competing risk of death. Main Outcome Measures Baseline and annual stereoscopic fundus photographs were assessed centrally by masked graders for the development of late AMD, either neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy (GA). Results Of the 3791 participants (2462 with bilateral large drusen and 1329 with unilateral late AMD at baseline), 1659 (43.8%) were statin users. The overall analysis, with no matching of propensity scores and no adjustment for death as a competing risk, showed that statin use was not associated with progression to late AMD (hazard ratios [HR] of 1.08, 95% confidence intervals [CI] of 0.83–1.41, P=0.56). When matched for propensity scores and adjusted for death as a competing risk, the result was not statistically significant with HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.55–1.20, P=0.29. Further subgroup analyses of persons with or without late AMD at baseline to the various components of late AMD (neovascular, central geographic atrophy, or any geographic atrophy) also showed no statistically significant association of statin use with progression to AMD. Conclusions Statin use was not statistically significantly associated with the

  10. Visual Acuity after Cataract Surgery in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report No. 5

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Nancy; Nicholson, Benjamin P.; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E.; Bressler, Susan B.; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate visual acuity outcomes after cataract surgery in persons with varying severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Cohort study. Participants A total of 1232 eyes of 793 participants who underwent cataract surgery during the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial of nutritional supplements for treatment of AMD. Methods Preoperative and postoperative characteristics of participants who underwent cataract extraction during the 5 year trial were analyzed. Both clinical data and standardized red-reflex lens and fundus photographs were obtained at baseline and annually. Photographs were graded by a centralized reading center for cortical and posterior subcapsular lens opacities and for AMD severity. Cataract surgery was documented at annual study visits or by history during the 6 month telephone calls. Analyses were conducted using multivariate repeated-measures regression. Main Outcome Measures Change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after cataract surgery compared with preoperative BCVA. Results Adjusting for age at time of surgery, gender, interval between preoperative and postoperative visits, and type and severity of cataract, the mean changes in visual acuity were as follows: eyes with mild AMD (n=30) gained 11.2 letters (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.9-15.5), eyes with moderate AMD (n=346) gained 11.1 letters (95% CI, 9.1-13.2), eyes with severe AMD (n=462) gained 8.7 letters (95% CI, 6.7-10.7), eyes with non-central geographic atrophy (n=70) gained 8.9 letters (95% CI, 5.8-12.1), and eyes with advanced AMD (central geographic atrophy and/or neovascular) AMD (n=324) gained 6.8 letters (95% CI, 4.9-8.8). The visual acuity gain across all AMD severity groups was statistically significant from pre-operative state (P<0.0001). Conclusions Mean visual acuities improved significantly after cataract surgery across varying degrees of AMD severity. PMID:24613825

  11. Genetic Evidence for Role of Carotenoids in Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS)

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Kristin J.; Mares, Julie A.; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Liu, Zhe; Millen, Amy E.; Klein, Michael; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Karki, Chitra K.; Blodi, Barbara; Gehrs, Karen; Tinker, Lesley; Wallace, Robert; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Sarto, Gloria; Bernstein, Paul S.; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested variants in genes related to lutein and zeaxanthin status for association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS). Methods. Of 2005 CAREDS participants, 1663 were graded for AMD from fundus photography and genotyped for 424 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 24 candidate genes for carotenoid status. Of 337 AMD cases 91% had early or intermediate AMD. The SNPs were tested individually for association with AMD using logistic regression. A carotenoid-related genetic risk model was built using backward selection and compared to existing AMD risk factors using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results. A total of 24 variants from five genes (BCMO1, BCO2, NPCL1L1, ABCG8, and FADS2) not previously related to AMD and four genes related to AMD in previous studies (SCARB1, ABCA1, APOE, and ALDH3A2) were associated independently with AMD, after adjusting for age and ancestry. Variants in all genes (not always the identical SNPs) were associated with lutein and zeaxanthin in serum and/or macula, in this or other samples, except for BCO2 and FADS2. A genetic risk score including nine variants significantly (P = 0.002) discriminated between AMD cases and controls beyond age, smoking, CFH Y402H, and ARMS2 A69S. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for AMD among women in the highest versus lowest quintile for the risk score was 3.1 (2.0–4.9). Conclusions. Variants in genes related to lutein and zeaxanthin status were associated with AMD in CAREDS, adding to the body of evidence supporting a protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in risk of AMD. PMID:24346170

  12. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  13. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  14. Elevated angiopoietin 2 in aqueous of patients with neovascular age related macular degeneration correlates with disease severity at presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Danny S.; Yip, Yolanda W.; Bakthavatsalam, Malini; Chen, Li J.; Ng, Tse K.; Lai, Timothy Y.; Pang, Calvin P.; Brelén, Mårten E.

    2017-01-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANG2) is a proangiogenic cytokine which may have an implication in neovascular age related macular degeneration (nAMD). In 24 eyes of 24 subjects presenting with treatment naïve nAMD and 26 eyes of 26 control patients, aqueous humor samples were collected at the time of intervention (intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor or cataract extraction). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) with and central macular thickness (CMT) using optical coherence tomography (OCT) were measured before each injection in the nAMD group. Aqueous cytokine levels were determined by immunoassay using a multiplex array (Quansys Biosciences, Logan, UT). Levels of ANG2 in the aqueous were significantly higher in nAMD patients than those of the control group (p < 0.0001), so were hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP 1), all with p < 0.001. ANG2 correlated with worse BCVA (r = 0.44, p-value = 0.027) and greater CMT (r = 0.66, p-value < 0.0001) on optical coherence tomography (OCT). ANG2 is upregulated in patients with nAMD and correlates with severity of disease at presentation. PMID:28345626

  15. CKD increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) based on the Cockcroft-Gault equation) was present in 24% of the population (286 of 1183). The 5-yr incidence of early age-related macular degeneration was 3.9% in participants with no/mild chronic kidney disease (35 of 897) and 17.5% in those with moderate chronic kidney disease (50 of 286). After adjusting for age, sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, complement factor H polymorphism, and other risk factors, persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 5.7, P < 0.0001). Each SD (14.8 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) decrease in Cockcroft-Gault estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with a doubling of the adjusted risk for early age-related macular degeneration (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.8, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, persons with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk of early age-related macular degeneration, suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms between the two conditions.

  16. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  17. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  18. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  19. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  20. Genetic Determinants of Macular Pigments in Women of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Kristin J.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Bernstein, Paul S.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Karki, Chitra K.; Liu, Zhe; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Klein, Michael L.; Snodderly, D. Max; Blodi, Barbara A.; Gehrs, Karen M.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Wallace, Robert B.; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Hageman, Gregory; Tinker, Lesley; Mares, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate genetic determinants of macular pigment optical density in women from the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods. 1585 of 2005 CAREDS participants had macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measured noninvasively using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry and blood samples genotyped for 440 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 candidate genes related to absorption, transport, binding, and cleavage of carotenoids directly, or via lipid transport. SNPs were individually tested for associations with MPOD using least-squares linear regression. Results. Twenty-one SNPs from 11 genes were associated with MPOD (P ≤ 0.05) after adjusting for dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin. This includes variants in or near genes related to zeaxanthin binding in the macula (GSTP1), carotenoid cleavage (BCMO1), cholesterol transport or uptake (SCARB1, ABCA1, ABCG5, and LIPC), long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status (ELOVL2, FADS1, and FADS2), and various maculopathies (ALDH3A2 and RPE65). The strongest association was for rs11645428 near BCMO1 (βA = 0.029, P = 2.2 × 10−4). Conditional modeling within genes and further adjustment for other predictors of MPOD, including waist circumference, diabetes, and dietary intake of fiber, resulted in 13 SNPs from 10 genes maintaining independent association with MPOD. Variation in these single gene polymorphisms accounted for 5% of the variability in MPOD (P = 3.5 × 10−11). Conclusions. Our results support that MPOD is a multi-factorial phenotype associated with variation in genes related to carotenoid transport, uptake, and metabolism, independent of known dietary and health influences on MPOD. PMID:23404124

  1. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  2. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatment and future options.

    PubMed

    Moutray, Tanya; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment among older adults in the developed world. Epidemiological studies have revealed a number of genetic, ocular and environmental risk factors for this condition, which can be addressed by disease reduction strategies. We discuss the various treatment options for dry and exudative age-related macular degeneration available and explain how the recommended treatment depends on the exact type, location and extent of the degeneration. Currently, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition therapy is the best available treatment for exudative age-related macular degeneration but is limited by the need for repeated intravitreal injections. The current treatment regime is being refined through research on optimal treatment frequency and duration and type of anti-VEGF drug. Different modes of drug delivery are being developed and in the future other methods of VEGF inhibition may be used.

  3. Nicotinamide Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in a Human iPSC Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Saini, Janmeet S; Corneo, Barbara; Miller, Justine D; Kiehl, Thomas R; Wang, Qingjie; Boles, Nathan C; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Temple, Sally

    2017-01-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer essential for photoreceptor survival, and is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. There are no disease-altering therapies for dry AMD, which is characterized by accumulation of subretinal drusen deposits and complement-driven inflammation. We report the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients with diagnosed AMD, including two donors with the rare ARMS2/HTRA1 homozygous genotype. The hiPSC-derived RPE cells produce several AMD/drusen-related proteins, and those from the AMD donors show significantly increased complement and inflammatory factors, which are most exaggerated in the ARMS2/HTRA1 lines. Using a panel of AMD biomarkers and candidate drug screening, combined with transcriptome analysis, we discover that nicotinamide (NAM) ameliorated disease-related phenotypes by inhibiting drusen proteins and inflammatory and complement factors while upregulating nucleosome, ribosome, and chromatin-modifying genes. Thus, targeting NAM-regulated pathways is a promising avenue for developing therapeutics to combat AMD.

  4. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  5. Interactive Image Analysis in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and Stargardt Disease (STGD).

    PubMed

    Smith, R Theodore; Lee, Noah; Chen, Jian; Busuioc, Mihai; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-26

    The literature of the last three decades is replete with automatic methods for retinal image analysis. Acceptance has been limited due to post-processing or tuning requirements that may be just as time consuming as the original manual methods. The point of view herein is that by taking advantage of the human visual system and expert knowledge from the outset, the promised efficiencies of digital methods can be achieved in practice as well as in theory. Thus, simple labeling of regions of interest that is accepted and easily performed in a few moments by the human can provide enormous advantage to an already well-developed algorithm. Three examples are provided: drusen segmentation, image registration, and geographic atrophy segmentation, with applications to disease understanding.

  6. Safety and Tolerability Study of AAV2-sFLT01 in Patients With Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-20

    Macular Degeneration; Age-Related Maculopathies; Age-Related Maculopathy; Maculopathies, Age-Related; Maculopathy, Age-Related; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Neovascularization; Gene Therapy; Therapy, Gene; Eye Diseases

  7. Complement factor H and age-related macular degeneration: the role of glycosaminoglycan recognition in disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is the major cause of blindness in the western world, associated with the formation of extracellular deposits called drusen in the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina. These drusen contain cellular debris and proteins, including components of the complement system such as the regulator CFH (complement factor H); dysregulation of complement is thought to play a major role in the development of AMD. CFH acts through its capacity to recognize polyanionic structures [e.g. sulfated GAGs (glycosaminoglycans)] found on host tissues, and thereby inactivates any C3b that becomes deposited. Importantly, a common polymorphism in CFH (Y402H) has been strongly associated with an increased risk of AMD. This polymorphism, which causes a tyrosine to histidine coding change, has been shown to alter the binding of CFH to sulfated GAGs, as well as to other ligands including C-reactive protein, necrotic cells and bacterial coat proteins. Of these, the change in the GAG-recognition properties of CFH is likely to be of most significance to AMD. Recent research has revealed that the disease-associated 402H allotype interacts less well (compared with 402Y) with binding sites within the macula (e.g. Bruch's membrane), where the GAGs heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate play a major role in mediating the interaction with CFH. Reduced binding of the 402H allotype could result in impaired regulation of complement leading to chronic local inflammation that may contribute to the accumulation of drusen and thus the initiation, development and progression of AMD.

  8. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  9. Vitreomacular traction and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Green-Simms, Amy E; Bakri, Sophie J

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between the vitreous and the internal limiting membrane of the retina is important in the pathoetiology of numerous ocular disease processes. Recent studies have focused on the vitreo-retinal interface in the context of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), linking vitreo-retinal adhesion to exudative AMD in particular. This review summarizes our knowledge of vitreous anatomy and recent investigations regarding vitreomacular adhesion and AMD.

  10. Developments in age-related macular degeneration: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Steven R

    2009-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness of Americans over age 65 years. Severe loss of vision is usually due to exudative ARMD, of which there are about 200,000 new cases in the United States annually. Until recently, only a small fraction of patients benefited from treatment, but advances in the early diagnosis of the disease and major developments in therapy have substantially improved the prognosis of patients with ARMD. Because visual loss substantially reduces quality of life, effective management of ARMD will have increasing public health importance as the population ages. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that people over age 65 years should have a comprehensive eye examination every 1 to 2 years to check for cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and other conditions. Those who complain of difficulty reading, driving at night, or adapting from sunlight to indoor lighting might have macular degeneration.

  11. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  12. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index.

  13. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gorin, M B; Breitner, J C; De Jong, P T; Hageman, G S; Klaver, C C; Kuehn, M H; Seddon, J M

    1999-11-03

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is increasingly recognized as a complex genetic disorder in which one or more genes contribute to an individual's susceptibility for developing the condition. Twin and family studies as well as population-based genetic epidemiologic methods have convincingly demonstrated the importance of genetics in AMD, though the extent of heritability, the number of genes involved, and the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of the condition remain unresolved. The extent to which other hereditary macular dystrophies such as Stargardts disease, familial radial drusen (malattia leventinese), Best's disease, and peripherin/RDS-related dystrophy are related to AMD remains unclear. Alzheimer's disease, another late onset, heterogeneous degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, offers a valuable model for identifying the issues that confront AMD genetics.

  14. Age-related eye disease.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Vinod B; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    As with many organs, compromised function of the eye is accompanied with age and has become increasingly prevalent with the aging population. When decreased visual loss becomes significant, patients' ability to perform activities of daily living becomes compromised. This decrease in function is met with morbidity and mortality, as well as a large socioeconomic burden throughout the world. This review summarizes the most common age-related eye diseases, including cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration. Although our understanding of the genetic and biochemical pathways of these diseases is sill at its primitive stages, we have become able to help our patients improve the quality of life as they age.

  15. Flying Blind: Aeromedical Certification and Undiagnosed Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Final Report Flying Blind: Aeromedical Certification and Undiagnosed Age-Related Macular Degeneration DOT/FAA/AM-11/14 Office of Aerospace Medicine...Certification and Undiagnosed Age-Related Macular Degeneration 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report...resulted in an inadvertent stall.” The report also stated that “either the pilot’s macular degeneration or his unrecognized coronary artery disease

  16. Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Intracrine Biology: An Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Re, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory has studied the intracellular actions of angiotensin II and other signaling proteins that can act in the intracellular space—peptides/proteins we have called intracrines. Moreover, we have suggested that general principles of intracrine action exist and can help explain the progression of some chronic degenerative diseases such as diabetic nephropathy and congestive heart failure. Here, a similar analysis is carried out in the case of age-related macular degeneration. We propose that intracrine mechanisms are operative in this disorder. In particular, we hypothesize that intracrine loops involving renin, angiotensin II, transforming growth factor-beta, vascular endothelial growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-4, and p53, among other factors, are involved. If this analysis is correct, it suggests a commonality of mechanism linking chronic progressive renal diseases, congestive heart failure, and macular degeneration. PMID:27999510

  17. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized.

  18. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  19. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  20. Mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; LeCouter, Jennifer; Yaspan, Brian L; Ye, Weilan

    2014-01-01

    As the age of the population increases in many nations, age-related degenerative diseases pose significant socioeconomic challenges. One of the key degenerative diseases that compromise quality of life is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a multi-faceted condition that affects the central retina, which ultimately leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. The pathophysiology and risk factors for AMD are complex, and the symptoms manifest in multiple related but distinct forms. The ability to develop effective treatments for AMD will depend on a thorough understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, risk factors, and driver molecular pathways, as well as the ability to develop useful animal models. This review provides an overview of the aforementioned aspects in AMD.

  1. Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Katayoon B.; Handa, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. While excellent treatment has emerged for neovascular disease, treatment for early AMD is lacking due to an incomplete understanding of the early molecular events. A prominent age-related change is the accumulation of neutral lipid in normal Bruch's membrane (BrM) throughout adulthood and also disease-related BrM accumulations called basal deposits and drusen. AMD lesion formation has thus been conceptualized as sharing mechanisms with atherosclerotic plaque formation, where low-density lipoprotein (LDL) retention within the arterial wall initiates a cascade of pathologic events. However, we do not yet understand how lipoproteins contribute to AMD. This paper explores how systemic and local production of lipoproteins might contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:21822496

  2. The role of epigenetics in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2014-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms influence gene expression and can explain how interactions between genetics and the environment result in particular phenotypes during development. The extent to which this epigenetic effect contributes to phenotype heritability in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is currently ill defined. However, emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes are relevant to AMD and as such provide an exciting new avenue of research for AMD. This review addresses information on the impact of posttranslational modification of the genome on the pathogenesis of AMD, such as DNA methylation changes affecting antioxidant gene expression, hypoxia-regulated alterations in chromatin structure, and histone acetylation status in relation to angiogenesis and inflammation. It also contains information on the role of non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation in AMD at a posttranscriptional (before translation) level. Our aim was to review the epigenetic mechanisms that cause heritable changes in gene activity without changing the DNA sequence. We also describe some long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell, which are not necessarily heritable but remains to be defined in the future. Increasing understanding of the significance of common and rare genetic variants and their relationship to epigenetics and environmental influences may help in establishing methods to assess the risk of AMD. This in turn may allow new therapeutic interventions for the leading cause of central vision impairment in patients over the age of 50 years in developed countries. Search strategy We searched the MEDLINE/PubMed database following MeSH suggestions for articles including the terms: 'ocular epigenetic mechanisms', 'human disease epigenetics', and 'age-related macular degeneration genetics'. The headline used to locate related articles in PubMed was 'epigenetics in ocular disease', and to restrict search, we used the

  3. [The genetic variability of complement system in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Dziedzina, Sylwia; Sanak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible central vision impairment in people aged over 50 in developed countries. Age-related macular degeneration is a complex disease derived from environmental, immune and genetic factors. The complement pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Recently, variants in several genes, such as complement H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement 2 (C2), and complement 3 (C3), encoding complement pathway proteins, have been identified as associated with age-related macular degeneration. However, the associations between these genes and age-related macular degeneration varied due to genetic variation within populations and various ethnics groups. The strongest association was found between the age-related macular degeneration and SNP Y402H rs 1061170 variant of CFH gene, which is present in 30% to 50% of age-related macular degeneration patients in Caucasian population and which is a risk factor for the development of age-related macular degeneration. Cohort studies showed that polymorphism Arg102Gly (SNP rs 2230199) of C3 protein could serve as a high-risk genetic marker for the development of age-related macular degeneration. Other rare variants of C3 (Lys155Gln, Lys65Gln, Arg735Trp, Ser1619Arg), may also be associated with a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration in some ethnic groups. A protective haplotype of variants E318D and IVS10 in the C2 gene as well as L9H and R320 in the BF were associated with age-related macular degeneration but only in Caucasians. The genetic findings in age-related macular degeneration patients stress the importance of detailed phenotyping to identify age-related macular degeneration subtypes, which may be associated with the presence of different polymorphisms and various environmental risk factors in any population. Further studies may be helpful to improve the effectiveness of prophylaxis and therapeutic options in age-related

  4. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Damico, Francisco Max; Gasparin, Fabio; Scolari, Mariana Ramos; Pedral, Lycia Sampaio; Takahashi, Beatriz Sayuri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographic atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  5. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Guymer, Robyn

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To review the genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pathogenesis of AMD, the leading cause of severe visual disability and blindness in our community, remains unknown. However, AMD is regarded as a genetic disease where family history of AMD is a significant risk factor for the disease. Understanding the genetic factors associated with AMD offers the greatest chance for understanding the underlying disease processes. METHODS: Through a review of the literature and the use of original research findings, the current knowledge of the genetics of AMD is explored. CONCLUSION: AMD is increasing in prevalence and remains a major challenge for eye heath providers. Finding the genes that are associated with AMD offers the greatest chance for the development of preventative strategies and treatments.

  6. [Management of age-related macular degeneration. An update].

    PubMed

    García Lozano, Isabel; López García, Santiago; Elosua de Juán, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of legal blindness in people over 50 in developed countries. It is a multifactorial disease resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors, and the age is the only worldwide admitted risk factor. The socioeconomic impact of the disease reaches enormous proportions, if we take into account the high cost of the available antiangiogenic therapy, the strict schedule of medical visits that it requires, and the impairment that it gives rise to. The response to treatment and the visual outcomes improve with early management of the retinal lesions, thus the early diagnosis of the disease in its initial phases, based on self-control with an Amsler grid and with regular ophthalmologic assessments, is essential.

  7. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-11-13

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

  8. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate. PMID:24225910

  9. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Highly penetrant alleles in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Anneke I; de Jong, Eiko K

    2014-11-06

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies have identified several common genetic variants associated with AMD, which together account for 15%-65% of the heritability of AMD. Multiple hypotheses to clarify the unexplained portion of genetic variance have been proposed, such as gene-gene interactions, gene-environment interactions, structural variations, epigenetics, and rare variants. Several studies support a role for rare variants with large effect sizes in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this work, we review the methods that can be used to detect rare variants in common diseases, as well as the recent progress that has been made in the identification of rare variants in AMD. In addition, the relevance of these rare variants for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of AMD is highlighted.

  11. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  12. Targeting MAPK Signaling in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness affecting elderly people in the world. AMD is a complex multifactorial disease associated with demographic, genetics, and environmental risk factors. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AMD. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are activated by diverse extracellular stimuli, including growth factors, mitogens, hormones, cytokines, and different cellular stressors such as oxidative stress. They regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. This review addresses the novel findings from human and animal studies on the relationship of MAPK signaling with AMD. The use of specific MAPK inhibitors may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of this debilitating eye disease. PMID:27385915

  13. Highly Penetrant Alleles in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Anneke I.; de Jong, Eiko K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies have identified several common genetic variants associated with AMD, which together account for 15%–65% of the heritability of AMD. Multiple hypotheses to clarify the unexplained portion of genetic variance have been proposed, such as gene–gene interactions, gene–environment interactions, structural variations, epigenetics, and rare variants. Several studies support a role for rare variants with large effect sizes in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this work, we review the methods that can be used to detect rare variants in common diseases, as well as the recent progress that has been made in the identification of rare variants in AMD. In addition, the relevance of these rare variants for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of AMD is highlighted. PMID:25377141

  14. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  15. The role of epigenetics in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms influence gene expression and can explain how interactions between genetics and the environment result in particular phenotypes during development. The extent to which this epigenetic effect contributes to phenotype heritability in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is currently ill defined. However, emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes are relevant to AMD and as such provide an exciting new avenue of research for AMD. This review addresses information on the impact of posttranslational modification of the genome on the pathogenesis of AMD, such as DNA methylation changes affecting antioxidant gene expression, hypoxia-regulated alterations in chromatin structure, and histone acetylation status in relation to angiogenesis and inflammation. It also contains information on the role of non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation in AMD at a posttranscriptional (before translation) level. Our aim was to review the epigenetic mechanisms that cause heritable changes in gene activity without changing the DNA sequence. We also describe some long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell, which are not necessarily heritable but remains to be defined in the future. Increasing understanding of the significance of common and rare genetic variants and their relationship to epigenetics and environmental influences may help in establishing methods to assess the risk of AMD. This in turn may allow new therapeutic interventions for the leading cause of central vision impairment in patients over the age of 50 years in developed countries. Search strategy We searched the MEDLINE/PubMed database following MeSH suggestions for articles including the terms: ‘ocular epigenetic mechanisms', ‘human disease epigenetics', and ‘age-related macular degeneration genetics'. The headline used to locate related articles in PubMed was ‘epigenetics in ocular disease', and to restrict search, we used

  16. [Molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, É V; Churashov, S V; Kamilova, T A

    2013-01-01

    Visual loss due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is caused by one or both forms of advanced disease: "wet" (neovascular) or "dry" (geographic atrophy). Immune system plays a central role in pathogenesis and progression of both AMD forms. Main genetic polymorphisms associated with risk of AMD development and progression were found to be genes that regulate inflammation especially in complement factor H gen (1q31 locus) and 10q26 locus (PLEKHAI/ARMS2/HTRA1). Association of response to treatment and genotype was shown in patients with AMD. Complete characterization of both common and rare alleles that influence AMD risk is necessary for accurate determination of individual genetic risk as well as identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Update on geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biarnés, Marc; Monés, Jordi; Alonso, Jordi; Arias, Luis

    2011-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of legal blindness in older patients in developed countries, and geographic atrophy (GA) represents the advanced form of dry AMD. Although it accounts for one third of the cases of late AMD and is responsible for 20% of the cases of severe visual loss due to the disorder. GA currently lacks effective treatment, whereas antiangiogenic therapies have been shown to be successful in managing choroidal neovascularization, the other form of late AMD. Recent advances in GA epidemiology, etiology, genetics, and imaging techniques have renewed the interest in this entity, which is a cause of progressive visual loss even in treated patients with neovascular AMD. This knowledge has triggered many clinical trials targeting different molecules shown to be associated with the disease, and it is hoped that this research will translate into effective drugs for GA in the near future.

  18. A missense variant in CST3 exerts a recessive effect on susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration resembling its association with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Joe M; Sharif, Umar; Ali, Manir; McKibbin, Martin; Thompson, Joseph P; Gale, Richard; Yang, Yit C; Inglehearn, Chris; Paraoan, Luminita

    2015-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are degenerative, multifactorial diseases involving age-related accumulation of extracellular deposits linked to dysregulation of protein homeostasis. Here, we strengthen the evidence that an nsSNP (p.Ala25Thr) in the cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C gene CST3, previously confirmed by meta-analysis to be associated with AD, is associated with exudative AMD. To our knowledge, this is the first report highlighting a genetic variant that increases the risk of developing both AD and AMD. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the risk associated with the mutant allele follows a recessive model for both diseases. We perform an AMD-CST3 case-control study genotyping 350 exudative AMD Caucasian individuals. Bringing together our data with the previously reported AMD-CST3 association study, the evidence of a recessive effect on AMD risk is strengthened (OR = 1.89, P = 0.005). This effect closely resembles the AD-CST3 recessive effect (OR = 1.73, P = 0.005) previously established by meta-analysis. This resemblance is substantiated by the high correlation between CST3 genotype and effect size across the two diseases (R(2) = 0.978). A recessive effect is in line with the known function of cystatin C, a potent enzyme inhibitor. Its potency means that, in heterozygous individuals, a single functional allele is sufficient to maintain its inhibitory function; only homozygous individuals will lack this form of proteolytic regulation. Our findings support the hypothesis that recessively acting variants account for some of the missing heritability of multifactorial diseases. Replacement therapy represents a translational opportunity for individuals homozygous for the mutant allele.

  19. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  20. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  1. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  2. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  3. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Nonretinoid Retinol Binding Protein 4 Antagonists for the Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4–/– mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%. PMID:25210858

  5. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  6. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forest, David L.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD). A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease. PMID:26035859

  7. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  8. Mechanism of inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  9. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms.

  10. Activity loss and depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of severe vision loss in older persons and is associated with high rates of disability and depression. The authors evaluated 51 patients with bilateral AMD to investigate the interrelationships of disease severity, disability, and depression and focused on loss of valued activities as an emblematic disabling consequence of AMD. They characterized depression by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score, a syndromal state based on the CES-D, and as a level of distress (Index of Affective Suffering; IAS). Thirty subjects (58.8%) had loss of a valued, discretionary activity. They had worse visual acuity and more depressive symptoms and were represented in higher IAS levels than other subjects. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with IAS levels, but not with CES-D scores or syndromal depression. A regression model demonstrated that activity loss mediated the relationship between visual acuity and IAS level. Affective distress occurs in AMD, largely to the extent that valued activities are relinquished because of vision loss. IAS levels best illuminated this relationship, suggesting the value of this dimension of affective functioning in studies of the consequences of chronic disease.

  11. Fundus Autofluorescence in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Angelica; Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Assaad, Nagi; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) provides detailed insight into the health of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This is highly valuable in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as RPE damage is a hallmark of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise current clinical descriptions regarding the appearance of AMD using FAF and to integrate these findings into a chair-side reference. A wide variety of FAF patterns have been described in AMD, which is consistent with the clinical heterogeneity of the disease. In particular, FAF imaging in early to intermediate AMD has the capacity to reveal RPE alterations in areas that appear normal on funduscopy, which aids in the stratification of cases and may have visually significant prognostic implications. It can assist in differential diagnoses and also represents a reliable, sensitive method for distinguishing reticular pseudodrusen. FAF is especially valuable in the detection, evaluation, and monitoring of geographic atrophy and has been used as an endpoint in clinical trials. In neovascular AMD, FAF reveals distinct patterns of classic choroidal neovascularization noninvasively and may be especially useful for determining which eyes are likely to benefit from therapeutic intervention. FAF represents a rapid, effective, noninvasive imaging method that has been underutilized, and incorporation into the routine assessment of AMD cases should be considered. However, the practicing clinician should also be aware of the limitations of the modality, such as in the detection of foveal involvement and in the distinction of phenotypes (hypo-autofluorescent drusen from small areas of geographic atrophy). PMID:27668639

  12. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  13. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  14. Smoking and age-related macular degeneration: review and update.

    PubMed

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health.

  15. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  16. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient's home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  17. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  18. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis. Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety. Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers. Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk. PMID:28033280

  19. Fundus autofluorescence in exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Q; Dong, Y; Zhao, P Q

    2013-12-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) in patients with wet (exudative) age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Color fundus photographs, fundus fluorescein angiograms, indocyanine green angiograms, and FAF images were obtained from 61 patients (72 eyes) with exudative AMD. The FAF results for different patterns of exudative AMD were compared to those revealed by other fundus images. Of the 72 eyes evaluated, which were classified into three patterns based on the results of fundus fluorescein angiography, 68 had abnormal FAF. Forty-six eyes (63.9%) had classic wet AMD with abnormal FAF. Among these, 10 exhibited a slightly decreased FAF with near-normal or background FAF signal at the center of the lesion area; 36 demonstrated not only decreased FAF at the center of the lesion but also an increased FAF signal toward the lesion edge. Sixteen eyes (22.2%) had occult wet AMD, of which 12 exhibited heterogeneous fluorescence at the lesion site; 4 yielded normal FAF images. Ten eyes (13.9%) had a mixed pattern of wet AMD with abnormal FAF. FAF imaging suggested that the areas of blood and exudates decreased; however, fluorescence angiography revealed that lesions with hyperfluorescence had background or slightly increased FAF. These results showed that various patterns of wet AMD exhibit different autofluorescence characteristics. These represent the functional and metabolic features of retinal pigment epithelial cells. Therefore, FAF can be used to monitor disease development and evaluate the severity and prognosis of AMD.

  20. Gene transfer for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Campochiaro, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease that has two phases: a degenerative phase often referred to as nonneovascular AMD (non-NVAMD) or dry AMD and a phase dominated by growth of new blood vessels in the subretinal space, referred to as NVAMD or wet AMD. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of NVAMD have led to new drug therapies that have provided major benefits to patients. However, those treatments require frequent intraocular injections that in many patients must be continued indefinitely to maintain visual benefits. Gene transfer to augment expression of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term stability in patients with NVAMD. Studies in animal models that mimic aspects of NVAMD have identified several possible transgenes, and a clinical trial in patients with advanced NVAMD has suggested that the approach may be feasible. Many important questions remain, but the rationale and preliminary data are compelling. The results of two ongoing clinical trials may answer several of the questions and help direct future research.

  1. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  2. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  3. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2014-12-18

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD.

  4. Wearable diagnostic system for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mohaghegh, N; Zadeh, E Ghafar; Magierowski, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel head-mounted point-of-care diagnostic system for detection and continuous monitoring of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This wearable embedded open-source platform enables accurate monitoring of AMD by taking advantage of multiple standard graphical interface techniques such as Amsler Grid, Threshold Amsler Grid, Macular Computerized Psychophysical Test and Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP). Here, we describe the proposed multi-Grid or so-called NGRID software and elaborate on the hardware prototype. This prototype includes a commercially available Oculus HMD incorporated with a single board computer. As the first step towards a fully integrated wearable system, this paper successfully proves the functionality of head-mounted graphical interface device ready for a live demonstration. Participants can experience this device and take a 10-minute AMD eye-exam. Furthermore, NGRID has been approved and permitted for an in-hospital clinical trial.

  5. Knowledge and Use of Low Vision Services Among Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin J.; Maloney, Eileen K.; Rovner, Barry W.

    2005-01-01

    Visual impairment (blindness or low vision) is a leading cause of disability among older adults and is most often due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is predicted that 2.95 million people will have AMD by 2020 (Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group, 2004). Unfortunately, there is no cure for AMD, nor can lost vision be restored.…

  6. Macular Hole Formation After Intravitreal Ranibizumab Injection in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Chandoshi; Mitra, Arijit; Kumar, N. Ajith; Elsherbiny, Samer; Lip, Peck Lin

    2015-01-01

    Ranibizumab is a monoclonal antibody fragment that inhibits angiogenesis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor A, used as a treatment for patients with wet aged-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Adverse effects from intravitreal Ranibizumab injections are well recognised. Macular hole formation following Ranibizumab injection is a complication that has been recently reported in few case reports. We present a larger case series of five patients, who developed full thickness macular holes (FTMH) after intravitreal Ranibizumab injections for treatment of wet ARMD that we were aware of between 2009 and 2013. PMID:26962382

  7. Age related macular degeneration and drusen: neuroinflammation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Elisa; Piras, Antonio; Nuzzi, Raffaele; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2011-09-15

    Inflammation protects from dangerous stimuli, restoring normal tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory response in the nervous system ("neuroinflammation") has distinct features, which are shared in several diseases. The retina is an immune-privileged site, and the tight balance of immune reaction can be disrupted and lead to age-related macular disease (AMD) and to its peculiar sign, the druse. Excessive activation of inflammatory and immunological cascade with subsequent induction of damage, persistent activation of resident immune cells, accumulation of byproducts that exceeds the normal capacity of clearance giving origin to a chronic local inflammation, alterations in the activation of the complement system, infiltration of macrophages, T-lymphocytes and mast-cells from the bloodstream, participate in the mechanisms which originate the drusen. In addition, aging of the retina and AMD involve also para-inflammation, by which immune cells react to persistent stressful stimuli generating low-grade inflammation, aimed at restoring function and maintaining tissue homeostasis by varying the set point in relation to the new altered conditions. This mechanism is also seen in the normal aging retina, but, in the presence of noxious stimuli as in AMD, it can become chronic and have an adverse outcome. Finally, autophagy may provide new insights to understand AMD pathology, due to its contribution in the removal of defective proteins. Therefore, the AMD retina can represent a valuable model to study neuroinflammation, its mechanisms and therapy in a restricted and controllable environment. Targeting these pathways could represent a new way to treat and prevent both exudative and dry forms of AMD.

  8. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies.

  9. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Peter X; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  10. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  11. Evaluation of an oral telomerase activator for early age-related macular degeneration - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas; Harley, Calvin B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Telomere attrition and corresponding cellular senescence of the retinal pigment epithelium contribute to the changes of age-related macular degeneration. Activation of the enzyme telomerase can add telomeric DNA to retinal pigment epithelium chromosomal ends and has been proposed as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. We report the use of a small molecule, oral telomerase activator (TA)-65 in early macular degeneration. This study, focusing on early macular degeneration, provides a model for the use of TAs in age-related disease. Method Thirty-eight (38) patients were randomly assigned to a 1-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled interventional study with arms for oral TA-65 or placebo. Macular functions via micro-perimetry were the primary measured outcomes. Results The macular function in the arm receiving the TA-65 showed significant improvement relative to the placebo control. The improvement was manifest at 6 months and was maintained at 1 year: macular threshold sensitivity (measured as average dB [logarithmic decibel scale of light attenuation]) improved 0.97 dB compared to placebo (P-value 0.02) and percent reduced thresholds lessened 8.2% compared to the placebo arm (P-value 0.04). Conclusion The oral TA significantly improved the macular function of treatment subjects compared to controls. Although this study was a pilot and a larger study is being planned, it is noteworthy in that it is, to our knowledge, the first randomized placebo-controlled study of a TA supplement. PMID:26869760

  12. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  13. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  14. Genetics and age-related macular degeneration: a practical review for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Hampton, Blake M; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Brantley, Milam A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a complex disease, with both genetic and environmental risk factors interacting in unknown ways. Currently, 52 gene variants within 34 loci have been significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Two well-studied major genes are complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2). There exist several commercially available tests that are proposed to stratify patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, as well as predict response to nutritional supplementation. However, at present, the bulk of the available peer-reviewed evidence suggests that genetic testing is more useful as a research tool than for clinical management of patients. PMID:27445455

  15. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  16. A twin study on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S M

    1994-01-01

    A prospective twin study on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) recruited 83 monozygotic pairs, 28 dizygotic pairs, and one triplet set from 1986 through 1993. Zygosity was determined by genetic testing of red cell markers, HLA antigens, or specific DNA loci. There were no twin pairs in which I collected data on only one twin. To decrease ascertainment bias, after 1991 the recruitment notice did not mention AMD, and I did not ask about a history of eye disease before the eye examination. Because of this, twin pairs recruited from 1986 through 1991 were statistically analyzed separately from those after January 1, 1992. From 1986 through 1991, 23 twin pairs were recruited; 11 monozygotic and 2 dizygotic pairs had nonAMD retinal changes or no retinal abnormalities, 9 monozygotic pairs with AMD were all concordant, and 1 dizygotic pair was discordant for basal laminar drusen. The concordance rate of AMD did not differ significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (P = .10) for 1986 through 1991. In 1992 and 1993, 88 twin pairs and one triplet set were recruited; 49 monozygotic and 19 dizygotic pairs had nonAMD retinal changes or no retinal abnormalities, 14 monozygotic pairs with AMD were all concordant, and 2 of 7 dizygotic pairs were concordant for AMD. The nonidentical triplets (1 with and 2 without AMD) were categorized as one of the discordant dizygotic pairs in the statistical evaluation. In nontwin age-matched (within 2 or 5 years of age) or age- and sex-matched sibling pairs the concordance rate of AMD ranged from 16% to 25%. The concordance rate of AMD was significantly higher in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins (P = .001) for 1992 and 1993. The concordance rate was higher for monozygotic twin pairs recruited in 1992 and 1993 than in any of the four subsets of nontwin age-method or age- and sex-matched sibling pairs (P < .0001). Overall, from 1986 through 1993, 23 of 23 monozygotic and 2 of 8 dizygotic twin pairs were concordant for AMD

  17. Molecular pathology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD remain largely unclear, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is thought to exist. AMD pathology is characterized by degeneration involving the retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane, as well as, in some cases, alterations in choroidal capillaries. Recent research on the genetic and molecular underpinnings of AMD brings to light several basic molecular pathways and pathophysiological processes that might mediate AMD risk, progression, and/or response to therapy. This review summarizes, in detail, the molecular pathological findings in both humans and animal models, including genetic variations in CFH, CX3CR1, and ARMS2/HtrA1, as well as the role of numerous molecules implicated in inflammation, apoptosis, cholesterol trafficking, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:19026761

  18. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  19. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  20. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  1. CCR2+ monocytes infiltrate atrophic lesions in age-related macular disease and mediate photoreceptor degeneration in experimental subretinal inflammation in Cx3cr1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Sennlaub, Florian; Auvynet, Constance; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Poupel, Lucie; Hu, Shulong J; Dominguez, Elisa; Camelo, Serge; Levy, Olivier; Guyon, Elodie; Saederup, Noah; Charo, Israel F; Van Rooijen, Nico; Nandrot, Emeline; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Raoul, William; Combadiere, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). Their role in promoting or inhibiting retinal degeneration is unknown. We here show that atrophic AMD is associated with increased intraocular CCL2 levels and subretinal CCR2+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration in patients. Using age- and light-induced subretinal inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration in Cx3cr1 knockout mice, we show that subretinal Cx3cr1 deficient MPs overexpress CCL2 and that both the genetic deletion of CCL2 or CCR2 and the pharmacological inhibition of CCR2 prevent inflammatory monocyte recruitment, MP accumulation and photoreceptor degeneration in vivo. Our study shows that contrary to CCR2 and CCL2, CX3CR1 is constitutively expressed in the retina where it represses the expression of CCL2 and the recruitment of neurotoxic inflammatory CCR2+ monocytes. CCL2/CCR2 inhibition might represent a powerful tool for controlling inflammation and neurodegeneration in AMD. PMID:24142887

  2. Associations between genetic polymorphisms of insulin-like growth factor axis genes and risk for age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Our objective was to investigate if insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis genes affect the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: 864 Caucasian non-diabetic participants from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Genetic Repository were used in this case control st...

  3. A risk score for the prediction of advanced age-related macular degeneration: Development and validation in 2 prospective cohorts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We aimed to develop an eye specific model which used readily available information to predict risk for advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We used the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) as our training dataset, which consisted of the 4,507 participants (contributing 1,185 affected v...

  4. Genetics of immunological and inflammatory components in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch's membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflammatory effects of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress can result in abnormal retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor atrophy and choroidal neovascularization. The associations of immunological and inflammatory genes, in particular the genes related to innate immunity with AMD support the involvement of various immunological pathways in the AMD pathogenesis. We review the literature on the involvements of inflammatory genes in AMD, highlight recent genetic discoveries, and discuss the potential application of such knowledge in the management of patients with AMD.

  5. New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Age-related Macular Degeneration New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD ... Eye Institute Photo Courtesy of: NEI In a new study of nearly 650 people with age-related ...

  6. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  7. Development of quantitative diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration using Spectral Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Davies, Emily; Davis, Anjul M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of quantitative, reproducible diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). 3D SDOCT volumetric data sets (512 x 1000 x 100 voxels) were collected (5.7 seconds acquisition time) in over 50 patients with age-related macular degeneration and geographic atrophy using a state-of-the-art SDOCT scanner. Commercial and custom software utilities were used for manual and semi-automated segmentation of photoreceptor layer thickness, total drusen volume, and geographic atrophy cross-sectional area. In a preliminary test of reproducibility in segmentation of total drusen volume and geographic atrophy surface area, inter-observer error was less than 5%. Extracted volume and surface area of AMD-related drusen and geographic atrophy, respectively, may serve as useful observables for tracking disease state that were not accessible without the rapid 3D volumetric imaging capability unique to retinal SDOCT.

  8. Age-related macular degeneration: beyond anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kent, David L

    2014-01-06

    Recently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies for neovascular age-related macular degeneration have been developed. These agents, originally developed for their anti-angiogenic mechanism of action, probably also work through an anti-permeability effect in preventing or reducing the amount of leakage from submacular neovascular tissue. Other treatment modalities include laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin, and submacular surgery. In reality, these latter treatments can be similarly categorized as anti-angiogenic because their sole aim is destroying or removing choroidal neovascularization (CNV). At the cellular level, CNV resembles stereotypical tissue repair that consists of several matricellular components in addition to neovascularization. In the retina, the clinical term CNV is a misnomer since the term may more appropriately be referred to as aberrant submacular repair. Furthermore, CNV raises a therapeutic conundrum: To complete or correct any reparative process in the body, angiogenesis becomes an essential component. Anti-angiogenic therapy, in all its guises, arrests repair and causes the hypoxic environment to persist, thus fueling pro-angiogenesis and further development of CNV as a component of aberrant repair. However, we realize that anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy preserves vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration, albeit temporarily and therefore, repeated treatment is needed. More importantly, however, anti-angiogenic therapy demonstrates that we can at the very least tolerate neovascular tissue beneath the macula and preserve vision in contrast to our historical approach of total vascular destruction. In this clinical scenario, it may be possible to look beyond anti-angiogenesis if our goal is facilitating submacular repair without destroying the neurosensory retina. Thus, in this situation of neovascular tolerance, it may be timely to consider treatments that facilitate

  9. Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weikel, Karen A; Taylor, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/wk of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available. PMID:22503690

  10. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Weikel, Karen A; Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/week of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available.

  11. Therapeutic Modalities of Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mavija, Milka; Alimanovic, Emina; Jaksic, Vesna; Kasumovic, Sanja Sefic; Cekic, Sonja; Stamenkovic, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible serious vision damage in persons over 50 years of age. In treating AMD many medicaments are applied such as inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), have been very carefully included over the last few years after a series of study research. Aims: To analyze the past methods of treatment, discuss emerging therapies which could advance the treatment of exudative AMD. The past anti-VEGF therapies require frequent repetitions of administration, with uncertain visual acuity recovery, as not all patients react to anti-VEGF therapy. Consequently, there is a need to find out additional therapies which could improve the treatment of exudative AMD. The real aim in the treating of AMD is to prevent CNV development. Methods: A survey of the current clinical research and results in the field of the present and future treatments of exudative AMD. Results: There are many areas of research into new methods of the exudative AMD treatment. Conclusion: The future therapies for exudative AMD treatment have a potential not only to reduce the frequency of administration and follow-up visits, but also to improve effects of treatment by targeting additional ways of CNV development, increasing the aptitude of target binding and extending durability of treatment. PMID:25568535

  12. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  13. Reticular pseudodrusen in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Ruth Esther

    2014-08-01

    Historically, drusen, which are recognized as the hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), have been described in terms of size, margins, and texture, and several studies have emphasized the importance of large soft drusen particularly when combined with focal pigmentary irregularities in determining the risk of progression to neovascular AMD. However, recent developments in imaging over the past decade have revealed a further distinct phenotype strongly associated with the development of late AMD, namely, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) or reticular drusen. Reticular pseudodrusen appear as yellowish interlacing networks in the fundus and, although visible on color photography, are better visualized using infrared imaging or spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Studies correlating spectral domain optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy have shown that RPD are subretinal deposits located internal to the retinal pigment epithelium in contrast to traditional drusen, which are located external to the retinal pigment epithelium. As multiple longitudinal studies have revealed RPD are strong predictors for progression to both neovascular AMD and geographic atrophy, the interest in understanding the role that RPD play in the pathogenesis of AMD has grown. This review focuses on the current literature concerning RPD and considers what is currently known regarding their epidemiology, risk factors, appearance in both retinal imaging and histology, impact on visual function, relationship to other AMD lesions, and association with the development of late AMD.

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993–2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  15. Effects of Age-Related Macular Degeneration on Postural Sway

    PubMed Central

    Chatard, Hortense; Tepenier, Laure; Jankowski, Olivier; Aussems, Antoine; Allieta, Alain; Beydoun, Talal; Salah, Sawsen; Bucci, Maria P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on postural sway, and the influence of different visual conditions. The hypothesis of our study was that the impact of AMD will be different between unilateral and bilateral AMD subjects compared to age-matched healthy elderly. Methods: Postural stability was measured with a platform (TechnoConcept®) in 10 elderly unilateral AMD subjects (mean age: 71.1 ± 4.6 years), 10 elderly bilateral AMD subjects (mean age: 70.8 ± 6.1 years), and 10 healthy age-matched control subjects (mean age: 69.8 ± 6.3 years). Four visual conditions were tested: both eyes viewing condition (BEV), dominant eye viewing (DEV), non-dominant eye viewing (NDEV), and eyes closed (EC). We analyzed the surface area, the length, the mean speed, the anteroposterior (AP), and mediolateral (ML) displacement of the center of pressure (CoP). Results: Bilateral AMD subjects had a surface area (p < 0.05) and AP displacement of the CoP (p < 0.01) higher than healthy elderly. Unilateral AMD subjects had more AP displacement of the CoP (p < 0.05) than healthy elderly. Conclusions: We suggest that ADM subjects could have poor postural adaptive mechanisms leading to increase their postural instability. Further studies will aim to improve knowledge on such issue and to develop reeducation techniques in these patients.

  16. Object crowding in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Julian M.; Chung, Susana T. L.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2017-01-01

    Crowding, the phenomenon of impeded object identification due to clutter, is believed to be a key limiting factor of form vision in the peripheral visual field. The present study provides a characterization of object crowding in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) measured at the participants' respective preferred retinal loci with binocular viewing. Crowding was also measured in young and age-matched controls at the same retinal locations, using a fixation-contingent display paradigm to allow unlimited stimulus duration. With objects, the critical spacing of crowding for AMD participants was not substantially different from controls. However, baseline contrast energy thresholds in the noncrowded condition were four times that of the controls. Crowding further exacerbated deficits in contrast sensitivity to three times the normal crowding-induced contrast energy threshold elevation. These findings indicate that contrast-sensitivity deficit is a major limiting factor of object recognition for individuals with AMD, in addition to crowding. Focusing on this more tractable deficit of AMD may lead to more effective remediation and technological assistance. PMID:28129416

  17. Impact of age related macular degeneration on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, J B; Lamoureux, E L; Keeffe, J E

    2006-01-01

    Aims To describe the impact of age related macular degeneration (AMD) on quality of life and explore the association with vision, health, and demographic variables. Methods Adult participants diagnosed with AMD and with impaired vision (visual acuity <6/12) were assessed with the Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. Participants rated the extent that vision restricted participation in activities affecting quality of life and completed the Short Form General Health Survey (SF‐12) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results The mean age of the 106 participants (66% female) was 83.6 years (range 64–98). One quarter had mild vision impairment, (VA<6/12–6/18) and 75% had moderate or severely impaired vision. Participants reported from at least “a little” concern on 23 of the 32 IVI items including reading, emotional health, mobility, and participation in relevant activities. Those with mild and moderate vision impairment were similarly affected but significantly different from those with severe vision loss (p<0.05). Distance vision was associated with IVI scores but not age, sex, or duration of vision loss. Conclusion AMD affects many quality of life related activities and not just those related to reading. Referral to low vision care services should be considered for people with mild vision loss and worse. PMID:16622089

  18. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD.

  19. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  20. The burden of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmier, Jordana K; Jones, Mechelle L; Halpern, Michael T

    2006-01-01

    As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) becomes more prevalent as a result of longer life expectancy and the number of elderly people worldwide, it will become increasingly important to understand its potential health and economic impact for appropriate healthcare planning. This review identified published literature on costs and resource use associated with AMD. Despite the increasing prevalence of AMD, the worldwide burden of illness is unknown. Several studies of direct medical costs, both those associated with ophthalmic care and those associated with other care, have been conducted and have identified increased medical care associated with AMD. Direct non-medical costs include the cost for vision aids; while these costs may be substantial, they are difficult to quantify as no comprehensive sources track the distribution or use of vision aids. Because AMD is uncommon among people of working age, there is less concern regarding the impact of indirect (workplace) costs among AMD patients. However, indirect costs are incurred by caregivers who leave the workforce early or change their work patterns in order to provide assistance to AMD patients; the magnitude of caregiver-related costs is unknown. The cost effectiveness of some interventions for AMD has been explored. Supplementation with zinc and antioxidants for non-exudative (dry) AMD has been shown to result in an acceptable cost per QALY and is considered cost effective. Studies suggest that laser photocoagulation is cost effective but that photodynamic therapy with verteporfin appears to be cost effective only among patients with good visual acuity at baseline or when models extend longer than 5 years. Further research is needed to integrate the information on various components of AMD-related costs into a comprehensive burden of illness estimate and to evaluate basic utility assumptions in existing models.

  1. Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Constable, Ian Jeffery; Blumenkranz, Mark Scott; Schwartz, Steven D; Barone, Sam; Lai, Chooi-May; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate safety and signals of efficacy of gene therapy with subretinal rAAV.sFlt-1 for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). A phase 1 dose-escalating single-center controlled unmasked human clinical trial was followed up by extension of the protocol to a phase 2A single-center trial. rAAV.sFlt-1 vector was used to deliver a naturally occurring anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, sFlt-1, into the subretinal space. In phase 1, step 1 randomized 3 subjects to low-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm; step 2 randomized an additional 3 subjects to treatment with high-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm. Follow-up studies demonstrated that rAAV.sFlt-1 was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile in these elderly subjects with wet AMD. Subretinal injection was highly reproducible, and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Procedure-related adverse events were mild and self-resolving. Two phakic patients developed cataract and underwent cataract surgery. Four of the 6 patients responded better than the small control group in this study and historical controls in terms of maintaining vision and a relatively dry retina with zero ranibizumab retreatments per annum. Two patients required 1 ranibizumab injection over the 52-week follow-up period. rAAV.sFlt-1 gene therapy may prove to be a potential adjunct or alternative to conventional intravitreal injection for patients with wet AMD by providing extended delivery of a naturally occurring antiangiogenic protein.

  2. Identification of spectral phenotypes in age-related macular degeneration patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Bert; Russell, Steven; Abramoff, Michael; Nemeth, Sheila C.; Barriga, E. Simon; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that there exists a spectral characteristic that differentiates normal macular tissue from various types of genetic-based macular diseases. This paper demonstrates statistically that hyperspectral images of macular and other retinal tissue can be used to spectrally differentiate different forms of age-related macular degeneration. A hyperspectral fundus imaging device has been developed and tested for the purpose of collecting hyperspectral images of the human retina. A methodology based on partial least squares and ANOVA has been applied to determine the hyperspectral representation of individual spectral characteristics of retinal features. Each discrete tissue type in the retina has an identifiable spectral shape or signature which, when combined with spatial context, aids in detection of pathological features. Variations in the amount and distribution of various ocular pigments or the inclusion of additional biochemical substances will allow detection of pathological conditions prior to traditional histological presentation. Fundus imaging cameras are ubiquitous and are one of the most common imaging modalities used in documenting a patient's retinal state for diagnosis, e.g. remotely, or for monitoring the progression of an ocular disease. The added diagnostic information obtained with only a minor retro-fit of a specialized spectral camera will lead to new diagnostic information to the clinical ophthalmologist or eye-care specialist.

  3. Recent developments in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fleckenstein, Monika

    2014-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual loss in the elderly, with increasing prevalence due to increasing life expectancy. While the introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has improved outcomes, there are still major unmet needs and gaps in the understanding of underlying biological processes. These include early, intermediate, and atrophic disease stages. Recent studies have assessed therapeutic approaches addressing various disease-associated pathways, including complement inhibitors. Drug-delivery aspects are also relevant, as many agents have to be administered repeatedly. Herein, relevant pathogenetic factors and underlying mechanisms as well as recent and potential therapeutic approaches are reviewed.

  4. Age-related eye disease and gender.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of moderate to severe visual impairment and blindness is 285 millions, with 65% of visually impaired and 82% of all blind people being 50 years and older. Meta-analyses have shown that two out of three blind people are women, a gender discrepancy that holds true for both developed and developing countries. Cataract accounts for more than half of all blindness globally and gender inequity in access to cataract surgery is the major cause of the higher prevalence of blindness in women. In addition to gender differences in cataract surgical coverage, population-based studies on the prevalence of lens opacities indicate that women have a higher risk of developing cataract. Laboratory as well as epidemiologic studies suggest that estrogen may confer antioxidative protection against cataractogenesis, but the withdrawal effect of estrogen in menopause leads to increased risk of cataract in women. For the other major age-related eye diseases; glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, data are inconclusive. Due to anatomic factors, angle closure glaucoma is more common in women, whereas the dominating glaucoma type; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), is more prevalent in men. Diabetic retinopathy also has a male predominance and vascular/circulatory factors have been implied both in diabetic retinopathy and in POAG. For AMD, data on gender differences are conflicting although some studies indicate increased prevalence of drusen and neovascular AMD in women. To conclude, both biologic and socioeconomic factors must be considered when investigating causes of gender differences in the prevalence of age-related eye disease.

  5. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  6. Machine learning based detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yaonan; Yao, Zhaomin; Zhao, Ruixue; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Non-lethal macular diseases greatly impact patients' life quality, and will cause vision loss at the late stages. Visual inspection of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images by the experienced clinicians is the main diagnosis technique. We proposed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) model to discriminate age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) and healthy macula. The linear configuration pattern (LCP) based features of the OCT images were screened by the Correlation-based Feature Subset (CFS) selection algorithm. And the best model based on the sequential minimal optimization (SMO) algorithm achieved 99.3% in the overall accuracy for the three classes of samples.

  7. Machine learning based detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yaonan; Yao, Zhaomin; Zhao, Ruixue; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Non-lethal macular diseases greatly impact patients’ life quality, and will cause vision loss at the late stages. Visual inspection of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images by the experienced clinicians is the main diagnosis technique. We proposed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) model to discriminate age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) and healthy macula. The linear configuration pattern (LCP) based features of the OCT images were screened by the Correlation-based Feature Subset (CFS) selection algorithm. And the best model based on the sequential minimal optimization (SMO) algorithm achieved 99.3% in the overall accuracy for the three classes of samples. PMID:28018716

  8. Scotopic Microperimetry in the Early Diagnosis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recent clinical studies have shown that, in some degenerative retinal diseases, like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the sensitivity of the rods decreases more rapidly than the sensitivity of the cones. The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is a correlation between the presence of hard drusen at the macular level and the rod damage responsible for the reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity in subjects at risk for AMD. Methods. The authors selected 24 subjects (14 men and 10 women) with an average age of 67.25 ± 5.7 years. Macular hard drusen were present in 50% of the subjects at the fundus oculi exam. The researchers evaluated the retinal sensitivity to light in mesopic and scotopic conditions of each subject with an MP-1 scotopic microperimeter (MP-1S). Results. In subjects with hard drusen in the fundus oculi examination, there was a statistically significant reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity, while the mesopic retinal sensitivity was not compromised. Conclusion. This study revealed how the presence of hard drusen at the macular level is associated with a reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity compared to a control group of healthy subjects. Retinal functionality in a scotopic setting examined with MP-1S could be useful in early diagnosis of AMD. PMID:25548774

  9. Measurement of the economic impact of visual impairment from age-related macular degeneration in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hopley, Charles; Carter, Rob; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this report was to: (i) outline the potential value of health economic studies into age-related macular degeneration (AMD); (ii) provide an overview of health economic studies pertinent to AMD; and (iii) outline the basic frame work of cost-of-illness studies (a useful first step in applying economic methods). The detection and management of sensory loss in the elderly plays a key role in the Australian Government's Healthy Ageing Strategy. Age-related macular degeneration is currently the leading cause of blindness in elderly Australians. Although a large proportion of AMD cases remain untreatable, the introduction of photo-dynamic therapy provides a relatively expensive and possibly cost-effective innovation for others. Antioxidant therapy has also been proven effective in reducing progression of early to late disease. The discipline of economics can contribute to an understanding of AMD prevention and treatment through: (i) describing the current burden of disease; (ii) predicting the changes in the burden of disease over time, and (iii) evaluating the efficiency of different interventions. Cost-of-illness studies have been performed in many fields of medicine. Little work, however, has been done on describing the economic impact from AMD. A number of different economic evaluation methods can be used in judging the efficiency of possible interventions to reduce the disease burden of AMD. Although complementary in nature, each has specific uses and limitations. Studies of the economic impact of eye diseases are both feasible and necessary for informed health care decision-making.

  10. Potential role of retinal pigment epithelial lipofuscin accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Katz, Martin L

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment in developed countries. The vision loss associated with AMD is the result of degenerative changes in the central region of the retina called the macula. Maintenance of normal structure and function of the macular retina, and of the remainder of the retina as well, is critically dependent on the supporting role of the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Impairment of normal RPE functions is known to result in retinal degeneration and loss of visual function. Thus, it has been hypothesized that the retinal degeneration that characterizes AMD is secondary to age-related deterioration in RPE support functions. Like many other postmitotic cell types, the RPE accumulates autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies (lipofuscin) during senescence. In human eyes, lipofuscin comes to occupy a substantial fraction of the RPE cytoplasmic volume in the elderly. Does this lipofuscin accumulation contribute to the development of AMD? This question is a specific case of the broader question of whether lipofuscin accumulation in general is detrimental to cells. Unfortunately, definitive data do not exist to allow these questions to be answered. Although a correlation between RPE lipofuscin content and AMD has been reported, a cause-and-effect relationship between RPE lipofuscin accumulation and the development of this disease has not been established. It has been reported that a mutation in a gene encoding a photoreceptor-specific protein results in massive RPE lipofuscin accumulation and early-onset macular degeneration. However, again the accelerated RPE lipofuscin accumulation has not been shown to be the cause of the accompanying macular degeneration. The lack of a definitive link between RPE lipofuscin accumulation and AMD illustrates one of the biggest challenges remaining in lipofuscin research-determining whether lipofuscin accumulation per se has an impact on cell function.

  11. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for the treatment of Age-related Macular Degeneration--Evaluation of WO2012079419

    PubMed Central

    Cunnusamy, Khrishen

    2013-01-01

    A pharmaceutical composition composed of several traditional Chinese medicines is claimed to treat Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This represents a novel and alternative therapeutic solution for wet AMD, with the potential advantage of treating both the symptoms and the underlying causes of this devastating degenerative retinal disease. PMID:23215532

  12. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  13. Relationship between macular pigment and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, John M; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Beatty, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between macular pigment (MP) and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods 121 subjects with early AMD enrolled as part of the Central Retinal Enrichment Supplementation Trial (CREST; ISRCTN13894787) were assessed using a range of psychophysical measures of visual function, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), letter contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic CS, mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD), photostress recovery time (PRT), reading performance and subjective visual function, using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI VFQ-25). MP was measured using customised heterochromatic flicker photometry. Results Letter CS, mesopic and photopic CS, photopic GD and mean reading speed were each significantly (p<0.05) associated with MP across a range of retinal eccentricities, and these statistically significant relationships persisted after controlling for age, sex and cataract grade. BCVA, NEI VFQ-25 score, PRT and mesopic GD were unrelated to MP after controlling for age, sex and cataract grade (p>0.05, for all). Conclusions MP relates positively to many measures of visual function in unsupplemented subjects with early AMD. The CREST trial will investigate whether enrichment of MP influences visual function among those afflicted with this condition. Trial registration number ISRCTN13894787. PMID:27091854

  14. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies suggest that DME, DR and AMD are inflammatory conditions characterized by a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, inflammatory processes and an increase in vascular permeability. Key factors that seem to have a dominant role in DME, DR and AMD are angiotensin II, prostaglandins and the vascular endothelial growth factor and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory bioactive lipids. The imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids and enhanced production of pro-angiogenic factors may initiate the onset and progression of DME, DR and AMD. This implies that bioactive lipids that possess anti-inflammatory actions and suppress the production of angiogenic factors could be employed in the prevention and management of DME, DR and AMD. PMID:27695506

  15. Gene therapy in age related macular degeneration and hereditary macular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Kati; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo

    2012-06-01

    In ophthalmology, administration of the therapeutic agent can be difficult due to the tight barriers in the eye. Multiple injections may be needed to allow the therapeutic agent to reach adequate levels in retina and choroidea which may increase the risk of complications including endophthalmitis, cataract and haemorrhages. Optimal methods for the delivery of therapeutic agents to the posterior segments of the eye have not yet been developed. Gene therapy offers an alternative where the therapeutic protein or proteins can be induced in the target tissue for a prolonged period of time after a single injection. The eye is a promising target for gene therapy due to its small size and tissue boundaries preventing leakage of the therapeutic material to other tissues or systemic circulation. However, most of the work in ocular gene therapy is still at the preclinical phase; only three vectors have reached phase 1/2 clinical trials. This review summarizes basic principles and current status of gene therapy in age related macular degeneration and hereditary macular disorders.

  16. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies suggest that DME, DR and AMD are inflammatory conditions characterized by a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, inflammatory processes and an increase in vascular permeability. Key factors that seem to have a dominant role in DME, DR and AMD are angiotensin II, prostaglandins and the vascular endothelial growth factor and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory bioactive lipids. The imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids and enhanced production of pro-angiogenic factors may initiate the onset and progression of DME, DR and AMD. This implies that bioactive lipids that possess anti-inflammatory actions and suppress the production of angiogenic factors could be employed in the prevention and management of DME, DR and AMD.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography and the Development of Antiangiogenic Therapies in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explain the pivotal role optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging had in the development of antiangiogenic therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD). Methods A historical literature review was combined with personal perspectives from the introduction of OCT imaging and the early clinical use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Results At the time that OCT emerged, the gold standard for imaging of nvAMD was fluorescein angiography (FA), a time-consuming, dye-based, invasive technique that provided en face images of the retina and was used to characterize leakage, perfusion status, and the types of macular neovascularization (MNV). In comparison, OCT imaging was a fast, safe, noninvasive technique that complemented FA imaging by providing cross-sectional images of the macula. OCT was able to visualize and quantify the macular fluid that was associated with the presence of excess VEGF, which was identified by intraretinal fluid, subretinal fluid, and fluid under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Clinicians quickly appreciated the benefits of OCT imaging for following macular fluid after anti-VEGF therapy. By observing the qualitative and quantitative changes in macular fluid depicted by OCT imaging, clinicians were empowered to compare anti-VEGF drugs and move from fixed-dosing regimens to patient-specific dosing strategies requiring fewer injections. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography imaging was adopted as a VEGF-meter, a method to detect excess VEGF, and evolved to become the gold standard imaging strategy for diagnosing nvAMD, assessing treatment responses to anti-VEGF drugs, deciding when to re-treat, and evaluating disease progression. PMID:27409464

  18. A genetic approach to stratification of risk for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanke, Brent; Hawken, Steven; Carter, Ronald; Chow, David

    2010-02-01

    The genetic determinants of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are reviewed and a novel approach to risk determination based upon inherited genetic polymorphisms and smoking history is presented. Although AMD was long thought to have primarily an environmental etiology, genetic variation is now known to account for the majority of the disease risk, with variations in the genes of the complement pathways playing a prominent role. Independent and validated clinical studies have implicated the C3 gene and its regulator, complement factor H (1q31.1), complement component 2 (6q21.33), and complement factor B (6q21.33). Subtle variations in complement activity increase the risk of symptomatic macular inflammation with age. A second group of AMD-associated genetic markers may aggravate complement-mediated inflammation by permitting retinal oxidative damage. Variation within the chromosomal site (10q26) coding a mitochondrial-associated protein (age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2) and an independent variation within the mitochondrial genome itself (A4917G) suggest a contributing pathophysiological role of retinal oxidative stress. A genetic panel of disease-susceptibility markers and smoking history can identify a group of individuals with greater than 65% lifetime risk of AMD. The introduction of genetic marker testing into clinical practice may identify patients with early disease who may be aided by presymptomatic monitoring or inclusion into trials of newer prophylactic agents.

  19. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study to the Epidemiology of Cataract, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juan; Cho, Eunyoung; Ogata, Soshiro; Jacques, Paul; Taylor, Allen; Chiu, Chung-Jung; Wiggs, Janey L.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to understanding the genetic and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHS has helped to elucidate the roles of genetics, lifestyle factors (e.g., cigarette smoking associated with cataract extraction and age-related macular degeneration), medical conditions (e.g., diabetes associated with cataract extraction and glaucoma), and dietary factors (e.g., greater carotenoid intake and lower glycemic diet associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration) in the etiology of degree and progression of lens opacities, cataract extraction, age-related macular degeneration, primary open-angle glaucoma, and exfoliation glaucoma. Conclusions. The findings from the NHS, combined with those of other studies, have provided compelling evidence to support public health recommendations for helping to prevent age-related eye diseases: abstinence from cigarette smoking, maintenance of healthy weight and diabetes prevention, and a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables. PMID:27459452

  20. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative. PMID:23820727

  1. Treatment of dry age-related macular degeneration with dobesilate

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Angulo, J; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2012-01-01

    The authors present anatomical and functional evidences of dry age-macular degeneration improvement, after intravitreal treatment with dobesilate. Main outcomes measures were normalisation of retinal structure and function, assessed by optical coherence tomography, fundus-monitored microperimetry, electrophysiology and visual acuity. The effect might be related to the normalisation of the outer retinal architecture. PMID:22729337

  2. Pharmacogenetics of antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapies of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Elisa; Lazzeri, Stefano; Orlandi, Paola; Figus, Michele; Fioravanti, Anna; Di Desidero, Teresa; Sartini, Maria Sole; Nardi, Marco; Danesi, Romano; Bocci, Guido

    2012-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common age-related disease causing irreversible visual loss in industrialized countries, is a complex and multifactorial illness. Researchers have found components of the complement alternative pathway inside drusen and Bruch's membrane of AMD patients, underlying a possible important role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of AMD. The neovascular (wet) AMD is the most destructive form and it is characterized by invasion of new blood vessels into subretinal spaces with subsequent exudation and bleeding, resulting in scarring of the macular region and loss of the central vision. The hallmark of the neovascular form is the choroidal neovascularization, where VEGF-A has an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. SNPs of these genes have recently been investigated as potential pharmacogenetic markers of the antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapy of AMD, which includes verteporfin photodynamic therapy and anti-VEGF-A drugs, such as pegaptanib, bevacizumab and ranibizumab. The CFH rs1061170 CT and TT genotypes have been associated with an improvement of visual acuity in bevacizumab or ranibizumab treated patients, whereas patients harboring VEGF-A rs699946 G allele responded better to bevacizumab-based therapy if compared with patients carrying the A allele. In conclusion, the discovery of pharmacogenetic markers for the personalization of the antiangiogenic and/or antineovascular therapy could be, in the future, a key issue in ophthalmology to obtain a personalization of the therapy and to avoid unnecessary costs and adverse drug reactions.

  3. Exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Robman, Luba; Mahdi, Olaimatu; McCarty, Catherine; Dimitrov, Peter; Tikellis, Gabriella; McNeil, John; Byrne, Gerald; Taylor, Hugh; Guymer, Robyn

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies have found an association between exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To assess a potential risk of AMD progression posed by exposure to C. pneumoniae, the authors reexamined Australian residents in 2001-2002 who were aged 51-89 years with early AMD at baseline (1992-1995). Examination included macular photography and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine antibody titers to the elementary bodies from C. pneumoniae AR39. AMD progression was assessed quantitatively, using both coarse and fine progression steps following an international classification for AMD grading, and also qualitatively, by side-by-side comparison of baseline and follow-up macular photographs. Serologic data were available for 246 of 254 (97%) subjects. AMD progression was associated with a higher antibody titer. After adjustment for age, smoking, family history of AMD, history of cardiovascular diseases, and source study, the subjects in the upper tertiles of antibody titers were 2.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.92, 4.69), 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.24, 5.41), and 3.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.46, 6.37) times more at risk of progression than those in the lowest tertile, using three definitions of progression, respectively. The fact that seroreactivity to C. pneumoniae was independently associated with the risk of AMD progression suggests that C. pneumoniae infection may be an additional risk factor for AMD progression.

  4. Effect of topical isopropyl unoprostone on macular atrophy progression in eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shiragami, Chieko; Miyake, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Morizane, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yamashita, Ayana; Shiraga, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical isopropyl unoprostone (IU) in treating macular atrophy in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Methods: Fifty-two AMD patients with macular atrophy were included and randomly assigned (1:1) to the treatment (topical 0.15% IU) or placebo group. Subjects used study eye drops 3 times a day for 54 weeks. The macular atrophy was documented on fundus autofluorescence photographs and measured using RegionFinder. The enlargement rate of macular atrophy and the changes in visual acuity were examined statistically between baseline and 54 weeks. Results: Forty-eight subjects were included in the analyses because 4 subjects withdrew from the study. The differences between the IU and placebo groups in mean and median area of macular atrophy were not statistically significant at baseline. The baseline median lesion size of macular atrophy was 2.33 mm2 in the IU group and 1.63 mm2 in the placebo group (P = 0.51). The intergroup difference in the enlargement ratio of macular atrophy (21 ± 15% in the IU group and 111 ± 96% in the placebo group) was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, visual acuity tended to improve over baseline in the IU group. No serious adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Topical IU therapy is safe and effective for treating macular atrophy in AMD patients. PMID:28328847

  5. Unfolding the Therapeutic Potential of Chemical Chaperones for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Theodor; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao; Tuo, Jingsheng

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies suggest that pathological processes involved in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) might induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of chemical chaperones to decrease ER stress and ameliorate ER stress-related disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for AMD. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for ER stress in AMD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of ER stress-associated diseases, including other neurodegenerative diseases and retinopathies. Finally, we examine strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human disease. PMID:18528533

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a primary pathogenic mechanism leading to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Libby, Richard T; Gould, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multi-factorial disease and a leading cause of blindness. Proteomic and genetic data suggest that activation or de-repression of the alternate complement cascade of innate immunity is involved in end-stage disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that production of reactive oxygen species and chronic oxidative stress lead to protein and lipid modifications that initiate the complement cascade. Understanding the triggers of these pathogenic pathways and the site of the primary insult will be important for development of targeted therapeutics. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress from misfolded mutant proteins and other sources are an important potential tributary mechanism. We propose that misfolded-protein-induced ER stress in the retinal-pigmented epithelium and/or choroid could lead to chronic oxidative stress, complement deregulation and AMD. Small molecules targeted to ER stress and oxidative stress could allow for a shift from disease treatment to disease prevention.

  7. Genetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Concepts, Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Carr, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive degenerative disease which leads to blindness, affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. More than 1.75 million individuals in the United States are affected by the advanced form of AMD. The etiological pathway of AMD is not yet fully understood, but there is a clear genetic influence on disease risk. To date, the 1q32 (CFH) and 10q26 (PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1) loci are the most strongly associated with disease; however, the variation in these genomic regions alone is unable to predict disease development with high accuracy. Therefore, current genetic studies are aimed at identifying new genes associated with AMD and their modifiers, with the goal of discovering diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Moreover, these studies provide the foundation for further investigation into the pathophysiology of AMD by utilizing a systems-biology-based approach to elucidate underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:21609220

  8. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Fong, Angie H C; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2013-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, monoclonal antibody fragment against all isoforms of VEGF-A, has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD has been demonstrated in the ANCHOR and MARINA trials. Further studies including the PIER, PrONTO, and SUSTAIN trials have also evaluated the optimal dosing regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD. The CATT and IVAN trials compared the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab with off-label use of bevacizumab. Studies such as SUSTAIN and HORIZON have shown that ranibizumab has a good safety profile and is well tolerated for over 4 years with very few serious ocular and systemic adverse events. For DME, Phase II RESOLVE study and Phase III RISE and RIDE studies have demonstrated superiority of ranibizumab treatment in improving vision over placebo controls. Phase II READ and Phase III RESOLVE and REVEAL studies have shown that ranibizumab is more effective both as monotherapy and in combination with laser compared with laser monotherapy. The 3-year results from the DRCRnet protocol I study found that ranibizumab with deferred laser resulted in better long-term visual outcome compared with ranibizumab with prompt laser. This review summarizes various important clinical trials on the long-term efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The pharmacological properties of ranibizumab, its cost effectiveness, and impact on quality of life will also be discussed.

  9. Aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Salman; Clearfield, Elizabeth; Soliman, Mohamed Kamel; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Baldwin, Andrew J; Hanout, Mostafa; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Central vision loss caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in developed countries. Neovascular AMD is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Growth of new blood vessels in patients with neovascular AMD is driven by a complex process that involves a signal protein called vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). Anti-VEGF drugs that block this protein include ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. Objectives To assess and compare the effectiveness and safety of intravitreal injections of aflibercept versus ranibizumab, bevacizumab, or sham for treatment of patients with neovascular AMD. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (Issue 11, 2015), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2015), PubMed (1948 to November 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to November 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) (last searched December 4, 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on November 30, 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which aflibercept monotherapy was compared with ranibizumab, bevacizumab, or sham for participants with neovascular AMD who were treatment-naive. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration for screening, data abstraction, and study assessment. Two review authors

  10. Age-related macular degeneration: a guide for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Hazin, Ribhi; Freeman, P David; Kahook, Malik Y

    2009-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual loss in Americans over the age of 50 years. AMD often results in profound disability due to the disease destroying the macula, the part of the retina responsible for central visual acuity and color vision. Risk factors for AMD include age greater than 50, female gender, Caucasian race, cigarette smoking, and family history of AMD. African Americans and other racial or ethnic groups can be affected by AMD. Although there is no cure for AMD, early diagnosis and treatment may slow disease progression and minimize irreversible visual dysfunction. Individuals suffering from central vision loss from AMD often retain peripheral vision. These affected individuals can benefit from low vision therapy, visual rehabilitation, or both to maintain or enhance activities of daily living.

  11. Emerging roles for nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Goldis; Lad, Eleonora M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly in the Western world. Over the last 30 years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has grown exponentially thanks to the results of countless epidemiology, genetic, histo-logical, and biochemical studies. This information, in turn, has led to the identification of multiple biologic pathways potentially involved in development and progression of AMD, including but not limited to inflammation, lipid and extracellular matrix dysregulation, and angiogenesis. Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors that have been shown to regulate many of the pathogenic pathways linked with AMD and as such they are emerging as promising targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will present the fundamental phenotypic features of AMD and discuss our current understanding of the pathobiological disease mechanisms. We will introduce the nuclear receptor superfamily and discuss the current literature on their effects on AMD-related pathophysiology. PMID:25156067

  12. Age-related macular degeneration-clinical review and genetics update.

    PubMed

    Ratnapriya, R; Chew, E Y

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision impairment in persons over the age of 50 years in developed countries. Both genetic and non-genetic (environmental) factors play major roles in AMD etiology, and multiple gene variants and lifestyle factors such as smoking have been associated with the disease. While dissecting the basic etiology of the disease remains a major challenge, current genetic knowledge has provided opportunities for improved risk assessment, molecular diagnosis and clinical testing of genetic variants in AMD treatment and management. This review addresses the potential of translating the wealth of genetic findings for improved risk prediction and therapeutic intervention in AMD patients. Finally, we discuss the recent advancement in genetics and genomics and the future prospective of personalized medicine in AMD patients.

  13. Autophagy regulating kinases as potential therapeutic targets for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero

    2012-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly in the developed countries. The number of AMD patients will double during the next decades due to increasing number of aged people. Chronic oxidative stress, inflammation and accumulation of protein-rich deposits both in the retinal pigment epithelium lysosomes and under the retinal pigment epithelium herald the onset of AMD. The disease can be divided into dry and wet AMD forms. The dry form of the disease is more prevalent accounting for up to 90% of all cases. Continued intraocular injections are the current treatment strategy to prevent progression of wet AMD. It is a major challenge to develop new drugs that could prevent or at least ease the symptoms of the increasing population of AMD patients. Since AMD pathology is clearly associated with accumulated protein deposits, the autophagy clearance system might represent a potential future therapeutic target for AMD as is thoroughly discussed here.

  14. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machalińska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology.

  15. The role of anti-inflammatory agents in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Wang, V M; Chan, C-C

    2011-01-01

    Although age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not a classic inflammatory disease like uveitis, inflammation has been found to have an important role in disease pathogenesis and progression. Innate immunity and autoimmune components, such as complement factors, chemokines, cytokines, macrophages, and ocular microglia, are believed to be heavily involved in AMD development. Targeting these specific inflammatory molecules has recently been explored in an attempt to better understand and treat AMD. Although antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy is the first line of defence against neovascular AMD, anti-inflammatory agents such as corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), immunosuppressive agents (eg, methotrexate and rapamycin), and biologics (eg, infliximab, daclizumab, and complement inhibitors) may provide an adjunct or alternative mechanism to suppress the inflammatory processes driving AMD progression. Further investigation is required to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of these drugs for both neovascular and non-neovascular AMD. PMID:21183941

  16. Vision rehabilitation for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, W

    1999-01-01

    Though the numbers of patients with ARMD are high, associated referrals for vision rehabilitation are not. Practitioners need to refer patients with age-related maculopathy when medical and surgical treatment are no longer possible, and patients need to be educated to that fact. The impact of improving activities of daily living may be monumental and benefits society as a whole. People who are visually impaired are often ill-prepared to deal with the substantial adjustment involved, further stressing their entire support system. It may not be safe for visual and systemic reasons for older adults to cook, clean, and maintain their home. Poor vision contributes to the already increased risk of falls and subsequent fractures in these patients. Individuals who may have already been told they can no longer drive now face the possibility of being unable to live in their houses. Their independence may be threatened dramatically and abruptly. All these circumstances contribute to anxiety and depression. Patients with ARMD need to be educated about their disease process (teaching that can never be assumed to have been initiated). They need to be educated that they will not go completely blind and that, with assistance, they can accomplish a great deal. With today's technology, it is not difficult to help visually impaired individuals with ARMD, unless they are not referred or lack motivation. The primary complaint of an individual with ARMD is recognition of central detail. This affects all activities of daily living, and patient performance is subject to the duration and severity of the disease (including the size, density, and location of the central scotoma) and to their understanding of the disease. Rubin and coworkers, found that slow reading performance of patients with a dense central scotoma might reflect inherent limitations of peripheral retina for complex visual tasks. ARMD in most cases lends itself to magnification that enlarges the object beyond the blind spot

  17. New pharmacologic approaches to therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Eter, Nicole; Krohne, Tim U; Holz, Frank G

    2006-01-01

    As a result of a better understanding of molecular mechanisms, a variety of new pharmacologic treatments have recently been developed for patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Efficacy and tolerability have been demonstrated for drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key player in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization. Both pegaptanib (anti-VEGF aptamer) and ranibizumab (anti-VEGF antibody fragment), applied at 4- to 6-week intervals into the vitreous, modified the natural course of the disease in phase III clinical studies. Corticosteroids with anti-angiogenic properties also represent a treatment option for wet AMD. Both intravitreal triamcinolone and anecortave acetate, administered juxtasclerally, are currently being pursued. The combination of different treatment strategies and potential synergistic effects offers new perspectives. While photodynamic therapy (PDT) combined with intravitreal triamcinolone is already frequently applied, other combinations (e.g. anti-VEGF drugs with PDT or antifibrotic agents) appear to be attractive alternatives. Pigment epithelium-derived factor represents another potential target, as well as inhibitors of matrix-metallo-proteinases. With the advent of gene therapy, the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is also on the horizon. Prophylactic measures are still limited. The combination of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc as used in the AREDS (Age-Related Eye Disease Study) reduces risk for conversion from early- to late-stage disease in patients with high-risk features, at least to some extent. Lutein and zeaxanthin dietary supplements for improvement of macular pigment density need to be investigated in future longitudinal trials.

  18. Bmp6 Regulates Retinal Iron Homeostasis and Has Altered Expression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Song, Ying; Wolkow, Natalie; Iacovelli, Jared; Kautz, Leon; Roth, Marie-Paule; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2011-01-01

    Iron-induced oxidative stress causes hereditary macular degeneration in patients with aceruloplasminemia. Similarly, retinal iron accumulation in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may exacerbate the disease. The cause of retinal iron accumulation in AMD is poorly understood. Given that bone morphogenetic protein 6 (Bmp6) is a major regulator of systemic iron, we examined the role of Bmp6 in retinal iron regulation and in AMD pathogenesis. Bmp6 was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a major site of pathology in AMD. In cultured RPE cells, Bmp6 was down-regulated by oxidative stress and up-regulated by iron. Intraocular Bmp6 protein injection in mice up-regulated retinal hepcidin, an iron regulatory hormone, and altered retinal labile iron levels. Bmp6−/− mice had age-dependent retinal iron accumulation and degeneration. Postmortem RPE from patients with early AMD exhibited decreased Bmp6 levels. Because oxidative stress is associated with AMD pathogenesis and down-regulates Bmp6 in cultured RPE cells, the diminished Bmp6 levels observed in RPE cells in early AMD may contribute to iron build-up in AMD. This may in turn propagate a vicious cycle of oxidative stress and iron accumulation, exacerbating AMD and other diseases with hereditary or acquired iron excess. PMID:21703414

  19. Interaction of Complement Factor H and Fibulin3 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, M. Keith; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Mishra, Sanghamitra; Campos, Maria; Jaworski, Cynthia; Fariss, Robert N.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Wistow, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen) in Bruch’s membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A sequence variant (Y402H) in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7) of complement factor H (CFH) is associated with risk for “dry” AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3), which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H). This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD. PMID:23840815

  20. Inherited complement regulatory protein deficiency predisposes to human disease in acute injury and chronic inflammatory statesthe examples of vascular damage in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and debris accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Richards, Anna; Kavanagh, David; Atkinson, John P

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we examine the role of complement regulatory activity in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These diseases are representative of two distinct types of complement-mediated injury, one being acute and self-limited, the other reflecting accumulation of chronic damage. Neither condition was previously thought to have a pathologic relationship to the immune system. However, alterations in complement regulatory protein genes have now been identified as major predisposing factors for the development of both diseases. In aHUS, heterozygous mutations leading to haploinsufficiency and function-altering polymorphisms in complement regulators have been identified, while in AMD, polymorphic haplotypes in complement genes are associated with development of disease. The basic premise is that a loss of function in a plasma or membrane inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway allows for excessive activation of complement on the endothelium of the kidney in aHUS and on retinal debris in AMD. These associations have much to teach us about the host's innate immune response to acute injury and to chronic debris deposition. We all experience cellular injury and, if we live long enough, will deposit debris in blood vessel walls (atherosclerosis leading to heart attacks and strokes), the brain (amyloid proteins leading to Alzheimer's disease), and retina (lipofuscin pigments leading to AMD). These are three common causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. The clinical, genetic, and immunopathologic understandings derived from the two examples of aHUS and AMD may illustrate what to anticipate in related conditions. They highlight how a powerful recognition and effector system, the alternative complement pathway, reacts to altered self. A response to acute injury or chronic debris accumulation must be appropriately balanced. In either case, too much activation or too little regulation promotes

  1. The NLRP3 Inflammasome and its Role in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Biswal, Manas R; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Lewin, Alfred S

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among people of 65 years and older in developed countries (Klein and Klein, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 54:7395-7401, 2013). Recent advances in dry AMD research points towards an important role of the inflammatory response in the development of the disease. The presence of inflammatory cells, antibodies, complement factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines in AMD retinas and drusen indicates that the immune system could be an important driving force in dry AMD. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been proposed as an integrator of process associated with AMD and the induction of inflammation. Herein we summarize the most recent studies that attempt to understand the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in AMD.

  2. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  3. [NUTRITIONAL COMPONENTS AND MACULAR DEGENERATION AGE-RELATED].

    PubMed

    García-Montalvo, Iván Antonio; Matías-Pérez, Diana

    2015-04-28

    Objetivo: componentes nutricionales como los antioxidantes pueden modificar el riesgo de padecer Degeneración Macular Relacionada con la Edad (DMRE). Este es un artículo de revisión sistemática de estudios publicados relacionados con la modificación del estilo de vida, la nutrición y la ingesta de vitaminas para prevenir o retrasar la aparición o progresión de la DMRE. Resultados: el análisis de los resultados de investigación consultados pone de manifiesto que la DMRE es una de las causas de ceguera más frecuentes en sujetos mayores de 55 años. La DMRE se caracteriza por disminución de la visión, metamorfosias, macropsias, micropsias y escotoma central. Es una enfermedad que debe ser diagnosticada a tiempo, ya que puede conducir a la ceguera irreversible. Entre los componentes de la dieta que en numerosos estudios epidemiológicos han mostrado una asociación inversa con la DMRE y que se revisan en este trabajo se encuentran: vitaminas (E y C), minerales (ej. zinc, selenio, manganeso y cobre) y carotenoides. Conclusiones: existe una evidencia importante de que puede aplicarse un soporte nutricional a pacientes con DMRE. Esto requiere de la determinación de los beneficios nutricionales de estos nutrientes (vitaminas, minerales y carotenoides), o bien de alimentos nutracéuticos en pro de la salud de este grupo de enfermos.

  4. Mechanistically linking age-related diseases and dietary carbohydrate via autophagy and the ubiquitin proteolytic systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological data indicate that consuming diets that deliver sugar to the blood rapidly (called high glycemic index, GI) is associated with enhanced risk for age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These debilities...

  5. Investigating mitochondria as a target for treating age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Terluk, Marcia R; Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Soukup, Lauren M; Gong, Hwee; Gallardo, Christopher; Montezuma, Sandra R; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2015-05-06

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. Although the pathological mechanisms have not been definitively elucidated, evidence suggests a key role for mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction. The current study used our unique collection of human retinal samples graded for the donor's stage of AMD to address fundamental questions about mtDNA damage in the retina. To evaluate the distribution of mtDNA damage in the diseased retina, damage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina from individual donors were compared. To directly test a long-held belief that the macula is selectively damaged with AMD, RPE mtDNA damage was measured in the macula and peripheral sections from individual donors. Small segments of the entire mt genome were examined to determine whether specific regions are preferentially damaged. Our results show that mtDNA damage is limited to the RPE, equivalent mtDNA damage is found in the macular and peripheral RPE, and sites of damage are localized to regions of the mt genome that may impact mt function. These results provide a scientific basis for targeting the RPE mitochondria with therapies that protect and enhance mt function as a strategy for combating AMD.

  6. Association of EFEMP1 with malattia leventinese and age-related macular degeneration: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, Lihua

    2004-09-01

    Malattia leventinese (ML) or Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (DHRD) was the first clinically and histopathologically described Mendelian maculopathy. The gene responsible for ML/DHRD, EFEMPI (fibulin-3/SI-5/FBNL) encodes a member of the fibulin family, a newly recognized family of extracellular matrix proteins. EFEMPImutations have not been found in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients despite the close phenotypic similarities between ML/DHRD and AMD. This non-correlating genotype/phenotype relationship between inherited and age-related conditions is typical for common age-related diseases. Biochemical pathways delineated in other diseases indicate that the gene associated with the inherited condition is nonetheless critical in age-related forms. This review summarizes current knowledge relating to ML/DHRD and EFEMPI,with discussion of why EFEMPI mutations are absent in AMD and how EFEMPI may be involved in the pathogenesis of ML/DHRD and AMD.

  7. Effects of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection on Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Collett, Geoffrey; Lopez, Natalia; Lopez, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Our patient, in the 7th decade of life, presented with worsening blurry vision over 3 weeks. The pertinent history included nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, recent pulmonary mycobacterial infection, and autoimmune pancreatitis. The patient had decreased visual acuity in both eyes; the remaining findings of our examination were relatively benign. The diagnosis of bilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration was aided by ocular imaging. Not only were exudative changes confirmed, but one modality suggested an underlying occult choroiditis, which presumably fueled a local inflammatory drive leading to evolution of the disease. Given the choroiditis developed in the setting of a recent Mycobacterium chelonae infection, dissemination of the organism must be considered a potential culprit. Additionally, a chronic inflammatory state perhaps played a simultaneous immunologic role. We feel the proposed pathogenic mechanism outlined sufficiently accounts for the rare event, that is, development of subacute bilateral exudative maculopathy. The patient responded well to bilateral intravitreal aflibercept injections. After 1 month, visual acuity was found to be near baseline and ocular imaging showed significant resolution of the exudative changes. An additional follow-up 3 months after confirmed similar stability. This case required thorough investigation of seemingly unrelated components within the patient's history. We stress the importance of obtaining appropriate documentation from fellow health care teams when suspicious clinical presentations arise. During our investigation, we identified cryptic retinal lesions by way of angiography - leading us to recommend usage of such methods in complex cases. We also summarize the implemented aflibercept course and the favorable response to such treatment.

  8. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Buschini, Elisa; Fea, Antonio M; Lavia, Carlo A; Nassisi, Marco; Pignata, Giulia; Zola, Marta; Grignolo, Federico M

    2015-01-01

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%), dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper) on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6) are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1) reduce or block drusen formation, 2) reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3) lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4) reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5) improve choroidal perfusion, 6) replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7) develop a target gene therapy. PMID:25878491

  9. Physics of Lipofuscin Formation and Growth in Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the RPE in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results to the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration. )

  10. Higher Irradiance and Photodynamic Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joan W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using verteporfin was the first pharmacologic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and changed the treatment paradigm for a major, blinding disease. The experimental work in the nonhuman primate was essential in developing treatment parameters for verteporfin PDT that could successfully occlude choroidal neovascularization with limited injury to the neural retina. Early in the preclinical primate studies, we hypothesized that higher irradiances could be used for ocular PDT than had been used in dermatology and other applications, which typically utilized an irradiance of 150 to 200 mW/cm2. We set out to test the feasibility of irradiances up to 1800 mW/cm2. Methods PDT was applied to normal monkey eyes using verteporfin/benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) (2 mg/kg) mixed with low-density lipoprotein in DMSO, and 692-nm light, with a spot size 1250μm, fluence approximately 50 J/cm2, and irradiance varying from 150 (treatment time, 6 minutes) to 1800 mW/cm2 (treatment time, 30 seconds). Photocoagulation lesions were applied using 514-nm and 692-nm laser light without drug, with irradiance of 18,750 to 200,000 mW/cm2 and spot size of 500 μm. Treatment effect was evaluated by fundus photography, angiography, and light and electron microscopy with collagen denaturation as a marker of thermal injury. Results Verteporfin/BPD PDT at irradiances of 150 to 1800 mW/cm2 showed no collagen denaturation in contrast to photocoagulation lesions without dye (irradiance 10-fold and higher). Conclusions Verteporfin PDT could safely be performed at higher irradiances, permitting a clinically practical therapy. Ultimately, clinical trials demonstrated that verteporfin PDT could limit moderate vision loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Although anti-VEGF therapy has replaced PDT as a first-line therapy, PDT may still have a role, perhaps in combination therapies. Further investigations to optimize drug delivery and

  11. A RANDOMIZED PILOT STUDY OF SYSTEMIC IMMUNOSUPPRESSION IN THE TREATMENT OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION WITH CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Byrnes, Gordon; Sen, H. Nida; Yeh, Steven; Faia, Lisa; Meyerle, Catherine; Wroblewski, Keith; Li, Zhuqing; Liu, Baoying; Chew, Emily; Sherry, Patti R.; Friedman, Penelope; Ferris, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration remains the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and the developed world. Intravitreal injections of anti–vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) medications have become standard of care for the treatment of the wet form of the disease. Recent reports have demonstrated an association with various immune factors. We aimed to investigate the effect of immunosuppressive therapy in the clinical course of the wet form of the disease. We compared anti-VEGF therapy plus one of three systemic immunosuppressive therapies versus anti-VEGF therapy alone for recurrent choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration. Methods This was a pilot, Phase I/II, prospective, randomized, unmasked, single-center trial. Patients with subretinal exudation secondary to recurrent choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration were included in the study. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 systemic arms immunosuppressive agents (daclizumab, rapamycin, or infliximab) for 6 months plus intraocular anti-VEGF therapy if indicated, compared with a group who received only anti-VEGF therapy if indicated. Results The number of anti-VEGF injections per group, visual acuity, retinal thickness, and safety measures were assessed in all groups. Thirteen patients were randomized; comparing anti-VEGF injections before and during the study, a decrease in the number of injections from 0.73 injections per month to 0.42 for daclizumab and from 0.67 to 0.34 for sirolimus was seen, while no apparent decrease was seen for either infliximab or observation. Visual acuities were maintained in all groups. Conclusion These preliminary data suggest that some immunosuppressive agents given systemically can alter the clinical course of the wet form of the disease and support the notion that more definitive clinical trials of immune mediation of age-related macular degeneration are indicated

  12. Protect Your Eyes: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Facts and Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    PROTECT YOUR EYES Age-Related Macular Degeneration ( AMD ) FACTS & PREVENTION TIPS A LEADING CAUSE OF VISION LOSS IN THE U.S . AMD is a ... Black 2% Other 89% White As the population ages, the number of cases is expected to increase ...

  13. Diminishing risk for age related macular degeneration with nutrition: A current view

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies because they are more affordable...

  14. Introduction to the issue regarding research regarding age related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blindness is the second greatest fear among the elderly. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly in most industrialized nations. AMD first compromises central high acuity vision. Subsequently, all vision may be lost. AMD is a progressive retinal d...

  15. The Psychosocial Impact of Closed-Circuit Televisions on Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica G.; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Strong, J. Graham; Plotkin, Ann D.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-circuit televisions (CCTVs) are used by many elderly people who have age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The functional vision of 68 participants, which was measured immediately after they adopted CCTVs, suggested successful outcomes, but the psychosocial impact of the use of CCTVs did not peak until a month later. The findings help…

  16. A Qualitative Analysis of Reading Rehabilitation of Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feely, Mary; Vetere, Arlene; Myers, Lynn B.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most prevalent visual impairments of people aged 60 and older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which ranks third globally as a cause of visual impairment (World Health Organization, 2006). The purpose of this study was to conduct a tentative subjective assessment of eccentric viewing by persons with AMD. The authors recruited…

  17. Lighting Needs and Lighting Comfort During Reading with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosse, Per; Valberg, Arne

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of changes in luminance on the oral reading speeds of 13 participants with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and a control group of six age-matched persons with typical vision. For the AMD participants, self-reports of light preferences were also recorded. In the AMD group, reading rates depended on light…

  18. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its high concentration in the retina and role as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review of studies that investigated dietary inta...

  19. Psychosocial Intervention for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Hans-Werner; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Becker, Stefanie; Kaspar, Roman; Himmelsbach, Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated an emotion-focused and a problem-focused intervention designed for patients with age-related macular degeneration. It found a limited decrease in depression in the emotion-focused group and an increase in active problem orientation and in adaptation to vision loss in the problem-focused group.

  20. CYP4F2 (rs2108622) Gene Polymorphism Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kriauciuniene, Loresa; Balciuniene, Vilma Jurate; Buteikiene, Dovile; Miniauskiene, Goda; Liutkeviciene, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in elderly individuals where aetiology and pathophysiology of age-related macular degeneration are not absolutely clear. Purpose. To determine the frequency of the genotype of rs2108622 in patients with early and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Methods. The study enrolled 190 patients with early age-related macular degeneration, 181 patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (eAMD), and a random sample of 210 subjects from the general population (control group). The genotyping of rs2108622 was carried out using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Results. The analysis of rs2108622 gene polymorphism did not reveal any differences in the distribution of C/C, C/T, and T/T genotypes between the early AMD group, the eAMD group, and the control group. The CYP4F2 (1347C>T) T/T genotype was more frequent in males with eAMD compared to females (10.2% versus 0.8%; p = 0.0052); also T/T genotype was less frequently present in eAMD females compared to healthy control females (0.8% versus 6.2%; p = 0.027). Conclusion. Rs2108622 gene polymorphism had no predominant effect on the development of early AMD and eAMD. The T/T genotype was more frequent in males with eAMD compared to females and less frequently present in eAMD females compared to healthy females. PMID:27652291

  1. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M E A Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future.

  2. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M. E. A. Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  3. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--Novel targets for designing treatment options?

    PubMed

    Grassmann, Felix; Fauser, Sascha; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the central retina and the main cause of legal blindness in industrialized countries. Risk to develop the disease is conferred by both individual as well as genetic factors with the latter being increasingly deciphered over the last decade. Therapeutically, striking advances have been made for the treatment of the neovascular form of late stage AMD while for the late stage atrophic form of the disease, which accounts for almost half of the visually impaired, there is currently no effective therapy on the market. This review highlights our current knowledge on the genetic architecture of early and late stage AMD and explores its potential for the discovery of novel, target-guided treatment options. We reflect on current clinical and experimental therapies for all forms of AMD and specifically note a persisting lack of efficacy for treatment in atrophic AMD. We further explore the current insight in AMD-associated genes and pathways and critically question whether this knowledge is suited to design novel treatment options. Specifically, we point out that known genetic factors associated with AMD govern the risk to develop disease and thus may not play a role in its severity or progression. Treatments based on such knowledge appear appropriate rather for prevention than treatment of manifest disease. As a consequence, future research in AMD needs to be greatly focused on approaches relevant to the patients and their medical needs.

  4. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions. Methods The Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group. The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists. Discussion This trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial. PMID:26449197

  5. The design and implementation of a study to investigate the effectiveness of community vs hospital eye service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Scott, L J; Rogers, C A; Muldrew, A; O'Reilly, D; Wordsworth, S; Mills, N; Hogg, R; Violato, M; Harding, S P; Peto, T; Townsend, D; Chakravarthy, U; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionStandard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs. Following multiple injections, nAMD lesions often become quiescent but there is a high risk of reactivation, and regular review by hospital ophthalmologists is the norm. The present trial examines the feasibility of community optometrists making lesion reactivation decisions.MethodsThe Effectiveness of Community vs Hospital Eye Service (ECHoES) trial is a virtual trial; lesion reactivation decisions were made about vignettes that comprised clinical data, colour fundus photographs, and optical coherence tomograms displayed on a web-based platform. Participants were either hospital ophthalmologists or community optometrists. All participants were provided with webinar training on the disease, its management, and assessment of the retinal imaging outputs. In a balanced design, 96 participants each assessed 42 vignettes; a total of 288 vignettes were assessed seven times by each professional group.The primary outcome is a participant's judgement of lesion reactivation compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes are the frequency of sight threatening errors; judgements about specific lesion components; participant-rated confidence in their decisions about the primary outcome; cost effectiveness of follow-up by optometrists rather than ophthalmologists.DiscussionThis trial addresses an important question for the NHS, namely whether, with appropriate training, community optometrists can make retreatment decisions for patients with nAMD to the same standard as hospital ophthalmologists. The trial employed a novel approach as participation was entirely through a web-based application; the trial required very few resources compared with those that would have been needed for a conventional randomised controlled clinical trial.

  6. Age-related macular degeneration--emerging pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Gehrs, Karen M; Anderson, Don H; Johnson, Lincoln V; Hageman, Gregory S

    2006-01-01

    Today, the average life expectancy in developed nations is over 80 years and climbing. And yet, the quality of life during those additional years is often significantly diminished by the effects of age-related, degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. AMD is characterized by a progressive loss of central vision attributable to degenerative and neovascular changes in the macula, a highly specialized region of the ocular retina responsible for fine visual acuity. Estimates gathered from the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) global eye disease survey conservatively indicate that 14 million persons are blind or severely visually impaired because of AMD. The disease has a tremendous impact on the physical and mental health of the geriatric population and their families and is becoming a major public health burden. Currently, there is neither a cure nor a means to prevent AMD. Palliative treatment options for the less prevalent, late-stage 'wet' form of the disease include anti-neovascular agents, photodynamic therapy and thermal laser. There are no current therapies for the more common 'dry' AMD, except for the use of antioxidants that delay progression in 20%-25% of eyes. New discoveries, however, are beginning to provide a much clearer picture of the relevant cellular events, genetic factors, and biochemical processes associated with early AMD. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that the innate immune system and, more specifically, uncontrolled regulation of the complement alternative pathway plays a central role in the pathobiology of AMD. The complement Factor H gene--which encodes the major inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway--is the first gene identified in multiple independent studies that confers a significant genetic risk for the development of AMD. The emergence of this new paradigm of AMD pathogenesis should hasten the development of novel

  7. Age-related macular degeneration—emerging pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts

    PubMed Central

    GEHRS, KAREN M.; ANDERSON, DON H.; JOHNSON, LINCOLN V.; HAGEMAN, GREGORY S.

    2014-01-01

    Today, the average life expectancy in developed nations is over 80 years and climbing. And yet, the quality of life during those additional years is often significantly diminished by the effects of age-related, degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. AMD is characterized by a progressive loss of central vision attributable to degenerative and neovascular changes in the macula, a highly specialized region of the ocular retina responsible for fine visual acuity. Estimates gathered from the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) global eye disease survey conservatively indicate that 14 million persons are blind or severely visually impaired because of AMD. The disease has a tremendous impact on the physical and mental health of the geriatric population and their families and is becoming a major public health burden. Currently, there is neither a cure nor a means to prevent AMD. Palliative treatment options for the less prevalent, late-stage ‘wet’ form of the disease include anti-neovascular agents, photodynamic therapy and thermal laser. There are no current therapies for the more common ‘dry’ AMD, except for the use of antioxidants that delay progression in 20%–25% of eyes. New discoveries, however, are beginning to provide a much clearer picture of the relevant cellular events, genetic factors, and biochemical processes associated with early AMD. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that the innate immune system and, more specifically, uncontrolled regulation of the complement alternative pathway plays a central role in the pathobiology of AMD. The complement Factor H gene—which encodes the major inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway—is the first gene identified in multiple independent studies that confers a significant genetic risk for the development of AMD. The emergence of this new paradigm of AMD pathogenesis should hasten the development

  8. Automatic multiresolution age-related macular degeneration detection from fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Mickaël.; Hurtut, Thomas; Ben Tahar, Houssem; Cheriet, Farida

    2014-03-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of legal blindness. As the disease progress, visual loss occurs rapidly, therefore early diagnosis is required for timely treatment. Automatic, fast and robust screening of this widespread disease should allow an early detection. Most of the automatic diagnosis methods in the literature are based on a complex segmentation of the drusen, targeting a specific symptom of the disease. In this paper, we present a preliminary study for AMD detection from color fundus photographs using a multiresolution texture analysis. We analyze the texture at several scales by using a wavelet decomposition in order to identify all the relevant texture patterns. Textural information is captured using both the sign and magnitude components of the completed model of Local Binary Patterns. An image is finally described with the textural pattern distributions of the wavelet coefficient images obtained at each level of decomposition. We use a Linear Discriminant Analysis for feature dimension reduction, to avoid the curse of dimensionality problem, and image classification. Experiments were conducted on a dataset containing 45 images (23 healthy and 22 diseased) of variable quality and captured by different cameras. Our method achieved a recognition rate of 93:3%, with a specificity of 95:5% and a sensitivity of 91:3%. This approach shows promising results at low costs that in agreement with medical experts as well as robustness to both image quality and fundus camera model.

  9. The Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of Community versus Hospital Eye Service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease (ECHoES): a virtual randomised balanced incomplete block trial.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Scott, Lauren J; Taylor, Jodi; Hogg, Ruth; Rogers, Chris A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Townsend, Daisy; Muldrew, Alyson; Peto, Tunde; Violato, Mara; Dakin, Helen; Cappel-Porter, Heike; Mills, Nicola; O'Reilly, Dermot; Harding, Simon P; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) usually attend regular reviews, even when the disease is quiescent. Reviews are burdensome to health services, patients and carers. OBJECTIVES To compare the proportion of correct lesion classifications made by community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists from vignettes of patients; to estimate the cost-effectiveness of community follow-up by optometrists compared with follow-up by ophthalmologists in the Hospital Eye Service (HES); to ascertain views of patients, their representatives, optometrists, ophthalmologists and clinical commissioners on the proposed shared care model. DESIGN Community-based optometrists and ophthalmologists in the HES classified lesions from vignettes comprising clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). SETTING Internet-based application. PARTICIPANTS Ophthalmologists had to have ≥ 3 years post-registration experience in ophthalmology, have passed part 1 of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Diploma in Ophthalmology or equivalent examination, and have experience in the age-related macular degeneration service. Optometrists had to be fully qualified, be registered with the General Optical Council for ≥ 3 years and not be participating in nAMD shared care. INTERVENTIONS The trial sought to emulate a conventional trial in comparing optometrists' and ophthalmologists' decision-making, but vignettes, not patients, were assessed; therefore, there were no interventions. Participants received training prior to assessing vignettes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary outcome - correct classification of the activity status of a lesion based on a vignette, compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes - frequencies of potentially sight-threatening errors, participants' judgements about specific lesion

  10. How genetic studies have advanced our understanding of age-related macular degeneration and their impact on patient care: a review.

    PubMed

    Baird, Paul N; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata

    2014-01-01

    The last 10 years have seen an unprecedented explosion in our knowledge regarding the genomic basis of age-related macular degeneration. This has come about through major advances in computing power, microfabrication of large numbers of molecular markers on chips and improved statistical algorithms for analysis. In tandem, it has become clear that age-related macular degeneration appears to be a multifactorial disease with influences from genetic and structural variants, as well as epigenetic involvement. The combination of these factors with known environmental determinants indicates the highly complex nature of this disease, but at the same time also offers insights into risk prediction and disease stratification through genotype profiling.

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: genome-wide association studies to translation.

    PubMed

    Black, James R M; Clark, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which are able to analyze the contribution to disease of genetic variations that are common within a population, have attracted considerable investment. Despite identifying genetic variants for many conditions, they have been criticized for yielding data with minimal clinical utility. However, in this regard, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common form of blindness in the Western world, is a striking exception. Through GWAS, common genetic variants at a number of loci have been discovered. Two loci in particular, including genes of the complement cascade on chromosome 1 and the ARMS2/HTRA1 genes on chromosome 10, have been shown to convey significantly increased susceptibility to developing AMD. Today, although it is possible to screen individuals for a genetic predisposition to the disease, effective interventional strategies for those at risk of developing AMD are scarce. Ongoing research in this area is nonetheless promising. After providing brief overviews of AMD and common disease genetics, we outline the main recent advances in the understanding of AMD, particularly those made through GWAS. Finally, the true merit of these findings and their current and potential translational value is examined.Genet Med 18 4, 283-289.

  12. Age-related macular degeneration: genome-wide association studies to translation

    PubMed Central

    Black, James R. M.; Clark, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which are able to analyze the contribution to disease of genetic variations that are common within a population, have attracted considerable investment. Despite identifying genetic variants for many conditions, they have been criticized for yielding data with minimal clinical utility. However, in this regard, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common form of blindness in the Western world, is a striking exception. Through GWAS, common genetic variants at a number of loci have been discovered. Two loci in particular, including genes of the complement cascade on chromosome 1 and the ARMS2/HTRA1 genes on chromosome 10, have been shown to convey significantly increased susceptibility to developing AMD. Today, although it is possible to screen individuals for a genetic predisposition to the disease, effective interventional strategies for those at risk of developing AMD are scarce. Ongoing research in this area is nonetheless promising. After providing brief overviews of AMD and common disease genetics, we outline the main recent advances in the understanding of AMD, particularly those made through GWAS. Finally, the true merit of these findings and their current and potential translational value is examined. Genet Med 18 4, 283–289. PMID:26020418

  13. Genome surgery using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Daesik; Koo, Taeyoung; Kim, Kwang-eun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2017-01-01

    RNA-guided genome surgery using CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases has shown promise for the treatment of diverse genetic diseases. Yet, the potential of such nucleases for therapeutic applications in nongenetic diseases is largely unexplored. Here, we focus on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in adults, which is associated with retinal overexpression of, rather than mutations in, the VEGFA gene. Subretinal injection of preassembled, Vegfa gene–specific Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) into the adult mouse eye gave rise to mutagenesis at the target site in the retinal pigment epithelium. Furthermore, Cas9 RNPs effectively reduced the area of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a mouse model of AMD. Genome-wide profiling of Cas9 off-target effects via Digenome-seq showed that off-target mutations were rarely induced in the human genome. Because Cas9 RNPs can function immediately after in vivo delivery and are rapidly degraded by endogenous proteases, their activities are unlikely to be hampered by antibody- and cell-mediated adaptive immune systems. Our results demonstrate that in vivo genome editing with Cas9 RNPs has the potential for the local treatment for nongenetic degenerative diseases, expanding the scope of RNA-guided genome surgery to a new dimension. PMID:28209587

  14. Genome-wide analysis of copy number variants in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kacie J.; Davis, Lea K.; Schindler, Emily I.; Beck, John S.; Rudd, Danielle S.; Grundstad, A. Jason; Scheetz, Todd E.; Braun, Terry A.; Fingert, John H.; Alward, Wallace L.; Kwon, Young H.; Folk, James C.; Russell, Stephen R.; Stone, Edwin M.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex genetic disease, with many loci demonstrating appreciable attributable disease risk. Despite significant progress toward understanding the genetic and environmental etiology of AMD, identification of additional risk factors is necessary to fully appreciate and treat AMD pathology. In this study, we investigated copy number variants (CNVs) as potential AMD risk variants in a cohort of 400 AMD patients and 500 AMD-free controls ascertained at the University of Iowa. We used three publicly available copy number programs to analyze signal intensity data from Affymetrix® GeneChip SNP Microarrays. CNVs were ranked based on prevalence in the disease cohort and absence from the control group; high interest CNVs were subsequently confirmed by qPCR. While we did not observe a single-locus “risk CNV” that could account for a major fraction of AMD, we identified several rare and overlapping CNVs containing or flanking compelling candidate genes such as NPHP1 and EFEMP1. These and other candidate genes highlighted by this study deserve further scrutiny as sources of genetic risk for AMD. PMID:20981449

  15. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  16. Decoding simulated neurodynamics predicts the perceptual consequences of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianing V; Wielaard, Jim; Smith, R Theodore; Sajda, Paul

    2011-12-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in the developed world. Though substantial work has been done to characterize the disease, it is difficult to predict how the state of an individual's retina will ultimately affect their high-level perceptual function. In this paper, we describe an approach that couples retinal imaging with computational neural modeling of early visual processing to generate quantitative predictions of an individual's visual perception. Using a patient population with mild to moderate AMD, we show that we are able to accurately predict subject-specific psychometric performance by decoding simulated neurodynamics that are a function of scotomas derived from an individual's fundus image. On the population level, we find that our approach maps the disease on the retina to a representation that is a substantially better predictor of high-level perceptual performance than traditional clinical metrics such as drusen density and coverage. In summary, our work identifies possible new metrics for evaluating the efficacy of treatments for AMD at the level of the expected changes in high-level visual perception and, in general, typifies how computational neural models can be used as a framework to characterize the perceptual consequences of early visual pathologies.

  17. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Thach, Lyna; Zheng, Wenhua; Osman, Narin

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch's membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD. PMID:27563459

  18. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Wang, Mingxu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Qianyu; Nie, Jing; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Xiaohong; Ma, Le

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR), 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007). High levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05). The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05). The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions. PMID:27782072

  19. Melatonin in Retinal Physiology and Pathology: The Case of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine, is synthesized mainly in the pineal gland in a circadian fashion, but it is produced in many other organs, including the retina, which seems to be especially important as the eye is a primary recipient of circadian signals. Melatonin displays strong antioxidative properties, which predispose it to play a protective role in many human pathologies associated with oxidative stress, including premature aging and degenerative disease. Therefore, melatonin may play a role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease affecting photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with an established role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Several studies have shown that melatonin could exert the protective effect against damage to RPE cells evoked by reactive oxygen species (ROS), but it has also been reported to increase ROS-induced damage to photoreceptors and RPE. Melatonin behaves like synthetic mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, which concentrate in mitochondria at relatively high levels; thus, melatonin may prevent mitochondrial damage in AMD. The retina contains telomerase, an enzyme implicated in maintaining the length of telomeres, and oxidative stress inhibits telomere synthesis, while melatonin overcomes this effect. These features support considering melatonin as a preventive and therapeutic agent in the treatment of AMD. PMID:27688828

  20. Photo-damage, photo-protection and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marquioni-Ramella, Melisa D; Suburo, Angela M

    2015-09-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative retinal disease that causes blindness in people 60-65 years and older, with the highest prevalence appearing in people 90 years-old or more. Epidemiological estimates indicate that the number of cases is increasing, and will almost double in the next 20 years. Preventive measures require precise etiological knowledge. This is quite difficult, since AMD is a multifactorial condition with intricate relationships between causes and risk factors. In this review, we describe the impact of light on the structure and physiology of the retina and the pigment epithelium, taking into account the continuous exposure to natural and artificial light sources along the life of an individual. A large body of experimental evidence demonstrates the toxic effects of some lighting conditions on the retina and the pigment epithelium, and consensus exists about the importance of photo-oxidation phenomena in the causality chain between light and retinal damage. Here, we analyzed the transmission of light to the retina, and compared the aging human macula in healthy and diseased retinas, as shown by histology and non-invasive imaging systems. Finally, we have compared the putative retinal photo-sensitive molecular structures that might be involved in the genesis of AMD. The relationship between these compounds and retinal damage supports the hypothesis of light as an important initiating cause of AMD.

  1. Recent patents relating to diagnostic advances in age related macular degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Schache, Maria; Ashdown, M Luisa; Baird, Paul N

    2009-01-01

    Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder accounting for 50% of blind registrations in the western world. Its substantial impact on quality of life has been a main driver in research to understand its etiology, which up until recently was mostly unknown. In the last three years our understanding of the molecular pathology of AMD has increased dramatically with the identification of two major AMD loci comprising of, Complement Factor H (CFH) and a chromosome 10q26 locus consisting of the Heat Shock Serine Protease (HTRA1) and LOC387715 genes. These two loci have been described as associated with over 50% of disease in certain ethnicities. The rapid pace in our understanding of the complex biology of this disease has placed a large emphasis on gene patenting, especially with the licensing of the CFH and chromosome 10 patents to a private life science company called Optherion Inc. The patents discussed in this review highlight the important discoveries that have contributed to our understanding of AMD and provide valuable information as to where research in this area will be heading in the future.

  2. Recent Patents on Emerging Therapeutics for the Treatment of Glaucoma, Age Related Macular Degeneration and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field and rising interest among pharmaceutical researchers have led to the development of new molecules with enhanced therapeutic activity. Design of new drugs which can target a particular pathway and/or explore novel targets is of immense interest to ocular pharmacologists worldwide. Delivery of suitable pharmacologically active agents at proper dose (within the therapeutic window) to the target tissues without any toxicity to the healthy ocular tissues still remain an elusive task. Moreover, the presence of static and dynamic barriers to drug absorption including the corneal epithelium (lipophilic), corneal and scleral stroma (hydrophilic), conjunctival lymphatics, choroidal vasculature and the blood-ocular barriers also pose a significant challenge for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations at the target site. Although many agents are currently available, new compounds are being introduced for treating various ocular diseases. Deeper understanding of the etiology and complex mechanisms associated with the disease condition would aid in the development of potential therapeutic candidates. Novel small molecules as well as complex biotechnology derived macromolecules with superior efficacy, safety and tolerability are being developed. Therefore, this review article provides an overview of existing drugs, treatment options, advances in emerging therapeutics and related recent patents for the treatment of ocular disorders such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. PMID:25414810

  3. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ângela; Andrade, José Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  4. Decoding simulated neurodynamics predicts the perceptual consequences of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianing V.; Wielaard, Jim; Smith, R. Theodore; Sajda, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in the developed world. Though substantial work has been done to characterize the disease, it is difficult to predict how the state of an individual’s retina will ultimately affect their high-level perceptual function. In this paper, we describe an approach that couples retinal imaging with computational neural modeling of early visual processing to generate quantitative predictions of an individual’s visual perception. Using a patient population with mild to moderate AMD, we show that we are able to accurately predict subject-specific psychometric performance by decoding simulated neurodynamics that are a function of scotomas derived from an individual’s fundus image. On the population level, we find that our approach maps the disease on the retina to a representation that is a substantially better predictor of high-level perceptual performance than traditional clinical metrics such as drusen density and coverage. In summary, our work identifies possible new metrics for evaluating the efficacy of treatments for AMD at the level of the expected changes in high-level visual perception and, in general, typifies how computational neural models can be used as a framework to characterize the perceptual consequences of early visual pathologies. PMID:22144563

  5. [Contemporary pharmacogenetic approaches to the treatment of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V; Pogoda, T V; Generozov, E V; Chikun, E A; Gurova, I V; Shchegoleva, I V; Sizova, M V

    2013-01-01

    A study on the role of CFH, HTRA and IL-8 gene polymorphism in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) development has been conducted. At the first stage of the study genetic testing was done in 69 patients with exudative AMD and 370 random Moscow citizens without the disease. The goal of the second stage was to determine the influence of gene polymorphism on patient's response to endovitreal ranibizumab treatment. For that, visual acuity and foveal thickness were assessed before and after ranibizumab injections in 120 patients with wet AMD. All patients were genotyped for the genes of interest. The results showed that the presence of homozygous 402H polymorphism in CFH gene, as well as homozygous (-625)A mutation in HTRA1 gene, determines certain clinical presentations. Moreover, visual acuity below 0.1 and presence of 402H, (-625)A and (-251)A alleles in both copies of all three genes (CFH, HTRA and IL-8) are negative predictors of disease severity and antiangiogenic treatment response.

  6. Oxidative stress, hypoxia, and autophagy in the neovascular processes of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Janusz; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe and irreversible loss of vision in the elderly in developed countries. AMD is a complex chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with many environmental, lifestyle, and genetic factors. Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seem to play a pivotal role in AMD pathogenesis. It is known that the macula receives the highest blood flow of any tissue in the body when related to size, and anything that can reduce the rich blood supply can cause hypoxia, malfunction, or disease. Oxidative stress can affect both the lipid rich retinal outer segment structure and the light processing in the macula. The response to oxidative stress involves several cellular defense reactions, for example, increases in antioxidant production and proteolysis of damaged proteins. The imbalance between production of damaged cellular components and degradation leads to the accumulation of detrimental products, for example, intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular drusen. Autophagy is a central lysosomal clearance system that may play an important role in AMD development. There are many anatomical changes in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris in response to chronic oxidative stress, hypoxia, and disturbed autophagy and these are estimated to be crucial components in the pathology of neovascular processes in AMD.

  7. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Al Gwairi, Othman; Thach, Lyna; Zheng, Wenhua; Osman, Narin; Little, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch's membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD.

  8. Association of the Intestinal Microbiome with the Development of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zinkernagel, Martin S.; Zysset-Burri, Denise C.; Keller, Irene; Berger, Lieselotte E.; Leichtle, Alexander B.; Largiadèr, Carlo R.; Fiedler, Georg M.; Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of blindness in the elderly. There is evidence that nutrition, inflammation and genetic risk factors play an important role in the development of AMD. Recent studies suggest that the composition of the intestinal microbiome is associated with metabolic diseases through modulation of inflammation and host metabolism. To investigate whether compositional and functional alterations of the intestinal microbiome are associated with AMD, we sequenced the gut metagenomes of patients with AMD and controls. The genera Anaerotruncus and Oscillibacter as well as Ruminococcus torques and Eubacterium ventriosum were relatively enriched in patients with AMD, whereas Bacteroides eggerthii was enriched in controls. Patient’s intestinal microbiomes were enriched in genes of the L-alanine fermentation, glutamate degradation and arginine biosynthesis pathways and decreased in genes of the fatty acid elongation pathway. These findings suggest that modifications in the intestinal microbiome are associated with AMD, inferring that this common sight threatening disease may be targeted by microbiome-altering interventions. PMID:28094305

  9. Therapeutic targeting of the complement system in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Troutbeck, Robyn; Al-Qureshi, Salmaan; Guymer, Robyn H

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has produced pivotal change in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of global blindness. In this time, the complement system has featured as a unifying theme for several elements of new evidence: initially, the discovery of complement proteins within drusen and subsequently, the association between AMD and mutations in various complement pathway genes, most notably complement factor H. Increasingly, a wealth of data are pointing towards a role for chronic local inflammation and complement activation in the patho-aetiology of AMD. These findings have paved the way for the exploration of a new paradigm of therapy in AMD management; targeting of specific molecular constituents in the complement pathway thus producing dampening or inhibition of the inflammatory response. Such an approach has the potential to intervene earlier in the disease process and ideally before vision is compromised. In this review we discuss the role of the complement system in AMD, novel therapies in preclinical evaluation and clinical trial, and whether these have a part to play in reducing the burden of disease.

  10. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Models in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Issues and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Schmier, Jordana K; Hulme-Lowe, Carolyn K

    2016-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common ophthalmic condition that can have few symptoms in its early stage but can progress to major visual impairment. While there are no treatments for early-stage AMD, there are multiple modalities of treatment for advanced disease. Given the increasing prevalence of the disease, there are dozens of analyses of cost effectiveness of AMD treatments, but methods and approaches vary broadly. The goal of this review was to identify, characterize, and critique published models in AMD and provide guidance for their interpretation. After a literature review was performed to identify studies, and exclusion criteria applied to limit the review to studies comparing treatments for AMD, we compared methods across the 36 studies meeting the review criteria. To some extent, variation was related to targeting different audiences or acknowledging the most appropriate population for a given treatment. However, the review identified potential areas of uncertainty and difficulty in interpretation, particularly regarding duration of observation periods and the importance of visual acuity as an endpoint or a proxy for patient-reported utilities. We urge thoughtful consideration of these study characteristics when comparing results.

  12. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Ângela

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease. PMID:28154734

  13. Olive Oil Consumption and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Le Goff, Mélanie; Samieri, Cécilia; Dartigues, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Background Olive oil provides a mixture of lipids and antioxidant nutrients which may help preventing age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, little is known about the associations between olive oil consumption and the risk of AMD. Objective To examine associations between olive oil use and AMD prevalence in elderly subjects. Methods Alienor (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition et maladies OculaiRes) is a population-based study on eye diseases performed in elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). In 1999–2000, frequencies of consumption of main categories of dietary fats used were collected. In 2006–2088, AMD was graded from non mydriatic retinal photographs into three exclusive stages: no AMD, early AMD, and late AMD. Two categories of preferred dietary fat used (olive oil, n-3 rich oils, n-6 rich oils, mixed oils, butter and margarine) were defined: “no use” and “regular use” (using fat for spreading and/or cooking and/or dressing). Associations of AMD with each fat use were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions models. Results Our study included 654 subjects (1269 eyes) with complete data (n = 268 eyes with early AMD and n = 56 with late AMD). After adjustment for potential confounders, regular use of olive oil was significantly associated with a decreased risk of late AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21;0.91). In contrast, regular use of olive oil was not significantly associated with early AMD (OR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.59;1.21). No associations were found between regular consumption of n-3 rich oils, n-6 rich oils, mixed oils, butter and margarine and AMD, whatever the stage. Conclusions This study suggests a protective effect of olive oil consumption for late AMD in this elderly community-dwelling population. Characterization of the mediating nutrients deserves further research. PMID:27467382

  14. Epidemiology and quality of life of patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Synek, Svatopluk; Vojniković, Bozo; Pahor, Dana

    2010-04-01

    It is well known that age-related macular degeneration (AMD), besides glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, represents a major cause of low vision and blindness throughout the world. In this study, specific causal factors of AMD are analyzed, emphasizing the causal role and effects of sunlight, no matter which part of its spectrum, in a longer exposition through life. The accent is also put on the influence of lifestyle as well as vitamin and antioxidants supplementation in development or prevention of AMD.

  15. [New perspectives in the approach to age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Gallego-Pinazo, R; Zapata, M A

    2015-03-01

    The approval of aflibercept for the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration has opened up the possibility of treating patients with fewer injections, since the drug can be administered once every two months. Aflibercept can also be used as rescue therapy in patients with suboptimal response to other antiangiogenic treatments. The present study reviews the scientific evidence on aflibercept, both in treatment-naïve patients and in those with an unsatisfactory response to conventional treatments.

  16. [Effects of diabetes mellitus on the occurrence of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Wang, Yu-sheng

    2011-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus causing long term disturbed glucose metabolism could result in tissue injury and multiple complications. According to recent studies, diabetes mellitus might be regarded as one of the risk factors of age related macular degeneration (AMD). Diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. By studying epidemiological investigation and basic research on this subject comprehensively, it is required to review the correlation between diabetes mellitus and AMD.

  17. Electrophysiological changes after 360° retinotomy and macular translocation for subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation in age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Luke, C.; Aisenbrey, S.; Luke, M.; Marzella, G.; Bartz-Schmidt, K. U.; Walter, P.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate electrophysiological changes after 360° retinotomy and macular translocation for subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation in patients with age related macular degeneration (AMD).
METHODS—A consecutive series of 32 patients suffering from subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation secondary to AMD underwent 360° retinotomy and macular translocation. The ERG served as the main parameter of the study and was recorded 1 day before the translocation surgery and no earlier than 4 weeks after the silicone oil removal.
RESULTS—The scotopic ERG amplitudes were significantly reduced after translocation surgery. Depending on the applied flash luminance the mean b-wave amplitude reduction of the scotopic ERG varied between 67% (0.2 cd.s/m2) and 74% (0.03 cd.s/m2). The a-waves and b-waves of the saturating light response decreased significantly by 46% and 59%, respectively. The photopic a-wave and b-wave amplitudes were significantly lower after the translocation surgery resulting in a mean reduction of 27% and 43%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS—Although macular translocation may provide the potential of preserving and even restoring vision in patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to AMD the present study indicates that a significant electrophysiological decrease is caused by surgical procedures associated with this technique. Further research is necessary to clarify if certain modifications of the surgical procedure are able to substantially reduce the neuroretinal trauma.

 PMID:11466247

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Updates on Clinical and Technical Developments. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Drusen and Geographic Atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Holz, Frank G.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental factors influencing its development. With the advent of high-resolution OCT imaging, the characterization of drusen in AMD has become possible. The in vivo morphologic characteristics imaged with SD-OCT may represent distinct subclasses of drusen variants, may relate closely to ultrastructural drusen elements identified in donor eyes, and may be useful imaging biomarkers for disease severity or risk of progression [Khanifar et al. Ophthalmology 115(11):1883-1890, 2008].

  19. Influence of anti-VEGF about cardiovascular biomarkers in age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Manresa, N; Mulero, J; Losada, M; Zafrilla, P

    2015-02-01

    Systemic VEGF inhibition disrupts endothelial homeostasis and accelerates the atherogenesis, suggesting that these events contribute to the clinical cardiovascular adverse events of VEGF-inhibiting therapies. The objective of the current study was to analyze the effect of anti-VEGF therapy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with exudative age related macular degeneration. A total of 73 patients with exudative age related macular degeneration (without previous anti-VEGF therapy) were treated with two anti-VEGF: Ranibizumab and Pegaptanib sodium. The follow up was 6 months. The following parameters were determined before and after treatment: homocysteine, lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-c, LDL-c), C-Reactive Protein and fibrinogen. There were not statistically significant differences in parameters studied before and after treatment with both Pegaptanib sodium and Ranibizumab, except C-Reactive Protein. Of all patients analyzed, only 3 of them have initially C-Reactive Protein levels above normal levels and after antiangiogenic therapy, there was a significant increase in C-Reactive Protein. We have not found results in our study who to suspect that treatment with anti-VEGF in the patients with exudative age related macular degeneration increases cardiovascular risk predictors. However, after therapy was increased the CRP and fibrinogen may mean that anti-VEGF contribute an alteration of endothelial homeostasis in exudative AMD.

  20. Transfer learning based classification of optical coherence tomography images with diabetic macular edema and dry age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karri, S. P. K.; Chakraborty, Debjani; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2017-01-01

    We present an algorithm for identifying retinal pathologies given retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Our approach fine-tunes a pre-trained convolutional neural network (CNN), GoogLeNet, to improve its prediction capability (compared to random initialization training) and identifies salient responses during prediction to understand learned filter characteristics. We considered a data set containing subjects with diabetic macular edema, or dry age-related macular degeneration, or no pathology. The fine-tuned CNN could effectively identify pathologies in comparison to classical learning. Our algorithm aims to demonstrate that models trained on non-medical images can be fine-tuned for classifying OCT images with limited training data. PMID:28270969

  1. PPARβ/δ selectively regulates phenotypic features of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mayur; Ding, Jin-dong; Qi, Xiaoping; Boulton, Michael E.; Yao, Pei-Li; Peters, Jeffrey M.; Malek, Goldis

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a nuclear receptor that regulates differentiation, inflammation, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis in multiple tissues. These pathways are also central to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss globally. With the goal of identifying signaling pathways that may be important in the development of AMD, we investigated the impact of PPARβ/δ activation on ocular tissues affected in the disease. PPARβ/δ is expressed and can be activated in AMD vulnerable cells, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cells. Further, PPARβ/δ knockdown modulates AMD-related pathways selectively. Specifically, genetic ablation of Pparβ/δ in aged mice resulted in exacerbation of several phenotypic features of early dry AMD, but attenuation of experimentally induced choroidal neovascular (CNV) lesions. Antagonizing PPARβ/δ in both in vitro angiogenesis assays and in the in vivo experimentally induced CNV model, inhibited angiogenesis and angiogenic pathways, while ligand activation of PPARβ/δ, in vitro, decreased RPE lipid accumulation, characteristic of dry AMD. This study demonstrates for the first time, selective regulation of a nuclear receptor in the eye and establishes that selective targeting of PPARβ/δ may be a suitable strategy for treatment of different clinical sub-types of AMD. PMID:27622388

  2. Use of fundus imaging in quantification of age-related macular change.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Hannah; Eperjesi, Frank

    2007-01-01

    This review will discuss the use of manual grading scales, digital photography, and automated image analysis in the quantification of fundus changes caused by age-related macular disease. Digital imaging permits processing of images for enhancement, comparison, and feature quantification, and these techniques have been investigated for automated drusen analysis. The accuracy of automated analysis systems has been enhanced by the incorporation of interactive elements, such that the user is able to adjust the sensitivity of the system, or manually add and remove pixels. These methods capitalize on both computer and human image feature recognition and the advantage of computer-based methodologies for quantification. The histogram-based adaptive local thresholding system is able to extract useful information from the image without being affected by the presence of other structures. More recent developments involve compensation for fundus background reflectance, which has most recently been combined with the Otsu method of global thresholding. This method is reported to provide results comparable with manual stereo viewing. Developments in this area are likely to encourage wider use of automated techniques. This will make the grading of photographs easier and cheaper for clinicians and researchers.

  3. PPARβ/δ selectively regulates phenotypic features of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mayur; Ding, Jin-Dong; Qi, Xiaoping; Boulton, Michael E; Yao, Pei-Li; Peters, Jeffrey M; Malek, Goldis

    2016-09-08

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a nuclear receptor that regulates differentiation, inflammation, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis in multiple tissues. These pathways are also central to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss globally. With the goal of identifying signaling pathways that may be important in the development of AMD, we investigated the impact of PPARβ/δ activation on ocular tissues affected in the disease. PPARβ/δ is expressed and can be activated in AMD vulnerable cells, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and choroidal endothelial cells. Further, PPARβ/δ knockdown modulates AMD-related pathways selectively. Specifically, genetic ablation of Pparβ/δ in aged mice resulted in exacerbation of several phenotypic features of early dry AMD, but attenuation of experimentally induced choroidal neovascular (CNV) lesions. Antagonizing PPARβ/δ in both in vitro angiogenesis assays and in the in vivo experimentally induced CNV model, inhibited angiogenesis and angiogenic pathways, while ligand activation of PPARβ/δ, in vitro, decreased RPE lipid accumulation, characteristic of dry AMD. This study demonstrates for the first time, selective regulation of a nuclear receptor in the eye and establishes that selective targeting of PPARβ/δ may be a suitable strategy for treatment of different clinical sub-types of AMD.

  4. Automatic Screening and Grading of Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Texture Analysis of Fundus Images

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thanh Vân; Seoud, Lama; Chakor, Hadi; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease which causes visual deficiency and irreversible blindness to the elderly. In this paper, an automatic classification method for AMD is proposed to perform robust and reproducible assessments in a telemedicine context. First, a study was carried out to highlight the most relevant features for AMD characterization based on texture, color, and visual context in fundus images. A support vector machine and a random forest were used to classify images according to the different AMD stages following the AREDS protocol and to evaluate the features' relevance. Experiments were conducted on a database of 279 fundus images coming from a telemedicine platform. The results demonstrate that local binary patterns in multiresolution are the most relevant for AMD classification, regardless of the classifier used. Depending on the classification task, our method achieves promising performances with areas under the ROC curve between 0.739 and 0.874 for screening and between 0.469 and 0.685 for grading. Moreover, the proposed automatic AMD classification system is robust with respect to image quality. PMID:27190636

  5. A Validated Phenotyping Algorithm for Genetic Association Studies in Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Sohrab, Mahsa A; Pacheco, Jennifer; Armstrong, Loren L; Rzhetskaya, Margarita; Smith, Maureen; Geoffrey Hayes, M; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-08-10

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial, neurodegenerative disease, is a leading cause of vision loss. With the rapid advancement of DNA sequencing technologies, many AMD-associated genetic polymorphisms have been identified. Currently, the most time consuming steps of these studies are patient recruitment and phenotyping. In this study, we describe the development of an automated algorithm to identify neovascular (wet) AMD, non-neovascular (dry) AMD and control subjects using electronic medical record (EMR)-based criteria. Positive predictive value (91.7%) and negative predictive value (97.5%) were calculated using expert chart review as the gold standard to assess algorithm performance. We applied the algorithm to an EMR-linked DNA bio-repository to study previously identified AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using case/control status determined by the algorithm. Risk alleles of three SNPs, rs1061170 (CFH), rs1410996 (CFH), and rs10490924 (ARMS2) were found to be significantly associated with the AMD case/control status as defined by the algorithm. With the rapid growth of EMR-linked DNA biorepositories, patient selection algorithms can greatly increase the efficiency of genetic association study. We have found that stepwise validation of such an algorithm can result in reliable cohort selection and, when coupled within an EMR-linked DNA biorepository, replicates previously published AMD-associated SNPs.

  6. Individualized Therapy with Ranibizumab in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Figueroa, Marta S.; Arias, Luis; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José María; García-Arumí, José; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; López-Gálvez, María Isabel; Cabrera-López, Francisco; García-Campos, José Manuel; Monés, Jordi; Cervera, Enrique; Armadá, Felix; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Individualized treatment regimens may reduce patient burden with satisfactory patient outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs are the current gold standard. Fixed monthly injections offer the best visual outcome but this regimen is not commonly followed outside clinical trials. A PRN regimen requires monthly visits where the patient is treated in the presence of signs of lesion activity. Therefore, an early detection of reactivation of the disease with immediate retreatment is crucial to prevent visual acuity loss. Several trials suggest that “treat and extend” and other proactive regimens provide a reasonable approach. The rationale of the proactive regimens is to perform treatment anticipating relapses or recurrences and therefore avoid drops in vision while individualizing patient followup. Treat and extend study results in significant direct medical cost savings from fewer treatments and office visits compared to monthly treatment. Current data suggest that, for one year, PRN is less expensive, but treat and extend regimen would likely be less expensive for subsequent years. Once a patient is not a candidate to continue with treatment, he/she should be sent to an outpatient unit with adequate resources to follow nAMD patients in order to reduce the burden of specialized ophthalmologist services. PMID:26491550

  7. Strategies for improving early detection and diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Pearse A; de Salvo, Gabriella; Sim, Dawn A; Goverdhan, Srini; Agrawal, Rupesh; Tufail, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been revolutionized by the introduction of such agents as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. As a result, the incidence of legal blindness occurring secondary to AMD has fallen dramatically in recent years in many countries. While these agents have undoubtedly been successful in reducing visual impairment and blindness, patients with neovascular AMD typically lose some vision over time, and often lose the ability to read, drive, or perform other important activities of daily living. Efforts are therefore under way to develop strategies that allow for earlier detection and treatment of this disease. In this review, we begin by providing an overview of the rationale for, and the benefits of, early detection and treatment of neovascular AMD. To achieve this, we begin by providing an overview of the pathophysiology and natural history of choroidal neovascularization, before reviewing the evidence from both clinical trials and “real-world” outcome studies. We continue by highlighting an area that is often overlooked: the importance of patient education and awareness for early AMD detection. We conclude the review by reviewing an array of both established and emerging technologies for early detection of choroidal neovascularization, ranging from Amsler chart testing, to hyperacuity testing, to advanced imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography. PMID:25733802

  8. Structural basis for complement factor H–linked age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Herbert, Andrew P.; Blaum, Bärbel S.; Tyrrell, Jess; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Uhrín, Dušan; Barlow, Paul N.; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Anthony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Nearly 50 million people worldwide suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which causes severe loss of central vision. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene for the complement regulator factor H (FH), which causes a Tyr-to-His substitution at position 402, is linked to ∼50% of attributable risks for AMD. We present the crystal structure of the region of FH containing the polymorphic amino acid His402 in complex with an analogue of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that localize the complement regulator on the cell surface. The structure demonstrates direct coordination of ligand by the disease-associated polymorphic residue, providing a molecular explanation of the genetic observation. This glycan-binding site occupies the center of an extended interaction groove on the regulator's surface, implying multivalent binding of sulfated GAGs. This finding is confirmed by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, nuclear magnetic resonance–monitored binding experiments performed for both H402 and Y402 variants with this and another model GAG, and analysis of an extended GAG–FH complex. PMID:17893204

  9. Caregiver perceptions about the impact of caring for patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vukicevic, M; Heraghty, J; Cummins, R; Gopinath, B; Mitchell, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Caregivers of older persons with eye disease, namely age-related macular degeneration (AMD), have been reported to have a higher than expected distress. Very few studies have explored caregiver perceptions as to what is important when providing care. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of caregivers of persons with neovascular AMD in relation to the most important aspects of caring, as described in extended answers to self-administered survey questions. Methods A cross-sectional, self-administered survey of 643 caregivers of people with neovascular AMD, comprising 27 closed-response questions and 2 open ended questions. The latter were analysed as part of this study utilising and ‘inductive' Grounded Theory approach. Results Six-hundred and forty-three caregiver responses to 2 open ended questions were analysed using an inductive approach and sorted into thematic networks. Three discrete categories arose: The Impact of Caring; Injections and Information and Activities of Daily Living. Conclusions Most caregivers were family caregivers and were found to be compassionate and self-sacrificing. They accepted additional responsibility whilst providing an encouraging environment for their care recipient. As a result, they experience distress and consider their own needs as secondary. Very few seek or receive respite and this added burden can have a negative impact upon the relationship between caregiver and care recipient. PMID:26611848

  10. Resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiqi; Zhao, Jingke; Sun, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    As a progressive chronic disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision impairment worldwide. Experimental and clinical evidence has demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a vital role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization. Intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents have been recommended as a first-line treatment for neovascular AMD. However, persistent fluid or recurrent exudation still occurs despite standardized anti-VEGF therapy. Patients suffering from refractory or recurrent neovascular AMD may develop mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy, which results in a diminished therapeutic effect. Until now, there has been no consensus on the definitions of refractory neovascular AMD and recurrent neovascular AMD. This article aims at clarifying these concepts to evaluate the efficacy of switching drugs, which contributes to making clinical decision more scientifically. Furthermore, insight into the causes of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy would be helpful for developing possible therapeutic approaches, such as combination therapy and multi-target treatment that can overcome this resistance.

  11. Alterations in Circulating Immune Cells in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Judith; Chen, Mei; Hogg, Ruth E; Toth, Levente; Silvestri, Giuliana; Chakravarthy, Usha; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-17

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition to local retinal chronic inflammatory response, systemic immune alterations have also been observed in AMD patients. In this study we investigated the association between the frequency of circulating leukocyte populations and the prevalence as well as clinical presentations of nAMD. Leukocyte subsets of 103 nAMD patients (most of them were receiving anti-VEGF therapy prior to enrolment) and 26 controls were analysed by flow cytometry by relative cell size, granularity and surface markers. Circulating CD11b(+) cells and CD16(hi)HLA-DR(-) neutrophils were significantly increased (P = 0.015 and 0.009 respectively) in nAMD when compared to controls. The percentage of circulating CD4(+) T-cells was reduced in nAMD patients without subretinal fibrosis (P = 0.026) compared to patients with subretinal fibrosis. There was no correlation between the percentage of circulating leukocytes and the responsiveness to anti-VEGF therapy in nAMD patients. Our results suggest that higher levels of circulating CD11b(+) cells and neutrophils are associated with nAMD and that reduced levels of CD4(+) T-cells are associated with the absence of subretinal fibrosis in nAMD.

  12. Individualized Therapy with Ranibizumab in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Figueroa, Marta S; Arias, Luis; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José María; García-Arumí, José; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; López-Gálvez, María Isabel; Cabrera-López, Francisco; García-Campos, José Manuel; Monés, Jordi; Cervera, Enrique; Armadá, Felix; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Individualized treatment regimens may reduce patient burden with satisfactory patient outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs are the current gold standard. Fixed monthly injections offer the best visual outcome but this regimen is not commonly followed outside clinical trials. A PRN regimen requires monthly visits where the patient is treated in the presence of signs of lesion activity. Therefore, an early detection of reactivation of the disease with immediate retreatment is crucial to prevent visual acuity loss. Several trials suggest that "treat and extend" and other proactive regimens provide a reasonable approach. The rationale of the proactive regimens is to perform treatment anticipating relapses or recurrences and therefore avoid drops in vision while individualizing patient followup. Treat and extend study results in significant direct medical cost savings from fewer treatments and office visits compared to monthly treatment. Current data suggest that, for one year, PRN is less expensive, but treat and extend regimen would likely be less expensive for subsequent years. Once a patient is not a candidate to continue with treatment, he/she should be sent to an outpatient unit with adequate resources to follow nAMD patients in order to reduce the burden of specialized ophthalmologist services.

  13. Scanning Laser Entoptic Perimetry for the Detection of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, William R.; El-Bradey, Mohamed; Plummer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the sensitivity and specificity of scanning laser entoptic perimetry for detecting visual function damage due to age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods We measured the presence or absence of visual field disturbances by entoptic perimetry and determined the severity of ARMD based on masked readings of fundus photographs. A prospective masked study comparing the findings of entoptic perimetry with fundus photographs was performed. We recruited 91 patients with ARMD and 24 patients without ARMD during ophthalmologic visits. An appropriate institutional review board approval was obtained for the project. The main outcome measure was the detection of visual scotomata. Results Scanning laser entoptic perimetry had an overall sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 100% for the detection of ARMD. The sensitivity for early stages of the disease is greater than 70%, and increases to above 90% for moderate to late stages. Conclusion Scanning laser entoptic perimetry is a specific and sensitive test for detecting ARMD, even at the earliest stages when patients are typically asymptomatic. PMID:15534125

  14. Automated age-related macular degeneration classification in OCT using unsupervised feature learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venhuizen, Freerk G.; van Ginneken, Bram; Bloemen, Bart; van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Philipsen, Rick; Hoyng, Carel; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2015-03-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a common eye disorder with high prevalence in elderly people. The disease mainly affects the central part of the retina, and could ultimately lead to permanent vision loss. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is becoming the standard imaging modality in diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of its progression. However, the evaluation of the obtained volumetric scan is time consuming, expensive and the signs of early AMD are easy to miss. In this paper we propose a classification method to automatically distinguish AMD patients from healthy subjects with high accuracy. The method is based on an unsupervised feature learning approach, and processes the complete image without the need for an accurate pre-segmentation of the retina. The method can be divided in two steps: an unsupervised clustering stage that extracts a set of small descriptive image patches from the training data, and a supervised training stage that uses these patches to create a patch occurrence histogram for every image on which a random forest classifier is trained. Experiments using 384 volume scans show that the proposed method is capable of identifying AMD patients with high accuracy, obtaining an area under the Receiver Operating Curve of 0:984. Our method allows for a quick and reliable assessment of the presence of AMD pathology in OCT volume scans without the need for accurate layer segmentation algorithms.

  15. Resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shiqi; Zhao, Jingke; Sun, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    As a progressive chronic disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision impairment worldwide. Experimental and clinical evidence has demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a vital role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization. Intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents have been recommended as a first-line treatment for neovascular AMD. However, persistent fluid or recurrent exudation still occurs despite standardized anti-VEGF therapy. Patients suffering from refractory or recurrent neovascular AMD may develop mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy, which results in a diminished therapeutic effect. Until now, there has been no consensus on the definitions of refractory neovascular AMD and recurrent neovascular AMD. This article aims at clarifying these concepts to evaluate the efficacy of switching drugs, which contributes to making clinical decision more scientifically. Furthermore, insight into the causes of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy would be helpful for developing possible therapeutic approaches, such as combination therapy and multi-target treatment that can overcome this resistance. PMID:27330279

  16. Overview of Risk Factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Richard A; Mousavi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make life style choices that may reduce the risk of disease. This review discusses the role of genetics, sunlight, diet, cardiovascular factors, smoking, and alcohol as possible risk factors for AMD. Genetics plays a more significant role in AMD than previously thought, especially in younger patients, histocompatibility locus antigen (HLA) and complement system genes being the most significant. Whether the risk of AMD is increased by exposure to sunlight, cardiovascular risk factors, and diet is more controversial. Smoking is the risk factor most consistently associated with AMD. Current smokers are exposed to a two to three times higher risk of AMD than non-smokers and the risk increases with intensity of smoking. Moderate alcohol consumption is unlikely to increase the risk of AMD. Optometrists as front-line informers and educators of ocular health play a significant role in increasing public awareness of the risks of AMD. Cessation of smoking, the use of eye protection in high light conditions, dietary changes, and regular use of dietary supplements should all be considered to reduce the lifetime risk of AMD.

  17. Assessment of polygenic effects links primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Wang, Jie Jin; Vote, Brendan J; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L; Isaacs, Timothy; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A; Constable, Ian J; Mitchell, Paul; Hewitt, Alex W; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-05-31

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Several loci have been mapped using genome-wide association studies. Until very recently, there was no recognized overlap in the genetic contribution to AMD and POAG. At genome-wide significance level, only ABCA1 harbors associations to both diseases. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of POAG and AMD using genome-wide array data. We estimated the heritability for POAG (h(2)g = 0.42 ± 0.09) and AMD (h(2)g = 0.71 ± 0.08). Removing known loci for POAG and AMD decreased the h(2)g estimates to 0.36 and 0.24, respectively. There was evidence for a positive genetic correlation between POAG and AMD (rg = 0.47 ± 0.25) which remained after removing known loci (rg = 0.64 ± 0.31). We also found that the genetic correlation between sexes for POAG was likely to be less than 1 (rg = 0.33 ± 0.24), suggesting that differences of prevalence among genders may be partly due to heritable factors.

  18. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in retinal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, Christine A.; Johnson, Mark; Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Rudolf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The largest risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is advanced age. With aging, there is a striking accumulation of neutral lipids in Bruch's membrane (BrM) of normal eye that continues through adulthood. This accumulation has the potential to significantly impact the physiology of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It also ultimately leads to the creation of a lipid wall at the same locations where drusen and basal linear deposit, the pathognomonic extracellular, lipid-containing lesions of ARMD, subsequently form. Here, we summarize evidence obtained from light microscopy, ultrastructural studies, lipid histochemistry, assay of isolated lipoproteins, and gene expression analysis. These studies suggest that lipid deposition in BrM is at least partially due to accumulation of esterified cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles produced by the RPE. Furthermore, we suggest that the formation of ARMD lesions and their aftermath may be a pathological response to the retention of a sub-endothelial apolipoprotein B lipoprotein, similar to a widely accepted model of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (Tabas, I., K. J. Williams, and J. Borén. 2007. Subendothelial lipoprotein retention as the initiating process in atherosclerosis: update and therapeutic implications. Circulation. 116:1832–1844). This view provides a conceptual basis for the development of novel treatments that may benefit ARMD patients in the future. PMID:19797256

  19. Assessment of polygenic effects links primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Wang, Jie Jin; Vote, Brendan J.; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L.; Isaacs, Timothy; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A.; Constable, Ian J.; Mitchell, Paul; Hewitt, Alex W.; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Several loci have been mapped using genome-wide association studies. Until very recently, there was no recognized overlap in the genetic contribution to AMD and POAG. At genome-wide significance level, only ABCA1 harbors associations to both diseases. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of POAG and AMD using genome-wide array data. We estimated the heritability for POAG (h2g = 0.42 ± 0.09) and AMD (h2g = 0.71 ± 0.08). Removing known loci for POAG and AMD decreased the h2g estimates to 0.36 and 0.24, respectively. There was evidence for a positive genetic correlation between POAG and AMD (rg = 0.47 ± 0.25) which remained after removing known loci (rg = 0.64 ± 0.31). We also found that the genetic correlation between sexes for POAG was likely to be less than 1 (rg = 0.33 ± 0.24), suggesting that differences of prevalence among genders may be partly due to heritable factors. PMID:27241461

  20. Clinical evidence of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide in the management of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Becerra, E M; Morescalchi, F; Gandolfo, F; Danzi, P; Nascimbeni, G; Arcidiacono, B; Semeraro, F

    2011-02-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is one of the first pharmacologic compounds evaluated for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most important effects of TA consist in the stabilisation of the blood-retinal barrier and the down-regulation of inflammation. TA also has anti-angiogenic and anti-fibrotic properties. The peculiar characteristic of being well tolerated by ocular tissues and the capability to remain active for many months after a single intravitreal injection, make this drug a safe and effective alternative. In the past decade, intravitreal injection of TA (IVTA) has emerged as a useful treatment of several ocular diseases such as uveitis, macular edema secondary to retinal vasculature disease, neovascularisation and vitreoretinopathy. In this paper, we review all the available evidence of its use in AMD as mono-therapy or in combination with other treatments, and we discuss which role TA will play in the treatment of AMD in the future. The first experiences with IVTA as monotherapy for the treatment of exudative AMD reported a positive outcome in transiently reducing the leakage from CNV. However, in the long-term follow-up, IVTA as monotherapy had no effect on the risk of severe visual acuity loss, despite a significant anti-angiogenic effect found 3 months after the treatment. Consequently, studies using the combination of IVTA and photodynamic therapy (PDT), which acts synergistically, were performed. They reported to improve vision and to reduce the number of re-treatments with PDT. A large number of publications confirmed the positive synergic role of combining TA and PDT (therapies) for the treatment of all types of CNV: classic or predominantly classic, occult or minimally classic and RAP (Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation) lesions. The advantages registered with the use of IVTA plus PDT compared to PDT alone were partially limited by the side effects, such as the rapid evolution

  1. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shaker A; Mousa, Shaymaa S

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the process by which new vessels are created from pre-existing vasculature, has become the subject of intense research in recent years. Increased rates of angiogenesis are associated with several disease states, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetic retinopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, and has been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions, including AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. AMD is a progressive disease of the macula and the third major cause of blindness worldwide. If not treated appropriately, AMD can progress to involve both eyes. Until recently, the treatment options for AMD have been limited, with photodynamic therapy (PDT) the mainstay of treatment. Although PDT is effective at slowing disease progression, it rarely results in improved vision. Several therapies have been or are now being developed for neovascular AMD, with the goal of inhibiting VEGF. These VEGF inhibitors include the RNA aptamer pegaptanib, partial and full-length antibodies ranibizumab and bevacizumab, the VEGF receptor decoy aflibercept, small interfering RNA-based therapies bevasiranib and AGN 211745, sirolimus, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vatalanib, pazopanib, TG 100801, TG 101095, AG 013958, and AL 39324. At present, established therapies have met with great success in reducing the vision loss associated with neovascular AMD, whereas those still under investigation offer the potential for further advances. In AMD patients, these therapies slow the rate of vision loss and in some cases increase visual acuity. Although VEGF-inhibitor therapies are a milestone in the treatment of these disease states, several concerns need to be addressed before their impact can be fully realized.

  2. [New possibilities in the pharmacologic prevention of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2008-01-20

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown--endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, antiadhesive and anti-inflammatory functions; trimetazidine as an adjuvant agent helps to normalize, to restore the disturbed metabolism of the retinal tissue functioning insufficiently, in the end. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive--taking into consideration all possible side effects--ACE-inhibitor and/or AR blocker and statin and aspirin treatment, and trimetazidine as adjuvant medicine 1. those without maculopathy but being above the age of 50 and having risk factors inducing endothelial dysfunction; 2. those, who already developed AMD in one eye as a prevention in the second, unaffected eye; and 3. those patients who developed AMD in both eyes in order to ameliorate or merely slow the progression of the disease. Besides, it is advisory to

  3. Evaluation of peripheral fundus autofluorescence in eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Tetsuyuki; Kato, Aki; Yoshida, Munenori; Yasukawa, Tsutomu; Nishiwaki, Akiko; Hasegawa, Norio; Usui, Hideaki; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of abnormal peripheral fundus autofluorescence (FAF) in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using wide-field imaging instrument. Patients and methods A retrospective, case-controlled study involving 66 eyes of 46 Japanese wet AMD patients and 32 eyes of 20 control patients was performed. Wide-field FAF images were obtained for typical AMD (37 eyes/28 patients), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) (22 eyes/20 patients), and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) (seven eyes/four patients). Two masked ophthalmologists independently graded the images for mottled, granular, and nummular patterns. Main outcome measures were abnormal peripheral FAF frequencies and relative risks by disease subgroups and treatments. Results Abnormal peripheral FAF patterns were found in 51.5% of wet AMD eyes compared with 18.8% of control eyes (P<0.001). Mottled, granular, and nummular patterns were found in 45.5%, 31.8%, and 16.7%, respectively, of wet AMD eyes. Each disease subgroup (typical AMD, 54.1%; PCV, 36.4%; and RAP, 85.7%) showed significantly higher frequencies of peripheral FAF (P<0.001, P=0.03, and P<0.001, respectively) than control eyes (18.8%). There were no significant differences (P=0.76) between the frequencies in untreated and treated eyes. Conclusion Eyes of Japanese wet AMD patients had a higher abnormal FAF prevalence compared with control eyes. Among the three disease subtypes, abnormal patterns were least prevalent in PCV eyes. PMID:28008222

  4. Apolipoprotein E gene associations in age-related macular degeneration: the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Madeleine K M; Simpson, Julie A; Richardson, Andrea J; English, Dallas R; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Guymer, Robyn H; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John; Robman, Liubov D; Baird, Paul N

    2012-03-15

    The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) has been found to be associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Reported associations have been questioned, as they are opposite those for Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease. The authors examined associations between APOE genotype and AMD using a case-control study (2,287 cases and 2,287 controls individually matched on age, sex, and country of origin) nested within Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study participants aged 48-86 years at AMD detection. The odds ratio for early AMD among participants with ε2-containing genotypes (ε2ε2/ε2ε3/ε2ε4) was 1.32 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11, 1.58; P = 0.002) versus persons with genotype ε3ε3. Associations with early AMD varied by smoking status; ε2-containing genotypes were positively associated with early AMD for never and previous smokers (never smokers: odds ratio (OR) = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.76 (P = 0.003); previous smokers: OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.93 (P = 0.05)) but not for current smokers (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.34, 1.30 (P = 0.2; interaction P = 0.05). The ε4-containing genotype group (ε3ε4/ε4ε4) had an inverse association with early AMD among current smokers only (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.77 (P = 0.005)). These results highlight the importance of stratifying by smoking status in elderly populations. Smokers who survive to old age may be more likely to possess unknown genotypes which modify exposure-disease associations.

  5. Joint Associations of Diet, Lifestyle, and Genes with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Kristin J.; Liu, Zhe; Millen, Amy E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Blodi, Barbara A.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Snodderly, D. Max; Klein, Michael L.; Gehrs, Karen M.; Tinker, Lesley; Sarto, Gloria E.; Robinson, Jennifer; Wallace, Robert B.; Mares, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Healthy diets and lifestyles are thought to protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but whether the benefits vary across high risk AMD genotypes is unknown. The objective is to investigate the joint effects of healthy diet and lifestyle with genetic risk on the odds for AMD. Design Healthy lifestyles scores and their interactions with AMD risk genotypes were studied in relation to the prevalence of AMD, assessed six years later. Participants Women 50–79 years of age in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS) with exposure and AMD data available (N=1,663). Methods Healthy lifestyle scores (0–6 points) were assigned based on Healthy Eating Index scores, physical activity (MetHrs/week), and pack years of smoking assessed between 1994–1998. Genetic risk was based on Y402H in complement factor H (CFH) and A69S in age-related maculopathy susceptibility locus 2 (ARMS2). Interactions between healthy lifestyle score and genotype in relation to the odds of AMD were assessed. Main Outcome Stereoscopic fundus photographs were taken and graded for AMD six years after exposure assessment (2001–2004). A total of 308 women had early AMD and 29 had late AMD). Results The odds of AMD were 3.3 times greater in women with both low healthy lifestyle score (0–2) and high risk CFH genotype (CC), relative to those who had low genetic risk (TT) and healthy lifestyle scores of 4–6 (95% CI:1.8–6.1). There were no significant additive (SI=1.08, 95% CI: 0.70–1.67) or multiplicative (Pinteraction=0.94) interactions in the full sample. Limiting the sample to those with stable diets prior to AMD assessment (n=728) strengthened the joint effects (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.85–11.6) and suggested high risk genotype and low lifestyle score combined had a stronger association than expected by simply adding the two effects (SI=1.34, 95% CI: 1.05–1.70). Adjusting for dietary lutein and zeaxanthin attenuated, and therefore partially explained the

  6. Age-related macular degeneration and the role of the complement system.

    PubMed

    McHarg, Selina; Clark, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Bishop, Paul N

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment. It is characterised by damage to a tissue complex composed of the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaris. In early AMD extracellular debris including drusen accumulates in Bruch's membrane and then in late AMD geographic atrophy and/or neovascularisation develop. Variants in genes encoding components of the alternative pathway of the complement cascade have a major influence on AMD risk, especially at the RCA locus on chromosome 1, which contains CFH and the CFHR genes. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated complement components in unaffected and AMD macular tissue. Whilst other factors, including oxidative stress, play important roles in AMD pathogenesis, evidence for the central role played by complement dysregulation is discussed in this review.

  7. Visual function 5 years or more after macular translocation surgery for myopic choroidal neovascularisation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K; Kachi, S; Iwata, E; Ishikawa, K; Terasaki, H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the changes in the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after 1 year and after ≥5 years after macular translocation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or myopic choroidal neovascularisation (mCNV). Methods The medical records of 61 consecutive patients who underwent macular translocation with 360° retinotomy for AMD (35 eyes) or mCNV (26 eyes) were reviewed. Overall, 40 patients, 17 mCNV and 23 AMD, were followed for at least 5 years. BCVA and area of the Goldmann visual field (VF) measured before, 12 months after surgery, and at the final visit. Results In the 23 AMD eyes followed for ≥5 years, the mean preoperative BCVA was 1.149±0.105 logMAR units, which significantly improved to 0.69±0.06 logMAR units at 1 year (P<0.001). This BCVA was maintained at 0.633±0.083 logMAR units on their final examination. In the 17 eyes with mCNV followed for ≥5 years, the mean preoperative BCVA was 1.083±0.119 logMAR units, which was significantly improved to 0.689±0.121 logMAR units at 1 year (P=0.001). This BCVA was maintained at 0.678±0.142 logMAR units on their final examination. The area of the VF was significantly decreased at 12 months and did not change significantly thereafter. Conclusions Our results show that macular translocation surgery significantly improves the BCVA and significantly decreases the VF area of eyes with mCNV or AMD after first 1 year. The BCVA and VF area do not change significantly from the values at 1 year for at least 5 years. PMID:22173070

  8. Identification of Chlamydia pneumoniae within human choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kalayoglu, Murat V; Bula, Deisy; Arroyo, Jorge; Gragoudas, Evangelos S; D'Amico, Donald; Miller, Joan W

    2005-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the United States, and increasing evidence suggests that it is an inflammatory disease. The prokaryotic obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae is emerging as a novel risk factor in cardiovascular disease, and recent sero-epidemiological data suggest that C. pneumoniae infection is also associated with AMD. In this study, we examined choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) tissue from patients with neovascular AMD for the presence of C. pneumoniae and determined whether the pathogen can dysregulate the function of key cell types in ways that can cause neovascular AMD. Nine CNV removed from patients with neovascular AMD were examined for the presence of C. pneumoniae by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR); in addition, we performed PCR on nine non-AMD eyes, and IHC on five non-AMD CNV, seven non-AMD eyes, and one internal limiting membrane specimen. Finally, human monocyte-derived macrophages and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were exposed to C. pneumoniae and assayed in vitro for the production of pro-angiogenic immunomodulators (VEGF, IL-8, and MCP-1). C. pneumoniae was detected in four of nine AMD CNV by IHC and two of nine AMD CNV by PCR, induced VEGF production by human macrophages, and increased production of IL-8 and MCP-1 by RPE cells. In contrast, none of the 22 non-AMD specimens showed evidence for C. pneumoniae. These data indicate that a pathogen capable of inducing chronic inflammation and pro-angiogenic cytokines can be detected in some AMD CNV, and suggest that infection may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  9. Cytokines in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: fundamentals of targeted combination therapy.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Dias, João Rafael; Rodrigues, Eduardo Büchele; Maia, Mauricio; Magalhães, Octaviano; Penha, Fernando Marcondes; Farah, Michel Eid

    2011-12-01

    The neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), called wet-AMD or choroidal neovascularisation, begins with damage to the outer retinal cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which elicits a cascade of inflammatory and angiogenic responses leading to neovascularisation under the macula. Studies showed that oxidative damage, chronic inflammation of the RPE and complement misregulation work at different steps of this disease. After established neovascularisation, several pro- and antiangiogenic agents start to play an important role. Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are the most specific and potent regulators of angiogenesis, which are inhibited by intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, bevacizumab, VEGF Trap, pegaptanib sodium and other agents under investigation. Pigment epithelium-derived factor, on the other hand, shows neuroprotective and antiangiogenic activities. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has a mitogenic effect on a wide range of epithelial and endothelial cells, and it is inhibited by an anti-HGF monoclonal antibody. Platelet-derived growth factor is a potent chemoattractant and mitogen for both fibroblasts and retinal RPE cells, which has been inhibited experimentally by VEGF Trap and human anti-platelet-derived growth factor-D monoclonal antibody. Fibroblast growth factor-2 has pleiotropic effects in different cell and organ systems, and it is blocked by anti-FGF antibodies, with a greater benefit regarding antiangiogenesis when combined treatment with anti-VEGF is performed. Tumour necrosis factor alpha is expressed in the retina and the choroid, and its blockade in choroidal neovascularisation includes the use of monoclonals such as infliximab. This paper reviews the most important cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of wet-AMD, with emphasis on potential combined therapies for disease control.

  10. Association between vitamin D status and age-related macular degeneration by genetic risk

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Amy E.; Meyers, Kristin J; Liu, Zhe; Engelman, Corinne D; Wallace, Robert B; LeBlanc, Erin S; Tinker, Lesley F.; Iyengar, Sudha K; Robinson, Jennifer; Sarto, Gloria E.; Mares, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Importance Deficient 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with increased odds of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Objective We examined 1) whether this association is modified by genetic risk for AMD and 2) if there is an association between AMD and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes involved in vitamin D transport, metabolism and genomic function. Design, Setting and Participants Women were postmenopausal and participants of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS) (54 to <75 years) with available serum 25(OH)D concentrations (assessed from 1994–1998), genetic data, and measures of AMD (n=142) assessed at CAREDS baseline from 2001–2004 (n=913). Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalent early or late AMD was determined from graded, stereoscopic fundus photographs. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AMD by the joint effects of 25(OH)D (<30, ≥30 to <50, ≥50 to <75, and ≥75 nmol/L) and risk genotype (noncarrier, one, or two risk alleles). The referent group was noncarriers with adequate vitamin D status (≥75 nmol/L). Joint effect ORs were adjusted for age, smoking, iris pigmentation, self-reported cardiovascular disease, self-reported diabetes status, and hormone use. Additive and multiplicative interactions were assessed using the Synergy Index (SI) and an interaction term, respectively. Results We observed a 6.7-fold increased odds of AMD (95% CI=1.6, 28.2) among women with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D<30 nmol/L) and two risk alleles for complement factor H (CFH) Y402H (SI for additive interaction=1.4, 95% CI=1.1, 1.7; p for multiplicative interaction=0.25,. A significant additive (SI=1.4, 95% CI=1.1, 1.7) and multiplicative interaction (p=0.02) was observed for deficient women with two high risk complement factor I (CFI) (rs10033900) alleles (OR=6.3, 95% CI=1.6, 24.2). The odds of AMD did not differ by genotype of candidate

  11. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  12. Wet Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    Wet macular degeneration Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes blurred vision ... of the retina responsible for central vision. Wet macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related ...

  13. Dry age-related macular degeneration: A currently unmet clinical need.

    PubMed

    Girmens, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment and disability in older people worldwide. Although considerable advances in the management of the neovascular form of AMD have been made in the last decade, no therapy is yet available for the advanced dry form of AMD (geographic atrophy). This review focuses on current trends in the development of new therapies targeting specific pathophysiological pathways of dry AMD. Increased understanding of the complex mechanisms that underlie dry AMD will help to address this largely unmet clinical need.

  14. [Progression of treatment and researches in dry age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaiyan; Tang, Shibo

    2015-03-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness and visual disability among old patients in Europe and North America. AMD has been divided into two broad clinical categories depending on whether there is a presence of abnormal neovascularization: neovascular (exudative or wet) AMD and dry (or geographic atrophic) AMD. VEGF has been understood as a pathogenesis of wet AMD which allows us to get breakthroughs in treatment. While the progression of dry AMD treatment is very slow because the lack of pathogenesis, no acute loss of vision, and without appropriate standards for treatment. This review tries to introduce about the recent researches and progressions for dry AMD treatment.

  15. Dry age-related macular degeneration: A currently unmet clinical need

    PubMed Central

    Girmens, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment and disability in older people worldwide. Although considerable advances in the management of the neovascular form of AMD have been made in the last decade, no therapy is yet available for the advanced dry form of AMD (geographic atrophy). This review focuses on current trends in the development of new therapies targeting specific pathophysiological pathways of dry AMD. Increased understanding of the complex mechanisms that underlie dry AMD will help to address this largely unmet clinical need. PMID:25343081

  16. Binocular contrast inhibition in subjects with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Valberg, Arne; Fosse, Per

    2002-01-01

    In subjects with normal vision, binocular contrast sensitivity is generally higher than monocular sensitivity, indicating summation of contrast in the two eyes. We have compared monocular and binocular contrast sensitivity and acuity for a group of 13 subjects with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Relative to a normal control group, many of the AMD subjects showed reduced binocular contrast summation, and binocular inhibition was found for eight subjects for a narrow or an extended frequency band. A better monocular than binocular function may have practical implications for reading and orientation in AMD.

  17. Effectiveness of Community versus Hospital Eye Service follow-up for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with quiescent disease (ECHoES): a virtual non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Scott, Lauren J; Taylor, Jodi; Harding, Simon P; Peto, Tunde; Muldrew, Alyson; Hogg, Ruth E; Wordsworth, Sarah; Mills, Nicola; O'Reilly, Dermot; Rogers, Chris A; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the ability of ophthalmologists versus optometrists to correctly classify retinal lesions due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Design Randomised balanced incomplete block trial. Optometrists in the community and ophthalmologists in the Hospital Eye Service classified lesions from vignettes comprising clinical information, colour fundus photographs and optical coherence tomographic images. Participants' classifications were validated against experts' classifications (reference standard). Setting Internet-based application. Participants Ophthalmologists with experience in the age-related macular degeneration service; fully qualified optometrists not participating in nAMD shared care. Interventions The trial emulated a conventional trial comparing optometrists' and ophthalmologists' decision-making, but vignettes, not patients, were assessed. Therefore, there were no interventions and the trial was virtual. Participants received training before assessing vignettes. Main outcome measures Primary outcome—correct classification of the activity status of a lesion based on a vignette, compared with a reference standard. Secondary outcomes—potentially sight-threatening errors, judgements about specific lesion components and participants' confidence in their decisions. Results In total, 155 participants registered for the trial; 96 (48 in each group) completed all assessments and formed the analysis population. Optometrists and ophthalmologists achieved 1702/2016 (84.4%) and 1722/2016 (85.4%) correct classifications, respectively (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.25; p=0.543). Optometrists' decision-making was non-inferior to ophthalmologists' with respect to the prespecified limit of 10% absolute difference (0.298 on the odds scale). Optometrists and ophthalmologists made similar numbers of sight-threatening errors (57/994 (5.7%) vs 62/994 (6.2%), OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.57; p=0.789). Ophthalmologists assessed lesion components as

  18. The potential preventive effects of vitamins for cataract and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jacques, P F

    1999-05-01

    Age-related cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are important public health problems. Approximately 50% of the 30 to 50 million cases of blindness worldwide result from unoperated cataract. In the US and other developed countries AMD is the leading cause of blindness, but age-related cataract remains the leading cause of visual disability. Age-related cataract and AMD represent an enormous economic burden. In the United States more than 1.3 million cataract extractions are performed annually at a cost of approximately $3.5 billion. Much of the experimental research on the etiology of cataract and AMD has focused on the role of nutritional antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids). Evidence from epidemiologic studies support a role for nutritional antioxidants in delaying the onset of these age-related vision disorders. Although it is not yet possible to conclude that antioxidant nutrients have a role in prevention of cataract or AMD, a summary of the epidemiologic evidence suggests that it is prudent to consume diets high in vitamins C and E and carotenoids, particularly the xanthophylls, as insurance against the development of cataract and AMD.

  19. Genetics of Unilateral and Bilateral Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severity Stages

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Tina; Altay, Lebriz; Viehweger, Eva; Hoyng, Carel B.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Felsch, Moritz; Fauser, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disease causing visual impairment and blindness. Various gene variants are strongly associated with late stage AMD, but little is known about the genetics of early forms of the disease. This study evaluated associations of genetic factors and different AMD stages depending on unilateral and bilateral disease severity. Methods In this case-control study, participants were assigned to nine AMD severity stages based on the characteristics of each eye. 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and attempted to correlate with AMD severity stages by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses and trend analyses. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were calculated. Results Of 3444 individuals 1673 were controls, 379 had early AMD, 333 had intermediate AMD and 989 showed late AMD stages. With increasing severity of disease and bilateralism more SNPs with significant associations were found. Odds ratios, especially for the main risk polymorphisms in ARMS2 (rs10490924) and CFH (rs1061170), gained with increasing disease severity and bilateralism (exemplarily: rs1061170: unilateral early AMD: OR = 1.18; bilateral early AMD: OR = 1.20; unilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.28; bilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.39, unilateral geographic atrophy (GA): OR = 1.50; bilateral GA: OR = 1.71). Trend analyses showed p<0.0001 for ARMS2 (rs10490924) and for CFH (rs1061170), respectively. AUC of risk models for various AMD severity stages was lowest for unilateral early AMD (AUC = 0.629) and showed higher values in more severely and bilaterally affected individuals being highest for late AMD with GA in one eye and neovascular AMD in the other eye (AUC = 0.957). Conclusion The association of known genetic risk factors with AMD became stronger with increasing disease severity, which also led to an increasing discriminative ability of AMD cases and controls. Genetic predisposition was

  20. Pathophysiology of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Giuseppina; Chiappelli, Martina; De Martinis, Massimo; Franco, Vito; Ginaldi, Lia; Guiglia, Rosario; Licastro, Federico; Lio, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A Symposium regarding the Pathophysiology of Successful and Unsuccessful Ageing was held in Palermo, Italy on 7-8 April 2009. Three lectures from that Symposium by G. Campisi, L. Ginaldi and F. Licastro are here summarized. Ageing is a complex process which negatively impacts on the development of various bodily systems and its ability to function. A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Thus, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of age-related diseases is urgently required to improve our understanding of maintaining good health in the elderly and to program possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:19737378

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: clinical findings, histopathology and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, Marco A; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among people over age 55 years in industrialized countries. Known major risk factors for AMD include: age >55 years, history of smoking, white race, and mutations in various components of the complement system. Early AMD is characterized by the presence of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities. Late AMD is associated with central visual loss and is characterized by the presence of choroidal neovascularization and/or geographic atrophy. Early AMD is associated with a number of biochemical abnormalities including oxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, complement deposition in the RPE-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex, lipidization of Bruch's membrane, and extracellular matrix abnormalities (e.g. collagen crosslinking, advanced glycation end product formation). Antiangiogenic drugs block the vascular leakage associated with choroidal new vessels, thus reducing retinal edema and stabilizing or restoring vision. At this time, there are no proven effective treatments for the nonexudative complications of AMD. Modern ocular imaging technologies (including spectral domain and phase variance optical coherence tomography, short- and long-wavelength fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and near-infrared reflectance) enable one to follow changes in the RPE, photoreceptors, and choriocapillaris quantitatively as the disease progresses. In addition, one can quantitatively assess the volume of drusen and areas of atrophy. These data, when correlated with the known histopathology of AMD, may provide useful measures of treatment efficacy that are likely to be more sensitive and reproducible than conventional end points such as visual acuity and rate of enlargement of geographic atrophy. As a result, these imaging technologies may be valuable in assessing the effects of cell-based therapy for patients with AMD.

  2. Distribution and Quantification of Choroidal Macrophages in Human Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D. Scott; Bhutto, Imran; Edwards, Malia M.; Silver, Rachel E.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increasing evidence suggests a role for macrophages in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study examined choroidal macrophages and their activation in postmortem eyes from subjects with and without AMD. Methods Choroids were incubated with anti-ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (anti-IBA1) to label macrophages, anti-human leukocyte antigen-antigen D-related (anti-HLA-DR) as a macrophage activation marker, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin lectin to label blood vessels. Whole mounts were imaged using confocal microscopy. IBA1- and HLA-DR–positive (activated) cells were counted in submacula, paramacula, and nonmacula, and cell volume and sphericity were determined using computer-assisted image analysis. Results In aged control eyes, the mean number of submacular IBA1+ and HLA-DR+ macrophages was 433/mm2 and 152/mm2, respectively. In early AMD eyes, there was a significant increase in IBA1+ and HLA-DR+ cells in submacula compared to those in controls (P = 0.0015 and P = 0.008, respectively). In eyes with neovascular AMD, there were significantly more HLA-DR+ cells associated with submacular choroidal neovascularization (P = 0.001). Mean cell volume was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.02), and sphericity was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.005) in all AMD groups compared to controls. Conclusions The average number of IBA1+ macrophages in submacular and paramacular choroid was significantly higher in early/intermediate AMD compared to that in aged controls. HLA-DR+ submacular macrophages were significantly increased in all stages of AMD, and they were significantly more round and smaller in size in the submacular AMD choroid, suggesting their activation. These findings support the concept that AMD is an inflammatory disease. PMID:27802514

  3. Awareness of Age-related Macular Degeneration and Its Risk Factors among Beijing Residents in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Xi; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Ma, Nan; Xia, Song; Yang, Jing-Yuan; Chen, You-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness, and awareness of this disease is important in the prevention of blindness. However, lack of public awareness of AMD was shown in previous studies, and there was no report of AMD awareness in the Mainland of China. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the awareness of AMD and its risk factors among Beijing residents in China. Methods: A cross-sectional, computer-assisted, telephone investigation was conducted to measure the awareness of AMD among Beijing residents. All the contacts of potential respondents were randomly generated by computer. Only those above 18 years of age and willing to participate in the study were included. The questionnaire for the study was modified from the AMD Alliance International Global Report. Pearson's Chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis were used to identify the factors that affected the knowledge of AMD. Results: Among 385 Beijing residents who agreed to participate, the awareness of AMD was 6.8%, far below than that of cataract and glaucoma. Participants who were above 30 years of age (odds ratio [OR] 6.17, confidence interval [CI] 1.44–26.57), with experience of health-related work (OR 8.11, CI 3.25–20.27), and whose relatives/friends or themselves suffering from AMD (OR 32.18, CI 11.29–91.68) had better AMD awareness. Among those familiar with AMD, only 35% of them identified smoking as a risk factor, and only 23.1% of the residents believed that smoking could lead to blindness. Conclusions: The sample of Chinese population had limited knowledge of AMD. Educational programs need to be carried out to raise public awareness of AMD. PMID:28091406

  4. Local configuration pattern features for age-related macular degeneration characterization and classification.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Fujita, Hamido; Koh, Joel E W; Tan, Jen Hong; Noronha, Kevin; Bhandary, Sulatha V; Chua, Chua Kuang; Lim, Choo Min; Laude, Augustinus; Tong, Louis

    2015-08-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is an irreversible and chronic medical condition characterized by drusen, Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) and Geographic Atrophy (GA). AMD is one of the major causes of visual loss among elderly people. It is caused by the degeneration of cells in the macula which is responsible for central vision. AMD can be dry or wet type, however dry AMD is most common. It is classified into early, intermediate and late AMD. The early detection and treatment may help one to stop the progression of the disease. Automated AMD diagnosis may reduce the screening time of the clinicians. In this work, we have introduced LCP to characterize normal and AMD classes using fundus images. Linear Configuration Coefficients (CC) and Pattern Occurrence (PO) features are extracted from fundus images. These extracted features are ranked using p-value of the t-test and fed to various supervised classifiers viz. Decision Tree (DT), Nearest Neighbour (k-NN), Naive Bayes (NB), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to classify normal and AMD classes. The performance of the system is evaluated using both private (Kasturba Medical Hospital, Manipal, India) and public domain datasets viz. Automated Retinal Image Analysis (ARIA) and STructured Analysis of the Retina (STARE) using ten-fold cross validation. The proposed approach yielded best performance with a highest average accuracy of 97.78%, sensitivity of 98.00% and specificity of 97.50% for STARE dataset using 22 significant features. Hence, this system can be used as an aiding tool to the clinicians during mass eye screening programs to diagnose AMD.

  5. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Background Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD. Design This was an observational case–control study. Participants or samples A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included. Methods Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers. Main outcome measures Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured. Results The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP). Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes) were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5%) compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028). The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) was lower for AMD patients (99.4%) compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032). Conclusion We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an imbalance in the recruitment of macrophages into the retina during disease development. PMID:28176950

  6. The stereotypical molecular cascade in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: the role of dynamic reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Kent, D

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises our current understanding of the molecular basis of subretinal neovascularisation (SRNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The term neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is derived from the dominant early clinical features of haemorrhage, fluid, and lipid in the subretinal space (SRS) and the historical role of fluorescein angiography in detecting the presence of NV tissue. However, at the cellular level, SRNV resembles an aberrant but stereotypical tissue repair response that incorporates both an early inflammatory phase and a late fibrotic phase in addition to the neovascular (NV) component that dominates the early clinical presentation. This review will seek not only to highlight the important molecules involved in each of these components but to demonstrate that the development of SRNV has its origins in the earliest events in non-NV AMD pathogenesis. Current evidence suggests that this early-stage pathogenesis is characterised by complement-mediated immune dysregulation, leading to a state of chronic inflammation in the retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane/choriocapillaris complex. These initial events can be seamlessly and inextricably linked to late-stage development of SRNV in AMD by the process of dynamic reciprocity (DyR), the ongoing bidirectional communication between cells, and their surrounding matrix. Moreover, this correlation between disease onset and eventual outcome is reflected in the temporal and spatial correlation between chronic inflammation, NV, and fibrosis within the reparative microenvironment of the SRS. In summary, the downstream consequences of the earliest dysfunctional molecular events in AMD can result in the late-stage entity we recognize clinically as SRNV and is characterized by a spectrum of predictable, related, and stereotypical processes referred to as DyR.

  7. Whole Exome Sequencing in Patients with the Cuticular Drusen Subtype of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Duvvari, Maheswara R.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; Geerlings, Maartje J.; Saksens, Nicole T. M.; Bakker, Bjorn; Henkes, Arjen; Neveling, Kornelia; del Rosario, Marisol; Westra, Dineke; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P. W. J.; Schick, Tina; Fauser, Sascha; Boon, Camiel J. F.; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Jong, Eiko K.; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly people worldwide. Cuticular drusen (CD) is a clinical subtype of AMD, which typically displays an earlier age at onset, and has a strong genetic component. Genetic studies support a role for rare sequence variants in CD susceptibility, and rare sequence variants in the CFH gene have been identified in 8.8% of CD cases. To further explore the role of rare variants in CD, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in 14 affected members of six families and 12 sporadic cases with CD. We detected rare sequence variants in CFH and FBLN5, which previously were shown to harbor rare variants in patients with CD. In addition, we detected heterozygous rare sequence variants in several genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), including FBLN1, FBLN3/EFEMP1, FBLN5, FBLN6/HMCN1, FBN2, and COL15A1. Two rare pathogenic variants were identified in the COL15A1 gene: one in a sporadic case and another was found to segregate in a family with six affected individuals with CD. In addition, two rare pathogenic variants were identified in the FGL1 gene in three unrelated CD cases. These findings suggest that alterations in the ECM and in the coagulation pathway may play a role in the pathogenesis of CD. The identified candidate genes require further analyses in larger cohorts to confirm their role in the CD subtype of AMD. No evidence was found of rare sequence variants in a single gene that segregate with CD in the six families, suggesting that the disease is genetically heterogeneous. PMID:27007659

  8. Submacular hemorrhage in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: A synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stanescu-Segall, Dinu; Balta, Florian; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Large submacular hemorrhage, an uncommon manifestation of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, may also occur with idiopathic polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Submacular hemorrhage damages photoreceptors owing to iron toxicity, fibrin meshwork contraction, and reduced nutrient flux, with subsequent macular scarring. Clinical and experimental studies support prompt treatment, as tissue damage can occur within 24 hours. Without treatment the natural history is poor, with a mean final visual acuity (VA) of 20/1600. Reported treatments include retinal pigment epithelial patch, macular translocation, pneumatic displacement, intravitreal or subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs, and combinations thereof. In the absence of comparative studies, we combined eligible studies to assess the VA change before and after each treatment option. The greatest improvement occurred after combined pars plana vitrectomy, subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, with VA improving from 20/1000 to 20/400. The best final VA occurred using combined intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator, gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, with VA improving from 20/200 to 20/100. Both treatments had an acceptable safety profile, but most studies were small, and larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine both safety and efficacy.

  9. STAT3 activation in circulating monocytes contributes to neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Lechner, Judith; Zhao, Jiawu; Toth, Levente; Hogg, Ruth; Silvestri, Giuliana; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Chakravarthy, Usha; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating macrophages are critically involved in pathogenic angiogenesis such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Macrophages originate from circulating monocytes and three subtypes of monocyte exist in humans: classical (CD14+CD16-), non-classical (CD14-CD16+) and intermediate (CD14+CD16+) monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of circulating monocyte in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Flow cytometry analysis showed that the intermediate monocytes from nAMD patients expressed higher levels of CX3CR1 and HLA-DR compared to those from controls. Monocytes from nAMD patients expressed higher levels of phosphorylated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (pSTAT3), and produced higher amount of VEGF. In the mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), pSTAT3 expression was increased in the retina and RPE/choroid, and 49.24% of infiltrating macrophages express pSTAT3. Genetic deletion of the Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 3 (SOCS3) in myeloid cells in the LysM-Cre+/-:SOCS3fl/fl mice resulted in spontaneous STAT3 activation and accelerated CNV formation. Inhibition of STAT3 activation using a small peptide LLL12 suppressed laser-induced CNV. Our results suggest that monocytes, in particular the intermediate subset of monocytes are activated in nAMD patients. STAT3 activation in circulating monocytes may contribute to the development of choroidal neovascularisation in AMD. PMID:27009107

  10. Incidence of Intraocular Pressure Elevation following Intravitreal Ranibizumab (Lucentis) for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Gustavo MSM; Grigg, John; Chua, Brian; Lee, Anne; Lim, Ridia; Higgins, Ralph; Martins, Alessandra; Goldberg, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim The aim of this article is to evaluate the rate of patients developing sustained elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) after ranibizumab (Lucentis) intravitreal (IVT) injections. Design This is a retrospective study. Participants Charts of 192 consecutive patients receiving Lucentis for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were retrospectively reviewed. Materials and methods We enrolled patients with at least two IOP measurements between injections. Elevated IOP was defined as >21 mm Hg with an increase of at least 20% from baseline. Noninjected contralateral eyes of the same patient cohort were used as control. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was defined as elevated IOP. Secondary outcomes were presence and type of glaucoma, number of injections, and time to IOP elevation. Results Elevated IOP occurred at a significantly higher rate in eyes receiving IVT ranibizumab (7.47%; n = 9) compared with control (0.93%; n = 1). Patients with preexisting glaucoma or ocular hypertension (OHT) were more likely to develop elevated IOP after IVT ranibizumab injection. Conclusion Intravitreal ranibizumab injections are associated with sustained IOP elevation in some eyes. How to cite this article Reis GMSM, Grigg J, Chua B, Lee A, Lim R, Higgins R, Martins A, Goldberg I, Clement CI. The Incidence of Intraocular Pressure Elevation following Intravitreal Ranibizumab (Lucentis) for Age-related Macular Degeneration. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2017;11(1):3-7. PMID:28138211

  11. A paradigm shift in imaging biomarkers in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Waldstein, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has undergone substantial break-throughs in diagnostic as well as therapeutic respect, with optical coherence tomography (OCT) allowing to identify disease morphology in great detail, and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy providing unprecedented benefit. However, these two paths have yet not been combined in an optimal way, real-world outcomes are inferior to expectations, and disease management is largely inefficient in the real-world setting. This dilemma can be solved by identification of valid biomarkers relevant for visual function, disease activity and prognosis, which can provide solid guidance for therapeutic management on an individual level as well as on the population base. Qualitative and quantitative morphological features obtained by advanced OCT provide novel insight into exudative and degenerative stages of neovascular AMD. However, conclusions from structure/function correlations evolve differently from previous paradigms. While central retinal thickness was used as biomarker for guiding retreatment management in clinical trials and practice, fluid localization in different compartments offers superior prognostic value: Intraretinal cystoid fluid has a negative impact on visual acuity and is considered as degenerative when persisting through the initial therapeutic interval. Subretinal fluid is associated with superior visual benefit and a lower rate of progression towards geographic atrophy. Detachment of the retinal pigment epithelium was identified as most pathognomonic biomarker, often irresponsive to therapy and responsible for visual decline during a pro-re-nata regimen. Alterations of neurosensory tissue are usually associated with irreversible loss of functional elements and a negative prognosis. Novel OCT technologies offer crucial insight into corresponding changes at the level of the photoreceptor--retinal pigment epithelial--choriocapillary unit, identifying

  12. Retinal Ultrastructure of Murine Models of Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Hema L.; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most prevalent form of irreversible blindness worldwide in the elderly population. The pathology of dry AMD consists of degeneration of photoreceptors and the RPE, lipofuscin (A2E) accumulation, and drusen formation. Mice have been widely used for generating models that simulate human AMD features for investigating the pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of the disease. Although the mouse has no macula, focal atrophy of photorecptors and RPE, lipofuscin accumulation, and increased A2E can develop in aged mouse eyes. However, drusen are rarely seen in mice because of their simpler Bruch’s membrane and different process of lipofuscin extrusion compared with humans. Thus, analyzing basal deposits at the ultrastructural level and understanding the ultrastructural pathologic differences between various mouse AMD models are critical to comprehending the significance of research findings and response to possible therapeutic options for dry AMD. Based on the multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD, murine dry AMD models can be classified into three groups. First, genetically engineered mice that target genes related to juvenile macular dystrophies are the most common models, and they include abcr−/− (Stargardt disease), transgenic ELOVL4 (Stargardt-3 dominant inheritary disease), Efemp1R345W/R345W (Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy), and Timp3S156C/S156C (Sorsby fundus dystrophy) mice. Other murine models target genes relevant to AMD, including inflammatory genes such as Cfh−/−, Ccl2−/−, Ccr2−/−, Cx3cr1−/−, and Ccl2−/−/cx3cr1−/−, oxidative stress associated genes such as Sod1−/− and Sod2 knockdown, metabolic pathway genes such as neprilysin −/− (amyloid β), transgenic mcd/mcd (cathepsin D), Cp−/−/Heph−/Y (ferroxidase ceruloplasmin/hepaestin, iron metabolism), and transgenic ApoE4 on high fat and high cholesterol diet (lipid metabolism). Second, mice have also been immunologically

  13. Development of gene therapy for treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Askou, Anne Louise

    2014-07-01

    Intraocular neovascular diseases are the leading cause of blindness in the Western world in individuals over the age of 50. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of these diseases. Exudative AMD, the late-stage form, is characterized by abnormal neovessel development, sprouting from the choroid into the avascular subretinal space, where it can suddenly cause irreversible damage to the vulnerable photoreceptor (PR) cells essential for our high-resolution, central vision. The molecular basis of AMD is not well understood, but several growth factors have been implicated including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the advent of anti-VEGF therapy has markedly changed the outcome of treatment. However, common to all current therapies for exudative AMD are the complications of repeated monthly intravitreal injections, which must be continued throughout one's lifetime to maintain visual benefits. Additionally, some patients do not benefit from established treatments. Strategies providing long-term suppression of inappropriate ocular angiogenesis are therefore needed, and gene therapy offers a potential powerful technique. This study aimed to develop a strategy based on RNA interference (RNAi) for the sustained attenuation of VEGF. We designed a panel of anti-VEGF short hairpin RNAs (shRNA), and based on the most potent shRNAs, microRNA (miRNA)-mimicked hairpins were developed. We demonstrated an additive VEGF silencing effect when we combined the miRNAs in a tricistronic miRNA cluster. To meet the requirements for development of medical treatments for AMD with long-term effects, the shRNA/miRNA is expressed from vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) or lentivirus (LV). Both vector systems have been found superior in terms of transduction efficiency and persistence in gene expression in retinal cells. The capacity of AAV-encoded RNAi effector molecules to silence endogenous VEGF gene expression was evaluated in mouse models, including the model

  14. Genetic insights into age-related macular degeneration: controversies addressing risk, causality, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael B

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition among the elderly population that leads to the progressive central vision loss and serious compromise of quality of life for its sufferers. It is also one of the few disorders for whom the investigation of its genetics has yielded rich insights into its diversity and causality and holds the promise of enabling clinicians to provide better risk assessments for individuals as well as to develop and selectively deploy new therapeutics to either prevent or slow the development of disease and lessen the threat of vision loss. The genetics of AMD began initially with the appreciation of familial aggregation and increase risk and expanded with the initial association of APOE variants with the disease. The first major breakthroughs came with family-based linkage studies of affected (and discordant) sibs, which identified a number of genetic loci and led to the targeted search of the 1q31 and 10q26 loci for associated variants. Three of the initial four reports for the CFH variant, Y402H, were based on regional candidate searches, as were the two initial reports of the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus variants. Case-control association studies initially also played a role in discovering the major genetic variants for AMD, and the success of those early studies have been used to fuel enthusiasm for the methodology for a number of diseases. Until 2010, all of the subsequent genetic variants associated with AMD came from candidate gene testing based on the complement factor pathway. In 2010, several large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified genes that had not been previously identified. Much of this historical information is available in a number of recent reviews (Chen et al., 2010b; Deangelis et al., 2011; Fafowora and Gorin, 2012b; Francis and Klein, 2011; Kokotas et al., 2011). Large meta analysis of AMD GWAS has added new loci and variants to this collection (Chen et al., 2010a; Kopplin et al., 2010; Yu et

  15. Polarization sensitive changes in the human macula associated with normal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanNasdale, Dean Allan, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    The human macula occupies a relatively small, but crucial retinal area, as it is the location responsible for our most acute spatial vision and best color discrimination. Localizing important landmarks in the retina is difficult even in normal eyes where morphological inter-individual variability is high. This becomes even more challenging in the presence of sight-threatening pathology. With respect to the human macula, there remains a significant gap in the understanding of normal structure and function. Even less is known about the pathological mechanisms that occur in sight-threatening diseases including age-related macular degeneration. Because relatively little is known about normal aging changes, it is also difficult to differentiate those changes from changes associated with retinal disease. To better understand normal and pathological changes in the macula, imaging techniques using specific optical signatures are required. Structural features in the macula can be distinguished based on their intrinsic properties using specific light/tissue interactions. Because of the high degree of structural regularity in the macula, polarization sensitive imaging is potentially a useful tool for evaluating the morphology and integrity of the cellular architecture for both normal individuals and those affected by disease. In our investigations, we used polarization sensitive imaging to determining normal landmarks that are important clinically and for research investigations. We found that precision and accuracy in localizing the central macula was greatly improved through the use of polarization sensitive imaging. We also found that specific polarization alterations can be used to demonstrate systematic changes as a function of age, disproportionately affecting the central macular region. When evaluating patients with age-related macular degeneration, we found that precision and accuracy of localizing the central macula was also improved, even when significant pathology

  16. The utility of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stringham, J M; Hammond, B R; Nolan, J M; Wooten, B R; Mammen, A; Smollon, W; Snodderly, D M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and validity of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in patients with intermediate stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The measurement procedure was optimized to accommodate individual differences in temporal vision related to age, disease, or other factors. The validity criteria were based on the similarity of the spectral absorption curves to ex vivo curves of lutein and zeaxanthin and the similarity of spatial density profiles to those measured in subjects without retinal disease. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profiles were measured with an LED-based macular densitometer; spectral absorption curves were measured with a 3-channel Maxwellian view system including a monochromator. All patients were characterized via clinical exams and all but 2 subjects from whom data were obtained had masked grading of color fundus photographs using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Most of the patients were in AREDS category 2 (27%) or 3 (57%). Patients with visual acuity as poor as 20/80 were included, and could perform the task as long as they could see the stimulus. Eighty-one percent of the patients screened were able to perform the cHFP task, and data were obtained from 30 AMD patients. Spatial profiles of MPOD were measured in 19 subjects who could see the stimulus at all tested loci. These profiles were highly similar to those that have been measured with HFP in subjects without retinal disease. The average shape of the spectral absorption curves for the AMD subjects corresponded well to an ex vivo template. These data support both the utility and validity of the cHFP method for measuring MPOD in subjects with intermediate stages of AMD. The ability to measure the retinal response to nutritional intervention is of practical importance for monitoring patients being supplemented with lutein and

  17. Intake of dietary salt and drinking water: Implications for the development of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hollborn, Margrit; Kohen, Leon; Wiedemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Systemic hypertension is a risk factor of age-related retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. High intake of dietary salt and low intake of water increase extracellular osmolality resulting in hypertension, in particular in salt-sensitive individuals. This review summarizes the present knowledge regarding the impact of salt and water intake on the regulation of blood pressure, retinal function, and the development of age-related retinal diseases. Methods A literature search of the Medline database and a summary of recent studies that used human RPE cells. Results The salt sensitivity of the blood pressure and plasma osmolality increase with age, and body water deficits are common in older individuals. High plasma osmolality has adverse effects in the retina. In RPE cells, high osmolality induces expression and secretion of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor, and expression of aquaporin-5, a water channel implicated in transepithelial water transport. The transcriptional activities of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) are critical for the production of VEGF in response to salt-induced osmotic stress. Salt-induced osmotic stress also induces priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome and activates inflammatory enzymes in RPE cells. Conclusions Raised plasma osmolality may aggravate age-related retinal diseases by stimulation of local inflammation and angiogenic factor production in the RPE. Alterations in salt and water consumption, and of minerals that stimulate renal salt excretion, may offer nutritional approaches to prevent age-related retinal disorders, in particular in salt-sensitive individuals and individuals who show signs of body dehydration. PMID:28031693

  18. Six-year outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration with ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Julie; Brié, Heidi; Leys, Anita; Levecq, Laurent; Mergaerts, Filip; Denhaerynck, Kris; Vancayzeele, Stefaan; Van Craeyveld, Eline; Abraham, Ivo; MacDonald, Karen

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the outcomes of ≥6y ranibizumab therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS HELIX was a retrospective, observational effectiveness study using medical records of patients treated in three clinics in Belgium. Patients had neovascular AMD and were initially treated with intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg) between November 1, 2007 and October 31, 2008, had ≥6y of data available, and were treated on an ongoing, as-needed basis. Outcomes included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central retinal thickness (CRT). RESULTS The sample consisted of 88 eyes from 69 patients. Mean age was 76.4±6.5y, most patients were female (62.3%). Most eyes (62.5%) were treatment-naive, 33 previously treated eyes had received predominantly other anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents and verteporfin. Mean baseline BCVA was 57.4±12.7 ETDRS letters and CRT was 291.5±86.1 μm. On average, patients received 20.6±11.9 ranibizumab injections over the ≥6y. Intervals between injections were on average 12.7±16.1wk. Mean change in BCVA from baseline to last observation for the sample was less than one letter (-0.9±17.3 letters), with an average loss of -3.2±15.6 letters in previously treated eyes versus a gain of 0.6±18.4 letters in treatment-naïve eyes. When considering a loss of <15 letters over 6y as stabilization of disease, 75.9% of all eyes showed a positive (improvement or stabilization) outcome. Mean change in CRT from baseline to last observation for the sample was -26.9±148.4 μm with the greatest reduction observed in treatment-naive eyes. CONCLUSION This retrospective study of 69 neovascular AMD patients treated for ≥6y with ranibizumab demonstrates long-term visual stabilization. In light of the natural evolution of the disease, these data confirm that ranibizumab is effective long-term under real-world conditions of heterogeneity of patients, clinicians, and centers. PMID:28149782

  19. Efficacy and safety of ranibizumab for wet age-related macular degeneration in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Hui-Jun; Li, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Zhao, Ming-Wei

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of ranibizumab for wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) in Chinese patients and to determine the mean number of injections administered over one year of follow-up. METHODS This single centre, retrospective observational case series study included data from 121 patients with wAMD (121 eyes) who were diagnosed by indirect ophthalmoscopy, fluorescence fundus angiography (FFA), indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Ranibizumab was injected into the vitreous cavities once per month for 3mo and as needed afterwards. Changes in visual acuity and central foveal thickness (CFT) during the follow-up period were compared, and the mean number of injections over the year was calculated. Patients with one or more adverse events related to the drugs and injections were recorded for further adverse events analysis. RESULTS The study population included 70 males and 51 females aged between 50 and 87y (mean: 71.32±9.41y). The mean number of injections over the first year was 5±1 (range: 3-9). The mean best-corrected visual acuity by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study increased from 43.2±19.3 (95%CI: 39.8-46.7) at baseline to 51.7±20.1 (95%CI: 48.1-55.3), and central foveal thickness (CFT) decreased from 526.5±277.0 µm (95%CI: 476.6-576.4) to 258.2±161.6 µm (95%CI: 229.2-287.3) at 12mo. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.001). Visual acuity significantly improved in 34.1% of the patients (38 eyes), stabilized in 66.1% of the patients (80 eyes), and significantly decreased in 2.5% of the patients (3 eyes). CFT at baseline was an independent risk factor of decreased CFT and increased visual acuity. None of the patients had severe adverse events during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION Ranibizumab can effectively control disease progression and improve visual acuity in patients with wAMD. The disease conditions of most patients stabilized after a one-year treatment with an

  20. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  1. Can HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (“statins”) slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration? The Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS)

    PubMed Central

    Guymer, Robyn H; Dimitrov, Peter N; Varsamidis, Mary; Lim, Lyndell L; Baird, Paul N; Vingrys, Algis J; Robman, Luba

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is responsible for the majority of visual impairment in the Western world. The role of cholesterol-lowering medications, HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors or statins, in reducing the risk of AMD or of delaying its progression has not been fully investigated. A 3-year prospective randomized controlled trial of 40 mg simvastatin per day compared to placebo in subjects at high risk of AMD progression is described. This paper outlines the primary aims of the Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS), and the methodology involved. Standardized clinical grading of macular photographs and comparison of serial macular digital photographs, using the International grading scheme, form the basis for assessment of primary study outcomes. In addition, macular function is assessed at each visit with detailed psychophysical measurements of rod and cone function. Information collected in this study will assist in the assessment of the potential value of HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins) in reducing the risk of AMD progression. PMID:18982929

  2. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  3. Whole exome sequencing of extreme age-related macular degeneration phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sardell, Rebecca J.; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Courtenay, Monique D.; Whitehead, Patrice; Laux, Reneé A.; Adams, Larry D.; Fortun, Jorge A.; Brantley, Milam A.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Agarwal, Anita; Scott, William K.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Demographic, environmental, and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been identified; however, a substantial portion of the variance in AMD disease risk and heritability remains unexplained. To identify AMD risk variants and generate hypotheses for future studies, we performed whole exome sequencing for 75 individuals whose phenotype was not well predicted by their genotype at known risk loci. We hypothesized that these phenotypically extreme individuals were more likely to carry rare risk or protective variants with large effect sizes. Methods A genetic risk score was calculated in a case–control set of 864 individuals (467 AMD cases, 397 controls) based on 19 common (≥1% minor allele frequency, MAF) single nucleotide variants previously associated with the risk of advanced AMD in a large meta-analysis of advanced cases and controls. We then selected for sequencing 39 cases with bilateral choroidal neovascularization with the lowest genetic risk scores to detect risk variants and 36 unaffected controls with the highest genetic risk score to detect protective variants. After minimizing the influence of 19 common genetic risk loci on case-control status, we targeted single variants of large effect and the aggregate effect of weaker variants within genes and pathways. Single variant tests were conducted on all variants, while gene-based and pathway analyses were conducted on three subsets of data: 1) rare (≤1% MAF in the European population) stop, splice, or damaging missense variants, 2) all rare variants, and 3) all variants. All analyses controlled for the effects of age and sex. Results No variant, gene, or pathway outside regions known to be associated with risk for advanced AMD reached genome-wide significance. However, we identified several variants with substantial differences in allele frequency between cases and controls with strong additive effects on affection status after controlling for age and sex

  4. Cost effectiveness of treatments for wet age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Paul; Annemans, Lieven; White, Richard; Gallagher, Meghan; Thomas, Simu

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in people aged ≥50 years. Wet AMD in particular has a major impact on patient quality of life and imposes substantial burdens on healthcare systems. This systematic review examined the cost-effectiveness data for current therapeutic options for wet AMD. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for all articles reporting original cost-effectiveness analyses of wet AMD treatments. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Cochrane Library databases were searched for all wet AMD health technology assessments (HTAs). Overall, 44 publications were evaluated in full and included in this review. A broad range of cost-effectiveness analyses were identified for the most commonly used therapies for wet AMD (pegaptanib, ranibizumab and photodynamic therapy [PDT] with verteporfin). Three studies evaluated the cost effectiveness of bevacizumab in wet AMD. A small number of analyses of other treatments, such as laser photocoagulation and antioxidant vitamins, were also found. Ranibizumab was consistently shown to be cost effective for wet AMD in comparison with all the approved wet AMD therapies (four of the five studies identified showed ranibizumab was cost effective vs usual care, PDT or pegaptanib); however, there was considerable variation in the methodology for cost-effectiveness modelling between studies. Findings from the HTAs supported those from the PubMed and EMBASE searches; of the seven HTAs that included ranibizumab, six (including HTAs for Australia, Canada and the UK) concluded that ranibizumab was cost effective for the treatment of wet AMD; most compared ranibizumab with PDT and/or pegaptanib. By contrast, HTAs at best generally recommended pegaptanib or PDT for restricted use in subsets of patients with wet AMD. In the literature analyses, pegaptanib was found to be cost effective versus usual/best supportive care (including PDT) or no treatment in one of five studies; the other four

  5. miRNA involvement in angiogenesis in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lee, Amy Yi Wei; Wigg, Jonathan P; Peshavariya, Hitesh; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Late-stage AMD is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). miR-93 appears to play a role in regulating vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), a known factor involved in neovascularization. Understanding its biological significance might enable development of therapeutic interventions for diseases like AMD. We aimed to determine the role of miR-93 in AMD using a laser-induced CNV mouse model. CNV was induced by laser photocoagulation in C57BL/6 mice. The CNV mice were transfected with scrambled miR or miR-93 mimic. The treatment effect was assessed by fundus photography and fluorescein angiography and confirmed by choroidal flatmount. The expression of miR-93 and VEGF-A in ocular tissues was analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot. The overexpression effects of miR-93 were also proved on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Significantly decreased expression of miR-93 was observed by qPCR analysis in CNV mice compared to untreated mice (p < 0.05). VEGF-A messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were upregulated with CNV; these changes were ameliorated by restoration of miR-93 (p < 0.05). CNV was reduced after miR-93 transfection. Transfection of miR-93 reduced the proliferation of HMECs (p < 0.01), but no significant changes were observed in 2D capillary-like tube formation (p > 0.05) and migration (p > 0.05) compared with that in the untreated cells. miR-93 has been shown to be a negative modulator of angiogenesis in the eye. All together, these results highlight the therapeutic potential of miR-93 and suggest that it may contribute as a putative therapeutic target for AMD in humans.

  6. Mitochondrial variation and the risk of age-related macular degeneration across diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Nicole A; Mitchell, Sabrina L; Goodloe, Robert J; Murdock, Deborah G; Haines, Jonanthan L; Crawford, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identifying susceptibility variants for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The majority of research to identify genetic variants associated with AMD has focused on nuclear genetic variation. While there is some evidence that mitochondrial genetic variation contributes to AMD susceptibility, to date, these studies have been limited to populations of European descent resulting in a lack of data in diverse populations. A major goal of the Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study is to describe the underlying genetic architecture of common, complex diseases across diverse populations. This present study sought to determine if mitochondrial genetic variation influences risk of AMD across diverse populations. We performed a genetic association study to investigate the contribution of mitochondrial DNA variation to AMD risk. We accessed samples from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, a U.S population-based, cross-sectional survey collected without regard to health status. AMD cases and controls were selected from the Third NHANES and NHANES 2007-2008 datasets which include non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans. AMD cases were defined as those > 60 years of age with early/late AMD, as determined by fundus photography. Targeted genotyping was performed for 63 mitochondrial SNPs and participants were then classified into mitochondrial haplogroups. We used logistic regression assuming a dominant genetic model adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking status (ever vs. never). Regressions and meta-analyses were performed for individual SNPs and mitochondrial haplogroups J, T, and U. We identified five SNPs associated with AMD in Mexican Americans at p < 0.05, including three located in the control region (mt16111, mt16362, and mt16319), one in MT-RNR2 (mt1736), and one in MT-ND4 (mt12007). No mitochondrial variant or haplogroup was significantly

  7. Individualized Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: What are Patients Gaining? Or Losing?

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of drugs that bind diffusible vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pivotal ranibizumab and aflibercept registration trials featured monthly intravitreal injections for 12 months, during which visual acuities and macular edema rapidly improved for the first 3 months and modest gains or stabilization continued until the primary endpoint. In many subsequent trials, patients were evaluated monthly and treated as-needed (PRN) according to the results of visual acuity (VA) testing, fundus examinations and optical coherence tomography scans. Compared to monthly-treated control groups, PRN treated patients require fewer injections during the first year but they also experience smaller VA gains (1–3 letters). A small number of prospective trials that directly compared monthly with PRN therapy showed that VA gains with discontinuous therapy lag slightly behind those achieved with monthly injections. Physicians recognize that monthly office visits with frequent intraocular injections challenge patients’ compliance, accrue high drug and professional service costs, and clog office schedules with frequently returning patients. To decrease the numbers of both office visits and anti-VEGF injections without sacrificing VA gains, physicians have embraced the treat-and-extend strategy. Treat-and-extend has not been studied as rigorously as PRN but it has become popular among both vitreoretinal specialists and patients. Despite the possible risks associated with discontinuous therapy (decreased VA and increased macular fluid), most physicians individualize treatment (PRN or treat-and-extend) for the majority of their patients. This review chapter explores the many advantages of individualized therapy, while balancing these against suboptimal responses due to the decreased frequency of anti-VEGF injections. PMID:26239466

  8. Intravitreal aflibercept in neovascular age-related macular degeneration previously treated with ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Rachel Hui Fen; Gupta, Bhaskar; Simcock, Peter

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the change in visual acuity and central macular thickness (CMT) following treatment with intravitreal aflibercept injections in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) with suboptimum response to ranibizumab. METHODS This was a retrospective study. The inclusion criteria were patients with nAMD who responded poorly to ranibizumab. Patients then received either 3 consecutive aflibercept injections followed by pro re nata (PRN) treatment or PRN alone. Primary endpoints were mean change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and CMT at 12mo. Secondary endpoints were number of injections and adverse events. RESULTS Forty-nine eyes from 49 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed 12-month follow up on aflibercept. Thirty-eight eyes received 3 consecutive aflibercept injections followed by PRN treatment and 11 eyes received PRN injections alone. At 12mo, mean BCVA improved by one letters (logMAR 0.56±0.31 to 0.54±0.34) and mean CMT decreased from 303.9±82.1 to 259.2±108.3 µm. Four percent of eyes gained 15 letters or more, 6% lost more than 15 letters and the remaining 90% had stable BCVA. The mean number of aflibercept injections was 6. There was one case of infectious endophthalmitis. CONCLUSION Intravitreal aflibercept in patients with nAMD with a previous suboptimal response to ranibizumab resulted in an anatomical improvement in macular appearance at 12mo without a corresponding improvement in visual acuity. PMID:28393034

  9. Individualized Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: What are Patients Gaining? Or Losing?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2015-05-21

    The widespread use of drugs that bind diffusible vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pivotal ranibizumab and aflibercept registration trials featured monthly intravitreal injections for 12 months, during which visual acuities and macular edema rapidly improved for the first 3 months and modest gains or stabilization continued until the primary endpoint. In many subsequent trials, patients were evaluated monthly and treated as-needed (PRN) according to the results of visual acuity (VA) testing, fundus examinations and optical coherence tomography scans. Compared to monthly-treated control groups, PRN treated patients require fewer injections during the first year but they also experience smaller VA gains (1-3 letters). A small number of prospective trials that directly compared monthly with PRN therapy showed that VA gains with discontinuous therapy lag slightly behind those achieved with monthly injections. Physicians recognize that monthly office visits with frequent intraocular injections challenge patients' compliance, accrue high drug and professional service costs, and clog office schedules with frequently returning patients. To decrease the numbers of both office visits and anti-VEGF injections without sacrificing VA gains, physicians have embraced the treat-and-extend strategy. Treat-and-extend has not been studied as rigorously as PRN but it has become popular among both vitreoretinal specialists and patients. Despite the possible risks associated with discontinuous therapy (decreased VA and increased macular fluid), most physicians individualize treatment (PRN or treat-and-extend) for the majority of their patients. This review chapter explores the many advantages of individualized therapy, while balancing these against suboptimal responses due to the decreased frequency of anti-VEGF injections.

  10. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Jacob A.; Brunt, Vienna E.; Vallerga, Anne K.; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A.; Minson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed. PMID:26594225

  11. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Zarling, Jacob A; Brunt, Vienna E; Vallerga, Anne K; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed.

  12. [Urgent action needed to raise public awareness of age-related macular degeneration in China].

    PubMed

    Chen, You-xin

    2009-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. The impact of AMD to the economics, society and the patients are huge. However, the awareness of AMD is alarmingly low. Even in developed countries, the awareness of AMD is below 30%. In terms of the risk factors of AMD, the awareness is also quite low, e.g., only 32% were aware of the causal link between smoking and AMD. Although cataract is the leading cause of the blindness in China, as the economic and social progress, as the coming of the aging society, as people pursuing higher quality of life, AMD will become a unignoring public health problem. Thus, it is urgent to take action now to increase the public awareness of AMD.

  13. HLA B27 as Predisposition Factor to Suffer Age Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Enrique Villegas; Fernández, Rafael González; Torres, Luis Pérula; Lacomba, Manuel Santos; Galera, José María Gallardo

    2009-01-01

    To research whether specific alleles HLA class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and class II (HLA-DR) are risk factors for the development of exudative type of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD), HLA antigens are expressed both in normal and affected eyes with ARMD. We designed a prospective case-controlled study. We recruited 75 patients with choroidal neovascularization predominantly classic or occult, secondary to ARMD, and treated with photodynamic therapy. Two hundred and fifty patients over 55 years old, without ophthalmologic pathology who went to hospital for an analytical routine check were used as control. The analysis of the data shows a significant difference between two groups. Allele HLA-B27 correlated positively with ARMD (p < 0.0113). However, we didn't find alleles negatively associated. Thus HLA-B27 is an allele predisposed to suffer ARMD. PMID:19728932

  14. Quantitative spatiotemporal image analysis of fluorescein angiography in age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeffrey W.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation and analysis of retinal angiographic studies has been largely qualitative. Quantitative analysis of pathologic fundus features will facilitate interpretation and potentiate clinical studies where precise image metrology is vital. Fluorescein angiography studies of patients with age- related macular degeneration were digitized. Sequential temporal images were spatially-registered with polynomial warping algorithms, allowing for the construction of a three- dimensional (two spatial and one temporal) angiogram vector. Temporal profiles through spatially-registered, temporally- sequential pixels were computed. Characteristic temporal profiles for fundus background, retinal vasculature, retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, and choroidal neovascular (CNV) membranes were observed, allowing for pixel assignment and fundus feature quantitation. Segmentation and quantitation of fundus features including geographic atrophy and CNV is facilitated by spatio-temporal image analysis.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of subretinal fibrosis in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Keijiro; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Subretinal fibrosis is a result of a wound healing response that follows choroidal neovascularization in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Although anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy has become a standard treatment that improves visual acuity in many nAMD patients, unsuccessful treatment outcomes have often been attributed to the progression of subretinal fibrosis. In this review, we summarize the cellular and extracellular components of subretinal fibrous membranes and also discuss the possible molecular mechanisms including the functional involvement of growth factors and the inflammatory response in the process. Moreover, we present an murine animal model of subretinal fibrosis that might facilitate greater understanding of the pathophysiology and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the inhibition of subretinal fibrosis in nAMD. PMID:25773985

  16. HLA B27 as predisposition factor to suffer age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Villegas Becerril, Enrique; González Fernández, Rafael; Pérula Torres, Luis; Lacomba, Manuel Santos; Gallardo Galera, José María

    2009-08-01

    To research whether specific alleles HLA class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and class II (HLA-DR) are risk factors for the development of exudative type of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD), HLA antigens are expressed both in normal and affected eyes with ARMD. We designed a prospective case-controlled study. We recruited 75 patients with choroidal neovascularization predominantly classic or occult, secondary to ARMD, and treated with photodynamic therapy. Two hundred and fifty patients over 55 years old, without ophthalmologic pathology who went to hospital for an analytical routine check were used as control. The analysis of the data shows a significant difference between two groups. Allele HLA-B27 correlated positively with ARMD (p < 0.0113). However, we didn't find alleles negatively associated. Thus HLA-B27 is an allele predisposed to suffer ARMD.

  17. An aspheric intraocular telescope for age-related macular degeneration patients.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Qureshi, Muhammad A; Robbie, Scott J; Artal, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    We have designed an intraocular telescope for the posterior chamber of the human eye of patients with age related macular degeneration. The basic design is composed of two decentered high optical power lenses ( + 66D and -66D) inducing a 3° prismatic effect to project a magnified central field of view into a healthier location off the central fovea. Aspheric surfaces were used to ensure a compromise between good optical quality and high tolerance to the final axial position of both lenses after surgery. With this particular design, the telescope affords an extended range of depth of focus, high tolerance to different axial lengths of the eye and robustness against typical values of astigmatism and higher order aberrations. The final design has been manufactured in a foldable material and is compact enough to facilitate surgical implantation. This telescope is a simple but promising intraocular visual aid for AMD patients.

  18. Recombinant Haplotypes Narrow the ARMS2/HTRA1 Association Signal for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grassmann, Felix; Heid, Iris M.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in ageing societies, triggered by both environmental and genetic factors. The strongest genetic signal for AMD with odds ratios of up to 2.8 per adverse allele was found previously over a chromosomal region in 10q26 harboring two genes, ARMS2 and HTRA1, although with little knowledge as to which gene or genetic variation is functionally relevant to AMD pathology. In this study, we analyzed rare recombinant haplotypes in 16,144 AMD cases and 17,832 controls from the International AMD Genomics Consortium and identified variants in ARMS2 but not HTRA1 to exclusively carry the AMD risk with P-values between 1.0 × 10−773 and 6.7 × 10−5. This now allows prioritization of the gene of interest for subsequent functional studies. PMID:27879347

  19. Knowledge discovery in ophthalmology: analysis of wet form of age-related macular degeneration treatment outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulińska, Magdalena; Tataj, Emanuel; Mulawka, Jan J.; Szaflik, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), according to epidemiological data, is a main reason of social blindness among elderly people in developed countries. There are two forms of AMD: dry and wet. The first one is of good prognosis with low possibility of serious visual deterioration, while the second one usually leads to quick and severe visual impairment. The aim of our investigations is to analyse results of so called real-life treatment of wet AMD. We analysed outcomes of our patients treated with intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs: Lucentis (61 patients) and Avastin (78 patients). We analysed changes in visual acuity (functional effect) and central retinal thickness (anatomic effect). Both drugs occurred to be efficient in treatment of wet form of AMD, however results were more satisfying in patients with better baseline visual acuity. In our approach we used R environment - an integrated suite of software facilities for data analysis and graphics.

  20. An aspheric intraocular telescope for age-related macular degeneration patients

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Juan; Qureshi, Muhammad A; Robbie, Scott J; Artal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We have designed an intraocular telescope for the posterior chamber of the human eye of patients with age related macular degeneration. The basic design is composed of two decentered high optical power lenses ( + 66D and −66D) inducing a 3° prismatic effect to project a magnified central field of view into a healthier location off the central fovea. Aspheric surfaces were used to ensure a compromise between good optical quality and high tolerance to the final axial position of both lenses after surgery. With this particular design, the telescope affords an extended range of depth of focus, high tolerance to different axial lengths of the eye and robustness against typical values of astigmatism and higher order aberrations. The final design has been manufactured in a foldable material and is compact enough to facilitate surgical implantation. This telescope is a simple but promising intraocular visual aid for AMD patients. PMID:25798322

  1. The role of the ERG in the diagnosis and treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Christina

    2009-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is affecting an increasing number of people, with 2.95 million people estimated to be affected in the USA by 2020. Possible preventive agents, such as vitamins and supplements have been studied and new treatment options for AMD have been developed in recent years. What role does electrophysiology play as a sensitive outcome measure? The most commonly used tests are the full-field electroretinogram (ffERG) and the multifocal ERG (mfERG). Test results from patients with AMD and reduced central vision need special attention in respect to fixation pattern, age-matched control data, and retinal luminance. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of techniques will be considered, together with a review of published studies.

  2. Current knowledge on reticular pseudodrusen in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Alten, F; Eter, N

    2015-06-01

    Drusen are focal deposits of extracellular material located between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane and represent the major phenotypic characteristic of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Due to evolving imaging techniques and recent histological studies, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) have received increasing attention and have been recently identified as an additional phenotypic entity in AMD. In contrast to conventional drusen, RPD proved to be located internal to the RPE. In the past few years, numerous studies collected new findings on RPD related to their pathogenesis, imaging properties and impact on retinal function. While most former natural history studies as well as interventional studies in early AMD did not include imaging RPD beyond colour fundus photography, this phenotype must be included in every future large-scale study on AMD. This review summarises the current knowledge on RPD.

  3. Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Incident Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Antonio B.; Panza, Gregory A.; Cramer, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Saurav; Jayaraman, Ramya; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in people over 65 years old in the United States and has been associated with cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. There is conflicting data, however, regarding the contribution of AMD to the prediction of stroke. Aim To determine whether AMD is a risk indicator for incident stroke in a meta-analysis of available prospective and retrospective cohort studies published in the English literature. Methods We performed a systematic literature search of all studies published in English with Pub Med and other databases from 1966 to August 2014, reporting stroke incidence in patients with macular degeneration. Two investigators independently extracted the data. A random effects model was used to report Odds ratios (OR), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-regression using a mixed linear model was used to understand potential heterogeneity amongst studies. Results We identified 9 studies that reported stroke incidence in patients with and without early AMD (N = 1,420,978). No significant association was found between early AMD with incident stroke. Combined, these 9 studies demonstrated random effects (OR, 1.12; CI, 0.86–1.47; I2 = 96%). Meta-regression on baseline covariates of age, sex, and year of publication did not significantly relate to heterogeneity. Conclusions We found no significant relationship between AMD and incident stroke. Further studies are needed to clarify other causes of decreased survival in patients with AMD. PMID:26580396

  4. Stem cell-based therapies for age-related macular degeneration: current status and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yalin; Zhao, Manli; Su, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness both in developed and developing countries. During the past decades, the managements of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) have dramatically progressed. However, still no effective treatment for non-neovascular AMD (dry AMD) which was characterized by geographic macular atrophy. Recent advances in stem cell sciences have demonstrated that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells can be generated from several types of stem cells (including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, et al) by cell co-culturing or defined factors. Additionally, studies also showed that visual function could be recovered by transplantation of these cells into subretinal space in vivo. Moreover, the United States Food and Drug Administration already approved several clinical trials to evaluate the efficiencies of stem cell based cell transplantation for dry AMD patients. Till now, a few patients enrolled in these studies achieved promising outcomes. This review will summarize recent advances in stem cell based RPE differentiation, transplantation, and the preliminary results of clinical trials. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed. PMID:25550892

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor Gene Polymorphisms in Advanced Non-exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein Jabbarpoor; Bonyadi, Morteza; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Fotuhi, Nikoo; Shoeibi, Nasser; Saadat, Saeed; Yagubi, Zakieh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α gene polymorphisms in advanced dry-type age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a population from Northeastern Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 50 patients with geographic macular atrophy and 73 gender-matched controls were enrolled. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from the peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze 2 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in the TNF-α gene, namely −1031 thymine (T)/cytosine (C) and −308 guanine (G)/adenine (A). Results: The distribution of the - 1031 T/C genotype was TT, 62%; TC, 36%; CC, 2% in the patients and TT, 60%; TC, 36%; CC, 4% in the controls (P = 0.94). Genotype analysis of TNF-α −308 also revealed no significant difference in distribution between patients (G, 78%; GA, 22%; AA, 0%) and controls (GG, 74%; GA, 23%; AA, 3%) (P = 0.51). None of the haplotypes nor alleles of studied TNF-α polymorphisms were significantly associated with advanced dry-type AMD. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that polymorphisms in the TNF-α gene, do not play an important role in dry-type AMD in the studied population. PMID:26425318

  6. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Fernández-Blanco, Clemencia Torrón; Figueroa, Marta S; Pina Marín, Begoña; Fernández-Baca Vaca, Gustavo; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Donate López, Juan; García-Arumí, José; Farrés Martí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5 ± 1.8 and 1.6 ± 2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4 ± 2.8 and 3.6 ± 2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits), and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  7. Validation of anti-aging drugs by treating age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2009-03-28

    Humans die from age-related diseases, which are deadly manifestations of the aging process. In order to extend life span, an anti-aging drug must delay age-related diseases. All together age-related diseases are the best biomarker of aging. Once a drug is used for treatment of any one chronic disease, its effect against other diseases (atherosclerosis, cancer, prostate enlargement, osteoporosis, insulin resistance, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, age-related macular degeneration) may be evaluated in the same group of patients. If the group is large, then the anti-aging effect could be validated in a couple of years. Startlingly, retrospective analysis of clinical and preclinical data reveals four potential anti-aging modalities.

  8. Complement factor H and hemicentin-1 in age-related macular degeneration and renal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cheryl L; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Xu, Zhiying; Capriotti, Jennifer; Joshi, Tripti; Leontiev, Dmitry; Lee, Kristine E; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the associations of complement factor H (CFH) and hemicentin-1 (HMCN1) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and renal function. Three scales, measuring the course of AMD and drusen development, were examined in two samples: the Family Age-Related Macular degeneration Study (FARMS), consisting of families ascertained through a single individual with severe AMD, and an unascertained population-based family cohort, the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), which was also used to assess longitudinal changes in AMD and associations with renal function. Associations were performed by a regression accounting for known risk factors as well as familial and sibling effects. Strong evidence of the association of rs1061170 (Y402H) variation with AMD was confirmed (P = 9.15 x 10(-5) in BDES, P = 0.016 in FARMS). This association was observed in multiple AMD scales, suggesting that its role is not phenotype-specific. Polymorphisms in both CFH and HMCN1 appeared to influence the longitudinal rate of change of AMD. The rs1061170 polymorphism was also associated with a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (P = 0.046). Another CFH polymorphism, rs800292, was similarly associated with eGFR [beta = -0.90 (P = 0.022)]. Associations between rs743137 (P = 0.05) and rs680638 (P = 0.022) in HMCN1 with calculated creatinine clearance progression were also observed. Both genes appear to play a role in both AMD and renal pathophysiology. These findings support evidence for common pathways influencing ocular and renal function and suggest that further work is required on their common determinants.

  9. Health state utilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema and age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health state utility values (HSUVs) are important in the assessment of the cost effectiveness of new interventions. In the case of visual conditions, models generally tend have tended to be built around a set of health states defined by visual acuity (VA). The aim of this review was to assess the impact of VA on HSUVs in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema or age-related macular degeneration. Methods A systematic literature search was undertaken in major bibliographic databases to identify articles reporting on the relationship between HSUVs and vision. Data were extracted for population characteristics, visual levels and estimated utilities. Evidence from reported statistical models, where available, was considered in the evaluation of vision in the better-seeing eye and the worse-seeing eye. Due to the heterogeneity of included studies, a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results Of the 17 relevant studies, 9 studies had data that could be used in the analysis of the impact of vision on HSUVs. Visual loss was associated with a marked impact on health utilities. However, the relationship was not comparable between conditions or by measure of HSUVs. Key results included the finding that overall, self-rated time-trade off estimates were more likely to discriminate between different VA levels than EQ-5D values. Additionally, a stronger correlation was observed between HSUVs and better-seeing eye VA compared to worse-seeing eye VA. Conclusions Visual acuity has a significant impact on HSUVs. Nevertheless, care must be taken in the interpretation and use of estimates in cost-effectiveness models due to differences in measures and population diversity. PMID:24304921

  10. Mechanism of inflammation in age-related macular degeneration: an up-to-date on genetic landmarks.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Romano, Mario R; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Bonomo Roversi, Elia; Franceschelli, Paola; Sebastiani, Adolfo; Rubini, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of AMD. Proinflammatory effects secondary to chronic inflammation (e.g., alternative complement activation) and heterogeneous types of oxidative stress (e.g., impaired cholesterol homeostasis) can result in degenerative damages at the level of crucial macular structures, that is photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch's membrane. In the most recent years, the association of AMD with genes, directly or indirectly, involved in immunoinflammatory pathways is increasingly becoming an essential core for AMD knowledge. Starting from the key basic-research notions detectable at the root of AMD pathogenesis, the present up-to-date paper reviews the best-known and/or the most attractive genetic findings linked to the mechanisms of inflammation of this complex disease.

  11. The new methods of treatment for age-related macular degeneration using the ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yumiko; Awazu, Kunio; Suzuki, Sachiko; Ohshima, Tetsuro; Sawa, Miki; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Tano, Yasuo; Ohji, Masahito

    2007-02-01

    The non-invasive methods of treatments have been studying for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing treatment. A photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the non-invasive treatments. PDT is the methods of treatment using combination of a laser and a photosensitizer. PDT has few risks for patients. Furthermore, PDT enables function preservation of a disease part. PDT has been used for early cancer till now, but in late years it is applied for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is one of the causes of vision loss in older people. However, PDT for AMD does not produce the best improvement in visual acuity. The skin photosensivity by an absorption characteristic of a photosensitizer is avoided. We examined new PDT using combination of an ultra-short pulsed laser and indocyanine green (ICG).

  12. Almost total protection from age-related macular degeneration by haplotypes of the Regulators of Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Joseph F; McLure, Craig A; Guymer, Robyn H; Baird, Paul N; Millman, John; Cantsilieris, Stuart; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. It has been proposed that the polymorphism encoding Y402H (T1277C) in the complement factor H gene (CFH) is one of the main determinants of disease. We genotyped the polymorphism at a number of loci in the region encompassing the Regulators of Complement Activation (RCA) on chromosome 1, including T1277C SNP, in 187 patients and 146 controls. Haplotypes have been classified as protective (P) or susceptible (S) with respect to AMD. This included the identification of an S haplotype with a T at 1277. The results show that no single locus should be assumed to be directly responsible for AMD, but rather argue for the existence of RCA haplotypes, which can be assigned meaningful predictive values for AMD. We conclude that the critical sequences are within a region 450 kb centromeric to 128 kb telomeric of CFH.

  13. Genome-wide association studies: getting to pathogenesis, the role of inflammation/complement in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2014-09-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a chronic, degenerative, and significant cause of visual impairment and blindness in the elderly. Genetic and epidemiological studies have confirmed that AMD has a strong genetic component, which has encouraged the application of increasingly sophisticated genetic techniques to uncover the important underlying genetic variants. Although various genes and pathways have been implicated in the risk for AMD, complement activation has been emphasized repeatedly throughout the literature as having a major role both physiologically and genetically in susceptibility to and pathogenesis of this disease. This article explores the research efforts that brought about the discovery and characterization of the role of inflammatory and immune processes (specifically complement) in AMD. The focus herein is on the genetic evidence for the role of complement in AMD as supported specifically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies, which interrogate hundreds of thousands of variants across the genome in a hypothesis-free approach, and other genetic interrogation methods.

  14. Aging Changes in Retinal Microglia and their Relevance to Age-related Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenxin; Wong, Wai T

    2016-01-01

    Age-related retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, contain features of chronic retinal inflammation that may promote disease progression. However, the relationship between aging and neuroinflammation is unclear. Microglia are long-lived, resident immune cells of the retina, and mediate local neuroinflammatory reactions. We hypothesize that aging changes in microglia may be causally linked to neuroinflammatory changes underlying age-dependent retinal diseases. Here, we review the evidence for (1) how the retinal microglial phenotype changes with aging, (2) the factors that drive microglial aging in the retina, and (3) aging-related changes in microglial gene expression. We examine how these aspects of microglial aging changes may relate to pathogenic mechanisms of immune dysregulation driving the progression of age-related retinal disease. These relationships can highlight microglial aging as a novel target for the prevention and treatment of retinal disease.

  15. Aberrant accumulation of EFEMP1 underlies drusen formation in Malattia Leventinese and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Munier, Francis L; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Schorderet, Daniel F; McLaughlin, Precious J; Chung, Daniel; Traboulsi, Elias; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2002-10-01

    Malattia Leventinese (ML), an inherited macular degenerative disease, is closely reminiscent of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of incurable blindness. Both ML and AMD are characterized by extracellular deposits known as drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane. The mechanism underlying drusen formation is unknown. An Arg to Trp mutation in a gene of unknown function, EFEMP1, is responsible for ML, indicating EFEMP1 may be important in drusen formation. Here, we show that wild-type EFEMP1 is a secreted protein whereas mutant EFEMP1 is misfolded, secreted inefficiently, and retained within cells. In normal eyes, EFEMP1 is not present at the site of drusen formation. However, in ML eyes, EFEMP1 accumulates within the RPE cells and between the RPE and drusen, but does not appear to be a major component of drusen. Furthermore, in AMD eyes, EFEMP1 is found to accumulate beneath the RPE immediately overlaying drusen, but not in the region where there is no apparent retinal pathology observed. These data present evidence that misfolding and aberrant accumulation of EFEMP1 may cause drusen formation and cellular degeneration and play an important role in the etiology of both ML and AMD.

  16. Kilovoltage radiosurgery with gold nanoparticles for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD): a Monte Carlo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, D.; Zygmanski, P.; Arnoldussen, M.; Hanlon, J.; Chell, E.; Sajo, E.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.; Ngwa, W.

    2015-12-01

    This work uses Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to assess the potential benefits of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clinically, a 100 kVp x-ray beam of 4 mm diameter is aimed at the macula to deliver an ablative dose in a single fraction. In the transport model, AuNP accumulated at the bottom of the macula are targeted with a source representative of the clinical beam in order to provide enhanced dose to the diseased macular endothelial cells. It is observed that, because of the AuNP, the dose to the endothelial cells can be significantly enhanced, allowing for greater sparing of optic nerve, retina and other neighboring healthy tissue. For 20 nm diameter AuNP concentration of 32 mg g-1, which has been shown to be achievable in vivo, a dose enhancement ratio (DER) of 1.97 was found to be possible, which could potentially be increased through appropriate optimization of beam quality and/or AuNP targeting. A significant enhancement in dose is seen in the vicinity of the AuNP layer within 30 μm, peaked at the AuNP-tissue interface. Different angular tilting of the 4 mm beam results in a similar enhancement. The DER inside and in the penumbra of the 4 mm irradiation-field are almost the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field leading to normal tissue sparing. The prescribed dose to macular endothelial cells can be delivered using almost half of the radiation allowing reduction of dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve by 49% when compared to a treatment without AuNP.

  17. Progress in measurement of ocular blood flow and relevance to our understanding of glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Harris, A; Chung, H S; Ciulla, T A; Kagemann, L

    1999-09-01

    New technologies have facilitated the study of the ocular circulation. These modalities and analysis techniques facilitate very precise and comprehensive study of retinal, choroidal, and retrobulbar circulations. These techniques include: 1. Vessel caliber assessment; 2. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopic fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography to image and evaluate the retinal circulation and choroidal circulation respectively; 3. Laser Doppler flowmetry and confocal scanning laser Doppler flowmetry to measure blood flow in the optic nerve head and retinal capillary beds; 4. Ocular pulse measurement; and 5. color Doppler imaging to measure blood flow velocities in the central retinal artery, the ciliary arteries and the ophthalmic artery. These technique have greatly enhanced the ability to quantify ocular perfusion defects in many disorders, including glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration, two of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world. Recently it has become clear, in animal models of glaucoma, that retinal ganglion cells die via apoptosis. The factors that initiate apoptosis in these cells remain obscure, but ischemia may play a central role. Patients with either primary open-angle glaucoma or normal-tension glaucoma experience various ocular blood flow deficits. With regard to age-related macular degeneration, the etiology remains unknown although some theories include primary retinal pigment epithelial senescence, genetic defects such as those found in the ABCR gene which is also defective in Stargardt's disease and ocular perfusion abnormalities. As the choriocapillaris supplies the metabolic needs of the retinal pigment epithelium and the outer retina, perfusion defect in the choriocapillaris could account for some of the physiologic and pathologic changes in AMD. Vascular defects have been identified in both nonexudative and exudative AMD patients using new technologies. This paper is a comprehensive update

  18. Leukocyte telomere length is associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hong; Kan, Mengyuan; Ye, Junyi; Liu, Fatao; Wang, Ting; Deng, Jiaying; Tan, Yanfang; He, Lin; Liu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Telomeres located at the ends of chromosomes are involved in genomic stability and play a key role in various cancers and age-related diseases. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a late-onset, age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disease, which includes the geographic atrophy (GA) subtype and the choroidal neovascularization (CNV) subtype. To better understand how leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is related to AMD, we conducted an association study in 197 AMD patients and 259 healthy controls using the established quantitative PCR technique. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of LTL and AMD with the age-adjusted ratio of the telomere length to the copy number of a single-copy gene (T/S). Notably, we found a significant association between AMD and LTL (OR=2.24; 95% CI=1.68-3.07; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Furthermore, the results showed a strongly significant association between the GA subtype and the LTL (OR=4.81; 95% CI=3.15-7.82; P=0.0001) after adjusting for age and sex. Our findings provide evidence of the role that LTL plays in the pathological mechanisms of AMD, mainly in the GA subgroup but not the CNV subgroup.

  19. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor and other endogenous interplayers in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Salvatore; Tatar, Olcay

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifaceted disease characterized by early subclinical changes at the choroidea-retinal pigment epithelium interface. Both the causal and formal pathogenesis of the disease is still puzzling. Similarly, the reason for progression into two distinct late forms which are "geographic atrophy" and "choroidal neovascularization" remains enigmatic. Late changes are usually responsible for the dramatic loss in central function that has a devastating effect on quality of life. In industrialized countries the disease is a major cause for visual disability among persons over 60 years of age. Due to demographic right-shift and increased life expectancy, AMD is not only a medical problem but will have a pronounced socio-economic effect. Neovascular AMD with the development of choroidal neovascularization in the macular area accounts for 80% of the severe loss of visual acuity due to AMD. In the last decades, treatment modes were merely based on the destruction or surgical removal of the neovascular complex. In the present, however, the philosophical approach to treat the disease is changing to a pathology modifying manner. Intelligent targeting of the involved relevant factors and pathways should stop disease progression, reduce complications and improve vision. The first step into this new era has been accomplished with the introduction of antiangiogenic agents. The new agents act either directly on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or indirectly on its functional cascade. VEGF makes a fundamental contribution to neovascular processes but it also acts in physiological pathways. The main purpose of this review is to summarize its physiological role especially within the eye, the role in the development of AMD and to understand and foresee both the benefits and potential side-effects of the anti-VEGF-based therapy.

  20. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  1. Psychosocial Adaptation to Visual Impairment and Its Relationship to Depressive Affect in Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Jennifer; Hill, Robert D.; Kleinschmidt, Julia J.; Gregg, Charles H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examined psychosocial adaptation to vision loss and its relationship to depressive symptomatology in legally blind older adults with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Design and Methods: The 144 study participants were outpatients of a large regional vision clinic that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of…

  2. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  3. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Psychosocial Intervention Program for Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, Tanja; Hickl, Susanne; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Miller, Daniel; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Becker, Stefanie; Volcker, Hans E.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The psychosocial needs of patients suffering from severe visual loss associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) are generally ignored in the clinical routine. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a psychosocial intervention program for ARMD patients. This intervention program was based on six modules…

  4. Ocular Risk Factors for Age-related Macular Degeneration: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES)

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Bell, Samantha; Choudhury, Farzana; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley; Varma, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association of ocular factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Latinos. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study of 6357 self-identified Latinos aged 40 years and older. Methods Ophthalmic examination included subjective refraction, measurement of axial length, evaluation of iris color, Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II) grading of cataracts, and stereoscopic macular photographs for AMD lesions. Generalized estimating equation analysis incorporated data from both eyes to estimate odds ratios adjusted for covariates. Results After controlling for confounders (age, gender and smoking), prior cataract surgery was associated with advanced AMD (OR: 2.8, 95% CI 1.0, 7.8), increased retinal pigment (OR: 1.6, 95% CI 1.0, 1.5) and retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation (OR: 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.4). The presence of any lens opacity was associated with soft drusen (OR: 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.5). Longer axial length (per mm) was associated with a decreased odds of soft drusen, increased retinal pigment, and geographic atrophy (GA) (ORs: 0.8 [95% CI 0.7, 0.9], 0.8 [95% CI 0.7, 0.9], 0.7 [95% CI 0.5, 0.9], respectively. Myopia was inversely associated with soft drusen (OR: 0.8; 95% CI 0.7, 1.0). Lighter colored irises were associated with GA (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 1.0, 25.3). Conclusions Cross-sectional associations of ocular factors such as cataract, cataract surgery, and refractive errors with early AMD lesions found in Latinos were consistent with those in whites. Additionally, prior cataract surgery was associated with advanced AMD. PMID:20138605

  5. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Age-related Macular Degeneration: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Bell, Samantha; Wu, Joanne; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley P.; Hooper, Claire; Foong, Athena W. P.; Varma, Rohit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association of cardiovascular risk factors, ocular perfusion pressure with early and advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Latinos. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study. Methods Data were collected from a population-based sample of self-identified adult Latinos using standardized protocols for assessing blood pressure and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement and stereoscopic macular photography. Hypertension was defined as either a history of hypertension or systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140mmHg +/− diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥85mmHg. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was defined as the difference between mean arterial blood pressure and IOP. AMD was diagnosed from photographic grading by masked trained graders. Logistic regression was used to assess associations. Results Gradable retinal photographs were available in 5875 participants. After adjusting for age, sex, and cigarette smoking, higher DBP and uncontrolled diastolic hypertension were associated with exudative AMD (Odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1−2.8; and OR, 3.3; CI, 1.2−9.3, respectively). Higher OPP was associated with a decreased risk of GA (OR, 0.4 per 10mmHg; CI, 0.3−0.5). Low pulse pressure was associated with a lower risk of exudative AMD (OR, 0.2; CI, 0.1−0.6). Obesity was associated with increased retinal pigment (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.0−2.3). Conclusion These data suggest that in Latinos cardiovascular risk factors may play a role in advanced AMD. Given that Latinos have a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, an intervention aimed at reducing these risk factors may also have a beneficial impact on the risk of having early and advanced AMD. PMID:18222193

  6. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Francesco; New, David D.; Hollingsworth, T. J.; Umfress, Allison; Alhatem, Albert H.; Neeli, Indira; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Calzada, Jorge I.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Mathews, Dennis; Diaz, Rocio I.; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen C.; Charles, Steve; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Radic, Marko Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated sera from elderly subjects with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for presence of autoantibodies (AAbs) against human macular antigens and characterized their identity. Methods Sera were collected from participants in the Age-Related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA) Study, a cross-sectional investigation ancillary to the Health ABC Study, enriched with participants from the general population. The resulting sample (mean age: 79.2±3.9 years old) included subjects with early to advanced AMD (n = 131) and controls (n = 231). Sera were tested by Western blots for immunoreactive bands against human donor macular tissue homogenates. Immunoreactive bands were identified and graded, and odds ratios (OR) calculated. Based on these findings, sera were immunoprecipitated, and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis (GE). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the targets recognized by circulating AAbs seen on 2D-GE, followed by ELISAs with recombinant proteins to confirm LC-MS/MS results, and quantify autoreactivities. Results In AMD, 11 immunoreactive bands were significantly more frequent and 13 were significantly stronger than in controls. Nine of the more frequent bands also showed stronger reactivity. OR estimates ranged between 4.06 and 1.93, and all clearly excluded the null value. Following immunoprecipitation, 2D-GE and LC-MS/MS, five of the possible autoreactivity targets were conclusively identified: two members of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, HSPA8 and HSPA9; another member of the HSP family, HSPB4, also known as alpha-crystallin A chain (CRYAA); Annexin A5 (ANXA5); and Protein S100-A9, also known as calgranulin B that, when complexed with S100A8, forms calprotectin. ELISA testing with recombinant proteins confirmed, on average, significantly higher reactivities against all targets in AMD samples compared to controls. Conclusions Consistent with other evidence supporting the

  7. Preliminary Study on Electrophysiological Changes After Cellular Autograft in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Limoli, Paolo Giuseppe; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Morales, Marco Ulisses; Nebbioso, Marcella; Limoli, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Evolving atrophic macular degeneration represents at least 80% of all macular degenerations and is currently without a standardized care. Autologous fat transplantation efficacy was demonstrated by several studies, as these cells are able to produce growth factors. The aim of the work was to demonstrate possible therapeutic effect of the joined suprachoroidal graft of adipocytes, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in stromal vascular fractions (SVFs) of adipose tissue, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Twelve eyes in 12 dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients, aged 71.25 (SD ± 6.8) between 62 and 80 years, were analyzed. A complete ocular evaluation was performed using best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), retinographic analysis, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, microperimetry, computerized visual field, and standard electroretinogram (ERG). Each eye received a cell in graft between choroid and sclera of mature fat cells and ADSCs in SVF enriched with PRP by means of the variant second Limoli (Limoli retinal restoration technique [LRRT]). In order to test if the differences pre- and post-treatment were significant, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been performed. Adverse effects were not reported in the patients. After surgery with LRRT, the most significant increase in the ERG values was recorded by scotopic rod-ERG (answer coming from the rods), from 41.26 to 60.83 μV with an average increase of 47.44% highly significant (P < 0.05). Moderately significant was the one recorded by scotopic maximal ERG (answer coming from the rods and cones), from 112.22 to 129.68 μV with an average increase of 15.56% (P < 0.1). Cell-mediated therapy based on growth factors used appears interesting because it can improve the retinal functionality responses in the short term. The ERG could, therefore, be used to monitor the effect of cell-mediated regenerative therapies. PMID:25546695

  8. HLA class II genotypes are not associated with age related macular degeneration in a case-control, population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Derek; Hollenbach, Jill; Coleman, Anne L.; Gorin, Michael B.; Yu, Fe; Williams, Kevin; Noble, Janelle; Tranah, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support an immunologic basis and genetic disposition for the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Comprehensive Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) class II typing at four loci (DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1) was assessed using next generation sequencing methods and tested for association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in a case-control study of 456 AMD cases and 499 controls from the population-based Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort. No statistically significant associations were identified for any of the class II loci and a previously identified association between DRB1*13:01 was not replicated in this dataset. These results reported here suggest that common HLA class II genetic variation does not contribute to AMD disease risk. PMID:25665771

  9. Aflibercept as a Second Line Therapy for Neovascular Age Related Macular Degeneration in Israel (ASLI) study.

    PubMed

    Tiosano, L; Segal, O; Mathalone, N; Pollack, A; Ehrlich, R; Klemperer, I; Barak, Y; Moroz, I; Chowers, I; Goldstein, M

    2017-02-17

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate an early switch to aflibecept in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) showing partial or lack of response for initial therapy with bevacizumab.MethodsThe Aflibercept as a Second Line Therapy for Neovascular Age Related Macular Degeneration in Israel (ASLI) was a prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Eyes with nvAMD having incomplete response to 3-9 prior bevacizumab injections were recruited. Three monthly intravitreal aflibercept (2 mg) injections were administered, followed by two bi-monthly injections and a final examination at week 28. An optional injection was allowed at week 20.ResultsForty-seven eyes of 46 patients (mean±SD age 76±8 years) were recruited. The mean number of prior bevacizumab injections was 5.5±2.9. The mean visual acuity improved from 60.3±10 ETDRS letters at baseline to 63.1±15 letters at week 28 (P=0.02, paired t-test). The central subfield thickness (CST) reduced from 409±127 micron at baseline to 330±110 microns at week 4 (P=0.0002; paired t-test), and 277±70 microns at week 28 (P=0.00002; paired t-test). Twenty-two eyes had three to five prior bevacizumab injections (mean 5.1±0.7), and 25 eyes had six to nine prior injections (7.32±1.2). Both groups had reduced CST from baseline to week 28 (P=0.0004 and P=0.0007; paired t-test, respectively). Thirty-five (75%) eyes required the optional additional aflibercept injection at week 20.ConclusionsThe ASLI study demonstrated improved BCVA and reduced CST following an early switch to aflibercept therapy in eyes with prior incomplete response to initial therapy with three to nine bevacizumab injections.Eye advance online publication, 17 February 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.7.

  10. Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Are Practice Guidelines Based on Systematic Reviews?

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, Kristina; Li, Tianjing; Ssemanda, Elizabeth; Virgili, Gianni; Dickersin, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Topic Are existing systematic reviews of interventions for age-related macular degeneration incorporated into clinical practice guidelines? Clinical relevance High-quality systematic reviews should be used to underpin evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and clinical care. We have examined the reliability of systematic reviews of interventions for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and described the main findings of reliable reviews in relation to clinical practice guidelines. Methods Eligible publications are systematic reviews of the effectiveness of treatment interventions for AMD. We searched a database of systematic reviews in eyes and vision and employed no language or date restrictions; the database is up-to-date as of May 6, 2014. Two authors independently screened records for eligibility and abstracted and assessed the characteristics and methods of each review. We classified reviews as “reliable” when they reported eligibility criteria, comprehensive searches, appraisal of methodological quality of included studies, appropriate statistical methods for meta-analysis, and conclusions based on results. We mapped treatment recommendations from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Patterns (AAO PPP) for AMD to the identified systematic reviews and assessed whether any reliable systematic review was cited or could have been cited to support each treatment recommendation. Results Of 1,570 systematic reviews in our database, 47 met our inclusion criteria. Most of the systematic reviews targeted neovascular AMD and investigated anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) interventions, dietary supplements or photodynamic therapy. We classified over two-thirds (33/47) of the reports as reliable. The quality of reporting varied, with criteria for reliable reporting met more often for Cochrane reviews and for reviews whose authors disclosed conflicts of interest. Although most systematic reviews were reliable, anti

  11. Plasma Complement Components and Activation Fragments: Associations with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Genotypes and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Robyn; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Atkinson, John P.; Giclas, Patricia C.; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several genes encoding complement system components and fragments are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was conducted to determine whether alterations in circulating levels of these markers of complement activation and regulation are also independently associated with advanced AMD and whether they are related to AMD genotypes. Methods Plasma and DNA samples were selected from individuals in our AMD registry who had progressed to or developed the advanced stages of AMD, including 58 with geographic atrophy and 62 with neovascular disease. Subjects of similar age and sex, but without AMD, and who did not progress were included as controls (n = 60). Plasma complment components (C3, CFB, CFI, CFH, and factor D) and activation fragments (Bb, C3a, C5a, iC3b, and SC5b-9) were analyzed. DNA samples were genotyped for seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in six genes previously shown to be associated with AMD: CFB, CFH, C2, C3, and CFI and the LOC387715/ARMS2 gene region. The association between AMD and each complement biomarker was assessed by using logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and proinflammatory risk factors: smoking and body mass index (BMI). Functional genomic analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the complement markers and genotypes. Concordance, or C, statistics were calculated to assess the effect of complement components and activation fragments in an AMD gene-environment prediction model. Results The highest quartiles of Bb and C5a were significantly associated with advanced AMD, when compared with the lowest quartiles. In multivariate models without genetic variants, the odds ratio (OR) for Bb was 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-8.6), and the OR for C5a was 3.6 (95% CI = 1.2-10.3). With adjustment for genetic variants, these ORs were substantially higher. The alternative pathway regulator CFH was inversely associated with AMD in the model without genotypes (OR = 0.3; P = 0

  12. Adaptation to Low Vision Caused by Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Theresa Marie

    2008-01-01

    One in eight Americans aged 65 and older has an eye disease resulting in low vision, and more women than men are visually impaired, mainly because women live longer. Age-related visual impairments are an indicator of a decline in activities of daily living and self-help skills. The top eye conditions that affect older adults are macular…

  13. Estimated cases of blindness and visual impairment from neovascular age-related macular degeneration avoided in Australia by ranibizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Paul; Bressler, Neil; Doan, Quan V; Dolan, Chantal; Ferreira, Alberto; Osborne, Aaron; Rochtchina, Elena; Danese, Mark; Colman, Shoshana; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, such as ranibizumab, have significantly improved the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This study used patient-level simulation modelling to estimate the number of individuals in Australia who would have been likely to avoid legal blindness or visual impairment due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration over a 2-year period as a result of intravitreal ranibizumab injections. The modelling approach used existing data for the incidence of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Australia and outcomes from ranibizumab trials. Blindness and visual impairment were defined as visual acuity in the better-seeing eye of worse than 6/60 or 6/12, respectively. In 2010, 14,634 individuals in Australia were estimated to develop neovascular age-related macular degeneration who would be eligible for ranibizumab therapy. Without treatment, 2246 individuals would become legally blind over 2 years. Monthly 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab would reduce incident blindness by 72% (95% simulation interval, 70-74%). Ranibizumab given as needed would reduce incident blindness by 68% (64-71%). Without treatment, 4846 individuals would become visually impaired over 2 years; this proportion would be reduced by 37% (34-39%) with monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, and by 28% (23-33%) with ranibizumab given as needed. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, given either monthly or as needed, can substantially lower the number of cases of blindness and visual impairment over 2 years after the diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  14. Aging, age-related macular degeneration, and the response-to-retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, Christine A.; Johnson, Mark; Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Rudolf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The largest risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is advanced age. A prominent age-related change in the human retina is the accumulation of histochemically detectable neutral lipid in normal Bruch’s membrane (BrM) throughout adulthood. This change has the potential to have a major impact on physiology of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It occurs in the same compartment as drusen and basal linear deposit, the pathognomonic extracellular, lipid-containing lesions of ARMD. Here we present evidence from light microscopic histochemistry, ultrastructure, lipid profiling of tissues and isolated lipoproteins, and gene expression analysis that this deposition can be accounted for by esterified cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles constitutively produced by the RPE. This work collectively allows ARMD lesion formation and its aftermath to be conceptualized as a response to the retention of a sub-endothelial apolipoprotein B lipoprotein, similar to a widely accepted model of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) (Tabas et al., 2007). This approach provides a wide knowledge base and sophisticated clinical armamentarium that can be readily exploited for the development of new model systems and the future benefit of ARMD patients. PMID:19698799

  15. Quantitative assessment of age-related macular degeneration using parametric modeling of the leakage transfer function: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Eldeeb, Safaa M; Abdelmoula, Walid M; Shah, Syed M; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults. The wet form of the disease is characterized by abnormal blood vessels forming a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV), that result in destruction of normal architecture of the retina. Current evaluation and follow up of wet AMD include subjective evaluation of Fluorescein Angiograms (FA) to determine the activity of the lesion and monitor the progression or regression of the disease. However, this subjective evaluation prevents accurate monitoring of the disease progression or regression in response to a pharmacologic agent. In this work, we present a method that allows objective assessment of the activity of a CNV lesion which can be statistically compared across different patient and time points. The method is based on a hypothesis that the discrepancy in the time-intensity signals among the diseased and normal retinal areas are due to an implicit transfer function whose parameters can be used to characterize the retina. The method begins with parametric modeling of the temporal variation of the lesion and background intensities. Then, the values of the model parameters are used to evaluate the change in the activity of the disease. Preliminary results on five datasets show that the calculated parameters are highly correlated with the Visual Acuity (VA) of the patients.

  16. [Correctly evaluate the role of visual acuity in age-related macular degeneration treatment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in aged population. As the aging of population, the prevalence of AMD increases gradually. Anti-VEGF medication intravitreal injection, which can obtain good therapeutic efficiency and is relatively safe, becomes the main therapy for neovascular AMD. However, high-frequency repeated treatment increases the intravitreal injections risk, as well as the costs. In clinical practice, to pursue the best-corrected visual acuity, high-frequency repeated injections are implemented and inflict psychological pressure and economic burden on patients. The author believes that to pursue the best corrected visual acuity is the ultimate aim but not the only one for every ophthalmologist and patient. The activity of lesions should be overall evaluated with fundus imaging technologies. Being people-oriented is the principle in clinical medicine. A treatment plan is made according to the patients' sickness and economy and to coordinate the relation between the best corrected visual acuity and the numbers of treatment. Based on the stabilized lesion, patient should be benefited at the lowest risk and cost with the best effect.

  17. BMP9/ALK1 inhibits neovascularization in mouse models of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ntumba, Kalonji; Akla, Naoufal; Oh, S. Paul; Eichmann, Anne; Larrivée, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in aging populations of industrialized countries. The drawbacks of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFs) currently used for the treatment of AMD, which include resistance and potential serious side-effects, require the identification of new therapeutic targets to modulate angiogenesis. BMP9 signaling through the endothelial Alk1 serine-threonine kinase receptor modulates the response of endothelial cells to VEGF and promotes vessel quiescence and maturation during development. Here, we show that BMP9/Alk1 signaling inhibits neovessel formation in mouse models of pathological ocular angiogenesis relevant to AMD. Activating Alk1 signaling in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) inhibited neovascularization and reduced the volume of vascular lesions. Alk1 signaling was also found to interfere with VEGF signaling in endothelial cells whereas BMP9 potentiated the inhibitory effects of VEGFR2 signaling blockade, both in OIR and laser-induced CNV. Together, our data show that targeting BMP9/Alk1 efficiently prevents the growth of neovessels in AMD models and introduce a new approach to improve conventional anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27517154

  18. Hyperhomocysteinemia disrupts retinal pigment epithelial structure and function with features of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Mander, Suchreet; Hussein, Khaled A.; Elsherbiny, Nehal M.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Tawfik, Amany

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function and the degeneration of photoreceptors are cardinal features of age related macular degeneration (AMD); however there are still gaps in our understanding of underlying biological processes. Excess homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported to be elevated in plasma of patients with AMD. This study aimed to evaluate the direct effect of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) on structure and function of RPE. Initial studies in a mouse model of HHcy, in which cystathionine-β-synthase (cbs) was deficient, revealed abnormal RPE cell morphology with features similar to that of AMD upon optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), histological, and electron microscopic examinations. These features include atrophy, vacuolization, hypopigmentation, thickened basal laminar membrane, hyporeflective lucency, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and disturbed RPE–photoreceptor relationship. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of Hcy per se in normal wild type (WT) mice resulted in diffuse hyper-fluorescence, albumin leakage, and CNV in the area of RPE. In vitro experiments on ARPE-19 showed that Hcy dose-dependently reduced tight junction protein expression, increased FITC dextran leakage, decreased transcellular electrical resistance, and impaired phagocytic activity. Collectively, our results demonstrated unreported effects of excess Hcy levels on RPE structure and function that lead to the development of AMD-like features. PMID:26885895

  19. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Christopher B; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-06-09

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch's membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh(+/-) mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh(+/-) mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh(-/-) animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch's membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch's membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD.

  20. Improving function in age-related macular degeneration: design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Massof, Robert W; Leiby, Benjamin E; Tasman, William S

    2011-03-01

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older adults and impairs the ability to read, drive, and live independently and increases the risk for depression, falls, and earlier mortality. Although new medical treatments have improved AMD's prognosis, vision-related disability remains a major public health problem. Improving Function in AMD (IF-AMD) is a two-group randomized, parallel design, controlled clinical trial that compares the efficacy of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST) with Supportive Therapy (ST) (an attention control treatment) to improve vision function in 240 patients with AMD. PST and ST therapists deliver 6 one-hour respective treatment sessions to subjects in their homes over 2 months. Outcomes are assessed masked to treatment assignment at 3 months (main trial endpoint) and 6 months (maintenance effects). The primary outcome is targeted vision function (TVF), which refers to specific vision-dependent functional goals that subjects highly value but find difficult to achieve. TVF is an innovative outcome measure in that it is targeted and tailored to individual subjects yet is measured in a standardized way. This paper describes the research methods, theoretical and clinical aspects of the study treatments, and the measures used to evaluate functional and psychiatric outcomes in this population.

  1. Visual performance in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration undergoing treatment with intravitreal ranibizumab.

    PubMed

    Sabour-Pickett, Sarah; Loughman, James; Nolan, John M; Stack, Jim; Pesudovs, Konrad; Meagher, Katherine A; Beatty, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess visual function and its response to serial intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). Methods. Forty-seven eyes of 47 patients with nv-AMD, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) logMAR 0.7 or better, undergoing intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, were enrolled into this prospective study. Visual function was assessed using a range of psychophysical tests, while mean foveal thickness (MFT) was determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results. Group mean (±sd) MFT reduced significantly from baseline (233 (±59)) to exit (205 (±40)) (P = 0.001). CDVA exhibited no change between baseline and exit visits (P = 0.48 and P = 0.31, resp.). Measures of visual function that did exhibit statistically significant improvements (P < 0.05 for all) included reading acuity, reading speed, mesopic and photopic contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD), and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS) at all eccentricities. Conclusion. Eyes with nv-AMD undergoing intravitreal ranibizumab injections exhibit improvements in many parameters of visual function. Outcome measures other than CDVA, such as CS, GD, and ROS, should not only be considered in the design of studies investigating nv-AMD, but also in treatment and retreatment strategies for patients with the condition.

  2. The association between statin use and risk of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Le; Wang, Yafeng; Du, Junhui; Wang, Mingxu; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Yihao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between statin use and the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE and ISI web of science databases was used to identify eligible published literatures without language restrictions up to April 2015. Summary relative ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using a fixed-effect or random-effects model. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was observed between statin use and the risk of any AMD (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.74–1.15); and stratified analysis showed that statins had a significantly different effects on early and late stages of AMD. For early AMD, statin use significantly reduced the risk approximately 17% (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.66–0.99). At the late stage, we observed a significant protective association of statin use with exudative AMD (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80–0.99), in contrast with the absent association between statins and geographic atrophy (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.77–1.56). These results demonstrated that statin use was protective for early and exudative AMD. Additional large prospective cohort studies and RCTs are required to determine the potential effect of statins on AMD prevention. PMID:26658620

  3. Improving Function in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Design and Methods of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Hegel, Mark T.; Massof, Robert W.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Tasman, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older adults and impairs the ability to read, drive, and live independently and increases the risk for depression, falls, and earlier mortality. Although new medical treatments have improved AMD’s prognosis, vision-related disability remains a major public health problem. Improving Function in AMD (IF-AMD) is a two-group randomized, parallel design, controlled clinical trial that compares the efficacy of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST) with Supportive Therapy (ST) (an attention control treatment) to improve vision function in 240 patients with AMD. PST and ST therapists deliver 6 one-hour respective treatment sessions to subjects in their homes over 2 months. Outcomes are assessed masked to treatment assignment at 3 months (main trial endpoint) and 6 months (maintenance effects). The primary outcome is targeted vision function (TVF), which refers to specific vision-dependent functional goals that subjects highly value but find difficult to achieve. TVF is an innovative outcome measure in that it is targeted and tailored to individual subjects yet is measured in a standardized way. This paper describes the research methods, theoretical and clinical aspects of the study treatments, and the measures used to evaluate functional and psychiatric outcomes in this population. PMID:20974293

  4. Retinal Image Classification for the Screening of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, Mohd Hanafi Ahmad; Coenen, Frans; Zheng, Yalin

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in old-age. Early identification of AMD can allow for mitigation (but not cure). One of the fist symptoms of AMD is the presence of fatty deposits, called drusen, on the retina. The presence of drusen may be identified through inspection of retina images. Given the aging global population, the prevalence of AMD is increasing. Many health authorities therefore run screening programmes. The automation, or at least partial automation, of retina image screening is therefore seen as beneficial. This paper describes a Case Based Reasoning (CBR) approach to retina image classification to provide support for AMD screening programmes. In the proposed approach images are represented in the form of spatial-histograms that store both colour and spatial image information. Each retina image is represented using a series of histograms each encapsulated as a time series curve. The Case Base (CB) is populated with a labelled set of such curves. New cases are classified by finding the most similar case (curve) in the CB. Similarity checking is achieved using the Dynamic Time warping (DTW).

  5. MP-1 biofeedback: luminous pattern stimulus versus acoustic biofeedback in age related macular degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Salvatore, Serena; Limoli, Paolo G

    2013-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the efficacy of visual rehabilitation by means of two different types of biofeedback techniques in patients with age related macular degeneration (AMD). Thirty patients, bilaterally affected by AMD, were randomly divided in two groups: one group was treated with an acoustic biofeedback (AB group), the other was treated with luminous biofeedback of a black and white checkerboard flickering during the examination (LB group). All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination. Rehabilitation consisted of 12 training sessions of 10 min for each eye performed once a week for both groups. Both groups showed better visual performance after rehabilitation and luminous flickering biofeedback stimulus showed a statistically significant improvement in training the patients to modify their preferred retinal locus in comparison to acoustic biofeedback. This suggests that it might be possible in the damaged retina to override dead photoreceptor and outer retinal layers and involve residual surviving cells, as well as amplify and integrate retinal and brain cortex plasticity by using other spared channels towards associative pathways.

  6. Evaluation of cardiovascular biomarkers in patients with age-related wet macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Sadullah; Ates, Orhan; Kartal, Baki; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Ekinci, Metin; Ceylan, Erdinc; Ondas, Osman; Arpali, Eren; Dogan, Semih; Yildirim, Kenan; Keles, Mevlut Sait

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate levels of homocysteine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and nitric oxide (NO), as well as activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods The levels of homocysteine, ADMA, and NO and activity of eNOS in patients who were diagnosed with wet AMD by fundus fluorescein angiography (n=30) were compared to a control group with no retinal pathology (n=30). Results Levels of homocysteine and ADMA were found to be significantly higher in the wet AMD group than in the control group (P<0.001), whereas NO levels and eNOS activity were higher in the control group (P<0.001). In the wet AMD group, we detected a 2.64- and 0.33-fold increase in the levels of ADMA and homocysteine, respectively, and a 0.49- and 2.41-fold decrease in the eNOS activity and NO level, respectively. Conclusion Elevated levels of homocysteine and ADMA were observed in patients with wet AMD. Increased ADMA may be responsible for the diminished eNOS activity found in these patients, which in turn contributes to the decrease in NO levels, which likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25210424

  7. Visual Performance in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Undergoing Treatment with Intravitreal Ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, James; Nolan, John M.; Stack, Jim; Pesudovs, Konrad; Meagher, Katherine A.; Beatty, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess visual function and its response to serial intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). Methods. Forty-seven eyes of 47 patients with nv-AMD, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) logMAR 0.7 or better, undergoing intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, were enrolled into this prospective study. Visual function was assessed using a range of psychophysical tests, while mean foveal thickness (MFT) was determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results. Group mean (±sd) MFT reduced significantly from baseline (233 (±59)) to exit (205 (±40)) (P = 0.001). CDVA exhibited no change between baseline and exit visits (P = 0.48 and P = 0.31, resp.). Measures of visual function that did exhibit statistically significant improvements (P < 0.05 for all) included reading acuity, reading speed, mesopic and photopic contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD), and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS) at all eccentricities. Conclusion. Eyes with nv-AMD undergoing intravitreal ranibizumab injections exhibit improvements in many parameters of visual function. Outcome measures other than CDVA, such as CS, GD, and ROS, should not only be considered in the design of studies investigating nv-AMD, but also in treatment and retreatment strategies for patients with the condition. PMID:23533703

  8. Association between Blood Lead Levels and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Lee, Seung Bum; Jee, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between blood lead levels and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study included 4,933 subjects aged over 40 years who participated in the 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and for whom fundus photographs were available. All participants underwent a standardized interview, evaluation of blood lead concentration, and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis. All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system. Results Mean blood lead levels were 3.15 μg/dL in men and 2.27 μg/dL in women (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03–3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06–3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile. In men, however, blood lead level was not significantly associated with AMD. Conclusions Blood lead levels were higher in men, but were only associated with AMD in women. Increased levels of blood lead may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD development in women. PMID:26252225

  9. Peptide redesign for inhibition of the complement system: Targeting age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rohith R.; Cabrera, Andrea P.; Harrison, Reed E. S.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To redesign a complement-inhibiting peptide with the potential to become a therapeutic for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We present a new potent peptide (Peptide 2) of the compstatin family. The peptide is developed by rational design, based on a mechanistic binding hypothesis, and structural and physicochemical properties derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The inhibitory activity, efficacy, and solubility of Peptide 2 are evaluated using a hemolytic assay, a human RPE cell–based assay, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption properties, respectively, and compared to the respective properties of its parent peptide (Peptide 1). Results The sequence of Peptide 2 contains an arginine-serine N-terminal extension (a characteristic of parent Peptide 1) and a novel 8-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block C-terminal extension. Peptide 2 has significantly improved aqueous solubility compared to Peptide 1 and comparable complement inhibitory activity. In addition, Peptide 2 is more efficacious in inhibiting complement activation in a cell-based model that mimics the pathobiology of dry AMD. Conclusions We have designed a new peptide analog of compstatin that combines N-terminal polar amino acid extensions and C-terminal PEGylation extensions. This peptide demonstrates significantly improved aqueous solubility and complement inhibitory efficacy, compared to the parent peptide. The new peptide overcomes the aggregation limitation for clinical translation of previous compstatin analogs and is a candidate to become a therapeutic for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27829783

  10. CCR3 is a therapeutic and diagnostic target for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsunobu; Baffi, Judit Z.; Kleinman, Mark E.; Cho, Won Gil; Nozaki, Miho; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Hiroki; Albuquerque, Romulo J.C.; Dridi, Sami; Saito, Kuniharu; Raisler, Brian J.; Budd, Steven J.; Geisen, Pete; Munitz, Ariel; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Green, Martha G.; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Wright, John D.; Humbles, Alison A.; Gerard, Craig J.; Ogura, Yuichiro; Pan, Yuzhen; Smith, Justine R.; Grisanti, Salvatore; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). We report that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in CNV endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that, despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2, and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. Genetic or pharmacological targeting of CCR3 or eotaxins inhibited injury-induced CNV in mice. CNV suppression by CCR3 blockade was due to direct inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, and was uncoupled from inflammation as it occurred in mice lacking eosinophils or mast cells and was independent of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. CCR3 blockade was more effective at reducing CNV than vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) neutralization, which is currently in clinical use, and, unlike VEGF-A blockade, not toxic to the mouse retina. In vivo imaging with CCR3-targeting quantum dots located spontaneous CNV invisible to standard fluorescein angiography in mice before retinal invasion. CCR3 targeting might reduce vision loss due to AMD through early detection and therapeutic angioinhibition. PMID:19525930

  11. The role of omega-3 and micronutrients in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Querques, Giuseppe; Souied, Eric H

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in the United States, Europe, and other developed countries. Although the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear, current evidence suggests a multifactorial aetiology. Nutrition may play an important role in the development and progression of AMD. There have been several epidemiological studies suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids could have a protective role in AMD, but a beneficial effect remains to be demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. There also exists a substantial body of evidence suggesting that protection against AMD may be provided by specific micronutrients (vitamins and minerals and antioxidants). The identification of risk factors for the development and progression of AMD is of particular importance for understanding the origins of the disorder and for establishing strategies for its prevention. We examine the relationship between dietary omega-3 intake and the incidence and progression of AMD, as well as the role of omega-3 supplementation in the prevention of the disorder, and also explore the role of other micronutrients in AMD.

  12. The potential role of amyloid β in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Sato, Tetsuji; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C.; Hisatomi, Toshio; Mochizuki, Manabu; Morita, Ikuo

    2005-01-01

    Drusen are extracellular deposits that lie beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and are the earliest signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent proteome analysis demonstrated that amyloid β (Aβ) deposition was specific to drusen from eyes with AMD. To work toward a molecular understanding of the development of AMD from drusen, we investigated the effect of Aβ on cultured human RPE cells as well as ocular findings in neprilysin gene–disrupted mice, which leads to an increased deposition Aβ. The results showed that Aβ treatment induced a marked increase in VEGF as well as a marked decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Conditioned media from Aβ-exposed RPE cells caused a dramatic increase in tubular formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Light microscopy of senescent neprilysin gene–disrupted mice showed an increased number of degenerated RPE cells with vacuoles. Electron microscopy revealed basal laminar and linear deposits beneath the RPE layer, but we did not observe choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The present study demonstrates that Aβ accumulation affects the balance between VEGF and PEDF in the RPE, and an accumulation of Aβ reproduces features characteristic of human AMD, such as RPE atrophy and basal deposit formation. Some other factors, such as breakdown of integrity of Bruch membrane, might be necessary to induce CNV of AMD. PMID:16167083

  13. Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yalong; Zhang, Chun; Zhu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD), which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death (or dysfunction) and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells) by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed. PMID:25609937

  14. CCR3 is a target for age-related macular degeneration diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsunobu; Baffi, Judit Z; Kleinman, Mark E; Cho, Won Gil; Nozaki, Miho; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Hiroki; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Dridi, Sami; Saito, Kuniharu; Raisler, Brian J; Budd, Steven J; Geisen, Pete; Munitz, Ariel; Ambati, Balamurali K; Green, Martha G; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Wright, John D; Humbles, Alison A; Gerard, Craig J; Ogura, Yuichiro; Pan, Yuzhen; Smith, Justine R; Grisanti, Salvatore; Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-07-09

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV). Here we show that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in choroidal neovascular endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2 and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. Genetic or pharmacological targeting of CCR3 or eotaxins inhibited injury-induced CNV in mice. CNV suppression by CCR3 blockade was due to direct inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, and was uncoupled from inflammation because it occurred in mice lacking eosinophils or mast cells, and was independent of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. CCR3 blockade was more effective at reducing CNV than vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) neutralization, which is in clinical use at present, and, unlike VEGF-A blockade, is not toxic to the mouse retina. In vivo imaging with CCR3-targeting quantum dots located spontaneous CNV invisible to standard fluorescein angiography in mice before retinal invasion. CCR3 targeting might reduce vision loss due to AMD through early detection and therapeutic angioinhibition.

  15. The vitreomacular interface in different types of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    El-Hifnawy, Mohamed Abd ElMonaem; Ibrahim, Hisham Ali; Gomaa, Amir Ramadan; Elmasry, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the vitreomacular interface in cases with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to compare them to eyes with dry AMD and normal eyes. METHODS This was a cross-sectional comparative study that included 87 eyes with wet AMD, 42 eyes with dry AMD and 40 eyes without AMD as a control group. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination was performed for all patients to assess the vitreomacular interface. RESULTS In the wet AMD group, 34.5% of cases had vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). Only 14.3% of dry AMD cases and 10% of control cases had VMA. There was a significant difference between the control group and the wet AMD group (P=0.004) as well as the dry and wet AMD group (P=0.017). There was also a significant difference between the incidence of VMA in patients with subretinal choroidal neovascularization (CNV, type 1) and intraretinal CNV (type 2 or type 3) (P=0.020). CONCLUSION There is an association between posterior vitreous attachment and AMD. There is also an increased incidence of VMA with intra-retinal CNV. PMID:28251084

  16. Treatment of Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration: Focus on Aflibercept.

    PubMed

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Figueroa, Marta S; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José M; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arias-Barquet, Luis; Reiter, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    A formulation of aflibercept for intravitreal injection (Eylea) is approved for the treatment of patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Aflibercept has a significantly higher affinity for Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A compared with other monoclonal anti-VEGF antibodies. In addition to binding all VEGF-A isoforms, aflibercept also blocks other proangiogenic factors such as VEGF-B and placental growth factor. The VIEW 1 and 2 trials showed this drug achieves improved results in patients with exudative AMD similar to those obtained with monthly ranibizumab, using a bimonthly treatment regimen after a loading dose of three intravitreal injections, which translates to less use of healthcare resources. There is a subgroup of patients that present with persistent fluid after the loading dose that could benefit from monthly injections or personalized proactive treatment after the first year. In the second year of treatment, the Treat and Extend patterns can permit even more lengthening of the time between injections. More data are needed to confirm the optimal monitoring and retreatment dosing, to maintain long-term efficacy. Other preliminary data suggest that patients that do not respond to other anti-angiogenics and patients with special pathologies such as polypoidal choroidopathy or retinal angiomatous proliferation can improve upon switching to aflibercept. To date, the safety profile of aflibercept is excellent and is comparable to other anti-angiogenic treatments.

  17. Bevasiranib for the treatment of wet, age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Garba, Adinoyi O; Mousa, Shaker A

    2010-01-01

    Age- related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe visual impairment in people 65 years and older in industrialized nations. Exudative, or "wet", AMD is a late form of AMD (as distinguished from atrophic, so-called dry, AMD) and is responsible for over 60% of all cases of blindness due to AMD. It is widely accepted that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key component in the pathogenesis of choroidal neo-vascularization (CNV), which is a precursor to wet AMD. The current gold-standard for treating wet AMD is the monoclonal antibody fragment ranibizumab (trade name Lucentis), which targets VEGF. Other agents used to treat wet AMD include pegaptanib (Macugen), bevacizumab (Avastin; off-label use), and several other experimental agents. The advent of small interfering RNA (siRNA) has presented a whole new approach to inhibiting VEGF. This article reviews the status of a novel siRNA-based therapeutic, bevasiranib, for the treatment of wet AMD. Bevasiranib is believed to work by down regulating VEGF production in the retina. Studies in human cell-lines and animal models have shown that VEGF siRNAs are effective in inhibiting VEGF production. Although there is a lack of sufficient published data on human studies supporting the use of bevasiranib for wet AMD, available data indicates that due to its unique mechanism of action, bevasiranib might hold some promise as a primary or adjunct treatment for wet AMD.

  18. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, Joel; Purta, Patryk; Poskin, Zach; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the autofluorescence (AF) signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 488 nm excitation. Methods The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496–610 nm, 6 nm resolution). The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch’s Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered. Results Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch’s Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02). Conclusions The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation) compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm) and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo. PMID:27631087

  19. Health State Utility Values for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Advice.

    PubMed

    Butt, Thomas; Tufail, Adnan; Rubin, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Health state utility values are a major source of uncertainty in economic evaluations of interventions for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This review identifies and critiques published utility values and methods for eliciting de novo utility values in AMD. We describe how utility values have been used in healthcare decision making and provide guidance on the choice of utility values for future economic evaluations for AMD. Literature was searched using PubMed, and health technology assessments (HTA) were searched using HTA agency websites to identify articles reporting utility values or approaches to derive utility values in AMD and articles applying utilities for use in healthcare decision making relating to treatments for AMD. A total of 70 studies qualified for data extraction, 22 of which were classified as containing utility values and/or elicitation methods, and 48 were classified as using utility values in decision making. A large number of studies have elicited utility values for AMD, although those applied to decision making have focused on a few of these. There is an appreciation of the challenges in the measurement and valuation of health states, with recent studies addressing challenges such as the insensitivity of generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires and utility in the worse-seeing eye. We would encourage careful consideration when choosing utility values in decision making and an explicit critique of their applicability to the decision problem.

  20. Apolipoprotein E promotes subretinal mononuclear phagocyte survival and chronic inflammation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Olivier; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Hu, Shulong J; Raoul, William; Dominguez, Elisa; Housset, Michael; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Combadiere, Christophe; Guillonneau, Xavier; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expresses immunosuppressive signals such as FAS ligand (FASL), which prevents the accumulation of leukocytes in the subretinal space. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a breakdown of the subretinal immunosuppressive environment and chronic accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). We show that subretinal MPs in AMD patients accumulate on the RPE and express high levels of APOE. MPs of Cx3cr1−/− mice that develop MP accumulation on the RPE, photoreceptor degeneration, and increased choroidal neovascularization similarly express high levels of APOE. ApoE deletion in Cx3cr1−/− mice prevents pathogenic age- and stress-induced subretinal MP accumulation. We demonstrate that increased APOE levels induce IL-6 in MPs via the activation of the TLR2-CD14-dependent innate immunity receptor cluster. IL-6 in turn represses RPE FasL expression and prolongs subretinal MP survival. This mechanism may account, in part, for the MP accumulation observed in Cx3cr1−/− mice. Our results underline the inflammatory role of APOE in sterile inflammation in the immunosuppressive subretinal space. They provide rationale for the implication of IL-6 in AMD and open avenues toward therapies inhibiting pathogenic chronic inflammation in late AMD. PMID:25604058

  1. Adaptive optics-assisted optical coherence tomography for imaging of patients with age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Kenta; Cense, Barry

    2013-03-01

    We developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype with a sample arm that uses a 3.4 mm beam, which is considerably larger than the 1.2 to 1.5 mm beam that is used in commercialized OCT systems. The system is equipped with adaptive optics (AO), and to distinguish it from traditional AO-OCT systems with a larger 6 mm beam we have coined this concept AO-assisted OCT. Compared to commercialized OCT systems, the 3.4 mm aperture combined with AO improves light collection efficiency and imaging lateral resolution. In this paper, the performance of the AOa-OCT system was compared to a standard OCT system and demonstrated for imaging of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Measurements were performed on the retinas of three human volunteers with healthy eyes and on one eye of a patient diagnosed with AMD. The AO-assisted OCT system imaged retinal structures of healthy human eyes and a patient eye affected by AMD with higher lateral resolution and a 9° by 9° field of view. This combination of a large isoplanatic patch and high lateral resolution can be expected to fill a gap between standard OCT with a 1.2 mm beam and conventional AO-OCT with a 6 mm beam and a 1.5° by 1.5° isoplanatic patch.

  2. Protective effects of resveratrol and its analogs on age-related macular degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Hwan; Choung, Se-Young

    2016-12-01

    Damage of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells by A2E may be critical for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) management. Accumulation and photooxidation of A2E are known to be one of the critical causes in AMD. Here, we evaluated the protective effect of resveratrol (RES), piceatannol (PIC) and RES glycones on blue-light-induced RPE cell death caused by A2E photooxidation. A2E treatment followed by blue light exposure caused significant damages on human RPE cells (ARPE-19). But the damages were attenuated by post- and pre-treatment of RES and PIC in our in vitro models. The results of cell free system and FAB-MS analysis clearly showed that the reduction of A2E by blue light exposure was significantly rescued, and that oxidized forms of A2E were significantly reduced by RES or PIC treatment. Besides, RES or PIC inhibited the intracellular accumulation of A2E. Not only RES and PIC but RES glycones showed protection of ARPE-19 cells against A2E and blue-light-induced photo-damage. These findings demonstrate that RES and its analogs may have protective effects against A2E and blue-light-induced ARPE-19 cell death through regulation of A2E accumulation as well as photooxidation of A2E. Thus RES and its analogs may be beneficial for AMD treatment.

  3. Management of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration: A Review on Landmark Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Aggarwal, Kanika; Gupta, Vishali

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have led to substantial improvements in the outcome of these patients. The introduction of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents has resulted in improvement of visual outcomes and has had a positive impact on the quality of life among elderly population. While the contemporary management of neovascular AMD has been successful in tremendously reducing the visual morbidity, the financial burden of therapy has increased exponentially. To overcome these challenges, newer pharmacologic agents are evaluated for their efficacy and safety in AMD. Ground-breaking advances in bench to bedside research have led to discovery of new pathways that appear to be viable targets for preventing visual loss in AMD. In this review, study designs and results of landmark clinical trials in AMD from the past decade have been summarized.

  4. HTRA1 variant confers similar risks to geographic atrophy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D Joshua; Yang, Zhenglin; Gibbs, Daniel; Chen, Haoyu; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Jorgensen, Adam; Zeng, Jiexi; Luo, Ling; Brinton, Eric; Brinton, Gregory; Brand, John M; Bernstein, Paul S; Zabriskie, Norman A; Tang, Shibo; Constantine, Ryan; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2007-05-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD), represent two types of degenerative processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft confluent drusen, characterized by deposits in macula without visual loss are considered a precursor of advanced AMD. A single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11200638, in the promoter of HTRA1 has been shown to increases the risk for wet AMD. However, its impact on soft confluent drusen and GA or the relationship between them is unclear. To better understand the role the HTRA1 polymorphism plays in AMD subtypes, we genotyped an expanded Utah population with 658 patients having advanced AMD or soft confluent drusen and 294 normal controls and found that the rs11200638 was significantly associated with GA. This association remains significant conditional on LOC387715 rs10490924. In addition, rs11200638 was significantly associated with soft confluent drusen, which are strongly immunolabeled with HTRA1 antibody in an AMD eye with GA similar to wet AMD. Two-locus analyses were performed for CFH Y402H variant at 1q31 and the HTRA1 polymorphism. Together CFH and HTRA1 risk variants increase the odds of having AMD by more than 40 times. These findings expand the role of HTRA1 in AMD. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanism will provide an important insight in pathogenesis of AMD.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Trigger for Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Hyttinen, Juha MT; Toropainen, Elisa; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be classified into two main categories: the atrophic, dry form and the exudative, wet form. The crucial difference between dry and wet AMD is the development of choroidal neovascularization in wet AMD. One fundamental cause of the neovascularization is the increased expression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Progression of AMD is linked to augmentation of cellular stress, for example, oxidative stress, proteotoxic stress, inflammation and hypoxia. All these conditions can trigger stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which maintains protein quality control in cells. ER stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR) via IRE1 (inositol-requiring protein-1), PERK (protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase) and ATF6 (activating transcription factor-6) transducers. UPR signaling is a double-edged sword, that is, it can restore cellular homeostasis as far as possible, but ultimately may lead to chronic, overwhelming stress that can cause apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, ER stress is a well-known inducer of angiogenesis in cancer. Moreover, stress conditions associated with the progress of AMD can induce the expression of VEGF. We discuss the role of ER stress in the regulation of neovascularization and the conversion of dry AMD to its wet, detrimental counterpart. PMID:20683548

  6. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  7. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration. PMID:27941641

  8. Experiences of patients undergoing repeated intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jessica; Vukicevic, Meri; Koklanis, Konstandina; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Rees, Gwyneth

    2017-01-09

    Current therapy to slow disease progression in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) entails regular intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections, often indefinitely. Little is known about the burden imposed on patients by this repetitive treatment schedule and how this can be best managed. The aim of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of repeated intravitreal injections on patients with neovascular AMD. Forty patients (16 males, 24 females) with neovascular AMD undergoing anti-VEGF treatment were recruited using purposive sampling from a private ophthalmology practice and public hospital in Melbourne. Patients were surveyed using the Macular Disease Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (MacTSQ; Bradley, Health Psychology Research Unit, Surrey, England) and underwent semi-structured, one-on-one interviews. Interview topics were: treatment burden and satisfaction; tolerability; barriers to adherence; treatment motivation; and patient education. Interviews were audio recorded and thematic analysis performed using NVivo 10 (QSR International, Doncaster, Australia). Patients recognised the importance of treatment to preserve eyesight, yet experienced significant psychosocial and practical burden from the treatment schedule. Important issues included treatment-related anxiety, financial considerations and transport burden placed on relatives or carers. Many patients were restricted to sedentary activities post-injection owing to treatment side effects. Patients prioritised treatment, often sacrificing family, travel and social commitments owing to a fear of losing eyesight if treatment was not received. Whilst anti-VEGF injections represent the current mainstay of treatment for neovascular AMD, the ongoing treatment protocol imposes significant burden on patients. An understanding of the factors that contribute to the burden of treatment may help inform strategies to lessen its impact and assist

  9. The Value of Measurement of Macular Carotenoid Pigment Optical Densities and Distributions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Other Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Paul S.; Delori, François C.; Richer, Stuart; van Kuijk, Frederik J. M.; Wenzel, Adam J.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the optical and antioxidant properties of the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin play an important role in maintaining the health and function of the human macula. In this review article, we assess the value of non-invasive quantification of macular pigment levels and distributions to identify individuals potentially at risk for visual disability or catastrophic vision loss from age-related macular degeneration, and we consider the strengths and weaknesses of the diverse measurement methods currently available. PMID:19854211

  10. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Foong, Athena W.P.; Lai, Mei-Ying; Choudhury, Farzana; Klein, Ronald; Azen, Stanley P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate 4-year incidence and progression of early and advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Population-based cohort study. Methods A comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including stereoscopic fundus photography was performed on adult Latinos at baseline and follow-up. Photographs were graded using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. For estimations of incidence and progression of AMD, the Age Related Eye Disease Study Scale was used. Main outcome measures are incidence and progression of early AMD (drusen type, drusen size, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities) and advanced AMD (exudative AMD and geographic atrophy). Results 4,658/6100 (76%) completed the follow-up examination. The 4-year incidence of early AMD was 7.5% (95%CI:6.6,8.4) and advanced AMD was 0.2% (95%CI:0.1,0.4). Progression of any AMD occurred in 9.3% (95%CI:8.4,10.3) of at-risk participants. Incidence and progression increased with age. Incidence of early AMD in the second eye (10.8%) was higher than incidence in the first eye (6.9%). Baseline presence of soft indistinct large drusen≥250μm in diameter was more likely to predict the 4-year incidence of pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy, and exudative AMD than smaller or hard or soft distinct drusen. Conclusions Age-specific incidence and progression of AMD in Latinos are lower than in non-Hispanic whites. While incident early AMD is more often unilateral, the risk of its development in the second is higher than in the first eye. Older persons and those with soft indistinct large drusen had a higher risk of developing advanced AMD compared to those who were younger and did not have soft indistinct large drusen. PMID:20399926

  11. Quality of life in age-related macular degeneration: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jan; Bradley, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Background The Age-related Macular Degeneration Alliance International commissioned a review of the literature on quality of life (QoL) in macular degeneration (MD) with a view to increasing awareness of MD, reducing its impact and improving services for people with MD worldwide. Method A systematic review was conducted using electronic databases, conference proceedings and key journal hand search checks. The resulting 'White Paper' was posted on the AMD Alliance website and is reproduced here. Review MD is a chronic, largely untreatable eye condition which leads to loss of central vision needed for tasks such as reading, watching TV, driving, recognising faces. It is the most common cause of blindness in the Western world. Shock of diagnosis, coupled with lack of information and support are a common experience. Incidence of depression is twice that found in the community-dwelling elderly, fuelled by functional decline and loss of leisure activities. Some people feel suicidal. MD threatens independence, especially when comorbidity exacerbates functional limitations. Rehabilitation, including low vision aid (LVA) provision and training, peer support and education, can improve functional and psychological outcomes but many people do not receive services likely to benefit them. Medical treatments, suitable for only a small minority of people with MD, can improve vision but most limit progress of MD, at least for a time, rather than cure. The White Paper considers difficulties associated with inappropriate use of health status measures and misinterpretation of utility values as QoL measures: evidence suggests they have poor validity in MD. Conclusion There is considerable evidence for the major damage done to QoL by MD which is underestimated by health status and utility measures. Medical treatments are limited to a small proportion of people. However, much can be done to improve QoL by early diagnosis of MD with good communication of prognosis and continuing support

  12. Relation between Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xue, Yangjing; Thapa, Saroj; Wang, Luping; Tang, Jifei

    2016-01-01

    Data on the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease and mortality are conflicting. The purpose of this report is to conduct a systematic review to better understand the role of AMD as a risk factor for CVD events and mortality. We searched Medline (Ovid) and Embase (Ovid) for trials published from 1980 to 2015. We included 20 cohort studies that reported relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association of AMD and cardiovascular events and mortality, involving 29,964,334 participants. In a random-effects model, the adjusted RR (95% confidence interval [CI]) associated with AMD was 1.08 (1.00–1.117) for all-cause mortality (8 studies) and 1.18 (0.98–1.43) for cardiovascular disease mortality (5 studies). The pooled RR (95% CI) was 1.17 (0.94–1.45) for coronary heart disease (CHD; 3 studies) and 1.13 (0.93–1.36) for stroke (8 studies). Findings from this systematic review support that AMD is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality. The evidence that AMD predicts incident CVD events or CVD mortality remains inclusive and warrants further study in the future. PMID:28070519

  13. The association of geographic atrophy and decreased renal function in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Leisy, H B; Rastogi, A; Guevara, G; Ahmad, M; Smith, R T

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to investigate the association between area and presence of geographic atrophy (GA) and renal function, as measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR).Patients and methodsWe retrospectively identified patients aged 50-90 years who were assigned an ICD-9 diagnosis code for age-related macular generation (AMD) between January 2012 and January 2016. Patients met inclusion criteria if they had at least one macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography volume scan, one provider note, and one GFR value in the electronic medical record. Images were evaluated for the presence of GA, area of GA, drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) and for subfoveal choroidal thickness (CTh) by standard criteria. Imaging findings were correlated with the most recent GFR from the patient's chart.ResultsWe identified 107 patients who met our inclusion criteria (mean age=74 years, range 50-90 years). Overall, we found a significant correlation between the presence of GA and reduced GFR (P=0.002), which was maintained even after accounting for age and other confounders. No association between GFR and GA area was found. CTh was significantly lower in patients with GA (P=0.038) and those with decreased GFR (P=0.004). Within the SDD-positive population, GA was associated with reduced GFR (P=0.007) but only trended toward significance after controlling for age.ConclusionOur study findings demonstrate an association between impaired renal function and the presence, but not area, of GA within an AMD population. These findings may shed light on common pathogenic mechanisms for these two diseases.

  14. Delayed Patchy Choroidal Filling in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatment Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Gewaily, Dina Y.; Grunwald, Juan E.; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen G.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Ostroff, Candace P.; Fine, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between delayed patchy choroidal filling and morphologic and functional outcomes among eyes treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab. Design Cohort study. Methods Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatment Trials participants were randomly assigned to ranibizumab or bevacizumab on a monthly or as needed schedule. Presence of delayed patchy choroidal filling and morphologic and functional outcomes were evaluated among eyes with gradeable fluorescein angiography at baseline (N=973) and at one year (N=860) eyes. Results Delayed filling was present in 75 (7.7%) of 973 eyes at baseline. Eyes with incident delayed filling at one year (23 (2.9%) of 798) showed a mean decrease of 1.7 letters in visual acuity, whereas eyes without incident delayed filling had a mean improvement of 8.1 letters (Δ=−9.8 [−15.8, −3.9], p<0.01). Eyes with incident delayed filling had a larger increase in mean total lesion area of choroidal neovascularization (3.00 mm2) than eyes without incident delayed filling (0.56 mm2, Δ=2.4 [0.4, 4.4], p=0.02). The proportion with incident delayed filling at one year was similar among eyes treated with ranibizumab (10 (2.4%) of 413) or bevacizumab (13 (3.3%) of 385, p=0.53) and among eyes treated monthly (12 (3.1%) of 388) or as needed (11 (2.7%) of 410, p=0.83). Conclusions Delayed patchy choroidal filling was uncommon at baseline. Although only a small percentage of eyes developed delayed filling during the first year of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, these eyes had worse visual acuity and a larger increase in total lesion area of choroidal neovascularization. PMID:24949820

  15. Transcriptome Analysis on Monocytes from Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grunin, Michelle; Hagbi-Levi, Shira-; Rinsky, Batya; Smith, Yoav; Chowers, Itay

    2016-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs), including monocytes/macrophages, play complex roles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. We reported altered gene-expression signature in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AMD patients, and a chemokine receptor signature on AMD monocytes. To obtain comprehensive understanding of MP involvement, particularly in peripheral circulation in AMD, we performed global gene expression analysis in monocytes. We separated monocytes from treatment-naïve neovascular AMD (nvAMD) patients (n = 14) and age-matched controls (n = 15), and performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on other sets of nvAMD (n = 25), atrophic AMD (n = 21), and controls (n = 28) for validation. This validated microarray genes (like TMEM176A/B and FOSB) tested, including differences between nvAMD and atrophic AMD. We identified 2,165 differentially-expressed genes (P < 0.05), including 79 genes with log2 fold change ≥1.5 between nvAMD and controls. Functional annotation using DAVID and TANGO demonstrated immune response alterations in AMD monocytes (FDR-P <0.05), validated by randomized data comparison (P < 0.0001). GSEA, ISMARA, and MEME analysis found immune enrichment and specific involved microRNAs. Enrichment of differentially-expressed genes in monocytes was found in retina via SAGE data-mining. These genes were enriched in non-classical vs. classical monocyte subsets (P < 0.05). Therefore, global gene expression analysis in AMD monocytes reveals an altered immune-related signature, further implicating systemic MP activation in AMD. PMID:27374485

  16. Size or spacing: Which limits letter recognition in people with age-related macular degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Susana T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a double dissociation of size and spacing limit on letter recognition — it is limited by size in the fovea and critical spacing in the normal periphery. Here, we evaluated whether size or spacing limits letter recognition in people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who must use their peripheral vision. We measured the size threshold for recognizing lowercase letters presented alone, or flanked by two letters at various center-to-center nominal letter spacings (multiples of letter size) for 11 observers with AMD. For comparison, similar measurements were obtained at 5 and 10° eccentricity in the nasal and lower visual fields in three older adults with normal vision. Single-letter size thresholds were worse for observers with AMD than at comparable retinal locations in the normal periphery. For flanked letters, size threshold improved with larger nominal spacing up to the critical spacing, beyond which size threshold was unaffected by the flankers. Seven AMD observers had a nominal critical spacing between 1.25× and 1.80×, values close to those in the normal fovea, suggesting that their letter recognition is size-limited; two had a nominal critical spacing of 3–4×, values close to those in the normal periphery, implying that their letter recognition is limited by spacing; and another two had a nominal critical spacing of ~2.3×, implying that their letter recognition is limited by both size and spacing. The wide range of nominal critical spacings observed in our AMD observers may reflect the degree of completeness of their adaptation process to vision loss. PMID:25014400

  17. Clinical outcomes and mechanism of action for rheopheresis treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Pulido, Jose; Sanders, Donald; Winters, Jeffrey L; Klingel, Reinhard

    2005-10-01

    The primary goals are to provide a comprehensive explanation of the potential role of therapeutic apheresis in the treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Initial clinical results with this technique and a summary of current literature that addresses the mechanism of action for the Rheopheresis approach are presented. Rheopheresis has been found to be a safe and effective application of double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) for extracorporeal hemorheotherapy. In this report, it is proposed that Rheopheresis results in an immediate decrease in the proportion of high molecular weight proteins that could combine with the TIMP-3 fibulin complex allowing for the barely functioning retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to function better and diminish the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Interim results from the randomized, double-masked MIRA-1 clinical trial include (1) improved vision restoration; 28.0% of Treated Primary Eyes increased by > or = 2 lines of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) compared to 18.2% of Placebo Eyes; (2) a decline in progressive vision loss; 0.0% of treated eyes progressing to worse than 20/200 vision over the 12-month study compared to 18.2% of Placebo Eyes; (3) 57.9% of Treatment Eyes obtained improvement in their BCVA to 20/40 or better (driver's license qualification), compared to only 14.3% of Placebo Eyes 12-month post-treatment. Rheopheresis treatment shows strong promise as a viable clinical option for patients suffering from the dry form of AMD in terms of minimizing vision loss, vision restoration, and overall quality of life factors. Expanded clinical outcomes from the ongoing MIRA-1 clinical study will be valuable in the assessment of this new clinical tool for ophthalmic applications.

  18. Evaluation of fundus autofluorescence patterns in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sagar, Pradeep; Chawla, Rohan; Gogia, Varun; Vohra, Rajpal; Sharma, Yog Raj

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the various morphological patterns of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Indian population. METHODS Totally 179 eyes of 104 patients with clinical diagnosis of AMD were recruited into the study. Autofluorescence images were captured using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and the patterns of FAF were classified. RESULTS Of 179 eyes, 27 (15.08%) were early AMD, 58 (32.41%) were intermediate AMD, 94 eyes (52.51%) were late AMD. Of 94 eyes with late AMD, 79 (84.04%) were neovascular AMD and 15 (15.96%) were central geographic atrophy. In eyes with early and intermediate AMD, 9 patterns of FAF were noted. Six patterns (normal, minimal change, focal increased, patchy increased, linear, reticular) were similar to that in the published classification. Two patterns (lacelike and speckled) described in the published classification were not found. Three new patterns (focal hypo-fluorescence, patchy hypo-fluorescence, mixed focal hypo-fluorescence and hyper-fluorescence) were detected. In eyes with neovascular AMD, 6 morphological patterns of FAF were noted. Two patterns (mixed hypo-fluorescence and hyper-fluorescence, central hypo-fluorescence with hyper-fluorescent rim) were similar to that in published classification. Two patterns (normal, near normal or normal background fluorescence in the centre of hypo-fluorescent area) described in the published classification were not found. Four new patterns (minimal change, hypo-fluorescent patch, central hypo-fluorescence with surrounding reticular, bull's eye) were recognized. In eye with central geographic atrophy 5 morphological patterns were noted and these were similar to that in published classification. CONCLUSION Phenotypic differences in the pattern of FAF exist in the study population compared to existing classification systems. PMID:28003979

  19. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Astle, Andrew T.; Blighe, Alan J.; Webb, Ben S.; McGraw, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach. PMID:26605694

  20. Residual abilities in age-related macular degeneration to process spatial frequencies during natural scene categorization.

    PubMed

    Musel, Benoit; Hera, Ruxandra; Chokron, Sylvie; Alleysson, David; Chiquet, Christophe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Guyader, Nathalie; Peyrin, Carole

    2011-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by a central vision loss. We explored the relationship between the retinal lesions in AMD patients and the processing of spatial frequencies in natural scene categorization. Since the lesion on the retina is central, we expected preservation of low spatial frequency (LSF) processing and the impairment of high spatial frequency (HSF) processing. We conducted two experiments that differed in the set of scene stimuli used and their exposure duration. Twelve AMD patients and 12 healthy age-matched participants in Experiment 1 and 10 different AMD patients and 10 healthy age-matched participants in Experiment 2 performed categorization tasks of natural scenes (Indoors vs. Outdoors) filtered in LSF and HSF. Experiment 1 revealed that AMD patients made more no-responses to categorize HSF than LSF scenes, irrespective of the scene category. In addition, AMD patients had longer reaction times to categorize HSF than LSF scenes only for indoors. Healthy participants' performance was not differentially affected by spatial frequency content of the scenes. In Experiment 2, AMD patients demonstrated the same pattern of errors as in Experiment 1. Furthermore, AMD patients had longer reaction times to categorize HSF than LSF scenes, irrespective of the scene category. Again, spatial frequency processing was equivalent for healthy participants. The present findings point to a specific deficit in the processing of HSF information contained in photographs of natural scenes in AMD patients. The processing of LSF information is relatively preserved. Moreover, the fact that the deficit is more important when categorizing HSF indoors, may lead to new perspectives for rehabilitation procedures in AMD.

  1. Increased choroidal mast cells and their degranulation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A; McLeod, D Scott; Jing, Tian; Sunness, Janet S.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Lutty, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammation has been implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study investigates the association of mast cells (MCs), a resident choroidal inflammatory cell, with pathological changes in AMD. Methods Human donor eyes included aged controls (n=10), clinically diagnosed with early AMD (n=8), geographic atrophy (GA, n=4), and exudative AMD (n=11). The choroids were excised and incubated alkaline phosphatase (APase; blood vessels) and nonspecific esterase activities (MCs). Degranulated (DG) and nondegranulated (NDG) MCs in four areas of posterior choroid (nasal, nonmacular, paramacular, and submacular) were counted in flat mounts (4∼6 fields/area). Choroids were subsequently embedded in JB-4 and sectioned for histological analyses. Results The number of MCs was significantly increased in all choroidal areas in early AMD (p=0.0006) and in paramacular area in exudative AMD (139.44±55.3 cells/mm2; p=0.0091) and GA (199.08±82.0 cells/mm2; p=0.0019) compared to the aged controls. DG MCs was also increased in paramacular (p=0.001) and submacula choroid (p=0.02) in all forms of AMD. Areas with the greatest numbers of DG MC had loss of choriocapillaris (CC). Sections revealed that the MCs were widely distributed in Sattler's and Haller's layer in the choroidal stroma in aged controls, whereas MCs were frequently found in close proximity to CC in GA and exudative AMD and in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Conclusion Increased MC numbers and degranulation were observed in all AMD choroids. These results suggest that MC degranulation may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD: death of CC and RPE and CNV formation. The proteolytic enzymes released from MC granules may result in thinning of AMD choroid. PMID:26931413

  2. Generating iPSC-Derived Choroidal Endothelial Cells to Study Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Songstad, Allison E.; Wiley, Luke A.; Duong, Khahn; Kaalberg, Emily; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J.; Cranston, Cathryn M.; Riker, Megan J.; Levasseur, Dana; Stone, Edwin M.; Mullins, Robert F.; Tucker, Budd A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of incurable blindness in the western world, is characterized by the dysfunction and eventual death of choroidal endothelial (CECs), RPE, and photoreceptor cells. Stem cell–based treatment strategies designed to replace photoreceptor and RPE cells currently are a major scientific focus. However, the success of these approaches likely also will require replacement of the underlying, supportive choroidal vasculature. The purpose of this study was to generate stem cell–derived CECs to develop efficient differentiation and transplantation protocols. Methods Dermal fibroblasts from the Tie2-GFP mouse were isolated and reprogrammed into two independent induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines via viral transduction of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Tie2-GFP iPSCs were differentiated into CECs using a coculture method with either the RF6A CEC line or primary mouse CECs. Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs were characterized via RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry for EC- and CEC-specific markers. Results Induced pluripotent stem cells generated from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the endothelial Tie2 promoter display classic pluripotency markers and stem cell morphology. Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs express carbonic anhydrase IV, eNOS, FOXA2, PLVAP, CD31, CD34, ICAM-1, Tie2, TTR, VE-cadherin, and vWF. Conclusions Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived CECs will be a valuable tool for modeling of choriocapillaris-specific insults in AMD and for use in future choroidal endothelial cell replacement approaches. PMID:26720480

  3. Phonemic Fluency and Brain Connectivity in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-hui; Potter, Guy G.; Diaz, Michele T.; Chen, Nan-kuei; Lad, Eleonora M.; Johnson, Micah A.; Cousins, Scott W.; Zhuang, Jie; Madden, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in developed nations, has been associated with poor performance on tests of phonemic fluency. This pilot study sought to (1) characterize the relationship between phonemic fluency and resting-state functional brain connectivity in AMD patients and (2) determine whether regional connections associated with phonemic fluency in AMD patients were similarly linked to phonemic fluency in healthy participants. Behavior-based connectivity analysis was applied to resting-state, functional magnetic resonance imaging data from seven patients (mean age=79.9±7.5 years) with bilateral AMD who completed fluency tasks prior to imaging. Phonemic fluency was inversely related to the strength of functional connectivity (FC) among six pairs of brain regions, representing eight nodes: left opercular portion of inferior frontal gyrus (which includes Broca's area), left superior temporal gyrus (which includes part of Wernicke's area), inferior parietal lobe (bilaterally), right superior parietal lobe, right supramarginal gyrus, right supplementary motor area, and right precentral gyrus. The FC of these reference links was not related to phonemic fluency among 32 healthy individuals (16 younger adults, mean age=23.5±4.6 years and 16 older adults, mean age=68.3±3.4 years). Compared with healthy individuals, AMD patients exhibited higher mean connectivity within the reference links and within the default mode network, possibly reflecting compensatory changes to support performance in the setting of reduced vision. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phonemic fluency deficits in AMD reflect underlying brain changes that develop in the context of AMD. PMID:25313954

  4. Relationship between Retinal Layer Thickness and the Visual Field in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Jennifer H.; Smith, R. Theodore; Hood, Donald C.; Greenstein, Vivienne C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare the structural and functional changes in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and microperimetry. Methods. Twenty-one eyes of 21 subjects with early AMD were examined. MP-1 10-2 visual fields (VFs) and SD-OCT line and detail volume scans were acquired. The thicknesses of the outer segment (OS; distance between inner segment ellipsoid band and upper retinal pigment epithelium [RPE] border) and RPE layers and elevation of the RPE from Bruch's membrane were measured using a computer-aided manual segmentation technique. Thickness values were compared with those for 15 controls, and values at locations with VF total deviation defects were compared with values at nondefect locations at equivalent eccentricities. Results. Sixteen of 21 eyes with AMD had VF defects. Compared with controls, line scans showed significant thinning of the OS layer (P = 0.006) and thickening and elevation of the RPE (P = 0.037, P = 0.002). The OS layer was significantly thinner in locations with VF defects compared with locations without defects (P = 0.003). There was a negligible difference between the retinal layer thickness values of the 5 eyes without VF defects and the values of normal controls. Conclusions. In early AMD, when VF defects were present, there was significant thinning of the OS layer and thickening and elevation of the RPE. OS layer thinning was significantly associated with decreased visual sensitivity, consistent with known photoreceptor loss in early AMD. For AMD subjects without VF defects, thickness values were normal. The results highlight the clinical utility of both SD-OCT retinal layer quantification and VF testing in early AMD. PMID:23074210

  5. Association of Vision Loss in Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration with IADL Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Chad; Maul, Eugenio; Chan, Emilie S.; Van Landingham, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if glaucoma and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are associated with disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Methods. Glaucoma subjects (n = 84) with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and AMD subjects (n = 47) with bilateral or severe unilateral visual acuity (VA) loss were compared with 60 subjects with normal vision (controls). Subjects completed a standard IADL disability questionnaire, with disability defined as an inability to perform one or more IADLs unassisted. Results. Disability in one or more IADLs was present in 18.3% of controls as compared with 25.0% of glaucoma subjects (P = 0.34) and 44.7% of AMD subjects (P = 0.003). The specific IADL disabilities occurring more frequently in both AMD and glaucoma subjects were preparing meals, grocery shopping, and out-of-home travelling (P < 0.05 for both). In multivariate logistic regression models run adjusting for age, sex, mental status, comorbidity, and years of education, AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P = 0.02) but not glaucoma (OR = 1.4, P = 0.45) was associated with IADL disability. However, among glaucoma and control patients, the odds of IADL disability increased 1.6-fold with every 5 dB of VF loss in the better-seeing eye (P = 0.001). Additionally, severe glaucoma subjects (better-eye MD worse than −13.5 dB) had higher odds of IADL disability (OR = 4.2, P = 0.02). Among AMD and control subjects, every Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study line of worse acuity was associated with a greater likelihood of IADL disability (OR = 1.3). Conclusions. VA loss in AMD and severe VF loss in glaucoma are associated with self-reported difficulties with IADLs. These limitations become more likely with increasing magnitude of VA or VF loss. PMID:22491415

  6. Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with month and season of birth in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Antonio; Casuccio, Alessandra; Pani, Luca; Avitabile, Teresio; Cillino, Salvatore; Uva, Maurizio G.; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Russo, Andrea; Parisi, Guglielmo; Cennamo, Gilda; Furino, Claudio; Parravano, Mariacristina; Xoxi, Entela; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of season and month of birth on the risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) in Italy, we evaluated the month birth and sex of all patients, recorded in the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monitoring registry of the Italian Medicines Agency, born between 1925–1944, who received intravitreal anti-VEGF injections for n-AMD between January 1, 2013 and July 29, 2015. The numbers of all births in Italy in the same years, extracted from the Italian National Institute of Statistics, were used to calculate the expected number of n-AMD cases. Overall, 45,845 patients (19,207 men, 26,638 women) received intravitreal anti-VEGF for n-AMD; in the same years, 20,140,426 people (10,334,262 male, 9,806,164 female) were born in Italy. Comparing the observed number of n-AMD cases with the expected number of n- AMD cases in each season, we found that the season-specific risk for n-AMD was 2.5% higher for those born in summer (OR=1.03, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.008) and 3% lower for those born in winter (OR=0.96, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0004). When considering the month of birth, the risk of n-AMD was 5.9% lower for people born in January (OR=0.93, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0012). The factors causing such differences should be determined. PMID:27997361

  7. Age-related macular degeneration and changes in the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Małgorzata; Strzałka-Mrozik, Barbara; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Mazurek, Urszula; Romaniuk, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent, irreversible, central blindness (scotoma in the central visual field that makes reading and writing impossible, stereoscopic vision, recognition of colors and details) in patients over the age of 50 years in European and North America countries, and an important role is attributed to disorders in the regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The main aim of this article is to present the crucial processes that occur on the level of Bruch’s membrane, with special consideration of the metalloproteinase substrates, metalloproteinase, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). A comprehensive review of the literature was performed through MEDLINE and PubMed searches, covering the years 2005–2012, using the following keywords: AMD, extracellular matrix, metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, Bruch’s membrane, collagen, elastin. In the pathogenesis of AMD, a significant role is played by collagen type I and type IV; elastin; fibulin-3, -5, and -6; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, MMP-14, and MMP-1; and TIMP-3. Other important mechanisms include: ARMS2 and HTR1 proteins, the complement system, the urokinase plasminogen activator system, and pro-renin receptor activation. Continuous rebuilding of the extracellular matrix occurs in both early and advanced AMD, simultaneously with the dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and endothelial cells. The pathological degradation or accumulation of ECM structural components are caused by impairment or hyperactivity of specific MMPs/TIMPs complexes, and is also endangered by the influence of other mechanisms connected with both genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24938626

  8. Visual factors and mobility in persons with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kuyk, T; Elliott, J L

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of reducing light level on mobility performance in persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how performance relates to measures of visual sensory and perceptual function. ARMD results in the loss of central, high-acuity vision and is the leading cause of vision loss in veterans participating in the blind rehabilitation programs of the Department of Veterans Affairs. In 41 subjects with ARMD acuity, peak letter contrast sensitivity, visual field extent, glare disability, color confusion, spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, motion sensitivity, scanning ability, and figure-ground discrimination were measured to determine their ability to predict mobility performance. Mobility performance was assessed under photopic (high illumination) and mesopic (low illumination) lighting conditions on a laboratory obstacle course and two real-world courses, an indoor hallway and an outdoor residential route. Reducing illumination resulted in significant increases in the time to complete each course and the number of mobility incidents (errors) that occurred. Two measures of overall performance, total time and total mobility incidents, were calculated for each course by summing time and incidents over the two illumination levels. Combinations of vision variables were able to account for 30 to 60% of the variance in the measures of overall performance. Log contrast sensitivity measured with the Pelli-Robson chart test and visual field extent were the most important predictors of performance. Other variables making significant contributions to prediction in multi-predictor models included: scanning ability, glare sensitivity, color confusion, and peak contrast sensitivity to drifting gratings.

  9. Bioptic Telescope Use and Driving Patterns of Drivers with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Alex R.; Sheldon, Sarah S.; DeCarlo, Dawn K.; Peli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the telescope use and driving patterns of bioptic drivers with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods A questionnaire addressing telescope use and driving patterns was administered by telephone interview to three groups of bioptic drivers: AMD (n = 31; median 76 years); non-AMD first licensed with a bioptic (n = 38; 53 years); and non-AMD first licensed without a bioptic (n = 47; 37 years). Driving patterns of bioptic AMD drivers were also compared with those of normal vision (NV) drivers (n = 36; 74 years) and nonbioptic AMD drivers (n = 34; 79 years). Results Bioptic usage patterns of AMD drivers did not differ from those of the younger bioptic drivers and greater visual difficulty without the bioptic was strongly correlated with greater bioptic helpfulness. Bioptic AMD drivers were more likely to report avoidance of night driving than the age-similar NV drivers (P = 0.06). However, they reported less difficulty than the nonbioptic AMD drivers in all driving situations (P ≤ 0.02). Weekly mileages of bioptic AMD drivers were lower than those of the younger bioptic drivers (P < 0.001), but not the NV group (P = 0.54), and were higher than those of the nonbioptic AMD group (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our results suggest that bioptic telescopes met the visual demands of drivers with AMD and that those drivers had relatively unrestricted driving habits. Translational Relevance Licensure with a bioptic telescope may prolong driving of older adults with AMD; however, objective measures of bioptic use, driving performance, and safety are needed. PMID:27642541

  10. Bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Chinese patients in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Kwok, Alvin Kwan-Ho; Tong, Justin Man-Kit; Chan, Clement Wai-Nang; Li, Walton Wai-Tat

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the outcome of non-investigational treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. METHODS Retrospective chart review of 81 eyes with neovascular AMD followed-up for at least 12mo and received 3-monthly loading IVB injections. Re-treat was based upon the individual clinician's judgment. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and optical coherence tomography measurements of central foveal thickness outcomes were evaluated at 12, 24mo. RESULTS Eighty-one eyes (of 75 patients) completed 12mo of follow-up and 44 eyes (of 41 patients) completed 24mo of follow-up. The mean baseline logMAR BCVA significantly improved from 0.94±0.69 to 0.85±0.68 at 12mo (P<0.001) and from 0.91±0.65 to 0.85±0.60 (P=0.004) at 24mo. The proportion of eyes that lost <15 logMAR letters at 12mo was 90.1% and at 24mo was 81.8%. IVB was effective in improving visual acuity in both treatment naïve and previous photodynamic therapy (PDT)-treated subgroups. Treatment naive patients required significantly fewer injections than patients with prior PDT. Multiple regression analysis identified that poorer baseline visual acuity was associated with greater improvement in visual acuity (P=0.015). CONCLUSION Fewer injections in clinical practice may result in suboptimal visual outcomes compared with clinical trials of IVB in neovascular AMD patients. Poor baseline visual acuity and prior PDT treatment may also improve vision after IVB. The safety and durability of effect was maintained at 24mo. PMID:27158614

  11. Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with month and season of birth in Italy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Antonio; Casuccio, Alessandra; Pani, Luca; Avitabile, Teresio; Cillino, Salvatore; Uva, Maurizio G; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Russo, Andrea; Parisi, Guglielmo; Cennamo, Gilda; Furino, Claudio; Parravano, Mariacristina; Xoxi, Entela; Reibaldi, Michele

    2016-12-19

    In order to investigate the influence of season and month of birth on the risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) in Italy, we evaluated the month birth and sex of all patients, recorded in the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monitoring registry of the Italian Medicines Agency, born between 1925-1944, who received intravitreal anti-VEGF injections for n-AMD between January 1, 2013 and July 29, 2015. The numbers of all births in Italy in the same years, extracted from the Italian National Institute of Statistics, were used to calculate the expected number of n-AMD cases. Overall, 45,845 patients (19,207 men, 26,638 women) received intravitreal anti-VEGF for n-AMD; in the same years, 20,140,426 people (10,334,262 male, 9,806,164 female) were born in Italy. Comparing the observed number of n-AMD cases with the expected number of n- AMD cases in each season, we found that the season-specific risk for n-AMD was 2.5% higher for those born in summer (OR=1.03, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.008) and 3% lower for those born in winter (OR=0.96, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0004). When considering the month of birth, the risk of n-AMD was 5.9% lower for people born in January (OR=0.93, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0012). The factors causing such differences should be determined.

  12. [Age-related macular degeneration – a challenge for public health care].

    PubMed

    Mantel, Irmela

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the predominant cause of legal blindness in the population over 50 years of age. The disorder shows exponentially increasing prevalence with age, and the late forms with their vision threatening evolution are found in approximately one third of cases. The late AMD may be purely atrophic and so far untreatable. Or it may be neovascular and exudative, for which medical treatment is available, consisting of repetitive intravitreous injections of Anti-VEGF molecules. The treatment is highly effective in blocking the growth of the pathological vessels and allowing resolution of the accompanying edema. Visual improvement is variable but often very meaningful for the patients. However, the final visual level depends mostly on early intervention. Thus, screening for the first signs of neovascular AMD is crucial for the endresult. However, the repetitive intraocular injections are an important burden for the patients. Due to the high patient numbers, the chronic care management with steadily adding new patients is a major challenge for treating institutions. Limited resources may put patients at risk of undertreatment with resulting visual loss. Various strategies have been developed to cope with the burden. In addition, the financial cost is high for the health care system. On the other hand, timely and ongoing treatment is the best investment to achieve meaningful visual improvement, which is extremely important for the quality of life and autonomy of the patients. Side effects of the treatment are limited and mostly procedure related. Systemic side effects are possible but despite the large studies not conclusive. However, care must be taken in cases of high cardiovascular risk, as thromboembolic risk increase may rarely happen. So far unsolved problems include the long term visual results, the degree of reversibility of neovascularization, and the missing treatment options of atrophic AMD. Basic and clinical research on various

  13. The Relationship between Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte Ratio and Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possible associations of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods Patients were divided to three groups of 40 patients with non-neovascular ARMD (group 1), 40 patients with neovascular ARMD (group 2), and 40 healthy control subjects (group 3). The neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were evaluated using an ABX Pentra DF120/USA biochemical analyzer, and hs-CRP levels were measured using a Beckman Coulter Immage 800. The NLR was measured by dividing neutrophil count by lymphocyte count. Results The patients in group 2 were older and more often diabetic than the patients in groups 1 and 3 (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The NLR level was 1.65 ± 0.71 in group 1, 1.98 ± 0.84 in group 2, and 1.46 ± 0.44 in group 3. The hs-CRP value was 1.98 ± 0.251 mg/L in group 1, 3.242 ± 0.211 mg/L in group 2, and 1.145 ± 0.193 mg/L in group 3. Both NLR and hs-CRP values were significantly higher in group 2 compared to group 3 (p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, respectively). In multivariate analysis, NLR remained an independent predictor of neovascular ARMD (odds ratio, 3.882; 95% confidence interval, 1.574 to 9.576; p = 0.003) together with age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.041), and hs-CRP (p = 0.018). Conclusions Our study suggests that increased NLR value is independently associated with neovascular ARMD. PMID:27729758

  14. Polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes and neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Amy M.; Lee, Aaron Y.; Kulkarni, Mukti; Osborn, Melissa P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Genetic factors influence an individual’s risk for developing neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Previous studies on the potential genetic link between AMD and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key regulator of angiogenesis and vascular permeability, have yielded conflicting results. In the present case-control association study, we aimed to determine whether VEGF or its main receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2 is genetically associated with neovascular AMD. Methods A total of 515 Caucasian patients with neovascular AMD and 253 ethically-matched controls were genotyped for polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes. A tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) approach was employed to cover each gene plus two kilobases on each side, spanning the promoter and 3′ untranslated regions. SNPs with a minimum allele frequency of 10% were covered by seven tSNPs in VEGFA and 20 tSNPs in VEGFR-2. Two VEGFA SNPs previously linked with AMD, rs1413711 and rs3025039, were also analyzed. Results The 29 VEGFA and VEGFR-2 SNPs analyzed in our cohort demonstrated no significant association with neovascular AMD. A single rare haplotype in the VEGFR-2 gene was associated with the presence of neovascular AMD (p=0.034). Conclusions This study is the first to investigate the association of VEGFR-2 polymorphisms with AMD and evaluates VEGFA genetic variants in the largest neovascular AMD cohort to date. Despite the angiogenic and permeability-enhancing effects of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, we found minimal evidence of a significant link between polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes and neovascular AMD. PMID:20019880

  15. Gold nanoparticle enhancement of stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2012-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries for people over the age of 50. In this work, the dosimetric feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNP) as radiosensitizers to enhance kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular AMD is investigated. Microdosimetry calculations at the sub-cellular level were carried out to estimate the radiation dose enhancement to individual nuclei in neovascular AMD endothelial cells (nDEF) due to photon-induced photo-/Auger electrons from x-ray-irradiated AuNP. The nDEF represents the ratio of radiation doses to the endothelial cell nuclei with and without AuNP. The calculations were carried out for a range of feasible AuNP local concentrations using the clinically applicable 100 kVp x-ray beam parameters employed by a commercially available x-ray therapy system. The results revealed nDEF values of 1.30-3.26 for the investigated concentration range of 1-7 mg g-1, respectively. In comparison, for the same concentration range, nDEF values of 1.32-3.40, 1.31-3.33, 1.29-3.19, 1.28-3.12 were calculated for 80, 90, 110 and 120 kVp x-rays, respectively. Meanwhile, calculations as a function of distance from the AuNP showed that the dose enhancement, for 100 kVp, is markedly confined to the targeted neovascular AMD endothelial cells where AuNP are localized. These findings provide impetus for considering the application of AuNP to enhance therapeutic efficacy during stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular AMD.

  16. Stereotactic targeting and dose verification for age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Gertner, Michael; Chell, Erik; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Hansen, Steve; Kaiser, Peter K.; Moshfeghi, Darius M.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Validation of the targeting and dose delivery of the IRay low voltage age-related macular degeneration treatment system. Methods: Ten human cadaver eyes were obtained for this study and mounted in the IRay system. Using gel and vacuum, an I-Guide immobilization device was coupled to the eyes and radiochromic film was affixed to the posterior aspect of the globes. Three narrow x-ray beams were delivered through the pars plana to overlap on the predicted nominal fovea. A needle was placed through the center of the film's beam spot and into the eye to register the film and the inner retina. The process was performed three times for each of the ten eyes (30 simulated treatments; 90 individual beams). The globes were dissected to assess the targeting accuracy by measuring the distances from the needles to the fovea. The dose to the fovea was calculated from the radiochromic film. Results: X-ray targeting on the retina averaged 0.6{+-}0.4 mm from the fovea. Repeated treatments on the same eye showed a reproducibility of 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The optic nerve was safely avoided, with the 90% isodose edge of the beam spot between 0.4 and 2.6 mm from the edge of the optic disk. Measured dose matched that prescribed. Conclusions: This study provides confidence that the IRay, with an average accuracy of 0.6 mm and a precision of 0.4 mm, can reliably treat most AMD lesions centered on the fovea. With the exception of motion, all sources of error are included.

  17. Profile of ranibizumab: efficacy and safety for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youxin; Han, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision loss due to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The critical role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the pathogenesis of CNV is well understood. Ranibizumab plays an inhibitory role with CNV and reduces vascular permeability by binding to vascular endothelial growth factor. Intravitreal ranibizumab reduces the risk of visual acuity (VA) loss and increases the chance of VA gain compared with no treatment or photodynamic therapy for CNV in AMD. Some high-quality research has shown that the optimal timing for ranibizumab treating wet AMD is the first 3 months. It is recommended that ranibizumab is intravitreally injected monthly in the initiation for at least 3 months. Subsequent managing of regimens should be made dependent on the VA change, fundus examination, and image of optical coherence topography. An individualized strategy or combined method with photodynamic therapy is beneficial to the active lesion in the consecutive treatment of ranibizumab for CNV, and may be a good choice in order to decrease injection times. Regarding the safety profile, ranibizumab has been well tolerated in clinical trials. The principal ocular adverse event detected in clinical trials is a low frequency of ocular inflammation. Key serious ocular adverse events occurred in <5% of ranibizumab-treated patients in large-scale clinical trials. It appears unlikely that treatment with ranibizumab increases the risk of vascular events significantly. Less frequent injections on an as-needed schedule, based on monthly monitoring may have the most optimal risk:benefit ratio. PMID:22911433

  18. Predictors of anti-VEGF treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Finger, Robert P; Wickremasinghe, Sanjeewa S; Baird, Paul N; Guymer, Robyn H

    2014-01-01

    Currently available evidence on predictors of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration was reviewed. No meta-analysis of results is possible because of a lack of controlled and randomized trials, varying treatment regimes and outcome measures used, as well as suboptimal reporting. For genetic factors, most evidence to date has been generated for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement factor H (CFH), and VEGF-A genes. Just under half of the SNPs assessed in the CFH gene and 15% of the SNPs assessed in the VEGF gene were found to be associated with visual outcomes or the number of injections required during follow-up. Some evidence suggests association of worse treatment outcomes as well as a younger age at treatment onset with an increasing number of risk alleles in known risk genes (CFH and ARMS2/HTRA1) and polymorphisms in the VEGF-A gene. Clinical factors such as higher age, a better visual acuity (VA), a larger choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesion at baseline, and a delay between symptom onset and initiation of treatment of more than 3 weeks also impact outcomes. Conversely, a worse acuity at baseline predicted more gain in vision. Overall, patients presenting with good acuity at baseline were more likely to have good VA at follow up, but the gain afforded by treatment was impacted by a ceiling effect. Most available evidence suggests a strong association of clinical factors such as age, baseline VA, and CNV lesion size with anti-VEGF treatment outcomes. No behavioral factors such as smoking influence treatment outcomes. Based on the studies conducted so far, the evidence suggests that underlying genotype of known AMD risk associated genes or of the VEGF-A gene have a limited effect, whereas presenting clinical factors appear to be more important in determining treatment outcomes.

  19. Functional Outcomes of the Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deemer, Ashley D.; Massof, Robert W.; Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Piersol, Catherine V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavioral activation (BA) plus low vision rehabilitation with an occupational therapist (OT-LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) on visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized clinical trial with AMD patients with subsyndromal depressive symptoms (n = 188). All subjects had two outpatient low vision rehabilitation optometry visits, then were randomized to in-home BA + OT-LVR or ST. Behavioral activation is a structured behavioral treatment aiming to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Functional vision was assessed with the activity inventory (AI) in which participants rate the difficulty level of goals and corresponding tasks. Participants were assessed at baseline and 4 months. Results Improvements in functional vision measures were seen in both the BA + OT-LVR and ST groups at the goal level (d = 0.71; d = 0.56 respectively). At the task level, BA + OT-LVR patients showed more improvement in reading, inside-the-home tasks and outside-the-home tasks, when compared to ST patients. The greatest effects were seen in the BA + OT-LVR group in subjects with a visual acuity ≥20/70 (d = 0.360 reading; d = 0.500 inside the home; d = 0.468 outside the home). Conclusions Based on the trends of the AI data, we suggest that BA + OT-LVR services, provided by an OT in the patient's home following conventional low vision optometry services, are more effective than conventional optometric low vision services alone for those with mild visual impairment. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00769015.) PMID:28273318

  20. Cost-Utility Analyses of Cataract Surgery in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyan; Huang, Jiannan; Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To explore the cost-utility of cataract surgery in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Patients who were diagnosed as having and treated for age-related cataract and with a history of advanced AMD at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, were included in the study. All of the participants underwent successful phacoemulsification with foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation under retrobulbar anesthesia. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and utility value elicited by time trade-off method from patients at 3-month postoperative time were compared with those before surgery. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in a lifetime were calculated at a 3% annual discounted rate. Costs per QALY gained were calculated using the bootstrap method, and probabilities of being cost-effective were presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA in the operated eye increased from 1.37 ± 0.5 (Snellen, 20/469) to 0.98 ± 0.25 (Snellen, 20/191) (p < 0.001); BCVA in the weighted average from both eyes (=75% better eye + 25% worse eye) was changed from 1.13 ± 0.22 (Snellen, 20/270) to 0.96 ± 0.17 (Snellen, 20/182) (p < 0.001). Utility values from both patients and doctors increased significantly after surgery (p < 0.001 and p = 0.007). Patients gained 1.17 QALYs by cataract surgery in their lifetime. The cost per QALY was 8835 Chinese yuan (CNY) (1400 U.S. dollars [USD]). It is cost-effective at the threshold of 115,062 CNY (18,235 USD) per QALY in China recommended by the World Health Organization. The cost per QALY varied from 7045 CNY (1116 USD) to 94,178 CNY (14,925 USD) in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Visual acuity and quality of life assessed by utility value improved significantly after surgery

  1. Association between Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Polymorphisms and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in elderly people worldwide and the major degenerative disease of the retina that leads to progressive impairment of central vision. Several polymorphisms in different genes have been proposed as factors that increase the disease susceptibility. The aim of the present study is to carry out a systematic review and an updated meta-analysis in order to summarize the current published studies and to evaluate the associations between four common vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms (rs833061, rs1413711, rs3025039, and rs2010963) and AMD risk, also stratifying for AMD subtypes and ethnicity. A systematic literature search in the Medline database, using PubMed, was carried out for epidemiological studies, published before June 2016. Associations of VEGF polymorphisms with AMD were estimated by calculating pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) based on different models. Twelve articles were included in the analysis. The present meta-analysis constitutes a useful guide for readers to study AMD and adds new evidence to the growing literature on the role of VEGF polymorphisms in the risk of AMD. Significant associations with AMD risk were showed for rs833061, rs1413711, and rs3025039 polymorphisms but not for rs2010963. PMID:27999450

  2. Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Control Region Polymorphisms in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Waltraud; Mayr, Johannes A.; Egger, Stefan F.; Nischler, Christian; Oberkofler, Hannes; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Patsch, Wolfgang; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background Onset and development of the multifactorial disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are highly interrelated with mitochondrial functions such as energy production and free radical turnover. Mitochondrial dysfunction and overproduction of reactive oxygen species may contribute to destruction of the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal atrophy and choroidal neovascularization, leading to AMD. Consequently, polymorphisms of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are postulated to be susceptibility factors for this disease. Previous studies from Australia and the United States detected associations of mitochondrial haplogroups with AMD. The aim of the present study was to test these associations in Middle European Caucasians. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitochondrial haplogroups (combinations of mtDNA polymorphisms) and mitochondrial CR polymorphisms were analyzed in 200 patients with wet AMD (choroidal neovascularization, CNV), in 66 patients with dry AMD, and in 385 controls from Austria by means of multiplex primer extension analysis and sequencing, respectively. In patients with CNV, haplogroup H was found to be significantly less frequent compared to controls, and haplogroup J showed a trend toward a higher frequency compared to controls. Five CR polymorphisms were found to differ significantly in the two study populations compared to controls, and all, except one (T152C), are linked to those haplogroups. Conclusions/Significance It can be concluded that haplogroup J is a risk factor for AMD, whereas haplogroup H seems to be protective for AMD. PMID:22348027

  3. Retinal pigment epithelium cell-derived exosomes: Possible relevance to CNV in wet-age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-Li; Wang, Yi-Xiao; Zhao, Pei-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2016-12-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles that are released by almost every cell type and play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes associated with different diseases. Specifically, they promote angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of some diseases. According to previous research, the proteins of exosomes taken from the aqueous humor (AH) of patients with wet-age related macular degeneration (AMD) may function as a new diagnostic biomarker of AMD, suggesting that exosomes may play an important role in the occurrence and development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Moreover, additional research has revealed that the levels of some protein makers of exosomes are up-regulated in aged retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and that drusen and oxidative stress may promote the secretion of exosomes derived from RPE cells. Consequently, we hypothesize that RPE cell-derived exosomes may be relevant to CNV in wet AMD. If this hypothesis is proven correct, future studies based on this link may also help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of wet AMD and to find new therapeutic targets for the treatment of AMD.

  4. Visual Function and Its Relationship with Severity of Early, and Activity of Neovascular, Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, James; Sabour-Pickett, Sarah; Nolan, John M.; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Beatty, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between visual function and severity of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and activity of neovascular (nv-) AMD. Methods The following data was collected from 66 eyes of 66 subjects with early AMD and 47 eyes of 47 subjects with active nv-AMD: corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA); contrast sensitivity (CS); glare disability (GD); and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS) of the central 5° of the retina, by microperimetry. Fundus photographic grading of early AMD was performed in a masked fashion. Mean foveal thickness (MFT) was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography in patients with nv-AMD. Results In subjects with early AMD, there was an inverse and statistically significant relationship between measures of ROS within the central 5° of retina (including fixation) and severity of early AMD (p=0.01). In eyes with active nv-AMD, an inverse and statistically significant relationship was observed between measures of MFT and measures of ROS at the central 5° of retina (r=-0.34; p=0.02). No other measures, including CDVA, were significantly related to severity of early AMD, or to MFT in nv-AMD. Conclusion Although ROS was cross-sectionally associated with disease severity, and inversely related to MFT, an important determinant of need-to-treat in cases of nv-AMD, further research is required to determine the appropriateness of ROS for monitoring early and active neovascular forms of this disease.

  5. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosel, Jelena; Wang, Ziyuan; de Jong, Henk; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and changes in retinal layer thicknesses occur which could be used as biomarkers for disease monitoring and diagnosis. Due to the topology disrupting pathology, existing segmentation methods often fail. Here, we present a solution for the segmentation of retinal layers in dry AMD subjects by extending our previously presented loosely coupled level sets framework which operates on attenuation coefficients. In eyes affected by AMD, Bruch's membrane becomes visible only below the drusen and our segmentation framework is adapted to delineate such a partially discernible interface. Furthermore, the initialization stage, which tentatively segments five interfaces, is modified to accommodate the appearance of drusen. This stage is based on Dijkstra's algorithm and combines prior knowledge on the shape of the interface, gradient and attenuation coefficient in the newly proposed cost function. This prior knowledge is incorporated by varying the weights for horizontal, diagonal and vertical edges. Finally, quantitative evaluation of the accuracy shows a good agreement between manual and automated segmentation.

  6. Digital reader vs print media: the role of digital technology in reading accuracy in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gill, K; Mao, A; Powell, A M; Sheidow, T

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare patient satisfaction, reading accuracy, and reading speed between digital e-readers (Sony eReader, Apple iPad) and standard paper/print media for patients with stable wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Patients recruited for the study were patients with stable wet AMD, in one or both eyes, who would benefit from a low-vision aid. The selected text sizes by patients reflected the spectrum of low vision in regard to their macular disease. Stability of macular degeneration was assessed on a clinical examination with stable visual acuity. Patients recruited for the study were assessed for reading speeds on both digital readers and standard paper text. Standardized and validated texts for reading speeds were used. Font sizes in the study reflected a spectrum from newsprint to large print books. Patients started with the smallest print size they could read on the standardized paper text. They then used digital readers to read the same size standardized text. Reading speed was calculated as words per minute by the formula (correctly read words/reading time (s)·60). The visual analog scale was completed by patients after reading each passage. These included their assessment on ‘ease of use' and ‘clarity of print' for each device and the print paper. Results A total of 27 patients were used in the study. Patients consistently read faster (P<0.0003) on the Apple iPad with larger text sizes (size 24 or greater) when compared with paper, and also on the paper compared with the Sony eReader (P<0.03) in all text group sizes. Patients chose the iPad to have the best clarity and the print paper as the easiest to use. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that digital devices may have a use in visual rehabilitation for low-vision patients. Devices that have larger display screens and offer high contrast ratios will benefit AMD patients who require larger texts to read. PMID:23492860

  7. Laser treatment of drusen to prevent progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Virgili, Gianni; Michelessi, Manuele; Parodi, Maurizio B; Bacherini, Daniela; Evans, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Background Drusen are amorphous yellowish deposits beneath the sensory retina. People with drusen, particularly large drusen, are at higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most common complication in AMD is choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), the growth of new blood vessels in the centre of the macula. The risk of CNV is higher among people who are already affected by CNV in one eye. It has been observed clinically that laser photocoagulation of drusen leads to their disappearance and may prevent the occurrence of advanced disease (CNV or geographic atrophy) associated with visual loss. Objectives To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of laser photocoagulation of drusen in AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 August 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment of drusen in AMD in which laser treatment had been compared with no intervention or sham treatment. Two types of trials were included. Some trials studied one eye of each participant (unilateral studies); other studies recruited participants with bilateral drusen and randomised one eye to photocoagulation or control and the fellow eye to the other group. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently

  8. Intravitreal dobesilate in the treatment of choroidal neovascularisation associated with age-related macular degeneration: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis; Azanza, Carlos; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    This case report presents the effectiveness of intravitreal administration of dobesilate, a synthetic fibroblast growth factor inhibitor, in two patients showing neovascular age-related macular degeneration of the classic, and of the occult choroidal neovascularisation types, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the treatment induces the regression of both forms of this pathology, as assessed by spectral optical coherence tomography. Improvement of the lesions was accompanied of visual acuity improvement. PMID:22948997

  9. Intravitreal dobesilate in the treatment of choroidal neovascularisation associated with age-related macular degeneration: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis; Azanza, Carlos; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2012-09-03

    This case report presents the effectiveness of intravitreal administration of dobesilate, a synthetic fibroblast growth factor inhibitor, in two patients showing neovascular age-related macular degeneration of the classic, and of the occult choroidal neovascularisation types, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the treatment induces the regression of both forms of this pathology, as assessed by spectral optical coherence tomography. Improvement of the lesions was accompanied of visual acuity improvement.

  10. The role of proteases and inflammatory molecules in triggering neovascular age-related macular degeneration: basic science to clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaraman A; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Baird, Paul N

    2014-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision impairment in aged individuals. The health impact and cost of the disease will dramatically increase over the years, with the increase in the aging population. Currently, antivascular endothelial growth factor agents are routinely used for managing late-stage AMD, and recent data have shown that up to 15%-33% of patients do not respond to this treatment. Henceforth, there is a need to develop better treatment options. One avenue is to investigate the role proteases and inflammatory molecules might have in regulating and being regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor. Moreover, emerging data indicate that proteases and inflammatory molecules might be critical in the development and progression of AMD. This article reviews recent literature that investigates proteases and inflammatory molecules involved in the development of AMD. Gaining insights into the proteolytic and inflammatory pathways associated with the pathophysiology of AMD could enable the development of additional or alternative drug strategies for the treatment of AMD.

  11. Quality of life in patients with age-related macular degeneration: impact of the condition and benefits of treatment.

    PubMed

    Slakter, Jason S; Stur, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the macula and is the leading cause of central vision loss among elderly people in the western world. Traditionally, clinical studies of AMD have described the impact of AMD, and treatments for AMD, in terms of the patient's visual acuity. However, visual acuity alone does not provide information about a patient's perception of his or her quality of life. Researchers have used a variety of instruments to measure quality of life. Several studies have shown that AMD can severely impair quality of life and that increasing vision loss is associated with increasing impairment of quality of life and frequently causes depression. Interestingly, patients with only one eye affected may become more depressed than those with both eyes affected, possibly because of uncertainty surrounding future vision loss in patients with one eye affected and a greater acceptance of the condition in those with both eyes affected. Studies also have provided some information on the possible quality of life benefits of therapy for AMD. By incorporating measurements of quality of life into the design of future prospective studies, clinical researchers may be able to obtain more comprehensive data on the impact of AMD on patients and the relative benefits of different therapies.

  12. Further evidence for an association of ABCR alleles with age-related macular degeneration. The International ABCR Screening Consortium.

    PubMed

    Allikmets, R

    2000-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for >50% of the registered visual disability among North American and Western European populations and has been associated both with environmental factors, such as smoking, and with genetic factors. Previously we have reported disease-associated variants in the ABCR (also called ABCA4) gene in a subset of patients affected with this complex disorder. We have now tested our original hypothesis, that ABCR is a dominant susceptibility locus for AMD, by screening 1,218 unrelated AMD patients of North American and Western European origin and 1,258 comparison individuals from 15 centers in North America and Europe for the two most frequent AMD-associated variants found in ABCR. These two sequence changes, G1961E and D2177N, were found in one allele of ABCR in 40 patients ( approximately 3.4%), and in 13 control subjects ( approximately 0.95%). Fisher's two-sided exact test confirmed that these two variants are associated with AMD at a statistically significant level (P<.0001). The risk of AMD is elevated approximately threefold in D2177N carriers and approximately fivefold in G1961E carriers. The identification of a gene that confers risk of AMD is an important step in unraveling this complex disorder.

  13. Gene Therapy with Endogenous Inhibitors of Angiogenesis for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Beyond Anti-VEGF Therapy.

    PubMed

    Prea, Selwyn M; Chan, Elsa C; Dusting, Gregory J; Vingrys, Algis J; Bui, Bang V; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of substantial and irreversible vision loss amongst elderly populations in industrialized countries. The advanced neovascular (or "wet") form of the disease is responsible for severe and aggressive loss of central vision. Current treatments aim to seal off leaky blood vessels via laser therapy or to suppress vessel leakage and neovascular growth through intraocular injections of antibodies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, the long-term success of anti-VEGF therapy can be hampered by limitations such as low or variable efficacy, high frequency of administration (usually monthly), potentially serious side effects, and, most importantly, loss of efficacy with prolonged treatment. Gene transfer of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term suppression of neovascularization and/or excessive vascular leakage in the eye. Preclinical studies of gene transfer in a large animal model have provided impressive preliminary results with a number of transgenes. In addition, a clinical trial in patients suffering from advanced neovascular AMD has provided proof-of-concept for successful gene transfer. In this mini review, we summarize current theories pertaining to the application of gene therapy for neovascular AMD and the potential benefits when used in conjunction with endogenous antiangiogenic proteins.

  14. Current Treatment Limitations in Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Future Approaches Based on Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Robredo, P.; Sancho, A.; Johnen, S.; Recalde, S.; Gama, N.; Thumann, G.; Groll, J.; García-Layana, A.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. With an ageing population, it is anticipated that the number of AMD cases will increase dramatically, making a solution to this debilitating disease an urgent requirement for the socioeconomic future of the European Union and worldwide. The present paper reviews the limitations of the current therapies as well as the socioeconomic impact of the AMD. There is currently no cure available for AMD, and even palliative treatments are rare. Treatment options show several side effects, are of high cost, and only treat the consequence, not the cause of the pathology. For that reason, many options involving cell therapy mainly based on retinal and iris pigment epithelium cells as well as stem cells are being tested. Moreover, tissue engineering strategies to design and manufacture scaffolds to mimic Bruch's membrane are very diverse and under investigation. Both alternative therapies are aimed to prevent and/or cure AMD and are reviewed herein. PMID:24672707

  15. Examining the Association Between Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Motor Vehicle Collision Involvement: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McGwin, Gerald; Mitchell, Bradford; Searcey, Karen; Albert, Michael A.; Feist, Richard; Mason, John O.; Thomley, Martin; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about motor vehicle collision (MVC) risk in older drivers with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of this study is to examine associations between MVC involvement and AMD presence and severity. Methods In a retrospective cohort study pooling the samples from four previous studies, we examined associations between MVC rate and older drivers with early, intermediate, or advanced AMD as compared to those in normal eye health. MVC data were based on accident reports obtained from the state agency that compiles this information. Results MVC rate was highest among those in normal eye health and progressively declined among those with early and intermediate disease, and then increased for those with advanced AMD. However, only for drivers with intermediate AMD was the MVC rate significantly different (lower) as compared to those in normal eye health, regardless of whether the rate was defined in terms of person-years (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.89) or person-miles (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13–0.91) of driving. Conclusion These results suggest that older drivers with intermediate AMD have a reduced risk of collision involvement. Further research should investigate whether self-regulatory driving practices by these drivers (avoiding challenging driving situations) underlies this reduced risk. PMID:23832967

  16. Oxidative Stress and the Nrf2 Anti-Oxidant Transcription Factor in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lambros, Mandy L; Plafker, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of acquired and irreversible blindness among elderly Americans. Most AMD patients have the dry form of the disease (dAMD) for which reliable therapies are lacking. A major obstacle to the development of effective treatments is a deficit in our understanding of what triggers dAMD onset. This is particularly the case with respect to the events that cause retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to transition from a state of health and homeostasis to one of dysfunction and atrophy. These cells provide critical support to the photoreceptors and their atrophy often precipitates photoreceptor death in dAMD. Chronic oxidative stress is a primary driver of age-dependent, RPE atrophy. Sources of this stress have been identified (e.g., cigarette smoke, photooxidized bisretinoids), but we still do not understand how these stressors damage RPE constituents or what age-dependent changes undermine the cytoprotective systems in the RPE. This review focuses on Nrf2, the master antioxidant transcription factor, and its role in the RPE during aging and dAMD onset.

  17. The direct, indirect and intangible costs of visual impairment caused by neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ke, Kathleen Melissa

    2010-12-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) is a chronic, progressive disease of the central retina, and its prevalence is expected to rise with the ageing population. Using a bottom-up approach based on retrospective data, this cross-sectional study estimated average annual direct costs of nvAMD to be £4,047, and average annual indirect costs to be £449. An attempt to measure intangible costs through willingness-to-pay yielded a lower response rate and estimated intangible costs to be 11.5% of monthly income. Direct costs were significantly higher for male participants, for those who have mild or moderate visual impairment in both eyes, and for those who have been diagnosed for a shorter time. The findings of this study suggest that the availability of early diagnosis, effective treatment, support services, and sustained research into the management of nvAMD may reduce the burden of visual impairment caused by nvAMD to affected individuals and the state.

  18. Current treatment limitations in age-related macular degeneration and future approaches based on cell therapy and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Robredo, P; Sancho, A; Johnen, S; Recalde, S; Gama, N; Thumann, G; Groll, J; García-Layana, A

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. With an ageing population, it is anticipated that the number of AMD cases will increase dramatically, making a solution to this debilitating disease an urgent requirement for the socioeconomic future of the European Union and worldwide. The present paper reviews the limitations of the current therapies as well as the socioeconomic impact of the AMD. There is currently no cure available for AMD, and even palliative treatments are rare. Treatment options show several side effects, are of high cost, and only treat the consequence, not the cause of the pathology. For that reason, many options involving cell therapy mainly based on retinal and iris pigment epithelium cells as well as stem cells are being tested. Moreover, tissue engineering strategies to design and manufacture scaffolds to mimic Bruch's membrane are very diverse and under investigation. Both alternative therapies are aimed to prevent and/or cure AMD and are reviewed herein.

  19. The Use of Microperimetry to Detect Functional Progression in Non-Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evan N; Chew, Avenell L; Morgan, William H; Patel, Praveen J; Chen, Fred K

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed the current literature on the ability of microperimetry to detect non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) disease progression. The index test was retinal sensitivity measurement assessed by microperimetry and comparators were other functional measures (best-corrected and low-luminance visual acuities, and fixation stability) and structural parameters [retinal thickness, choroidal thickness, and area of geographic atrophy (GA) determined by color fundus photographs, short-wave or near-infrared fundus autofluorescence]. The reference standard was area of GA. The literature search was conducted in January 2016 and included MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Biosis, Science Citation Index, ProQuest Health and Medicine, CINAHL, and Highwire Press. We included 6 studies that enrolled 41 eyes with intermediate AMD (from a single study) and 80 eyes with GA secondary to AMD. Retinal sensitivity measured by microperimetry was the only functional measure that consistently detected progression in each cohort. Insufficient reported data precluded meta-analysis. Various microperimetry parameters were used to assess cohort-level change in retinal sensitivity, but the methods of analysis have yet to mature in complexity in comparison with established glaucoma field progression analysis. Microperimetry-assessed retinal sensitivity measurement may be more sensitive in detecting progression than other functional measures in non-neovascular AMD. However, the lack of standardized testing protocol and methods of progression analysis hindered comparison. Harmonization of testing protocol and development of more robust methods of analyzing raw microperimetric data will facilitate clinical implementation of this valuable retinal assessment tool.

  20. Metabolic risk factors, coping with stress, and psychological well-being in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavar, Ivan; Lovrić, Sanjin; Vukojević, Mladenka; Sesar, Irena; Petric-Vicković, Ivanka; Sesar, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the risk factors (age, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, consumption of alchohol and drugs, positive family history, and exposure to sunlight), coping with stress, psychological well-being and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Forty patients with ARMD (case group) and 63 presbyopes (control group) participated in the study. Patient data were collected through general information questionnaire including patient habits, the COPE questionnaire that showed the way the patients handling stress, and the GHQ that analyzed the psychological aspects of their quality of life. These questionnaires were administered to the patients during ophthalmologic examination. The study involved 46 (44.66%) men and 57 (55.33%) women. Statistical analysis showed that the major risks for the development of ARMD were elevated cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in plasma. A significantly higher number ofARMD patients had a positive family history when compared with presbyopes. This study showed presbyopes to cope with emotional problems significantly better and to have a lower level of social dysfunction when compared with ARMD patients. However, it is necessary to conduct further studies in a large number of patients to determine more accurately the pathophysiological mechanisms of metabolic factors as well as the impact of the disease on the quality of life in patients with ARMD.

  1. Increased serum IgA concentration and plasmablast frequency in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honghua; Yuan, Ling; Yang, Yahan; Ma, Suihong; Peng, Lianghong; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Chu; Li, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among senior citizens of developed countries, with currently unknown etiology. Despite the close associations between AMD development and inhibitory complement factor H mutations, the first step of complement activation, which is the antibody response in AMD patients, has not been studied. Here, we obtained blood and tear samples from AMD patients and Non-AMD controls. We found that compared to Non-AMD controls, AMD subjects had increased IgA titers in serum and tear, and had elevated levels of circulating antibody-secreting plasmablasts. The increase in antibody titer was limited to the IgA isotype, since no significant differences were observed in IgM and IgG isotypes between AMD patients and Non-AMD controls. Interestingly, this increased antibody response in AMD patients was correlated with disease severity, as late AMD patients had increased IgA titers in serum and tear, as well as elevated plasmablast frequency after staphylococcal enterotoxin B stimulation, compared to early AMD patients. Together, our results implicated a role of overreactive IgA responses in AMD pathogenesis.

  2. Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy: Similarities to Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Potential Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D

    2016-01-01

    Fibulin-3 (F3) is a secreted, disulfide-rich glycoprotein which is expressed in a variety of tissues within the body, including the retina. An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in F3 was identified as the cause of a rare retinal dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy (ML/DHRD). ML/DHRD shares many phenotypic similarities with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most prominent feature of ML/DHRD is the development of radial or honeycomb patterns of drusen which can develop as early as adolescence. Two independent mouse models of ML/DHRD show evidence of complement activation as well as retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, strengthening the phenotypic connection with AMD. Because of its similarities with AMD, ML/DHRD is receiving increasing interest as a potential surrogate disease to study the underpinnings of AMD. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge of F3 and points toward potential therapeutic strategies which directly or indirectly target cellular dysfunction associated with R345W F3.

  3. Association between SERPING1 rs2511989 polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Li, Ze-Dong; Fang, Xin-Yu; Shi, Xue-Feng; Chen, Song; Tang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between SERPING1 rs2511989 (G>A) polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS A number of electronic databases (up to July 15, 2014) were searched independently by two investigators. A Meta-analysis was performed on the association between SERPING1 rs2511989 polymorphism and AMD. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. RESULTS Eight studies with 16 cohorts consisting of 9163 cases and 6813 controls were included in this Meta-analysis. There was no significant association between rs2511989 polymorphism and AMD under all genetic models in overall estimates (A vs G: OR= 0.938, 95%CI =0.858-1.025; AA vs GG:OR =0.871, 95%CI =0.719-1.056; AG vs GG: OR =0.944, 95%CI =0.845-1.054; AA+AG vs GG: OR =0.927, 95% CI =0.823-1.044; AA vs AG+GG: OR =0.890, 95%CI =0.780-1.034). Cumulative Meta-analyses also showed a trend of no association between rs2511989 polymorphism and AMD as information accumulated by year. Subgroup analysis and Meta-regression analysis indicated that age-matching status was the main source of heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis found the results in overall comparisons and subgroup comparisons of white subjects under the allele model were found to have significantly statistical differences after studies deviating from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were excluded (overall: OR=0.918, 95%CI = 0.844-0.999, P =0.049; whites: OR =0.901, 95%CI = 0.817-0.994, P =0.038). However, the results were not sufficiently robust for further sensitivity analysis and statistical differences disappeared on applying Bonferroni correction (with a significance level set at 0.05/25). CONCLUSION This Meta-analysis indicates that SERPING1 rs2511989 polymorphism and AMD tend to have no association with each other. Age matching status is a big confounding factor, and more studies with subtle designs are warranted in future. PMID:25938061

  4. Systemic Complement Inhibition with Eculizumab for Geographic Atrophy in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yehoshua, Zohar; Filho, Carlos Alexandre de Amorim Garcia; Nunes, Renata Portella; Gregori, Giovanni; Penha, Fernando M.; Moshfeghi, Andrew A.; Zhang, Kang; Sadda, SriniVas; Feuer, William; Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of eculizumab, a systemic inhibitor of complement component (C5), on the growth of geographic atrophy (GA) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Prospective, double-masked, randomized clinical trial. Participants Patients with GA measuring from 1.25 to 18 mm2 based on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography imaging. Methods Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive intravenous eculizumab or placebo over 6 months. In the eculizumab treatment arm, the first 10 patients received a low-dose regimen of 600 mg weekly for 4 weeks followed by 900 mg every 2 weeks until week 24, and the next 10 patients received a high-dose regimen of 900 mg weekly for 4 weeks followed by 1200 mg every 2 weeks until week 24. The placebo group was infused with saline. Patients were observed off treatment for an additional 26 weeks. Both normal-luminance and lowluminance visual acuities were measured throughout the study, and the low-luminance deficits were calculated as the difference between the letter scores. Main Outcome Measures Change in area of GA at 26 weeks. Results Thirty eyes of 30 patients were enrolled. Eighteen fellow eyes also met inclusion criteria and were analyzed as a secondary endpoint. For the 30 study eyes, mean square root of GA area measurements ± standard deviation at baseline were 2.55±0.94 and 2.02±0.74 mm in the eculizumab and placebo groups,respectively (P = 0.13). At 26 weeks, GA enlarged by a mean of 0.19±0.12 and 0.18±0.15 mm in the eculizumab and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.96). At 52 weeks of follow-up, GA enlarged by a mean of 0.37±0.22 mm in the eculizumab-treated eyes and by a mean of 0.37±0.21 mm in the placebo group (P = 0.93, 2 sample t test). None of the eyes converted to wet AMD. No drug-related adverse events were identified. Conclusions Systemic complement inhibition with eculizumab was well tolerated through 6 months but did not decrease the growth rate of GA significantly

  5. Improving Function in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Hegel, Mark T.; Massof, Robert W.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Ho, Allen C.; Tasman, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST) with Supportive Therapy (ST) to improve Targeted Vision Function in Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Design Single-masked, attention controlled randomized clinical trial with outcome assessments at 3 months (main trial endpoint) and 6 months (maintenance effects). Participants Patients with AMD (N = 241) attending retina practices. Interventions PST uses a structured problem-solving approach to reduce vision-related task difficulty. ST is a standardized attention control treatment. Main Outcome Measures Targeted Vision Function (TVF); National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire - 25 plus Supplement (NEI VFQ); Activities Inventory (AI); and Vision-Related Quality of Life. Results There were no significant between-group differences in TVF scores at 3 months (p = 0.47) or 6 months (p = 0.62). For PST subjects, mean [standard deviation (SD)] TVF scores improved from 2.71 (0.52) at baseline to 2.18 (0.88) at 3 months (p = 0.001) and were 2.18 (0.95) at 6 months (change from 3 to 6 months, p = .74). For ST subjects, TVF scores improved from 2.73 (0.52) at baseline to 2.14 (0.96) at 3 months (p = 0.001) and were 2.15 (0.96) at 6 months (change from 3 to 6 months, p = .85). Similar proportions of PST and ST subjects had less difficulty performing a TVF goal at 3 months (77.4% vs. 78.6%, respectively; p = 0.83) and 6 months (76.2% vs. 79.1%, respectively; p = 0.61). There were no significant changes in the NEI VFQ or AI. Vision-related quality-of-life improved for PST relative to ST subjects at 3 months [F (4,192) = 2.46; p = 0.05] and 6 months [F (4,178) = 2.55; p = 0.05)]. PST subjects also developed more adaptive coping strategies than ST subjects. Conclusions We found that PST was not superior to ST at improving vision function in patients with AMD but PST improved their vision-related quality of life. Despite the benefits of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatments

  6. Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Hegel, Mark T.; Massof, Robert W.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Ho, Allen C.; Tasman, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavior activation (BA) + low vision rehabilitation (LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) + LVR to prevent depressive disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized, clinical trial with outcome assessment at 4 months. Participants Patients with AMD and subsyndromal depressive symptoms attending retina practices (n = 188). Interventions Before randomization, all subjects had 2 outpatient LVR visits, and were then randomized to in-home BA+LVR or ST+LVR. Behavior activation is a structured behavioral treatment that aims to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Main Outcome Measures The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV defined depressive disorder based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (primary outcome), Activities Inventory, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire–25 plus Supplement (NEI-VFQ), and NEI-VFQ quality of life (secondary outcomes). Results At 4 months, 11 BA+LVR subjects (12.6%) and 18 ST+LVR subjects (23.4%) developed a depressive disorder (relative risk [RR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27–1.06; P = 0.067). In planned adjusted analyses the RR was 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27–0.98; P = 0.04). A mediational analysis suggested that BA+LVR prevented depression to the extent that it enabled subjects to remain socially engaged. In addition, BA+LVR was associated with greater improvements in functional vision than ST+LVR, although there was no significant between-group difference. There was no significant change or between-group difference in quality of life. Conclusions An integrated mental health and low vision intervention halved the incidence of depressive disorders relative to standard outpatient LVR in patients with AMD. As the population ages, the number of persons with AMD and the adverse effects of comorbid

  7. Homocysteine and risk of age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Antonio; Zaccheddu, Francesco; Boscia, Francesco; Carru, Ciriaco; Solinas, Giuliana

    2016-12-14

    There is still no agreement on total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of new blindness in industrialized countries. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published data on the correlation between tHcy and AMD. MEDLINE/PubMed and ISI Web of Sciences searches were performed according to MOOSE guidelines. Case-control studies were eligible for inclusion. Participants and controls were AMD patients and subjects without AMD. The main outcome measure was wet AMD. Homocysteine level was the main exposure variable. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. Twelve case-control studies were identified: 10 assessed wet AMD, four dry AMD, one early AMD, one late AMD, and one any AMD. As for wet AMD, there was a total of 453 cases and 514 controls. Mean tHcy was on average 1.1 μmol/l (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96-1.25) greater in wet AMD cases, but there was evidence of extreme between-study heterogeneity (p < 0.001, I(2)  = 91.8%). In a model homogenous for age, including six wet AMD studies (214 cases, 274 controls), mean tHcy was on average 0.58 μmol/l (95% CI = 0.35-0.73) greater in the case group, a not statistically significant result (p = 0.144) associated with moderate heterogeneity (I(2)  = 39.2%). Our meta-analysis indicates that there is some weak evidence that increased tHcy might be associated with wet AMD; however, this result should be interpreted cautiously, because of a marked between-study heterogeneity and the possible effect of publication bias. Future studies, preferably of cohort design, are necessary before any firm conclusions on the putative role of increased tHcy on AMD can be drawn.

  8. THE BURDEN OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: A VALUE-BASED MEDICINE ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gary C; Brown, Melissa M; Sharma, Sanjay; Stein, Joshua D; Roth, Zachary; Campanella, Joseph; Beauchamp, George R

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To assess the quality-of-life loss and the macroeconomic financial consequences associated with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods Time tradeoff utility analysis was performed to assess the quality-of-life diminution caused by ARMD (both dry and neovascular) in cohorts consisting of (1) patients with ARMD, (2) ophthalmologists asked to assume they had various degrees of severity of ARMD, (3) healthcare providers asked to assume they had various degrees of severity of ARMD, and (4) participants from the general community asked to assume they had various degrees of severity of ARMD. ARMD was classified according to vision in the better-seeing eye as (1) mild: 20/20 to 20/40, (2) moderate: 20/50 to 20/100, (3) severe: ≤ 20/200, or (4) very severe: ≤ 20/800. Results Mild ARMD caused a 17% decrement in the quality of life of the average patient, similar to that encountered with moderate cardiac angina or symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus syndrome. Moderate ARMD caused a 32% decrease in the average patient’s quality of life, similar to that associated with severe cardiac angina or a fractured hip. Severe ARMD caused a 53% decrease in quality, more than that of dialysis, and very severe ARMD caused a 60% decrease in the average ARMD patient’s quality of life, similar to that encountered with end-stage prostate cancer or a catastrophic stroke that leaves a person bedridden, incontinent, and requiring constant nursing care. Patients with varying degrees of severity of ARMD were found to have quality-of-life impairment ranging from 96% to 750% greater than that estimated by treating ophthalmologists for the same condition. An economic analysis based upon losses to the gross domestic product suggests that ARMD has approximately a $30 billion annual negative impact. The return on investment is therefore potentially high for both treatment with current ARMD therapies and the research costs invested in the development of new ARMD treatment

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Function in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pertl, Laura; Kern, Sabine; Weger, Martin; Hausberger, Silke; Trieb, Markus; Gasser-Steiner, Vanessa; Haas, Anton; Scharnagl, Hubert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-density lipoproteins (HDL) have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported with regard to the associations of AMD with HDL-cholesterol levels. The present study is the first to assess HDL composition and metrics of HDL function in patients with exudative AMD and control patients. Methods Blood samples were collected from 29 patients with exudative AMD and 26 age-matched control patients. Major HDL associated apolipoproteins were determined in apoB-depleted serum by immunoturbidimetry or ELISA, HDL-associated lipids were quantified enzymatically. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function, including cholesterol efflux capacity, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities using apoB-depleted serum from study participants. Results In our study, we observed that the HDL associated acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) was significantly increased in AMD patients (p<0.01), whereas all other assessed apolipoproteins including ApoA-I, apoA-II, apoC-II, apoC-III and apoE as well as major HDL associated lipids were not altered. HDL efflux capacity, anti-oxidative capacity and arylesterase activity were not different in AMD patients when compared with the control group. The ability of apoB-depleted serum to inhibit monocyte NF-κB expression was significantly improved in AMD patients (mean difference (MD) -5.6, p<0.01). Moreover, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, a marker of vascular inflammation, was decreased in AMD subjects (MD -24.1, p<0.01). Conclusions The investigated metrics of HDL composition and HDL function were not associated with exudative AMD in this study, despite an increased content of HDL associated SAA in AMD patients. Unexpectedly, anti-inflammatory activity of apoB-depleted serum was even increased in our study. Our data suggest that the investigated parameters of serum HDL

  10. The Onion Sign in neovascular age-related macular degeneration represents cholesterol crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Claudine E.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zanzottera, Emma C.; Freund, K. Bailey; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the frequency, natural evolution and histological correlates of layered, hyperreflective, sub-retinal pigment epithelium (sub-RPE) lines, known as the Onion Sign, in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD). Design Retrospective observational cohort study; an experimental laboratory study. Participants Two hundred thirty eyes of 150 consecutive patients with nvAMD; 40 human donor eyes with clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of nvAMD. Methods Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), near-infrared reflectance (nIR), color fundus images and medical charts were reviewed. Donor eyes underwent multimodal ex vivo imaging including SD-OCT before processing for high-resolution histology. Main Outcome Measures Presence of layered, hyperreflective sub-RPE lines, qualitative analysis of their change in appearance over time with SD-OCT, histological correlates of these lines, and associated findings within surrounding tissues. Results Sixteen of 230 eyes of patients (7.0%) and 2 of 40 donor eyes (5.0%) with nvAMD had layered, hyperreflective sub-RPE lines on SD-OCT imaging. These appeared as refractile, yellow-gray exudates on color imaging and hyperreflective lesions on nIR. In all 16 eyes, the Onion Sign persisted in follow-up for up to 5 years, with fluctuations in the abundance of lines and associated with intraretinal hyperreflective foci. Patients with the Onion Sign were disproportionately taking cholesterol-lowering medications (p = 0.025). Histology of 2 donor eyes revealed that hyperreflective lines correlated with clefts created by extraction of cholesterol crystals during tissue processing. Fluid surrounding crystals contained lipid yet was distinct from oily drusen. Intraretinal hyperreflective foci correlated with intraretinal RPE and lipid-filled cells of probable monocyte origin. Conclusion Persistent and dynamic, the Onion Sign represents sub-RPE cholesterol crystal precipitation in aqueous environment. The

  11. Subretinal Hyper-Reflective Material in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Alex S.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Toth, Cynthia A.; Maguire, Maureen G.; Burns, Russell E.; Grunwald, Juan E.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Jaffe, Glenn J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of subretinal hyper-reflective material (SHRM) with visual acuity (VA), geographic atrophy (GA) and scar in the Comparison of Age related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT) Design Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. Participants The 1185 participants in CATT. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to ranibizumab or bevacizumab treatment monthly or as-needed. Masked readers graded scar and GA on fundus photography and fluorescein angiography images, SHRM on time domain (TD) and spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) throughout 104 weeks. Measurements of SHRM height and width in the fovea, within the center 1mm2, or outside the center 1mm2 were obtained on SD-OCT images at 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66) weeks. VA was measured by certified examiners. Main Outcome Measures SHRM presence, location and size, and associations with VA, scar, and GA. Results Among all CATT participants, the percentage with SHRM at enrollment was 77%, decreasing to 68% at 4 weeks after treatment and 54% at 104 weeks. At 104 weeks, scar was present more often in eyes with persistent SHRM than eyes with SHRM that resolved (64% vs. 31%; p<0.0001). Among eyes with detailed evaluation of SHRM at weeks 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66), mean [SE] VA letter score was 73.5 [2.8], 73.1 [3.4], 65.3 [3.5], and 63.9 [3.7] when SHRM was absent, present outside the central 1mm2, present within the central 1mm2 but not the foveal center, or present at the foveal center (p=0.02). SHRM was present at the foveal center in 43 (30%), within the central 1mm2 in 21 (15%) and outside the central 1mm2 in 19 (13%). When SHRM was present, the median maximum height in microns under the fovea, within the central 1 mm2 including the fovea and anywhere within the scan was 86; 120; and 122, respectively. VA was decreased with greater SHRM height and width (p<0.05). Conclusions SHRM is common in eyes with NVAMD and often persists after anti

  12. Growth of Geographic Atrophy in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-shuang; Maguire, Maureen G; Daniel, Ebenezer; Martin, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the growth of geographic atrophy (GA) during anti-VEGF therapy. Design Cohort within clinical trial. Participants Patients included in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Treatments Trials (CATT) Methods Participants were randomly assigned to injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab and to a 2-year dosing regimen of monthly or pro re nata (PRN), or to monthly for 1 year and PRN the following year. Digital color photographs and fluorescein angiograms at baseline, 1 and 2 years were evaluated for GA and the total area of GA was measured by two graders masked to treatment; differences were adjudicated. Multivariate linear mixed models of the annual change in the square root of the area included baseline demographic, treatment, and ocular characteristics on imaging as candidate risk factors. Main outcome measures GA growth rate. Results Among 1185 participants, 86 (7.3%) had GA at baseline, 120 (10.1%) developed GA during year 1 and 36 (3.0%) during year 2. Among 194 eyes evaluable for growth, the rate was 0.43 (standard error [SE]: ±0.03) mm/year. In multivariate analysis, the growth rate was 0.37 mm/year in eyes receiving bevacizumab and 0.49 mm/year in eyes receiving ranibizumab (difference 0.11, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: (0.01, 0.22); p=0.03). Growth rate did not differ between eyes treated monthly and PRN (p=0.85). Eyes with subfoveal CNV lesions had a lower growth rate than eyes with non-subfoveal CNV lesions (difference 0.12, CI: 0.01, 0.22; p=0.03). Eyes with GA farther from the fovea had higher growth rates by 0.14 (CI: 0.01, 27) mm/year for every mm farther from the fovea. The growth rate was 0.58 mm/year for eyes with predominantly classic lesions, 0.41 mm/year for eyes with minimally classic lesions, and 0.30 mm/year for eyes with occult only lesions (p<0.01). The growth rate in eyes having a fellow eye with GA was higher by 0.13 (CI: 0.01, 0.24; p=0.03) mm/year than in eyes without GA in the fellow eye. Eyes

  13. Sporadic Visual Acuity Loss in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Benjamin J.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Levy, Nicole E.; Maguire, Maureen G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate transient, large visual acuity (VA) decreases, termed sporadic vision loss, during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Cohort within a randomized clinical trial. Methods Setting Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT). Study Population 1185 CATT patients. Main Outcome Measures incidence of sporadic vision loss and odds ratio (OR) for association with patient and ocular factors. Sporadic vision loss was a decline of ≥ 15 letters from the previous visit, followed by a return at the next visit to no more than 5 letters worse than the visit before the VA loss. Results There were 143 sporadic vision loss events in 122/1185 (10.3%) patients. Mean VA at two years for those with and without sporadic vision loss was 58.5 (~20/63) and 68.4 (~20/40) letters, respectively (P < 0.001). Among patients treated pro re nata, no injection was given for 27.6% (27/98) of sporadic vision loss events. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that baseline predictors for sporadic vision loss included worse baseline VA (OR 2.92, 95%CI:1.65–5.17 for ≤ 20/200 compared with ≥ 20/40), scar (OR 2.21, 95%CI:1.22–4.01), intraretinal foveal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OR 1.80, 95%CI:1.11–2.91), and medical history of anxiety (OR 1.90, 95%CI:1.12–3.24) and syncope (OR 2.75, 95%CI:1.45–5.22). Refraction decreased the likelihood of sporadic vision loss (OR 0.62, 95%CI:0.42–0.91). Conclusions Approximately 10% of CATT patients had sporadic vision loss. Baseline predictors included AMD-related factors and factors independent of AMD. These data are relevant for clinicians in practice and those involved in clinical trials. PMID:24727261

  14. PREFERRED RETINAL LOCUS IN MACULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SANTOS, RODRIGO A. V.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; BARILE, GAETANO R.; SEIPLE, WILLIAM

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Methods Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull’s eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Results Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Conclusion Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function. PMID:18628727

  15. Common cell biologic and biochemical changes in aging and age-related diseases of the eye: Toward new therapeutic approaches to age-related ocular diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reviews of information about age related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, and glaucoma make it apparent that while each eye tissue has its own characteristic metabolism, structure and function, there are common perturbations to homeostasis that are associated with age-related dysfunction. The c...

  16. A 32 kb Critical Region Excluding Y402H in CFH Mediates Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Itsara, Andy; Kopplin, Laura J.; Chen, Wei; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Peachey, Neal S.; Francis, Peter J.; Klein, Michael L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Ramprasad, Vedam L.; Tay, Wan-Ting; Mitchell, Paul; Seielstad, Mark; Stambolian, Dwight E.; Edwards, Albert O.; Lee, Kristine E.; Leontiev, Dmitry V.; Jun, Gyungah; Wang, Yang; Tian, Liping; Qiu, Feiyou; Henning, Alice K.; LaFramboise, Thomas; Sen, Parveen; Aarthi, Manoharan; George, Ronnie; Raman, Rajiv; Das, Manmath Kumar; Vijaya, Lingam; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Wong, Tien Y.; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H shows very strong association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), and recent data suggest that multiple causal variants are associated with disease. To refine the location of the disease associated variants, we characterized in detail the structural variation at CFH and its paralogs, including two copy number polymorphisms (CNP), CNP147 and CNP148, and several rare deletions and duplications. Examination of 34 AMD-enriched extended families (N = 293) and AMD cases (White N = 4210 Indian = 134; Malay = 140) and controls (White N = 3229; Indian = 117; Malay = 2390) demonstrated that deletion CNP148 was protective against AMD, independent of SNPs at CFH. Regression analysis of seven common haplotypes showed three haplotypes, H1, H6 and H7, as conferring risk for AMD development. Being the most common haplotype H1 confers the greatest risk by increasing the odds of AMD by 2.75-fold (95% CI = [2.51, 3.01]; p = 8.31×10−109); Caucasian (H6) and Indian-specific (H7) recombinant haplotypes increase the odds of AMD by 1.85-fold (p = 3.52×10−9) and by 15.57-fold (P = 0.007), respectively. We identified a 32-kb region downstream of Y402H (rs1061170), shared by all three risk haplotypes, suggesting that this region may be critical for AMD development. Further analysis showed that two SNPs within the 32 kb block, rs1329428 and rs203687, optimally explain disease association. rs1329428 resides in 20 kb unique sequence block, but rs203687 resides in a 12 kb block that is 89% similar to a noncoding region contained in ΔCNP148. We conclude that causal variation in this region potentially encompasses both regulatory effects at single markers and copy number. PMID:22022419

  17. A 32 kb critical region excluding Y402H in CFH mediates risk for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, Theru A; Igo, Robert P; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Itsara, Andy; Kopplin, Laura J; Chen, Wei; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Peachey, Neal S; Francis, Peter J; Klein, Michael L; Chew, Emily Y; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Tay, Wan-Ting; Mitchell, Paul; Seielstad, Mark; Stambolian, Dwight E; Edwards, Albert O; Lee, Kristine E; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Jun, Gyungah; Wang, Yang; Tian, Liping; Qiu, Feiyou; Henning, Alice K; LaFramboise, Thomas; Sen, Parveen; Aarthi, Manoharan; George, Ronnie; Raman, Rajiv; Das, Manmath Kumar; Vijaya, Lingam; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Wong, Tien Y; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Nickerson, Deborah A; Eichler, Evan E; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H shows very strong association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), and recent data suggest that multiple causal variants are associated with disease. To refine the location of the disease associated variants, we characterized in detail the structural variation at CFH and its paralogs, including two copy number polymorphisms (CNP), CNP147 and CNP148, and several rare deletions and duplications. Examination of 34 AMD-enriched extended families (N = 293) and AMD cases (White N = 4210 Indian = 134; Malay = 140) and controls (White N = 3229; Indian = 117; Malay = 2390) demonstrated that deletion CNP148 was protective against AMD, independent of SNPs at CFH. Regression analysis of seven common haplotypes showed three haplotypes, H1, H6 and H7, as conferring risk for AMD development. Being the most common haplotype H1 confers the greatest risk by increasing the odds of AMD by 2.75-fold (95% CI = [2.51, 3.01]; p = 8.31×10(-109)); Caucasian (H6) and Indian-specific (H7) recombinant haplotypes increase the odds of AMD by 1.85-fold (p = 3.52×10(-9)) and by 15.57-fold (P = 0.007), respectively. We identified a 32-kb region downstream of Y402H (rs1061170), shared by all three risk haplotypes, suggesting that this region may be critical for AMD development. Further analysis showed that two SNPs within the 32 kb block, rs1329428 and rs203687, optimally explain disease association. rs1329428 resides in 20 kb unique sequence block, but rs203687 resides in a 12 kb block that is 89% similar to a noncoding region contained in ΔCNP148. We conclude that causal variation in this region potentially encompasses both regulatory effects at single markers and copy number.

  18. Quantitative Classification of Eyes with and without Intermediate Age-related Macular Degeneration Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Farsiu, Sina; Chiu, Stephanie J.; O'Connell, Rachelle V.; Folgar, Francisco A.; Yuan, Eric; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define quantitative indicators for the presence of intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) via spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging of older adults. Design Evaluation of diagnostic test and technology. Participants and Controls One eye from 115 elderly subjects without AMD and 269 subjects with intermediate AMD from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) Ancillary SD-OCT Study. Methods We semiautomatically delineated the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and RPE drusen complex (RPEDC, the axial distance from the apex of the drusen and RPE layer to Bruch's membrane) and total retina (TR, the axial distance between the inner limiting and Bruch's membranes) boundaries. We registered and averaged the thickness maps from control subjects to generate a map of “normal” non-AMD thickness. We considered RPEDC thicknesses larger or smaller than 3 standard deviations from the mean as abnormal, indicating drusen or geographic atrophy (GA), respectively. We measured TR volumes, RPEDC volumes, and abnormal RPEDC thickening and thinning volumes for each subject. By using different combinations of these 4 disease indicators, we designed 5 automated classifiers for the presence of AMD on the basis of the generalized linear model regression framework. We trained and evaluated the performance of these classifiers using the leave-one-out method. Main Outcome Measures The range and topographic distribution of the RPEDC and TR thicknesses in a 5-mm diameter cylinder centered at the fovea. Results The most efficient method for separating AMD and control eyes required all 4 disease indicators. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) for this classifier was >0.99. Overall neurosensory retinal thickening in eyes with AMD versus control eyes in our study contrasts with previous smaller studies. Conclusions We identified and validated efficient biometrics to distinguish AMD from normal eyes by

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 variant D299G is associated with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zareparsi, Sepideh; Buraczynska, Monika; Branham, Kari E H; Shah, Sapna; Eng, Donna; Li, Mingyao; Pawar, Hemant; Yashar, Beverly M; Moroi, Sayoko E; Lichter, Paul R; Petty, Howard R; Richards, Julia E; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elner, Victor M; Swaroop, Anand

    2005-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease that leads to progressive and irreversible vision loss among the elderly. Inflammation, oxidative damage, cholesterol metabolism and/or impaired function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. We examined toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a candidate gene for AMD susceptibility because: (i) the TLR4 gene is located on chromosome 9q32-33, a region exhibiting evidence of linkage to AMD in three independent reports; (ii) the TLR4-D299G variant is associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease with subendothelial accumulation; (iii) the TLR4 is not only a key mediator of proinflammatory signaling pathways but also linked to regulation of cholesterol efflux and (iv) the TLR4 participates in phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments by the RPE. We examined D299G and T399I variants of TLR4 in a sample of 667 unrelated AMD patients and 439 unrelated controls, all of Caucasian ancestry. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated an increased risk of AMD in carriers of the G allele at TLR4 residue 299 (odds ratio=2.65, P=0.025), but lack of an independent effect by T399I variant. TLR4-D299G showed an additive effect on AMD risk (odds ratio=4.13, P=0.002) with allelic variants of apolipoprotein E (APOE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1), two genes involved in cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, the effect of TLR4, APOE and ABCA1 variants on AMD susceptibility was opposite to that of association with atherosclerosis risk. Our data provide evidence of a link between multiple diverse mechanisms underlying AMD pathogenesis.

  20. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  1. Surgical implantation of steroids with antiangiogenic characteristics for treating neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Geltzer, Arthur; Turalba, Angela; Vedula, Satyanarayana S

    2014-01-01

    Background Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with rapid vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV), leakage, and scarring. Steroids have gained attention in their role for the treatment of neovascular AMD for their antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Objectives This review aims to examine effects of steroids with antiangiogenic properties in the treatment of neovascular AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 11), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 21 November 2012. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled clinical trials of intra- and peri-ocular antiangiogenic steroids in people diagnosed with neovascular AMD. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened abstracts and full-text articles, assessed risk of bias in the included trials, and extracted data. We did not conduct a meta-analysis. Main results We included three trials after screening a total of 1503 abstracts and 21 full-text articles. The three trials included a total of 809 participants. One trial compared different doses of acetonide anecortave acetate with placebo, a second trial compared triamcinolone acetonide versus placebo, and the third trial compared anecortave acetate against photodynamic therapy (PDT). We did not conduct a

  2. Dosimetry characterization of a multibeam radiotherapy treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Chell, Erik; Gertner, Michael; Hansen, Steven; Howell, Roger W.; Hanlon, Justin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-11-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major health problem worldwide. Advanced ARMD, which ultimately leads to profound vision loss, has dry and wet forms, which account for 20% and 80% of cases involving severe vision loss, respectively. A new device and approach for radiation treatment of ARMD has been recently developed by Oraya Therapeutics, Inc. (Newark, CA). The goal of the present study is to provide a initial dosimetry characterization of the proposed radiotherapy treatment via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation. A 3D eye model including cornea, anterior chamber, lens, orbit, fat, sclera, choroid, retina, vitreous, macula, and optic nerve was carefully designed. The eye model was imported into the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and radiation transport simulations were undertaken to obtain absorbed doses and dose volume histograms (DVH) to targeted and nontargeted structures within the eye. Three different studies were undertaken to investigate (1) available beam angles that maximized the dose to the macula target tissue, simultaneously minimizing dose to normal tissues, (2) the energy dependency of the DVH for different x-ray energies (80, 100, and 120 kVp), and (3) the optimal focal spot size among options of 0.0, 0.4, 1.0, and 5.5 mm. All results were scaled to give 8 Gy to the macula volume, which is the current treatment requirement. Eight beam treatment angles are currently under investigation. In all eight beam angles, the source-to-target distance is 13 cm, and the polar angle of entry is 30 degree sign from the geometric axis of the eye. The azimuthal angle changes in eight increments of 45 degree sign in a clockwise fashion, such that an azimuthal angle of 0 degree sign corresponds to the 12 o'clock position when viewing the treated eye. Based on considerations of nontarget tissue avoidance, as well as facial-anatomical restrictions on beam delivery, treatment azimuthal angles between 135 degree sign and 225 degree sign would be available

  3. Surgery for cataracts in people with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Casparis, Heather; Lindsley, Kristina; Kuo, Irene C; Sikder, Shameema; Bressler, Neil M

    2012-01-01

    Background Cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are common causes of decreased vision that often occur simultaneously in people over age 50. Although cataract surgery is an effective treatment for cataract-induced visual loss, some clinicians suspect that such an intervention may increase the risk of worsening of underlying AMD and thus have deleterious effects on vision. Objectives The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cataract surgery in eyes with AMD., Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1950 to April 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to April 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). The