Science.gov

Sample records for age-related metabolic dysfunction

  1. Rutin protects against aging-related metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Chen, Sufang; Feng, Tao; Dong, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Aging is a complex process which is accompanied by multiple related chronic diseases. Among them, metabolic dysfunction is one of the most important aging-related disorders. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of rutin on aging-related metabolic dysfunction. We found that the increase of fasting blood glucose, insulin levels, blood pressure and HOMA-IR in aged rats was significantly inhibited by rutin. In addition, rutin improved glucose and insulin tolerance in aged rats, as reflected by decreased glucose level in IPGTT and IPITT test. Rutin treatment notably increased Akt and IRS-1 phosphorylation in the livers of old rats. The increase of inflammatory markers, such as IL-1β and TNFα, was prevented by the rutin administration. Moreover, in circulation and livers of old rats, rutin treatment significantly decreased the content of TG. Rutin also inhibited the increase of serum AST and ALT levels. Furthermore, rutin treatment markedly inhibited aging-related mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress, and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased oxygen consumption rate and activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Ca2(+)-ATPase, decreased expression of ATF3 and GRP78, decreased level of MDA, increased content of GSH and enhanced activity of SOD in aged rats. We show that the administration of rutin could effectively improve aging-related metabolic dysfunction. The amelioration of inflammation, lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress, and oxidative stress may be involved in the effect of rutin on aging-related metabolic dysfunction. These findings provide novel insights into the potential use of rutin in the intervention of aging and its related metabolic diseases.

  2. Energy metabolism, proteotoxic stress and age-related dysfunction - protection by carnosine.

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2011-08-01

    This review will discuss the relationship between energy metabolism, protein dysfunction and the causation and modulation of age-related proteotoxicity and disease. It is proposed that excessive glycolysis, rather than aerobic (mitochondrial) activity, could be causal to proteotoxic stress and age-related pathology, due to the generation of endogenous glycating metabolites: the deleterious role of methylglyoxal (MG) is emphasized. It is suggested that TOR inhibition, exercise, fasting and increased mitochondrial activity suppress formation of MG (and other deleterious low molecular weight carbonyl compounds) which could control onset and progression of proteostatic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms by which the endogenous dipeptide, carnosine, which, by way of its putative aldehyde-scavenging activity, may control age-related proteotoxicity, cellular dysfunction and pathology, including cancer, are also considered. Whether carnosine could be regarded as a rapamycin mimic is briefly discussed.

  3. Therapeutic Strategies for Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Age-Related Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, J S; Kumar, S; Vijayan, M; Bhatti, G K; Reddy, P H

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex, intercellular organelles present in the cells and are involved in multiple roles including ATP formation, free radicals generation and scavenging, calcium homeostasis, cellular differentiation, and cell death. Many studies depicted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in aging and pathogenesis of age-related metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Remarkable advancements have been made in understanding the structure, function, and physiology of mitochondria in metabolic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. Further, much progress has been done in the improvement of therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle interventions, pharmacological, and mitochondria-targeted therapeutic approaches. These strategies were mainly focused to reduce the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress and to retain the mitochondrial health in various diseases. In this chapter, we have highlighted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of various disorders and recent progress in the development of mitochondria-targeted molecules as therapeutic measures for metabolic disorders.

  4. 17α-Estradiol Alleviates Age-related Metabolic and Inflammatory Dysfunction in Male Mice Without Inducing Feminization

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Michael B.; Steyn, Frederik J.; Jurczak, Michael J.; Camporez, Joao-Paulo G.; Zhu, Yi; Hawse, John R.; Jurk, Diana; Palmer, Allyson K.; Xu, Ming; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Evans, Glenda L.; de Souza Santos, Roberta; Frank, Aaron P.; White, Thomas A.; Monroe, David G.; Singh, Ravinder J.; Casaclang-Verzosa, Grace; Miller, Jordan D.; Clegg, Deborah J.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Shulman, Gerald I.; Tchkonia, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with visceral adiposity, metabolic disorders, and chronic low-grade inflammation. 17α-estradiol (17α-E2), a naturally occurring enantiomer of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), extends life span in male mice through unresolved mechanisms. We tested whether 17α-E2 could alleviate age-related metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. 17α-E2 reduced body mass, visceral adiposity, and ectopic lipid deposition without decreasing lean mass. These declines were associated with reductions in energy intake due to the activation of hypothalamic anorexigenic pathways and direct effects of 17α-E2 on nutrient-sensing pathways in visceral adipose tissue. 17α-E2 did not alter energy expenditure or excretion. Fasting glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin were also reduced by 17α-E2, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps revealed improvements in peripheral glucose disposal and hepatic glucose production. Inflammatory mediators in visceral adipose tissue and the circulation were reduced by 17α-E2. 17α-E2 increased AMPKα and reduced mTOR complex 1 activity in visceral adipose tissue but not in liver or quadriceps muscle, which is in contrast to the generalized systemic effects of caloric restriction. These beneficial phenotypic changes occurred in the absence of feminization or cardiac dysfunction, two commonly observed deleterious effects of exogenous estrogen administration. Thus, 17α-E2 holds potential as a novel therapeutic for alleviating age-related metabolic dysfunction through tissue-specific effects. PMID:26809497

  5. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  6. Glial dysfunction causes age-related memory impairment in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Ueno, Kohei; Ueno, Taro; Saeki, Shinjiro; Matsuno, Motomi; Naganos, Shintaro; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Yukinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Isobe, Toshiaki; Honda, Yoshiko; Kodama, Tohru; Masuda, Tomoko; Saitoe, Minoru

    2014-11-19

    Several aging phenotypes, including age-related memory impairment (AMI), are thought to be caused by cumulative oxidative damage. In Drosophila, age-related impairments in 1 hr memory can be suppressed by reducing activity of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the mechanism for this effect has been unclear. Here we show that decreasing PKA suppresses AMI by reducing activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a glial metabolic enzyme whose amounts increase upon aging. Increased PC activity causes AMI through a mechanism independent of oxidative damage. Instead, increased PC activity is associated with decreases in D-serine, a glia-derived neuromodulator that regulates NMDA receptor activity. D-serine feeding suppresses both AMI and memory impairment caused by glial overexpression of dPC, indicating that an oxidative stress-independent dysregulation of glial modulation of neuronal activity contributes to AMI in Drosophila.

  7. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  8. Understanding Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle Metabolism: Differences Between Females and Males.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Brandon J F; Riddle, Emily S; Lem, Melinda R; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-07-17

    Skeletal muscle is the largest metabolic organ system in the human body. As such, metabolic dysfunction occurring in skeletal muscle impacts whole-body nutrient homeostasis. Macronutrient metabolism changes within the skeletal muscle with aging, and these changes are associated in part with age-related skeletal muscle remodeling. Moreover, age-related changes in skeletal muscle metabolism are affected differentially between males and females and are likely driven by changes in sex hormones. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors impact observed age-related changes and sex-related differences in skeletal muscle metabolism. Despite some support for sex-specific differences in skeletal muscle metabolism with aging, more research is necessary to identify underlying differences in mechanisms. Understanding sex-specific aging skeletal muscle will assist with the development of therapies to attenuate adverse metabolic and functional outcomes.

  9. Cognitive dysfunction and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rozzini, Luca; Riva, Maddalena; Ghilardi, Nausica; Facchinetti, Paola; Forbice, Eliana; Semeraro, Francesco; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Several previous studies showed that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share common risk factors and histopathology changes, and there is epidemiological evidence linking AMD to cognitive impairment. We tested this theory in 51 patients with late-stage AMD and 24 controls by analyzing their neuropsychological profiles. In this study, data showed that patients affected by late-stage AMD have a worse global cognitive function than those of the controls and, in particular, show worse performances in memory tasks. Moreover, patients affected by the dry form of AMD are significantly impaired in executive functions in addition to memory. Data support the hypothesis of a possible association between AMD and cognitive impairment. In particular, patients affected by the dry form of AMD may be at greater risk of developing subsequent dementia.

  10. Age-related lysosomal dysfunction: an unrecognized roadblock for cobalamin trafficking?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Brunk, Ulf T; Garner, Brett

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin-B(12) is a generic term for corrinoid compounds that exhibit the biological activity of cyanocobalamin and are collectively referred to as cobalamins. Methylcobalamin and 5-deoxyadenosylcobalamin are the active cobalamins in human metabolism. Cobalamin plays a crucial role in the maintenance of homocysteine and methylmalonyl-CoA homeostasis and is required for erythrocyte formation and DNA synthesis. Data from human and animal studies indicate that cobalamin deficiency impairs neuronal function; a process that is thought to contribute to age-related cognitive decline and dementia. Cobalamin deficiency also results in dysfunction of the peripheral nervous system; among other disorders. Although there is a detailed understanding of the biochemical pathways that are perturbed in cobalamin deficiency, the mechanisms underlying age-related dyshomeostasis in such pathways remain to be addressed. Because cobalamin utilization is dependent on its efficient transit through lysosomes, and mounting evidence indicates that lysosomal function deteriorates in aging long-lived post-mitotic cells such as neurons, in the present article we review published data that supports the proposition that impaired lysosomal processing of cobalamin may play a significant role in age-related (neuro) degenerative diseases.

  11. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  12. Growth hormone action predicts age-related white adipose tissue dysfunction and senescent cell burden in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Palmer, Allyson K.; List, Edward O.; Berryman, Darlene E.; Lubbers, Ellen R.; Escande, Carlos; Spong, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Oberg, Ann L.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Miller, Richard A.; Kopchick, John J.; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L.

    2014-01-01

    The aging process is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. White adipose tissue (WAT) may play a central role in age-related disease onset and progression due to declines in adipogenesis with advancing age. Recent reports indicate that the accumulation of senescent progenitor cells may be involved in age-related WAT dysfunction. Growth hormone (GH) action has profound effects on adiposity and metabolism and is known to influence lifespan. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that GH activity would predict age-related WAT dysfunction and accumulation of senescent cells. We found that long-lived GH-deficient and -resistant mice have reduced age-related lipid redistribution. Primary preadipocytes from GH-resistant mice also were found to have greater differentiation capacity at 20 months of age when compared to controls. GH activity was also found to be positively associated with senescent cell accumulation in WAT. Our results demonstrate an association between GH activity, age-related WAT dysfunction, and WAT senescent cell accumulation in mice. Further studies are needed to determine if GH is directly inducing cellular senescence in WAT or if GH actions on other target organs or alternative downstream alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin or glucose levels are responsible. PMID:25063774

  13. Growth hormone action predicts age-related white adipose tissue dysfunction and senescent cell burden in mice.

    PubMed

    Stout, Michael B; Tchkonia, Tamara; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Palmer, Allyson K; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Escande, Carlos; Spong, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Oberg, Ann L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Miller, Richard A; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L

    2014-07-01

    The aging process is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. White adipose tissue (WAT) may play a central role in age-related disease onset and progression due to declines in adipogenesis with advancing age. Recent reports indicate that the accumulation of senescent progenitor cells may be involved in age-related WAT dysfunction. Growth hormone (GH) action has profound effects on adiposity and metabolism and is known to influence lifespan. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that GH activity would predict age-related WAT dysfunction and accumulation of senescent cells. We found that long-lived GH-deficient and -resistant mice have reduced age-related lipid redistribution. Primary preadipocytes from GH-resistant mice also were found to have greater differentiation capacity at 20 months of age when compared to controls. GH activity was also found to be positively associated with senescent cell accumulation in WAT. Our results demonstrate an association between GH activity, age-related WAT dysfunction, and WAT senescent cell accumulation in mice. Further studies are needed to determine if GH is directly inducing cellular senescence in WAT or if GH actions on other target organs or alternative downstream alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin or glucose levels are responsible.

  14. Red ginseng delays age-related hearing and vestibular dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunjie; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Kim, Young Sun; Park, Hun Yi; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Since Korean red ginseng (KRG) has been proven to protect against gentamicin-induced vestibular and hearing dysfunction, the effects of KRG on age-related inner ear disorder in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. While age-related hearing loss was detected at the age of 6months (32kHz) and 9months (16kHz) in the control group, it was significantly delayed (p<0.05) in the 150mg/kg KRG-treated group. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in the tail-hanging and swimming tests, with significantly different severity scores and swimming times detected between the control and 150mg/kg KRG-treated group at the age of 12months (p<0.05). Mice treated with 500mg/kg KRG exhibited irritability and aggravated inner ear dysfunction. Histological observation supported the findings of hearing and vestibular function defects. In conclusion, C57BL/6 mice showed early-onset hearing loss and progressive vestibular dysfunction with aging, which were delayed by treatment with 150mg/kg KRG. However, 500mg/kg KRG treatment may induce aggressive behavior.

  15. [Metabolic therapy for early treatment of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Bálint; Kovács, Illés; Schvöller, Mónika; Corrado Balacco, Gabrieli

    2007-12-02

    Currently, age-related macular degeneration is one of the most common eye diseases causing severe and permanent loss of vision. This disease is estimated to affect approximately 300-500 thousand Hungarians. While earlier no treatment was available, in the recent decade an antioxidant therapy became very popular using combinations of high dosage antioxidant vitamins C, E, beta carotene and zinc. Based on theoretical concepts and mostly in vitro experiences, this combination was thought to be effective through neutralizing reactive oxygen species. According to a large clinical trial (AREDS) it reduced progression of intermediate state disease to advanced state, but did not influence early disease. This original combination, due to potential severe side effects, is not on the market anymore. However, the efficacy of modified formulas has not been proved yet. Recently, the metabolic therapy, a combination of omega-3 fatty acids, coenzyme Q10 and acetyl-L-carnitine has been introduced for treating early age-related macular degeneration through improving mitochondrial dysfunction, specifically improving lipid metabolism and ATP production in the retinal pigment epithelium, improving photoreceptor turnover and reducing generation of reactive oxygen species. According to a pilot study and a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial, both central visual field and visual acuity slightly improved after 3-6 months of treatment and they remained unchanged by the end of the study. The difference was statistically significant as compared to the base line or to controls. These functional changes were accompanied by an improvement in fundus alterations: drusen covered area decreased significantly as compared to the base line or to control. Characteristically, all these changes were more marked in less affected eyes. A prospective case study on long-term treatment confirmed these observations. With an exception that after slight improvement, visual functions

  16. Age-related dysfunctions of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons under proteasome stress.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, Elena; Pintado, Cristina; Gavilan, Maria P; Daza, Paula; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Castaño, Angélica; Ruano, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and autophagy deregulation gives rise to severe disorders. Many of the signaling pathways regulating autophagy under stress conditions are still poorly understood. Using a model of proteasome stress in rat hippocampus, we have characterized the functional crosstalk between the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway, identifying also age-related modifications in the crosstalk between both proteolytic systems. Under proteasome inhibition, both autophagy activation and resolution were efficiently induced in young but not in aged rats, leading to restoration of protein homeostasis only in young pyramidal neurons. Importantly, proteasome stress inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β in young but activated in aged rats. This age-related difference could be because of a dysfunction in the signaling pathway of the insulin growth factor-1 under stress situations. Present data highlight the potential role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the coordination of both proteolytic systems under stress situation, representing a key molecular target to sort out this deleterious effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  18. Normal age-related changes in left ventricular function: Role of afterload and subendocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Jehill D; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Wallace, Dorothy; Blamire, Andrew M; MacGowan, Guy A

    2016-11-15

    In normal ageing, both vascular and ventricular properties change, and how these affect left ventricular function is not clear. 96 subjects (ages 20-79) without cardiovascular disease underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for measurement of global function, diastolic function (E/A ratio), MR tagging for measurement of torsion to shortening ratio (TSR, ratio of epicardial torsion to endocardial circumferential shortening, with increase in TSR suggesting subendocardial dysfunction relative to the subepicardium), and phase contrast MR imaging measurement of central aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV). The Vicorder device was used to measure carotid to femoral PWV. Univariate correlations established that the 4 principal age-related changes in the left ventricular function were: 1) diastolic function: E/A ratio (r: -0.61, p<0.00001); 2) global systolic function: cardiac output (r: -0.49, p<0.00001), 3) structure: end-diastolic volume index (r: -0.39, p<0.0001), and 4) systolic strains: TSR (r: 0.49, p<0.0001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age was the dominant factor in predicting changes in cardiac output and E/A ratio (both p<0.01). Increased TSR was significantly related to reduced cardiac output and end-diastolic volume index (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). Measures of vascular stiffness were not significantly related to any of these variables, but increased effective arterial elastance (afterload) was significantly related to reduced E/A ratio (p<0.05). In this group of normal ageing subjects, afterload but not vascular stiffness is significantly related to diastolic dysfunction. Increased TSR, suggesting relative subendocardial dysfunction, has a significant role in reductions of cardiac output and end-diastolic volume index. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. NAD+ metabolism, a therapeutic target for age-related metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a central metabolic cofactor by virtue of its redox capacity, and as such regulates a wealth of metabolic transformations. However, the identification of the longevity protein Sir2, the founding member of the sirtuin protein family, as being NAD+-dependent reignited interest in this metabolite. The sirtuins (SIRT1-7 in mammals) utilize NAD+ to deacetylate proteins in different subcellular compartments with a variety of functions, but with a strong convergence on optimizing mitochondrial function. Since cellular NAD+ levels are limiting for sirtuin activity, boosting its levels is a powerful means to activate sirtuins as a potential therapy for mitochondrial, often age-related, diseases. Indeed, supplying excess precursors, or blocking its utilization by PARP enzymes or CD38/CD157, boosts NAD+ levels, activates sirtuins and promotes healthy aging. Here, we discuss the current state of knowledge of NAD+ metabolism, primarily in relation to sirtuin function. We highlight how NAD+ levels change in diverse physiological conditions, and how this can be employed as a pharmacological strategy. PMID:23742622

  20. NPY antagonism reduces adiposity and attenuates age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjoon; Fujishita, Chika; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Kim, Sang Eun; Chiba, Takuya; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-12-01

    An orexigenic hormone, neuropeptide Y (NPY), plays a role not only in the hypothalamic regulation of appetite, but also in the peripheral regulation of lipid metabolism. However, the intracellular mechanisms triggered by NPY to regulate lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we report that NPY deficiency reduces white adipose tissue (WAT) mass and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism in mice. Gene expression involved in adipogenesis/lipogenesis was found to decrease, whereas proteins involved in lipolysis increased in gonadal WAT (gWAT) of NPY-knockout mice. These changes were associated with an activated SIRT1- and PPARγ-mediated pathway. Moreover, the age-related decrease of de novo lipogenesis in gWAT and thermogenesis in inguinal WAT was inhibited by NPY deficiency. Further analysis using 3T3-L1 cells showed that NPY inhibited lipolysis through the Y1 receptor and enhanced lipogenesis following a reduction in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and SIRT1 protein expression. Therefore, NPY appears to act as a key regulator of adipose tissue metabolism via the CREB-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Taken together, NPY deficiency reduces adiposity and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism, suggesting that antagonism of NPY may be a promising target for drug development to prevent age-related metabolic diseases. © FASEB.

  1. Age-related differences in experimental stroke: possible involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanlin; Kong, Xiangwei; Ye, Ruidong; Yang, Qianzi; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize

    2011-06-01

    Age is the single most important risk factor for cerebral stroke. Unfortunately, the effect of age on ischemic brain damage is less clear. In this study, we sought to examine the potential influence of aging on the histologic and functional outcomes after ischemia. Juvenile (4 weeks of age), young adult (4 months of age), mid-aged (11-12 months of age), and aged (18-19 months of age) mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no remarkable difference of infarct volume on postoperative days 1 and 3. However, on postoperative day 7, aged mice exhibited significantly worsened infarct volume compared with juvenile and young mice. Intriguingly, the increase of infarct volume was most prominent in the striatal area rather than in cortex. Accordingly, aged mice displayed a slower and incomplete functional recovery after stroke. We further evaluated the effects of aging on the oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following ischemia. Brain tissues were assayed for lipid, DNA, and protein peroxidation products, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mitochondrial membrane potential, production of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant activities. Aging was associated with declined mitochondrial function and antioxidant detoxification following ischemia, thereby inducing a deteriorated oxidative damage. Regional subanalyses demonstrated that, in accordance with infarct area, the pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalance occurred more prominently in subcortical areas. Collectively, these findings suggest mitochondria-mediated oxidative damage may be involved in the age-related aggravated injury in subcortical areas. Mitochondrial protection could be a promising target for neuroprotective therapy, especially in the aged population.

  2. Tryptophan metabolism: entering the field of aging and age-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Annemieke T; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2013-06-01

    Aging is an important risk factor for many debilitating diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration. In model organisms, interfering with metabolic signaling pathways, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 (IIS) and TOR pathways, can protect against age-related pathologies and increase lifespan. Recent studies in multiple organisms have implicated tryptophan metabolism as a powerful regulator of age-related diseases and lifespan. Its high conservation throughout evolution has enabled studies that begin to dissect the contribution of individual enzymes and metabolites. Here, we focus on the emerging view of tryptophan metabolism as a pathway that integrates environmental and metabolic signals to regulate animal biology and health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) attenuates age-related renal dysfunction by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yokozawa, Takako; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyun Ju; Tanaka, Takashi; Sugino, Hidetoshi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Chu, Djong-Chi; Juneja, Lekh Raj

    2007-09-19

    To investigate the effects of amla on renal dysfunction involved in oxidative stress during the aging process, we employed young (2 months old) and aged (13 months old) male rats and administered SunAmla (Taiyo Kagaku Co., Ltd., Japan) or an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of amla, a polyphenol-rich fraction, at a dose of 40 or 10 mg/kg body weight/day for 100 days. The administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla reduced the elevated levels of serum creatinine and urea nitrogen in the aged rats. In addition, the tail arterial blood pressure was markedly elevated in aged control rats as compared with young rats, while the systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased by the administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla. Furthermore, the oral administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla significantly reduced thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels of serum, renal homogenate, and mitochondria in aged rats, suggesting that amla would ameliorate oxidative stress under aging. The increases of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the aorta of aging rats were also significantly suppressed by SunAmla extract or EtOAc extract of amla, respectively. Moreover, the elevated expression level of bax, a proapoptotic protein, was significantly decreased after oral administration of SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla. However, the level of bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, did not show any difference among the groups. The expressions of renal nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), inhibitory kappaB in cytoplasm, iNOS, and COX-2 protein levels were also increased with aging. However, SunAmla or EtOAc extract of amla reduced the iNOS and COX-2 expression levels by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation in the aged rats. These results indicate that amla would be a very useful antioxidant for the prevention of age-related renal disease.

  4. The Absence of the Calcium-buffering Protein Calbindin is Associated with Faster Age-related Decline in Hippocampus Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Nesha S.; Vela-Duarte, Daniel; Masciotti, James; Hua, Fan; Fenton, André A.; Schwaller, Beat; Small, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Although reductions in the expression of the calcium-buffering proteins calbindin D-28K (CB) and parvalbumin (PV) have been observed in the aging brain, it is unknown whether these changes contribute to age-related hippocampal dysfunction. To address this issue, we measured basal hippocampal metabolism and hippocampal structure across the lifespan of C57BL/6J, calbindin D-28k knockout (CBKO) and parvalbumin knockout (PVKO) mice. Basal metabolism was estimated using steady state relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), which is a variant of fMRI that provides the highest spatial resolution, optimal for the analysis of individual subregions of the hippocampal formation. We found that like primates, normal aging in C57BL/6J mice is characterized by an age-dependent decline in rCBV-estimated dentate gyrus metabolism. Although abnormal hippocampal fMRI signals were observed in CBKO and PVKO mice, only CBKO mice showed accelerated age-dependent decline of rCBV-estimated metabolism in the dentate gyrus. We also found age-independent structural changes in CBKO mice, which included an enlarged hippocampus and neocortex as well as global brain hypertrophy. These metabolic and structural changes in CBKO mice correlated with a deficit in hippocampus-dependent learning in the active place avoidance task. Our results suggest that the decrease in CB that occurs during normal aging is involved in age-related hippocampal metabolic decline. Our findings also illustrate the value of using multiple MRI techniques in transgenic mice to investigate mechanisms involved in the functional and structural changes that occur during aging. PMID:21630373

  5. Hypothalamic ΔFosB prevents age-related metabolic decline and functions via SNS

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Kenichi; Rowe, Glenn C.; Gori, Francesca; Baron, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The ventral hypothalamus (VHT) integrates several physiological cues to maintain glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Aging is associated with increased glucose intolerance but the underlying mechanisms responsible for age-related metabolic decline, including neuronal signaling in the VHT, remain elusive. We have shown that mice with VHT-targeted overexpression of ΔFosB, a splice variant of the AP1 transcription factor FosB, exhibit increased energy expenditure, leading to decreased adiposity. Here, we show that VHT-targeted overexpression of ΔFosB also improves glucose tolerance, increases insulin sensitivity in target organs and thereby suppresses insulin secretion. These effects are also observed by the overexpression of dominant negative JunD, demonstrating that they occur via AP1 antagonism within the VHT. Furthermore, the improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity persisted in aged animals overexpressing ΔFosB in the VHT. These beneficial effects on glucose metabolism were abolished by peripheral sympathectomy and α-adrenergic, but not β-adrenergic, blockade. Taken together, our results show that antagonizing AP1 transcription activity in the VHT leads to a marked improvement in whole body glucose homeostasis via activation of the SNS, conferring protection against age-related impairment in glucose metabolism. These findings may open novel avenues for therapeutic intervention in diabetes and age-related glucose intolerance. PMID:28121620

  6. Raspberry supplementation alleviates age-related motor dysfunction in select populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age-related declines in balance, muscle strength and coordination often lead to a higher incidence of falling. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of distress, pain, injury, loss of confidence, and ultimately, loss of independence and death. Previous studies in our laboratory have demons...

  7. Calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation: Discrete and integrated mechanisms for age-related synaptic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sama, Diana M.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the best biomarkers of age-related cognitive decline are closely linked to synaptic function and plasticity. This review highlights several age-related synaptic alterations as they relate to Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, through elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and neuroinflammation, through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Though distinct in many ways, Ca2+ and neuroinflammatory signaling mechanisms exhibit extensive cross-talk and bidirectional interactions. For instance, cytokine production in glial cells is strongly dependent on the Ca2+ dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, which shows elevated activity in animal models of aging and disease. In turn, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, can augment the expression/activity of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels in neurons, leading to Ca2+ dysregulation, hyperactive calcineurin activity, and synaptic depression. Thus, in addition to discussing unique contributions of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neuroinflammation, this review emphasizes how these processes interact to hasten age-related synaptic changes. PMID:23751484

  8. Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in the cell: its relevance to aging and aging-related disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David G

    2002-11-01

    Mitochondria plays a complex multi-factorial role in the cell. In addition to their primary role in ATP generation, the organelles sequester calcium and both generate and detoxify reactive oxygen species. All these functions are intimately inter-linked through the central bioenergetic parameter of the proton electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Subtle changes in respiratory chain capacity, substrate supply, glutathione levels, cytoplasmic calcium and membrane potential occur in aging and in conditions predisposing towards neurodegenerative disease. These interactions are incompletely understood and in this review I present an overview of some of the current research in this area, and its possible relevance to aging and aging-related disease.

  9. Effects of moderate exercise over different phases on age-related physiological dysfunction in testes of SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiujun; Bian, Yanqing; Sun, Yichong; Li, Li; Wang, Lixuan; Zhao, Chunfang; Shen, Yongqing; Song, Qingliang; Qu, Yine; Niu, Siyun; Wu, Wenshuang; Gao, Fulu

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the testicular aging process. Different types and moderate-intensity of regular exercise may reduce age-related physiological dysfunction associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, but such effects of moderate-intensity of exercise over different phases of life in testes have not been reported. In this study, male SAMP8 mice, a senescence-accelerated strain, were maintained as sedentary (sed) or subjected to daily 15-min periods of swimming exercise between ages of 2-7 months (lifelong), 2-4 months (earlier) or 5-7 months (late). Age-related changes, including serum testosterone levels and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were analyzed at the end of the experiment. All exercise groups showed significantly greater serum testosterone levels and decreased age-related inflammation and oxidative stress compared with the sedentary group. Exercise also increased expression and activity of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), a transcriptional regulator of the cellular anti-oxidant system, and decreased expression and activity of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB), a mediator of inflammatory molecules, in the nucleus of testicular cells. However, lifelong and earlier groups generally showed significantly better protective effects than the late group against age-related physiological dysfunction in testes. Thus, lifelong exercise and earlier phase exercise were most effective in counteracting oxidative stress and inflammation and in preserving testes function through regulation of Nrf2 and NF-κB. These results advocate the benefits of lifelong exercise and emphasize a greater protection against male aging by instituting exercise earlier rather than late in life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Age-related changes in metabolic properties of equine skeletal muscle associated with muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-su; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Yamaguchi, Mamoru; Beard, Laurie A; Markert, Chad D; Devor, Steven T

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the age-related changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition and muscle oxidative and glycolytic capacity in 18 horses ranging in age from two to 30 years. Muscle samples were collected by excisional biopsy of the semimebranosus muscle. MHC expression and the key enzymatic activities were measured. There was no significant correlation between horse age and the proportions of type-IIA and type-IIX MHC isoforms. The percentage of type-I MHC isoforms decreased with advancing age. Muscle citrate synthase activity decreased, whereas lactate dehydrogenase activity increased with increasing age. Muscle 3-OH acyl CoA dehydrogenase activity did not change with ageing. The results suggest that, similar to humans, the oxidative capacity of equine skeletal muscle decreases with age. The age-related changes in muscle metabolic properties appear to be consistent with an age-related transition in MHC isoforms of equine skeletal muscle that shifts toward more glycolytic isoforms with age.

  11. Prefrontal cortical GABAergic dysfunction contributes to age-related working memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Frazier, Charles J; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2014-03-05

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions.

  12. Prefrontal Cortical GABAergic Dysfunction Contributes to Age-Related Working Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B. Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Frazier, Charles J.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions. PMID:24599447

  13. Age-Related Impairments in Object-Place Associations Are Not Due to Hippocampal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Abigail R.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Reasor, Jordan E.; Turner, Sean M.; Barthle, Sarah E.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline can reduce an individual’s quality of life. As no single neurobiological deficit can account for the wide spectrum of behavioral impairments observed in old age, it is critical to develop an understanding of how interactions between different brain regions change over the life span. The performance of young and aged animals on behaviors that require the hippocampus and cortical regions to interact, however, has not been well characterized. Specifically, the ability to link a spatial location with specific features of a stimulus, such as object identity, relies on the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices. Although aging is associated with dysfunction in each of these brain regions, behavioral measures of functional change within the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices in individual animals are often not correlated. Thus, how dysfunction of a single brain region within this circuit, such as the hippocampus, impacts behaviors that require communication with the perirhinal and prefrontal cortices remains unknown. To address this question, young and aged rats were tested on the interregion dependent object-place paired association task, as well as a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial reference memory. This particular cohort of aged rats did not show deficits on the hippocampal-dependent task, but were significantly impaired at acquiring object-place associations relative to young. These data suggest that behaviors requiring functional connectivity across different regions of the memory network may be particularly sensitive to aging, and can be used to develop models that will clarify the impact of systems-level dysfunction in the elderly. PMID:26413723

  14. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  15. Age-related alterations of skeletal muscle metabolism by intermittent hypoxia and TRH-analogue treatment.

    PubMed

    Pastoris, O; Dossena, M; Arnaboldi, R; Gorini, A; Villa, R F

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the energy metabolism were evaluated in the gastrocnemius muscle from 3- and 24-month-old rats in normoxia or subjected to either mild or severe chronic (4 weeks) intermittent normobaric hypoxia. Furthermore, 4-week treatment with saline or the TRH-analogue posatireline was performed. The muscular concentration of the following metabolites related to the energy metabolism was evaluated: glycogen, glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio; citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, malate; aspartate, glutamate, alanine; ammonia; ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate; energy charge potential. Furthermore the maximum rate of the following muscular enzymes was evaluated: hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase; citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase; total NADH cytochrome c reductase; cytochrome oxidase. The age-related decrease in muscular glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate and alanine concentrations and increase in citrate concentration were consistent with the age-related decreased hexokinase and increased citrate synthase activities. Ageing was characterized by a decrease in muscular creatine phosphate concentration, while the energy mediators and the energy charge potential were unchanged. The chronic (4 weeks) intermittent normobaric mild and severe hypoxia-induced alterations of the components in the anaerobic glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy storage, that were magnified in the skeletal muscle from the oldest animals. The effect of the chronic treatment with the TRH-analogue posatireline suggests that the action of central nervous system-acting drugs could also be related to their direct influence on the muscular biochemical mechanisms related to the energy transduction.

  16. Age-related spontaneous lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis is accompanied by dysfunctional T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G.; Bian, Fang; Zaheer, Mahira; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Volpe, Eugene A.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2016-01-01

    In both humans and animal models the development of Sjögren syndrome (SS) and non-SS keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) increases with age. Here, we investigated the ocular surface and lacrimal gland phenotype of NOD.B10.H2b mice at 7–14, 45–50, and 96–100 weeks. Aged mice develop increased corneal permeability, CD4+ T cell infiltration and conjunctival goblet cell loss. Aged mice have lacrimal gland (LG) atrophy with increased lymphocyte infiltration and inflammatory cytokine levels. An increase in the frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs cells was observed with age in the cervical lymph node (CLN), spleen and LG. These CD4+CD25+ lose suppressive ability, while maintaining expression of Foxp3 and producing IL-17 and IFN-γ. An increase Foxp3+IL-17+ or Foxp3+IFN-γ+ was observed in the LG and LG-draining CLN. In adoptive transfer experiments, recipients of either purified Tregs or purified T effector cells from aged donors developed lacrimal keratoconjunctivitis, while recipients of young Tregs or young T effector cells failed to develop disease. Overall, these results suggest inflammatory cytokine-producing CD4+Foxp3+ cells participate in the pathogenesis of age-related ocular surface disease. PMID:27706128

  17. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  18. Prmt7 Deficiency Causes Reduced Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism and Age-Related Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ju; Lee, Hye-Jin; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Choi, Dahee; Koo, Sung-Hoi; Cho, Sung Chun; Cho, Hana; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle function is critical for metabolic health and the disruption of which exacerbates many chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Skeletal muscle responds to exercise or metabolic demands by a fiber-type switch regulated by signaling-transcription networks that remains to be fully defined. Here, we report that protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (Prmt7) is a key regulator for skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. Prmt7 is expressed at the highest levels in skeletal muscle and decreased in skeletal muscles with age or obesity. Prmt7(-/-) muscles exhibit decreased oxidative metabolism with decreased expression of genes involved in muscle oxidative metabolism, including PGC-1α. Consistently, Prmt7(-/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced endurance exercise capacities. Furthermore, Prmt7(-/-) mice exhibit decreased energy expenditure, which might contribute to the exacerbated age-related obesity of Prmt7(-/-) mice. Similarly to Prmt7(-/-) muscles, Prmt7 depletion in myoblasts also reduces PGC-1α expression and PGC-1α-promoter driven reporter activities. Prmt7 regulates PGC-1α expression through interaction with and activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which in turn activates ATF2, an upstream transcriptional activator for PGC-1α. Taken together, Prmt7 is a novel regulator for muscle oxidative metabolism via activation of p38MAPK/ATF2/PGC-1α. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular metabolic deficiency in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xue-Mei; Huang, Han-Chang; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2012-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder. The pathology of AD includes amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau, as well as neuronal loss in specific brain regions. Increasing epidemiological and functional neuroimaging evidence indicates that global and regional disruptions in brain metabolism are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Aβ precursor protein is cleaved to produce both extracellular and intracellular Aβ, accumulation of which might interfere with the homeostasis of cellular metabolism. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that not only supply the main energy to the cell but also regulate apoptosis. Mitochondrial dysfunction might contribute to Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize the pathways of Aβ generation and its potential neurotoxic effects on cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Age-Related Sex-Specific Changes in Brain Metabolism and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Ito, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2016-02-01

    With a large database, we aimed to evaluate sex-specific distinctive changes in brain glucose metabolism and morphology during normal aging using MRI and (18)F-FDG PET. A total of 963 cognitively healthy adults were included in this study. All subjects completed a medical questionnaire, took the mini-mental state examination, and underwent brain MRI and whole-body (18)F-FDG PET. The MR and PET images were statistically analyzed using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection. All images were corrected for whole-brain pixel value to identify the brain regions with significant changes, and regions of interest were set up with reference to Brodmann areas. We evaluated morphologic and glucose metabolic changes by cross-sectional analysis. The baseline database consisted of subjects from 30 to 40 y old, and the age-step for comparison was 5-y ranges. We also compared sex-specific differences in MR and PET images in each age group. Regarding age-related changes, in both sexes brain atrophy was observed in the lateral frontal and parietal regions and glucose hypometabolism in the medial frontal regions. There were significant differences in these parameters between the sexes; parallel changes in volume and metabolism were manifested in the medial frontal cortex in men and in the lateral and medial temporal cortex in women. By contrast, metabolism-dominant reductions were manifested in the lateral and medial parietal cortex in men and in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, including the Broca area, in women. These differences became insignificant in individuals 66 y or older. Our brain mapping study with a large number of reference human brain data demonstrated age-related parallel changes between morphology and metabolism in the medial frontal regions and sex-specific hypometabolism in the parietal (male) and ventrolateral prefrontal (female) cortices. These findings may suggest an aging vulnerability in sex-specific brain regions: the parietal cortex for

  1. Plasma lipoprotein subfraction concentrations are associated with lipid metabolism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Gan, Alfred; Fan, Qiao; Chee, Miao Ling; Apte, Rajendra S; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Yeo, Ian; Mathur, Ranjana; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin; Tai, E Shyong

    2017-09-01

    Disturbance in lipid metabolism has been suggested as a major pathogenic factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Conventional lipid measures have been inconsistently associated with AMD. Other factors that can alter lipid metabolism include lipoprotein phenotype and genetic mutations. We performed a case-control study to examine the association between lipoprotein profile and neovascular AMD (nAMD) and whether the cholesterylester transfer protein (CETP) D442G mutation modulates these associations. Patients with nAMD had significantly higher concentrations of HDL and IDL compared with controls. The increase in HDL particles in nAMD patients was driven by an excess of medium-sized particles. Concurrently, patients with nAMD also had lower Apo A-1, lower VLDL and chylomicron lipoprotein. Many of these associations showed a dose-dependent association between controls, early AMD cases, and nAMD cases. Adjustment for the presence of the D442G mutation at the CETP locus did not significantly alter the increased AMD risk associated with HDL particle concentration. AMD is associated with variation in many lipoprotein subclasses, including increased HDL and IDL particles and decreased Apo A-1, VLDL, and chylomicron particles. These data suggest widespread systemic disturbance in lipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of AMD, including possible alterations in lipoprotein carrier capacity. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. PPAR nuclear receptors and altered RPE lipid metabolism in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Malek, Goldis; Hu, Peng; Wielgus, Albert; Dwyer, Mary; Cousins, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of 'early' dry age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), characterized by the accumulation of lipid and protein-rich sub-retinal deposits remains largely unknown. Accumulation and dysregulated turnover of lipids as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in sub-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) deposits and Bruch's membrane, itself an ECM, play a role in ARMD. Epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk for the disease associated with higher dietary intake of long chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and specifically more so for n-6 versus n-3 fatty acids. PUFAs are membrane targets of lipid peroxidation and natural ligands for the nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR). Here we investigated the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and expression of the three isoforms of PPARs in an immortalized cell line of human RPE cells (ARPE19) in the presence or absence of fatty acids.

  3. Age-Related Changes in Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism in Male C57bl/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jang Su; Oh, Jeong-Ja; Kwak, Hui Chan; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Kim, Hyoung Chin; Kim, Young-Mi; Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2017-06-14

    Alterations in sulfur amino acid metabolism are associated with an increased risk of a number of common late-life diseases, which raises the possibility that metabolism of sulfur amino acids may change with age. The present study was conducted to understand the age-related changes in hepatic metabolism of sulfur amino acids in 2-, 6-, 18- and 30-month-old male C57BL/6 mice. For this purpose, metabolite profiling of sulfur amino acids from methionine to taurine or glutathione (GSH) was performed. The levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites were not significantly different among 2-, 6- and 18-month-old mice, except for plasma GSH and hepatic homocysteine. Plasma total GSH and hepatic total homocysteine levels were significantly higher in 2-month-old mice than those in the other age groups. In contrast, 30-month-old mice exhibited increased hepatic methionine and cysteine, compared with all other groups, but decreased hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine and homocysteine, relative to 2-month-old mice. No differences in hepatic reduced GSH, GSH disulfide, or taurine were observed. The hepatic changes in homocysteine and cysteine may be attributed to upregulation of cystathionine β-synthase and down-regulation of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase in the aged mice. The elevation of hepatic cysteine levels may be involved in the maintenance of hepatic GSH levels. The opposite changes of methionine and SAM suggest that the regulatory role of SAM in hepatic sulfur amino acid metabolism may be impaired in 30-month-old mice.

  4. Adhesive capsulitis: An age related symptom of metabolic syndrome and chronic low-grade inflammation?

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Max

    2016-03-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is very poorly understood, particularly it's underlying etiology. Obesity and metabolic syndrome, which are strongly associated with chronic low grade inflammation, are becoming increasingly understood to underlie a raft of morbid states including upper limb pain syndromes, diabetes (DM), cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and central nervous system dysfunction and degeneration. Notwithstanding age, two of the strongest established risk factors for AC are DM and CVD. The hypothesis argues that similar to DM and CVD, the inflammation and capsular fibrosis seen in AC is precipitated by metabolic syndrome and chronic low grade inflammation. These pathophysiological mechanisms are highly likely to be perpetuated by upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, sympathetic dominance of autonomic balance, and neuro-immune activation. The hypothesis predicts and describes how these processes may etiologically underpin and induce each sub-classification of AC. An improved understanding of the etiology of AC may lead to more accurate diagnosis, improved management, treatment outcomes, and reduce or prevent pain, disability and suffering associated with the disease. The paper follows on with a discussion of similarities between the pathophysiology of AC to general systemic inflammatory control mechanisms whereby connective tissue (CT) fibrosis is induced as a storage depot for leukocytes and chronic inflammatory cells. The potential role of hyaluronic acid (HA), the primary component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and CT, in the pathophysiology of AC is also discussed with potential treatment implications. Lastly, a biochemical link between physical and mental health through the ECM is described and the concept of a periventricular-limbic central driver of CT dysfunction is introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic risk factors, coping with stress, and psychological well-being in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavar, Ivan; Lovrić, Sanjin; Vukojević, Mladenka; Sesar, Irena; Petric-Vicković, Ivanka; Sesar, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the risk factors (age, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, consumption of alchohol and drugs, positive family history, and exposure to sunlight), coping with stress, psychological well-being and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Forty patients with ARMD (case group) and 63 presbyopes (control group) participated in the study. Patient data were collected through general information questionnaire including patient habits, the COPE questionnaire that showed the way the patients handling stress, and the GHQ that analyzed the psychological aspects of their quality of life. These questionnaires were administered to the patients during ophthalmologic examination. The study involved 46 (44.66%) men and 57 (55.33%) women. Statistical analysis showed that the major risks for the development of ARMD were elevated cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in plasma. A significantly higher number ofARMD patients had a positive family history when compared with presbyopes. This study showed presbyopes to cope with emotional problems significantly better and to have a lower level of social dysfunction when compared with ARMD patients. However, it is necessary to conduct further studies in a large number of patients to determine more accurately the pathophysiological mechanisms of metabolic factors as well as the impact of the disease on the quality of life in patients with ARMD.

  6. Telomere dysfunction induces metabolic and mitochondrial compromise

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ergün; Colla, Simona; Liesa, Marc; Moslehi, Javid; Müller, Florian L.; Guo, Mira; Cooper, Marcus; Kotton, Darrell; Fabian, Attila J.; Walkey, Carl; Maser, Richard S.; Tonon, Giovanni; Foerster, Friedrich; Xiong, Robert; Wang, Y. Alan; Shukla, Sachet A.; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Martin, Eric S.; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Mahoney, John E.; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Perry, Samuel R.; Bronson, Roderick; Liao, Ronglih; Mulligan, Richard; Shirihai, Orian S.; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction activates p53-mediated cellular growth arrest, senescence and apoptosis to drive progressive atrophy and functional decline in high-turnover tissues. The broader adverse impact of telomere dysfunction across many tissues including more quiescent systems prompted transcriptomic network analyses to identify common mechanisms operative in haematopoietic stem cells, heart and liver. These unbiased studies revealed profound repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha and beta (PGC-1α and PGC-1β, also known as Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b, respectively) and the downstream network in mice null for either telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert) or telomerase RNA component (Terc) genes. Consistent with PGCs as master regulators of mitochondrial physiology and metabolism, telomere dysfunction is associated with impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and function, decreased gluconeogenesis, cardiomyopathy, and increased reactive oxygen species. In the setting of telomere dysfunction, enforced Tert or PGC-1α expression or germline deletion of p53 (also known as Trp53) substantially restores PGC network expression, mitochondrial respiration, cardiac function and gluconeogenesis. We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction activates p53 which in turn binds and represses PGC-1α and PGC-1β promoters, thereby forging a direct link between telomere and mitochondrial biology. We propose that this telomere–p53–PGC axis contributes to organ and metabolic failure and to diminishing organismal fitness in the setting of telomere dysfunction. PMID:21307849

  7. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report

    PubMed Central

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S.; Anthony, Brian W.; Manini, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  8. The Need for Standardized Assessment of Muscle Quality in Skeletal Muscle Function Deficit and Other Aging-Related Muscle Dysfunctions: A Symposium Report.

    PubMed

    Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly; Harris-Love, Michael O; Miljkovic, Iva; Fragala, Maren S; Anthony, Brian W; Manini, Todd M

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of scientific literature suggests that not only changes in skeletal muscle mass, but also other factors underpinning muscle quality, play a role in the decline in skeletal muscle function and impaired mobility associated with aging. A symposium on muscle quality and the need for standardized assessment was held on April 28, 2016 at the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a venue for basic science and clinical researchers and expert clinicians to discuss muscle quality in the context of skeletal muscle function deficit and other aging-related muscle dysfunctions. The present article provides an expanded introduction concerning the emerging definitions of muscle quality and a potential framework for scientific inquiry within the field. Changes in muscle tissue composition, based on excessive levels of inter- and intra-muscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids, have been found to adversely impact metabolism and peak force generation. However, methods to easily and rapidly assess muscle tissue composition in multiple clinical settings and with minimal patient burden are needed. Diagnostic ultrasound and other assessment methods continue to be developed for characterizing muscle pathology, and enhanced sonography using sensors to provide user feedback and improve reliability is currently the subject of ongoing investigation and development. In addition, measures of relative muscle force such as specific force or grip strength adjusted for body size have been proposed as methods to assess changes in muscle quality. Furthermore, performance-based assessments of muscle power via timed tests of function and body size estimates, are associated with lower extremity muscle strength may be responsive to age-related changes in muscle quality. Future aims include reaching consensus on the definition and standardized assessments of muscle quality, and

  9. Age-Related Alterations in the Metabolic Profile in the Hippocampus of the Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Prone 8: A Spontaneous Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualong; Lian, Kaoqi; Han, Bing; Wang, Yanyong; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Geng, Yuan; Qiang, Jing; Sun, Meiyu; Wang, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder, produces a progressive decline in cognitive function. The metabolic mechanism of AD has emerged in recent years. In this study, we used multivariate analyses of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements to determine that learning and retention-related metabolic profiles are altered during aging in the hippocampus of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8). Alterations in 17 metabolites were detected in mature and aged mice compared to young mice (13 decreased and 4 increased metabolites), including metabolites related to dysfunctional lipid metabolism (significantly increased cholesterol, oleic acid, and phosphoglyceride levels), decreased amino acid (alanine, serine, glycine, aspartic acid, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid), and energy-related metabolite levels (malic acid, butanedioic acid, fumaric acid, and citric acid), and other altered metabolites (increased N-acetyl-aspartic acid and decreased pyroglutamic acid, urea, and lactic acid) in the hippocampus. All of these alterations indicated that the metabolic mechanisms of age-related cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice were related to multiple pathways and networks. Lipid metabolism, especially cholesterol metabolism, appears to play a distinct role in the hippocampus in AD. PMID:24284365

  10. The therapeutic potential of metabolic hormones in the treatment of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Grizzanti, John; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Camins, Antoni; Pallas, Merce; Casadesus, Gemma

    2017-01-01

    Aging leads to a number of physiological alterations, specifically changes in circulating hormone levels, increases in fat deposition, decreases in metabolism, changes in inflammatory responses, and reductions in growth factors. These progressive changes in physiology and metabolism are exacerbated by modern culture and Western diet and give rise to diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes (T2D). These age and lifestyle-related metabolic diseases are often accompanied by insulin and leptin resistance, as well as aberrant amylin production and signaling. Many of these alterations in hormone production and signaling are directly influenced by an increase in both oxidative stress and inflammation. Importantly, changes in hormone production and signaling have direct effects on brain function and the development of age-related neurologic disorders. Therefore, this review aims to present evidence on the effects that diet and metabolic disease have on age-related cognitive decline and the development of cognitive diseases, particularly Alzheimer disease. This review will focus on the metabolic hormones insulin, leptin, and amylin and their role in cognitive decline, as well as the therapeutic potential of these hormones in treating cognitive disease. Future investigations targeting the long-term effects of insulin and leptin treatment may reveal evidence to reduce risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. PMID:27923524

  11. Genomic deletion of GIT2 induces a premature age-related thymic dysfunction and systemic immune system disruption

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Sana; Lustig, Ana; Carter, Arnell; Sankar, Mathavi; Daimon, Caitlin M.; Premont, Richard T.; Etienne, Harmonie; van Gastel, Jaana; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Janssens, Jonathan; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yongqing; Wood, William; Lehrmann, Elin; Martin, James G.; Martin, Bronwen; Taub, Dennis D.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has proposed that GIT2 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2) acts as an integrator of the aging process through regulation of ‘neurometabolic’ integrity. One of the commonly accepted hallmarks of the aging process is thymic involution. At a relatively young age, 12 months old, GIT2−/− mice present a prematurely distorted thymic structure and dysfunction compared to age-matched 12 month-old wild-type control (C57BL/6) mice. Disruption of thymic structure in GIT2−/− (GIT2KO) mice was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of the cortical thymic marker, Troma-I (cytokeratin 8). Double positive (CD4+CD8+) and single positive CD4+ T cells were also markedly reduced in 12 month-old GIT2KO mice compared to age-matched control wild-type mice. Coincident with this premature thymic disruption in GIT2KO mice was the unique generation of a novel cervical ‘organ’, i.e. ‘parathymic lobes’. These novel organs did not exhibit classical peripheral lymph node-like characteristics but expressed high levels of T cell progenitors that were reflexively reduced in GIT2KO thymi. Using signaling pathway analysis of GIT2KO thymus and parathymic lobe transcriptomic data we found that the molecular signaling functions lost in the dysfunctional GIT2KO thymus were selectively reinstated in the novel parathymic lobe – suggestive of a compensatory effect for the premature thymic disruption. Broader inspection of high-dimensionality transcriptomic data from GIT2KO lymph nodes, spleen, thymus and parathymic lobes revealed a systemic alteration of multiple proteins (Dbp, Tef, Per1, Per2, Fbxl3, Ddit4, Sin3a) involved in the multidimensional control of cell cycle clock regulation, cell senescence, cellular metabolism and DNA damage. Altered cell clock regulation across both immune and non-immune tissues therefore may be responsible for the premature ‘aging’ phenotype of GIT2KO mice. PMID:28260693

  12. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  13. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  14. Resveratrol Ameliorates Aging-Related Metabolic Phenotypes by Inhibiting cAMP Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jun; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Williams, Tishan; Luo, Haibin; Ke, Hengming; Rehmann, Holger; Taussig, Ronald; Brown, Alexandra L.; Kim, Myung K.; Beaven, Michael A.; Burgin, Alex B.; Manganiello, Vincent; Chung, Jay H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine, has been reported as a calorie restriction mimetic with potential antiaging and antidiabetogenic properties. It is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, but its mechanism of action remains a mystery. Here, we report that the metabolic effects of resveratrol result from competitive inhibition of cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterases, leading to elevated cAMP levels. The resulting activation of Epac1, a cAMP effector protein, increases intracellular Ca2+ levels and activates the CamKKβ-AMPK pathway via phospholipase C and the ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel. As a consequence, resveratrol increases NAD+ and the activity of Sirt1. Inhibiting PDE4 with rolipram reproduces all of the metabolic benefits of resveratrol, including prevention of diet-induced obesity and an increase in mitochondrial function, physical stamina, and glucose tolerance in mice. Therefore, administration of PDE4 inhibitors may also protect against and ameliorate the symptoms of metabolic diseases associated with aging. PMID:22304913

  15. Resveratrol Prevents Age-Related Memory and Mood Dysfunction with Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Microvasculature, and Reduced Glial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol. PMID:25627672

  16. Resveratrol prevents age-related memory and mood dysfunction with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and microvasculature, and reduced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-01-28

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol.

  17. Brain Iron Metabolism Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Wang, Jun; Rogers, Jack; Xie, Junxia

    2017-05-01

    Dysfunction of iron metabolism, which includes its uptake, storage, and release, plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Understanding how iron accumulates in the substantia nigra (SN) and why it specifically targets dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is particularly warranted for PD, as this knowledge may provide new therapeutic avenues for a more targeted neurotherapeutic strategy for this disease. In this review, we begin with a brief introduction describing brain iron metabolism and its regulation. We then provide a detailed description of how iron accumulates specifically in the SN and why DAergic neurons are especially vulnerable to iron in PD. Furthermore, we focus on the possible mechanisms involved in iron-induced cell death of DAergic neurons in the SN. Finally, we present evidence in support that iron chelation represents a plausable therapeutic strategy for PD.

  18. Towards finding the linkage between metabolic and age-related disorders using semantic gene data network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uzzal Hossain, Mohammad; Zaffar Shibly, Abu; Md. Omar, Taimur; Tous Zohora, Fatama; Sara Santona, Umme; Hossain, Md. Jakir; Hosen Khoka, Md. Sadek; Ara Keya, Chaman; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    A metabolic disorder (MD) occurs when the metabolic process is disturbed. This process is carried out by thousands of enzymes participating in numerous inter-dependent metabolic pathways. Critical biochemical reactions that involve the processing and transportation of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids are affected in metabolic diseases. Therefore, it is of interest to identify the common pathways of metabolic disorders by building protein-protein interactions (PPI) for network analysis. The molecular network linkages between MD and age related diseases (ARD) are intriguing. Hence, we created networks of protein-protein interactions that are related with MD and ARD using relevant known data in the public domain. The network analysis identified known MD associated proteins and predicted genes and or its products of ARD in common pathways. The genes in the common pathways were isolated from the network and further analyzed for their co-localization and shared domains. Thus, a model hypothesis is proposed using interaction networks that are linked between MD and ARD. This data even if less conclusive finds application in understanding the molecular mechanism of known diseases in relation to observed molecular events PMID:27212841

  19. Recent advances in the role of cortisol and metabolic syndrome in age-related degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Stefanelli, Manuela; Falaschi, Giulia Maria; Toussan, Lavinia; Ferri, Claudio; Falaschi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) presents an increasing prevalence in elderly people. A significant role in MetS is played by the stress response and cortisol. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity is increased by central (loss of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors) and peripheral (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1, hyperactivity) mechanisms. The HPA hyperactivity has been found in chronic diseases affecting the endocrine (abdominal obesity with MetS, type 2 diabetes), cardiovascular (atherosclerosis, essential hypertension), and nervous systems (dementia, depression), in aging. A novel therapeutic approach (11β-HSD1 inhibition) is promising in treating the HPA axis hyperactivity in chronic diseases with MetS. A large-scale national clinical trial (AGICO, AGIng, and COrtisol study) has been proposed by our group to evaluate the role of cortisol and MetS in the main pathologies of aging (vascular and degenerative dementia, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, abdominal obesity).

  20. Metabolic syndrome, its components and risk of age-related cataract extraction: a case-control study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Galeone, Carlotta; Petracci, Elisabetta; Pelucchi, Claudio; Zucchetto, Antonella; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tavani, Alessandra

    2010-05-01

    We sought to explore the relationship between age-related cataract extraction and the metabolic syndrome or its various components separately and in various combinations in an Italian case-control study. A total of 761 cases and 1,522 controls in hospital for acute, non-neoplastic, non-ophthalmologic, non-metabolic diseases were interviewed between 1991 and 2003. Odds ratios (ORs), and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were computed from multiple logistic regression models, conditioned on sex, age, and study center and adjusted for education and smoking. The ORs were 1.41 for a history of central obesity, 1.42 for hypertension, 1.25 for hyperlipidemia, and 1.16 for diabetes. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (defined as the simultaneous presence of central obesity and at least two other factors among hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes) had an increased risk of cataract, with an OR of 2.01 (95% CI: 1.43-2.83). The ORs were 1.75 for the presence of any of two components and 2.50 for three to four components, with a linear trend in risk. This study indicates that the metabolic syndrome, its components, and their combination are associated with an increased risk of cataract extraction in this Italian population. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design, synthesis and in vivo study of novel pyrrolidine-based 11β-HSD1 inhibitors for age-related cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Rosana; Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Seira, Constantí; Valverde, Elena; McBride, Andrew; Binnie, Margaret; Pérez, Belén; Luque, F Javier; Pallàs, Mercè; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; Webster, Scott P; Vázquez, Santiago

    2017-10-20

    Recent findings suggest that treatment with 11β-HSD1 inhibitors provides a novel approach to deal with age-related cognitive dysfunctions, including Alzheimer's disease. In this work we report potent 11β-HSD1 inhibitors featuring unexplored pyrrolidine-based polycyclic substituents. A selected candidate administered to 12-month-old SAMP8 mice for four weeks prevented memory deficits and displayed a neuroprotective action. This is the first time that 11β-HSD1 inhibitors have been studied in this broadly-used mouse model of accelerated senescence and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro effects of vitamin supplements on platelet-activating factor and its metabolism in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Marilita M; Chatziralli, Irini P; Stamatakis, George; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki D; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate for the first time a series of vitamin supplements used for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as potential inhibitors of platelet-activating factor (PAF). Various vitamin supplements were tested in washed rabbit platelets (WRPs), in order to investigate the interaction between vitamin supplements (InShape, Nutrof, Ocuvite, Vitalux) and inhibition of PAF-induced platelet aggregation. Additionally, we examined their ability to affect PAF-metabolism, through their in vitro effect on PAF basic metabolic enzymes (PAF-CPT, lyso PAF-AT, and PAF-AH). Nutrof exhibited the strongest anti-PAF activity, while Vitalux was the most potent anti-inflammatory factor. This is the first study to bring in surface potent anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities of some vitamin supplements used against AMD, through their in vitro anti-PAF effects in WRPs and the rabbit plasma and leukocyte PAF metabolism, suggesting a promising role of vitamin supplements and especially resveratrol, concerning its potent anti-angiogenic activity in AMD.

  3. Aging-Related Correlation between Serum Sirtuin 1 Activities and Basal Metabolic Rate in Women, but not in Men

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sirtuin (SIRT) is a main regulator of metabolism and lifespan, and its importance has been implicated in the prevention against aging-related diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify the pattern of serum SIRT1 activity according to age and sex, and to investigate how serum SIRT1 activity is correlated with other metabolic parameters in Korean adults. The Biobank of Jeju National University Hospital, a member of the Korea Biobank Network, provided serum samples from 250 healthy adults. Aging- and metabolism-related factors were analyzed in serum, and the data were compared by the stratification of age and sex. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) decreased with age and was significantly lower in men in their fifties and older and in women in their forties and older compared with twenties in men and women, respectively. SIRT1 activities were altered by age and sex. Especially, women in their thirties showed the highest SIRT1 activities. Correlation analysis displayed that SIRT1 activity is positively correlated with serum triglyceride (TG) in men, and with waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and serum TG in women. And, SIRT1 activity was negatively correlated with aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratio in women (r = −0.183, p = 0.039). Positive correlation was observed between SIRT1 activity and BMR in women (r = 0.222, p = 0.027), but not in men. Taken together, these findings suggest the possibility that serum SIRT1 activities may be utilized as a biomarker of aging. In addition, positive correlation between SIRT1 activity and BMR in women suggests that serum SIRT1 activity may reflect energy expenditure well in human. PMID:28168178

  4. Medical management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Duleba, Antoni J

    2012-03-10

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. There is a growing need to develop pharmacologic interventions to improve metabolic function in women with PCOS. Medications that have been tested in patients with PCOS include metformin, thiazolidinediones, acarbose, naltrexone, orlistat, vitamin D and statins. Metformin decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis and free fatty acid oxidation while increasing peripheral glucose uptake. Early studies in PCOS suggested that metformin indirectly reduces insulin level, dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation; however, recent placebo-controlled trials failed to demonstrate significant metabolic benefit. Thiazolidinediones act primarily by increasing peripheral glucose uptake. Most studies in PCOS have demonstrated that thiazolidinediones reduce insulin resistance; however, effects on dyslipidemia were disappointing. Use of thiazolidinediones is associated with weight gain and major complications. Acarbose reduces digestion of polysaccharides. Studies in PCOS yielded inconsistent effects of acarbose on insulin sensitivity and no significant improvement of dyslipidemia. Naltrexone reduces appetite and modulates insulin release; its use in PCOS may reduce hyperinsulinemia. Orlistat decreases absorption of dietary fats; studies in PCOS suggest beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. Vitamin D may improve insulin sensitivity but mixed results on lipid profile in PCOS have been reported. Statins are competitive inhibitors of the key enzyme regulating the mevalonate pathway; their effects are related to reduced cholesterol production as well as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. In women with PCOS, statins reduce hyperandrogenism, improve lipid profile and reduce systemic inflammation while the effects on insulin sensitivity are variable. Use of statins is contraindicated in pregnancy.

  5. Energy metabolic dysfunction as a carcinogenic factor in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongyan; Shi, Zhenhua; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Cancer, as a leading cause of death, has attracted enormous public attention. Reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is deemed to be one of the principal hallmarks of cancer. In this article, we reviewed the mutual relationships among environmental pollution factors, energy metabolic dysfunction, and various cancers. We found that most environmental pollution factors could induce cancers mainly by disturbing the energy metabolism. By triggering microenvironment alteration, energy metabolic dysfunction can be treated as a factor in carcinogenesis. Thus, we put forward that energy metabolism might be as a key point for studying carcinogenesis and tumor development to propose new methods for cancer prevention and therapy.

  6. S-allyl cysteine ameliorates the quality of sperm and provides protection from age-related sperm dysfunction and oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play a central role in the pathophysiology of the age-related decrease in male fertility. It has been reported that the total protein of DJ-1 was decreased in a proteomic analysis of seminal plasma from asthenozoospermia patients and a DJ-1 protein acts as a sensor of cellular redox homeostasis. Therefore, we evaluated the age-related changes in the ratio of the oxidized/reduced forms of the DJ-1 protein in the epididymis. In addition, the protective effects of S-allyl cysteine (SAC), a potent antioxidant, were evaluated against sperm dysfunction. Male rats aged 15–75 weeks were used to assess age-associated sperm function and oxidative stress. Sperm count increased until 25 weeks, but then decreased at 50 and 75 weeks. The rate of sperm movement at 75 weeks was decreased to approximately 60% of the rate observed at 25 weeks. Expression of DJ-1 decreased, but oxidized-DJ-1 increased with age. In addition, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins in the epididymis increased until 50 weeks of age. The total number and DNA synthetic potential of the sperm increased until 25 weeks, and then decreased. In rats 75 weeks of age, SAC (0.45% diet) attenuated the decrease in the number, motility, and DNA synthesis of sperm and inhibited the oxidized proteins. These results suggest that SAC ameliorates the quality of sperm subjected to age-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25411519

  7. Age-related longitudinal changes in metabolic energy expenditure during walking in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Merel-Anne; Kempen, Jiska C E; van der Kooi, Anneke J; de Groot, Imelda J M; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Niks, Erik H; Harlaar, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in metabolic walking energy expenditure in ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy over a follow-up period of 12 months. At baseline (T1) and 12 months later (T2), metabolic walking energy expenditure was assessed during a 6-minute walk test at comfortable speed in 14 ambulant boys with Duchenne (age range: 6.0-12.5 years, mean 8.2). Outcome measures derived from the assessment included the 6-minute comfortable walking distance (m) and net-nondimensional energy cost relative to speed-matched control cost (SMC-EC, %). Statistical comparisons were made using a two-way repeated measures ANOVA (factors: time (T1 versus T2) and age (<8 years of age (yoa) versus ≥8 yoa)). Over the course of the study, a significant decrease of -28m (-8.2%, p = 0.043) was noted in the walked distance at comfortable speed. Besides, SMC-EC increased with 4.4%, although this change was not significant (p = 0.452). Regarding age groups, boys below 8 yoa showed a smaller annual decrease in the walked distance (-15 m) compared to boys above 8 yoa (-37 m). SMC-EC increased with 10% in the older boys, while in the younger boys it decreased (-2.1%). The main effect of age group on walking distance and SMC-EC however was not significant (p>0.158), and also there were no interaction effects (p>0.248). The results of our small study suggest that the natural course of walking performance in ambulant boys with Duchenne is characterized by a decrease in comfortable walking distance and an increase in walking energy cost. The rate of energy cost seems to increase with age, while walking distance decreases, which is opposite from the trend in typically developing children.

  8. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency causes dysregulated cellular matrix metabolism and age-related macular degeneration-like pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Herrmann, Rolf; Bednar, Amanda; Saloupis, Peter; Dwyer, Mary A.; Yang, Ping; Qi, Xiaoping; Thomas, Russell S.; Jaffe, Glenn J.; Boulton, Michael E.; McDonnell, Donald P.; Malek, Goldis

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. Herein, we report a previously undescribed role for the AhR signaling pathway as an essential defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of early dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. We found that AhR activity and protein levels in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, cells vulnerable in AMD, decrease with age. This finding is significant given that age is the most established risk factor for development of AMD. Moreover, AhR−/− mice exhibit decreased visual function and develop dry AMD-like pathology, including disrupted RPE cell tight junctions, accumulation of RPE cell lipofuscin, basal laminar and linear-like deposit material, Bruch’s membrane thickening, and progressive RPE and choroidal atrophy. High-serum low-density lipoprotein levels were also observed in AhR−/− mice. In its oxidized form, this lipoprotein can stimulate increased secretion of extracellular matrix molecules commonly found in deposits from RPE cells, in an AhR-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the importance of cellular clearance via the AhR signaling pathway in dry AMD pathogenesis, implicating AhR as a potential target, and the mouse model as a useful platform for validating future therapies. PMID:24106308

  9. Common cell biologic and biochemical changes in aging and age-related diseases of the eye: Toward new therapeutic approaches to age-related ocular diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reviews of information about age related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, and glaucoma make it apparent that while each eye tissue has its own characteristic metabolism, structure and function, there are common perturbations to homeostasis that are associated with age-related dysfunction. The c...

  10. Dietary nitrate improves age-related hypertension and metabolic abnormalities in rats via modulation of angiotensin II receptor signaling and inhibition of superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Hezel, Michael; Peleli, Maria; Liu, Ming; Zollbrecht, Christa; Jensen, Boye L; Checa, Antonio; Giulietti, Alessia; Wheelock, Craig E; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Carlström, Mattias

    2016-10-01

    Advanced age is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A proposed central event is diminished amounts of nitric oxide (NO) due to reduced generation by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and increased oxidative stress. In addition, it is widely accepted that increased angiotensin II (ANG II) signaling is also implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by accelerating formation of reactive oxygen species. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dietary nitrate supplementation could reduce blood pressure and improve glucose tolerance in aged rats, via attenuation of NADPH oxidase activity and ANG II receptor signaling. Dietary nitrate supplementation for two weeks reduced blood pressure (10-15mmHg) and improved glucose clearance in old, but not in young rats. These favorable effects were associated with increased insulin responses, reduced plasma creatinine as well as improved endothelial relaxation to acetylcholine and attenuated contractility to ANG II in resistance arteries. Mechanistically, nitrate reduced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and increased cGMP signaling. Finally, nitrate treatment in aged rats normalized the gene expression profile of ANG II receptors (AT1A, AT2, AT1A/AT2 ratio) in the renal and cardiovascular systems without altering plasma levels of renin or ANG II. Our results show that boosting the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway can partly compensate for age-related disturbances in endogenous NO generation via inhibition of NADPH oxidase and modulation of ANG II receptor expression. These novel findings may have implications for nutrition-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  11. Gut microbiome, obesity, and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Kaser, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related disorders such as metabolic syndrome has vastly increased throughout the world. Recent insights have generated an entirely new perspective suggesting that our microbiota might be involved in the development of these disorders. Studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with profound microbiotal changes, and the induction of a metabolic syndrome phenotype through fecal transplants corroborates the important role of the microbiota in this disease. Dietary composition and caloric intake appear to swiftly regulate intestinal microbial composition and function. As most findings in this field of research are based on mouse studies, the relevance to human biology requires further investigation.

  12. Mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction in cancer-associated cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Wagner, Erwin F.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction contributes to the clinical deterioration observed in advanced cancer patients and is characterized by weight loss, skeletal muscle wasting, and atrophy of the adipose tissue. This systemic syndrome, termed cancer-associated cachexia (CAC), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While once attributed solely to decreased food intake, the present description of cancer cachexia is a disorder of multiorgan energy imbalance. Here we review the molecules and pathways responsible for metabolic dysfunction in CAC and the ideas that led to the current understanding. PMID:26944676

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in metabolic disorders - A step towards mitochondria based therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Bhatti, Gurjit Kaur; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-11-09

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell and are involved in essential functions of the cell, including ATP production, intracellular Ca(2+) regulation, reactive oxygen species production & scavenging, regulation of apoptotic cell death and activation of the caspase family of proteases. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are largely involved in aging, cancer, age-related neurodegenerative and metabolic syndrome. In the last decade, tremendous progress has been made in understanding mitochondrial structure, function and their physiology in metabolic syndromes such as diabetes, obesity, stroke and hypertension, and heart disease. Further, progress has also been made in developing therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle interventions (healthy diet and regular exercise), pharmacological strategies and mitochondria-targeted approaches. These strategies were mainly focused to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and to maintain mitochondrial quality in metabolic syndromes. The purpose of our article is to highlight the recent progress on the mitochondrial role in metabolic syndromes and also summarize the progress of mitochondria-targeted molecules as therapeutic targets to treat metabolic syndromes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Quality in Diabetes/Obesity and Critical Illness Spectrum of Diseases - edited by P. Hemachandra Reddy.

  14. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  15. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction after noncardiac surgery: effects of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hudetz, Judith A; Patterson, Kathleen M; Amole, Oludara; Riley, Aaron V; Pagel, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    Vascular risk factors, including metabolic syndrome, are known to contribute to the development of cognitive dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that patients with metabolic syndrome are more likely to develop cognitive dysfunction after noncardiac surgery. Age- and education-balanced patients (n = 60) undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with and without metabolic syndrome and 30 nonsurgical controls were enrolled. Recent verbal and nonverbal memory and executive functions were assessed using a psychometric test battery before and 1 month after noncardiac surgery or at a 1-month interval in nonsurgical controls. Neurocognitive scores under baseline conditions were similar in surgical patients with versus without metabolic syndrome in all examined cognitive modalities (recent nonverbal and verbal memory, executive functions). Pronounced reductions in tests of verbal memory (delayed story recall, immediate and delayed word list recall) and executive function (backward digit span) were observed in patients with versus without metabolic syndrome after surgery. Overall cognitive performance after surgery was also significantly (P = 0.03) more impaired in patients with versus without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence rate of POCD wasdifferent in the studied groups (17/30 [corrected] and 8/30 in patientswith versus without metabolic syndrome; P < 0.02). The results indicate that cognitive functions were more profoundly impaired in patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing noncardiac surgery compared with their healthier counterparts.

  16. Decrease in age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive improvement following vitamin D supplementation are associated with modulation of brain energy metabolism and redox state.

    PubMed

    Briones, T L; Darwish, H

    2014-03-14

    In the present study we examined whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive impairment by enhancing brain energy homeostasis and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and modulating the redox state. Male F344 rats aged 20 months (aged) and 6 months (young) were randomly assigned to either vitamin D supplementation or no supplementation (control). Rats were housed in pairs and the supplementation group (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received subcutaneous injections of vitamin D (1, α25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) for 21 days. Control animals (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received equal volume of normal saline and behavioral testing in the water maze started on day 14 after the initiation of vitamin D supplementation. Tau phosphorylation, markers of brain energy metabolism (ADP/ATP ratio and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) and redox state (levels of reactive oxygen species, activity of superoxide dismutase, and glutathione levels) as well as PP2A activity were measured in hippocampal tissues. Our results extended previous findings that: (1) tau phosphorylation significantly increased during aging; (2) markers of brain energy metabolism and redox state are significantly decreased in aging; and (3) aged rats demonstrated significant learning and memory impairment. More importantly, we found that age-related changes in brain energy metabolism, redox state, and cognitive function were attenuated by vitamin D supplementation. No significant differences were seen in tau hyperphosphorylation, markers of energy metabolism and redox state in the young animal groups. Our data suggest that vitamin D ameliorated the age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive decline by enhancing brain energy metabolism, redox state, and PP2A activity making it a potentially useful therapeutic option to alleviate the effects of aging. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-related transcriptional changes in gene expression in different organs of mice support the metabolic stability theory of aging.

    PubMed

    Brink, Thore C; Demetrius, Lloyd; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2009-10-01

    Individual differences in the rate of aging are determined by the efficiency with which an organism transforms resources into metabolic energy thus maintaining the homeostatic condition of its cells and tissues. This observation has been integrated with analytical studies of the metabolic process to derive the following principle: The metabolic stability of regulatory networks, that is the ability of cells to maintain stable concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other critical metabolites is the prime determinant of life span. The metabolic stability of a regulatory network is determined by the diversity of the metabolic pathways or the degree of connectivity of genes in the network. These properties can be empirically evaluated in terms of transcriptional changes in gene expression. We use microarrays to investigate the age-dependence of transcriptional changes of genes in the insulin signaling, oxidative phosphorylation and glutathione metabolism pathways in mice. Our studies delineate age and tissue specific patterns of transcriptional changes which are consistent with the metabolic stability-longevity principle. This study, in addition, rejects the free radical hypothesis which postulates that the production rate of ROS, and not its stability, determines life span.

  18. Complex mechanisms linking neurocognitive dysfunction to insulin resistance and other metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gandy, Sam; Small, Dana; Kahn, C. Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Pawlyk, Aaron; Sherwin, Robert; Smith, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scientific evidence has established several links between metabolic and neurocognitive dysfunction, and epidemiologic evidence has revealed an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in patients with diabetes. In July 2015, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases gathered experts from multiple clinical and scientific disciplines, in a workshop entitled “The Intersection of Metabolic and Neurocognitive Dysfunction”, to clarify the state-of-the-science on the mechanisms linking metabolic dysfunction, and insulin resistance and diabetes in particular, to neurocognitive impairment and dementia. This perspective is intended to serve as a summary of the opinions expressed at this meeting, which focused on identifying gaps and opportunities to advance research in this emerging area with important public health relevance. PMID:27303627

  19. Interventions for the metabolic dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gurkan; Yildiz, Bulent O

    2013-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with metabolic disturbances including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Cardiometabolic risk should be assessed at regular intervals starting from diagnosis. A comprehensive clinical evaluation includes determination of body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure and measurement of serum lipid and glucose levels in all women with PCOS. A standard 2-h 75g oral glucose tolerance test is required for women with a body mass index over 25kg/m(2) and with other risk factors for glucose intolerance. No long-term data are available for the risk or benefit of any medical intervention for metabolic dysfunction of PCOS. For the initial management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS, available guidelines recommend lifestyle intervention which improves androgen excess and insulin resistance without significant effect on glucose intolerance or dyslipidemia. Pharmacological interventions include insulin sensitizing agents and statins. Metformin is the most commonly prescribed insulin sensitizer in PCOS. Available randomized controlled trials suggest that metformin improves insulin resistance without any effect on body mass index, fasting glucose or lipid levels. Short term use of statins alone or in combination with metformin decreases total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides in PCOS patients with dyslipidemia. Low dose oral contraception in PCOS appears not to be associated with clinically significant metabolic dysfunction.

  20. Study on autonomic dysfunction and metabolic syndrome in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Zhao, Xiaolan; Zeng, Ping; Zhu, Jianguo; Yang, Shuwen; Liu, Annan; Song, Yuehua

    2016-11-01

    There is still a lack of simple methods and instruments for the early assessment of autonomic dysfunction in metabolic syndrome patients. Assessment of sudomotor function has been proposed to explore autonomic function, and could be used as an early biomarker for metabolic syndrome. In the present study, we use a quick and non-invasive method to measure sudomotor function, and aimed to evaluate its efficacy to identify metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population. Information on the 1,160 Chinese participants involved in the study, such as age, sex, blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile, and SUDOSCAN, was recorded. During the sudomotor test, patients were asked to place their bare hands and feet on large electrodes. The test took 2 min to carry out, was painless and no participant preparation was required. A total of 567 participants were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome correlated significantly with increasing SUDOSCAN cardiac risk score (P for trend <0.0001). Furthermore, an increase in cardiac risk score value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (P for trend <0.0001). Compared with the no-risk group (cardiac risk score <20), participants in the high-risk group (cardiac risk score ≥30) had a 2.83-fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome (P < 0.0001), and 1.51-fold increased risk (P = 0.01) after adjustments. Autonomic dysfunction is correlated to components of metabolic syndrome. The role of SUDOSCAN in the screening of at-risk populations for metabolic syndrome has to be confirmed by further studies. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Age-Related Changes in Gustatory, Homeostatic, Reward, and Memory Processing of Sweet Taste in the Metabolic Syndrome: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Aaron; Green, Erin; Haase, Lori; Szajer, Jacquelyn; Murphy, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Age affects the human taste system at peripheral and central levels. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors (e.g., abdominal obesity and hypertension) that co-occur, increase with age, and heighten risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cognitive decline. Little is known about how age, metabolic syndrome, and hunger state interact to influence how the brain processes information about taste. We investigated brain activation during the hedonic evaluation of a pleasant, nutritive stimulus (sucrose) within regions critical for taste, homeostatic energy regulation, and reward, as a function of the interactions among age, metabolic syndrome, and hunger condition. We scanned young and elderly adults, half with risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome twice: Once fasted overnight and once after a preload. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data indicated significant effects of age as well as interactive effects with metabolic syndrome and hunger condition. Age-related differences in activation were dependent on the hunger state in regions critical for homoeostatic energy regulation and basic as well as higher order sensory processing and integration. The effects of age and metabolic syndrome on activation in the insula, orbital frontal cortex, caudate, and the hypothalamus may have particularly important implications for taste processing, energy regulation, and dietary choices.

  2. The relationship of metabolic syndrome and body composition in children with premature adrenarche: is it age related?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristen M; Oberfield, Sharon E; Zhang, Chengchen; McMahon, Donald J; Sopher, Aviva B

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies that evaluate both body composition and metabolic syndrome (MeS) risk in prepubertal children with premature adrenarche (PA) are limited. Methods Fifty-eight prepubertal children (5-9 years, 33F and 25M), with PA(n=30) and controls (n=28) were evaluated for the presence of MeS as defined by age-modified NCEP ATP III criteria. A subset had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bone markers (n=23/58) to evaluate the effect of hyperandrogenism on metabolic abnormalities and body composition. Results There was no difference in prevalence of MeS between PA and controls(p=0.138). Children with MeS were obese with increased WC and decreased HDL levels. Androgens were not associated with having more than one criteria for MeS (p=0.08), but were associated with triglycerides and WC (p=0.029, p=0.041). Lean mass was greater in PA (p=0.039) and androgens correlated with BMD(p=0.029) and total body fat(p=0.008). Subjects with higher percent body fat were more likely to have more than one MeS risk factor(p=0.005). Conclusions MeS was seen only in obese subjects whether or not they had PA. Thus, it appears that obesity drives metabolic risk in the prepubertal population, rather than PA. Our findings are important in determining how the prepubertal patient with PA should be evaluated for metabolic risk. PMID:26513727

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  4. Metabolic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-na; Ji, Sunggoan; Rothman, Sarah; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Efforts towards developing effective treatments for these disorders have shown limited efficacy at best, with no true cure to this day being present. Recent work, both clinical and experimental, indicates that many neurodegenerative disorders often display a coexisting metabolic dysfunction which may exacerbate neurological symptoms. It stands to reason therefore that metabolic pathways may themselves contain promising therapeutic targets for major neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the most recent evidence for metabolic dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and discuss several potential mechanisms that may underlie the potential relationships between metabolic dysfunction and etiology of nervous system degeneration. We also highlight some prominent signaling pathways involved in the link between peripheral metabolism and the central nervous system that are potential targets for future therapies, and we will review some of the clinical progress in this field. It is likely that in the near future, therapeutics with combinatorial neuroprotective and 'eumetabolic' activities may possess superior efficacies compared to less pluripotent remedies.

  5. Age-related changes in secretion rate and post-secretory metabolism of growth hormone in swine.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C; Lapierre, H; Matte, J J; Brazeau, P

    1993-07-01

    The effect of age on growth hormone (GH) metabolism and GH-releasing factor (GRF)-induced GH concentrations were studied in 7 young (3 mo, 39 kg) and 7 old (30 mo, 156 kg) Yorkshire x Landrace female pigs. Jugular catheters were surgically inserted and 60 hr later total serum volume was determined. The following day, all animals were infused for 3 hr with GH (30.3 ng.min/kg B.W.) in order to calculate GH metabolic clearance rate (MCR), secretion rate (SR) and half-life (t 1/2). Two days later, 15 micrograms/kg of GRF was injected i.v. into all pigs. On a per animal basis, aging increased (P < .01) MCR (299 vs 132 ml/min), SR (714 vs 422 ng/min) and serum volume (6.6 vs 2.01), whereas t1/2 was unaltered (P > .1). Basal GH concentrations were lower in older pigs (P < .10) but the GRF-induced GH concentrations (measured as GH peak or area under the curve, AUC) were not affected by age (P > .1). Yet, when induced total GH secretion (AUC x MCR) and average total serum GH (mean GH post-injection x serum volume) were calculated per pig, these variables significantly increased between 3 and 30 mo of age. Basal IGF-I concentrations were lower in older pigs (P < .01), yet, there was a tendency (P = .10) for these pigs to show a greater IGF-I response to GH infusion. The present data therefore indicate that age alters both SR and post-secretory metabolism of GH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Early obesity and age-related mimicry of metabolic syndrome in female mice with sex hormonal imbalances.

    PubMed

    Sairam, M Ram; Wang, Min; Danilovich, Natalia; Javeshghani, Danesh; Maysinger, Dusica

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the relationship of early obesity to metabolic syndrome during sex hormonal imbalances in mutant female mice at different ages. Hormonal imbalances, accumulation and nature of adipose tissue, food intake, glucose tolerance, and expression of candidate genes and markers of inflammation were studied by comparing wild-type, null, and haploinsufficient follitropin receptor knockout female mice at different ages. Follitropin receptor deletion in mice produced null females that are infertile and haploinsufficient mice that undergo accelerated biological aging. Both types of mutants with sex hormonal imbalances have central obesity without hyperphagia, but circulating leptin is elevated. Adipocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy is attributed to elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression. Adiponectin protein levels increase in fat tissue and plasma. Only mutants but not controls acquire age-dependent decline in glucose tolerance with high insulin and altered pancreatic beta cells. Changes in inflammation markers, decreased muscle insulin receptor phosphorylation, and increase of the enzyme protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B indicate insulin resistance. In this animal model, the chronological appearance of early obesity induced by hormonal imbalances culminates in characteristics that are attributable to metabolic syndrome, including cardiovascular abnormalities. Dissection of the depot-specific alterations and defining molecular interrelationships could help in developing targeted remedies and resolving complications and controversies related to health benefits and adversities of current hormone replacement therapy.

  7. [Age-related aspects of the extent of lipid metabolism and post-traumatic stress disorders among veterans of modern warfare].

    PubMed

    Torgashov, M N; Miakotnykh, V S; Pal'tsev, A I

    2013-01-01

    The peculiarities of violations of lipid metabolism and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 161 patients of 25-69 years, veterans of the military actions on the territory of Afghanistan and the Northern Caucasus were investigated. The dependence of the formation of dyslipidemia and related changes of atherosclerosis in the young age on neuroendocrine effects, accompanying the effects of combat stress and promoting accelerated aging was determined. On the other hand, with the time, after 15-25 years after participating in hostilities, the intensity of PTSD and its influence on the development of violations of lipid spectrum may decline. The leading role in the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia goes to age-related changes, accompanying a process of accelerated aging of veterans of combat operations, and to pathological disorders of metabolism in liver associated with alcohol abuse and the consequences of infectious diseases.

  8. Human cancer: is it linked to dysfunctional lipid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Sarwar; Wang, Yi; Suman, Devi S; Parhar, Ranjit S; Collison, Kate; Conca, Walter; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Gaugler, Randy

    2015-02-01

    Lipid metabolism dysfunction leading to excess fat deposits (obesity) may cause tumor (cancer) development. Both obesity and cancer are the epicenter of important medical issues. Lipid metabolism and cell death/proliferation are controlled by biochemical and molecular pathways involving many proteins, and organelles; alteration in these pathways leads to fat accumulation or tumor growth. Mammalian Krüppel-like factors, KLFs play key roles in both lipid metabolism and tumor development. Substantial epidemiological and clinical studies have established strong association of obesity with a number of human cancers. However, we need more experimental verification to determine the exact role of this metabolic alteration in the context of tumor development. A clear understanding of molecules, pathways and the mechanisms involved in lipid metabolism and cell death/proliferation will have important implications in pathogenesis, and prevention of these diseases. The regulatory role of KLFs, in both cell death/proliferation and lipid metabolism suggests a common regulation of both processes. This provides an excellent model for delivering a precise understanding of the mechanisms linking altered expression of KLFs to obesity and tumor development. Currently, mouse and rats are the models of choice for investigating disease mechanisms and pharmacological therapies but a genetic model is needed for a thorough examination of KLF function in vivo during the development of an organism. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal model to study the connectivity between lipid metabolism and cell death/proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Endocrine Dysfunctions in Patients with Inherited Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Erdöl, Şahin; Sağlam, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) can affect many organ systems, including the endocrine system. There are limited data regarding endocrine dysfunctions related to IMDs in adults, however, no data exist in pediatric patients with IMDs. The aim of this study was to investigate endocrine dysfunctions in patients with IMDs by assessing their demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. Methods: Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical reports of patients with IMDs who were followed by the division of pediatric metabolism and nutrition between June 2011 and November 2013. Results: In total, 260 patients [139 males (53%) and 121 females (47%)] with an IMD diagnosis were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 5.94 (range; 0.08 to 49) years and 95.8% (249 of 260 patients) were in the pediatric age group. Growth status was evaluated in 258 patients and of them, 27 (10.5%) had growth failure, all cases of which were attributed to non-endocrine reasons. There was a significant correlation between growth failure and serum albumin levels below 3.5 g/dL (p=0.002). Only three of 260 (1.1%) patients had endocrine dysfunction. Of these, one with lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency and another with Kearns-Sayre syndrome had diabetes, and one with glycerol kinase deficiency had glucocorticoid deficiency. Conclusion: Endocrine dysfunction in patients with IMDs is relatively rare. For this reason, there is no need to conduct routine endocrine evaluations in most patients with IMDs unless a careful and detailed history and a physical examination point to an endocrine dysfunction. PMID:27086477

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10575.001 PMID:27307216

  11. Age-related onset of obesity corresponds with metabolic dysregulation and altered microglia morphology in mice deficient for Ifitm proteins.

    PubMed

    Wee, Yin Shen; Weis, Janis J; Gahring, Lorise C; Rogers, Scott W; Weis, John H

    2015-01-01

    The IfitmDel mouse lacks all five of the Ifitm genes via LoxP deletion. This animal breeds normally with no obvious defect in development. The IfitmDel animals exhibit a steady and significantly enhanced weight gain relative to wild-type controls beginning about three months of age and under normal feeding conditions. The increased weight corresponds with elevated fat mass, and in tolerance tests they are hyporesponsive to insulin but respond normally to glucose. Both young (4 mo) and older (12 mo) IfitmDel mice have enhanced levels of serum leptin suggesting a defect in leptin/leptin receptor signaling. Analysis of the gene expression profiles in the hypothalamus of IfitmDel animals, compared to WT, demonstrated an altered ratio of Pomc and Npy neuropeptide expression, which likely impairs the satiation response of the IfitmDel animal leading to an increased eating behavior. Also elevated in hypothalamus of IfitmDel mice were pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced IL-10. Anatomical analysis of the hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry revealed that microglia exhibit an abnormal morphology in IfitmDel animals and respond abnormally to Poly:IC challenge. These abnormalities extend the phenotype of the IfitmDel mouse beyond abnormal responses to viral challenge to include a metabolic phenotype and weight gain. Further, this novel phenotype for the IfitmDel mouse could be related to abnormal neuropeptide production, inflammatory status and microglia status in the hypothalamus.

  12. Age-related changes of anandamide metabolism in CB1 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice: correlation with behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maccarrone, Mauro; Valverde, Olga; Barbaccia, Maria L; Castañé, Anna; Maldonado, Rafael; Ledent, Catherine; Parmentier, Marc; Finazzi-Agrò, Alessandro

    2002-04-01

    Anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are the most active endocannabinoids at brain (CB1) cannabinoid receptors. CD1 mice lacking the CB1 receptors ("knockout" [KO] mutants) were compared with wildtype (WT) littermates for their ability to degrade AEA through an AEA membrane transporter (AMT) and an AEA hydrolase (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH). The age dependence of AMT and FAAH activity were investigated in 1- or 4-month-old WT and KO animals, and found to increase with age in KO, but not WT, mice and to be higher in the hippocampus than in the cortex of all animals. AEA and 2-AG were detected in nmol/mg protein (microm) concentrations in both regions, though the hippocampus showed approximately twice the amount found in the cortex. In the same regions, 2-AG failed to change across groups, while AEA was significantly decreased (approximately 30%) in hippocampus, but not in cortex, of old KO mice, when compared with young KO or age-matched WT animals. In the open-field test under bright light and in the lit-dark exploration model of anxiety, young KO mice, compared with old KO, exhibited a mild anxiety-related behaviour. In contrast, neither the increase in memory performance assessed by the object recognition test, nor the reduction of morphine withdrawal symptoms, showed age dependence in CB1 KO mice. These results suggest that invalidation of the CB1 receptor gene is associated with age-dependent adaptive changes of endocannabinoid metabolism which appear to correlate with the waning of the anxiety-like behaviour exhibited by young CB1 KO mice.

  13. Hepatic Steatosis as a Marker of Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrini, Elisa; Magkos, Faidon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver manifestation of the complex metabolic derangements associated with obesity. NAFLD is characterized by excessive deposition of fat in the liver (steatosis) and develops when hepatic fatty acid availability from plasma and de novo synthesis exceeds hepatic fatty acid disposal by oxidation and triglyceride export. Hepatic steatosis is therefore the biochemical result of an imbalance between complex pathways of lipid metabolism, and is associated with an array of adverse changes in glucose, fatty acid, and lipoprotein metabolism across all tissues of the body. Intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content is therefore a very good marker (and in some cases may be the cause) of the presence and the degree of multiple-organ metabolic dysfunction. These metabolic abnormalities are likely responsible for many cardiometabolic risk factors associated with NAFLD, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Understanding the factors involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of NAFLD will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic complications of obesity, and hopefully to the discovery of novel effective treatments for their reversal. PMID:26102213

  14. Developmental androgenization programs metabolic dysfunction in adult mice: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2014-04-01

    Emerging evidence supports a developmental origin for the metabolic syndrome in the context of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in which the fetal environment programs both reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that will occur in adulthood. To explore the role of developmental androgen excess in programming metabolic dysfunction in adulthood, we reported a mouse model system in which neonates were androgenized with testosterone. We compared female mice with neonatal exposure to testosterone (NTF) with control females (CF), control males (CM), and male mice with neonatal testosterone exposure (NTM). NTF develop many of the features of metabolic syndrome observed in women with PCOS. These features include increased food intake and lean mass, visceral adiposity with enlarged adipocytes, hypoadiponectinemia, decreased osteocalcin activity, insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and hypertension. NTF also develop a novel form of leptin resistance independent of STAT3. In contrast, littermate NTM develop a phenotype of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with decreased lean mass and food intake. These NTM mice exhibit subcutaneous adiposity without cardiometabolic alterations. We discuss the relevance of this mouse model of developmental androgenization to the metabolic syndrome and its clinical implications to human metabolic diseases.

  15. Erectile dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular risks: facts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Edward; Pastuszak, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction, and shares many risk factors with systemic conditions including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). ED is considered to be an independent risk factor for CVD and can be a harbinger of future cardiovascular events. Given this relationship, each encounter for ED should be viewed by healthcare providers as an opportunity to screen for CVD and other comorbid conditions, including the MetS, that can significantly affect a man’s overall health. While universally accepted screening guidelines are lacking, expert panels do recommend an approach to risk stratification in men with ED. In this review, we discuss the current state of understanding of the relationship between ED, the MetS, and CV risk, and how this impacts the approach to the patient presenting with ED. PMID:28217448

  16. Effects of dietary protein type on oxidized cholesterol-induced alteration in age-related modulation of lipid metabolism and indices of immune function in rats.

    PubMed

    Minehira, K; Inoue, S; Nonaka, M; Osada, K; Yamada, K; Sugano, M

    2000-01-03

    Exogenous oxidized cholesterol disturbs both lipid metabolism and immune functions. Therefore, it may perturb these modulations with ageing. Effects of the dietary protein type on oxidized cholesterol-induced modulations of age-related changes in lipid metabolism and immune function was examined using differently aged (4 weeks versus 8 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats when casein, soybean protein or milk whey protein isolate (WPI) was the dietary protein source, respectively. The rats were given one of the three proteins in diet containing 0.2% oxidized cholesterols mixture. Soybean protein, as compared with the other two proteins, significantly lowered both the serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value and cholesterol, whereas it elevated the ratio of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol/cholesterol in young rats, but not in adult. Moreover, soybean protein, but not casein and WPI, suppressed the elevation of Delta6 desaturation indices of phospholipids in both liver and spleen, particularly in young. On the other hand, WPI, compared to the other two proteins, inhibited the leukotriene B4 production of spleen, irrespective of age. Soybean protein reduced the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cells in splenic lymphocytes. Therefore, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgE and IgG in serum were lowered in rats given soybean protein in both age groups except for IgA in adult, although these observations were not shown in rats given other proteins. Thus, various perturbations of lipid metabolism and immune function caused by oxidized cholesterol were modified depending on the type of dietary protein. The moderation by soybean protein on the change of lipid metabolism seems to be susceptible in young rats whose homeostatic ability is immature. These observations may be exerted through both the promotion of oxidized cholesterol excretion to feces and the change of hormonal release, while WPI may suppress the disturbance of immune function by oxidized cholesterol in

  17. [Vascular dysfunction in metabolic disorders: evaluation of some therapeutic interventions].

    PubMed

    Bouskela, Eliete; Kraemer de Aguiar, Luiz Guillherme; Nivoit, Pierre; Bahia, Luciana R; Villela, Nivaldo R; Bottino, Daniel A

    2007-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases continue to be the main cause of death in most industrialized countries. Endothelial dysfunction, a systemic process, is the earliest known marker of atherosclerosis and has become a major focus in acute ischemic disorders. We are investigating the hypothesis that, in these diseases, microvascular and endothelial dysfunctions occur simultaneously and precede the onset of macrovascular disease. We studied, to our knowledge for the first time in the same subjects, microvascular and endothelial functions in 11 patients with type 2 diabetes. 36 metabolic syndrome patients (NCEP-ATPIII criteria) and 25 young obese women matched with healthy controls. Micro vascular morphology and hemodynamics were evaluated non-invasively by means of nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Red blood cell velocity (RBCV, mm/s) was measured at rest and after release from 60 s of arterial occlusion (RBCVmax, mm/s) at the finger base, along with the time to reach RBCVmax (TRBCVmax, s), by video analysis with Cap Image software. Venous occlusion plethysmography was performed after intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside to assess endo thelial-dependent and -independent vasodilation, respectively. We found similar results in the three groups of subjects, namely a significant decrease in RBCVmax, an increase in TRBCVmax, and a decrease in endothelial-dependent vasodilation. These findings clearly demonstrate that the two dysfunctions occur simultaneously in these groups of patients. Several mechanisms which could impair micro vascular and endothelial functions are associated with insulin resistance, and drugs that act on insulin resistance might thus be beneficial. Metformin, given to 16 first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who had the metabolic syndrome and normal glucose tolerance (ADA criteria), improved endothelial-dependent vasodilation and microcirculatory function. Rosiglitazone, given to 18 patients with the

  18. Enhanced Glycolytic Metabolism Contributes to Cardiac Dysfunction in Polymicrobial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhibo; Ma, He; Zhang, Xia; Tu, Fei; Wang, Xiaohui; Ha, Tuanzhu; Fan, Min; Liu, Li; Xu, Jingjing; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Kalbfleisch, John; Kao, Race; Williams, David; Li, Chuanfu

    2017-05-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is present in >40% of sepsis patients and is associated with mortality rates of up to 70%. Recent evidence suggests that glycolytic metabolism plays a critical role in host defense and inflammation. Activation of Toll-like receptors on immune cells can enhance glycolytic metabolism. This study investigated whether modulation of glycolysis by inhibition of hexokinase will be beneficial to septic cardiomyopathy. Male C57B6/J mice were treated with a hexokinase inhibitor (2-deoxy-d-glucose [2-DG], 0.25-2 g/kg, n = 6-8) before cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced sepsis. Untreated septic mice served as control. Sham surgically operated mice treated with or without the 2-DG inhibitor served as sham controls. Cardiac function was assessed 6 hours after CLP sepsis by echocardiography. Serum was harvested for measurement of inflammatory cytokines and lactate. Sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction was significantly attenuated by administration of 2-DG. Ejection fraction and fractional shortening in 2-DG-treated septic mice were significantly (P < .05) greater than in untreated CLP mice. 2-DG administration also significantly improved survival outcome, reduced kidney and liver injury, attenuated sepsis-increased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β as well as lactate, and enhanced the expression of Sirt1 and Sirt3 in the myocardium, which play an important role in mitochondrial function and metabolism. In addition, 2-DG administration suppresses sepsis-increased expression of apoptotic inducers Bak and Bax as well as JNK phosphorylation in the myocardium. Glycolytic metabolism plays an important role in mediating sepsis-induced septic cardiomyopathy. The mechanisms may involve regulation of inflammatory response and apoptotic signaling.

  19. The perfect storm: obesity, adipocyte dysfunction, and metabolic consequences.

    PubMed

    de Ferranti, Sarah; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2008-06-01

    As the prevalence of adiposity soars in both developed and developing nations, appreciation of the close links between obesity and disease increases. The strong relationships between excess adipose tissue and poor health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, mandate elucidation of the complex cellular, hormonal, and molecular pathophysiology whereby adiposity initiates and maintains adverse health effects. In this report we review adipocyte metabolism and function in the context of energy imbalance and postprandial nutrient excess, including adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia, adipocyte dysfunction, and other systemic consequences. We also discuss implications for laboratory evaluation and clinical care, including the role of lifestyle modifications. Chronic energy imbalance produces adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. These processes lead to increased intracellular and systemic release of adipokines, free fatty acids, and inflammatory mediators that cause adipocyte dysfunction and induce adverse effects in the liver, pancreatic beta-cells, and skeletal muscle as well as the heart and vascular beds. Several specialized laboratory tests can quantify these processes and predict clinical risk, but translation to the clinical setting is premature. Current and future pharmacologic interventions may target these pathways; modest changes in diet, physical activity, weight, and smoking are likely to have the greatest impact. Adipocyte endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress, and associated changes in circulating adipokines, free fatty acids, and inflammatory mediators, are central to adverse health effects of adiposity. Future investigation should focus on these pathways and on reversing the adverse lifestyle behaviors that are the fundamental causes of adiposity.

  20. Prevention of age-related endothelial dysfunction by habitual aerobic exercise in healthy humans: possible role of nuclear factor κB.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Pierce, Gary L; Nowlan, Molly J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Habitual aerobic exercise prevents age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). We have hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) impairs EDD with sedentary aging, and habitual aerobic exercise prevents this age-related suppression of EDD by NF-κB. To test this hypothesis, we have inhibited NF-κB signalling via oral salsalate administration in healthy older aerobic exercise-trained adults (OT, n=14, 58 ± 2 years), older non-exercising adults (ON, n=16, 61 ± 1 years) and young non-exercising controls (YN, n=8, 23 ± 1 years). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell expression of NF-κB p65 by ~25% in ON (P<0.05) but did not significantly change expression in OT or YN (P>0.05). EDD, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), was improved by salsalate in ON (4.0 ± 0.7% compared with 6.8 ± 0.7%, placebo compared with salsalate, P<0.001) but did not change with salsalate in OT or YN (OT: 7.2 ± 0.7% compared with 7.7 ± 0.6%; YN: 7.6 ± 0.9% compared with 8.1 ± 0.8%; placebo compared with salsalate, P>0.05). Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by salsalate in any group (P>0.05). In ON, vitamin C infusion improved FMD by ~30% during placebo (P<0.001) but had no affect during salsalate (P>0.05). In OT and YN, vitamin C infusion did not affect FMD during either placebo or salsalate (P>0.05). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell nitrotyrosine content by ~25% and NADPH oxidase p47phox expression by ~30% in ON (P<0.05) but had no effect in OT or YN (P>0.05). Our results suggest that endothelial NF-κB signalling is associated with oxidative stress-related impairment of EDD in healthy non-exercising but not aerobically exercising older adults. This may be a key mechanism by which regular aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function and reduces cardiovascular risk with aging.

  1. Prevention of age-related endothelial dysfunction by habitual aerobic exercise in healthy humans: Possible role of nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Pierce, Gary L; Nowlan, Molly J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    Habitual aerobic exercise prevents age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). We hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) impairs EDD with sedentary aging and habitual aerobic exercise prevents this age-related suppression of EDD by NF-κB. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited NF-κB signaling via oral salsalate administration in healthy older aerobic exercise-trained adults (OT, n=14, 58±2 years), older non-exercising adults (ON, n=16, 61±1 years) and young non-exercising controls (YN, n=8, 23±1 years). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell expression of NF-κB p65 by ~25% in ON (P<0.05), but did not significantly change expression in OT or YN (P>0.05). EDD, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), was improved by salsalate in ON (4.0±0.7% vs. 6.8±0.7%, placebo vs. salsalate, P<0.001), but did not change with salsalate in OT or YN (OT: 7.2±0.7% vs. 7.7±0.6%; YN: 7.6±0.9% vs. 8.1±0.8%; placebo vs. salsalate, P>0.05). Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by salsalate in any group (P>0.05). In ON, vitamin C infusion improved FMD by ~30% during placebo (P<0.001), but had no affect during salsalate (P>0.05). In OT and YN, vitamin C infusion did not affect FMD during either placebo or salsalate (P>0.05). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell nitrotyrosine content by ~25% and NADPH oxidase p47phox expression by ~30% in ON (P<0.05), but had no effect in OT or YN (P>0.05). Our results suggest that endothelial NF-κB signaling is associated with oxidative stress-related impairment of EDD in healthy non-exercising, but not aerobically exercising older adults. This may be a key mechanism by which regular aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function and reduces cardiovascular risk with aging. PMID:24947434

  2. Metabolic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: Bioenergetics, Redox Homeostasis and Central Carbon Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Jacome, Maria S; Lei, Shulei; Hernandez-Franco, Pablo; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the accumulation of protein inclusions (Lewy bodies) are the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is triggered by genetic alterations, environmental/occupational exposures and aging. However, the exact molecular mechanisms linking these PD risk factors to neuronal dysfunction are still unclear. Alterations in redox homeostasis and bioenergetics (energy failure) are thought to be central components of neurodegeneration that contribute to the impairment of important homeostatic processes in dopaminergic cells such as protein quality control mechanisms, neurotransmitter release/metabolism, axonal transport of vesicles and cell survival. Importantly, both bioenergetics and redox homeostasis are coupled to neuro-glial central carbon metabolism. We and others have recently established a link between the alterations in central carbon metabolism induced by PD risk factors, redox homeostasis and bioenergetics and their contribution to the survival/death of dopaminergic cells. In this review, we focus on the link between metabolic dysfunction, energy failure and redox imbalance in PD, making an emphasis in the contribution of central carbon (glucose) metabolism. The evidence summarized here strongly supports the consideration of PD as a disorder of cell metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatalism and cardio-metabolic dysfunction in Mexican-American women.

    PubMed

    Espinosa de Los Monteros, Karla; Gallo, Linda C

    2013-12-01

    Mexican-American women are disproportionately vulnerable to cardio-metabolic dysfunction and related health conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Research shows that low socioeconomic status contributes to this populations excess vulnerability to cardio-metabolic dysfunction, but little is known about the contribution of cultural factors to these associations. The current study explored the association between fatalism and cardio-metabolic dysfunction in a randomly selected community cohort of middle-aged Mexican-American women and examined whether fatalism could be conceptualized as a pathway linking socioeconomic status to cardio-metabolic dysfunction in this population. Participants included 300 women (ages 40-65), recruited from San Diego communities located near the Mexican border, who completed a self-administered survey battery and underwent a fasting clinical exam between the years 2006 and 2009. Linear regression analyses and mediation analyses utilizing bootstrapping procedures were performed to test study hypotheses. After controlling for age, menopausal status, and acculturation level, fatalism was associated with cardio-metabolic dysfunction. Although slightly attenuated, this relationship persisted after accounting for socioeconomic status. In addition, individuals of low socioeconomic status displayed more fatalistic beliefs and higher cardio-metabolic dysfunction after accounting for relevant covariates. Finally, the indirect effect of socioeconomic status on cardio-metabolic dysfunction via fatalism reached statistical significance. Fatalism may be an important independent risk factor for cardio-metabolic dysfunction in Mexican-American women as well as a mechanism linking socioeconomic status to cardio-metabolic health.

  4. Adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic dysfunction: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tam, Charmaine S; Redman, Leanne M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is characterized by a state of chronic low-grade inflammation due to increased immune cells, specifically infiltrated macrophages into adipose tissue, which in turn secrete a range of proinflammatory mediators. This nonselective low-grade inflammation of adipose tissue is systemic in nature and can impair insulin signaling pathways, thus, increasing the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical studies examining the role of adipose tissue in the development of obesity-associated complications in humans. We will discuss adipose tissue inflammation during different scenarios of energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction including obesity and overfeeding, weight loss by calorie restriction or bariatric surgery, and conditions of insulin resistance (diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome).

  5. Adipokines, metabolic dysfunction and illness course in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Rizzo, Lucas B; Santos, Camila M; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    Replicated evidence indicates that individuals with BD are differentially affected by metabolic comorbidities and that its occurrence is a critical mediator and/or moderator of BD outcomes. This study aimed to explore the role of adipokines on bipolar disorder (BD) course and its relationship with metabolic comorbidities (i.e. type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity). We measured plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin, as well as anthropometric and metabolic parameters of 59 patients with BD and 28 healthy volunteers. Our results showed that, in female participants, adiponectin was lower in individuals with BD, relative to healthy controls (p = 0.017). In the BD population, adiponectin levels were correlated with fasting glucose (r = -0.291, p = 0.047), fasting insulin (r = -0.332, p = 0.023), C-peptide (r = 0.040, p = 0.040), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (r = -0.411, p = 0.004), HDL (r = 0.508, p < 0.001), VLDL (r = -0.395, p = 0.005) and triglycerides (r = -0.310, p = 0.030). After adjustment for age, gender and BMI, individuals with BD and low adiponectin levels (i.e. < 7.5 μg/ml), had a higher number of mood episodes (p < 0.001), lower number of psychiatric hospitalizations (p = 0.007), higher depressive symptoms (p < 0.001) and lower levels of functioning (p = 0.020). In conclusion, adiponectin levels, either directly or as a proxy of metabolic dysfunction, is independently associated with an unfavorable course of illness in BD.

  6. Progressive cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in rats with evolving metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, A M; Leguisamo, N M; Casali, K R; Schaan, B D

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is linked to increased cardiovascular mortality, which may be partially attributed to cardiac sympatho-vagal imbalance. However, autonomic changes were not evaluated during the metabolic syndrome development in a monosodium glutamate-induced animal model. We evaluate temporal changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation in an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Eighteen neonate male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were treated with monosodium glutamate (MetS), and compared with Wistar-Kyoto (C) and saline-treated SHR (H). Lee index, insulin resistance and autonomic control (spectral analysis) were evaluated at 3 (3-mo), 6 (6-mo) and 9 (9-mo) months of age (compared by two-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Weight of visceral fat, Lee index and arterial pressure were higher in the MetS vs. C and H groups (p<0.001) at all ages. Heart rate variability (HRV) was decreased in the MetS and H groups at 3-mo and 9-mo vs. C. The LF component of HRV was reduced in the MetS group at 3-mo vs. C (p=0.032), and higher vs. C and H at 9-mo (p<0.001, all comparisons). H and MetS rats had a higher LF/HF index vs. C at 9-mo (p=0.001, all comparisons). The VLF component of systolic arterial pressure variability of the MetS was higher earlier (6-mo) than that of the H group. A reduction of 70%, 98% and 54% in αLF index of H and MetS rats vs. C, was observed at 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Metabolic syndrome and hypertension in rats evolve with progressive autonomic dysfunction (worst at 9 months), with specific derangements occurring very early.

  7. Age-related changes to vascular protease-activated receptor 2 in metabolic syndrome: a relationship between oxidative stress, receptor expression, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2017-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed in vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide (NO) - cyclic GMP-mediated vasodilation in response to 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fLIGRLO), a PAR2-activating peptide, is impaired in aortas from aged SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with metabolic syndrome. Here we investigated mechanisms linking PAR2's vascular effects to phenotypic characteristics of male SHRSP.ZF rats at 10, 20, and 30 weeks of age. We found vasodilation responses to either 2fLIGRLO or enzyme-mediated PAR2 activation by trypsin were sustained until 20 weeks and lessened at 30 weeks. PAR2 protein and mRNA levels were lower in aortas at 30 weeks than at 10 and 20 weeks. PAR2-mediated responses positively correlated with PAR2 protein and mRNA levels. Decreased cGMP accumulation in the presence of 2fLIGRLO paralleled the decreased relaxations elicited by nitroprusside and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-cGMP, and the less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein at 30 weeks. 2fLIGRLO-induced relaxation was negatively correlated with serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an index of oxidative stress, which increased with age. Forward stepwise data regression supported a model of age-related decreases in PAR2 function resulting from decreased PAR2 mRNA and increased oxidative stress. We conclude that decreased responsiveness of aortic smooth muscle to NO and downregulation of receptor expression impair PAR2 functions at later stages of metabolic syndrome in SHRSP.ZF rats.

  8. Metabolic Dysfunctions in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Pathogenesis and Potential Metabolic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tefera, Tesfaye W.; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. The death of motor neurons leads to denervation of muscle which in turn causes muscle weakness and paralysis, decreased respiratory function and eventually death. Growing evidence indicates disturbances in energy metabolism in patients with ALS and animal models of ALS, which are likely to contribute to disease progression. Particularly, defects in glucose metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction limit the availability of ATP to CNS tissues and muscle. Several metabolic approaches improving mitochondrial function have been investigated in vitro and in vivo and showed varying effects in ALS. The effects of metabolic approaches in ALS models encompass delays in onset of motor symptoms, protection of motor neurons and extension of survival, which signifies an important role of metabolism in the pathogenesis of the disease. There is now an urgent need to test metabolic approaches in controlled clinical trials. In addition, more detailed studies to better characterize the abnormalities in energy metabolism in patients with ALS and ALS models are necessary to develop metabolically targeted effective therapies that can slow the progression of the disease and prolong life for patients with ALS. PMID:28119559

  9. Metabolic Dysfunctions in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Pathogenesis and Potential Metabolic Treatments.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Tesfaye W; Borges, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. The death of motor neurons leads to denervation of muscle which in turn causes muscle weakness and paralysis, decreased respiratory function and eventually death. Growing evidence indicates disturbances in energy metabolism in patients with ALS and animal models of ALS, which are likely to contribute to disease progression. Particularly, defects in glucose metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction limit the availability of ATP to CNS tissues and muscle. Several metabolic approaches improving mitochondrial function have been investigated in vitro and in vivo and showed varying effects in ALS. The effects of metabolic approaches in ALS models encompass delays in onset of motor symptoms, protection of motor neurons and extension of survival, which signifies an important role of metabolism in the pathogenesis of the disease. There is now an urgent need to test metabolic approaches in controlled clinical trials. In addition, more detailed studies to better characterize the abnormalities in energy metabolism in patients with ALS and ALS models are necessary to develop metabolically targeted effective therapies that can slow the progression of the disease and prolong life for patients with ALS.

  10. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGES

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; ...

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  11. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  12. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils. PMID:26393799

  13. Metabolic Dysfunction Underlying Autism Spectrum Disorder and Potential Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ning; Rho, Jong M; Masino, Susan A

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, and increased repetitive and/or restrictive behaviors. While the etio-pathogenesis of ASD is unknown, clinical manifestations are diverse and many possible genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. As such, it has been a great challenge to identify key neurobiological mechanisms and to develop effective treatments. Current therapies focus on co-morbid conditions (such as epileptic seizures and sleep disturbances) and there is no cure for the core symptoms. Recent studies have increasingly implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD. The fact that mitochondria are an integral part of diverse cellular functions and are susceptible to many insults could explain how a wide range of factors can contribute to a consistent behavioral phenotype in ASD. Meanwhile, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD), used for nearly a century to treat medically intractable epilepsy, has been shown to enhance mitochondrial function through a multiplicity of mechanisms and affect additional molecular targets that may address symptoms and comorbidities of ASD. Here, we review the evidence for the use of metabolism-based therapies such as the KD in the treatment of ASD as well as emerging co-morbid models of epilepsy and autism. Future research directions aimed at validating such therapeutic approaches and identifying additional and novel mechanistic targets are also discussed.

  14. Normalizing dysfunctional purine metabolism accelerates diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Andrew L; Lalezarzadeh, Frank D; Soares, Marc A; Saadeh, Pierre B; Ceradini, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic patients exhibit dysfunction of the normal wound healing process, leading to local ischemia by vascular occlusive disease as well as sustained increases in the proinflammatory cytokines and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Of the many sources of ROS, the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) has been linked to overproduction of ROS in diabetic environment, and studies have shown that treatment with XO inhibitors decreases XO overactivity and XO-generated ROS. This study evaluates the role of XO in the diabetic wound and the impact of specifically inhibiting its activity on wound healing. Treatment of diabetic wounds with siXDH (xanthine dehydrogenase siRNA) decreased XDH mRNA expression by 51.6%, XO activity by 35.9%, ROS levels by 78.1%, pathologic wound burden by 31.5%, and accelerated wound healing by 7 days (23.3%). Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that increased XO activity in wild-type wound may be due to XDH to XO conversion and/or XO phosphorylation, but not to gene transcription, whereas increased XO activity in diabetic wounds may also be from gene transcription. These results suggest that XO may be responsible for large proportion of elevated oxidative stress in the diabetic wound environment and that normalizing the metabolic activity of XO using targeted delivery of siXDH may decrease overproduction of ROS and accelerate wound healing in diabetic patients. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  15. Metabolic Dysfunction Underlying Autism Spectrum Disorder and Potential Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ning; Rho, Jong M.; Masino, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, and increased repetitive and/or restrictive behaviors. While the etio-pathogenesis of ASD is unknown, clinical manifestations are diverse and many possible genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. As such, it has been a great challenge to identify key neurobiological mechanisms and to develop effective treatments. Current therapies focus on co-morbid conditions (such as epileptic seizures and sleep disturbances) and there is no cure for the core symptoms. Recent studies have increasingly implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD. The fact that mitochondria are an integral part of diverse cellular functions and are susceptible to many insults could explain how a wide range of factors can contribute to a consistent behavioral phenotype in ASD. Meanwhile, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD), used for nearly a century to treat medically intractable epilepsy, has been shown to enhance mitochondrial function through a multiplicity of mechanisms and affect additional molecular targets that may address symptoms and comorbidities of ASD. Here, we review the evidence for the use of metabolism-based therapies such as the KD in the treatment of ASD as well as emerging co-morbid models of epilepsy and autism. Future research directions aimed at validating such therapeutic approaches and identifying additional and novel mechanistic targets are also discussed. PMID:28270747

  16. Systems biology-based analysis implicates a novel role for vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Margaux A; Silveira, Alexandra C; Huynh, Nancy; Jun, Gyungah; Smith, Silvia E; Zacharaki, Fani; Sato, Hajime; Loomis, Stephanie; Andreoli, Michael T; Adams, Scott M; Radeke, Monte J; Jelcick, Austin S; Yuan, Yang; Tsiloulis, Aristoteles N; Chatzoulis, Dimitrios Z; Silvestri, Giuliana; Kotoula, Maria G; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Hollis, Bruce W; Chen, Rui; Haider, Neena B; Miller, Joan W; Farrer, Lindsay A; Hageman, Gregory S; Kim, Ivana K; Schaumberg, Debra A; DeAngelis, Margaret M

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to have anti-angiogenic properties and to play a protective role in several types of cancer, including breast, prostate and cutaneous melanoma. Similarly, vitamin D levels have been shown to be protective for risk of a number of conditions, including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, as well as numerous autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and type 1 diabetes mellitus. A study performed by Parekh et al. was the first to suggest a role for vitamin D in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and showed a correlation between reduced serum vitamin D levels and risk for early AMD. Based on this study and the protective role of vitamin D in diseases with similar pathophysiology to AMD, we examined the role of vitamin D in a family-based cohort of 481 sibling pairs. Using extremely phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, initially we evaluated the association of neovascular AMD and vitamin D/sunlight-related epidemiological factors. After controlling for established AMD risk factors, including polymorphisms of the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2/HtrA serine peptidase (ARMS2/HTRA1), and smoking history, we found that ultraviolet irradiance was protective for the development of neovascular AMD (p = 0.001). Although evaluation of serum vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) was higher in unaffected individuals than in their affected siblings, this finding did not reach statistical significance. Based on the relationship between ultraviolet irradiance and vitamin D production, we employed a candidate gene approach for evaluating common variation in key vitamin D pathway genes (the genes encoding the vitamin D receptor [VDR]; cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 [CYP27B1]; cytochrome P450, family 24, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 [CYP24A1]; and CYP27A1) in this same family-based cohort. Initial findings were then

  17. Systems biology-based analysis implicates a novel role for vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to have anti-angiogenic properties and to play a protective role in several types of cancer, including breast, prostate and cutaneous melanoma. Similarly, vitamin D levels have been shown to be protective for risk of a number of conditions, including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, as well as numerous autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and type 1 diabetes mellitus. A study performed by Parekh et al. was the first to suggest a role for vitamin D in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and showed a correlation between reduced serum vitamin D levels and risk for early AMD. Based on this study and the protective role of vitamin D in diseases with similar pathophysiology to AMD, we examined the role of vitamin D in a family-based cohort of 481 sibling pairs. Using extremely phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, initially we evaluated the association of neovascular AMD and vitamin D/sunlight-related epidemiological factors. After controlling for established AMD risk factors, including polymorphisms of the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2/HtrA serine peptidase (ARMS2/HTRA1), and smoking history, we found that ultraviolet irradiance was protective for the development of neovascular AMD (p = 0.001). Although evaluation of serum vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) was higher in unaffected individuals than in their affected siblings, this finding did not reach statistical significance. Based on the relationship between ultraviolet irradiance and vitamin D production, we employed a candidate gene approach for evaluating common variation in key vitamin D pathway genes (the genes encoding the vitamin D receptor [VDR]; cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 [CYP27B1]; cytochrome P450, family 24, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 [CYP24A1]; and CYP27A1) in this same family-based cohort. Initial findings were then

  18. How to Study Basement Membrane Stiffness as a Biophysical Trigger in Prostate Cancer and Other Age-related Pathologies or Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Breit, Claudia; Clarke, Mitchell; Talar, Kamil; Wang, Kai; Mohammad, Mohammad A.; Pickwell, Sage; Etchandy, Guillermina; Stasiuk, Graeme J.; Sturge, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that can be used to study the biophysical microenvironment related to increased thickness and stiffness of the basement membrane (BM) during age-related pathologies and metabolic disorders (e.g. cancer, diabetes, microvascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy). The premise of the model is non-enzymatic crosslinking of reconstituted BM (rBM) matrix by treatment with glycolaldehyde (GLA) to promote advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) generation via the Maillard reaction. Examples of laboratory techniques that can be used to confirm AGE generation, non-enzymatic crosslinking and increased stiffness in GLA treated rBM are outlined. These include preparation of native rBM (treated with phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) and stiff rBM (treated with GLA) for determination of: its AGE content by photometric analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy, its non-enzymatic crosslinking by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) as well as confocal microscopy, and its increased stiffness using rheometry. The procedure described here can be used to increase the rigidity (elastic moduli, E) of rBM up to 3.2-fold, consistent with measurements made in healthy versus diseased human prostate tissue. To recreate the biophysical microenvironment associated with the aging and diseased prostate gland three prostate cell types were introduced on to native rBM and stiff rBM: RWPE-1, prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from a normal prostate gland; BPH-1, PECs derived from a prostate gland affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); and PC3, metastatic cells derived from a secondary bone tumor originating from prostate cancer. Multiple parameters can be measured, including the size, shape and invasive characteristics of the 3D glandular acini formed by RWPE-1 and BPH-1 on native versus stiff rBM, and average cell length, migratory velocity and persistence of cell movement of 3D spheroids formed by PC3 cells under

  19. How to Study Basement Membrane Stiffness as a Biophysical Trigger in Prostate Cancer and Other Age-related Pathologies or Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Breit, Claudia; Clarke, Mitchell; Talar, Kamil; Wang, Kai; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Pickwell, Sage; Etchandy, Guillermina; Stasiuk, Graeme J; Sturge, Justin

    2016-09-20

    Here we describe a protocol that can be used to study the biophysical microenvironment related to increased thickness and stiffness of the basement membrane (BM) during age-related pathologies and metabolic disorders (e.g. cancer, diabetes, microvascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy). The premise of the model is non-enzymatic crosslinking of reconstituted BM (rBM) matrix by treatment with glycolaldehyde (GLA) to promote advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) generation via the Maillard reaction. Examples of laboratory techniques that can be used to confirm AGE generation, non-enzymatic crosslinking and increased stiffness in GLA treated rBM are outlined. These include preparation of native rBM (treated with phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) and stiff rBM (treated with GLA) for determination of: its AGE content by photometric analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy, its non-enzymatic crosslinking by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) as well as confocal microscopy, and its increased stiffness using rheometry. The procedure described here can be used to increase the rigidity (elastic moduli, E) of rBM up to 3.2-fold, consistent with measurements made in healthy versus diseased human prostate tissue. To recreate the biophysical microenvironment associated with the aging and diseased prostate gland three prostate cell types were introduced on to native rBM and stiff rBM: RWPE-1, prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from a normal prostate gland; BPH-1, PECs derived from a prostate gland affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); and PC3, metastatic cells derived from a secondary bone tumor originating from prostate cancer. Multiple parameters can be measured, including the size, shape and invasive characteristics of the 3D glandular acini formed by RWPE-1 and BPH-1 on native versus stiff rBM, and average cell length, migratory velocity and persistence of cell movement of 3D spheroids formed by PC3 cells under

  20. Breast-feeding, Leptin:Adiponectin Ratio, and Metabolic Dysfunction in Adolescents with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Mihalopoulos, Nicole L; Urban, Brittney M; Metos, Julie M; Balch, Alfred H; Young, Paul C; Jordan, Kristine C

    2017-05-01

    Increased adiposity increases leptin and decreases adiponectin concentrations, resulting in an increased leptin:adiponectin ratio (LAR). In adults, components of the metabolic syndrome and other cardiometabolic risk factors, what we classify here as "metabolic dysfunction," are associated with both a high LAR and a history of being breast-fed. The relation among breast-feeding, LAR, and degree of metabolic dysfunction in obese youth is unknown. The purpose of our pilot study was to explore this relation and estimate the effect size of the relations to determine the sample size needed to power future prospective studies. We obtained fasting levels of leptin, adiponectin, lipids, insulin, and glucose from obese youth (aged 8-17 years). Weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, and breast-feeding history also were assessed. Of 96 participants, 78 were breast-fed as infants, 54% of whom were breast-fed for >6 months. Wide variation was observed in LARs among children who were and were not breast-fed (>100% coefficient of variation). Overall, prevalence of metabolic dysfunction in the cohort was 94% and was not proven to be associated with higher LAR. In this cohort of obese youth, we found a high prevalence of breast-feeding, metabolic dysfunction, and wide variation in the LARs. Based on the effect size estimated, future studies would need to enroll >1500 patients or identify, stratify, and selectively enroll obese patients without metabolic dysfunction to accurately determine whether breast-feeding in infancy influences LARs or metabolic dysfunction among obese youth.

  1. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Down's syndrome brains.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Do Carmo, Sonia; Ower, Alison K; Fortress, Ashley M; Flores Aguilar, Lisi; Hanna, Michael; Wisniewski, Thomas; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Buhusi, Mona; Busciglio, Jorge; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons play a key role in cognition. This neuronal system is highly dependent on NGF for its synaptic integrity and the phenotypic maintenance of its cell bodies. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons progressively degenerate in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, and their atrophy contributes to the manifestation of dementia. Paradoxically, in Alzheimer's disease brains, the synthesis of NGF is not affected and there is abundance of the NGF precursor, proNGF. We have shown that this phenomenon is the result of a deficit in NGF's extracellular metabolism that compromises proNGF maturation and exacerbates its subsequent degradation. We hypothesized that a similar imbalance should be present in Down's syndrome. Using a combination of quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and zymography, we investigated signs of NGF metabolic dysfunction in post-mortem brains from the temporal (n = 14), frontal (n = 34) and parietal (n = 20) cortex obtained from subjects with Down's syndrome and age-matched controls (age range 31-68 years). We further examined primary cultures of human foetal Down's syndrome cortex (17-21 gestational age weeks) and brains from Ts65Dn mice (12-22 months), a widely used animal model of Down's syndrome. We report a significant increase in proNGF levels in human and mouse Down's syndrome brains, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator messenger RNA as well as an increment in neuroserpin expression; enzymes that partake in proNGF maturation. Human Down's syndrome brains also exhibited elevated zymogenic activity of MMP9, the major NGF-degrading protease. Our results indicate a failure in NGF precursor maturation in Down's syndrome brains and a likely enhanced proteolytic degradation of NGF, changes which can compromise the trophic support of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. The alterations in pro

  2. Principles of targeting endothelial cell metabolism to treat angiogenesis and endothelial cell dysfunction in disease

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Jermaine; Stapor, Peter; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is the orchestral conductor of blood vessel function. Pathological blood vessel formation (a process termed pathological angiogenesis) or the inability of endothelial cells (ECs) to perform their physiological function (a condition known as EC dysfunction) are defining features of various diseases. Therapeutic intervention to inhibit aberrant angiogenesis or ameliorate EC dysfunction could be beneficial in diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, respectively, but current strategies have limited efficacy. Based on recent findings that pathological angiogenesis and EC dysfunction are accompanied by EC-specific metabolic alterations, targeting EC metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how EC metabolism is altered in disease and discuss potential metabolic targets and strategies to reverse EC dysfunction and inhibit pathological angiogenesis. PMID:25063693

  3. Estrogens prevent metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions in female mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian disruption has become a significant factor contributing to the epidemics of obesity and insulin resistance. However, interventions to treat metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions are limited. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, produces important antiobesity and antidiabetic ef...

  4. Influence of the human intestinal microbiome on obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Adolph, Timon E

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be a strong link between the gut microbiota, energy extraction and body metabolism. Evidence is accumulating that the intestinal microbiota, in addition to other major factors such as diet and host genetics, contributes to obesity, metabolic dysfunction and diabetes. Both preclinical experimental and human studies have shown that obesity and metabolic dysfunction are characterized by a profound dysbiosis. Several human metagenome-wide association studies have demonstrated highly significant correlations of certain members of intestinal microbiota with obesity and type 2 diabetes. In addition dietary factors that substantially affect microbial composition, microbiota disruption, and the consequence of early-life antibiotic use, may contribute to childhood obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Further evidence for an association between microbiota and metabolic dysfunction has been derived from studies in pregnancy demonstrating that major gut microbial shifts occur during pregnancy thereby affecting host metabolism. In particular, the high rate of obesity following caesarean section could be partially explained by functional alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction emerge from disturbed interactions between the intestinal microbiota, dietary changes and host immune functions. A better understanding of this relationship might lead to better therapies for human metabolic and inflammatory diseases in the future.

  5. Fermented Red Ginseng Potentiates Improvement of Metabolic Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Min Chul; Lee, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Hun; Kim, Hye Yoom; Yoon, Jung Joo; Ahn, You Mee; Tan, Rui; Park, Min Cheol; Cha, Jeong Dan; Choi, Kyung Min; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome including obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension is a cluster of risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. Red ginseng (RG), a widely used traditional herbal medicine, was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. Aim in the present study was to investigate that the effects of fermented red ginseng (FRG) on a high-fructose (HF) diet induced metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to RG and losartan. Animals were divided into four groups: a control group fed a regular diet and tap water, and fructose groups that were fed a 60% high-fructose (HF) diet with/without RG 250 mg/kg/day or FRG 250 mg/kg/day for eight weeks, respectively. Treatment with FRG significantly suppressed the increments of body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat weight and adipocyte size. Moreover, FRG significantly prevented the development of metabolic disturbances such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Staining with Oil-red-o demonstrated a marked increase of hepatic accumulation of triglycerides, and this increase was prevented by FRG. FRG ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by downregulation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and adhesion molecules in the aorta. In addition, FRG induced markedly upregulation of Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4) in the muscle. These results indicate that FRG ameliorates obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and fatty liver in HF diet rats. More favorable pharmacological effects on HF diet induced metabolic disorders were observed with FRG, compared to an equal dose of RG. These results showed that the pharmacological activity of RG was enhanced by fermentation. Taken together, fermentated red ginseng might be a beneficial therapeutic approach for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27322312

  6. Relationship between CYP 2D6 metabolic status and sexual dysfunction in paroxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Zourková, Alexandra; Hadasová, Eva

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the incidence of sexual dysfunction in 30 patients subjected to long-term treatment by paroxetine in dependence on the P 450 CYP 2D6 isoenzyme metabolic status. Measured on the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX; McGahuey, Delgado, & Gelenberg, 1999), the incidence of sexual dysfunction in patients converted to CYP 2D6 poor metabolizers was markedly higher compared with patients who had no history of such conversion, a difference that reached the level of statistical significance. Our article discusses the incidence of sexual dysfunction in connection with reduced CYP 2D6 capacity.

  7. Metabolic Profiling in Association with Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction Following Non-Toxic Cadmium Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Nong, Qingjiao; Mao, Baoyu; Pan, Xue

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the metabolic profile of non-toxic cadmium (Cd)-induced dysfunctional endothelial cells using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs (n = 6 per group) were treated with 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) for 48 h. Cell phenotypes, including nitric oxide (NO) production, the inflammatory response, and oxidative stress, were evaluated in Cd-exposed and control HUVECs. Cd-exposed and control HUVECs were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight/mass spectrometry. Compared to control HUVECs, Cd-exposed HUVECs were dysfunctional, exhibiting decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress. Further metabolic profiling revealed 24 significantly-altered metabolites in the dysfunctional endothelial cells. The significantly-altered metabolites were involved in the impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, activated pyruvate metabolism, up-regulated glucogenic amino acid metabolism, and increased pyrimidine metabolism. The current metabolic findings further suggest that the metabolic changes linked to TCA cycle dysfunction, glycosylation of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), and compensatory responses to genomic instability and energy deficiency may be generally associated with dysfunctional phenotypes, characterized by decreased NO production, a proinflammatory state, and non-significant oxidative stress, in endothelial cells following non-toxic Cd exposure. PMID:28872622

  8. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increa...

  9. Environmental enteric dysfunction is associated with altered bile acid metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a clinically asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, and increased gut permeability, is common among children in developing countries. Because of abnormal gut mucosa and altered gut microbiome, EED coul...

  10. [Age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  11. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S. Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M.; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  12. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions.

  13. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency aggravates energy metabolism disturbance and diastolic dysfunction in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Shen, Cheng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiaona; Sun, Xiaolei; Dong, Zhen; Ma, Xin; Liu, Xiangwei; Han, Shasha; Wu, Chaoneng; Zou, Yunzeng; Hu, Kai; Ge, Junbo; Sun, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes causes energy metabolism disturbance and may lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects cardiac function from myocardial damage. Therefore, understanding of its roles in diabetic heart is critical for developing new therapeutics targeting ALDH2 and mitochondrial function for diabetic hearts. This study investigated the impact of ALDH2 deficiency on diastolic function and energy metabolism in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced in ALDH2 knockout and wild-type mice by streptozotocin. Cardiac function was determined by echocardiography. Glucose uptake, energy status, and metabolic profiles were used to evaluate cardiac energy metabolism. The association between ALDH2 polymorphism and diabetes was also analyzed in patients. Echocardiography revealed preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic function in diabetic ALDH2-deficient mice. Energy reserves (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate ratio) were reduced in the diabetic mutants and were associated with diastolic dysfunction. Western blot analysis showed that diabetes induces accumulated lipid peroxidation products and escalated AMP-activated protein kinase-LKB1 pathway. Further, ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated the diabetes-induced deficient myocardial glucose uptake and other perturbations of metabolic profiles. Finally, ALDH2 mutations were associated with worse diastolic dysfunction in diabetic patients. Together, our results demonstrate that ALDH2 deficiency and resulting energy metabolism disturbance is a part of pathology of diastolic dysfunction of diabetic hearts, and suggest that patients with ALDH2 mutations are vulnerable to diabetic damage. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbates diastolic dysfunction in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency triggers decompensation of metabolic reserves and energy metabolism disturbances in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency potentiates oxidative stress and AMPK phosphorylation induced by diabetes via post

  14. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ordiz, M Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J

    2016-06-13

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12-59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity.

  15. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12–59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  16. Preparing Muscles for Diving: Age-Related Changes in Muscle Metabolic Profiles in Harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Hooded (Cystophora cristata) Seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Lestyk, K; Freistroffer, D; Hammill, M O

    2015-01-01

    In adult marine mammals, muscles can sustain aerobic metabolism during dives in part because they contain large oxygen (O2) stores and metabolic rates are low. However, young pups have significantly lower tissue O2 stores and much higher mass-specific metabolic rates. To investigate how these differences may influence muscle function during dives, we measured the activities of enzymes involved in aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways (citrate synthase [CS], β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase [HOAD], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) and the LDH isoform profile in six muscles from 41 harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and 30 hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals ranging in age from fetal to adult. All neonatal muscles had significantly higher absolute but lower metabolically scaled CS and HOAD activities than adults (∼ 70% and ∼ 85% lower, respectively). Developmental increases in LDH activity lagged that of aerobic enzymes and were not accompanied by changes in isozyme profile, suggesting that changes in enzyme concentration rather than structure determine activity levels. Biochemical maturation proceeded faster in the major locomotory muscles. In combination, findings suggest that pup muscles are unable to support strenuous aerobic exercise or rely heavily on anaerobic metabolism during early diving activities and that pups' high mass-specific metabolic rates may play a key role in limiting the ability of their muscles to support underwater foraging.

  17. Erectile dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and arterial disease. Clinical-pathological relation by carotid ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, M A; Vera-Arroyo, B; Lahoz-García, C; Valderrama-Illana, P; Cámara-Ortega, M; Arrabal-Martín, M; Zuluaga-Gomez, A; Lopez-Carmona Pintado, F

    2014-04-01

    Different studies have shown the relationship between erectile dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of arteriopathy performing carotid ultrasound in patients with and without erectile dysfunction. We conducted a case-control study with 44 patients consulting for erectile dysfunction and 20 controls. All subjects completed the IIEF-5 test and we studied the criteria for metabolic syndrome, and a carotid ultrasound to study the intima-media thickness and the presence of atherosclerotic plaques was performed. Mean intima-media thickness was .71mm±.21 for the right and of .71±.17 for the left carotid in patients with erectile dysfunction. In the control group, the means were .54±0.11 and 0.59±0.15mm respectively, statistically significant differences (P=.02 and P=.05 respectively). No plaque was found in any control, but in 25% of both carotid arteries of patients with erectile dysfunction (P=.01). As metabolic syndrome, according to the American Heart Association, were diagnosed 52.8% of patients with erectile dysfunction, and 16.7% of controls, and according to the International Diabetes Federation, 52.3% of patients with erectile dysfunction and 25% of controls met diagnostic criteria. In both cases there were significant differences (P<.01 and P=.02 respectively). We found a positive linear correlation between waist circumference and the intima-media thickness in both carotid (P<.05). Patients with erectile dysfunction may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, as determined by the presence of arterial disease in the carotid arteries, which indicates that we should made a more thorough and comprehensive study of patients with erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Adipose tissue dysfunction and its effects on tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan; Gusky, Halina Chkourko; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Growing by an alarming rate in the Western world, obesity has become a condition associated with a multitude of diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and various cancers. Generally viewed as an abnormal accumulation of hypertrophied adipocytes, obesity is also a poor prognostic factor for recurrence and chemoresistance in cancer patients. With more than two-thirds of the adult population in the United States considered clinically overweight or obese, it is critical that the relationship between obesity and cancer is further emphasized and elucidated. Adipocytes are highly metabolically active cells, which, through release of adipokines and cytokines and activation of endocrine and paracrine pathways, affect processes in neighboring and distant cells, altering their normal homeostasis. This work will examine specifically how adipocyte-derived factors regulate the cellular metabolism of malignant cells within the tumor niche. Briefly, tumor cells undergo metabolic pressure towards a more glycolytic and hypoxic state through a variety of metabolic regulators and signaling pathways, i.e., phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and c-MYC signaling. Enhanced glycolysis and high lactate production are hallmarks of tumor progression largely because of a process known as the Warburg effect. Herein, we review the latest literature pertaining to the body of work on the interactions between adipose and tumor cells, and underlining the changes in cancer cell metabolism that have been targeted by the currently available treatments. PMID:25781550

  19. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  20. A indicator of visceral adipose dysfunction to evaluate metabolic health in adult Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming-Feng; Chen, Ying; Lin, Huan-Dong; Ma, Hui; Li, Xiao-Ming; Aleteng, Qiqige; Li, Qian; Wang, Dan; Hu, Yu; Pan, Bai-shen; Li, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adipose dysfunction is a major cause of metabolic disorders. However, there is lack of a clinical index for prediction of visceral fat dysfunction in Asians. The present study aims to establish a visceral adiposity index for evaluation of metabolic health status in Chinese, the largest Asian ethnic group. 485 subjects were recruited from Lianqian Community, Xiamen and received abdominal computed tomography(CT) for visceral fat area. A Chinese visceral adiposity index (CVAI) was created using multivariate linear regression analyses, and was further validated in 6495 subjects recruited from Changfeng Community, Shanghai. CVAI was well associated with visceral obesity (r = 0.68, P < 0.001) and HOMA-IR (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). The AUROCs were 0.89(0.88–0.90), 0.72(0.71–0.73), 0.69(0.68–0.71) and 0.67(0.65–0.68) for determination of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, diabetes and prediabetes, respectively. CVAI was more valuable compared to BMI and waist circumference in evaluation of metabolic risks (all P < 0.001), even in subjects with metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUNW) and metabolically healthy obese/overweight (MHO). This study demonstrates that CVAI is a reliable and applicable index for evaluation of visceral fat dysfunction in Chinese. It might be used to evaluate metabolic health status in Asians. PMID:27905531

  1. Alpha-synuclein, epigenetics, mitochondria, metabolism, calcium traffic, & circadian dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. An integrated strategy for management.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Oliver T

    2017-10-03

    The motor deficits which characterise the sporadic form of Parkinson's disease arise from age-related loss of a subset of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Although motor symptoms respond to dopamine replacement therapies, the underlying disease process remains. This review details some features of the progressive molecular pathology and proposes deployment of a combination of nutrients: R-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, ubiquinol, melatonin (or receptor agonists) and vitamin D3, with the collective potential to slow progression of these features. The main nutrient targets include impaired mitochondria and the associated oxidative/nitrosative stress, calcium stress and impaired gene transcription induced by pathogenic forms of alpha- synuclein. Benefits may be achieved via nutrient influence on epigenetic signaling pathways governing transcription factors for mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant defences and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, via regulation of the metabolic energy sensor AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin mTOR. Nutrients also benefit expression of the transcription factor for neuronal survival (NR4A2), trophic factors GDNF and BDNF, and age-related calcium signals. In addition a number of non-motor related dysfunctions in circadian control, clock genes and associated metabolic, endocrine and sleep-wake activity are briefly addressed, as are late-stage complications in respect of cognitive decline and osteoporosis. Analysis of the network of nutrient effects reveals how beneficial synergies may counter the accumulation and promote clearance of pathogenic alpha-synuclein. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the Gut Microbiome in the Pathogenesis of Obesity and Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bouter, Kristien E; van Raalte, Daniël H; Groen, Albert K; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2017-05-01

    The potential role of intestinal microbiota in the etiology of various human diseases has attracted massive attention in the last decade. As such, the intestinal microbiota has been advanced as an important contributor in the development of obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, amongst others. Experiments in animal models have produced evidence for a causal role of intestinal microbiota in the etiology of obesity and insulin resistance. However, with a few exceptions, such causal relation is lacking for humans and most publications merely report associations between intestinal microbial composition and metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Thus, the reciprocal relationship between the bacteria and these metabolic disorders remains a matter of debate. The main objective of this review is to critically assess the driving role of intestinal microbe composition in the etiology, prevention, and treatment of obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunction, including type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow older. Your genes and loud noise (from rock concerts or music headphones) may play a large role. The following factors contribute to age-related hearing loss: Family history (age-related hearing loss tends to run in ...

  4. Adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sam, Susan

    2015-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder among reproductive-age women and is associated with a high risk for metabolic disorders. Adiposity and insulin resistance are two prevalent conditions in PCOS and the likely culprits for the heightened metabolic risk. Up to 60% of women with PCOS are considered to be overweight or obese, and even among non-obese women with PCOS there is an increased accumulation of adipose tissue in abdominal depots. Insulin resistance in PCOS is unique and independent of obesity, as even non-obese women with this condition are frequently insulin resistant. However, obesity substantially aggravates the insulin resistance and the metabolic and reproductive abnormalities in women with PCOS. Recently, it has been shown that many aspects of adipose tissue function in PCOS are abnormal, and these abnormalities likely predispose to development of insulin resistance even in the absence of obesity. This review provides an overview of these abnormalities and their impact on development of metabolic disorders. At the end, an overview of the therapeutic options for management of adiposity and its complications in PCOS are discussed.

  5. Plasma copeptin and metabolic dysfunction in individuals with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Rizzo, Lucas B; Santos, Camila M; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni-Graiff, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare plasma copeptin levels, the c-terminal of provasopressin, between individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) and healthy controls and to assess the relation between copeptin and metabolic parameters. We measured plasma levels of copeptin in individuals with BD (n = 55) and healthy controls (n = 21). Information related to psychiatric/medical history, as well as to metabolic comorbidities and laboratorial parameters was also captured. Insulin resistance and β-cell function in basal state were calculated from fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide using the HOMA2 calculator. Impaired glucose metabolism was defined as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copeptin, adiponectin, and leptin plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma copeptin levels were lower in individuals with BD, relative to healthy controls (P < 0.001). There were significant interactions between BD and plasma copeptin on β-cell function (rate ratio [RR] = 1.048; P = 0.030) and on leptin levels (RR = 1.087; P = 0.012), indicating that there was a positive correlation between these markers in the BD group, but a negative one in healthy controls. Finally, in individuals with BD only, the association between β-cell function, body mass index (RR = 1.007; P < 0.001), and insulin resistance (RR = 1.001; P = 0.037) was moderated by copeptin levels. Copeptin levels were lower in individuals with BD than in healthy controls. There were differential associations between copeptin and metabolic parameters within the BD and healthy control subgroups, suggesting an association between abnormal copeptin and metabolic dysregulation only in the BD population. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  6. Fatty acid metabolism in pulmonary arterial hypertension: role in right ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex, multifactorial disease in which an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance leads to increased afterload on the right ventricle (RV), causing right heart failure and death. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction in PAH is limited but is constantly improving. Increasing evidence suggests that in PAH RV dysfunction is associated with various components of metabolic syndrome, such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. The relationship between RV dysfunction and fatty acid/glucose metabolites is multifaceted, and in PAH it is characterized by a shift in utilization of energy sources toward increased glucose utilization and reduced fatty acid consumption. RV dysfunction may be caused by maladaptive fatty acid metabolism resulting from an increase in fatty acid uptake by fatty acid transporter molecule CD36 and an imbalance between glucose and fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. This leads to lipid accumulation in the form of triglycerides, diacylglycerol, and ceramides in the cytoplasm, hallmarks of lipotoxicity. Current interventions in animal models focus on improving RV dysfunction through altering fatty acid oxidation rates and limiting lipid accumulation, but more specific and effective therapies may be available in the coming years based on current research. In conclusion, a deeper understanding of the complex mechanisms of the metabolic remodeling of the RV will aid in the development of targeted treatments for RV failure in PAH. PMID:26064451

  7. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Davel, A P; Wenceslau, C F; Akamine, E H; Xavier, F E; Couto, G K; Oliveira, H T; Rossoni, L V

    2011-09-01

    The endothelium plays a vital role in maintaining circulatory homeostasis by the release of relaxing and contracting factors. Any change in this balance may result in a process known as endothelial dysfunction that leads to impaired control of vascular tone and contributes to the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased production of thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and superoxide anion in conductance and resistance arteries are commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive, diabetic and obese animals, resulting in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and in increased vasoconstrictor responses. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the role of enhanced overactivation of β-adrenergic receptors inducing vascular cytokine production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling that seem to be the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in hypertension, heart failure and in endocrine-metabolic disorders. However, some adaptive mechanisms can occur in the initial stages of hypertension, such as increased NO production by eNOS. The present review focuses on the role of NO bioavailability, eNOS uncoupling, cyclooxygenase-derived products and pro-inflammatory factors on the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in hypertension, sympathetic hyperactivity, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. These are cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases of high incidence and mortality around the world, especially in developing countries and endothelial dysfunction contributes to triggering, maintenance and worsening of these pathological situations.

  8. Metabolic dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: A critical examination of underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mesarwi, Omar A; Sharma, Ellora V; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2015-01-01

    It has recently become clear that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, a disorder of defective energy storage and use. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this finding, drawing upon the characteristics that define OSA. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, elevated sympathetic tone, and oxidative stress - all consequences of OSA - have been implicated in the progression of poor metabolic outcomes in OSA. In this review we examine the evidence to support each of these disease manifestations of OSA as a unique risk for metabolic dysfunction. Tissue hypoxia and sleep fragmentation are each directly connected to insulin resistance and hypertension, and each of these also may increase sympathetic tone, resulting in defective glucose homeostasis, excessive lipolysis, and elevated blood pressure. Oxidative stress further worsens insulin resistance and in turn, metabolic dysfunction also increases oxidative stress. However, despite many studies linking each of these individual components of OSA to the development of metabolic syndrome, there are very few reports that actually provide a coherent narrative about the mechanism underlying metabolic dysfunction in OSA.

  9. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease.

  10. Dysregulated arginine metabolism and cardiopulmonary dysfunction in patients with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S; Wood, John; Porter, John B; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-min-walk-test, Borg Dyspnoea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanisms of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥ 2·5 m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including LDH, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥ 2·5 m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dysregulated Arginine Metabolism and Cardiopulmonary Dysfunction in Patients with Thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Claudia R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wood, John; Porter, John B.; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A.; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H.; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-minute-walk-test, Borg Dyspnea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanism of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥2.5m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥2.5m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia. PMID:25907665

  12. [The role of the interferon system in pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, O O; Rybalko, S L

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the serum interferon activity and its relation to the endothelial dysfunction. Atherosclerosis development in patients with metabolic syndrome is followed by significant increase in interferon activity. Close relation presents between activity of the serum interferon and indexes of structural and functional changes of arterial vessels compromised with atherosclerosis process.

  13. The Loss Of Macrophage Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Collins, Samuel L; Horton, Maureen R; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Fatty acid oxidation in macrophages has been suggested to play a causative role in high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction, particularly in the etiology of adipose driven insulin resistance. To understand the contribution of macrophage fatty acid oxidation directly to metabolic dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2 Mϕ-KO), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. While fatty acid oxidation was clearly induced upon IL-4 stimulation, fatty acid oxidation deficient CPT2 Mϕ-KO bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) displayed canonical markers of M2 polarization following IL-4 stimulation in vitro. In addition, loss of macrophage fatty acid oxidation in vivo did not alter the progression of high-fat diet induced obesity, inflammation, macrophage polarization, oxidative stress, or glucose intolerance. These data suggest that although alternatively activated macrophages up-regulate fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid oxidation is dispensable for macrophage polarization and high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. Macrophage fatty acid oxidation likely plays a correlative rather than causative role in systemic metabolic dysfunction.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Dysfunction in Patients With Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sara J; Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Noseworthy, Michael D; Rayner, Tammy E; Schneiderman, Jane E; Cifra, Barbara; Wells, Greg D

    2017-08-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH), a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle, presents with a potentially lethal hypermetabolic reaction to certain anesthetics. However, some MH-susceptible patients experience muscle weakness, fatigue, and exercise intolerance in the absence of anesthetic triggers. The objective of this exploratory study was to elucidate the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in patients tested positive for MH with the caffeine-halothane contracture test. To this end, we used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and traditional exercise testing to compare skeletal muscle metabolism in MH-positive patients and healthy controls. Skeletal muscle metabolism was assessed using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI in 29 MH-positive patients and 20 healthy controls. Traditional measures of physical capacity were employed to measure aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity, and muscle strength. During 30- and 60-second exercise, MH-positive patients had significantly lower ATP production via the oxidative pathway compared to healthy controls. MH-positive patients also had a longer recovery time with blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI compared to healthy controls. Exercise testing revealed lower aerobic and anaerobic capacity in MH-positive patients compared to healthy controls. Results of this exploratory study suggest that MH-positive patients have impaired aerobic metabolism compared to healthy individuals. This could explain the exercise intolerance exhibited in MH-susceptible patient population.

  15. Age-Related Inducibility of Carboxylesterases by the Antiepileptic Agent Phenobarbital and Implications in Drug Metabolism and Lipid Accumulation 1, 2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Da; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Yang, Dongfang; Yan, Bingfang

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CES) constitute a class of hydrolytic enzymes that play critical roles in drug metabolism and lipid mobilization. Previous studies with a large number of human liver samples have suggested that the inducibility of carboxylesterases is inversely related with age. To directly test this possibility, neonatal (10 days of age) and adult mice were treated with the antiepileptic agent phenobarbital. The expression and hydrolytic activity were determined on six major carboxylesterases including ces1d, the ortholog of human CES1. Without exception, all carboxylesterases tested were induced to a greater extent in neonatal than adult mice. The induction was detected at mRNA, protein and catalytic levels. Ces1d was greatly induced and found to rapidly hydrolyze the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel and support the accumulation of neutral lipids. Phenobarbital represents a large number of therapeutic agents that induce drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in a species-conserved manner. The higher inducibility of carboxylesterases in the developmental age likely represents a general phenomenon cross species including human. Consequently, individuals in the developmental age may experience greater drug-drug interactions. The greater induction of ces1d also provides a molecular explanation to the clinical observation that children on antiepileptic drugs increase plasma lipids. PMID:22513142

  16. Metabolic dysfunction in obese Hispanic women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Susan; Scoccia, Bert; Yalamanchi, Sudha; Mazzone, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are certain ethnic groups with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) at increased risk of metabolic disorders? SUMMARY ANSWER Obese Hispanic women with PCOS are at increased risk of metabolic disorders compared with age- and BMI-matched obese non-Hispanic white women with PCOS in the USA. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Ethnic differences in body composition and metabolic risk are well established. PCOS is a common disorder in women of reproductive age and is associated with high rates of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A cross-sectional observational study was performed at an Academic Medical Center on 60 women of reproductive age with PCOS. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Blood was obtained after fasting from 17 Hispanic, 22 non-Hispanic black and 21 non-Hispanic white women with PCOS who were similar in age and BMI. Anthropometric parameters, insulin, lipid and lipoprotein levels (measured by nuclear magnetic resonance) were compared between the three groups. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Age and BMI did not differ between the groups. Hispanic women with PCOS had higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (P = 0.02), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = 0.03) and a more atherogenic lipid and lipoprotein profile consisting of lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (P = 0.02), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number (P = 0.02), higher very low-density lipoprotein particle (VLDL) size (P = 0.03) and lower LDL (P = 0.03) and HDL particle size (P = 0.005) compared with non-Hispanic white women. The differences in HDL, HOMA-IR, VLDL and LDL size did not persist after adjustment for WHR while differences in LDL particle number (P = 0.04) and HDL size (P = 0.01) persisted. LIMITATIONS, REASON FOR CAUTION The sample size for the three groups was small but the findings were still significant. The women were mostly obese so the ethnic differences in metabolic disorders may

  17. Age-related effects on markers of inflammation and cartilage metabolism in response to an intra-articular lipopolysaccharide challenge in horses.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M K; Coverdale, J A; Leatherwood, J L; Arnold, C E; Dabareiner, R A; Bradbery, A N; Millican, A A; Welsh, T H

    2017-02-01

    Eighteen Quarter Horses were used in a randomized complete design for a 28-d experiment to evaluate age-related effects on inflammation and cartilage turnover after induction of a single inflammatory insult using lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Horses were grouped by age as yearlings (3 males and 3 females), 2 to 3 yr olds (2/3 yr old; 2 males and 4 females), and skeletally mature 5 to 8 yr olds (mature; 2 males and 4 females). On d 0, all horses were individually housed and fed diets that met or exceeded requirements. On d 14, horses were challenged with an intra-articular injection of LPS. Radial carpal joints were randomly assigned to receive 0.5 ng LPS solution obtained from O55:B5 or 0.8 mL sterile lactated Ringer's solution as a contralateral control. Synovial fluid was collected prior to LPS injection at h 0 before injection and at 6, 12, 24, 168, and 336 h after injection. Samples were analyzed using commercial ELISA kits for PGE, collagenase cleavage neoepitope (C2C), and carboxypropeptide of type II collagen (CPII). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and rectal temperature (RT) were monitored over the initial 24 h and carpal circumference and surface temperature were also recorded, with additional measurements at 168 and 336 h. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS. Values for RT, HR, and RR were within the normal range for each age group. Heart rate and RT were influenced by age ( < 0.01), whereas RR was unaffected ( ≤ 0.21). Joint circumference was not influenced by age of horse ( = 0.84), but circumference and surface temperature increased ( < 0.01) over time across all age groups. Synovial PGE concentrations tended ( = 0.09) to be influenced by age, with yearlings having lower ( = 0.03) concentrations than mature horses. Concentrations of synovial C2C were affected by age of horse, with yearlings and 2/3 yr olds having lower ( < 0.01) concentrations than mature horses. Similarly, synovial CPII was influenced by age, with yearlings and 2/3 yr

  18. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  19. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (P<0.01)). Skeletal muscle glycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (P<0.0001). Glycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (P<0.05) but glycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (P<0.01) in mdx compared with wild-type mice. The rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (P<0.01) in mdx mice resulting from a 24% reduction in PKA activity (P<0.01). In mdx mice glycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (P<0.001) together with starch-binding domain protein 1 (219% higher; P<0.01). In addition, mdx mice were glucose intolerant (P<0.01) and had 30% less liver glycogen (P<0.05) compared with control mice. Subsequent analysis of the enzymes dysregulated in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; P<0.05) as a possible cause of this phenotype. Conclusion We identified that mdx mice were glucose intolerant, and had increased skeletal muscle glycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  20. Metabolic dysfunction following weight-cycling in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, SE; Parkinson, JRC; Henley, AB; Sahuri, M; Sanchez-Canon, GJ; Bell, JD

    2016-01-01

    Background Combatting over-weight or obesity can lead to large fluctuations in an individual’s body weight, often referred to as weight cycling or “yo-yo” dieting. Current evidence regarding the potentially damaging effects of these changes is conflicting. Methods Here, we assess the metabolic effects of weight cycling in a murine model, comprising three dietary switches to normal or high fat diets at 6 week intervals; male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control (C) or high fat (F) diet for 6 weeks (n=140/group). C and F groups were then either maintained on their initial diet (CC and FF respectively) or switched to a high fat (CF) or control (FC) diet (n=35/group). For the final 6 week interval, CC and CF groups were returned to the control diet (CCC and CFC groups) while FC and FF groups were placed on a high fat diet (FCF and FFF) (n=28/group). Results For the majority of metabolic outcomes changes aligned with dietary switches; however assessment of neuropeptides and receptors involved in appetite regulation and reward signalling pathways reveal variable patterns of expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that multiple cycling events leads to a significant increase in internal fat deposition, even when compared to animals maintained on a high fat diet (Internal Fat: FCF: 7.4 ± 0.2g vs. FFF: 5.6 ± 0.2g; p<0.01). Conclusions Increased internal adipose tissue is strongly linked to the development of metabolic syndrome associated conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. While further work will be required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuronal control of energy homeostasis, these studies provide a causative link between weight cycling and adverse health. PMID:27840414

  1. Diastolic dysfunction in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome: promising potential for diagnosis and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    St John Sutton, M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease in diabetes mellitus and in the metabolic syndrome consists of both vascular and myocardial abnormalities. The latter are characterised predominantly by diastolic dysfunction, which has been difficult to evaluate in spite of its prevalence. While traditional Doppler echocardiographic parameters enable only semiquantitative assessment of diastolic function and cannot reliably distinguish perturbations in loading conditions from altered diastolic functions, new technologies enable detailed quantification of global and regional diastolic function. The most readily available technique for the quantification of subclinical diastolic dysfunction is tissue Doppler imaging, which has been integrated into routine contemporary clinical practice, whereas cine magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) remains a promising complementary research tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the disease. Diastolic function is reported to vary linearly with age in normal persons, decreasing by 0.16 cm/s each year. Diastolic function in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is determined by cardiovascular risk factors that alter myocardial stiffness and myocardial energy availability/bioenergetics. The latter is corroborated by the improvement in diastolic function with improvement in metabolic control of diabetes by specific medical therapy or lifestyle modification. Accordingly, diastolic dysfunction reflects the structural and metabolic milieu in the myocardium, and may allow targeted therapeutic interventions to modulate cardiac metabolism to prevent heart failure in insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:20349347

  2. Inflammation and metabolic dysfunction: links to cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Taube, Annika; Schlich, Raphaela; Sell, Henrike; Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Juergen

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and recent studies highlight a key role of adipose tissue dysfunction, inflammation, and aberrant adipokine release in this process. An increased demand for lipid storage results in both hyperplasia and hypertrophy, finally leading to chronic inflammation, hypoxia, and a phenotypic change of the cellular components of adipose tissue, collectively leading to a substantially altered secretory output of adipose tissue. In this review we have assessed the adipo-vascular axis, and an overview of adipokines associated with cardiovascular disease is provided. This resulted in a first list of more than 30 adipokines. A deeper analysis only considered adipokines that have been reported to impact on inflammation and NF-κB activation in the vasculature. Out of these, the most prominent link to cardiovascular disease was found for leptin, TNF-α, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, interleukins, and several novel adipokines such as lipocalin-2 and pigment epithelium-derived factor. Future work will need to address the potential role of these molecules as biomarkers and/or drug targets.

  3. Hypogonadism as a possible link between metabolic diseases and erectile dysfunction in aging men.

    PubMed

    Corona, Giovanni; Bianchini, Silvia; Sforza, Alessandra; Vignozzi, Linda; Maggi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence demonstrating that sexual complaints represent the most specific symptoms associated with late onset hypogonadism, while central obesity is the most specific sign. In obese men, hypogonadism can further worsen the metabolic profile and increase abdominal fat. In addition, although hypogonadism can exacerbate obesity-associated erectile dysfunction (ED), recent data suggest that a direct contribution of fat-derived factors could be hypothesized. In particular, an animal model recently documented that fat accumulation induces several hepatic pro-inflammatory genes closely linked to corpora cavernosa endothelial dysfunction. Lifestyle modifications and weight loss are the first steps in the treatment of ED patients with obesity or metabolic diseases. In symptomatic hypogonadal men with metabolic impairment and obesity, combining the effect of testosterone substitution with lifestyle modifications could result in better outcomes.

  4. Association of hypertension with coexistence of abnormal metabolism and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Guiyan; Wang, Aili; Tong, Weijun; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    To explore association of hypertension with coexistence of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal metabolism, a community-based study was conducted among Mongolian people in China. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle risk factors were investigated, blood pressure, body weight and waist circumference were measured, fasting blood samples were obtained to measure blood lipids, fasting plasma glucose and the biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and angiotensin II. Rates of abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II as well as coexistence of abnormal metabolism with the elevated biomarkers were all higher in hypertensives than these in normotensives (all p < 0.01). Compared with subjects with normal metabolism and without any elevated biomarker, multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of hypertension associated with abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin, elevated angiotensin II, coexistences of abnormal metabolism with elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1,elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II were 2.209 (1.594-3.062), 2.820 (1.992-3.992), 2.370 (1.665-3.374), 1.893 (1.331-2.691), 2.545 (1.793-3.612), 2.990 (2.102-4.252), 2.551 (1.775-3.667), 2.223 (1.544-3.220), 3.135 (2.185-4.519), respectively. In conclusion, this study indicated that inflammation and endothelial dysfunction was associated with hypertension and abnormal metabolism, and individuals with co-existence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction had higher risk of prevalent hypertension among Mongolian population. This study suggests that further study on treatment for hypertension patients with coexistence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction should be conducted in the near

  5. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein–protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  6. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein-protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism.

  7. Age-related changes in protein metabolism of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds during alleviation of dormancy and in the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Kalemba, Ewa M; Pukacka, Stanislawa

    2015-09-01

    The long-term storage of seeds generally reduces their viability and vigour. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of long-term storage on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds at optimal conditions, over 9 years, on the total and soluble protein levels and activity of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and aminopeptidases, as well as free amino acid levels and protein synthesis, in dry seeds, after imbibition and during cold stratification leading to dormancy release and germination. The same analyses were conducted in parallel on seeds gathered from the same tree in the running growing season and stored under the same conditions for only 3 months. The results showed that germination capacity decreased from 100% in freshly harvested seeds to 75% in seeds stored for 9 years. The levels of total and soluble proteins were highest in freshly harvested seeds and decreased significantly during storage, these proportions were retained during cold stratification and germination of seeds. Significant differences between freshly harvested and stored seeds were observed in the activities of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases, and in the levels of free amino acids. The neosynthesis of proteins during dormancy release and in the early stage of seed germination was significantly weaker in stored seeds. These results confirm the importance of protein metabolism for seed viability and the consequences of its reduction during seed ageing.

  8. Long-lasting partnership between insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction: role of metabolic memory

    PubMed Central

    Tallapragada, Divya Sri Priyanka; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The persistence of deleterious effects of hyperglycaemia even after glucose normalization is referred to as ‘metabolic memory’. However, similar persistent effects of the metabolic consequences of a high fat diet (HFD) have not been described. Experimental Approach Rats were given a normal pellet diet (NPD) or a HFD for 3 months. The animals from the HFD group were then returned to the NPD to observe the long-term effects of insulin resistance. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by carbachol-mediated vasorelaxation and eNOS phosphorylation. Key Results As expected, HFD consumption resulted in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177 was decreased in HFD rats, compared with that in the NPD group. Rats on 3 months of HFD showed glucose intolerance and impaired insulin sensitivity and were then switched back to NPD (REV group). Levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, and adiposity returned to normal in REV rats. However, endothelium-dependent vascular responses to carbachol which were impaired in HFD rats, continued to be impaired in REV rats. Similarly, decreased eNOS phosphorylation after HFD was not improved after 1 or 6 months of REV. Conclusions and Implications Our data indicate that returning to NPD did not improve the insulin sensitivity or the endothelial dysfunction induced by HFD. Although some biochemical parameters responsible for insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction were normalized, molecular and vascular abnormalities, involving NO, persisted for several months, highlighting the long-lasting effects of metabolic memory. PMID:25825057

  9. A constraint-based modelling approach to metabolic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Longfei; Nicolae, Averina; Oliveira, Miguel A.P.; He, Feng; Hachi, Siham; Fleming, Ronan M.T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of sporadic Parkinson's disease is degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. The aetiopathogenesis of this degeneration is still not fully understood, with dysfunction of many biochemical pathways in different subsystems suggested to be involved. Recent advances in constraint-based modelling approaches hold great potential to systematically examine the relative contribution of dysfunction in disparate pathways to dopaminergic neuronal degeneration, but few studies have employed these methods in Parkinson's disease research. Therefore, this review outlines a framework for future constraint-based modelling of dopaminergic neuronal metabolism to decipher the multi-factorial mechanisms underlying the neuronal pathology of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26504511

  10. AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Andreea; Mahdi, Labib; Musat, Ovidiu

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to review the current knowledge on Age- Related Macular Degeneration, including pathogenesis, ocular manifestations, diagnosis and ancillary testing. Relevant publications on Age-Related Macular Degeneration that were published until 2014. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterized by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or geographic atrophy.

  11. Morinda citrifolia Linn. (Noni) and Its Potential in Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Aline Carla; Figueiredo, Priscila Silva; dos Santos-Eichler, Rosângela Aparecida; Freitas, Karine de Cássia; Hiane, Priscila Aiko; de Castro, Alinne Pereira; Guimarães, Rita de Cássia Avellaneda

    2017-01-01

    Cultural and economic shifts in the early 19th century led to the rapid development of companies that made good profits from technologically-produced commodities. In this way, some habits changed in society, such as the overconsumption of processed and micronutrient-poor foods and devices that gave rise to a sedentary lifestyle. These factors influenced host-microbiome interactions which, in turn, mediated the etiopathogenesis of “new-era” disorders and diseases, which are closely related, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, hypertension, and inflammatory bowel disease, which are characterized by chronic dysregulation of metabolic and immune processes. These pathological conditions require novel and effective therapeutic approaches. Morinda citrifolia (noni) is well known as a traditional healing plant due to its medicinal properties. Thus, many studies have been conducted to understand its bioactive compounds and their mechanisms of action. However, in obesity and obesity-related metabolic (dysfunction) syndrome, other studies are necessary to better elucidate noni’s mechanisms of action, mainly due to the complexity of the pathophysiology of obesity and its metabolic dysfunction. In this review, we summarize not only the clinical effects, but also important cell signaling pathways in in vivo and in vitro assays of potent bioactive compounds present in the noni plant which have been reported in studies of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction. PMID:28587078

  12. Consumption of Two Healthy Dietary Patterns Restored Microbiota Dysbiosis in Obese Patients With Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Haro, Carmen; García-Carpintero, Sonia; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol A; Alcalá-Díaz, Juan F; Landa, Blanca B; Clemente, José C; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; Camargo, Antonio

    2017-09-20

    The consumption of two healthy diets (Mediterranean (MED) and low-fat (LF) diets) may restore the gut microbiome dysbiosis in obese patients depending on the degree of metabolic dysfunction. We analyzed the differences in bacterial community at baseline and after 2 years of dietary intervention of 106 subjects from the CORDIOPREV study, 33 of whom were obese patients with severe metabolic disease (5 criteria for metabolic syndrome) (MetS-OB), 32 obese patients without metabolic dysfunction (2 or less criteria for metabolic syndrome) (NonMetS-OB) and 41 non-obese subjects (NonMetS-NonOB). Our study showed a marked dysbiosis in people with severe metabolic disease (Met-OB), compared with obese people without MetS (NonMetS-OB) and non-obese people (NonMetS-NonOB). This disbiotic pattern was reversed by consumption of both MED (35% of calories as fat (22% MUFA fat, 6% PUFA fat and <10% saturated fat) or LF (<30% total fat (<10% saturated fat, 12%-14% MUFA fat and 6-8% PUFA fat) diets, whereas no significant microbiota changes were observed in NonMetS-NonOB and NonMetS-OB groups. Our results suggest that the chronic intake of two healthy dietary patterns partially restores the gut microbiome dysbiosis in obese patients with coronary heart disease, depending on the degree of metabolic dysfunction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Inherent lipid metabolic dysfunction in glycogen storage disease IIIa.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Ling, Yun; Huang, Chong; Yu, De-Min; Gu, Lei-Lei; Liao, Xiang-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Hu, Xi-Qi; Han, Yue; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-12-05

    We studied two patients from a nonconsanguineous family with life-long abnormal liver function, hepatomegaly and abnormal fatty acid profiles. Abnormal liver function, hypoglycemia and muscle weakness are observed in various genetic diseases, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency and glycogen storage diseases. The proband showed increased free fatty acids, mainly C8 and C10, resembling fatty acid oxidation disorder. However, no mutation was found in ACADM and ACADL gene. Sequencing of theamylo-alpha-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) gene showed that both patients were compound heterozygotes for c.118C > T (p.Gln40X) and c.753_756 del CAGA (p.Asp251Glufsx29), whereas their parents were each heterozygous for one of these mutations. The AGL protein was undetectable in EBV-B cells from the two patients. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated a significant different pattern of gene expression in both of patients’ cells, including genes involving in the PPAR signaling pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis, lipid synthesis and visceral fat deposition and metabolic syndrome. This unique gene expression pattern is probably due to the absence of AGL, which potentially accounts for the observed clinical phenotypes of hyperlipidemia and hepatocyte steatosis in glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

  14. Relationship between Resting Pulse Rate and Lipid Metabolic Dysfunctions in Chinese Adults Living in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-jian; Li, Yu-qian; Li, Lin-lin; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Jing-zhi; You, Ai-guo; Guo, Yi-rui; Li, Wen-jie

    2012-01-01

    Background Resting pulse rate has been observed to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. However, its association with lipid metabolic dysfunctions remains unclear, especially resting pulse rate as an indicator for identifying the risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between resting pulse rate and lipid metabolic dysfunctions, and then evaluate the feasibility of resting pulse rate as an indicator for screening the risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed, and 16,926 subjects were included in this study from rural community residents aged 35–78 years. Resting pulse rate and relevant covariates were collected from a standard questionnaire. The fasting blood samples were collected and measured for lipid profile. Predictive performance was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results A significant correlation was observed between resting pulse rate and TC (r = 0.102, P = 0.001), TG (r = 0.182, P = 0.001), and dyslipidemia (r = 0.037, P = 0.008). In the multivariate models, the adjusted odds ratios for hypercholesterolemia (from 1.07 to 1.15), hypertriglyceridemia (1.11 to 1.16), low HDL hypercholesterolemia (1.03 to 1.06), high LDL hypercholesterolemia (0.92 to 1.14), and dyslipidemia (1.04 to 1.07) were positively increased across quartiles of resting pulse rate (P for trend <0.05). The ROC curve indicated that resting pulse rate had low sensitivity (78.95%, 74.18%, 51.54%, 44.39%, and 54.22%), specificity (55.88%, 59.46%, 57.27%, 65.02%, and 60.56%), and the area under ROC curve (0.70, 0.69, 0.54, 0.56, and 0.58) for identifying the risk of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL hypercholesterolemia, high LDL hypercholesterolemia, and dyslipidemia, respectively. Conclusion Fast resting pulse rate was associated with a moderate increased risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions in rural adults. However

  15. Relationship between resting pulse rate and lipid metabolic dysfunctions in Chinese adults living in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-jian; Li, Yu-qian; Li, Lin-lin; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Jing-zhi; You, Ai-guo; Guo, Yi-rui; Li, Wen-jie

    2012-01-01

    Resting pulse rate has been observed to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. However, its association with lipid metabolic dysfunctions remains unclear, especially resting pulse rate as an indicator for identifying the risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between resting pulse rate and lipid metabolic dysfunctions, and then evaluate the feasibility of resting pulse rate as an indicator for screening the risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions. A cross-sectional survey was performed, and 16,926 subjects were included in this study from rural community residents aged 35-78 years. Resting pulse rate and relevant covariates were collected from a standard questionnaire. The fasting blood samples were collected and measured for lipid profile. Predictive performance was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A significant correlation was observed between resting pulse rate and TC (r = 0.102, P = 0.001), TG (r = 0.182, P = 0.001), and dyslipidemia (r = 0.037, P = 0.008). In the multivariate models, the adjusted odds ratios for hypercholesterolemia (from 1.07 to 1.15), hypertriglyceridemia (1.11 to 1.16), low HDL hypercholesterolemia (1.03 to 1.06), high LDL hypercholesterolemia (0.92 to 1.14), and dyslipidemia (1.04 to 1.07) were positively increased across quartiles of resting pulse rate (P for trend <0.05). The ROC curve indicated that resting pulse rate had low sensitivity (78.95%, 74.18%, 51.54%, 44.39%, and 54.22%), specificity (55.88%, 59.46%, 57.27%, 65.02%, and 60.56%), and the area under ROC curve (0.70, 0.69, 0.54, 0.56, and 0.58) for identifying the risk of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL hypercholesterolemia, high LDL hypercholesterolemia, and dyslipidemia, respectively. Fast resting pulse rate was associated with a moderate increased risk of lipid metabolic dysfunctions in rural adults. However, resting pulse rate as an indicator has limited potential for

  16. Metabolic syndrome is associated with atrial electrical and mechanical dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hale; Özcan, Kazım Serhan; Sayar, Nurten; Kemaloglu, Tugba; Gungor, Baris; Erer, Betul; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Gurkan, Ufuk; Cakmak, Nazmiye; Oz, Dilaver; Calik, Ali Nazmi; Bolca, Osman

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the left atrial (LA) electrical and mechanical functions in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The study population consisted of 87 patients with MetS and 67 controls. Intra-atrial and interatrial electromechanical delays (EDs) were measured with tissue Doppler imaging. P-wave dispersion (Pd) was calculated from the 12-lead electrocardiograms. LA volumes were measured echocardiographically by the biplane area-length method. Intra-atrial and interatrial EDs and Pd were significantly higher in patients with MetS (10.3 ± 6.3, 21.0 ± 11.5 and 41.7 ± 10.8) than in controls (7.4 ± 5.5, 12.3 ± 10.4 and 29.2 ± 7.4; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The LA preatrial contraction volume and active emptying volumes were higher in this population, but the LA passive emptying fraction was lower. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, the presence of MetS, LA active emptying volume and left ventricular early diastolic (E) wave velocity/late diastolic (A) wave velocity (E/A) ratios were independent correlates of interatrial ED (p = 0.002, p = 0.001 and p = 0.025, respectively). This study showed that intra-atrial and interatrial EDs and Pd were prolonged and LA mechanical functions were impaired in patients with MetS. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Toward an early marker of metabolic dysfunction: omentin-1 in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Prats-Puig, Anna; Bassols, Judit; Bargalló, Eva; Mas-Parareda, Marta; Ribot, Rosa; Soriano-Rodríguez, Pilar; Berengüí, Àngela; Díaz, Marta; de Zegher, Francis; Ibánez, Lourdes; López-Bermejo, Abel

    2011-09-01

    Omentin-1 is a recently recognized adipokine primarily originating in visceral adipose tissue. We posited that circulating omentin-1 could be an early marker of metabolic dysfunction. To this end, we examined the associations between circulating omentin-1, body fat (bioelectric impedance), an endocrine-metabolic profile (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), serum lipids, high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin and blood pressure (BP)) and family history of obesity and diabetes in asymptomatic prepubertal children (n = 161; 77 boys and 84 girls; age 7 ± 1 year) with a normal distribution of height and weight. Increased circulating omentin-1 was associated with a poorer metabolic profile, with relatively higher HOMA(IR), fasting triacylglycerol, BP and familial prevalence of diabetes (all P < 0.005 to P < 0.0001), and relatively lower fraction of HMW adiponectin (P < 0.005), whereas no relationship was found with body weight or fat or with family history of obesity. All these associations were independent of age, gender and fat mass. In conclusion, circulating omentin-1 may become a marker of metabolic dysfunction integrating insulin sensitivity, markers of adipose-tissue metabolism and BP as early as in prepubertal childhood.

  18. Reversible cardiac dysfunction after venlafaxine overdose and possible influence of genotype and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Castanares-Zapatero, Diego; Gillard, Nathalie; Capron, Arnaud; Haufroid, Vincent; Hantson, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Acute poisoning by large venlafaxine (VEN) overdoses may result in serious cardiac events like acute left ventricular dysfunction or even fatalities. In humans, venlafaxine is biotransformed for the most part by CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 isoenzymes to its major metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV), and in parallel to N-desmethylvenlafaxine (NDV) and N,O-didesmethylvenlafaxine (NODV) by several CYP isoenzymes, mainly including CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. The ODV concentrations must be taken into consideration along with those of VEN when relating blood concentrations to clinical effects. Herein we describe a case of reversible cardiac dysfunction following VEN self-poisoning. The peak ODV concentration (46,094ng/mL) was observed 20h post-ingestion, being one of the highest ever associated with survival. The calculated elimination half-life was 10h for VEN and 22h for ODV, and the calculated ODV/VEN metabolic ratio 12.9. Genotyping confirmed the patient to have an extensive metabolizer phenotype for CYP2D6, and an ultra-rapid metabolizer phenotype for CYP2C19. We suspect cardiotoxicity was related to sustained ODV exposure despite extensive VEN metabolism, and therefore suggest that ODV metabolism saturation may occur following large VEN overdoses.

  19. Coexistence of age-related EBV-associated follicular hyperplasia and large B-cell EBV+ lymphoma of the elderly. Two distinct features of the same T-cell dysfunction related to senescence?

    PubMed

    Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Bouchindhomme, Brigitte; Dubois, Romain; Hivert, Benedicte; Grardel, Nathalie; Copin, Marie-Christine

    2017-03-01

    Age-related EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders form a new clinicopathological group. Until recently, this group was associated with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), characterised by an aggressive clinical presentation and a poor prognosis. Recent findings in Western Caucasian patients, however, suggest that this entity covers a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from reactive follicular hyperplasia (HR) to DLBCL. We report the case of an 85-year-old Caucasian man showing lymphadenopathy and numerous hypodense lesions of the liver. Examination of a lymph node revealed follicular hyperplasia with EBV expression confined to germinal centres. The patient was treated with Rituximab and subsequently, the lesions of the liver were explored. They showed extensive necrosis and a polymorphic large B-cell population with strong EBV expression. This is the first report to describe age-related EBV-associated follicular hyperplasia at one site coexisting with DLBCL at another. This case warrants undertaking further investigations each time a diagnosis of age-related EBV-HR is associated with extranodal lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Polyphenolic Derivatives on Heme Oxygenase-System in Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Pittala, Valeria; Vanella, Luca; Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Marrazzo, Agostino; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria

    2017-06-16

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effects of various naturally occurring polyphenols in the management of metabolic dysfunctions. This cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprises insulin resistance, increased levels of free fatty acids, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia and hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) along with DM-induced complications. Most of them are included in the well-known metabolic syndrome (MS). These metabolic dysfunctions in turn are tightly associated to a high risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. Although molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of metabolic dysfunctions and related complications are not yet clear, it is widely recognized that they are associated to oxidative stress and chronic low-grade of inflammatory levels. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic references through the use of SciFinder. The database is provided by a division of ACS (American Chemical Society) and guarantees access to the world's most extensive and authoritative source of references. The search has been performed by using "heme oxygenase-1" as research topic and a subsequent refinement has been done by using inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was evaluated on the basis of standard tools. From a careful review of the selected literature, of interest, the use of natural antioxidant polyphenols seems to be the ideal pharmacological treatment since they are endowed with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In particular, some polyphenols such as curcumin, quercetin, genistein, caffeic acid phenethyl ester are able to potently activate nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and related downstream expression of enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Indeed, an overexpression of HO-1 has demonstrated to play a beneficial role in metabolic diseases. The following review is intended to stimulate interest in the role of natural

  1. Sex Dimorphism in Late Gestational Sleep Fragmentation and Metabolic Dysfunction in Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Hakim, Fahed; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excessive sleep fragmentation (SF) is common in pregnant women. Adult-onset metabolic disorders may begin during early development and exhibit substantial sex dimorphism. We hypothesized that metabolic dysfunction induced by gestational SF in male mice would not be apparent in female littermates. Methods: Body weight and food consumption were measured weekly in male and female offspring after late gestational SF or control sleep (SC). At 20 weeks, plasma leptin, adiponectin, lipid profiles, and insulin and glucose tolerance tests were assessed. Leptin and adiponectin, M1, and M2 macrophage messenger RNA expression and polarity were examined. Adiponectin gene promoter methylation levels in several tissues were assessed. Results: Food intake, body weight, visceral fat mass, and insulin resistance were higher, and adiponectin levels lower in male but not female offspring exposed to gestational SF. However, dyslipidemia was apparent in both male and female offspring exposed to SF, albeit of lesser magnitude. In visceral fat, leptin messenger RNA expression was selectively increased and adiponectin expression was decreased in male offspring exposed to gestational SF, but adiponectin was increased in exposed female offspring. Differences in adipokine expression also emerged in liver, subcutaneous fat, and muscle. Increased M1 macrophage markers were present in male offspring exposed to SF (SFOM) while increased M2 markers emerged in SF in female offspring (SFOF). Similarly, significant differences emerged in the methylation patterns of adiponectin promoter in SFOM and SFOF. Conclusion: Gestational sleep fragmentation increases the susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in male but not in female offspring, most likely via epigenetic changes. Thus, sleep perturbations impose long-term detrimental effects to the fetus manifesting as sex dimorphic metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. Citation: Khalyfa A, Carreras A, Almendros I, Hakim F, Gozal D. Sex

  2. Novel diagnostics of metabolic dysfunction detected in breath and plasma by selective isotope-assisted labeling.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Julia A; Tonelli, Marco; Haughey, Dermot T; Porter, Warren P; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-08-01

    Metabolomics is the study of a unique fingerprint of small molecules present in biological systems under healthy and disease conditions. One of the major challenges in metabolomics is validation of fingerprint molecules to identify specifically perturbed pathways in metabolic aberrations. This step is crucial to the understanding of budding metabolic pathologies and the ability to identify early indicators of common diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We present a novel approach to diagnosing aberrations in glucose utilization including metabolic pathway switching in a disease state. We used a well-defined prenatally exposed glucocorticoid mouse model that results in adult females with metabolic dysfunction. We applied the complementary technologies of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy to analyze serial plasma samples and real-time breath measurements following selective (13)C-isotope-assisted labeling. These platforms allowed us to trace metabolic markers in whole animals and identify key metabolic pathway switching in prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals. Total glucose flux is significantly proportionally increased through the major oxidative pathways of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway in the prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals relative to the control animals. This novel diagnostics approach is fast, noninvasive, and sensitive for determining specific pathway utilization, and provides a direct translational application in the health care field.

  3. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  4. DNA Damage Links Mitochondrial Dysfunction to Atherosclerosis and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, John R.; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Figg, Nichola; Gorenne, Isabelle; Mahmoudi, Melli; Griffin, Julian; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Logan, Angela; Murphy, Michael P.; Bennett, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Rationale DNA damage is present in both genomic and mitochondrial DNA in atherosclerosis. However, whether DNA damage itself promotes atherosclerosis, or is simply a byproduct of the risk factors that promote atherosclerosis, is unknown. Objective To examine the effect of DNA damage on atherosclerosis, we studied apolipoprotein (Apo)E−/− mice that were haploinsufficient for the protein kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), which coordinates DNA repair. Methods and Results ATM+/−/ApoE−/− mice developed accelerated atherosclerosis and multiple features of the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, steatohepatitis, and glucose intolerance. Transplantation with ATM+/+ bone marrow attenuated atherosclerosis but not the metabolic syndrome. ATM+/− smooth muscle cells and macrophages showed increased nuclear DNA damage and defective DNA repair signaling, growth arrest, and apoptosis. Metabolomic screening of ATM+/−/ApoE−/− mouse tissues identified metabolic changes compatible with mitochondrial defects, with increased β-hydroxybutyrate but reduced lactate, reduced glucose, and alterations in multiple lipid species. ATM+/−/ApoE−/− mouse tissues showed an increased frequency of a mouse mitochondrial “common” deletion equivalent and reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Conclusions We propose that failure of DNA repair generates defects in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This in turn leads to ketosis, hyperlipidemia, and increased fat storage, promoting atherosclerosis and the metabolic syndrome. Prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction may represent a novel target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20705925

  5. Resistance to Aerobic Exercise Training Causes Metabolic Dysfunction and Reveals Novel Exercise-Regulated Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; Alves-Wagner, Ana B.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Gallagher, Iain J.; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Qi, Nathan R.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A.; Timmons, James A.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are “exercise-resistant” and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:23610057

  6. Resistance to aerobic exercise training causes metabolic dysfunction and reveals novel exercise-regulated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sarah J; Rivas, Donato A; Alves-Wagner, Ana B; Hirshman, Michael F; Gallagher, Iain J; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L; Qi, Nathan R; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A; Timmons, James A; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-08-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are "exercise-resistant" and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  7. Complex I Dysfunction Redirects Cellular and Mitochondrial Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Garmier, Marie; Carroll, Adam J.; Delannoy, Etienne; Vallet, Corinne; Day, David A.; Small, Ian D.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is a major avenue for reduced NAD oxidation linked to oxidative phosphorylation in plants. However, the plant enzyme has structural and functional features that set it apart from its counterparts in other organisms, raising questions about the physiological significance of this complex in plants. We have developed an experimental model in which rotenone, a classic complex I inhibitor, has been applied to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures in order to dissect early metabolic adjustments involved in cell acclimation to mitochondrial dysfunction. Rotenone induced a transitory decrease in cellular respiration (0–4 h after treatment). Cell respiration then progressively recovered and reached a steady state at 10 to 12 h after treatment. Complex I inhibition by rotenone did not induce obvious oxidative stress or cell death but affected longer term cell growth. Integrated analyses of gene expression, the mitochondrial proteome, and changes in primary metabolism indicated that rotenone treatment caused changes in mitochondrial function via alterations in specific components. A physical disengagement of glycolytic activities associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane was observed, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle was altered. Amino acid and organic acid pools were also modified by rotenone treatment, with a marked early decrease of 2-oxoglutarate, aspartate, and glutamine pools. These data demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis cells, complex I inhibition by rotenone induces significant remodeling of metabolic pathways involving the mitochondria and other compartments and point to early metabolic changes in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:18784283

  8. Carotid artery intima-media thickness and erectile dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Mustafa; Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Aydın, Yusuf; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Berker, Dilek; Karakaya, Jale; Guler, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MS) has become a pandemic in Turkey, as is the case globally. Increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) and erectile dysfunction (ED) may be evident before the clinical signs of cardiovascular disease appear. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of increased CIMT and ED as markers of atherosclerotic disease in patients with MS. Material/Methods Thirty-two patients with MS and 29 healthy controls were included. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters, along with total testosterone (TT), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), were recorded. Carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured. Erectile dysfunction was assessed with International Index of Erectile Function. Results Patients with MS had higher BMI, fasting plasma glucose, post-prandial plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol, triglycerides, hs-CRP, and CIMT, whereas TT levels were lower (p<0.0001). The prevalence and severity of erectile dysfunction were higher in patients with MS (p<0.0001). Erectile dysfunction scores correlated inversely with CIMT. MS patients with ED were older and had higher CIMT compared to those without ED. Increase in age and HOMA and decrease in TT increased the risk of ED. When KIMT exceeding the 95th percentile of healthy controls was accepted as a risk factor for CVD, presence of ED was the only determinant for this increase. Conclusions Erectile dysfunction was more prevalent and severe in patients with MS and correlated with subclinical endothelial dysfunction. Total testosterone deficiency was prominent among MS patients. Presence of ED points to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease when MS is present. PMID:24869934

  9. Asymptomatic Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome: Results from an Italian Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    La Carrubba, Salvatore; Todaro, Maria Chiara; Zito, Concetta; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Monte, Ines Paola; Caso, Pio; Colonna, Paolo; de Gregorio, Cesare; Pezzano, Antonio; Benedetto, Frank; Salvo, Giovanni Di; Carerj, Scipione; Bello, Vitantonio Di

    2013-01-01

    Context: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of interrelated common clinical disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia, associated with a greater risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease than any of its individual components. Although MS is associated with increased cardiovascular risk (CVR), its relationship with heart failure (HF) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is not fully understood. Aims: We sought to determine whether MS is associated to LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction in a sample of patients with MS and no symptoms for HF. Subjects and Methods: We enrolled 6422 consecutive asymptomatic patients admitted to echo-lab for a routine echocardiogram. We calculated LV systolic and diastolic function, by Simpson biplane method and validated Doppler parameters, respectively. MS was diagnosed if three or more CVR factors were found. Results: LV systolic function was evaluated in 6175 patients (96.2%). In the group of patients without MS (n = 5630), the prevalence of systolic dysfunction was 10.8% (n = 607) while in the group of patients with MS (n = 545) it was 12.5% (n = 87), (RR1.57; CI 95% 1.2-2.0; P < 0.001). Diastolic function was evaluated in 3936 patients (61.3%). In the group of patients without MS (n = 3566) the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was 33.3% (n = 1187), while in patients with MS (n = 370) it was 45.7% (n = 169), (RR1.68; CI95% 1.3-2.0; P < 0.001). After adjustment for age and gender, MS proved to be an independent predictor of LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Conclusions: Our data show that asymptomatic LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction, is correlated with MS and demonstrate that echocardiography is a useful tool to detect patients at high risk for HF. Echocardiography in asymptomatic patients with MS may lead to a therapy initiation at early stages to prevent future cardiovascular events and HF. PMID:28465894

  10. Preclinical Systolic and Diastolic Dysfunction in Metabolically Healthy and Unhealthy Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Chih; Liang, Chang-seng; Gopal, Deepa M.; Ayalon, Nir; Donohue, Courtney; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Sandhu, Harpaul; Perez, Alejandro J.; Downing, Jill; Gokce, Noyan; Colucci, Wilson S.; Ho, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the substantial overlap of obesity and metabolic disease, there is hetereogeneity with respect to cardiovascular risk. We sought to investigate preclinical differences in systolic and diastolic function in obesity, and specifically compare obese individuals with and without metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods and Results Obese individuals without cardiac disease with (OB/MS+, n=124) and without MS (OB/MS−, n=37) were compared to non-obese controls (n=29). Diastolic function was assessed by transmitral and tissue Doppler. Global longitudinal strain (LS) and time-based dyssynchrony were assessed by speckle tracking. Both Ob/MS− and OB/MS+ groups had similar ejection fraction but worse systolic mechanics as assessed by LS and dyssynchrony compared with non-obese controls. Specifically, OB/MS− had 2.5% lower LS (s.e. 0.7%, P=0.001 in multivariable-adjusted analyses) and 10.8 ms greater dyssynchrony (s.e. 3.3, P=0.002), and OB/MS+ had 1.0% lower LS (s.e. 0.3%, P<0.001) and 7.8 ms greater dyssynchrony (s.e. 1.5, P<0.001) compared with controls. Obesity was associated with impaired diastolic function regardless of MS status, as evidenced by greater left atrial diameter and left ventricular mass, though diastolic dysfunction was more pronounced in OB/MS+ compared with OB/MS− individuals. Conclusions Obesity is associated with subclinical differences in both systolic and diastolic function regardless of the presence or absence of MS, although MS appears to be associated with worse diastolic dysfunction. Compared to controls, ‘metabolically healthy’ obese had lower LS, greater dyssynchrony, and early diastolic dysfunction, supporting the notion that obesity per se may have adverse cardiovascular effects regardless of metabolic disease. PMID:26175540

  11. Obese dogs with and without obesity-related metabolic dysfunction - a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, Jose J; de Torre, Carlos; Ljubić, Blanka B; Holden, Shelley L; Queau, Yann; Morris, Penelope J; Pastor, Josep; German, Alexander J

    2016-09-20

    Approximately 20 % of obese dogs have metabolic disturbances similar to those observed in human metabolic syndrome, a condition known as obesity-related metabolic dysfunction. This condition is associated with insulin resistance and decreased circulating adiponectin concentrations, but clinical consequences have not been reported. In order to define better the metabolic changes associated with obesity-related metabolic dysfunction (ORMD), we compared the plasma proteomes of obese dogs with and without ORMD. A proteomic analysis was conducted on plasma samples from 8 obese male dogs, 4 with ORMD and 4 without ORMD. The samples were first treated for the depletion of high-abundance proteins and subsequently analysed by using 2-DE DIGE methodology. Using mass spectrometry, 12 proteins were identified: albumin, apoliprotein A-I, C2, C3, C5, C4BPA, A2M, Uncharacterised protein (Fragment) OS = Canis familiaris, fibrinogen, IGJ, ITIH2, and glutathione peroxidase. In obese dogs with ORMD, the relative amounts of ten proteins (albumin, apoliprotein A-I, C2, C3, C5, C4BPA, A2M, Uncharacterised protein (Fragment) OS = Canis familiaris, fibrinogen, and ITIH2) were increased and two proteins (IGJ and glutathione peroxidase) were decreased, compared with obese dogs without ORMD. Specific assays were then used to confirm differences in serum albumin, apoliprotein A-I and glutathione peroxidase in a separate group of 20 overweight dogs, 8 with ORMD and 12 without ORMD. The current study provides evidence that, in obese dogs with ORMD, there are changes in expression of proteins involved in lipid metabolism, immune response, and antioxidant status. The clinical significance of these changes remains to be defined.

  12. New links between SOD1 and metabolic dysfunction from a yeast model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bastow, Emma L.; Peswani, Amber R.; Tarrant, Daniel S. J.; Pentland, Daniel R.; Chen, Xi; Staniforth, Gemma L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of genes have been linked to familial forms of the fatal motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over 150 mutations within the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been implicated in ALS, but why such mutations lead to ALS-associated cellular dysfunction is unclear. In this study, we identify how ALS-linked SOD1 mutations lead to changes in the cellular health of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that it is not the accumulation of aggregates but the loss of Sod1 protein stability that drives cellular dysfunction. The toxic effect of Sod1 instability does not correlate with a loss of mitochondrial function or increased production of reactive oxygen species, but instead prevents acidification of the vacuole, perturbs metabolic regulation and promotes senescence. Central to the toxic gain-of-function seen with the SOD1 mutants examined was an inability to regulate amino acid biosynthesis. We also report that leucine supplementation results in an improvement in motor function in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of ALS. Our data suggest that metabolic dysfunction plays an important role in Sod1-mediated toxicity in both the yeast and worm models of ALS. PMID:27656112

  13. Molecular pathophysiology of impaired glucose metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative DNA damage in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Nona; Leon, Julio; Sheng, Zijing; Oka, Sugako; Hamasaki, Hideomi; Iwaki, Toru; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2017-01-01

    In normal brain, neurons in the cortex and hippocampus produce insulin, which modulates glucose metabolism and cognitive functions. It has been shown that insulin resistance impairs glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function, thus increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Recent progress in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research revealed that insulin production and signaling are severely impaired in AD brain, thereby resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. Among possible oxidative DNA lesions, 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is highly accumulated in the brain of AD patients. Previously we have shown that incorporating 8-oxoG in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA promotes MUTYH (adenine DNA glycosylase) dependent neurodegeneration. Moreover, cortical neurons prepared from MTH1 (8-oxo-dGTPase)/OGG1 (8-oxoG DNA glycosylase)-double deficient adult mouse brains is shown to exhibit significantly poor neuritogenesis in vitro with increased 8-oxoG accumulation in mitochondrial DNA in the absence of antioxidants. Therefore, 8-oxoG can be considered involved in the neurodegenerative process in AD brain. In mild cognitive impairment, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage may induce synaptic dysfunction due to energy failures in neurons thus resulting in impaired cognitive function. If such abnormality lasts long, it can lead to vicious cycles of oxidative damage, which may then trigger the neurodegenerative process seen in Alzheimer type dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New links between SOD1 and metabolic dysfunction from a yeast model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bastow, Emma L; Peswani, Amber R; Tarrant, Daniel S J; Pentland, Daniel R; Chen, Xi; Morgan, Alan; Staniforth, Gemma L; Tullet, Jennifer M; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Tuite, Mick F; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2016-11-01

    A number of genes have been linked to familial forms of the fatal motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over 150 mutations within the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been implicated in ALS, but why such mutations lead to ALS-associated cellular dysfunction is unclear. In this study, we identify how ALS-linked SOD1 mutations lead to changes in the cellular health of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We find that it is not the accumulation of aggregates but the loss of Sod1 protein stability that drives cellular dysfunction. The toxic effect of Sod1 instability does not correlate with a loss of mitochondrial function or increased production of reactive oxygen species, but instead prevents acidification of the vacuole, perturbs metabolic regulation and promotes senescence. Central to the toxic gain-of-function seen with the SOD1 mutants examined was an inability to regulate amino acid biosynthesis. We also report that leucine supplementation results in an improvement in motor function in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of ALS. Our data suggest that metabolic dysfunction plays an important role in Sod1-mediated toxicity in both the yeast and worm models of ALS. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Role of high-energy phosphate metabolism in hydrogen peroxide-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Kaneko, M; Iimuro, M; Fujise, Y; Hayashi, H

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the role of high-energy phosphate metabolism in hydrogen peroxide-induced cardiac dysfunction using phosphorus and fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The exposure of a Langendorff-perfused heart to hydrogen peroxide (200-400 micromol/L, 8 min) provoked biphasic contractile dysfunction characterized by a transient depression of left ventricular developed pressure during the administration of hydrogen peroxide and a delayed elevation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure after the washout of hydrogen peroxide. The initial phase of cardiac dysfunction correlated well with the accumulation of sugar phosphates (r = 0.89, p < 0.01). Furthermore, we demonstrated that glibenclamide, a potent inhibitor of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel, attenuated the initial depression of developed pressure. On the other hand, the delayed elevation of end-diastolic pressure correlated well with the total ATP depletion (r = 0.96, p < 0.01). However, ATP loss was supposed to be a mere result from the increased ATP consumption corresponding to a rise in intracellular free Ca2+ (from the control value of 315+/-23 nmol/L to 708+/-104 after the administration of hydrogen peroxide, p < 0.01), which also paralleled the elevation of end-diastolic pressure. Thus glycolytic inhibition and intracellular Ca2+ overload are independently responsible for the biphasic contractile dysfunction induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Analysis of abnormalities in purine metabolism leading to gout and to neurological dysfunctions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Cascante, M

    1998-01-01

    A modelling approach is used to analyse diseases associated with purine metabolism in man. The specific focus is on deficiencies in two enzymes, hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenylosuccinate lyase. These deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms, including neurological dysfunctions and mental retardation. Although the biochemical mechanisms of dysfunctions associated with adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency are not completely understood, there is at least general agreement in the literature about possible causes. Simulations with our model confirm that accumulation of the two substrates of the enzyme can lead to significant biochemical imbalance. In hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency the biochemical mechanisms associated with neurological dysfunctions are less clear. Model analyses support some old hypotheses but also suggest new indicators for possible causes of neurological dysfunctions associated with this deficiency. Hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is known to cause hyperuricaemia and gout. We compare the relative importance of this deficiency with other known causes of gout in humans. The analysis suggests that defects in the excretion of uric acid are more consequential than defects in uric acid synthesis such as hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:9445373

  17. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lim, Laurence S; Mitchell, Paul; Seddon, Johanna M; Holz, Frank G; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-05-05

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness worldwide. With ageing populations in many countries, more than 20% might have the disorder. Advanced age-related macular degeneration, including neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet) and geographic atrophy (late dry), is associated with substantial, progressive visual impairment. Major risk factors include cigarette smoking, nutritional factors, cardiovascular diseases, and genetic markers, including genes regulating complement, lipid, angiogenic, and extracellular matrix pathways. Some studies have suggested a declining prevalence of age-related macular degeneration, perhaps due to reduced exposure to modifiable risk factors. Accurate diagnosis combines clinical examination and investigations, including retinal photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Dietary anti-oxidant supplementation slows progression of the disease. Treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration incorporates intraocular injections of anti-VEGF agents, occasionally combined with other modalities. Evidence suggests that two commonly used anti-VEGF therapies, ranibizumab and bevacizumab, have similar efficacy, but possible differences in systemic safety are difficult to assess. Future treatments include inhibition of other angiogenic factors, and regenerative and topical therapies.

  18. Age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Hanna R; Chan, Chi-Chao; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in elderly populations of European descent. The most consistent risk factors associated with this ocular condition are increasing age and cigarette smoking. Genetic investigations have shown that complement factor H, a regulator of the alternative complement pathway, and LOC387715/HtrA1 are the most consistent genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown, oxidative stress might have an important role. Treatment with antioxidant vitamins and zinc can reduce the risk of developing advanced age-related macular degeneration by about a quarter in those at least at moderate risk. Intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits all forms of vascular endothelial growth factor, have been shown to stabilise loss of vision and, in some cases, improve vision in individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. These findings, combined with assessments of possible environmental and genetic interactions and new approaches to modulate inflammatory pathways, will hopefully further expand our ability to understand and treat age-related macular degeneration. PMID:19027484

  19. Influence of obesity and metabolic dysfunction on the endothelial control in the coronary circulation

    PubMed Central

    Belin de Chantemele, Eric J.; Stepp, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the coronary circulation remain the leading cause of death in Western society despite impressive advances in diagnosis, pharmacotherapy and post-event management. Part of this statistic likely stems from a parallel increase in the prevalence of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, both significant risk factors for coronary disease. Obesity and diabetes pose unique challenges for the heart and their impact on the coronary vasculature remain incompletely understood. The vascular endothelium is a major interface between arterial function and the physical and chemical components of blood flow. Proper function of the endothelium is necessary to preserve hemostasis, maintain vascular tone and limit the extent of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Given its central role in vascular health, endothelial dysfunction has been the source of considerable research interest in diabetes and obesity. In the current review, we will examine the pathologic impact of obesity and diabetes on coronary function and the extent to which these two factors impact endothelial function. PMID:21889942

  20. Innate lymphoid cells as novel regulators of obesity and its-associated metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Yang, W; Tian, Z; van Velkinburgh, J C; Song, J; Wu, Y; Ni, B

    2016-06-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity worldwide has been accompanied by increases in risk and rates of obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions, such as insulin resistance. The chronic, low-grade inflammatory condition of obesity highlights the pathophysiological link between the immune system and the metabolic system, which has yet to be fully understood. Recent studies of obesity have started to uncover potential regulatory roles for the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which under normal conditions serve to regulate development of lymphoid tissue and function of the mucosal immune system. The ILCs are a newly identified immune cell population with complicated composition and subsequently diverse and dynamic functions. Studies to determine the distribution profile of the various ILCs in adipose tissue provide intriguing clues as to their regulatory capacity in obesity and its associated metabolic dysfunctions. Here, we review the recent findings supporting a role for ILCs as regulators of obesity or its associated insulin resistance, and discuss the potential underlying molecular mechanism as well as its promise as a therapeutic target for clinical applications. © 2016 World Obesity. © 2016 World Obesity.

  1. Influence of metabolic dysfunction on cardiac mechanics in decompensated hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Bugenhagen, Scott M; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Rice, J Jeremy; Janssen, Paul M L; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in energetic state of the myocardium are associated with decompensated heart failure in humans and in animal models. However, the functional consequences of the observed changes in energetic state on mechanical function are not known. The primary aim of the study was to quantify mechanical/energetic coupling in the heart and to determine if energetic dysfunction can contribute to mechanical failure. A secondary aim was to apply a quantitative systems pharmacology analysis to investigate the effects of drugs that target cross-bridge cycling kinetics in heart failure-associated energetic dysfunction. Herein, a model of metabolite- and calcium-dependent myocardial mechanics was developed from calcium concentration and tension time courses in rat cardiac muscle obtained at different lengths and stimulation frequencies. The muscle dynamics model accounting for the effect of metabolites was integrated into a model of the cardiac ventricles to simulate pressure-volume dynamics in the heart. This cardiac model was integrated into a simple model of the circulation to investigate the effects of metabolic state on whole-body function. Simulations predict that reductions in metabolite pools observed in canine models of heart failure can cause systolic dysfunction, blood volume expansion, venous congestion, and ventricular dilation. Simulations also predict that myosin-activating drugs may partially counteract the effects of energetic state on cross-bridge mechanics in heart failure while increasing myocardial oxygen consumption. Our model analysis demonstrates how metabolic changes observed in heart failure are alone sufficient to cause systolic dysfunction and whole-body heart failure symptoms.

  2. Aluminum chloride caused liver dysfunction and mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder in rat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feibo; Liu, Yanfen; Zhao, Hansong; Yu, Kaiyuan; Song, Miao; Zhu, Yanzhu; Li, Yanfei

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is known to exert hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms mostly are unclear. Liver is a metabolism organ that maintains the energy level and structural stability of body, mitochondria are the main sites of energy metabolism, thus, we hypothesized that mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder contributes to liver dysfunction in aluminum chloride (AlCl3) treatment rat. To verify the hypothesis, forty male Wistar rats were randomly allocated and orally exposed to 0, 64mg/kg, 128mg/kg and 256mg/kg body weight AlCl3 in drinking water for 120days, respectively. We found that AlCl3 exposure reduced the electron transport chain complexes I-V activities and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, as well as disturbed mitochondrial DNA transcript, presenting as the inhibited mRNA expressions of NADH dehydrogenase 1, NADH dehydrogenase 2, cytochrome b, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 and ATP synthase 6, indicating that AlCl3 exposure disturbs the mitochondrial energy metabolism, and it caused an increase in liver enzymes (Aspartate aminotransferase and Alanine aminotransferase) and histopathological lesions. Additionally, we found that reactive oxygen species accumulation and decreased superoxide dismutase activity in mitochondria, and increased 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA, demonstrating AlCl3 exposure promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, which may be a contributing factor to mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder and liver dysfunction. The study displayed that mitochondria are the potential target of liver damage induced by AlCl3, providing considerable direction for the prevention and clinical intervention of liver diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy.

  4. Alterations in triglyceride rich lipoproteins are related to endothelial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Diego; López, Graciela I; Gorzalczany, Susana; Duarte, Mariano; González Ballerga, Esteban; Sordá, Juan; Schreier, Laura; Zago, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to analyze the effect of circulating triglyceride rich lipoprotein (TRL) on endothelial function in metabolic syndrome (MetS). We studied 40 patients with MetS (ATPIII), divided into those presenting normal endothelial function (n=19) and those with endothelial dysfunction (n=21) by means of the evaluation of pulse wave velocity, before and after brachial artery ischemia. In fasting serum we measured lipid and lipoprotein profile, insulin and glucose (HOMA-IR). Moreover, isolated TRL (d<1006g/l) were chemically characterized. In parallel, using randomly selected TRL from MetS patients with endothelial dysfunction (n=6) and MetS patients with normal endothelial function (n=6), the ability of TRL to inhibit ACh-induced vasorelaxation (10(-9)-10(-5)mM) on aortic rings previously pre-contracted by noradrenaline (10(-8)mM) was evaluated. Interestingly, TRL isolated from MetS patients presenting endothelial dysfunction showed triglyceride over-enrichment (59.1±4.8 vs. 54.1±4.7%; p=0.04), even after adjusting by potential confounders (p=0.05). In addition, while TRL resulting from both MetS groups significantly inhibited endothelium dependent vasorelaxation (p<0.001), TRL from MetS patients with endothelial dysfunction showed a strong tendency to a greater inhibition of vasorelaxation (p=0.06). Moreover, TRL-triglyceride (%) showed a strong tendency to correlate with the grade of vasorelaxation inhibition exerted by TRL (r=0.60; p=0.05). These results, taken together, would allow inferring for the first time that the predominance of triglyceride over-enriched TRL in circulation in MetS would induce endothelial dysfunction, contributing to the inherent cardiovascular risk of MetS. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeki; Hirata, Kumiko; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tanja; Miyake, Yumiko; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph; Homma, Shunichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predisposes to cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that both MetS and endothelial dysfunction are vascular risk factors and provide additive prognostic values in predicting cardiovascular events in a multi-ethnic community sample. Methods The study population consisted of 819 subjects (467 female, mean age 66.5±8.8 years, 66% Hispanic) enrolled in the Northern Manhattan Study. MetS was defined using the revised Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Endothelial dysfunction was defined as FMD < 8.44% (lower three quartiles). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of MetS and endothelial dysfunction on risk of cardiovascular events. Results During 81±21 months of follow-up, events occurred in 84 subjects. MetS was independently associated with cardiovascular events in a multivariate model including cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.27–3.40). Subjects with both MetS and endothelial dysfunction were at higher risk for cardiovascular events than those with either one of them alone (adjusted HR 2.60, 95% CI 1.14–5.92). Conclusions MetS is associated with incident cardiovascular events. Combined use of MetS and FMD identifies those who are at higher risk of cardiovascular events. MetS and non-invasive FMD testing can be used concurrently for cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:18657678

  6. Stress- and PTSD-associated obesity and metabolic dysfunction: A growing problem requiring further research and novel treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Sloan, Denise M.; Keane, Terence M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a growing public health concern. More recently, evidence has indicated that PTSD leads to obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms of this link are through dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and related moderation of appetite hormones and neural activity, leading to changes in consumptive behaviors. Although research has been examining associations between PTSD and obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, future research should delineate potential mechanisms for these associations and develop targeted treatments to reduce these metabolic outcomes. PMID:25267015

  7. Oxytocin system dysfunction as a common mechanism underlying metabolic syndrome and psychiatric symptoms in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Daniel S; Dieset, Ingrid; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Westlye, Lars T; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in using intranasal oxytocin (OT) to treat social dysfunction in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders (i.e., psychotic disorders). While OT treatment results have been mixed, emerging evidence suggests that OT system dysfunction may also play a role in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which appears in one-third of individuals with psychotic disorders and associated with increased mortality. Here we examine the evidence for a potential role of the OT system in the shared risk for MetS and psychotic disorders, and its prospects for ameliorating MetS. Using several studies to demonstrate the overlapping neurobiological profiles of metabolic risk factors and psychiatric symptoms, we show that OT system dysfunction may be one common mechanism underlying MetS and psychotic disorders. Given the critical need to better understand metabolic dysregulation in these disorders, future OT trials assessing behavioural and cognitive outcomes should additionally include metabolic risk factor parameters.

  8. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cubilin dysfunction causes abnormal metabolism of the steroid hormone 25(OH) vitamin D(3).

    PubMed

    Nykjaer, A; Fyfe, J C; Kozyraki, R; Leheste, J R; Jacobsen, C; Nielsen, M S; Verroust, P J; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Moestrup, S K; Ray, R; Gliemann, J; Willnow, T E; Christensen, E I

    2001-11-20

    Steroid hormones are central regulators of a variety of biological processes. According to the free hormone hypothesis, steroids enter target cells by passive diffusion. However, recently we demonstrated that 25(OH) vitamin D(3) complexed to its plasma carrier, the vitamin D-binding protein, enters renal proximal tubules by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockout mice lacking the endocytic receptor megalin lose 25(OH) vitamin D(3) in the urine and develop bone disease. Here, we report that cubilin, a membrane-associated protein colocalizing with megalin, facilitates the endocytic process by sequestering steroid-carrier complexes on the cellular surface before megalin-mediated internalization of the cubilin-bound ligand. Dogs with an inherited disorder affecting cubilin biosynthesis exhibit abnormal vitamin D metabolism. Similarly, human patients with mutations causing cubilin dysfunction exhibit urinary excretion of 25(OH) vitamin D(3). This observation identifies spontaneous mutations in an endocytic receptor pathway affecting cellular uptake and metabolism of a steroid hormone.

  10. Elevated 20-HETE impairs coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome via endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Gregory; Soler, Amanda; Hutcheson, Rebecca; Hunter, Ian; Bradford, Chastity; Hutcheson, Brenda; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Jiang, Houli; Falck, John R; Proctor, Spencer; Schwartzman, Michal Laniado; Rocic, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome (MetS). microRNA-145 (miR-145-Adv) delivery to our rat model of MetS (JCR) completely restored and neutrophil depletion significantly improved CCG. We determined whether low endogenous levels of miR-145 in MetS allowed for elevated production of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which, in turn, resulted in excessive neutrophil accumulation and endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired CCG. Rats underwent 0-9 days of repetitive ischemia (RI). RI-induced cardiac CYP4F (neutrophil-specific 20-HETE synthase) expression and 20-HETE levels were increased (4-fold) in JCR vs. normal rats. miR-145-Adv and 20-HETE antagonists abolished and neutrophil depletion (blocking antibodies) reduced (~60%) RI-induced increases in CYP4F expression and 20-HETE production in JCR rats. Impaired CCG in JCR rats (collateral-dependent blood flow using microspheres) was completely restored by 20-HETE antagonists [collateral-dependent zone (CZ)/normal zone (NZ) flow ratio was 0.76 ± 0.07 in JCR + 20-SOLA, 0.84 ± 0.05 in JCR + 20-HEDGE vs. 0.11 ± 0.02 in JCR vs. 0.84 ± 0.03 in normal rats]. In JCR rats, elevated 20-HETE was associated with excessive expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and neutrophil infiltration, which were reversed by miR-145-Adv. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of coronary arteries, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) Ser1179 phosphorylation, eNOS-dependent NO(·-) production and endothelial cell survival were compromised in JCR rats. These parameters of endothelial dysfunction were completely reversed by 20-HETE antagonism or miR-145-Adv delivery, whereas neutrophil depletion resulted in partial reversal (~70%). We conclude that low miR-145 in MetS allows for increased 20-HETE, mainly from neutrophils, which compromises endothelial cell survival and function leading to impaired CCG. 20-HETE antagonists could provide viable therapy for restoration of CCG in MetS.NEW & NOTEWORTHY

  11. Gender Dimorphism in Central Adiposity may Explain Metabolic Dysfunction after Spinal Cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Farkas, Gary J; Dolbow, David R; Khalil, Refka E; Gater, David R

    2017-08-18

    Increase in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is an independent risk for mortality and other health related comorbidities. To examine the gender differences in VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) cross-sectional areas (CSA) between men and women with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). The differences in the distribution of central adiposity were used to determine the association of VAT and SAT to metabolic dysfunction after SCI. cross-sectional design SETTING: hospital based study PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen individuals [8 men and 8 women] with motor complete SCI were matched based on age, time since injury and level of injury. Anthropometrics, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance imaging were captured to measure lean mass, fat mass (FM), percentage FM, VAT and SAT CSAs. Basal metabolic rate, intravenous glucose tolerance test and lipid panel were measured. VAT, SAT and Metabolic Profile RESULTS: SAT CSA was 1.6 -1.75 times greater in upper and lower trunks in women compared to men with SCI (P<.05). VAT CSA was 1.8-2.6 times greater in upper and lower trunks in men compared to women with SCI (P<.05). VAT adjusted to body weight was greater in men compared to women with SCI. HDL- C was positively related to SAT and negatively related to VAT. Glucose effectiveness was negatively related to lower trunk SAT (r=-0.60, P=.02). Cholesterol: HDL-C ratio and TG were positively related to upper VAT, lower VAT and VAT: SAT ratio. MRI demonstrated that there is a gender dimorphism in central adiposity in persons with chronic SCI. This gender dimorphism in central adipose tissue distribution may explain the higher prevalence of metabolic dysfunction in men with SCI, especially, the decrease in the HDL-C profile. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship of metabolic syndrome and its components with thyroid dysfunction in Algerian patients.

    PubMed

    Hamlaoui, Mohamed Larbi; Ayachi, Ammar; Dekaken, Aoulia; Gouri, Adel

    2017-08-10

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its compounds in subjects with different thyroid status. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the internal medicine department at El Okbi Hospital of Guelma (East of Algeria) from January 2014 to September 2015. Eighty six patients attending the specialist consultation for suspected thyroid disorders were included in the study. Gender; blood pressure; body mass index; and serum levels of fasting glucose, total cholesterol (TC), high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride were compared between subjects with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and euthyroidism. Thyroid dysfunction was found in 59.3% (n=42) patients, hypothyroidism (45.3%) was the major thyroid dysfunction followed by hyperthyroidism (14.0%). Overall, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 48.8% (n=42). Subjects with hypothyroidism had significantly higher level of BMI, WC, TC, LDL-C, and higher prevalence of abdominal obesity (84.6%, p<0.01) and hypertension (51.2%, p<0.05). The hyperthyroid group had significantly lower level of TC, LDL-C and HDL-C but a higher level of SBP and UA. Furthermore, abdominal obesity, hypertension and low HDL-C level were the most common metabolic syndrome compounds found in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. We found a positive association between TSH level and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex dimorphism in late gestational sleep fragmentation and metabolic dysfunction in offspring mice.

    PubMed

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Hakim, Fahed; Gozal, David

    2015-04-01

    Excessive sleep fragmentation (SF) is common in pregnant women. Adult-onset metabolic disorders may begin during early development and exhibit substantial sex dimorphism. We hypothesized that metabolic dysfunction induced by gestational SF in male mice would not be apparent in female littermates. Body weight and food consumption were measured weekly in male and female offspring after late gestational SF or control sleep (SC). At 20 weeks, plasma leptin, adiponectin, lipid profiles, and insulin and glucose tolerance tests were assessed. Leptin and adiponectin, M1, and M2 macrophage messenger RNA expression and polarity were examined. Adiponectin gene promoter methylation levels in several tissues were assessed. Food intake, body weight, visceral fat mass, and insulin resistance were higher, and adiponectin levels lower in male but not female offspring exposed to gestational SF. However, dyslipidemia was apparent in both male and female offspring exposed to SF, albeit of lesser magnitude. In visceral fat, leptin messenger RNA expression was selectively increased and adiponectin expression was decreased in male offspring exposed to gestational SF, but adiponectin was increased in exposed female offspring. Differences in adipokine expression also emerged in liver, subcutaneous fat, and muscle. Increased M1 macrophage markers were present in male offspring exposed to SF (SFOM) while increased M2 markers emerged in SF in female offspring (SFOF). Similarly, significant differences emerged in the methylation patterns of adiponectin promoter in SFOM and SFOF. Gestational sleep fragmentation increases the susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in male but not in female offspring, most likely via epigenetic changes. Thus, sleep perturbations impose long-term detrimental effects to the fetus manifesting as sex dimorphic metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Job stress strengthens the link between metabolic risk factors and renal dysfunction in adult men.

    PubMed

    Tsurugano, Shinobu; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Takeuchi, Takeaki; Nomura, Kyoko; Yano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The metabolic risk factors obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are closely associated with renal dysfunction. As psychosocial stress affects these risk factors, here, we examined relationships between metabolic risk factors and renal function, and their association with job stress. The participants were 1,231 Japanese male office workers attending annual health examinations. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the equation recommended by the Japanese Society for Nephrology: eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m(2)) = 194 × age(-0.287) × Cr(-1.094). Job stress was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job strain index equaled the job demand scores divided by the job control scores. The participants were classified into four ordinal groups of job strain index, based on previous studies (i.e., ≤ 0.4 the lowest, 0.4-0.5 lower, 0.5-0.6 higher, or ≥ 0.6 the highest). A significant correlation was found between lowered eGFR and each of the metabolic risk factors waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol (p < 0.001). Furthermore, job stress had an interactive effect on the relationships between eGFR and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides, depending on the job strain index (highest vs. lowest) (p < 0.05). The highly stressed workers exhibited a close association of eGFR with metabolic risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidemia. Therefore, intensive management may be important for preventing the progression of renal dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in those experiencing stress.

  15. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and coronary dysfunction in high-fat-fed obesity-resistant/prone rats.

    PubMed

    Dake, Brian L; Oltman, Christine L

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic leading to several comorbidities including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The hypothesis that the genetic background of the obesity-prone rat (OP) predisposes to physiologic, metabolic, and microvascular dysfunction which is exacerbated by a diet high in saturated fats was tested. Male OP and obesity-resistant (OR) rats were fed either a diet containing 10% (chow) or 45% kcal fat (HF) for 42 weeks. Weight of OP rats was greater than OR rats by 8 weeks on both diets. Blood pressure was increased in OP rats on chow and further augmented by HF diet compared to OR rats on similar diets. In contrast to weight and blood pressure, glucose clearance was similar in OR and OP rats on chow and impaired in both models on HF diet. Relaxation to acetylcholine was attenuated in OP rats compared to OR rats by 8 weeks and remained reduced throughout the study. A longer period of time was required to observe vascular dysfunction in HF-fed OR rats. When compared to OR rats, OP rats are prone to develop not only greater obesity but also hypertension and vascular dysfunction on a normal diet which is further augmented with HF diet. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  16. Neonatal treatment with scopolamine butylbromide prevents metabolic dysfunction in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Ananda; Souza, Aline Amenencia de; Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Pavanello, Audrei; Prates, Kelly Valério; Tófolo, Laize Peron; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Oliveira, Júlio Cezar de; Martins, Isabela Peixoto; Previate, Carina; Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether treatment with a cholinergic antagonist could reduce insulin levels in early postnatal life and attenuate metabolic dysfunctions induced by early overfeeding in adult male rats. Wistar rats raised in small litters (SLs, 3 pups/dam) and normal litters (NLs, 9 pups/dam) were used in models of early overfeeding and normal feeding, respectively. During the first 12 days of lactation, animals in the SL and NL groups received scopolamine butylbromide (B), while the controls received saline (S) injections. The drug treatment decreased insulin levels in pups from both groups, and as adults, these animals showed improvements in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, vagus nerve activity, fat tissue accretion, insulinemia, leptinemia, body weight gain and food intake. Low glucose and cholinergic insulinotropic effects were observed in pancreatic islets from both groups. Low protein expression was observed for the muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptor subtype (M3mAChR), although M2mAChR subtype expression was increased in SL-B islets. In addition, beta-cell density was reduced in drug-treated rats. These results indicate that early postnatal scopolamine butylbromide treatment inhibits early overfeeding-induced metabolic dysfunctions in adult rats, which might be caused by insulin decreases during lactation, associated with reduced parasympathetic activity and expression of M3mAChR in pancreatic islets. PMID:27561682

  17. Serotonergic dysfunctions and abnormal iron metabolism: Relevant to mental fatigue of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li-Jun; Yu, Shu-Yang; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Piao, Ying-Shan; Lian, Teng-Hong; Yu, Qiu-Jin; Wang, Rui-Dan; Li, Li-Xia; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Zhu, Rong-Yan; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Ya-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chan, Piu; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue is a very common non-motor symptom in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. It included physical fatigue and mental fatigue. The potential mechanisms of mental fatigue involving serotonergic dysfunction and abnormal iron metabolism are still unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the fatigue symptoms, classified PD patients into fatigue group and non-fatigue group, and detected the levels of serotonin, iron and related proteins in CSF and serum. In CSF, 5-HT level is significantly decreased and the levels of iron and transferrin are dramatically increased in fatigue group. In fatigue group, mental fatigue score is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF, and positively correlated with the scores of depression and excessive daytime sleepiness, and disease duration, also, mental fatigue is positively correlated with the levels of iron and transferrin in CSF. Transferrin level is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF. In serum, the levels of 5-HT and transferrin are markedly decreased in fatigue group; mental fatigue score exhibits a negative correlation with 5-HT level. Thus serotonin dysfunction in both central and peripheral systems may be correlated with mental fatigue through abnormal iron metabolism. Depression, excessive daytime sleepiness and disease duration were the risk factors for mental fatigue of PD.

  18. Effect of diosgenin on metabolic dysfunction: Role of ERβ in the regulation of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Jun; Long, Zi; Sun, Quangui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Lele; Zhang, Xiaodi; Hai, Chunxu

    2015-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of diosgenin (DSG) on metabolic dysfunction and to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms. High fat (HF) diet-fed mice and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was used to evaluate the effect of DSG. We showed that DSG attenuated metabolic dysfunction in HF diet-fed mice, as evidenced by reduction of blood glucose level and improvement of glucose and insulin intolerance. DSG ameliorated oxidative stress, reduced body weight, fat pads, and systematic lipid profiles and attenuated lipid accumulation. DSG inhibited 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and reduced adipocyte size through regulating key factors. DSG inhibited PPARγ and its target gene expression both in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat tissues in HF diet-fed mice. Overexpression of PPARγ suppressed DSG-inhibited adipocyte differentiation. DSG significantly increased nuclear expression of ERβ. Inhibition of ERβ significantly suppressed DSG-exerted suppression of adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ expression. In response to DSG stimulation, ERβ bound with RXRα and dissociated RXRα from PPARγ, leading to the reduction of transcriptional activity of PPARγ. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of DSG on adipocyte differentiation and demonstrate that ERβ-exerted regulation of PPARγ expression and activity is critical for DSG-inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipodystrophy and severe metabolic dysfunction in mice with adipose tissue-specific insulin receptor ablation.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Guifen; Whang Kong, Hyerim; Xu, Shanshan; Pham, Hoai An; Parlee, Sebastian D; Burr, Aaron A; Gil, Victoria; Pang, Jingbo; Hughes, Amy; Gu, Xuejiang; Fantuzzi, Giamila; MacDougald, Ormond A; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-07-01

    Insulin signaling plays pivotal roles in the development and metabolism of many tissues and cell types. A previous study demonstrated that ablation of insulin receptor (IR) with aP2-Cre markedly reduced adipose tissues mass and protected mice from obesity. However, multiple studies have demonstrated widespread non-adipocyte recombination of floxed alleles in aP2-Cre mice. These findings underscore the need to re-evaluate the role of IR in adipocyte and systemic metabolism with a more adipose tissue-specific Cre mouse line. We generated and phenotyped a new adipose tissue-specific IR mouse model using the adipose tissue-specific Adipoq-Cre line. Here we show that the Adipoq-Cre-mediated IR KO in mice leads to lipodystrophy and metabolic dysfunction, which is in stark contrast to the previous study. In contrast to white adipocytes, absence of insulin signaling does not affect development of marrow and brown adipocytes, but instead is required for lipid accumulation particularly for the marrow adipocytes. Lipodystrophic IR KO mice have profound insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, organomegaly, and impaired adipokine secretion. Our results demonstrate differential roles for insulin signaling for white, brown, and marrow adipocyte development and metabolic regulation.

  20. Cerebral metabolic dysfunction and impaired vigilance in recently abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    London, Edythe D; Berman, Steven M; Voytek, Bradley; Simon, Sara L; Mandelkern, Mark A; Monterosso, John; Thompson, Paul M; Brody, Arthur L; Geaga, Jennifer A; Hong, Michael S; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Rawson, Richard A; Ling, Walter

    2005-11-15

    Methamphetamine (MA) abusers have cognitive deficits, abnormal metabolic activity and structural deficits in limbic and paralimbic cortices, and reduced hippocampal volume. The links between cognitive impairment and these cerebral abnormalities are not established. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism with [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in 17 abstinent (4 to 7 days) methamphetamine users and 16 control subjects performing an auditory vigilance task and obtained structural magnetic resonance brain scans. Regional brain radioactivity served as a marker for relative glucose metabolism. Error rates on the task were related to regional radioactivity and hippocampal morphology. Methamphetamine users had higher error rates than control subjects on the vigilance task. The groups showed different relationships between error rates and relative activity in the anterior and middle cingulate gyrus and the insula. Whereas the MA user group showed negative correlations involving these regions, the control group showed positive correlations involving the cingulate cortex. Across groups, hippocampal metabolic and structural measures were negatively correlated with error rates. Dysfunction in the cingulate and insular cortices of recently abstinent MA abusers contribute to impaired vigilance and other cognitive functions requiring sustained attention. Hippocampal integrity predicts task performance in methamphetamine users as well as control subjects.

  1. Age-related eye disease.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Vinod B; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    As with many organs, compromised function of the eye is accompanied with age and has become increasingly prevalent with the aging population. When decreased visual loss becomes significant, patients' ability to perform activities of daily living becomes compromised. This decrease in function is met with morbidity and mortality, as well as a large socioeconomic burden throughout the world. This review summarizes the most common age-related eye diseases, including cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration. Although our understanding of the genetic and biochemical pathways of these diseases is sill at its primitive stages, we have become able to help our patients improve the quality of life as they age.

  2. Myocardial mechanical dysfunction following endotoxemia: role of changes in energy substrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soraya, Hamid; Masoud, Waleed G T; Gandhi, Manoj; Garjani, Alireza; Clanachan, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular depression due to endotoxemia remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care patients. To determine whether drug-induced alterations in cardiac metabolism may be a viable strategy to reduce endotoxemia-mediated cardiac dysfunction, we assessed endotoxemia-induced changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism under aerobic and post-ischemic conditions. Endotoxemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli 0111:B4c, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 6 h prior to heart removal for ex vivo assessment of left ventricular (LV) work and rates of glucose metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis and glucose oxidation) and palmitate oxidation. Under aerobic conditions, endotoxemic hearts had impaired LV function as judged by echocardiography in vivo (% ejection fraction, 66.0 ± 3.2 vs 78.0 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) or by LV work ex vivo (2.14 ± 0.16 vs 3.28 ± 0.16, Joules min(-1) g dry wt(-1), p < 0.05). However, rates of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation were not altered. Palmitate oxidation was lower in endotoxemic hearts in proportion to the decreased workload, thus metabolic efficiency was unaffected. In hearts reperfused following global ischemia, untreated hearts had impaired recovery of LV work (52.3 ± 9.4 %) whereas endotoxemic hearts had significantly higher recovery (105.6 ± 11.3 %, p < 0.05). During reperfusion, fatty acid oxidation, acetyl CoA production and metabolic efficiency were similar in both groups. As impaired cardiac function appeared unrelated to depression of energy substrate oxidation, it is unlikely that drug-induced acceleration of fatty acid oxidation will improve mechanical function. The beneficial repartitioning of glucose metabolism in reperfused endotoxemic hearts may contribute to the cardioprotected phenotype.

  3. Mechanisms of PD-L1/PD-1-mediated CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the context of aging-related immune defects in the Eµ-TCL1 CLL mouse model.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Riches, John C; Miller, Shaun; Day, William P; Kotsiou, Eleni; Neuberg, Donna; Croce, Carlo M; Capasso, Melania; Gribben, John G

    2015-07-09

    T-cell defects, immune suppression, and poor antitumor immune responses are hallmarks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signaling has emerged as a major immunosuppressive mechanism. However, the effect of different microenvironments and the confounding influence of aging are poorly understood. The current study uses the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model, which replicates human T-cell defects, as a preclinical platform to longitudinally examine patterns of T-cell dysfunction alongside developing CLL and in different microenvironments, with a focus on PD-1/PD-L1 interactions. The development of CLL was significantly associated with changes in T-cell phenotype across all organs and function. Although partly mirrored in aging wild-type mice, CLL-specific T-cell changes were identified. Murine CLL cells highly expressed PD-L1 and PD-L2 in all organs, with high PD-L1 expression in the spleen. CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells from leukemic and aging healthy mice highly expressed PD-1, identifying aging as a confounder, but adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated CLL-specific PD-1 induction. Direct comparisons of PD-1 expression and function between aging CLL mice and controls identified PD-1(+) T cells in CLL as a heterogeneous population with variable effector function. This is highly relevant for therapeutic targeting of CD8(+) T cells, showing the potential of reprogramming and selective subset expansion to restore antitumor immunity.

  4. [Biomarkers of iron metabolism and inflammation in patients with chronic heart failure and various types of left ventricular dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Kazymyrko, V K; Kutovyĭ, V V; Ivanyts'ka, L M; Dubkova, A G; Silant'ieva, T S

    2013-09-01

    Study the level of some of the indicators of iron metabolism and inflammatory markers in patients with chronic heart failure due to hypertension and coronary heart disease. The results of the study in systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle, the varying degrees of severity of heart failure. The level of the studied parameters determined by the severity of heart failure and does not depend on the nature of left ventricular dysfunction.

  5. Mitochondrial regulators of fatty acid metabolism reflect metabolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Fritz, Tomas; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Osler, Megan E

    2012-02-01

    The delicate homeostatic balance between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in relation to whole-body energy regulation is influenced by mitochondrial function. We determined expression and regulation of mitochondrial enzymes including pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) 4, PDK2, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase in skeletal muscle from people with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from NGT (n = 79) or T2DM (n = 33) men and women matched for age and body mass index. A subset of participants participated in a 4-month lifestyle intervention program consisting of an unsupervised walking exercise. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for expression and DNA methylation status. Primary myotubes were derived from biopsies obtained from NGT individuals for metabolic studies. Cultured skeletal muscle was exposed to agents mimicking exercise activation for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression analysis. The mRNA expression of PDK4, PDK2, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase was increased in skeletal muscle from T2DM patients. Methylation of the PDK4 promoter was reduced in T2DM and inversely correlated with PDK4 expression. Moreover, PDK4 expression was positively correlated with body mass index, blood glucose, insulin, C peptide, and hemoglobin A(1c). A lifestyle intervention program resulted in increased PDK4 mRNA expression in NGT individuals, but not in those with T2DM. Exposure to caffeine or palmitate increased PDK4 mRNA in a cultured skeletal muscle system. Our findings reveal that skeletal muscle expression of PDK4 and related genes regulating mitochondrial function reflects alterations in substrate utilization and clinical features associated with T2DM. Furthermore, hypomethylation of the PDK4 promoter in T2DM coincided with an impaired response of PDK4 mRNA after exercise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tripping on TRIB3 at the junction of health, metabolic dysfunction and cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasis; Mathur, Aditi; Chandra, Partha K

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes are frequently associated with increased risk of aggressive cancers. Although metabolic dysfunctions in normal cells are manifested due to defective signaling networks that control cellular homeostasis, malignant cells utilize these signaling networks for their increased survival, growth and metastasis. Despite decades of research, a common mechanistic link between these chronic pathologies is still not well delineated. Evidences show that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) pathways are often dysregulated in both metabolic diseases and cancer. The UPR also triggers coordinated signaling with both PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Autophagy pathways in order to promote stress-adaptive mechanisms. Whereas, uncontrolled UPR and the resultant ERS escalates cells towards metabolic dysfunctions and ultimately cell death. In this review, we will discuss findings that implicate a crucial role for the multifunctional ERS-induced protein, TRIB3. The 'pseudokinase' function of TRIB3 facilitates the inactivation of multiple transcription factors and signaling proteins. The MEK1 binding domain of TRIB3 enables it to deactivate multiple MAP-kinases. In addition, the COP1 motif of TRIB3 assists ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of numerous TRIB3 associated proteins. The most well studied action of TRIB3 has been on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, where TRIB3-mediated inhibition of AKT phosphorylation decreases insulin signaling and cell survival. Conversely, cancer cells can either upregulate the AKT survival pathway by suppressing TRIB3 expression or alter TRIB3 localization to degrade differentiation inducing nuclear transcription factors such as C/EBPα and PPARγ. The gain-of-function Q84R polymorphism in TRIB3 is associated with increased risk of diabetes and atherosclerosis. TRIB3 acts as a crucial 'stress adjusting switch' that links homeostasis, metabolic disease and cancer; and

  7. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*

    PubMed Central

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R.; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D.; Thompson, Jennifer L.; Boomershine, Chad S.; Shintani, Ayumi K.; Ely, E. Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. Design, Setting, and Patients This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Measurements and Main Results Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6–3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0–3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25

  8. Switching harmful visceral fat to beneficial energy combustion improves metabolic dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sui, Wenhai; Zhang, Meng; Dong, Mei; Lim, Sharon; Seki, Takahiro; Guo, Ziheng; Fischer, Carina; Lu, Huixia; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Yangang; Cao, Caixia; Gao, Yanyan; Zhao, Xingguo; Sun, Meili; Sun, Yuping; Zhuang, Rujie; Samani, Nilesh J.; Zhang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Visceral fat is considered the genuine and harmful white adipose tissue (WAT) that is associated to development of metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Here, we present a new concept to turn the harmful visceral fat into a beneficial energy consumption depot, which is beneficial for improvement of metabolic dysfunctions in obese mice. We show that low temperature–dependent browning of visceral fat caused decreased adipose weight, total body weight, and body mass index, despite increased food intake. In high-fat diet–fed mice, low temperature exposure improved browning of visceral fat, global metabolism via nonshivering thermogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and hepatic steatosis. Genome-wide expression profiling showed upregulation of WAT browning–related genes including Cidea and Dio2. Conversely, Prdm16 was unchanged in healthy mice or was downregulated in obese mice. Surgical removal of visceral fat and genetic knockdown of UCP1 in epididymal fat largely ablated low temperature–increased global thermogenesis and resulted in the death of most mice. Thus, browning of visceral fat may be a compensatory heating mechanism that could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating visceral fat–associated obesity and diabetes. PMID:28239649

  9. Switching harmful visceral fat to beneficial energy combustion improves metabolic dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sui, Wenhai; Zhang, Meng; Dong, Mei; Lim, Sharon; Seki, Takahiro; Guo, Ziheng; Fischer, Carina; Lu, Huixia; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Yangang; Cao, Caixia; Gao, Yanyan; Zhao, Xingguo; Sun, Meili; Sun, Yuping; Zhuang, Rujie; Samani, Nilesh J; Zhang, Yun; Cao, Yihai

    2017-02-23

    Visceral fat is considered the genuine and harmful white adipose tissue (WAT) that is associated to development of metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Here, we present a new concept to turn the harmful visceral fat into a beneficial energy consumption depot, which is beneficial for improvement of metabolic dysfunctions in obese mice. We show that low temperature-dependent browning of visceral fat caused decreased adipose weight, total body weight, and body mass index, despite increased food intake. In high-fat diet-fed mice, low temperature exposure improved browning of visceral fat, global metabolism via nonshivering thermogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and hepatic steatosis. Genome-wide expression profiling showed upregulation of WAT browning-related genes including Cidea and Dio2. Conversely, Prdm16 was unchanged in healthy mice or was downregulated in obese mice. Surgical removal of visceral fat and genetic knockdown of UCP1 in epididymal fat largely ablated low temperature-increased global thermogenesis and resulted in the death of most mice. Thus, browning of visceral fat may be a compensatory heating mechanism that could provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treating visceral fat-associated obesity and diabetes.

  10. Metabolic stress-induced cardiomyopathy is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction due to attenuated Erk5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ruiz-Velasco, Andrea; Wang, Shoubao; Khan, Saba; Zi, Min; Jungmann, Andreas; Dolores Camacho-Muñoz, Maria; Guo, Jing; Du, Guanhua; Xie, Liping; Oceandy, Delvac; Nicolaou, Anna; Galli, Gina; Müller, Oliver J; Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Ji, Yong; Wang, Xin

    2017-09-08

    The prevalence of cardiomyopathy from metabolic stress has increased dramatically; however, its molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 (Erk5) is lost in the hearts of obese/diabetic animal models and that cardiac-specific deletion of Erk5 in mice (Erk5-CKO) leads to dampened cardiac contractility and mitochondrial abnormalities with repressed fuel oxidation and oxidative damage upon high fat diet (HFD). Erk5 regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (Pgc-1α) is critical for cardiac mitochondrial functions. More specifically, we show that Gp91phox activation of calpain-1 degrades Erk5 in free fatty acid (FFA)-stressed cardiomyocytes, whereas the prevention of Erk5 loss by blocking Gp91phox or calpain-1 rescues mitochondrial functions. Similarly, adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9)-mediated restoration of Erk5 expression in Erk5-CKO hearts prevents cardiomyopathy. These findings suggest that maintaining Erk5 integrity has therapeutic potential for treating metabolic stress-induced cardiomyopathy.The mechanistic link between metabolic stress and associated cardiomyopathy is unknown. Here the authors show that high fat diet causes calpain-1-dependent degradation of ERK5 leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting the maintenance of cardiac ERK5 as a therapeutic approach for cardiomyopathy prevention and/or treatment.

  11. A Role for Timp3 in Microbiota-Driven Hepatic Steatosis and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mavilio, Maria; Marchetti, Valentina; Fabrizi, Marta; Stöhr, Robert; Marino, Arianna; Casagrande, Viviana; Fiorentino, Loredana; Cardellini, Marina; Kappel, Ben; Monteleone, Ivan; Garret, Celine; Mauriello, Alessandro; Monteleone, Giovanni; Farcomeni, Alessio; Burcelin, Remy; Menghini, Rossella; Federici, Massimo

    2016-07-19

    The effect of gut microbiota on obesity and insulin resistance is now recognized, but the underlying host-dependent mechanisms remain poorly undefined. We find that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 knockout (Timp3(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat diet exhibit gut microbiota dysbiosis, an increase in branched chain and aromatic (BCAA) metabolites, liver steatosis, and an increase in circulating soluble IL-6 receptors (sIL6Rs). sIL6Rs can then activate inflammatory cells, such as CD11c(+) cells, which drive metabolic inflammation. Depleting the microbiota through antibiotic treatment significantly improves glucose tolerance, hepatic steatosis, and systemic inflammation, and neutralizing sIL6R signaling reduces inflammation, but only mildly impacts glucose tolerance. Collectively, our results suggest that gut microbiota is the primary driver of the observed metabolic dysfunction, which is mediated, in part, through IL-6 signaling. Our findings also identify an important role for Timp3 in mediating the effect of the microbiota in metabolic diseases.

  12. Selective Heart Rate Reduction Improves Metabolic Syndrome-related Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Nassiba; Fang, Yuehua; Nicol, Lionel; Monteil, Christelle; Rémy-Jouet, Isabelle; Henry, Jean-Paul; Wecker, Didier; Le Bouter-Banon, Sabrina; Roussel, Jerome; Richard, Vincent; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Enhanced heart rate observed in metabolic syndrome (MS) contributes to the deterioration of left ventricular (LV) function via impaired LV filling and relaxation, increased myocardial O2 consumption, and reduced coronary perfusion. However, whether heart rate reduction (HRR) opposes LV dysfunction observed in MS is unknown. We assessed in Zucker fa/fa rats, a rat model of MS, the cardiovascular effects of HRR induced by the If current inhibitor S38844 (3 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)). Delayed short-term (4 days) and long-term (90 days) HRR induced by S38844 reduced LV end-diastolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relation, increased myocardial tissue perfusion, decreased myocardial oxidized glutathione levels, and preserved cardiac output, without modifying LV end-systolic pressure and LV end-systolic pressure-volume relation, although only long-term S38844 opposed LV collagen accumulation. Long-term S38844 improved flow-induced endothelium-dependent dilatation of mesenteric arteries, while metabolic parameters, such as plasma glucose levels, and Hb1c, were never modified. In rats with MS, HRR induced by the If inhibitor S38844 improved LV diastolic function and endothelium-dependent vascular dilatation, independent from modifications in metabolic status. Moreover, this improvement in cardiac function involves not only immediate effects such as improved myocardial perfusion and reduced oxidative stress but also long-term effects such as modifications in the myocardial structure.

  13. Age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Querques, Giuseppe; Avellis, Fernando Onofrio; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Souied, Eric H

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: Is there any new knowledge about the pathogenesis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Results: We now understand better the biochemical and pathological pathways involved in the genesis of AMD. Treatment of exudative AMD is based on intravitreal injection of new antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs for which there does not yet exist a unique recognized strategy of administration. No therapies are actually available for atrophic AMD, despite some experimental new pharmacological approaches. Implementation: strategy of administration, safety of intravitreal injection PMID:21654887

  14. Dysfunctional adipose tissue and low-grade inflammation in the management of the metabolic syndrome: current practices and future advances

    PubMed Central

    van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing worldwide obesity epidemic makes the metabolic syndrome an increasingly important entity. In this review, we provide a short background on the metabolic syndrome, we discuss recent developments in the three main options that have been identified for intervention in the metabolic syndrome, i.e. lifestyle and surgical and pharmacological interventions, and we focus on different views in the literature and also include our own viewpoints on the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss some emerging treatment targets for adipose tissue dysfunction and low-grade inflammation, i.e. activation of the inflammasome and the complement system, and consider some selected opportunities for intervention in these processes. PMID:27803798

  15. Compromised respiratory adaptation and thermoregulation in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sic L; Wei, Zelan; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Tu, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are at the heart of the aging process and are thought to underpin age-related diseases. Mitochondria are not only the primary energy-generating system but also the dominant cellular source of metabolically derived ROS. Recent studies unravel the existence of mechanisms that serve to modulate the balance between energy metabolism and ROS production. Among these is the regulation of proton conductance across the inner mitochondrial membrane that affects the efficiency of respiration and heat production. The field of mitochondrial respiration research has provided important insight into the role of altered energy balance in obesity and diabetes. The notion that respiration and oxidative capacity are mechanistically linked is making significant headway into the field of aging and age-related diseases. Here we review the regulation of cellular energy and ROS balance in biological systems and survey some of the recent relevant studies that suggest that respiratory adaptation and thermodynamics are important in aging and age-related diseases.

  16. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4☆

    PubMed Central

    Ullevig, Sarah L.; Kim, Hong Seok; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Hambright, William S.; Robles, Andrew J.; Tavakoli, Sina; Asmis, Reto

    2014-01-01

    Aims Dietary supplementation with ursolic acid (UA) prevents monocyte dysfunction in diabetic mice and protects mice against atherosclerosis and loss of renal function. The goal of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism by which UA prevents monocyte dysfunction induced by metabolic stress. Methods and results Metabolic stress sensitizes or “primes” human THP-1 monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages to the chemoattractant MCP-1, converting these cells into a hyper-chemotactic phenotype. UA protected THP-1 monocytes and peritoneal macrophages against metabolic priming and prevented their hyper-reactivity to MCP-1. UA blocked the metabolic stress-induced increase in global protein-S-glutathionylation, a measure of cellular thiol oxidative stress, and normalized actin-S-glutathionylation. UA also restored MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP1) protein expression and phosphatase activity, decreased by metabolic priming, and normalized p38 MAPK activation. Neither metabolic stress nor UA supplementation altered mRNA or protein levels of glutaredoxin-1, the principal enzyme responsible for the reduction of mixed disulfides between glutathione and protein thiols in these cells. However, the induction of Nox4 by metabolic stress, required for metabolic priming, was inhibited by UA in both THP-1 monocytes and peritoneal macrophages. Conclusion UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds. PMID:24494201

  17. NMR-based metabolomics reveals brain region-specific metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Lin, Qiuting; Wang, Dan; Xu, Pengtao; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in cognitive dysfunction, but its potential metabolic mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the metabolite profiling in eight different brain regions of the normal rats and the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats accompanied by cognitive dysfunction using a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach. A mixed linear model analysis was performed to assess the effects of DM, brain region and their interaction on metabolic changes. We found that different brain regions in rats displayed significant metabolic differences. In addition, the hippocampus was more susceptible to DM compared with other brain regions in rats. More interestingly, significant interaction effects of DM and brain region were observed on alanine, creatine/creatine-phosphate, lactate, succinate, aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glycine, choline, N-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol and taurine. Based on metabolic pathway analysis, we speculate that cognitive dysfunction in the STZ-induced diabetic rats may be associated with brain region-specific metabolic alterations involving energy metabolism, neurotransmitters, membrane metabolism and osmoregulation.

  18. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MK2 Deletion in Mice Prevents Diabetes-Induced Perturbations in Lipid Metabolism and Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Matthieu; Coderre, Lise; Lachance, Dominic; Houde, Valérie; Martel, Cécile; Thompson Legault, Julie; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; Bouchard, Bertrand; Daneault, Caroline; Carpentier, André C; Gaestel, Matthias; Allen, Bruce G; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease remains a major complication of diabetes, and the identification of new therapeutic targets is essential. This study investigates the role of the protein kinase MK2, a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase downstream target, in the development of diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy. Diabetes was induced in control (MK2(+/+)) and MK2-null (MK2(-/-)) mice using repeated injections of a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ). This protocol generated in MK2(+/+) mice a model of diabetes characterized by a 50% decrease in plasma insulin, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance (IR), as well as major contractile dysfunction, which was associated with alterations in proteins involved in calcium handling. While MK2(-/-)-STZ mice remained hyperglycemic, they showed improved IR and none of the cardiac functional or molecular alterations. Further analyses highlighted marked lipid perturbations in MK2(+/+)-STZ mice, which encompass increased 1) circulating levels of free fatty acid, ketone bodies, and long-chain acylcarnitines and 2) cardiac triglyceride accumulation and ex vivo palmitate β-oxidation. MK2(-/-)-STZ mice were also protected against all these diabetes-induced lipid alterations. Our results demonstrate the benefits of MK2 deletion on diabetes-induced cardiac molecular and lipid metabolic changes, as well as contractile dysfunction. As a result, MK2 represents a new potential therapeutic target to prevent diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations.

    PubMed

    Saben, Jessica L; Boudoures, Anna L; Asghar, Zeenat; Thompson, Alysha; Drury, Andrea; Zhang, Wendy; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-06-28

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance.

  1. High-fat diet triggers inflammation-induced cleavage of SIRT1 in adipose tissue to promote metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chalkiadaki, Angeliki; Guarente, Leonard

    2012-08-08

    Adipose tissue plays an important role in storing excess nutrients and preventing ectopic lipid accumulation in other organs. Obesity leads to excess lipid storage in adipocytes, resulting in the generation of stress signals and the derangement of metabolic functions. SIRT1 is an important regulatory sensor of nutrient availability in many metabolic tissues. Here we report that SIRT1 functions in adipose tissue to protect from inflammation and obesity under normal feeding conditions, and to forestall the progression to metabolic dysfunction under dietary stress and aging. Genetic ablation of SIRT1 in adipose tissue leads to gene expression changes that highly overlap with changes induced by high-fat diet in wild-type mice, suggesting that dietary stress signals inhibit the activity of SIRT1. Indeed, we show that high-fat diet induces the cleavage of SIRT1 protein in adipose tissue by the inflammation-activated caspase-1, providing a link between dietary stress and predisposition to metabolic dysfunction.

  2. Red Blood Cell Function and Dysfunction: Redox Regulation, Nitric Oxide Metabolism, Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Viktoria; Diederich, Lukas; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Kramer, Christian M.; Lückstädt, Wiebke; Panknin, Christina; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Isakson, Brant E.; Kelm, Malte

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Recent clinical evidence identified anemia to be correlated with severe complications of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as bleeding, thromboembolic events, stroke, hypertension, arrhythmias, and inflammation, particularly in elderly patients. The underlying mechanisms of these complications are largely unidentified. Recent Advances: Previously, red blood cells (RBCs) were considered exclusively as transporters of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues. More recent experimental evidence indicates that RBCs are important interorgan communication systems with additional functions, including participation in control of systemic nitric oxide metabolism, redox regulation, blood rheology, and viscosity. In this article, we aim to revise and discuss the potential impact of these noncanonical functions of RBCs and their dysfunction in the cardiovascular system and in anemia. Critical Issues: The mechanistic links between changes of RBC functional properties and cardiovascular complications related to anemia have not been untangled so far. Future Directions: To allow a better understanding of the complications associated with anemia in CVD, basic and translational science studies should be focused on identifying the role of noncanonical functions of RBCs in the cardiovascular system and on defining intrinsic and/or systemic dysfunction of RBCs in anemia and its relationship to CVD both in animal models and clinical settings. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 718–742. PMID:27889956

  3. Behavioral changes and brain energy metabolism dysfunction in rats treated with methamphetamine or dextroamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Feier, Gustavo; Valvassori, Samira S; Lopes-Borges, Jéssica; Varela, Roger B; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O; Andersen, Monica L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2012-11-14

    Studies have demonstrated that AMPHs produce long-term damage to the brain dopaminergic, serotoninergic and glutamatergic regions. Prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus and striatum appear to be involved in the toxicity and behavioral changes induced by AMPHs. A single dose of AMPH causes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in rat brain. The goal of the present study was thus to investigate the potency of two amphetamines, dextroamphetamine (d-AMPH) and methamphetamine (m-AMPH), on the behavior and energetic dysfunction in the brain of rats. d-AMPH and m-AMPH increased the crossing and rearing behaviors. The numbers of visits to the center were increased by d-AMPH and m-AMPH only at 2mg/kg. Likewise, at a high dose (2 mg/kg), the injection of m-AMPH increased the amount of sniffing. The AMPHs significantly decreased the activities of Krebs cycle enzymes (citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase) and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I-IV); nevertheless, this effect varied depending on the brain region evaluated. In summary, this study demonstrated that at high doses, m-AMPH, increased stereotyped (sniffing) behavior in rats, but d-AMPH did not. However, this study shows that d-AMPH and m-AMPH seem to have similar effects on the brains energetic metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Circulating Microparticles from Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agouni, Abdelali; Lagrue-Lak-Hal, Anne Hélène; Ducluzeau, Pierre Henri; Mostefai, Hadj Ahmed; Draunet-Busson, Catherine; Leftheriotis, Georges; Heymes, Christophe; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2008-01-01

    Microparticles are membrane vesicles that are released during cell activation and apoptosis. Elevated levels of microparticles occur in many cardiovascular diseases; therefore, we characterized circulating microparticles from both metabolic syndrome (MS) patients and healthy patients. We evaluated microparticle effects on endothelial function; however, links between circulating microparticles and endothelial dysfunction have not yet been demonstrated. Circulating microparticles and their cellular origins were examined by flow cytometry of blood samples from patients and healthy subjects. Microparticles were used either to treat human endothelial cells in vitro or to assess endothelium function in mice after intravenous injection. MS patients had increased circulating levels of microparticles compared with healthy patients, including microparticles from platelet, endothelial, erythrocyte, and procoagulant origins. In vitro treatment of endothelial cells with microparticles from MS patients reduced both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion production, resulting in protein tyrosine nitration. These effects were associated with enhanced phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase at the site of inhibition. The reduction of O2− was linked to both reduced expression of p47phox of NADPH oxidase and overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase. The decrease in NO production was triggered by nonplatelet-derived microparticles. In vivo injection of MS microparticles into mice impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreased endothelial NO synthase expression. These data provide evidence that circulating microparticles from MS patients influence endothelial dysfunction. PMID:18772329

  5. Farnesoid X receptor activation improves erectile dysfunction in models of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Maggi, Mario; Adorini, Luciano

    2011-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an insulin-resistant state characterized by a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure and combined dyslipidemia. In this review, we discuss the potential of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), a multifactorial disorder often comorbid with MetS. FXR not only regulates lipid and glucose homeostasis but also influences endothelial function and atherosclerosis, suggesting a regulatory role for this hormone nuclear receptor in the cardiovascular complications associated with the MetS, including ED. MetS induces ED via several mechanisms, and in particular through endothelial dysfunction in penile vessels. In a high-fat diet rabbit model of MetS, a 3-month treatment with the potent and selective FXR agonist INT-747 restores endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated cavernous tissue, normalizing responsiveness to acetylcholine and to electrical field stimulation. Accordingly, eNOS expression in the penis is greatly up-regulated by INT-747 treatment. Experiments in a rat model of chemically-induced type 1 diabetes further demonstrate that INT-747 treatment preserves erectile function induced by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. These results add a new facet to the pleiotropic activities mediated by FXR, and reveal novel beneficial effects of FXR activation with potential clinical relevance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease.

  6. Endothelial dysfunction and metabolic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Angulo, J; Peiró, C; Llergo, J L; Sánchez-Ferrer, A; López-Dóriga, P; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-04-01

    1. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the metabolic control, estimated by the levels of glycosylated haemoglobin in total blood samples (HbA1c), in developing vascular endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Four groups of animals with different levels of insulin treatment were established, by determining HbA1c values in 5.5 to 7.4%, 7.5 to 9.4%, 9.5 to 12% and > 12%, respectively. 2. The parameters analysed were: (1) the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) in isolated aorta and mesenteric microvessels; (2) the vasodilator responses to exogenous nitric oxide (NO) in aorta: and (3) the existence of oxidative stress by studying the influence of the free radical scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the vasodilator responses to both ACh and NO. 3. In both isolated aortic segments and mesenteric microvessels, the endothelium-mediated concentration-dependent relaxant responses elicited by ACh were significantly decreased when the vessels were obtained from diabetic animals but only with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. There was a high correlation between HbA1c levels and the impairment of ACh-induced relaxations, measured by pD2 values. 4. The concentration-dependent vasorelaxant responses to NO in endothelium-denuded aortic segments were significantly reduced only in vessels from diabetic animals with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. Again, a very high correlation was found between the HbA1c values and pD2 for NO-evoked responses. 5. In the presence of SOD, the responses to ACh or NO were only increased in the segments from diabetic rats with HbA1c levels higher than 7.5%, but not in those from non-diabetic or diabetic rats with a good metabolic control (HbA1c levels <7.5%). 6. These results suggest the existence of: (1) a close relation between the degree of endothelial dysfunction and the metabolic control of diabetes, estimated by the levels of HbA1c; and (2) an increased production of superoxide anions in

  7. The impact of metabolic syndrome and endothelial dysfunction on exercise-induced cardiovascular changes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Amanda M; Davies, Elaine; Lavoie, Kim L; Arsenault, André; Gordon, Jennifer L; Meloche, Bernard; Bacon, Simon L

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information regarding the synergistic or additive effects of metabolic syndrome (MS) and endothelial dysfunction (ED) on cardiovascular disease (CVD). Altered cardiovascular responses to exercise have been shown to predict future cardiovascular events as well as assess autonomic function. The present study evaluated the impact of MS and brachial artery reactivity (a proxy of ED) on peak exercise-induced cardiovascular changes. Individuals (n = 303) undergoing a standard nuclear medicine exercise stress test were assessed for MS. Participants underwent a Forearm Hyperaemic Reactivity test and were considered to have dysfunctional reactivity if their rate of uptake ratio (RUR) was <3.55. Resting and peak blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured. Reactivity was calculated as the difference between peak and resting measures. Analyses, adjusting for age, sex, resting HR, total metabolic equivalents (METs), and a history of major CVD, revealed a main effect of MS (F = 5.51, η(2) = 0.02, P = 0.02) and RUR (F = 6.69, η(2) = 0.02, P = 0.01) on HR reactivity, such that patients with MS and/or poor RUR had reduced HR reactivity. There were no interactive effects of RUR and MS. There were no effects of RUR or MS on systolic BP (SBP) or diastolic BP (DBP) reactivity or rate pressure product (RPP) reactivity. The presence of decreased HR reactivity among participants with MS or poor brachial artery reactivity, combined with the lack of difference in other exercise-induced cardiovascular changes, indicates that these patients may have some degree of parasympathetic dysregulation. Further longitudinal studies are needed to understand the long-term implications of MS and endothelial abnormalities in this context. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  8. Facilitated ethanol metabolism promotes cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through autophagy in murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Hu, Nan; Kandadi, Machender R.; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Chronic drinking leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction where ethanol metabolism plays an essential role. Acetaldehyde, the main ethanol metabolite, mediates alcohol-induced cell injury although the underlying mechanism is still elusive. This study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in accelerated ethanol metabolism-induced cardiac defect with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type FVB and cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase mice were placed on a 4% nutrition-balanced alcohol diet for 8 weeks. Myocardial histology, immunohistochemistry, autophagy markers and signal molecules were examined. Expression of micro RNA miR-30a, a potential target of Beclin 1, was evaluated by real-time PCR. Chronic alcohol intake led to cardiac acetaldehyde accumulation, hypertrophy and overt autophagosome accumulation (LC3-II and Atg7), the effect of which was accentuated by ADH. Signaling molecules governing autophagy initiation including class III PtdIns3K, phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K were enhanced and dampened, respectively, following alcohol intake. These alcohol-induced signaling responses were augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated or unmasked alcohol-induced downregulation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and MiR-30a. Interestingly, ADH aggravated alcohol-induced p62 accumulation. Autophagy inhibition using 3-MA abolished alcohol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Moreover, acetaldehyde led to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and autophagy induction, which was ablated by 3-MA. Ethanol or acetaldehyde increased GFP-LC3 puncta in H9c2 cells, the effect of which was ablated by 3-MA but unaffected by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1, E64D and pepstatin A. In summary, these data suggested that facilitated acetaldehyde production via ADH following alcohol intake triggered cardiac autophagosome formation along with impaired lysosomal degradation, en route to myocardial defect. PMID:22441020

  9. Effect of bariatric surgery on microvascular dysfunction associated to metabolic syndrome: a 12-month prospective study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, J F; Cervera-Barajas, A; Madrazo-Atutxa, A; García-Luna, P P; Pereira, J L; Castro-Luque, J; León-Justel, A; Morales-Conde, S; Castillo, J R; Leal-Cerro, A; Cano, D A

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate the effect of weight loss after bariatric surgery on microvascular function in morbidly obese patients with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS). A cohort of morbidly obese patients with and without MetS was studied before surgery and after 12 months of surgery. Healthy lean controls were also examined. Microvascular function was assessed by postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) at forearm skin evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated from laser-Doppler skin blood flow and blood pressure. Regression analysis was performed to assess the contribution of different clinical, metabolic and biochemical parameters to microvascular function. Before surgery, 62 obese patients, 39 with MetS and 23 without MetS, and 30 lean control subjects were analyzed. The absolute area under the hyperemic curve (AUC(H)) CVC of PORH was significantly decreased in obese patients compared with lean control subjects. One year after surgery, AUC(H) CVC significantly increased in patients free of MetS, including patients that had MetS before surgery. In contrast, AUC(H) CVC did not significantly change in patients in whom MetS persisted after surgery. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis showed that only changes in HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) independently predicted improvement of AUC(H) after surgery. These two variables together accounted for 40.9% of the variability of change in AUC(H) CVC after surgery. Bariatric surgery could significantly improve microvascular dysfunction in obese patients, but only in patients free of MetS after surgery. Improvement of microvascular dysfunction is strictly associated to postoperative increase in HDL-C levels and decrease in oxLDL levels.

  10. Nutrition, insulin resistance and dysfunctional adipose tissue determine the different components of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an excessive accumulation of body fat that may be harmful to health. Today, obesity is a major public health problem, affecting in greater or lesser proportion all demographic groups. Obesity is estimated by body mass index (BMI) in a clinical setting, but BMI reports neither body composition nor the location of excess body fat. Deaths from cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes accounted for approximately 65% of all deaths, and adiposity and mainly abdominal adiposity are associated with all these disorders. Adipose tissue could expand to inflexibility levels. Then, adiposity is associated with a state of low-grade chronic inflammation, with increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release, which interfere with adipose cell differentiation, and the action pattern of adiponectin and leptin until the adipose tissue begins to be dysfunctional. In this state the subject presents insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, probably the first step of a dysfunctional metabolic system. Subsequent to central obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, hypertension and fatty liver are grouped in the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS). In subjects with MetS an energy balance is critical to maintain a healthy body weight, mainly limiting the intake of high energy density foods (fat). However, high-carbohydrate rich (CHO) diets increase postprandial peaks of insulin and glucose. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are also increased, which interferes with reverse cholesterol transport lowering high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition, CHO-rich diets could move fat from peripheral to central deposits and reduce adiponectin activity in peripheral adipose tissue. All these are improved with monounsaturated fatty acid-rich diets. Lastly, increased portions of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, and complement the healthy diet that is recommended in patients with MetS. PMID

  11. Microcystin-LR induced thyroid dysfunction and metabolic disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun; Steinman, Alan D

    2015-02-03

    There is growing evidence that microcystins (MCs) act as hazardous materials and can disrupt the endocrine systems of animals. However, the response of thyroid function and the related energy metabolism following MCs exposure is still unknown. In the present study, mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with doses of either 5 or 20 μg/kg MC-LR for 4 weeks. We report, for the first time, that mice exposed to 20 μg/kg MC-LR showed disrupted glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism with obvious symptoms of hyperphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. The circulating thyroid hormone (TH) levels in mice following MC-LR exposure were detected. Significantly increased free triiodothyronine (FT3) and decreased free thyroxin (FT4) were largely responsible for the physiological aberrations and metabolic disorders observed in mice after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure. Increased expression of TH receptor (Trα) and mTOR expression in the brain after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure suggests that the increased FT3 enhanced mTOR signaling subsequently led to hyperphagia and elevated energy expenditure in mice. Furthermore, several genes involved in glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, which have been identified affected by TH, were also differentially expressed after MC-LR exposure. The above results clearly showed that mice exposed to MC-LR experienced thyroid dysfunction and its downstream functional changes, and are useful to better understand the endocrine toxicity of MC-LR to mammals or even humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Excess perigestational folic acid exposure induces metabolic dysfunction in post-natal life.

    PubMed

    Keating, Elisa; Correia-Branco, Ana; Araújo, João R; Meireles, Manuela; Fernandes, Rita; Guardão, Luísa; Guimarães, João T; Martel, Fátima; Calhau, Conceição

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand whether high folic acid (HFA) exposure during the perigestational period induces metabolic dysfunction in the offspring, later in life. To do this, female Sprague-Dawley rats (G0) were administered a dose of folic acid (FA) recommended for pregnancy (control, C, 2 mg FA/kg of diet, n=5) or a high dose of FA (HFA, 40 mg FA/kg of diet, n=5). Supplementation began at mating and lasted throughout pregnancy and lactation. Body weight and food and fluid intake were monitored in G0 and their offspring (G1) till G1 were 13 months of age. Metabolic blood profiles were assessed in G1 at 3 and 13 months of age (3M and 13M respectively). Both G0 and G1 HFA females had increased body weight gain when compared with controls, particularly 22 (G0) and 10 (G1) weeks after FA supplementation had been stopped. G1 female offspring of HFA mothers had increased glycemia at 3M, and both female and male G1 offspring of HFA mothers had decreased glucose tolerance at 13M, when compared with matched controls. At 13M, G1 female offspring of HFA mothers had increased insulin and decreased adiponectin levels, and G1 male offspring of HFA mothers had increased levels of leptin, when compared with matched controls. In addition, feeding of fructose to adult offspring revealed that perigestational exposure to HFA renders female progeny more susceptible to developing metabolic unbalance upon such a challenge. The results of this work indicate that perigestational HFA exposure the affects long-term metabolic phenotype of the offspring, predisposing them to an insulin-resistant state. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Diabetes and hyperlipidemia induce dysfunction of VSMCs: contribution of the metabolic inflammation/miRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guang-ming; Zhu, Yu; Wu, Yue; Chen, Xiang-yun; Lan, Dan; Tian, Kun-lun; Liu, Liang-ming

    2015-02-15

    Vascular endothelial cell injury is considered to be the major factor inducing vascular complications in metabolic diseases and plays an important role in other organ damage. With diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats and cultured VSMCs, the present study was aimed at investigating whether the early damage of VSMCs during metabolic diseases plays a critical role in vascular dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms and would be a promising treatment target. With diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats and cultured VSMCs, the changes and relationships of vascular relaxation and contractile function to the vital organ damage and the underlying mechanisms were investigated; meanwhile, the protective and preventive effects of lowering blood lipid and glucose and inhibition of diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced vascular hyperreactivity were observed. Diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats presented hyperreactivity in vascular contractile response in the early stages. Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia directly affected the contractile function of VSMCs. Early application of fasudil, a specific antagonist of Rho kinase, significantly alleviated diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced organ damage by inhibiting vascular hyperreactivity. Diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced inflammatory response could upregulate the expression of connexins and Rho kinase by selective downregulation of the expression of miR-10a, miR-139b, miR-206, and miR-222. These findings suggest that hyperglucose and lipid may directly impair VSMCs and induce vascular hyperreactivity in the early stages. Metabolic inflammation-induced changes in the miRNA-connexin/Rho kinase regulatory pathway are the main mechanism for vascular hyperreactivity and organ damage. Measures inhibiting vascular hyperreactivity are promising for the prevention of organ damage induced by metabolic diseases.

  14. Favorable effects of vildagliptin on metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El Batsh, Maha M; El Batch, Manal M; Shafik, Noha M; Younos, Ibrahim H

    2015-12-15

    Progression of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by metabolic disorders together with psychological deficits including cognitive dysfunctions. Herein, we used a murine streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes to investigate the beneficial effects of vildagliptin not only on metabolic abnormalities, but also on diabetes-induced cognitive decline. Sixty rats were divided randomly and equally into 2 groups; one remains normal and the other serves as STZ- induced diabetic. Both groups were further divided equally into 2 groups; one received vehicle and the other received oral vildagliptin for 8 weeks. Cognitive behavior was assessed using novel object recognition test. Blood samples were collected to measure metabolic parameters and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-IV activity. Brains were removed and investigated for the levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in addition to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and relative expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/p65. Treatment of STZ-induced diabetic rats with vildagliptin increased their body weight and corrected diabetes-induced memory and learning impairment. Moreover, vildagliptin significantly decreased serum levels of glucose and lipids (except high density lipoprotein) together with brain MDA, TNF-α, serum DPP-IV activities and NF-κB/p65 gene expression. On the other hand, vildagliptin significantly increased brain BDNF, SOD as well as serum insulin. Results suggested that vildagliptin has a protective role in counteracting both metabolic abnormalities and memory deficits in diabetic rats, possibly via its anti-hyperglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, together with reduction of brain NF-κB/p65 over expression.

  15. The Age-Related Changes in Cartilage and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, YongPing; Wei, XiaoChun; Zhou, JingMing; Wei, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with aging, but its underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent publications were reviewed to elucidate the connection between aging and OA. With increasing OA incidence, more senior people are facing heavy financial and social burdens. Age-related OA pathogenesis is not well understood. Recently, it has been realized that age-related changes in other tissues besides articular cartilage may also contribute to OA development. Many factors including senescence-related secretory phenotypes, chondrocytes' low reactivity to growth factors, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, and abnormal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may all play key roles in the pathogenesis of age-related OA. Lately, epigenetic regulation of gene expression was recognized for its impact on age-related OA pathogenesis. Up to now, few studies have been reported about the role of miRNA and long-noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in age-related OA. Research focusing on this area may provide valuable insights into OA pathogenesis. OA-induced financial and social burdens have become an increasingly severe threat to older population. Age-related changes in noncartilage tissue should be incorporated in the understanding of OA development. Growing attention on oxidative stress and epigenetics will provide more important clues for the better understanding of the age-related OA. PMID:23971049

  16. Effects of propofol containing EDTA on mineral metabolism in medical ICU patients with pulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Papadakos, P J; Tharratt, R S; Hall, J B; Williams, G J

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the addition of disodium edetate (EDTA) to propofol significantly alters mineral metabolism, adverse events, and outcome in critically ill medical patients with acute pulmonary dysfunction. Multicentre, double-randomised, double-blind, comparative trial. Medical intensive care units of 5 health centres. A total of 85 haemodynamically stable men and women aged 18-81 years who had pulmonary dysfunction or adult respiratory distress syndrome as a primary diagnosis or complication and who were expected to require at least 48 hours of sedation and mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomised to receive propofol with or without EDTA and then to 1 of 2 sedation levels: light (Modified Ramsay Sedation Scale [MRSS] score of 2 to 3) or deep (MRSS score of 4 to 5). Propofol was administered by continuous infusion at an initial rate of 5 microg/kg per min and titrated as needed. Approximately 63 % of patients had a high severity of illness as indicated by an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score > or = 19. As expected, these patients had a higher mortality rate but did not require a higher dose of propofol or propofol with EDTA. Extensive evaluation of cation homeostasis showed that ionised calcium and magnesium concentrations remained remarkably stable during treatment. Total calcium concentration was low as a result of hypoalbuminemia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration was elevated in both study groups at baseline, on day 4, and at the end of sedation. There were no significant differences in electrolyte levels and no progression to renal dysfunction. There were also no significant differences in haemodynamic or adverse-event profiles. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 5 patients in each group; 4 of these (in 3 patients receiving propofol and 1 patient receiving propofol with EDTA) were considered serious. Because a large percentage of patients experienced a change in sedation level, no analyses were performed using

  17. β-Cell Dysfunction Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Severity in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Finnegan, Stephen; Fealy, Ciaran E.; Filion, Julianne; Rocco, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    .59, r=−0.51, and r=−0.43, all P<0.001). Insulin secretion significantly predicted the Z-score independent of sex, body fat, blood lipids, blood pressure, IR, and glucose metabolism (P<0.005). Conclusion: β-cell dysfunction is highly correlated with the severity of metabolic syndrome in adults. Future work is warranted to elucidate the mechanism by which cardiometabolic disturbances influence insulin secretion. PMID:24283920

  18. Advanced glycation end products: A link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Zhang, John; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a heterogeneous syndrome of reproductive and metabolic alterations, is associated with increased long-term risk of cardiovascular complications. This phenomenon has been linked to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are pro-inflammatory molecules that trigger a state of intracellular oxidative stress and inflammation after binding to their cell membrane receptors RAGE. The activation of the AGE-RAGE axis has been well known to play a role in atherosclerosis in both men and women. Women with PCOS have systemic chronic inflammatory condition even at the ovarian level as represented by elevated levels of serum/ovarian AGEs and increased expression of the pro-inflammatory RAGE in ovarian tissue. Data also showed the presence of sRAGE in the follicular fluid and its potential protective role against the harmful effect of AGEs on ovarian function. Thus, whether AGE-RAGE axis constitutes a link between metabolic and endothelial dysfunction in women with PCOS is addressed in this review. Additionally, we discuss the role of hormonal changes observed in PCOS and how they are linked with the AGE-RAGE axis in order to better understand the nature of this complex syndrome whose consequences extend well beyond reproduction.

  19. Misalignment with the external light environment drives metabolic and cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    West, Alexander C; Smith, Laura; Ray, David W; Loudon, Andrew S I; Brown, Timothy M; Bechtold, David A

    2017-09-12

    Most organisms use internal biological clocks to match behavioural and physiological processes to specific phases of the day-night cycle. Central to this is the synchronisation of internal processes across multiple organ systems. Environmental desynchrony (e.g. shift work) profoundly impacts human health, increasing cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we characterise the impact of desynchrony between the internal clock and the external light-dark (LD) cycle on mammalian physiology. We reveal that even under stable LD environments, phase misalignment has a profound effect, with decreased metabolic efficiency and disrupted cardiac function including prolonged QT interval duration. Importantly, physiological dysfunction is not driven by disrupted core clock function, nor by an internal desynchrony between organs, but rather the altered phase relationship between the internal clockwork and the external environment. We suggest phase misalignment as a major driver of pathologies associated with shift work, chronotype and social jetlag.The misalignment between internal circadian rhythm and the day-night cycle can be caused by genetic, behavioural and environmental factors, and may have a profound impact on human physiology. Here West et al. show that desynchrony between the internal clock and the external environment alter metabolic parameters and cardiac function in mice.

  20. Developmental Programming of Obesity and Metabolic Dysfunction: Role of Prenatal Stress and Stress Biology

    PubMed Central

    Entringer, Sonja; Wadhwa, Pathik D.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, physiological, cellular and molecular evidence suggests the origins of obesity and metabolic dysfunction can be traced back to intrauterine life and supports an important role for maternal nutrition prior to and during gestation in fetal programming. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms is an area of interest and intense investigation. We propose that in addition to maternal nutrition-related processes, it may be important to concurrently consider the potential role of intrauterine stress and stress biology. We frame our arguments in the larger context of an evolutionary-developmental perspective that supports roles for both nutrition and stress as key environmental conditions driving natural selection and developmental plasticity. We suggest that intrauterine stress exposure may interact with the nutritional milieu, and that stress biology may represent an underlying mechanism mediating the effects of diverse intrauterine perturbations, including but not limited to maternal nutritional insults (undernutrition and overnutrition), on brain and peripheral targets of programming of body composition, energy balance homeostasis and metabolic function. We discuss putative maternal-placental-fetal endocrine and immune/inflammatory candidate processes that may underlie the long-term effects of intrauterine stress. PMID:23887109

  1. Metabolic Dysfunction Is Restricted to the Sciatic Nerve in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Oliver J; Unwin, Richard D; Dowsey, Andrew W; Begley, Paul; Ali, Sumia; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rustogi, Nitin; Petersen, Rasmus S; Dunn, Warwick B; Cooper, Garth J S; Gardiner, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    High glucose levels in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the marked distal pathology is incomplete. We performed a comprehensive, system-wide analysis of the PNS of a rodent model of DN. We integrated proteomics and metabolomics from the sciatic nerve (SN), the lumbar 4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of streptozotocin-diabetic and healthy control rats. Even though all tissues showed a dramatic increase in glucose and polyol pathway intermediates in diabetes, a striking upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and perturbation of lipid metabolism was found in the distal SN that was not present in the corresponding cell bodies of the DRG or the cranial TG. This finding suggests that the most severe molecular consequences of diabetes in the nervous system present in the SN, the region most affected by neuropathy. Such spatial metabolic dysfunction suggests a failure of energy homeostasis and/or oxidative stress, specifically in the distal axon/Schwann cell-rich SN. These data provide a detailed molecular description of the distinct compartmental effects of diabetes on the PNS that could underlie the distal-proximal distribution of pathology. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy: a series of unfortunate metabolic events.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a dying back neurodegenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system where mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an etiological factor. Diabetes (type 1 or type 2) invokes an elevation of intracellular glucose concentration simultaneously with impaired growth factor support by insulin, and this dual alteration triggers a maladaptation in metabolism of adult sensory neurons. The energy sensing pathway comprising the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/sirtuin (SIRT)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator α (PGC-1α) signaling axis is the target of these damaging changes in nutrient levels, e.g., induction of nutrient stress, and loss of insulin-dependent growth factor support and instigates an aberrant metabolic phenotype characterized by a suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and shift to anaerobic glycolysis. There is discussion of how this loss of mitochondrial function and transition to overreliance on glycolysis contributes to the diminishment of collateral sprouting and axon regeneration in diabetic neuropathy in the context of the highly energy-consuming nerve growth cone.

  3. Brain metabolic dysfunction at the core of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Tong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the concept that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is fundamentally a metabolic disease with molecular and biochemical features that correspond with diabetes mellitus and other peripheral insulin resistance disorders. Brain insulin/IGF resistance and its consequences can readily account for most of the structural and functional abnormalities in AD. However, disease pathogenesis is complicated by the fact that AD can occur as a separate disease process, or arise in association with systemic insulin resistance diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Whether primary or secondary in origin, brain insulin/IGF resistance initiates a cascade of neurodegeneration that is propagated by metabolic dysfunction, increased oxidative and ER stress, neuro-inflammation, impaired cell survival, and dysregulated lipid metabolism. These injurious processes compromise neuronal and glial functions, reduce neurotransmitter homeostasis, and cause toxic oligomeric pTau and (amyloid beta peptide of amyloid beta precursor protein) AβPP-Aβ fibrils and insoluble aggregates (neurofibrillary tangles and plaques) to accumulate in brain. AD progresses due to: (1) activation of a harmful positive feedback loop that progressively worsens the effects of insulin resistance; and (2) the formation of ROS- and RNS-related lipid, protein, and DNA adducts that permanently damage basic cellular and molecular functions. Epidemiologic data suggest that insulin resistance diseases, including AD, are exposure-related in etiology. Furthermore, experimental and lifestyle trend data suggest chronic low-level nitrosamine exposures are responsible. These concepts offer opportunities to discover and implement new treatments and devise preventive measures to conquer the AD and other insulin resistance disease epidemics. PMID:24380887

  4. Extension of the mitochondria dysfunction hypothesis of metabolic syndrome to atherosclerosis with emphasis on the endocrine-disrupting chemicals and biophysical laws.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyu; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-01-29

    Metabolic syndrome and its component phenotypes, hyperglycemia, hypertension, (abdominal) obesity and hypertriglyceridemia, are major risk factors for atherosclerosis. Recently, associations between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis have been established, suggesting a possible common mechanism underlying these phenomena. Extending a previously proposed mitochondria dysfunction theory of metabolic syndrome and using biophysical laws, such as metabolic scaling, Murray's law and fractal geometry of the vascular branching system, we propose that atherosclerosis could be explained as an ill-adaptive change occurring in nutrient-supplying arteries in response to the decreasing tissue energy demand caused by tissue mitochondrial dysfunction. Various aspects of this new hypothesis are discussed.

  5. Effects of genistein in combination with conjugated estrogens on endometrial hyperplasia and metabolic dysfunction in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), which combines a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) with one or more estrogens, is a novel approach to menopausal therapy. It has been demonstrated that the phytoestrogen genistein (GEN) exhibits mixed estrogen receptor agonist and antagonist activity, suggesting that GEN may have potential for use as a natural SERM. We evaluated, for the first time, the effects of GEN, conjugated estrogens (CE), and their pairing effects as a TSEC treatment on estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia and metabolic dysfunction in ovariectomized (OVX) mice fed a high-fat diet. CE replacement prevented fat accumulation in the adipose tissue and liver, improved glucose homeostasis, and induced endometrial hyperplasia in OVX mice. GEN at 100 mg/kg showed CE mimetic effects in preventing ovariectomy-induced metabolic dysfunctions without endometrial stimulation. Combination treatments with CE and GEN prevented metabolic dysfunctions more strongly than CE alone, but at both low and high doses, GEN did not reverse CE-induced endometrial hyperplasia. In addition, we found that in a TSEC regimen, a typical SERM raloxifene maintains the metabolic benefits of CE while simultaneously protecting the endometrium in OVX mice. These findings indicate that GEN acts as an estrogen agonist in metabolic regulation, but has no SERM function in the uteri of OVX mice.

  6. Parasitic Nematode-Induced Modulation of Body Weight and Associated Metabolic Dysfunction in Mouse Models of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhonghan; Grinchuk, Viktoriya; Smith, Allen; Qin, Bolin; Bohl, Jennifer A.; Sun, Rex; Notari, Luigi; Zhang, Zhongyan; Sesaki, Hiromi; Urban, Joseph F.; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines that are implicated in disrupted metabolic homeostasis. Parasitic nematode infection induces a polarized Th2 cytokine response and has been explored to treat autoimmune diseases. We investigated the effects of nematode infection against obesity and the associated metabolic dysfunction. Infection of RIP2-Opa1KO mice or C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis decreased weight gain and was associated with improved glucose metabolism. Infection of obese mice fed the HFD reduced body weight and adipose tissue mass, ameliorated hepatic steatosis associated with a decreased expression of key lipogenic enzymes/mediators, and improved glucose metabolism, accompanied by changes in the profile of metabolic hormones. The infection resulted in a phenotypic change in adipose tissue macrophages that was characterized by upregulation of alternative activation markers. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) activation of the STAT6 signaling pathway was required for the infection-induced attenuation of steatosis but not for improved glucose metabolism, whereas weight loss was attributed to both IL-13/STAT6-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Parasitic nematode infection has both preventive and therapeutic effects against the development of obesity and associated features of metabolic dysfunction in mice. PMID:23509143

  7. Cerebral microvascular dysfunction in metabolic syndrome is exacerbated by ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Nathalie; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Daliry, Anissa; Silvares, Raquel Rangel; Gomes, Fabiana; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Estato, Vanessa

    2017-09-08

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases, including cerebral ischemia. Microvascular dysfunction is an important feature underlying the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impacts of ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury on the cerebral microvascular function of rats with high-fat diet-induced MetS. We examined Wistar rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet (CTL) for 20 weeks underwent 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by 1 h of reperfusion (IR) or sham surgery. Microvascular blood flow was evaluated on the parietal cortex surface through a cranial window by laser speckle contrast imaging, functional capillary density, endothelial function and endothelial-leukocyte interactions by intravital videomicroscopy. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by TBARs analysis, the expression of oxidative enzymes and inflammatory markers in the brain tissue was analyzed by real-time PCR. The cerebral IR in MetS animals induced a functional capillary rarefaction (HFD IR 117 ± 17 vs. CTL IR 224 ± 35 capillary/mm(2); p < 0.05), blunted the endothelial response to acetylcholine (HFD IR -16.93% vs. CTL IR 16.19% from baseline inner diameter p < 0.05) and increased the endothelial-leukocyte interactions in the venules in the brain. The impact of ischemia on the cerebral microvascular blood flow was worsened in MetS animals, with a marked reduction of cerebral blood flow, exposing brain tissue to a higher state of hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that during ischemia and reperfusion, animals with MetS are more susceptible to alterations in the cerebral microcirculation involving endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress events.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Activity, Accompanied by Overproduction of Superoxide.

    PubMed

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Georgieva, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-12-16

    This study shows that a mitochondria-penetrating nitroxide probe (mito-TEMPO) allows detection of superoxide and visualization of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells due to the effect of T1 shortening in MRI. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by treatment of cells with rotenone and 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME/Rot). The MRI measurements were performed on 7T MRI. The 2-ME/Rot-treated cells were characterized by overproduction of superoxide, which was confirmed by a conventional dihydroethidium test. In the presence of mito-TEMPO, the intensity of MRI signal in 2-ME/Rot-treated cells was ∼30-40% higher, in comparison with that in untreated cells or culture media. In model (cell-free) systems, we observed that superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide, increased the intensity of T1-weighted MRI signal of mito-TEMPO. Moreover, the superoxide restores the T1-weighted MRI contrast of mito-TEMPOH, a noncontrast (diamagnetic) analogue of mito-TEMPO. This was also confirmed by using EPR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that superoxide radical is involved in the enhancement of T1-weighted MRI contrast in living cells, in the absence and presence of mito-TEMPO. This report gives a direction for discovering new opportunities for functional MRI, for detection of metabolic activity, accompanied by overproduction of superoxide, as well as by disturbance of the balance between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a very important approach to clarify the fine molecular mechanisms in the regulation of many pathologies. The visualization of mitochondrial activity in real-time can be crucial to clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional MRI in its commonly accepted definition, as a method for detection of neurovascular coupling.

  9. Stem cell therapies in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Ji, Xunming; Leak, Rehana K; Chen, Fenghua; Cao, Guodong

    2017-03-01

    Aging, a complex process associated with various structural, functional and metabolic changes in the brain, is an important risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. These diseases share similar neuropathological changes, such as the formation of misfolded proteins, oxidative stress, loss of neurons and synapses, dysfunction of the neurovascular unit (NVU), reduction of self-repair capacity, and motor and/or cognitive deficiencies. In addition to gray matter dysfunction, the plasticity and repair capacity of white matter also decrease with aging and contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Aging not only renders patients more susceptible to these disorders, but also attenuates their self-repair capabilities. In addition, low drug responsiveness and intolerable side effects are major challenges in the prevention and treatment of senile diseases. Thus, stem cell therapies-characterized by cellular plasticity and the ability to self-renew-may be a promising strategy for aging-related brain disorders. Here, we review the common pathophysiological changes, treatments, and the promises and limitations of stem cell therapies in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The impact of metabolic syndrome on retinal findings in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Balcı, Melih; Aslan, Yılmaz; Bozarslan, Berçem; Tuncel, Altuğ; Kayalı, Mustafa; Atan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we investigated the association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and retinal findings in patients presenting with erectile dysfunction (ED) complaints. Material and methods: A total of 102 patients with ED were included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel - III consensus definition: patients with MS (Group 1, n=62) and patients without MS (Group 2, n=40). The severity of ED was determined according to the first five versions of the International Index of Erectile Function. A detailed fundus examination was performed to evaluate the patients for retinopathy. The patients’ retinopathy grades were classified according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study. Results: The mean age of the patients was 51.4 years. Twenty-two patients (35.5%) in Group 1 and nine (22.5%) in Group 2 had severe ED (p=0.241). Ten (16.1%) patients in Group 1 and one (2.5%) patient in Group 2 had any degree of retinopathy (p=0.047). The logistic regression analysis of the correlation between severe ED and MS risk factors revealed that a fasting glucose level (FBG) of >110 mg/dL increased the risk of severe ED by 2.5 times (95% CI 1–6.2, p=0.058). Additionally, the logistic regression analysis of metabolic risk factors showed that only the FBS level was strongly associated with retinopathy, with the relative risk increased to 10.6 (95% CI 1.2–93, p=0.033). Conclusion: Our results showed that elevated FBG levels were the most critical MS component in the development of severe ED and retinopathy. PMID:26328073

  11. ATAD3 gene cluster deletions cause cerebellar dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial DNA and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Radha; Frazier, Ann E.; Durigon, Romina; Patel, Harshil; Jones, Aleck W.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Lake, Nicole J.; Compton, Alison G.; Mountford, Hayley S.; Tucker, Elena J.; Mitchell, Alice L. R.; Jackson, Deborah; Sesay, Abdul; Di Re, Miriam; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Burke, Derek; Lunke, Sebastian; McGillivray, George; Mandelstam, Simone; Mochel, Fanny; Keren, Boris; Jardel, Claude; Turner, Anne M.; Ian Andrews, P.; Smeitink, Jan; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Heales, Simon J.; Kohda, Masakazu; Ohtake, Akira; Murayama, Kei; Okazaki, Yasushi; Lombès, Anne; Holt, Ian J.; Thorburn, David R.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although mitochondrial disorders are clinically heterogeneous, they frequently involve the central nervous system and are among the most common neurogenetic disorders. Identifying the causal genes has benefited enormously from advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies; however, once the defect is known, researchers face the challenge of deciphering the underlying disease mechanism. Here we characterize large biallelic deletions in the region encoding the ATAD3C, ATAD3B and ATAD3A genes. Although high homology complicates genomic analysis of the ATAD3 defects, they can be identified by targeted analysis of standard single nucleotide polymorphism array and whole exome sequencing data. We report deletions that generate chimeric ATAD3B/ATAD3A fusion genes in individuals from four unrelated families with fatal congenital pontocerebellar hypoplasia, whereas a case with genomic rearrangements affecting the ATAD3C/ATAD3B genes on one allele and ATAD3B/ATAD3A genes on the other displays later-onset encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia and dystonia. Fibroblasts from affected individuals display mitochondrial DNA abnormalities, associated with multiple indicators of altered cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, drug-induced perturbations of cholesterol homeostasis cause mitochondrial DNA disorganization in control cells, while mitochondrial DNA aggregation in the genetic cholesterol trafficking disorder Niemann-Pick type C disease further corroborates the interdependence of mitochondrial DNA organization and cholesterol. These data demonstrate the integration of mitochondria in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in which ATAD3 plays a critical role. The dual problem of perturbed cholesterol metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction could be widespread in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28549128

  12. Assessment of serum IGF-1 and adipokines related to metabolic dysfunction in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Parfieniuk-Kowerda, Anna; Czaban, Sławomir Lech; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2013-10-01

    HIV/HAART associated metabolic syndrome (HAMS) seems to result from direct influence of HIV, adverse effects of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and individual genetic predisposition. This study aimed to assess the influence of HIV infection and cART on serum concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and adipokines related to metabolic abnormalities. Seventy-two HIV infected patients including 48 HIV/HCV coinfected were enrolled in this study. Insulin resistance was evaluated by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) indexes. Serum concentrations of IGF-1, adiponectin, chemerin and visfatin were measured by ELISA. Significant correlation between serum IGF-1 level and CD4 lymphocytes count was demonstrated and the lowest values were observed in subjects with CD4<200 cells/μL. Serum concentration of IGF-1 was significantly higher in patients treated with protease inhibitors based regimen compared to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and healthy subjects. A significant negative correlation between serum concentration of adiponectin and waist-hip ratio as an indicator of central obesity, was found. There were significant positive correlations between serum concentration of chemerin and HOMA1-IR and serum IGF-1 concentration. Serum chemerin was increased in patients with insulin resistance vs. those with preserved insulin sensitivity. According to these results HAMS is associated with insulin resistance and imbalance of adipokines serum concentration, therefore identification of pathways related to HAMS development might be helpful in management of the syndrome. Serum IGF-1 largely depends on level of immunodeficiency in HIV-infection and may provide a link between immune dysfunction and development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy, AIDS wasting syndrome, diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases in HIV-infected patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Epicardial Fat, Hypertension, Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease and Metabolic Syndrome With Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, João L.; Tamarappoo, Balaji K.; Hachamovitch, Rory; Kwon, Deborah H.; Alraies, M. Chadi; Halliburton, Sandra; Schoenhagen, Paul; Dey, Damini; Berman, Daniel S.; Marwick, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial fat is a metabolically active fat depot that is strongly associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease (CAD). The relationship of epicardial fat and diastolic function is unknown. We sought to: a) understand the relationship of epicardial fat volume (EFV) and diastolic function and b) understand the role of EFV relative to potential risk factors (hypertension, subclinical CAD and metabolic syndrome) of diastolic dysfunction in apparently healthy subjects with preserved systolic function and with no history of CAD. We studied 110 consecutive subjects (65% male, 55±13 years, mean BMI 28±5 kg/m2) who underwent cardiac computed tomography (CCT) and a transthoracic echocardiogram, within 6 months as part of a self-referred health screening program. Exclusion criteria included: history of CAD, significant valvular disease, systolic dysfunction (LVEF<50%). Diastolic function was defined according to American Society of Echocardiography guidelines. EFV was measured using validated CCT software by 2 independent cardiologists blinded to the clinical and echocardiographic data. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome were present in 60% and 45%, respectively. Subclinical CAD was identified in 20% of the cohort. Diastolic dysfunction was present in 45 patients. EFV was an independent predictor of diastolic dysfunction, mean e′ velocities and E/e′ ratio (p=0.01, <0.0001 and 0.001, respectively) with incremental contribution to the other clinical factors. In conclusion, EFV is an independent predictor of impaired diastolic function in apparently healthy overweight individuals, even after accounting for associated comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension and subclinical CAD. PMID:22980968

  14. Association of epicardial fat, hypertension, subclinical coronary artery disease, and metabolic syndrome with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, João L; Tamarappoo, Balaji K; Hachamovitch, Rory; Kwon, Deborah H; Alraies, M Chadi; Halliburton, Sandra; Schoenhagen, Paul; Dey, Damini; Berman, Daniel S; Marwick, Thomas H

    2012-12-15

    Epicardial fat is a metabolically active fat depot that is strongly associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and coronary artery disease (CAD). The relation of epicardial fat to diastolic function is unknown. We sought to (1) understand the relation of epicardial fat volume (EFV) to diastolic function and (2) understand the role of EFV in relation to potential risk factors (hypertension, subclinical CAD, and metabolic syndrome) of diastolic dysfunction in apparently healthy subjects with preserved systolic function and no history of CAD. We studied 110 consecutive subjects (65% men, 55 ± 13 years old, mean body mass index 28 ± 5 kg/m(2)) who underwent cardiac computed tomography and transthoracic echocardiography within 6 months as part of a self-referred health screening program. Exclusion criteria included history of CAD, significant valvular disease, systolic dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction <50%). Diastolic function was defined according to American Society of Echocardiography guidelines. EFV was measured using validated cardiac computed tomographic software by 2 independent cardiologists blinded to clinical and echocardiographic data. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome were present in 60% and 45%, respectively. Subclinical CAD was identified in 20% of the cohort. Diastolic dysfunction was present in 45 patients. EFV was an independent predictor of diastolic dysfunction, mean peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity, and ratio of early diastolic filling to peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (p = 0.01, <0.0001, and 0.001, respectively) with incremental contribution to other clinical factors. In conclusion, EFV is an independent predictor of impaired diastolic function in apparently healthy overweight patients even after accounting for associated co-morbidities such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and subclinical CAD.

  15. Resveratrol partially prevents oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction in pregnant rats fed a low protein diet and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Rodríguez-González, Guadalupe L; Bautista, Claudia J; Vázquez-Martínez, Magaly; Larrea, Fernando; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Zambrano, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Protein restriction in pregnancy produces maternal and offspring metabolic dysfunction potentially as a result of oxidative stress. Data are lacking on the effects of inhibition of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that maternal resveratrol administration decreases oxidative stress, preventing, at least partially, maternal low protein-induced maternal and offspring metabolic dysfunction. In the present study, pregnant wistar rats ate control (C) (20% casein) or a protein-restricted (R) (10% casein) isocaloric diet. Half of each group received resveratrol orally, 20 mg kg(-1) day(-1), throughout pregnancy. Post-delivery, mothers and offspring ate C. Oxidative stress biomarkers and anti-oxidant enzymes were measured in placenta, maternal and fetal liver, and maternal serum corticosterone at 19 days of gestation (dG). Maternal (19 dG) and offspring (postnatal day 110) glucose, insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, fat and leptin were determined. R mothers showed metabolic dysfunction, increased corticosterone and oxidative stress and reduced anti-oxidant enzyme activity vs. C. R placental and fetal liver oxidative stress biomarkers and anti-oxidant enzyme activity increased. R offspring showed higher male and female leptin, insulin and corticosterone, male triglycerides and female fat than C. Resveratrol decreased maternal leptin and improved maternal, fetal and placental oxidative stress markers. R induced offspring insulin and leptin increases were prevented and other R changes were offspring sex-dependent. Resveratrol partially prevents low protein diet-induced maternal, placental and sex-specific offspring oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Oxidative stress is one mechanism programming offspring metabolic outcomes. These studies provide mechanistic evidence to guide human pregnancy interventions when fetal nutrition is impaired by poor maternal nutrition or placental function. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  16. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Dysfunction in Renal Convoluted Tubules of Obese Mice: Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Giugno, Lorena; Lavazza, Antonio; Reiter, Russel J.; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common and complex health problem, which impacts crucial organs; it is also considered an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Few studies have analyzed the consequence of obesity in the renal proximal convoluted tubules, which are the major tubules involved in reabsorptive processes. For optimal performance of the kidney, energy is primarily provided by mitochondria. Melatonin, an indoleamine and antioxidant, has been identified in mitochondria, and there is considerable evidence regarding its essential role in the prevention of oxidative mitochondrial damage. In this study we evaluated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial alterations in an animal model of obesity (ob/ob mice) and describe the beneficial effects of melatonin treatment on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics as influenced by mitofusin-2 and the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Melatonin dissolved in 1% ethanol was added to the drinking water from postnatal week 5–13; the calculated dose of melatonin intake was 100 mg/kg body weight/day. Compared to control mice, obesity-related morphological alterations were apparent in the proximal tubules which contained round mitochondria with irregular, short cristae and cells with elevated apoptotic index. Melatonin supplementation in obese mice changed mitochondria shape and cristae organization of proximal tubules, enhanced mitofusin-2 expression, which in turn modulated the progression of the mitochondria-driven intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These changes possibly aid in reducing renal failure. The melatonin-mediated changes indicate its potential protective use against renal morphological damage and dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:25347680

  17. Management of endocrino-metabolic dysfunctions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cornillon, Jérôme; Decanter, Christine; Defrance, Frédérique; Karrouz, Wassila; Leroy, Clara; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Couturier, Marie-Anne; De Berranger, Eva; Hermet, Eric; Maillard, Natacha; Marcais, Ambroise; Francois, Sylvie; Tabrizi, Reza; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-10-29

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is mainly indicated in bone marrow dysfunction related to blood diseases, but also in some rare diseases (adrenoleucodystrophy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy or MNGIE...). After decades, this treatment has proven to be efficient at the cost of numerous early and delayed side effects such as infection, graft-versus-host disease, cardiovascular complications and secondary malignancies. These complications are mainly related to the conditioning, which requires a powerful chemotherapy associated to total body irradiation (myelo-ablation) or immunosuppression (non myelo-ablation). Among side effects, the endocrine complications may be classified as 1) hormonal endocrine deficiencies (particularly gonado- and somatotropic) related to delayed consequences of chemo- and above all radiotherapy, with their consequences on growth, puberty, bone and fertility); 2) auto-immune diseases, particularly dysthyroidism; 3) secondary tumors involving either endocrine glands (thyroid carcinoma) or dependent on hormonal status (breast cancer, meningioma), favored by immune dysregulation and radiotherapy; 4) metabolic complications, especially steroid-induced diabetes and dyslipidemia with their increased cardio-vascular risk. These complications are intricate. Moreover, hormone replacement therapy can modulate the cardio-vascular or the tumoral risk of patients, already increased by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially steroids and anthracyclins... Therefore, patients and families should be informed of these side effects and of the importance of a long-term follow-up requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

  18. Association between metabolic syndrome and vascular endothelium dysfunction in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Liu, G L; Yang, J Y; Zheng, R X; Jiang, L H; Li, Y P; Gao, F F

    2014-10-27

    We aimed at investigating the association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and vascular endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) in children and adolescents. Sixty children (30 obese children and 30 children with MS) were included in this retrospective analysis. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly selected as the control group. A series of indices/biomarkers known to be related to MS/ECD were determined using ELISA. Correlations between the variables measured were analyzed. Compared with the control group, PAI-1, vWF, VE-cad, TM, and VEGF were significantly increased in the MS group (P < 0.05). Adolescents in the obese group had significantly increased levels of serum PAI-1, VE-cad, TM, and VEGF as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Further, vWF in the obese and control groups did not differ significantly (P = 0.556). Our results suggest that ECD is correlated with MS in children and adolescents. Pathophysiological changes of the vascular endothelium may exist in obese children who have yet to develope MS. PAI-1, vWF, VE-cad, TM, and VEGF could be used as biomarkers for predicting ECD. ECD that develops in patients with MS may be associated with obesity, elevated blood lipid, elevated blood glucose, and higher blood pressure.

  19. Sex hormone imbalances and adipose tissue dysfunction impacting on metabolic syndrome; a paradigm for the discovery of novel adipokines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sairam, M Ram

    2014-02-01

    Sex hormone imbalance is causally related with visceral adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction and visceral obesity - an etiological component of metabolic syndrome (MetS), associated with high risk of both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. In general, premenopausal women appear to be protected from CVD and the dramatic decline in sex steroid hormone occurring during menopausal transitions or other sex-related disorders influence the regional distribution, function, and metabolism of AT and increase the risk of CVD. Visceral AT dysfunction, manifesting as abnormality of fatty acid metabolism, increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and excessive production of adipokines have been proposed in the pathogenesis of MetS. However, direct evidence of molecular mechanisms of depot-specific AT alterations, and dysfunction causally related to MetS is limited in studies on postmenopausal women due to difficulty in collecting discrete AT specimens at different ages and repeated sampling from different fat depots. This can be overcome using animal models that can mimic the cluster of pathology leading to MetS and help establish the molecular basis of links between loss of gonadal function on various AT depots and their contribution to MetS. Our group used sex hormone imbalance FSH receptor knock out (FORKO) female mice to recapitulate different aspects of the MetS and addressed the mechanism of visceral obesity related to MetS and discover two novel sex steroid hormone-regulated deep mesenteric estrogen-dependent adipose (MEDAs) genes. Taken together, such recent studies raise hopes for pharmacologic intervention strategies targeting sex steroid hormone signaling in AT to provide protection against AT dysfunction.

  20. High-phosphorus/zinc-free diet aggravates hypertension and cardiac dysfunction in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuka; Mitsushima, Shingo; Kato, Ai; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is reported in patients with the metabolic syndrome. We assessed the effects of high-phosphorus and zinc-free diet on cardiovascular system in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/NDmcr-cp (SHR/cp), a rat model of the metabolic syndrome. We also investigated the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, on the development of cardiac dysfunction under such conditions. Male SHR/cp and control [Wistar Kyoto (WKY)] rats were divided into three groups and fed control diet (P 0.3% w/w, Zn 0.2% w/w) or high-phosphorus and zinc-free (P 1.2% w/w, Zn 0.0% w/w) diet. The latter group was treated with either NAC (1.5 mg/g per day) or vehicle from 6 to 18 weeks of age (n=6 or 8 for each group). High-phosphate and zinc-free diet increased systolic blood pressure in both WKY and SHR/cp. Echocardiography showed that high-phosphate and zinc-free diet markedly reduced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in SHR/cp. Histopathologically, the same diet induced severe myocardial fibrosis in SHR/cp, and this effect was prevented by NAC. Whereas treatment with NAC prevented diastolic dysfunction induced by the same diet in WKY, it only improved systolic function but not diastolic function in SHR/cp. High-phosphate and zinc-free diet induced hypertension and cardiac dysfunction. These changes hamper the protective effects of NAC in the metabolic syndrome. The present study showed that consumption of high-phosphorus and zinc-free diet increased the myocardial expression of connective tissue growth factor and reduced the expression of metallothionein, which enhanced the development of severe cardiac dysfunction in rats with the metabolic syndrome. The results suggest that the metabolic syndrome seems to aggravate cardiac dysfunction and hamper the protective effects of antioxidant, NAC. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Obesity-initiated metabolic syndrome promotes urinary voiding dysfunction in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiqi; Babcook, Melissa A.; Shukla, Sanjeev; Shankar, Eswar; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Guiming; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Flask, Chris A.; Lu, Lan; Daneshgari, Firouz; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accumulating evidences suggests that obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) contribute towards lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) through alterations in the phenotype of bladder and prostate gland. Clinical studies indicate a link between MetS and LUTS. Nevertheless, there is lack of suitable animal model(s) which could illustrate an association linking obesity to LUTS. We examined the lower urinary tract function in an obesity-initiated MetS mouse model. METHODS Male C57BL/6N wild-type and obese B6.V-Lepob/J maintained on regular diet for 28 weeks were subjected to the assessment of body weight (BW), body length (BL), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), blood glucose (BG), plasma insulin (INS), plasma leptin (LEP), total cholesterol (CHO), free fatty acid (FFA) and measurement of urinary functions. Whole animal peritoneal and subcutaneous adipose tissue measurements as well as prostate and bladder volumes were analyzed by MRI followed by histological evaluation. These parameters were used to draw correlations between MetS and LUTS. RESULTS Obesity parameters such as BW, WC, and BMI were significantly higher in B6.V-Lepob/J mice compared to C57BL/6N mice (p<0.01). Higher levels of total CHO and FFA were noted in B6.V-Lepob/J mice than C57BL/6N mice (p<0.05). These results were concurrent with frequency, lower average urine volume and other urinary voiding dysfunctions in B6.V-Lepob/J mice. MRI assessments demonstrate marked increase in body fat and prostate volume in these mice. Compared to C57BL/6N mice, histological analysis of the prostate from B6.V-Lepob/J mice showed increased proliferation, gland crowding and infiltration of immune cells in the stroma; whereas the bladder urothelium was slightly thicker and appears more proliferative in these mice. The regression and correlation analysis indicate that peritoneal fat (R=0.853; p<0.02), CHO (R=0.729; p<0.001), BG (R=0.712; p<0.001) and prostate volume (R=0.706; p<0.023) strongly correlate

  2. Sexual dysfunction in pre-menopausal diabetic women: clinical, metabolic, psychological, cardiovascular, and neurophysiologic correlates.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzi, Donatella; Marconi, Annamaria; Guazzi, Marco; Cristina, Maurizio; Zecchini, Barbara; Veronelli, Annamaria; Cattalini, Claudio; Innocenti, Alessandro; Bosco, Giovanna; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2013-12-01

    An increased prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) has been reported in women with diabetes mellitus (DM). Our aim was to evaluate correlates (psychological, cardiovascular, and neurophysiologic) of FSD in DM women without chronic diabetic complications. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Index (DNI), and the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy (SDN) questionnaires, metabolic variables, endothelial vascular function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD), echocardiography, and electromyography were studied. 109 pre-menopausal women (18-50 years) [48 with DM (14 type 1 DM, 34 type 2 DM, duration 12.6 ± 1.91 years), and 61 healthy women] received the above questionnaires; physical activity, smoking habits, parity, BMI, waist circumference, HOMA-IR index, fibrinogen, cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL), triglycerides, HbA1c, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, total testosterone, and estradiol were measured; echocardiography, assessment of intima-media thickness (IMT), FMD, ECG (heart rate and Qtc, indexes of sympathetic activity), and electromyography were performed. FSFI total score and score for arousal, lubrication, and orgasm domains were lower in DM women than in controls (P < 0.05); DM women had higher BDI, Doppler A wave peak velocity, DNI, and SDN score (P < 0.001 to P < 0.04). Doppler E wave peak velocity, peroneal, posterior tibial and sural nerves conduction velocity and amplitude were lower in diabetic women than in controls (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). FSFI score was positively correlated with physical activity, Doppler E wave peak velocity, and peroneal nerve amplitude and negatively with BDI, parity, IMT, SDN, and HbA1c (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). At stepwise regression, SDN score (negatively) and Doppler E wave peak velocity (positively) predicted FSFI score (r = 507, P < 0.001). In conclusion, cardiovascular and neurological impairments are associated with FSD in diabetic women. Follow-up studies are

  3. Alterations of Hepatic Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease via D-box-binding Protein Aggravate the Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kengo; Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kondo, Hideaki; Ikeyama, Hisako; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Irino, Yasuhiro; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increase in serum retinol; however, the underlying mechanisms of this disorder are poorly characterized. Here, we found that the alteration of hepatic metabolism induced the accumulation of serum retinol in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. The liver is the major organ responsible for retinol metabolism; accordingly, microarray analysis revealed that the hepatic expression of most CYP genes was changed in 5/6Nx mice. In addition, D-box-binding protein (DBP), which controls the expression of several CYP genes, was significantly decreased in these mice. Cyp3a11 and Cyp26a1, encoding key proteins in retinol metabolism, showed the greatest decrease in expression in 5/6Nx mice, a process mediated by the decreased expression of DBP. Furthermore, an increase of plasma transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in 5/6Nx mice led to the decreased expression of the Dbp gene. Consistent with these findings, the alterations of retinol metabolism and renal dysfunction in 5/6Nx mice were ameliorated by administration of an anti-TGF-β1 antibody. We also show that the accumulation of serum retinol induced renal apoptosis in 5/6Nx mice fed a normal diet, whereas renal dysfunction was reduced in mice fed a retinol-free diet. These findings indicate that constitutive Dbp expression plays an important role in mediating hepatic dysfunction under CKD. Thus, the aggravation of renal dysfunction in patients with CKD might be prevented by a recovery of hepatic function, potentially through therapies targeting DBP and retinol.

  4. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  5. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Down’s syndrome brains

    PubMed Central

    Iulita, M. Florencia; Do Carmo, Sonia; Ower, Alison K.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Aguilar, Lisi Flores; Hanna, Michael; Wisniewski, Thomas; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Buhusi, Mona; Busciglio, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons play a key role in cognition. This neuronal system is highly dependent on NGF for its synaptic integrity and the phenotypic maintenance of its cell bodies. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons progressively degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease and Down’s syndrome, and their atrophy contributes to the manifestation of dementia. Paradoxically, in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the synthesis of NGF is not affected and there is abundance of the NGF precursor, proNGF. We have shown that this phenomenon is the result of a deficit in NGF’s extracellular metabolism that compromises proNGF maturation and exacerbates its subsequent degradation. We hypothesized that a similar imbalance should be present in Down’s syndrome. Using a combination of quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and zymography, we investigated signs of NGF metabolic dysfunction in post-mortem brains from the temporal (n = 14), frontal (n = 34) and parietal (n = 20) cortex obtained from subjects with Down’s syndrome and age-matched controls (age range 31–68 years). We further examined primary cultures of human foetal Down’s syndrome cortex (17–21 gestational age weeks) and brains from Ts65Dn mice (12–22 months), a widely used animal model of Down’s syndrome. We report a significant increase in proNGF levels in human and mouse Down’s syndrome brains, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator messenger RNA as well as an increment in neuroserpin expression; enzymes that partake in proNGF maturation. Human Down’s syndrome brains also exhibited elevated zymogenic activity of MMP9, the major NGF-degrading protease. Our results indicate a failure in NGF precursor maturation in Down’s syndrome brains and a likely enhanced proteolytic degradation of NGF, changes which can compromise the trophic support of basal forebrain cholinergic

  6. Association among metabolic syndrome, testosterone level and severity of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Wang, Chii-Jye; Lee, Yung-Chin; Hsiao, Hsi-Lin; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Chou, Yii-Her; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and serum testosterone in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and their possible association. A total of 103 men with ED were enrolled. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire was used to assess erectile condition. MS was defined according to the criteria formulated by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The mean age of the study population was 57.5 +/- 10.7 years, with an average IIEF of 14.7 +/- 6.7. The age and prevalence of MS using the NCEP ATP III criteria, but not the IDF criteria, were significantly different between mild and moderate/severe ED patients (p = 0.031 and 0.009, respectively). The percentage of hypertension (78.6% vs. 36.2%; p < 0.001) and raised fasting glucose levels (46.4% vs. 19.1%; p = 0.004) were significantly higher in the moderate/severe ED group, and both differences remained significant in multivariate analysis (p = 0.001 and 0.042, respectively). In addition, serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in ED patients with MS (p = 0.002). In summary, the presence of MS is associated with more severe ED. Among the components of MS, elevated blood pressure and fasting blood glucose were independent risk factors. NCEP ATP III criteria seem to correlate better with the degree of ED than the IDF definition. Our results also indicate that MS is associated with a lower testosterone level in patients with ED.

  7. Skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in an animal model of pulmonary emphysema: formoterol and skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sullo, Nikol; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Matteis, Maria; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Lombardi, Assunta; Lucattelli, Monica; Polverino, Francesca; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cirino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a significant contributor to exercise limitation in pulmonary emphysema. This study investigated skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism before and after aerosol exposure to a long-acting β-agonist (LABA), such as formoterol, in the pallid mouse (B6.Cg-Pldnpa/J), which has a deficiency in serum α(1)-antitrypsin (α(1)-PI) and develops spontaneous pulmonary emphysema. C57 BL/6J and its congener pallid mice of 8-12 and 16 months of age were treated with vehicle or formoterol aerosol challenge for 120 seconds. Morphological and morphometric studies and evaluations of mitochondrial adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration and of cytochrome oxidase activity on skeletal muscle were performed. Moreover, the mtDNA content in skeletal muscle and the mediators linked to muscle mitochondrial function and biogenesis, as well as TNF-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), were also evaluated. The lungs of pallid mice at 12 and 16 months of age showed patchy areas of airspace enlargements, with the destruction of alveolar septa. No significant differences were observed in basal values of mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes between C57 BL/6J and pallid mice. Exposure to LABA significantly improved mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes in emphysematous mice, where the mtDNA content was significantly higher with respect to 8-month-old pallid mice. This effect was compared with a significant increase of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles of 16-month-old pallid mice, with no significant changes in TNF-α concentrations. In conclusion, in emphysematous mice that showed an increased mtDNA content, exposure to inhaled LABA can improve mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes. PGC-1α may serve as a possible mediator of this effect.

  8. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Bradley D.; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  9. [New possibilities in the pharmacologic prevention of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2008-01-20

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown--endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, antiadhesive and anti-inflammatory functions; trimetazidine as an adjuvant agent helps to normalize, to restore the disturbed metabolism of the retinal tissue functioning insufficiently, in the end. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive--taking into consideration all possible side effects--ACE-inhibitor and/or AR blocker and statin and aspirin treatment, and trimetazidine as adjuvant medicine 1. those without maculopathy but being above the age of 50 and having risk factors inducing endothelial dysfunction; 2. those, who already developed AMD in one eye as a prevention in the second, unaffected eye; and 3. those patients who developed AMD in both eyes in order to ameliorate or merely slow the progression of the disease. Besides, it is advisory to

  10. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  11. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  12. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Sorwell, Krystina G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2010-03-01

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.

  14. Exploring Temporospatial Changes in Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Diffuse Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Gu, Lei; Ding, Fang; Zhu, Guangyao; Rong, Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the predominant effect of severe traumatic brain injury and contributes significantly to cognitive deficits. The mechanisms underlying these cognitive deficits are often associated with complex metabolic alterations. However, the relationships between temporospatial alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism and the pathophysiology of DAI-related learning and memory dysfunction are not yet completely understood. We used a small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) as a molecular probe to evaluate temporospatial glucose metabolism in vulnerable areas of rats with DAI. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate the development and progression of learning and memory dysfunction. Compared to the sham-treated group, PET-MRI fusion images showed that glucose metabolism was reduced in animals with DAI. In addition, the standardized uptake value (SUV) of 18F-FDG was significantly decreased in the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, corpus callosum, caudate putamen, brain stem, and cerebellum at days 1, 3, and 7 after injury. SUV returned to baseline levels by 30 days after injury. The escape latency of the injured group was significantly increased, and the percentages of distance travelled and time spent in the target quadrant were significantly decreased 1 month after injury. These effects persisted for 3 months. SUVs in the hippocampus at the acute stage were significantly correlated with MWM performance during the recovery stage of DAI. These results demonstrate that microstructural injury-induced hypometabolism in the hippocampus at the acute stage are all significantly correlated with learning and memory dysfunctions during the recovery stage of DAI. PMID:22880625

  15. Sodium Butyrate Protects Against High Fat Diet-induced Cardiac Dysfunction and Metabolic Disorders in Type II Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Du, Jianfeng; Yano, Naohiro; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yu Tina; Patricia, Dubielecka-Szczerba; Zhuang, Shougang; Chin, Eugene Y; Qin, Gangjian; Zhao, Ting C

    2017-01-21

    Histone deacetylases are recently identified to act as key regulators for cardiac pathophysiology and metabolic disorders. However, the function of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in controlling cardiac performance in type II diabetes and obesity remains unknown. Here we determine whether HDAC inhibition attenuates high fat diet (HFD)-induced cardiac dysfunction and improves metabolic features. Adult mice were fed with either HFD or standard chow food for 24 weeks. Starting at 12 weeks, mice were divided into four groups randomly, in which sodium butyrate (1%), a potent HDAC inhibitor, was provided to chow and HFD-fed mice in drinking water, respectively. Glucose intolerance, metabolic parameters, cardiac function, and remodeling were assessed. Histological analysis and cellular signaling were examined at 24 weeks following euthanization of mice. HFD-fed mice demonstrated myocardial dysfunction and profound interstitial fibrosis, which were attenuated by HDAC inhibition. HFD-induced metabolic syndrome features insulin resistance, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, lipid accumulations, and cardiac hypertrophy, these effects were prevented by HDAC inhibition. Furthermore, HDAC inhibition attenuated myocyte apoptosis, reduced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased angiogenesis in the HFD-fed myocardium. Notably, HFD induced decreases in MKK3, p38, p38 regulated/activated protein kinase (PRAK) and Akt-1, but not p44/42 phosphorylation, which were prevented by HDAC inhibition. These results suggest that HDAC inhibition plays a critical role to preserve cardiac performance and mitigate metabolic disorders in obesity and diabetes, which is associated with MKK3/p38/PRAK pathway. The study holds promise in developing a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of type II diabetic-induced heart failure and metabolic disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898). PMID:28053823

  17. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898).

  18. Study of the relationship between male erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes mellitus/metabolic syndrome and its components.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rakesh Kumar; Shamsi, Bilal Haider; Tan, Tan; Chen, Hui-Ming; Xing, Jun-Ping

    2016-06-01

    To study the relationship between erectile dysfunction and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)/metabolic syndrome (MetS). This prospective study invited male patients with T2DM attending for a routine outpatient check-up to complete two questionnaires. A general questionnaire was used to collect demographic and clinical characteristics, while sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function scoring system. The prevalence of MetS in this patient population was determined using information from the general questionnaire. Risk factors for erectile dysfunction were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A total of 175 patients provided valid questionnaires; of these, 148 (84.6%) had MetS. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 90.9% (159/175) in the entire survey population compared with 89.2% (132/148) in patients with MetS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following risk factors for erectile dysfunction in patients with T2DM and/or MetS: age, blood pressure and duration of diabetes. These current findings suggest that the MetS and its components have a negative impact on male erectile function. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  20. Age-Related Changes in Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos-Ewoldsen, Beverly; Black, Sheila R.; Mccown, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related differences in cognitive processes were used to understand age-related declines in creativity. According to the Geneplore model (Finke, Ward, & Smith, 1992), there are two phases of creativity--generating an idea and exploring the implications of the idea--each with different underlying cognitive processes. These two phases are…

  1. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  2. Alcohol-induced One-carbon Metabolism Impairment Promotes Dysfunction of DNA Base Excision Repair in Adult Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G.; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Henderson, George I.; Kruman, Inna I.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr+/− mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain. PMID:23118224

  3. Alcohol-induced one-carbon metabolism impairment promotes dysfunction of DNA base excision repair in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J; Bergeson, Susan E; Henderson, George I; Kruman, Inna I

    2012-12-21

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr(+/-) mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain.

  4. Brain mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and glutamate level reduction in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smeland, Olav B; Hadera, Mussie G; McDonald, Tanya S; Sonnewald, Ursula; Borges, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Although certain metabolic characteristics such as interictal glucose hypometabolism are well established for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), its pathogenesis still remains unclear. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of brain metabolism in a mouse model of TLE, induced by pilocarpine–status epilepticus (SE). To investigate glucose metabolism, we injected mice 3.5–4 weeks after SE with [1,2-13C]glucose before microwave fixation of the head. Using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantified metabolites and 13C labeling in extracts of cortex and hippocampal formation (HF). Hippocampal levels of glutamate, glutathione and alanine were decreased in pilocarpine–SE mice compared with controls. Moreover, the contents of N-acetyl aspartate, succinate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) NAD(P)H were decreased in HF indicating impairment of mitochondrial function. In addition, the reduction in 13C enrichment of hippocampal citrate and malate suggests decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover in this region. In cortex, we found reduced 13C labeling of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate via the pyruvate carboxylation and pyruvate dehydrogenation pathways, suggesting slower turnover of these amino acids and/or the TCA cycle. In conclusion, mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and altered amino-acid metabolism is found in both cortex and HF in this epilepsy model. PMID:23611869

  5. Amentoflavone protects against high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction: Possible role of the regulation of adipogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyong; Han, Yangdong; He, Wang; Liang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of amentoflavone (AMF) against high-fat (HF) diet-induced metabolic dysfunction and focused on the influence of AMF on adipogenic differentiation during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were fed a HF diet or a HF diet with AMF (10 or 50 mg/kg). We found that AMF protected against HF diet-induced metabolic dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by a decrease in the fasting blood glucose levels, fasting insulin levels and the homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), as well as by a decrease in the glucose level, as shown by the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test. Moreover, the results revealed that AMF significantly inhibited the increase in body weight, the weight of perirenal adipose tissues and the serum triglyceride (TG) content of the rats fed the HF diet in a dose-dependent manner. AMF also inhibited the accumulation of oil droplets in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The incubation of the cells with AMF for 0–8, 0–2, 2–4, or 4–8 days markedly inhibited adipogenesis. During the early phase of the adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, AMF decreased CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β expression in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). Moreover, our results demonstrated that AMF significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the cells and the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), markedly attenuated the inhibitory effects of AMF on adipogenesis. AMF also inhibited the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and C/EBPα and the expression of downstream targets in a concentration-dependent manner. The overexpression of PPARγ and C/EBPα (by transfection with respective overexpression plasmids) attentuated the inhibitory effects

  6. Amentoflavone protects against high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction: Possible role of the regulation of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangyong; Han, Yangdong; He, Wang; Liang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of amentoflavone (AMF) against high-fat (HF) diet-induced metabolic dysfunction and focused on the influence of AMF on adipogenic differentiation during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were fed a HF diet or a HF diet with AMF (10 or 50 mg/kg). We found that AMF protected against HF diet-induced metabolic dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by a decrease in the fasting blood glucose levels, fasting insulin levels and the homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index (HOMA‑IR), as well as by a decrease in the glucose level, as shown by the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test. Moreover, the results revealed that AMF significantly inhibited the increase in body weight, the weight of perirenal adipose tissues and the serum triglyceride (TG) content of the rats fed the HF diet in a dose-dependent manner. AMF also inhibited the accumulation of oil droplets in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The incubation of the cells with AMF for 0-8, 0-2, 2-4, or 4-8 days markedly inhibited adipogenesis. During the early phase of the adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, AMF decreased CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β expression in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). Moreover, our results demonstrated that AMF significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the cells and the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), markedly attenuated the inhibitory effects of AMF on adipogenesis. AMF also inhibited the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and C/EBPα and the expression of downstream targets in a concentration-dependent manner. The overexpression of PPARγ and C/EBPα  (by transfection with respective overexpression plasmids) attentuated the

  7. CREB Overexpression Ameliorates Age-related Behavioral and Biophysical Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao-Wen

    overexpressing CREB had increased excitability. This indicates that overexpression of CREB was sufficient to rescue both the cognitive deficits, and the biophysical dysfunction normally seen in aged animals. Together, the results from this thesis identify CREB as a new mechanism underlying age-related cognitive deficits. This not only furthers our understanding of how cognitive processes change with age, but also suggests that increasing activity of CREB or its downstream transcription targets may be a novel therapeutic for the treatment of age-related cognitive decline.

  8. Rimonabant-mediated changes in intestinal lipid metabolism and improved renal vascular dysfunction in the JCR:LA-cp rat model of prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Kelly, Sandra E; Diane, Abdoulaye; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Novak, Susan; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2010-08-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) is a specific antagonist of the cannabinoid-1 receptor. Activation of the receptor initiates multiple effects on central nervous system function, metabolism, and body weight. The hypothesis that rimonabant has protective effects against vascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome was tested using JCR:LA-cp rats. JCR:LA-cp rats are obese if they are cp/cp, insulin resistant, and exhibit associated micro- and macrovascular disease with end-stage myocardial and renal disease. Treatment of obese rats with rimonabant (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), 12-24 wk of age) caused transient reduction in food intake for 2 wk, without reduction in body weight. However, by 4 wk, there was a modest, sustained reduction in weight gain. Glycemic control improved marginally compared with controls, but at the expense of increased insulin concentration. In contrast, rimonabant normalized fasting plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and acute phase protein haptoglobin in cp/cp rats. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by reduced postprandial intestinal lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48, cholesterol, and haptoglobin. While macrovascular dysfunction and ischemic myocardial lesion frequency were unaffected by rimonabant treatment, both microalbuminuria and glomerular sclerosis were substantially reduced. In summary, rimonabant has a modest effect on body weight in freely eating obese rats and markedly reduces plasma triglyceride levels and microvascular disease, in part due to changes in intestinal metabolism, including lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48 and haptoglobin. We conclude that rimonabant improves renal disease and intestinal lipid oversecretion associated with an animal model of the metabolic syndrome that appears to be independent of hyperinsulinemia or macrovascular dysfunction.

  9. Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

    PubMed

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Solís-Lozano, Lourdes; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; González-Chávez, Antonio; Béjar, Yadira L; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Escobedo, Galileo

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

  10. Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Solís-Lozano, Lourdes; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; González-Chávez, Antonio; Béjar, Yadira L.; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Escobedo, Galileo

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = −0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings. PMID:23986664

  11. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarct are associated with abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Yangang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, depressive disorder, and gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats after myocardial infarction. Our goal was to elucidate the physiopathologic bases of somatic/psychiatric depression symptoms after myocardial infarction. A myocardial infarction model was established by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Depression-like behavior was evaluated using the sucrose preference test, open field test, and forced swim test. Gastric retention and intestinal transit were detected using the carbon powder labeling method. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in the hippocampus and ileum. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection determined the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, its precursor tryptophan, and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hippocampus, distal ileum, and peripheral blood. All data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance. Three weeks after arterial occlusion, rats in the model group began to exhibit depression-like symptoms. For example, the rate of sucrose consumption was reduced, the total and central distance traveled in the open field test were reduced, and immobility time was increased, while swimming, struggling and latency to immobility were decreased in the forced swim test. Moreover, the gastric retention rate and gastrointestinal transit rate were increased in the model group. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was increased in the hippocampus and ileum, whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism was decreased, resulting in lower 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the hippocampus and higher levels in the ileum. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarction involve abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, which may explain the somatic, cognitive

  12. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarct are associated with abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofang; Wang, Yuefen; Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Yangang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, depressive disorder, and gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats after myocardial infarction. Our goal was to elucidate the physiopathologic bases of somatic/psychiatric depression symptoms after myocardial infarction. A myocardial infarction model was established by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Depression-like behavior was evaluated using the sucrose preference test, open field test, and forced swim test. Gastric retention and intestinal transit were detected using the carbon powder labeling method. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in the hippocampus and ileum. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection determined the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, its precursor tryptophan, and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hippocampus, distal ileum, and peripheral blood. All data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance. Three weeks after arterial occlusion, rats in the model group began to exhibit depression-like symptoms. For example, the rate of sucrose consumption was reduced, the total and central distance traveled in the open field test were reduced, and immobility time was increased, while swimming, struggling and latency to immobility were decreased in the forced swim test. Moreover, the gastric retention rate and gastrointestinal transit rate were increased in the model group. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was increased in the hippocampus and ileum, whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism was decreased, resulting in lower 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the hippocampus and higher levels in the ileum. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarction involve abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, which may explain the somatic, cognitive

  13. mTOR signaling in aging and neurodegeneration: At the crossroad between metabolism dysfunction and impairment of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, Marzia; Di Domenico, Fabio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-12-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is involved in cellular senescence, organismal aging and age-dependent diseases. mTOR is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that is known to be part of two different protein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2, which differ in some components and in upstream and downstream signalling. In multicellular organisms, mTOR regulates cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and cellular energy conditions. Growing studies highlight that disturbance in mTOR signalling in the brain affects multiple pathways including glucose metabolism, energy production, mitochondrial function, cell growth and autophagy. All these events are key players in age-related cognitive decline such as development of Alzheimer disease (AD). The current review discusses the main regulatory roles of mTOR signalling in the brain, in particular focusing on autophagy, glucose metabolism and mitochondrial functions. Targeting mTOR in the CNS can offer new prospective for drug discovery; however further studies are needed for a comprehensive understanding of mTOR, which lies at the crossroads of multiple signals involved in AD etiology and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High-fructose corn syrup causes vascular dysfunction associated with metabolic disturbance in rats: protective effect of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Akar, Fatma; Uludağ, Orhan; Aydın, Ali; Aytekin, Yasin Atacan; Elbeg, Sehri; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used in many prepared foods and soft drinks. However, limited data is available on the consequences of HFCS consumption on metabolic and cardiovascular functions. This study was, therefore, designed to assess whether HFCS drinking influences the endothelial and vascular function in association with metabolic disturbances in rats. Additionally, resveratrol was tested at challenge with HFCS. We investigated the effects of HFCS (10% and 20%) and resveratrol (50mg/l) beverages on several metabolic parameters as well as endothelial relaxation, vascular contractions, expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins and superoxide generation in the aortas. Consumption of HFCS (20%) increased serum triglyceride, VLDL and insulin levels as well as blood pressure. Impaired relaxation to acetylcholine and intensified contractions to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were associated with decreased eNOS and SIRT1 whereas increased gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins, along with provoked superoxide production in the aortas from HFCS-treated rats. Resveratrol supplementation efficiently restored HFCS-induced deteriorations. Thus, intake of HFCS leads to vascular dysfunction by decreasing vasoprotective factors and provoking oxidative stress in association with metabolic disturbances. Resveratrol has a protective potential against the harmful consequences of HFCS consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kang, Jun-Myung; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2010). A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1) WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2) fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3) fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4) HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5) SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026). However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005–1.820) only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women. PMID:26859830

  16. Metabolic syndrome individuals with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus present generalized vascular dysfunction: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Walther, Guillaume; Obert, Philippe; Dutheil, Frédéric; Chapier, Robert; Lesourd, Bruno; Naughton, Geraldine; Courteix, Daniel; Vinet, Agnès

    2015-04-01

    The first objective of this study was to demonstrate differences within endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasoreactivity in macro- and microcirculation beds among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) compared with healthy counterparts. The second objective was to determine relationships among the function of macro- and microvascular systems and abdominal adiposity, as well as inflammatory markers in the 3 groups. Cross-sectional analyses of 53 patients with MetS without T2D and 25 with T2D, as well as aged 40 years and sex-matched healthy controls included microvascular (cutaneous blood flow measured with laser Doppler flowmetry in response to iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside), and macrovascular reactivity (flow-mediated dilation and nitrate-mediated dilation) along with anthropometric measures, plasma glucose, and insulin and inflammatory markers. Compared with controls, MetS participants showed depressed endothelial function of both micro- and macrocirculation beds. T2D in patients with MetS revealed an exacerbated vascular smooth muscle dysfunction in micro- and macrocirculation compared with MetS without T2D. Indices of micro- and macrocirculation were predominantly inversely related to abdominal fat and inflammatory markers. MetS was associated with endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent dysfunction, affecting both the macro- and the microvascular systems. Participants with diabetes mellitus demonstrated the most severe smooth muscle dysfunction. The presence of central abdominal fat and systemic inflammation seems implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunctions in MetS. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  18. Potentiation of intraocular absorption and drug metabolism of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops: drug interaction with sight threatening lipid peroxides in the treatment for age-related eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Cataract is the dominant cause of blindness worldwide. Studies of the morphological structure and biophysical changes of the lens in human senile cataracts have demonstrated the disappearance of normal fiber structure in the opaque region of the lens and the disintegration of the lens fiber plasma membrane in the lens tissue. Morphological and biochemical techniques have revealed the regions in human cataractous lenses in which the plasma membrane derangement occurs as the primary light scattering centers which cause the observed lens opacity. Human cataract formation is mostly considered to be a multifactorial disease; however, oxidative stress might be one of the leading causes for both nuclear and cortical cataract. Phospholipid molecules modified with oxygen, accumulating in the lipid bilayer, change its geometry and impair lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions in lenticular fiber membranes. Electron microscopy data of human lenses at various stages of age-related cataract document that these disruptions were globules, vacuoles, multilamellar membranes, and clusters of highly undulating membranes. The opaque shades of cortical cataracts represent cohorts of locally affected fibres segregated from unaffected neighbouring fibres by plasma membranes. Other potential scattering centers found throughout the mature cataract nucleus included variations in staining density between adjacent cells, enlarged extracellular spaces between undulating membrane pairs, and protein-like deposits in the extracellular space. These affected parts had membranes with a fine globular aspect and in cross-section proved to be filled with medium to large globular elements. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is a pathogenetic and causative factor of cataract. Increased concentrations of primary molecular LPO products (diene conjugates, lipid hydroperoxides, fatty acid oxy-derivatives) and end fluorescent LPO products were detected in the lipid moieties of the aqueous humor samples and human

  19. Age-Related Mitochondrial Changes after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Lesley K.; Ansari, Mubeen A.; Roberts, Kelly N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial dysfunction is known to occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and has been well characterized. This study assessed possible age-related changes in the cortical mitochondrial bioenergetics following TBI. Three hours following a moderate TBI, tissue from the ipsilateral hemisphere (site of impact and penumbra) and the corresponding contralateral region were harvested from young (3- to 5-month-old) and aged (22- to 24-month-old) Fischer 344 rats. Synaptic and extrasynaptic mitochondria were isolated using a Ficoll gradient, and several bioenergetic parameters were examined using a Clark-type electrode. Injury-related respiration deficits were observed in both young and aged rats. Synaptic mitochondria showed an age-related decline in the rate of ATP production, and a decline in respiratory control ratios (RCR), which were not apparent in the extrasynaptic fraction. Following respiration analysis, mitochondrial samples were probed for oxidative damage (3-nitrotyrosine [3-NT], 4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE], and protein carbonyls [PC]). All markers of oxidative damage were elevated with injury and age in the synaptic fraction, but only with injury in the extrasynaptic fraction. Synaptic mitochondria displayed the highest levels of oxidative damage and may contribute to the synaptic bioenergetic deficits seen following injury. Data indicate that cortical synaptic mitochondria appear to have an increased susceptibility to perturbation with age, suggesting that the increased mitochondrial dysfunction observed following injury may impede recovery in aged animals. PMID:20175672

  20. Body weight, metabolic dysfunction, and risk of type 2 diabetes in patients at high risk for cardiovascular events or with manifest cardiovascular disease: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Franssens, Bas T; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Kappelle, L Jaap; Westerink, Jan; de Borst, Gert J; Cramer, Maarten J; Visseren, Frank L J

    2015-10-01

    To quantify the role of BMI and metabolic dysfunction in the risk of development of type 2 diabetes in patients at high risk or with manifest vascular disease. A total of 6,997 patients participating in the prospective Secondary Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART) cohort study were classified according to BMI and metabolic dysfunction, defined as three or more of the modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) metabolic syndrome criteria (waist circumference replaced by hs-CRP ≥2 mg/L). Risk of type 2 diabetes (assessed with biannually questionnaires) was estimated with Cox proportional hazards analysis. During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (interquartile range 3.1-9.1 years), 519 patients developed type 2 diabetes (incidence rate 12/1,000 person-years). In the absence of metabolic dysfunction (≤2 NCEP criteria), adiposity increased the risk of type 2 diabetes compared with normal-weight patients (HR 2.5 [95% CI 1.5-4.2] for overweight and HR 4.3 [95% CI 2.2-8.6] for obese patients). In the presence of metabolic dysfunction (≥3 NCEP criteria), an increased risk of type 2 diabetes was observed in patients with normal weight (HR 4.7 [95% CI 2.8-7.8]), overweight (HR 8.5 [95% CI 5.5-13.4]), and obesity (HR 16.3 [95% CI 10.4-25.6]) compared with normal-weight patients without metabolic dysfunction. Adiposity, even in the absence of metabolic dysfunction, is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Moreover, presence of metabolic dysfunction increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in all BMI categories. This supports the assessment of adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in patients with vascular disease or at high risk for cardiovascular events. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Global Metabolomics Reveals the Metabolic Dysfunction in Ox-LDL Induced Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjuan; Wei, Ziyi; Dong, Jiaojiao; Duan, Feipeng; Chen, Kuikui; Chen, Chang; Liu, Jie; Yang, Xiaowei; Chen, Lianming; Xiao, Hongbin; Liu, An

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a chronic disorder of large arteries that is a major risk factors of high morbidity and mortality. Oxidative modification LDL is one of the important contributors to atherogenesis. Macrophages take up ox-LDL and convert into foam cells, which is the hallmark of AS. To advance the understanding of the metabolic perturbation involved in ox-LDL induced macrophage-derived foam cells and discover the potential biomarkers of early AS, a global metabolomics approach was applied based on UHPLC-QTOF/MS. Multivariate statistical analyses identified five metabolites (25-azacholesterol, anandamide, glycocholate, oleoyl ethanolamide, and 3-oxo-4, 6-choladienoate) for distinguishing foamy macrophages from controls. Among the six main metabolic pathways, the unsaturated fatty acid, especially arachidonic acid metabolism, contributed importantly to early AS. A new biomarker, anandamide (AEA), whose synthesis and metabolism in macrophages are disturbed by overloaded ox-LDL, results in metabolic obstruction. This study is the first to investigate the metabolic disturbance in macrophage-derived foam cells induced by ox-LDL and screen potential biomarkers and metabolic pathways associated with early AS. Our findings provide a new insight in the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and also help to identify novel targets for the intervention of AS. PMID:28912717

  2. Overview of age-related ocular conditions.

    PubMed

    Akpek, Esen K; Smith, Roderick A

    2013-05-01

    The United States is an aging society. The number of Americans 65 years or older is expected to more than double over the next 40 years, from 40.2 million in 2010 to 88.5 million in 2050, with aging baby boomers accounting for most of the increase. As the society ages, the prevalence of age-related diseases, including diseases of the eye, will continue to increase. By 2020, age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of vision loss, is expected to affect 2.95 million individuals in the United States. Likewise, the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma, estimated at 2.2 million in 2000, is projected to increase by 50%, to 3.36 million by 2020. As the eye ages, it undergoes a number of physiologic changes that may increase susceptibility to disease. Environmental and genetic factors are also major contributors to the development of age-related ocular diseases. This article reviews the physiology of the aging eye and the epidemiology and pathophysiology of 4 major age-related ocular diseases: age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and dry eye.

  3. Age-related changes in triathlon performances.

    PubMed

    Lepers, R; Sultana, F; Bernard, T; Hausswirth, C; Brisswalter, J

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was two-fold: i) to analyse age-related declines in swimming, cycling, and running performances for Olympic and Ironman triathlons, and ii) to compare age-related changes in these three disciplines between the Olympic and Ironman triathlons. Swimming, cycling, running and total time performances of the top 10 males between 20 and 70 years of age (in 5 years intervals) were analysed for two consecutive world championships (2006 and 2007) for Olympic and Ironman distances. There was a lesser age-related decline in cycling performance (p<0.01) compared with running and swimming after 55 years of age for Olympic distance and after 50 years of age for Ironman distance. With advancing age, the performance decline was less pronounced (p<0.01) for Olympic than for Ironman triathlon in cycling (>55 years) and running (>50 years), respectively. In contrast, an age-related decline in swimming performance seemed independent of triathlon distance. The age-related decline in triathlon performance is specific to the discipline, with cycling showing less declines in performance with age than swimming and running. The magnitude of the declines in cycling and running performance at Ironman distance is greater than at Olympic distance, suggesting that task duration exerts an important influence on the magnitude of the age-associated changes in triathlon performance.

  4. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  5. In vivo metabolic flux profiling with stable isotopes discriminates sites and quantifies effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Julian; Clarke, Colleen; Preston, Judith; Bennett, Michael J.; Yudkoff, Marc; Xiao, Rui; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    mutants but resembled that of the TCA cycle mutant (idh-1) and both signaling mutants (daf-2 and sir-2.1). All branched chain amino acid levels were significantly increased in the complex I and III mutants but decreased in the PDH mutant (pdha-1). The RC complex I, coenzyme Q, TCA cycle, and PDH mutants shared significantly increased relative enrichment of lactate+1 and absolute concentration of alanine+1, while glutamate+1 enrichment was significantly decreased uniquely in the RC mutants. Relative intermediary flux analyses were suggestive of proximal TCA cycle disruption in idh-1, completely reduced TCA cycle flux in sir-2.1, and apparent distal TCA cycle alteration in daf-2. GC/MS analysis with universally-labeled 13C-glucose in adult worms further showed significantly increased isotopic enrichment in lactate, citrate, and malate species in the complex I (gas-1) mutant. Conclusions Stable isotopic/mass spectrometric analysis can sensitively discriminate primary RC dysfunction from genetic deficiencies affecting either the TCA cycle or pyruvate metabolism. These data are further suggestive that metabolic flux analysis using stable isotopes may offer a robust means to discriminate and quantify the secondary effects of primary RC dysfunction across intermediary metabolism. PMID:24445252

  6. Hyperglycaemia induces metabolic dysfunction and glycogen accumulation in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Melissa F.; Rohm, Maria; Shimomura, Kenju; Holland, Christian; Tornovsky-Babeay, Sharona; Dadon, Daniela; Iberl, Michaela; Chibalina, Margarita V.; Lee, Sheena; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Rorsman, Patrik; Clark, Anne; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells is impaired in all forms of diabetes. The resultant hyperglycaemia has deleterious effects on many tissues, including β-cells. Here we show that chronic hyperglycaemia impairs glucose metabolism and alters expression of metabolic genes in pancreatic islets. In a mouse model of human neonatal diabetes, hyperglycaemia results in marked glycogen accumulation, and increased apoptosis in β-cells. Sulphonylurea therapy rapidly normalizes blood glucose levels, dissipates glycogen stores, increases autophagy and restores β-cell metabolism. Insulin therapy has the same effect but with slower kinetics. Similar changes are observed in mice expressing an activating glucokinase mutation, in in vitro models of hyperglycaemia, and in islets from type-2 diabetic patients. Altered β-cell metabolism may underlie both the progressive impairment of insulin secretion and reduced β-cell mass in diabetes. PMID:27882918

  7. Neuromuscular Contributions to Age-Related Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Declines in skeletal muscle mass and quality are important factors contributing to age-related weakness. Neural activation of agonist and antagonist muscles may also be important contributing factors. Methods. We conducted a review of the scientific literature on older adults to determine (a) methodologies used to quantify activation, (b) the potential role of agonist and antagonist activation on weakness, and (c) some possible neurophysiological mechanisms that may underlie impaired activation. Results. The cumulative evidence indicates that agonist activation is impaired in some, but not all, older adults and that this impairment contributes to age-related weakness. It is possible that antagonist coactivation also plays a role in age-related weakness, though a definitive link has not been established. Conclusion. Future research should focus on improving quantitative measurement and mechanistic understanding of impaired activation with aging. PMID:21415261

  8. Antipsychotics and the gut microbiome: olanzapine-induced metabolic dysfunction is attenuated by antibiotic administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Davey, K J; Cotter, P D; O'Sullivan, O; Crispie, F; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F; O'Mahony, S M

    2013-10-01

    The atypical antipsychotic olanzapine is often associated with serious metabolic side effects including weight gain and increased visceral fat. These adverse events are a considerable clinical problem and the mechanisms underlying them are multifactorial and poorly understood. Growing evidence suggests that the gut microbiota has a key role in energy regulation and disease states such as obesity. Moreover, we recently showed that chronic olanzapine altered the composition of the gut microbiome in the rat. It is thus possible that treatments that alter gut microbiota composition could ameliorate olanzapine-induced weight gain and associated metabolic syndrome. To this end, we investigated the impact of antibiotic-induced alteration of the gut microbiota on the metabolic effects associated with chronic olanzapine treatment in female rats. Animals received vehicle or olanzapine (2 mg kg(-1) per day) for 21 days, intraperitoneal injection, two times daily. Animals were also coadministered vehicle or an antibiotic cocktail consisting of neomycin (250 mg kg(-1) per day), metronidazole (50 mg kg(-1) per day) and polymyxin B (9 mg kg(-1) per day) by oral gavage, daily, beginning 5 days before olanzapine treatment. The antibiotic cocktail drastically altered the microbiota of olanzapine-treated rats, and olanzapine alone was also associated with an altered microbiota. Coadministration of the antibiotic cocktail in olanzapine-treated rats attenuated: body weight gain, uterine fat deposition, macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, plasma free fatty acid levels, all of which were increased by olanzapine alone. These results suggest that the gut microbiome has a role in the cycle of metabolic dysfunction associated with olanzapine, and could represent a novel therapeutic target for preventing antipsychotic-induced metabolic disease.

  9. Discrepancy between myocardial perfusion and fatty acid metabolism following acute myocardial infarction for evaluating the dysfunctional viable myocardium.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shankar K; Sarai, Masayoshi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Hishida, Hitoshi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) the area of myocardial perfusion and metabolism mismatch is designated as dysfunctional viable myocardium. (123)I-beta-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is clinically very useful for evaluating myocardial fatty acid metabolism, and (99)mTc-Tetrofosmin (TF) is a widely used tracer for myocardial perfusion. This study was designed to evaluate the degree of discrepancy between BMIPP and TF at the subacute state of AMI. Fifty-two patients (aged 59 ± 10 years; mean 46 years) with AMI were enrolled, and all of them underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients were classified according to ST-T change and PCI timing. (123)I-beta-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid and TF cardiac scintigraphy were performed on 7 ± 3.5 days of admission using a dual headed gamma camera. Perfusion and fatty acid metabolism defect were scored on a 17 segments model. The mean BMIPP defect score on early and delayed images were 16.67 ± 10.19 and 16.25 ± 10.40, respectively. The mean TF defect score was 10 ± 7.69. Defect score of BMIPP was significantly higher than that of the TF (P < 0.0001; 95% CI 4.32-7.02), and there was a strong correlation between perfusion and metabolism defect score (r = 0.89, P < 0.00001). Forty-seven (90%) patients showed mismatched defect (BMIPP > TF), and 5 (10%) patients showed matched defect (BMIPP = TF). Mismatched defect score (MMDS) was significantly higher in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) than that of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (P < 0.041; 95% CI 0.11-5.19). At the subacute state of AMI, most of the patients showed perfusion-metabolism mismatch, which represents the dysfunctional viable myocardium, and patients with STEMI showed higher mismatch. Copyright © 2012 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasma IL6 levels, metabolic dysfunction, and asthma severity: a cross-sectional analysis of two cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Michael C.; McGrath, Kelly Wong; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Hastie, Annette T.; Levy, Bruce D.; Israel, Elliot; Phillips, Brenda R.; Mauger, David T.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Johansson, Mats W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Coverstone, Andrea M.; Castro, Mario; Holguin, Fernando; Wenzel, Sally E.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Fahy, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease associated with older age and obesity. The presence of eosinophilic (type 2) inflammation in some but not all patients with severe asthma predicts responsiveness to current treatments, but new treatment approaches will require better understanding of non-type 2 mechanisms of severe asthma. We considered the possibility that systemic inflammation - which occurs in subgroups of obese and older patients - modifies asthma to make it worse. Interleukin 6 (IL6) is a biomarker of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction, and we aimed to explore the relationship between IL6, metabolic dysfunction, and asthma severity. Methods We generated a reference range in health for plasma IL6 in a cohort of healthy controls (n=93). We compared the clinical characteristics of asthmatics with plasma IL6 levels below and above the upper limit of normal (“IL6 low” and “IL-high” asthma) in two asthma cohorts - predominantly non-severe asthmatics recruited at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF)(n=249) and predominantly severe asthmatics recruited by the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP)(n=387). Findings The upper 95th centile value for plasma IL6 in the healthy cohort was 3·1pg/mL, and 14% of UCSF cohort and 26% of the SARP cohort had plasma IL6 levels above this upper limit. The “IL6-high” patients in both asthma cohorts had a significantly higher body mass index and a higher prevalence of metabolic disease than the IL6-low patients (all p values < 0.01). IL6-high patients also had significantly lower lung function and more frequent asthma exacerbations than IL6-low patients (all p values < 0·01). Although 75% of IL6-high asthmatics were obese, 63% of obese patients were IL6-low. Among obese patients, the forced expired volume in one second (FEV1) was significantly lower in IL6-high than in IL6-low patients (mean FEV1 70·8 [S.D. 19·5] vs. 78·1 [19·7] % predicted, p = 0·002), and the

  11. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  12. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  13. Sepsis induces long-term metabolic and mitochondrial muscle stem cell dysfunction amenable by mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocheteau, P.; Chatre, L.; Briand, D.; Mebarki, M.; Jouvion, G.; Bardon, J.; Crochemore, C.; Serrani, P.; Lecci, P. P.; Latil, M.; Matot, B.; Carlier, P. G.; Latronico, N.; Huchet, C.; Lafoux, A.; Sharshar, T.; Ricchetti, M.; Chrétien, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is the major cause of critical illness resulting in admission to intensive care units. Sepsis is caused by severe infection and is associated with mortality in 60% of cases. Morbidity due to sepsis is complicated by neuromyopathy, and patients face long-term disability due to muscle weakness, energetic dysfunction, proteolysis and muscle wasting. These processes are triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic imbalances and are aggravated by malnutrition and drugs. Skeletal muscle regeneration depends on stem (satellite) cells. Herein we show that mitochondrial and metabolic alterations underlie the sepsis-induced long-term impairment of satellite cells and lead to inefficient muscle regeneration. Engrafting mesenchymal stem cells improves the septic status by decreasing cytokine levels, restoring mitochondrial and metabolic function in satellite cells, and improving muscle strength. These findings indicate that sepsis affects quiescent muscle stem cells and that mesenchymal stem cells might act as a preventive therapeutic approach for sepsis-related morbidity. PMID:26666572

  14. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor teneligliptin improved endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in the SHR/NDmcr-cp rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Pang, Zhengda; Shimosato, Takashi; Moritani, Toshinori; Kurinami, Hitomi; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Tenma, Akiko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and metabolic syndrome are major risk factors for the occurrence of cardiovascular events. In this study, we used spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR)/NDmcr-cp (cp/cp) (SHRcp) rats as a model for metabolic syndrome to examine the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibition on hypertension, glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. First, we confirmed that SHRcp rats showed very severe obesity, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction phenotypes from 14 to 54 weeks of age. Next, we examined whether the DPP-4 inhibitor teneligliptin (10 mg kg(-1) per day per os for 12 weeks) could modify any of these phenotypes. Treatment with teneligliptin significantly improved hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, as evidenced by an oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, respectively. Teneligliptin showed no effects on systolic blood pressure or heart rate. In regard to endothelial function, the vasodilator response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in SHRcp rats when compared with WKY rats. Long-term treatment with teneligliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction through the upregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthase mRNA. These results demonstrate that long-term treatment with teneligliptin significantly improved endothelial dysfunction and glucose metabolism in a rat model of metabolic syndrome, suggesting that teneligliptin treatment might be beneficial for patients with hypertension and/or diabetes.

  15. Fatty old hearts: role of cardiac lipotoxicity in age-related cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Drosatos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cardiomyopathy accounts for a significant part of heart failure cases. Imbalance of the energetic equilibrium of the heart along with mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired β-adrenergic receptor signaling contributes in the aggravation of cardiac function in the elderly. In this review article, studies that correlate cardiac aging with lipotoxicity are summarized. The involvement of inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, β-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and mitochondrial dysfunction as underlying mechanisms for the lipid-driven age-related cardiomyopathy are presented with the aim to indicate potential therapeutic targets for cardiac aging. PMID:27558317

  16. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  17. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  18. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  19. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  20. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  1. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  2. Chronic Stress Contributes to Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Metabolic Abnormalities in APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Wang, Jin-Hua; Geng, Yuan; Shen, Li; Wang, Hua-Long; Wang, Yan-Yong; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Stress response is determined by the brain, and the brain is a sensitive target for stress. Our previous experiments have confirmed that once the stress response is beyond the tolerable limit of the brain, particularly that of the hippocampus, it will have deleterious effects on hippocampal structure and function; however, the metabolic mechanisms for this are not well understood. Here, we used morris water maze, elisa and gas chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry to observe the changes in cognition, neuropathology and metabolomics in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (C57) mice caused by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), we also further explored the correlation between cognition and metabolomics. We found that 4 weeks of CUMS aggravated cognitive impairment and increased amyloid-β deposition in APP/PS1 mice, but did not affect C57 mice. Under non-stress conditions, compared with C57 mice, there were 8 different metabolites in APP/PS1 mice. However, following CUMS, 3 different metabolites were changed compared with untreated C57 mice. Compared to APP/PS1 mice, there were 7 different metabolites in APP/PS1+CUMS mice. Among these alterations, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, valine, serine, beta-alanine and o-phosphorylethanolamine, which are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism. The results indicate that APP/PS1 mice are more vulnerable to stress than C57 mice, and the metabolic mechanisms of stress-related cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice are related to multiple pathways and networks, including sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The presentation of metabolic dysfunction and the relationship with energy output in breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer prognosis can be adversely influenced by obesity, physical inactivity and metabolic dysfunction. Interventions aimed at improving surrogate markers of breast cancer risk such as insulin resistance may result in improved breast cancer outcomes. The design of such interventions may be improved through increased understanding of metabolic presentation in this cohort. This cross-sectional study aimed to characterise the metabolic profile of breast cancer survivors relative to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. A secondary aim was to compare measures of energy output across these groups. Methods Sixty-nine women (mean (SD) age 53.43 (9.39) years) who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer were recruited. All measures were completed during one assessment conducted 3.1 (1.0) years post diagnosis. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance analysis and waist circumference (WC). Fasting (12 hour) blood samples were drawn to measure lipid profile, glucose, insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR)). Energy output was evaluated by resting metabolic rate (RMR) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Characteristics were compared across four groups (1. WC <80 cm, not insulin resistant; 2. WC 80–87.9 cm, not insulin resistant; 3. WC >88 cm, not insulin resistant; 4. WC >80 cm, insulin resistant) using ANOVA (p < 0.05). Results Group 4 was characterised by significant disturbances in measures of glucose metabolism (glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and HBA1c) and raised CRP compared to other groups. Group 4 also displayed evidence of dyslipidemia and higher body composition values compared to Groups 1 and 2. Both absolute and adjusted RMR were significantly higher in the Group 4 versus all other groups. Physical activity levels were similar for all

  4. Ginseng Extracts Restore High-Glucose Induced Vascular Dysfunctions by Altering Triglyceride Metabolism and Downregulation of Atherosclerosis-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-huen; Law, Betty Yuen-kwan; Chu, John Man-tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-man; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Lau, Chi-wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-wan; Ying-kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions. PMID:24194784

  5. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  6. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  7. Thrombospondin-1 regulates adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in diet-induced obesity enhancing adipose inflammation and stimulating adipocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos; Li, Na; Cavalera, Michele; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    As a typical matricellular protein, thrombospondin (TSP)-1, binds to the structural matrix and regulates cellular behavior by modulating growth factor and cytokine signaling. Obesity and diabetes are associated with marked upregulation of TSP-1 in adipose tissue. We hypothesized that endogenous TSP-1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Accordingly, we examined the effects of TSP-1 gene disruption on weight gain, adiposity, and adipose tissue inflammation in mice receiving a high-fat diet (HFD: 60% fat, 20% carbohydrate) or a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet (HCLFD: 10% fat, 70% carbohydrate). HFD mice had significantly higher TSP-1 expression in perigonadal adipose tissue; TSP-1 was predominantly localized in the adipose interstitium. TSP-1 loss attenuated weight gain and fat accumulation in HFD and HCLFD groups. Compared with corresponding wild-type animals, TSP-1-null mice had decreased insulin levels but exhibited elevated free fatty acid and triglyceride levels, suggesting impaired fatty acid uptake. TSP-1 loss did not affect adipocyte size and had no effect on adipose vascular density. However, TSP-1-null mice exhibited attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression and reduced macrophage infiltration, suggesting a role for TSP-1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation. In vitro, TSP-1 enhanced proliferation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes but did not modulate inflammatory cytokine and chemokine synthesis. In conclusion, TSP-1 upregulation contributes to weight gain, adipose growth, and the pathogenesis of metabolic dysfunction. The effects of TSP-1 may involve stimulation of adipocyte proliferation, activation of inflammatory signaling, and facilitated fatty acid uptake by adipocytes. PMID:23757408

  8. Female rats selectively bred for high intrinsic aerobic fitness are protected from ovariectomy-associated metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Park, Young-Min; Welly, Rebecca J.; Scroggins, Rebecca J.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Zidon, Terese; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M. E.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovariectomized rodents model human menopause in that they rapidly gain weight, reduce spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and develop metabolic dysfunction, including insulin resistance. How contrasting aerobic fitness levels impacts ovariectomy (OVX)-associated metabolic dysfunction is not known. Female rats selectively bred for high and low intrinsic aerobic fitness [high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR), respectively] were maintained under sedentary conditions for 39 wk. Midway through the observation period, OVX or sham (SHM) operations were performed providing HCR-SHM, HCR-OVX, LCR-SHM, and LCR-OVX groups. Glucose tolerance, energy expenditure, and SPA were measured before and 4 wk after surgery, while body composition via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and adipose tissue distribution, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle phenotype, hepatic lipid content, insulin resistance via homeostatic assessment model of insulin resistance and AdipoIR, and blood lipids were assessed at death. Remarkably, HCR were protected from OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance, observed only in LCR. HCR rats were ∼30% smaller, had ∼70% greater spontaneous physical activity (SPA), consumed ∼10% more relative energy, had greater skeletal muscle proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1-alpha, and ∼40% more BAT. OVX did not increase energy intake and reduced SPA to the same extent in both HCR and LCR. LCR were particularly affected by an OVX-associated reduction in resting energy expenditure and experienced a reduction in relative BAT; resting energy expenditure correlated positively with BAT across all animals (r = 0.6; P < 0.001). In conclusion, despite reduced SPA following OVX, high intrinsic aerobic fitness protects against OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance. The mechanism may involve preservation of resting energy expenditure. PMID:25608751

  9. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as a novel player in metabolic syndrome-induced erectile dysfunction: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Cellai, Ilaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Morelli, Annamaria; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maneschi, Elena; Galli, Andrea; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Saad, Farid; Mannucci, Edoardo; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2014-03-25

    A pathogenic link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is now well established. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the hepatic hallmark of MetS, is regarded as an active player in the pathogenesis of MetS-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was aimed at evaluating the relationship between MetS-induced NASH and penile dysfunction. We used a non-genomic, high fat diet (HFD)-induced, rabbit model of MetS, and treated HFD rabbits with testosterone (T), with the selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist obeticholic acid (OCA), or with the anti-TNFα mAb infliximab. Rabbits fed a regular diet were used as controls. Liver histomorphological and gene expression analysis demonstrated NASH in HFD rabbits. Several genes related to inflammation (including TNFα), activation of stellate cells, fibrosis, and lipid metabolism parameters were negatively associated to maximal acetylcholine (Ach)-induced relaxation in penis. When all these putative liver determinants of penile Ach responsiveness were tested as covariates in a multivariate model, only the association between hepatic TNFα expression and Ach response was confirmed. Accordingly, circulating levels of TNFα were increased 15-fold in HFD rabbits. T and OCA dosing in HFD rabbits both reduced TNFα liver expression and plasma levels, with a parallel increase of penile eNOS expression and responsiveness to Ach. Also neutralization of TNFα with infliximab treatment fully normalized HFD-induced hypo-responsiveness to Ach, as well as responsiveness to vardenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. Thus, MetS-induced NASH in HFD rabbits plays an active role in the pathogenesis of ED, likely through TNFα, as indicated by treatments reducing liver and circulating TNFα levels (T or OCA), or neutralizing TNFα action (infliximab), which significantly improve penile responsiveness to Ach in HFD rabbits.

  10. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mdaki, Kennedy S.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Wachal, Angela L.; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D.; Weaver, Lucinda J.; Dooyema, Samuel D. R.; Louwagie, Eli J.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. PMID:26801311

  11. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mdaki, Kennedy S; Larsen, Tricia D; Wachal, Angela L; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D; Weaver, Lucinda J; Dooyema, Samuel D R; Louwagie, Eli J; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-03-15

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Increased RhoA/Rho-Kinase Activity and Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Adult Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leguina-Ruzzi, Alberto; Pereira, Jaime; Pereira-Flores, Karla; Valderas, Juan P; Mezzano, Diego; Velarde, Victoria; Sáez, Claudia G

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a chronic condition associated with higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, is increasingly prevalent in young adults. Dyslipidemia, proinflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction signs, and RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) activation are considered risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. The occurrence of these factors in young patients with metabolic syndrome but without type 2 diabetes or hypertension has not been fully studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate young subjects with enlarged waist circumference and dyslipidemia but without type 2 diabetes or hypertension,for markers associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. Thirty-two male patients aged 31 ± 1.3 years diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guide for enlarged waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, and low HDL levels, but with blood pressure and fasting glucose within normal ranges, were evaluated for RhoA/ROCK activity in leukocytes, serum fatty acid methyl esters profile, proinflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress markers in addition to thrombin generation and biochemical analysis. Age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were equivalently evaluated. Patients showed higher RhoA/ROCK activity, elevated levels of interleukin-6, soluble CD40L, monocyte chemoattractant protein, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P < 0.001) as well as parameters of endogenous thrombin generation potential (P < 0.05) compared with healthy subjects. Increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, advanced oxidation protein product, and insulin levels and low nitric oxide biodisponibility (P < 0.001) were also found in patients as compared with controls. Palmitic acid was one of the saturated fatty acids found to be significantly elevated in patients compared with control subjects (P = 0.0087). Increased markers of cardiovascular risk are already present in young

  13. Intestine-selective farnesoid X receptor inhibition improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Lv, Ying; Li, Jing; Krausz, Kristopher W; Shi, Jingmin; Brocker, Chad N; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Liu, Yulan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-12-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Here we show that treatment of mice with glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA) inhibits FXR signalling exclusively in intestine, and improves metabolic parameters in mouse models of obesity. Gly-MCA is a selective high-affinity FXR inhibitor that can be administered orally and prevents, or reverses, high-fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. The high-affinity FXR agonist GW4064 blocks Gly-MCA action in the gut, and intestine-specific Fxr-null mice are unresponsive to the beneficial effects of Gly-MCA. Mechanistically, the metabolic improvements with Gly-MCA depend on reduced biosynthesis of intestinal-derived ceramides, which directly compromise beige fat thermogenic function. Consequently, ceramide treatment reverses the action of Gly-MCA in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. We further show that FXR signalling in ileum biopsies of humans positively correlates with body mass index. These data suggest that Gly-MCA may be a candidate for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  14. Intestine-selective farnesoid X receptor inhibition improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Lv, Ying; Li, Jing; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Shi, Jingmin; Brocker, Chad N.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G.; Bisson, William H.; Liu, Yulan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Here we show that treatment of mice with glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA) inhibits FXR signalling exclusively in intestine, and improves metabolic parameters in mouse models of obesity. Gly-MCA is a selective high-affinity FXR inhibitor that can be administered orally and prevents, or reverses, high-fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. The high-affinity FXR agonist GW4064 blocks Gly-MCA action in the gut, and intestine-specific Fxr-null mice are unresponsive to the beneficial effects of Gly-MCA. Mechanistically, the metabolic improvements with Gly-MCA depend on reduced biosynthesis of intestinal-derived ceramides, which directly compromise beige fat thermogenic function. Consequently, ceramide treatment reverses the action of Gly-MCA in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. We further show that FXR signalling in ileum biopsies of humans positively correlates with body mass index. These data suggest that Gly-MCA may be a candidate for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:26670557

  15. Chloroquine-induced nitric oxide as a potential treatment of erectile dysfunction associated with the metabolic syndrome: the science and the fiction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2007-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction is an important cause of decreased quality of life in men. It is estimated that approximately 30 million men in the US and 100 million worldwide may have erectile dysfunction. Data from epidemiological studies indicate a higher prevalence of impotence in obese men. Obesity may be a risk factor for sexual dysfunction in both sexes; data for the metabolic syndrome are very preliminary and need to be confirmed in larger epidemiological studies. The high prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular risk factors suggests that abnormalities of the vasodilator system of penile arteries play an important role in the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction. Nitric oxide released during non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission and from the endothelium is probably the principal neurotransmitter mediating penile erection. It has been shown that chloroquine administration was associated with an increase in nitric oxide synthesis. Chloroquine was also postulated to enhance insulin sensitivity, which suggests potential benefit in treating the metabolic syndrome-related erectile dysfunction.

  16. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  17. Caloric Restriction as a Strategy to Improve Vascular Dysfunction in Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Concha F.; Fernández-Alfonso, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has proved to be the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention to increase healthy lifespan and aging. A reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in obese subjects can be already achieved by a moderate and sustainable weight loss. Since pharmacological approaches for body weight reduction have, at present, a poor long-term efficacy, CR is of great interest in the prevention and/or reduction of CVD associated with obesity. Other dietary strategies changing specific macronutrients, such as altering carbohydrates, protein content or diet glycemic index have been also shown to decrease the progression of CVD in obese patients. In this review, we will focus on the positive effects and possible mechanisms of action of these strategies on vascular dysfunction. PMID:27314388

  18. Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Grandone, Anna; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Perrone, Laura; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research. PMID:26561830

  19. Adjustment of Dysregulated Ceramide Metabolism in a Murine Model of Sepsis-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ha-Yeun; Kollmey, Anna S; Schrepper, Andrea; Kohl, Matthias; Bläss, Markus F; Stehr, Sebastian N; Lupp, Amelie; Gräler, Markus H; Claus, Ralf A

    2017-04-15

    Cardiac dysfunction, in particular of the left ventricle, is a common and early event in sepsis, and is strongly associated with an increase in patients' mortality. Acid sphingomyelinase (SMPD1)-the principal regulator for rapid and transient generation of the lipid mediator ceramide-is involved in both the regulation of host response in sepsis as well as in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure. This study determined the degree and the potential role to which SMPD1 and its modulation affect sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy using both genetically deficient and pharmacologically-treated animals in a polymicrobial sepsis model. As surrogate parameters of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy, cardiac function, markers of oxidative stress as well as troponin I levels were found to be improved in desipramine-treated animals, desipramine being an inhibitor of ceramide formation. Additionally, ceramide formation in cardiac tissue was dysregulated in SMPD1(+/+) as well as SMPD1(-/-) animals, whereas desipramine pretreatment resulted in stable, but increased ceramide content during host response. This was a result of elevated de novo synthesis. Strikingly, desipramine treatment led to significantly improved levels of surrogate markers. Furthermore, similar results in desipramine-pretreated SMPD1(-/-) littermates suggest an SMPD1-independent pathway. Finally, a pattern of differentially expressed transcripts important for regulation of apoptosis as well as antioxidative and cytokine response supports the concept that desipramine modulates ceramide formation, resulting in beneficial myocardial effects. We describe a novel, protective role of desipramine during sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction that controls ceramide content. In addition, it may be possible to modulate cardiac function during host response by pre-conditioning with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug desipramine.

  20. Adjustment of Dysregulated Ceramide Metabolism in a Murine Model of Sepsis-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ha-Yeun; Kollmey, Anna S.; Schrepper, Andrea; Kohl, Matthias; Bläss, Markus F.; Stehr, Sebastian N.; Lupp, Amelie; Gräler, Markus H.; Claus, Ralf A.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction, in particular of the left ventricle, is a common and early event in sepsis, and is strongly associated with an increase in patients’ mortality. Acid sphingomyelinase (SMPD1)—the principal regulator for rapid and transient generation of the lipid mediator ceramide—is involved in both the regulation of host response in sepsis as well as in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure. This study determined the degree and the potential role to which SMPD1 and its modulation affect sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy using both genetically deficient and pharmacologically-treated animals in a polymicrobial sepsis model. As surrogate parameters of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy, cardiac function, markers of oxidative stress as well as troponin I levels were found to be improved in desipramine-treated animals, desipramine being an inhibitor of ceramide formation. Additionally, ceramide formation in cardiac tissue was dysregulated in SMPD1+/+ as well as SMPD1−/− animals, whereas desipramine pretreatment resulted in stable, but increased ceramide content during host response. This was a result of elevated de novo synthesis. Strikingly, desipramine treatment led to significantly improved levels of surrogate markers. Furthermore, similar results in desipramine-pretreated SMPD1−/− littermates suggest an SMPD1-independent pathway. Finally, a pattern of differentially expressed transcripts important for regulation of apoptosis as well as antioxidative and cytokine response supports the concept that desipramine modulates ceramide formation, resulting in beneficial myocardial effects. We describe a novel, protective role of desipramine during sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction that controls ceramide content. In addition, it may be possible to modulate cardiac function during host response by pre-conditioning with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug desipramine. PMID:28420138

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Plus High-Sugar Diet Provokes a Metabolic Crisis That Inhibits Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Esko; George, Jack; Garipler, Görkem; Tuomela, Tea; Kiviranta, Essi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Dunn, Cory D.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila mutant tko25t exhibits a deficiency of mitochondrial protein synthesis, leading to a global insufficiency of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. This entrains an organismal phenotype of developmental delay and sensitivity to seizures induced by mechanical stress. We found that the mutant phenotype is exacerbated in a dose-dependent fashion by high dietary sugar levels. tko25t larvae were found to exhibit severe metabolic abnormalities that were further accentuated by high-sugar diet. These include elevated pyruvate and lactate, decreased ATP and NADPH. Dietary pyruvate or lactate supplementation phenocopied the effects of high sugar. Based on tissue-specific rescue, the crucial tissue in which this metabolic crisis initiates is the gut. It is accompanied by down-regulation of the apparatus of cytosolic protein synthesis and secretion at both the RNA and post-translational levels, including a novel regulation of S6 kinase at the protein level. PMID:26812173

  2. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  3. Green tea extract activates AMPK and ameliorates white adipose tissue metabolic dysfunction induced by obesity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andréa; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Otton, Rosemari

    2016-10-01

    Beneficial effects of green tea (GT) polyphenols against obesity have been reported. However, until this moment the molecular mechanisms of how green tea can modulate obesity and regulates fat metabolism, particularly in adipose tissue, remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of GT extract in the adipose tissue of obese animals and its effect on weight gain, metabolism and function (de novo lipogenesis and lipolysis), and the involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Male Wistar rats were treated with GT by gavage (12 weeks/5 days/week; 500 mg/kg of body weight), and obesity was induced by cafeteria diet (8 weeks). Here, we show that obese rats treated with GT showed a significant reduction in indicators of obesity such as hyperlipidemia, fat synthesis, body weight, and fat depots as compared to those treated with standard control diet. AMPK was induced in adipose tissue in rats that were treated with GT and likely restored insulin sensitivity, increased mRNA expression of GLUT4, reducing the concentrations of plasma and liver lipid content, also stimulating fatty acid oxidation in the same tissue. Importantly, repression of de novo lipogenesis in the adipose tissue, reduced lipid droplets in the liver, and the development of insulin resistance in diet-induced obese rats were accompanied by AMPK activation. Our study identified that metabolic changes caused by GT intake induced AMPK activation and modulate the expression of genes involved in metabolism, particularly in adipose tissue, thus offering a therapeutic strategy to combat insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and obesity in rats.

  4. Metabolic dysfunction in female mice with disruption of 5α-reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Di Rollo, Emma M; Mak, Tracy C-S; Sooy, Karen; Walker, Brian R; Andrew, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    5α-Reductases irreversibly catalyse A-ring reduction of pregnene steroids, including glucocorticoids and androgens. Genetic disruption of 5α-reductase 1 in male mice impairs glucocorticoid clearance and predisposes to glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis upon metabolic challenge. However, it is unclear whether this is driven by changes in androgen and/or glucocorticoid action. Female mice with transgenic disruption of 5α-reductase 1 (5αR1-KO) were studied, representing a ‘low androgen’ state. Glucocorticoid clearance and stress responses were studied in mice aged 6 months. Metabolism was assessed in mice on normal chow (aged 6 and 12 m) and also in a separate cohort following 1-month high-fat diet (aged 3 m). Female 5αR1-KO mice had adrenal suppression (44% lower AUC corticosterone after stress), and upon corticosterone infusion, accumulated hepatic glucocorticoids (~27% increased corticosterone). Female 5αR1-KO mice aged 6 m fed normal chow demonstrated insulin resistance (~35% increased area under curve (AUC) for insulin upon glucose tolerance testing) and hepatic steatosis (~33% increased hepatic triglycerides) compared with controls. This progressed to obesity (~12% increased body weight) and sustained insulin resistance (~38% increased AUC insulin) by age 12 m. Hepatic transcript profiles supported impaired lipid β-oxidation and increased triglyceride storage. Female 5αR1-KO mice were also predisposed to develop high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Exaggerated predisposition to metabolic disorders in female mice, compared with that seen in male mice, after disruption of 5αR1 suggests phenotypic changes may be underpinned by altered metabolism of glucocorticoids rather than androgens. PMID:27647861

  5. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula. PMID:20862519

  6. Cellular and metabolic alterations in the hippocampus caused by insulin signalling dysfunction and its association with cognitive impairment during aging and Alzheimer's disease: studies in animal models.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Arias, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of animal and epidemiological studies suggest that metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with the development of cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer's disease, particularly in aging. Several lines of evidence suggest that insulin signalling dysfunction produces these metabolic alterations and underlie the development of these neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we address normal insulin function in the synapse; we review and discuss the physiopathological hallmarks of synaptic insulin signalling dysfunction associated with metabolic alterations. Additionally, we describe and review the major animal models of obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The comprehensive knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind the association of metabolic alterations and cognitive impairment could facilitate the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases in patients with metabolic alterations, with treatment that focus on neuroprotection. It could also help in the development of metabolic-based therapies and drugs for using in dementia and Alzheimer's disease patients to alleviate their symptoms in a more efficient and comprehensive way.

  7. Metformin improves metabolic memory in high fat diet (HFD)-induced renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Sharma, Ekta; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Pamulapati, Himani; Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang

    2016-08-22

    Recently, we have shown that high fat diet (HFD) in vivo and in vitro generates metabolic memory by altering H3K36me2 and H3K27me3 on the promoter of FOXO1 (transcription factor of gluconeogenic genes) (Kumar et al., 2015). Here we checked the hypothesis, whether concomitant diet reversal and metformin could overcome HFD-induced metabolic memory and renal damage. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were rendered insulin resistant by feeding high fat diet for 16 weeks. Then the rats were subjected to diet reversal (REV) alone and along with metformin (REV+MET) for 8 weeks. Biochemical and histological markers of insulin resistance and kidney function were measured. Blood pressure and in vivo vascular reactivity to Angiotensin II (200 mgkg-1) were also checked. Diet reversal could improve lipid profile but could not prevent renal complications induced by HFD. Interestingly, metformin along with diet reversal restored the levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. In kidney, metformin increased the activation of AMPK, decreased inflammatory markers-COX-2, IL-1β and apoptotic markers-PARP, Caspase3. Metformin was effective in lowering the elevated basal blood pressure, acute change in mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) in response to Ang II. It also attenuated the tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis induced by HFD-feeding in kidney. Here we report for the first time, that metformin treatment overcomes metabolic memory and prevents HFD-induced renal damage.

  8. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p < 0.05 for both). Gene expression analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue revealed significant down-regulation of genes related to BCAA catabolism and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of several inflammation-related pathways in high HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  9. Metabolomics Reveals that Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Environmental Chemicals Induces Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Nichols, Robert G.; Hao, Ruixin; Correll, Jared; Smith, Philip B.; Chiaro, Christopher R.; Perdew, Gary H.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds poses a significant health risk for human health. Developing a better understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is likely to improve the reliability of risk assessment. In this study, the AHR-dependent metabolic response of mice exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) were assessed using global 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics and targeted metabolic profiling of extracts obtained from serum and liver. 1H NMR analyses revealed that TCDF exposure suppressed gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, stimulated lipogenesis, and triggered inflammatory gene expression in an Ahr-dependent manner. Targeted analyses using gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed TCDF treatment altered the ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids. Consistent with this observation, an increase in hepatic expression of stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 was also observed. In addition, TCDF exposure resulted in inhibition of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis manifested by down-regulation of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA metabolites and related mRNA levels. In contrast, no significant changes in the levels of glucose and lipid were observed in serum and liver obtained from Ahr-null mice following TCDF treatment, thus strongly supporting the important role of the AHR in mediating the metabolic effects seen following TCDF exposure. PMID:26023891

  10. Is spaceflight-induced immune dysfunction linked to systemic changes in metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao Wen; Bellinger, Denise L; Jonscher, Karen R; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Mohney, Robert P; Gridley, Daila S

    2017-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on its final mission (STS-135) on July 8, 2011. After just under 13 days, the shuttle landed safely at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the last time. Female C57BL/6J mice flew as part of the Commercial Biomedical Testing Module-3 (CBTM-3) payload. Ground controls were maintained at the KSC facility. Subsets of these mice were made available to investigators as part of NASA's Bio-specimen Sharing Program (BSP). Our group characterized cell phenotype distributions and phagocytic function in the spleen, catecholamine and corticosterone levels in the adrenal glands, and transcriptomics/metabolomics in the liver. Despite decreases in most splenic leukocyte subsets, there were increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related activity. Although there were increases noted in corticosterone levels in both the adrenals and liver, there were no significant changes in catecholamine levels. Furthermore, functional analysis of gene expression and metabolomic profiles suggest that the functional changes are not due to oxidative or psychological stress. Despite changes in gene expression patterns indicative of increases in phagocytic activity (e.g. endocytosis and formation of peroxisomes), there was no corresponding increase in genes related to ROS metabolism. In contrast, there were increases in expression profiles related to fatty acid oxidation with decreases in glycolysis-related profiles. Given the clear link between immune function and metabolism in many ground-based diseases, we propose a similar link may be involved in spaceflight-induced decrements in immune and metabolic function.

  11. Proteomics analysis of human placenta reveals glutathione metabolism dysfunction as the underlying pathogenesis for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohan; Xu, Zhongwei; Cao, Jin; Shao, Ping; Zhou, Maobin; Qin, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Yu, Fang; Zhou, Xin; Ji, Wenjie; Cai, Wei; Ma, Yongqiang; Wang, Chengyan; Shan, Nana; Yang, Ning; Chen, Xu; Li, Yuming

    2017-09-01

    Hypertensive disorder in pregnancy (HDP) refers to a series of diseases that cause the hypertension during pregnancy, including HDP, preeclampsia (PE) and eclampsia. This study screens differentially expressed proteins of placenta tissues in PE cases using 2D LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomics strategy. A total of 2281 proteins are quantified, of these, 145 altering expression proteins are successfully screened between PE and control cases (p<0.05). Bioinformatics analysis suggests that these proteins are mainly involved in many biological processes, such as oxidation reduction, mitochondrion organization, and acute inflammatory response. Especially, the glutamine metabolic process related molecules, GPX1, GPX3, SMS, GGCT, GSTK1, NFκB, GSTT2, SOD1 and GCLM, are involved in the switching process from oxidized glutathione (GSSG) conversion to the reduced glutathione (GSH) by glutathione, mercapturic acid and arginine metabolism process. Results of this study revealed that glutathione metabolism disorder of placenta tissues may contribute to the occurrence of PE disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Microbiota-related Changes in Bile Acid & Tryptophan Metabolism are Associated with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Anna V; Joyce, Susan A; Moloney, Gerard; Burokas, Aurelijus; Sherwin, Eoin; Arboleya, Silvia; Flynn, Ian; Khochanskiy, Dmitry; Moya-Pérez, Angela; Peterson, Veronica; Rea, Kieran; Murphy, Kiera; Makarova, Olga; Buravkov, Sergey; Hyland, Niall P; Stanton, Catherine; Clarke, Gerard; Gahan, Cormac G M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-09-21

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most prevalent neurodevelopmental conditions worldwide. There is growing awareness that ASD is highly comorbid with gastrointestinal distress and altered intestinal microbiome, and that host-microbiome interactions may contribute to the disease symptoms. However, the paucity of knowledge on gut-brain axis signaling in autism constitutes an obstacle to the development of precision microbiota-based therapeutics in ASD. To this end, we explored the interactions between intestinal microbiota, gut physiology and social behavior in a BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J mouse model of ASD. Here we show that a reduction in the relative abundance of very particular bacterial taxa in the BTBR gut - namely, bile-metabolizing Bifidobacterium and Blautia species, - is associated with deficient bile acid and tryptophan metabolism in the intestine, marked gastrointestinal dysfunction, as well as impaired social interactions in BTBR mice. Together these data support the concept of targeted manipulation of the gut microbiota for reversing gastrointestinal and behavioral symptomatology in ASD, and offer specific plausible targets in this endeavor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD.

  14. Aging-related inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Greene, M A; Loeser, R F

    2015-11-01

    It is well accepted that aging is an important contributing factor to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). The mechanisms responsible appear to be multifactorial and may include an age-related pro-inflammatory state that has been termed "inflamm-aging." Age-related inflammation can be both systemic and local. Systemic inflammation can be promoted by aging changes in adipose tissue that result in increased production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Numerous studies have shown an age-related increase in blood levels of IL-6 that has been associated with decreased physical function and frailty. Importantly, higher levels of IL-6 have been associated with an increased risk of knee OA progression. However, knockout of IL-6 in male mice resulted in worse age-related OA rather than less OA. Joint tissue cells, including chondrocytes and meniscal cells, as well as the neighboring infrapatellar fat in the knee joint, can be a local source of inflammatory mediators that increase with age and contribute to OA. An increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators that include cytokines and chemokines, as well as matrix-degrading enzymes important in joint tissue destruction, can be the result of cell senescence and the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Further studies are needed to better understand the basis for inflamm-aging and its role in OA with the hope that this work will lead to new interventions targeting inflammation to reduce not only joint tissue destruction but also pain and disability in older adults with OA.

  15. Long-term dietary nitrite and nitrate deficiency causes the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice.

    PubMed

    Kina-Tanada, Mika; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Tanimoto, Akihide; Kaname, Tadashi; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Uchida, Taro; Nakasone, Junko; Kozuka, Chisayo; Ishida, Masayoshi; Kubota, Haruaki; Taira, Yuji; Totsuka, Yuichi; Kina, Shin-Ichiro; Sunakawa, Hajime; Omura, Junichi; Satoh, Kimio; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Shiro; Ohya, Yusuke; Matsushita, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Arasaki, Akira; Tsutsui, Masato

    2017-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised not only from L-arginine by NO synthases (NOSs), but also from its inert metabolites, nitrite and nitrate. Green leafy vegetables are abundant in nitrate, but whether or not a deficiency in dietary nitrite/nitrate spontaneously causes disease remains to be clarified. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency would induce the metabolic syndrome in mice. To this end, we prepared a low-nitrite/nitrate diet (LND) consisting of an amino acid-based low-nitrite/nitrate chow, in which the contents of L-arginine, fat, carbohydrates, protein and energy were identical with a regular chow, and potable ultrapure water. Nitrite and nitrate were undetectable in both the chow and the water. Three months of the LND did not affect food or water intake in wild-type C57BL/6J mice compared with a regular diet (RD). However, in comparison with the RD, 3 months of the LND significantly elicited visceral adiposity, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance. Eighteen months of the LND significantly provoked increased body weight, hypertension, insulin resistance and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine, while 22 months of the LND significantly led to death mainly due to cardiovascular disease, including acute myocardial infarction. These abnormalities were reversed by simultaneous treatment with sodium nitrate, and were significantly associated with endothelial NOS downregulation, adiponectin insufficiency and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. These results provide the first evidence that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency gives rise to the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice, indicating a novel pathogenetic role of the exogenous NO production system in the metabolic syndrome and its vascular complications.

  16. Long-Term Dietary Fructose Causes Gender-Different Metabolic and Vascular Dysfunction in Rats: Modulatory Effects of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Pektaş, Mehmet Bilgehan; Sadi, Gökhan; Akar, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the gender differences in the effects of dietary fructose. In the current study, we investigated whether long-term fructose intake impacts metabolic parameters and vascular reactivity differently between male and female rats. Moreover, we tested whether resveratrol has a gender-specific effectiveness on the alterations. Male and female rats were divided into four groups as control; resveratrol; fructose and resveratrol plus fructose. Fructose was given to the rats as 10% solution in drinking water for 24 weeks. All rats were fed with the standard diet with or without resveratrol. High-fructose diet increased plasma insulin, triglyceride and VLDL levels as well as omental weights in both genders. Long-term dietary fructose causes marked increase in body weight of males, but not females. Dietary fructose impaired endothelial relaxation to acetylcholine and intensified contraction to phenylephrine in the aortas of male and female rats, but differently it also reduced insulin-induced vasodilation in aortas of female rats. These changes were associated with decreased expression levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein, but increased in inducible NOS (iNOS), in aortas of male and female rats. Dietary fructose suppressed expression levels of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) mRNA in aortas from female rats. Resveratrol supplementation efficiently restored fructose-induced metabolic and vascular dysfunction in both genders probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. Moreover, the augmentations in SIRT1 and IRS-2 mRNA in females and IRS-1 mRNA in males may possibly contribute to the beneficial effects of resveratrol as well. Long-term fructose intake may differently affect metabolic and vascular function between male and female rats, which are modified by resveratrol. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. Methods Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), aromatic amino acid (AAA) and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all). Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all), whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26439744

  18. Is spaceflight-induced immune dysfunction linked to systemic changes in metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Bellinger, Denise L.; Jonscher, Karen R.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Mohney, Robert P.; Gridley, Daila S.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on its final mission (STS-135) on July 8, 2011. After just under 13 days, the shuttle landed safely at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the last time. Female C57BL/6J mice flew as part of the Commercial Biomedical Testing Module-3 (CBTM-3) payload. Ground controls were maintained at the KSC facility. Subsets of these mice were made available to investigators as part of NASA’s Bio-specimen Sharing Program (BSP). Our group characterized cell phenotype distributions and phagocytic function in the spleen, catecholamine and corticosterone levels in the adrenal glands, and transcriptomics/metabolomics in the liver. Despite decreases in most splenic leukocyte subsets, there were increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related activity. Although there were increases noted in corticosterone levels in both the adrenals and liver, there were no significant changes in catecholamine levels. Furthermore, functional analysis of gene expression and metabolomic profiles suggest that the functional changes are not due to oxidative or psychological stress. Despite changes in gene expression patterns indicative of increases in phagocytic activity (e.g. endocytosis and formation of peroxisomes), there was no corresponding increase in genes related to ROS metabolism. In contrast, there were increases in expression profiles related to fatty acid oxidation with decreases in glycolysis-related profiles. Given the clear link between immune function and metabolism in many ground-based diseases, we propose a similar link may be involved in spaceflight-induced decrements in immune and metabolic function. PMID:28542224

  19. Obesity and metabolic dysfunction severely influence prostate cell function: role of insulin and IGF1.

    PubMed

    L-López, Fernando; Sarmento-Cabral, André; Herrero-Aguayo, Vicente; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is a major health problem that courses with severe comorbidities and a drastic impairment of homeostasis and function of several organs, including the prostate gland (PG). The endocrine-metabolic regulatory axis comprising growth hormone (GH), insulin and IGF1, which is drastically altered under extreme metabolic conditions such as obesity, also plays relevant roles in the development, modulation and homeostasis of the PG. However, its implication in the pathophysiological interplay between obesity and prostate function is still to be elucidated. To explore this association, we used a high fat-diet obese mouse model, as well as in vitro primary cultures of normal-mouse PG cells and human prostate cancer cell lines. This approach revealed that most of the components of the GH/insulin/IGF1 regulatory axis are present in PGs, where their expression pattern is altered under obesity conditions and after an acute insulin treatment (e.g. Igfbp3), which might have some pathophysiological implications. Moreover, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the PG becomes severely insulin resistant under diet-induced obesity in mice. Finally, use of in vitro approaches served to confirm and expand the conception that insulin and IGF1 play a direct, relevant role in the control of normal and pathological PG cell function. Altogether, these results uncover a fine, germane crosstalk between the endocrine-metabolic status and the development and homeostasis of the PG, wherein key components of the GH, insulin and IGF1 axes could play a relevant pathophysiological role. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  20. Age-related changes in the central auditory system.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Profant, Oliver; Syka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    Aging is accompanied by the deterioration of hearing that complicates our understanding of speech, especially in noisy environments. This deficit is partially caused by the loss of hair cells as well as by the dysfunction of the stria vascularis. However, the central part of the auditory system is also affected by processes accompanying aging that may run independently of those affecting peripheral receptors. Here, we review major changes occurring in the central part of the auditory system during aging. Most of the information that is focused on age-related changes in the central auditory system of experimental animals arises from experiments using immunocytochemical targeting on changes in the glutamic-acid-decarboxylase, parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin. These data are accompanied by information about age-related changes in the number of neurons as well as about changes in the behavior of experimental animals. Aging is in principle accompanied by atrophy of the gray as well as white matter, resulting in the enlargement of the cerebrospinal fluid space. The human auditory cortex suffers not only from atrophy but also from changes in the content of some metabolites in the aged brain, as shown by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to this, functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals differences between activation of the central auditory system in the young and old brain. Altogether, the information reviewed in this article speaks in favor of specific age-related changes in the central auditory system that occur mostly independently of the changes in the inner ear and that form the basis of the central presbycusis.

  1. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN THE MEIBOMIAN GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Chyong Jy; Paugh, Jerry R.; Massei, Salina; Wahlert, Andrew J.; Kao, Winston W.; Jester, James V.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the age-related changes of the mouse meibomian gland. Eyelids from adult C57Bl/6 mice at 2, 6, 12 and 24 months of age were stained with specific antibodies against peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to identify differentiating meibocytes, Oil Red O(ORO) to identify lipid, Ki67 nuclear antigen to identify cycling cells, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1) to identify potential stem cells and CD45 to identify immune cells. Meibomian glands from younger mice (2 and 6 months) showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear staining with anti-PPARγ antibodies with abundant ORO staining of small, intracellular lipid droplets. Meibomian glands from older mice (12 and 24 months) showed only nuclear PPARγ localization with less ORO staining and significantly reduced acinar tissue (p<0.04). Acini of older mice also showed significantly reduced (p<0.004) numbers of Ki67 stained nuclei. While Blimp1 appeared to diffusely stain the superficial ductal epithelium, isolated cells were occasionally stained within the meibomian glandduct and acini of older mice that also stained with CD45 antibodies, suggesting the presence of infiltrating plasmacytoid cells. These findings suggest that there is altered PPARγ receptor signaling in older mice that may underlie changes in cell cycle entry/proliferation, lipid synthesis and gland atrophy during aging. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that mouse meibomian glands undergo age-related changes similar to those identified in humans and may be used as a model for age-related meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:19733559

  2. Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 promotes age-related organ fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Erpenbeck, Luise; Savchenko, Alexander; Hayashi, Hideki; Cherpokova, Deya; Gallant, Maureen; Mauler, Maximilian; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Aging promotes inflammation, a process contributing to fibrosis and decline in organ function. The release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs [NETosis]), orchestrated by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), damages organs in acute inflammatory models. We determined that NETosis is more prevalent in aged mice and investigated the role of PAD4/NETs in age-related organ fibrosis. Reduction in fibrosis was seen in the hearts and lungs of aged PAD4−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. An increase in left ventricular interstitial collagen deposition and a decline in systolic and diastolic function were present only in WT mice, and not in PAD4−/− mice. In an experimental model of cardiac fibrosis, cardiac pressure overload induced NETosis and significant platelet recruitment in WT but not PAD4−/− myocardium. DNase 1 was given to assess the effects of extracellular chromatin. PAD4 deficiency or DNase 1 similarly protected hearts from fibrosis. We propose a role for NETs in cardiac fibrosis and conclude that PAD4 regulates age-related organ fibrosis and dysfunction. PMID:28031479

  3. Caveolin-1, cellular senescence and age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huafei; Stoppani, Elena; Volonte, Daniela; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2011-01-01

    According to the “free radical theory” of aging, normal aging occurs as the result of tissue damages inflicted by reactive oxygen species (ROS) when ROS production exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell. ROS induce cellular dysfunctions such as stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), which is believed to contribute to normal organismal aging and play a role in age-related diseases. Consistent with this hypothesis, increased oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids have been reported in aged animals and senescent cells accumulate in vivo with advancing age. Caveolin-1 acts as a scaffolding protein that concentrates and functionally regulates signaling molecules. Recently, great progress has been made toward understanding of the role of caveolin-1 in stress-induced premature senescence. Data show that caveolin-mediated signaling may contribute to explain, at the molecular level, how oxidative stress promotes the deleterious effects of cellular senescence such as aging and age-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the cellular mechanisms and functions of caveolin-1 in the context of SIPS and their relevance to the biology of aging. PMID:22100852

  4. Age-related vascular gene expression profiling in mice.

    PubMed

    Rammos, Christos; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Deenen, Rene; Pohl, Julia; Stock, Pia; Hinzmann, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    Increasing age involves a number of detrimental changes in the cardiovascular system and particularly on the large arteries. It deteriorates vascular integrity and leads to increased vascular stiffness entailing hypertension with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The consequences of continuous oxidative stress and damages to biomolecules include altered gene expression, genomic instability, mutations, loss of cell division and cellular responses to increased stress. Many studies have been performed in aged C57BL/6 mice; however, analyses of the age-related changes that occur at a gene expression level and transcriptional profile in vascular tissue have not been elucidated in depth. To determine the changes of the vascular transcriptome, we conducted gene expression microarray experiments on aortas of adult and old mice, in which age-related vascular dysfunction was confirmed by increased stiffness and associated systolic hypertension. Our results highlight differentially expressed genes overrepresented in Gene Ontology categories. Molecular interaction and reaction pathways involved in vascular functions and disease, within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway, the renin-angiotensin system and the detoxification systems are displayed. Our results provide insight to an altered gene expression profile related to age, thus offering useful clues to counteract or prevent vascular aging and its detrimental consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroendorine and Epigentic Mechanisms Subserving Autonomic Imbalance and HPA Dysfunction in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemche, Erwin; Chaban, Oleg S.; Lemche, Alexandra V.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of environmental stress upon pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been substantiated by epidemiological, psychophysiological, and endocrinological studies. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of causative roles of nutritional factors, sympathomedullo-adrenal (SMA) and hypothalamic-pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axes, and adipose tissue chronic low-grade inflammation processes in MetS. Disturbances in the neuroendocrine systems for leptin, melanocortin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein systems have been found resulting directly in MetS-like conditions. The review identifies candidate risk genes from factors shown critical for the functioning of each of these neuroendocrine signaling cascades. In its meta-analytic part, recent studies in epigenetic modification (histone methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination) and posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs are evaluated. Several studies suggest modification mechanisms of early life stress (ELS) and diet-induced obesity (DIO) programming in the hypothalamic regions with populations of POMC-expressing neurons. Epigenetic modifications were found in cortisol (here HSD11B1 expression), melanocortin, leptin, NPY, and adiponectin genes. With respect to adiposity genes, epigenetic modifications were documented for fat mass gene cluster APOA1/C3/A4/A5, and the lipolysis gene LIPE. With regard to inflammatory, immune and subcellular metabolism, PPARG, NKBF1, TNFA, TCF7C2, and those genes expressing cytochrome P450 family enzymes involved in steroidogenesis and in hepatic lipoproteins were documented for epigenetic modifications. PMID:27147943

  6. Ghrelin receptor signaling: a promising therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wei-na; Golden, Erin; Pantaleo, Nick; White, Caitlin M.; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2010-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone ghrelin is an octanoylated 28-residue peptide that exerts numerous physiological functions. Ghrelin exerts its effects on the body mainly through a highly conserved G protein-coupled receptor known as the growth hormone secretagagogue receptor subtype 1a (GHS-R1a). Ghrelin and GSH-R1a are widely expressed in both peripheral and central tissues/organs, and ghrelin signaling plays a critical role in maintaining energy balance and neuronal health. The multiple orexigenic effects of ghrelin and its receptor have been studied in great detail, and GHS-R1a-mediated ghrelin signaling has long been a promising target for the treatment of metabolic disorders, such as obesity. In addition to its well-characterized metabolic effects, there is also mounting evidence that ghrelin-mediated GHS-R1a signaling exerts neuroprotective effects on the brain. In this review, we will summarize some of the effects of ghrelin-mediated GSH-R1a signaling on peripheral energy balance and cognitive function. We will also discuss the potential pharmacotherapeutic role of GSH-R1a-mediated ghrelin signaling for the treatment of complex neuroendocrine disorders. PMID:20632971

  7. Neuroendorine and Epigentic Mechanisms Subserving Autonomic Imbalance and HPA Dysfunction in the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemche, Erwin; Chaban, Oleg S; Lemche, Alexandra V

    2016-01-01

    Impact of environmental stress upon pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been substantiated by epidemiological, psychophysiological, and endocrinological studies. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of causative roles of nutritional factors, sympathomedullo-adrenal (SMA) and hypothalamic-pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axes, and adipose tissue chronic low-grade inflammation processes in MetS. Disturbances in the neuroendocrine systems for leptin, melanocortin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein systems have been found resulting directly in MetS-like conditions. The review identifies candidate risk genes from factors shown critical for the functioning of each of these neuroendocrine signaling cascades. In its meta-analytic part, recent studies in epigenetic modification (histone methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination) and posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs are evaluated. Several studies suggest modification mechanisms of early life stress (ELS) and diet-induced obesity (DIO) programming in the hypothalamic regions with populations of POMC-expressing neurons. Epigenetic modifications were found in cortisol (here HSD11B1 expression), melanocortin, leptin, NPY, and adiponectin genes. With respect to adiposity genes, epigenetic modifications were documented for fat mass gene cluster APOA1/C3/A4/A5, and the lipolysis gene LIPE. With regard to inflammatory, immune and subcellular metabolism, PPARG, NKBF1, TNFA, TCF7C2, and those genes expressing cytochrome P450 family enzymes involved in steroidogenesis and in hepatic lipoproteins were documented for epigenetic modifications.

  8. G protein coupled receptor 18: A potential role for endocannabinoid signaling in metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Gayathri; Simcocks, Anna; Hryciw, Deanne H; Hutchinson, Dana S; McAinch, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are products of dietary fatty acids that are modulated by an alteration in food intake levels. Overweight and obese individuals have substantially higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, and show an altered pattern of cannabinoid receptor expression. These cannabinoid receptors are part of a large family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs are major therapeutic targets for various diseases within the cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems, as well as metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity is considered a state of chronic low-grade inflammation elicited by an immunological response. Interestingly, the newly deorphanized GPCR (GPR18), which is considered to be a putative cannabinoid receptor, is proposed to have an immunological function. In this review, the current scientific knowledge on GPR18 is explored including its localization, signaling pathways, and pharmacology. Importantly, the involvement of nutritional factors and potential dietary regulation of GPR18 and its (patho)physiological roles are described. Further research on this receptor and its regulation will enable a better understanding of the complex mechanisms of GPR18 and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders.

  9. Nutritional influences on age-related skeletal muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ailsa A

    2014-02-01

    Age-related muscle loss impacts on whole-body metabolism and leads to frailty and sarcopenia, which are risk factors for fractures and mortality. Although nutrients are integral to muscle metabolism the relationship between nutrition and muscle loss has only been extensively investigated for protein and amino acids. The objective of the present paper is to describe other aspects of nutrition and their association with skeletal muscle mass. Mechanisms for muscle loss relate to imbalance in protein turnover with a number of anabolic pathways of which the mechanistic TOR pathway and the IGF-1-Akt-FoxO pathways are the most characterised. In terms of catabolism the ubiquitin proteasome system, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation, oxidation and insulin resistance are among the major mechanisms proposed. The limited research associating vitamin D, alcohol, dietary acid-base load, dietary fat and anti-oxidant nutrients with age-related muscle loss is described. Vitamin D may be protective for muscle loss; a more alkalinogenic diet and diets higher in the anti-oxidant nutrients vitamin C and vitamin E may also prevent muscle loss. Although present recommendations for prevention of sarcopenia focus on protein, and to some extent on vitamin D, other aspects of the diet including fruits and vegetables should be considered. Clearly, more research into other aspects of nutrition and their role in prevention of muscle loss is required.

  10. Apigenin and naringenin regulate glucose and lipid metabolism, and ameliorate vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Qin, Weiwei; Wu, Feihua; Wang, Shanshan; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Liying; Zeng, Biao; Ma, Shiping; Liang, Jingyu

    2016-02-15

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial step of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the amelioration of apigenin and naringenin in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin and explored the underlying mechanism. Apigenin or naringenin was intragastrically administered at 50 or 100mg/kg once a day for 6 weeks. Biochemical parameters including blood glucose, glycated serum protein, serum lipid, insulin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured. Vascular reactivity in isolated thoracic aortic rings was examined. Pathological features of the thoracic aorta were further observed through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Lastly, we evaluated their effects on insulin resistance of palmitic acid (PA)-induced endothelial cells. Compared with diabetic control group, apigenin and naringenin significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, serum lipid, malonaldehyde, ICAM-1 and insulin resistance index, increased SOD activity and improved impaired glucose tolerance. Apigenin and naringenin restored phenylephrine-mediated contractions and acetylcholine or insulin-induced relaxations in aortic tissues. Furthermore, pathological damage in the thoracic aorta of apigenin and naringenin groups was more remissive than diabetic control group. In vitro, apigenin and naringenin inhibited NF-κB activation and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in PA-treated endothelial cells and improved nitric oxide production in the presence of insulin. In conclusion, both apigenin and naringenin can ameliorate glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as endothelial dysfunction in T2D rats at least in part by down-regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. In general, apigenin showed greater potency than naringenin equivalent.

  11. Preventing painful age-related bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michelle L; Chartier, Stephane R; Mitchell, Stefanie A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone fractures are usually painful and have highly negative effects on a geriatric patient’s functional status, quality of life, and survival. Currently, there are few analgesic therapies that fully control bone fracture pain in the elderly without significant unwanted side effects. However, another way of controlling age-related fracture pain would be to preemptively administer an osteo-anabolic agent to geriatric patients with high risk of fracture, so as to build new cortical bone and prevent the fracture from occurring. A major question, however, is whether an osteo-anabolic agent can stimulate the proliferation of osteogenic cells and build significant amounts of new cortical bone in light of the decreased number and responsiveness of osteogenic cells in aging bone. To explore this question, geriatric and young mice, 20 and 4 months old, respectively, received either vehicle or a monoclonal antibody that sequesters sclerostin (anti-sclerostin) for 28 days. From days 21 to 28, animals also received sustained administration of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which labels the DNA of dividing cells. Animals were then euthanized at day 28 and the femurs were examined for cortical bone formation, bone mineral density, and newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum which is a tissue that is pivotally involved in the formation of new cortical bone. In both the geriatric and young mice, anti-sclerostin induced a significant increase in the thickness of the cortical bone, bone mineral density, and the proliferation of newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum. These results suggest that even in geriatric animals, anti-sclerostin therapy can build new cortical bone and increase the proliferation of osteogenic cells and thus reduce the likelihood of painful age-related bone fractures. PMID:27837171

  12. Age-related eye disease and gender.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of moderate to severe visual impairment and blindness is 285 millions, with 65% of visually impaired and 82% of all blind people being 50 years and older. Meta-analyses have shown that two out of three blind people are women, a gender discrepancy that holds true for both developed and developing countries. Cataract accounts for more than half of all blindness globally and gender inequity in access to cataract surgery is the major cause of the higher prevalence of blindness in women. In addition to gender differences in cataract surgical coverage, population-based studies on the prevalence of lens opacities indicate that women have a higher risk of developing cataract. Laboratory as well as epidemiologic studies suggest that estrogen may confer antioxidative protection against cataractogenesis, but the withdrawal effect of estrogen in menopause leads to increased risk of cataract in women. For the other major age-related eye diseases; glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, data are inconclusive. Due to anatomic factors, angle closure glaucoma is more common in women, whereas the dominating glaucoma type; primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), is more prevalent in men. Diabetic retinopathy also has a male predominance and vascular/circulatory factors have been implied both in diabetic retinopathy and in POAG. For AMD, data on gender differences are conflicting although some studies indicate increased prevalence of drusen and neovascular AMD in women. To conclude, both biologic and socioeconomic factors must be considered when investigating causes of gender differences in the prevalence of age-related eye disease.

  13. Renal tubular dysfunction and abnormalities of calcium metabolism in cadmium workers

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, George

    1979-01-01

    Tubular proteinuria is generally accepted as the critical effect following long-term, low-level exposure to cadmium as seen in an industrial environment. This effect may not be of immediate importance to the health of the individual, but the significance, in terms of long-term morbidity and mortality, of the renal tubular defect of which it is an indicator is not fully understood, and certain sequelae may have remained unrecognized due to inadequate follow-up. Follow-up studies have been performed in nine of 12 workers who were initially investigated in 1962. In six of the men exposures ranged from 28 to 45 years to cadmium sulfide dust and for shorter periods in the earlier years to cadmium oxide fume and dust. These six men had tubular proteinuria when first seen, and this has persisted in the five survivors. All six men had hypercalciuria, and two of them became recurrent stone formers. One man whose urinary calcium excretion later fell to a low level more recently developed vitamin D resistant osteomalacia. In addition, each of the six men had exhibited some, but not all, of a variety of biochemical abnormalities related to other proximal renal tubular defects, and the worker who developed osteomalacia had additional evidence of a distal tubular defect. The five survivors also have evidence of slowly progressive deterioration in glomerular function. Follow-up of this small group has shown that renal tubular dysfunction in cadmium workers may continue symptom-free for long intervals, but in a proportion of cases serious clinical effects may develop after a number of years. ImagesFIGURE 1. PMID:488032

  14. Genetics Home Reference: age-related macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions age-related macular degeneration age-related macular degeneration Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading ...

  15. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  16. Pathophysiology of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Giuseppina; Chiappelli, Martina; De Martinis, Massimo; Franco, Vito; Ginaldi, Lia; Guiglia, Rosario; Licastro, Federico; Lio, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A Symposium regarding the Pathophysiology of Successful and Unsuccessful Ageing was held in Palermo, Italy on 7-8 April 2009. Three lectures from that Symposium by G. Campisi, L. Ginaldi and F. Licastro are here summarized. Ageing is a complex process which negatively impacts on the development of various bodily systems and its ability to function. A long life in a healthy, vigorous, youthful body has always been one of humanity's greatest dreams. Thus, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of age-related diseases is urgently required to improve our understanding of maintaining good health in the elderly and to program possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:19737378

  17. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depression, and summarizes interventions for preventing depression in this high-risk group.

  18. Interleukin-15 in obesity and metabolic dysfunction: current understanding and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y; Li, F; Wang, W; Guo, Q; Wen, C; Li, Y; Yin, Y

    2017-10-01

    Obesity rises rapidly and is a major health concern for modern people. Importantly, it is a major risk factor in the development of numerous chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recently, interleukin (IL)-15 has attracted considerable attention as a potential regulator for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity and T2DM. The beneficial effects include increased loss of fat mass and body weight, improved lipid and glucose metabolism, reduced white adipose tissue inflammation, enhanced mitochondrial function, alterations in the composition of muscle fibres and gut bacterial and attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although these beneficial effects are somewhat controversial, IL-15, exogenously delivered or endogenously produced, may be a promising target in the prevention and treatment of obesity and T2DM. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  19. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity.

  20. [The cancer paradigm in pulmonary arterial hypertension: towards anti-remodeling therapies targeting metabolic dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Dumas, Sébastien J; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare, complex and multifactorial disease in which pulmonary vascular remodeling plays a major role ending in right heart failure and death. Current specific therapies of PAH that mainly target the vasoconstriction/vasodilatation imbalance are not curative. Bi-pulmonary transplantation remains the only option in patients resistant to current therapies. It is thus crucial to identify novel vascular anti-remodeling therapeutic targets. This remodeling displays several properties of cancer cells, especially overproliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary vascular cells, hallmarks of cancer related to the metabolic shift known as the "Warburg effect". The latter is characterized by a shift of ATP production, from oxidative phosphorylation to low rate aerobic glycolysis. In compensation, the cancer cells exhibit exacerbated glutaminolysis thus resulting in glutamine addiction, necessary to their overproliferation. Glutamine intake results in glutamate production, a molecule at the crossroads of energy metabolism and cancer cell communication, thus contributing to cell proliferation. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies targeting glutamate production, its release into the extracellular space and its membrane receptors have been suggested to treat different types of cancers, not only in the central nervous system but also in the periphery. We propose that similar strategies targeting glutamatergic signaling may be considered in PAH, especially as they could affect not only the vascular remodeling but also the right heart hypertrophy known to involve the glutaminolysis pathway. Ongoing studies aim to characterize the involvement of the glutamate pathway and its receptors in vascular remodeling, and the therapeutic potential of specific molecules targeting this pathway.

  1. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  2. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Jacob A.; Brunt, Vienna E.; Vallerga, Anne K.; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A.; Minson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed. PMID:26594225

  3. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Zarling, Jacob A; Brunt, Vienna E; Vallerga, Anne K; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed.

  4. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  5. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  7. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, and microvascular dysfunction: a principal component analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Panazzolo, Diogo G; Sicuro, Fernando L; Clapauch, Ruth; Maranhão, Priscila A; Bouskela, Eliete; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz G

    2012-11-13

    We aimed to evaluate the multivariate association between functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements. Data from 189 female subjects (34.0 ± 15.5 years, 30.5 ± 7.1 kg/m2), who were non-smokers, non-regular drug users, without a history of diabetes and/or hypertension, were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is a classical multivariate exploratory tool because it highlights common variation between variables allowing inferences about possible biological meaning of associations between them, without pre-establishing cause-effect relationships. In total, 15 variables were used for PCA: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), triglycerides (TG), insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and functional microvascular variables measured by nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy was used for direct visualization of nutritive capillaries, assessing functional capillary density, red blood cell velocity (RBCV) at rest and peak after 1 min of arterial occlusion (RBCV(max)), and the time taken to reach RBCV(max) (TRBCV(max)). A total of 35% of subjects had metabolic syndrome, 77% were overweight/obese, and 9.5% had impaired fasting glucose. PCA was able to recognize that functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements had a similar variation. The first five principal components explained most of the intrinsic variation of the data. For example, principal component 1 was associated with BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, insulin, TG, CRP, and TRBCV(max) varying in the same way. Principal component 1 also showed a strong association among HDL-c, RBCV, and RBCV(max), but in the opposite way. Principal component 3 was associated only with microvascular

  8. Intentionally induced intestinal barrier dysfunction causes inflammation, affects metabolism, and reduces productivity in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Kvidera, S K; Dickson, M J; Abuajamieh, M; Snider, D B; Fernandez, M V Sanz; Johnson, J S; Keating, A F; Gorden, P J; Green, H B; Schoenberg, K M; Baumgard, L H

    2017-03-22

    Study objectives were to evaluate the effects of intentionally reduced intestinal barrier function on productivity, metabolism, and inflammatory indices in otherwise healthy dairy cows. Fourteen lactating Holstein cows (parity 2.6 ± 0.3; 117 ± 18 d in milk) were enrolled in 2 experimental periods. Period 1 (5 d) served as the baseline for period 2 (7 d), during which cows received 1 of 2 i.v. treatments twice per day: sterile saline or a gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI; 1.5 mg/kg of body weight). Gamma-secretase inhibitors reduce intestinal barrier function by inhibiting crypt cell differentiation into absorptive enterocytes. During period 2, control cows receiving sterile saline were pair-fed (PF) to the GSI-treated cows, and all cows were killed at the end of period 2. Administering GSI increased goblet cell area 218, 70, and 28% in jejunum, ileum, and colon, respectively. In the jejunum, GSI-treated cows had increased crypt depth and reduced villus height, villus height-to-crypt depth ratio, cell proliferation, and mucosal surface area. Plasma lipopolysaccharide binding protein increased with time, and tended to be increased 42% in GSI-treated cows relative to PF controls on d 5 to 7. Circulating haptoglobin and serum amyloid A concentrations increased (585- and 4.4-fold, respectively) similarly in both treatments. Administering GSI progressively reduced dry matter intake (66%) and, by design, the pattern and magnitude of decreased nutrient intake was similar in PF controls. A similar progressive decrease (42%) in milk yield occurred in both treatments, but we observed no treatment effects on milk components. Cows treated with GSI tended to have increased plasma insulin (68%) and decreased circulating nonesterified fatty acids (29%) compared with PF cows. For both treatments, plasma glucose decreased with time while β-hydroxybutyrate progressively increased. Liver triglycerides increased 221% from period 1 to sacrifice in both treatments. No differences were

  9. Multiple effects of circadian dysfunction induced by photoperiod shifts: alterations in context memory and food metabolism in the same subjects.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert J; Zelinski, Erin L; Keeley, Robin J; Sutherland, Dylan; Fehr, Leah; Hong, Nancy S

    2013-06-13

    Humans exposed to shiftwork conditions have been reported to have increased susceptibility to various health problems including various forms of dementia, cancer, heart disease, and metabolic disorders related to obesity. The present experiments assessed the effects of circadian disruption on learning and memory function and various food related processes including diet consumption rates, food metabolism, and changes in body weight. These experiments utilized a novel variant of the conditioned place preference task (CPP) that is normally used to assess Pavlovian associative learning and memory processes produced via repeated context-reward pairings. For the present experiments, the standard CPP paradigm was modified in that both contexts were paired with food, but the dietary constituents of the food were different. In particular, we were interested in whether rats could differentiate between two types of carbohydrates, simple (dextrose) and complex (starch). Consumption rates for each type of carbohydrate were measured throughout training. A test of context preference without the food present was also conducted. At the end of behavioral testing, a fasting glucose test and a glucose challenge test were administered. Chronic photoperiod shifting resulted in impaired context learning and memory processes thought to be mediated by a neural circuit centered on the hippocampus. The results also showed that preferences for the different carbohydrate diets were altered in rats experiencing photoperiod shifting in that they maintained an initial preference for the simple carbohydrate throughout training. Lastly, photoperiod shifting resulted in changes in fasting blood glucose levels and elicited weight gain. These results show that chronic photoperiod shifting, which likely resulted in circadian dysfunction, impairs multiple functions of the brain and/or body in the same individual.

  10. Water metabolism dysfunction via renin-angiotensin system activation caused by liver damage in mice treated with microcystin-RR.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qing; Sun, Feng; Wang, Weiguang; Xiao, Wenqing; Zhao, Xiaoni; Gu, Kangding

    2017-03-19

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of monocyclic heptapeptide toxins that have been shown to act as potent hepatotoxins. However, the observed symptoms of water metabolism disruption induced by microcystin-RR (MC-RR) or MCs have rarely been reported, and a relatively clear mechanism has not been identified. In the present study, male mice were divided into 4 groups (A: 140μg/kg, B: 70μg/kg,C: 35μg/kg, and D: 0μg/kg) and administered MC-RR daily for a month. On day 8 of treatment, an increase in water intake and urine output was observed in the high-dose group compared with the control, and the symptoms worsened with the repeated administration of the toxin until day 30. In addition, the urine specific gravity decreased and serum enzymes that can reflect hepatic damage increased in the high-dose group compared with the control (P<0.05). The mRNA level of angiotensinogen (AGT) in hepatocytes was upregulated to approximately 150% of the control (P<0.05), and the serum renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was activated in the high-dose group; however, signs of renal injury were not observed throughout the experiment. After the toxin treatment was completed, the high levels of the RAS and vasopressin in group A returned to normal levels within 1 week. As expected, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia also disappeared. Therefore, we propose that water metabolism dysfunction occurs via RAS activation caused by liver damage because the increased serum RAS levels in the experiment were consistent with the increased urine output and water intake in the mice during the observation period. In addition, we found for the first time that a RAS blocker could alleviate the observed polyuria and polydipsia and inactivate the high level of the RAS induced by MC-RR in a dose-dependent manner, which further supported our hypothesis.

  11. Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 Ameliorates Metabolic and Immunological Dysfunction in Mice with High-Fat-Diet Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gauffin Cano, Paola; Santacruz, Arlette; Moya, Ángela; Sanz, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Background Associations have been made between obesity and reduced intestinal numbers of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, but there is no direct evidence of the role these bacteria play in obesity. Herein, the effects of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 on obesity-related metabolic and immune alterations have been evaluated. Methods and Findings Adult (6–8 week) male wild-type C57BL-6 mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat-diet HFD to induce obesity, supplemented or not with B. uniformis CECT 7771 for seven weeks. Animal weight was monitored and histologic, biochemical, immunocompetent cell functions, and features of the faecal microbiota were analysed after intervention. The oral administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 reduced body weight gain, liver steatosis and liver cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased small adipocyte numbers in HFD-fed mice. The strain also reduced serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and leptin levels, and improved oral tolerance to glucose in HFD fed mice. The bacterial strain also reduced dietary fat absorption, as indicated by the reduced number of fat micelles detected in enterocytes. Moreover, B. uniformis CECT 7771 improved immune defence mechanisms, impaired in obesity. HFD-induced obesity led to a decrease in TNF-α production by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LPS, conversely, the administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 increased TNF-α production and phagocytosis. Administering this strain also increased TNF-α production by dendritic cells (DCs) in response to LPS stimulation, which was significantly reduced by HFD. B. uniformis CECT 7771 also restored the capacity of DCs to induce a T-cell proliferation response, which was impaired in obese mice. HFD induced marked changes in gut microbiota composition, which were partially restored by the intervention. Conclusions Altogether, the findings indicate that administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 ameliorates HFD-induced metabolic

  12. Silymarin Ameliorates Metabolic Dysfunction Associated with Diet-Induced Obesity via Activation of Farnesyl X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Jinwen; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yahui; Li, Yin; Li, Yifei; Fan, Shengjie; Ma, Yue-Ming; Tong, Qingchun; Yang, Li; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Silymarin, a standardized extract of the milk thistle seeds, has been widely used to treat chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other types of toxic liver damage. Despite increasing studies on the action of silymarin and its major active constituent, silybin in their therapeutic properties against insulin resistance, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism underlying silymarin action remains unclear. Experimental approach: C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months to induce obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia, and fatty liver. These mice were then continuously treated with HFD alone or mixed with silymarin at 40 mg/100 g for additional 6 weeks. Biochemical analysis was used to test the serum lipid and bile acid profiles. Farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transactivities were analyzed in liver using a gene reporter assay based on quantitative RT-PCR. Key results: Silymarin treatment ameliorated insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and inflammation, and reconstituted the bile acid pool in liver of diet-induced obesity. Associated with this, silybin and silymarin enhanced FXR transactivity. Consistently, in HepG2 cells, silybin inhibited NF-κB signaling, which was enhanced by FXR activation. Conclusion and implications: Our results suggest that silybin is an effective component of silymarin for treating metabolic syndrome by stimulating FXR signaling. PMID:27733832

  13. TWEAK/Fn14 Signaling Axis Mediates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shuichi; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) through binding to its receptor fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14) has been shown to regulate many cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis, under both physiological and pathological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that TWEAK is also a major muscle wasting cytokine. TWEAK activates nuclear factor-κB signaling and proteolytic pathways such as ubiquitin–proteasome system, autophagy, and caspases to induce muscle proteolysis in cultured myotubes. Fn14 is dormant or expressed in minimal amounts in normal healthy muscle. However, specific atrophic conditions, such as denervation, immobilization, and starvation stimulate the expression of Fn14 leading to activation of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and eventually skeletal muscle atrophy. TWEAK also causes slow- to fast-type fiber transition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that TWEAK diminishes mitochondrial content and represses skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation capacity. TWEAK mediates these effects through affecting the expression of a number of genes and microRNAs. In this review article, we have discussed the recent advancements toward understanding the role and mechanisms of action of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of atrophy and oxidative metabolism. PMID:24478779

  14. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative condition and the most common type of amnestic dementia in the elderly. Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk of developing AD in adulthood as a result of chromosome 21 trisomy and triplication of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. In both conditions, the central nervous system (CNS) basal forebrain cholinergic system progressively degenerates, and such changes contribute to the manifestation of cognitive decline and dementia. Given the strong dependency of these neurons on nerve growth factor (NGF), it was hypothesized that their atrophy was caused by NGF deficits. However, in AD, the synthesis of NGF is not affected at the transcript level and there is a marked increase in its precursor, proNGF. This apparent paradox remained elusive for many years. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting a CNS deficit in the extracellular metabolism of NGF, both in AD and in DS brains. We describe the nature of this trophic disconnection and its implication for the atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We further discuss the potential of NGF pathway markers as diagnostic indicators of a CNS trophic disconnection.

  15. Hemodynamic and metabolic basis of impaired exercise tolerance in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Roubin, G.S.; Anderson, S.D.; Shen, W.F.; Choong, C.Y.; Alwyn, M.; Hillery, S.; Harris, P.J.; Kelly, D.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Hemodynamic and metabolic changes were measured at rest and during exercise in 23 patients with chronic heart failure and in 6 control subjects. Exercise was limited by leg fatigue in both groups and capacity was 40% lower in the patients with failure. At rest, comparing patients with control subjects, heart rate and right atrial and pulmonary wedge pressure were higher; cardiac output, stroke volume and work indexes and ejection fraction were lower; mean arterial and right atrial pressure and systemic resistance were similar. During all phases of exercise in patients with heart failure, pulmonary wedge pressure and systemic vascular resistance were higher and pulmonary vascular resistance remained markedly elevated compared with values in control subjects. Cardiac output was lower in the patients with failure, but appeared to have the same physiologic distribution in both groups during exercise. Although arterial-femoral venous oxygen content difference was higher in patients with heart failure, this increase did not compensate for the reduced blood flow. Even though the maximal oxygen consumption was significantly reduced, femoral venous lactate and pH values were higher than values in control subjects, but femoral venous pH was similar in both groups at their respective levels of maximal exercise. Ejection fraction was lower in those with heart failure at rest and did not increase with exercise. Ventilation in relation to oxygen consumption was higher in patients with failure than in control subjects.

  16. Ataxin-10 is part of a cachexokine cocktail triggering cardiac metabolic dysfunction in cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Michaela; Oeing, Christian U.; Rohm, Maria; Baysal-Temel, Ezgi; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Bauer, Ralf; Volz, H. Christian; Boutros, Michael; Sohn, Daniela; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Eichelbaum, Katrin; Werner, Tessa; Hirt, Marc N.; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Müller-Decker, Karin; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katus, Hugo A.; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Backs, Johannes; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cancer cachexia affects the majority of tumor patients and significantly contributes to high mortality rates in these subjects. Despite its clinical importance, the identity of tumor-borne signals and their impact on specific peripheral organ systems, particularly the heart, remain mostly unknown. Methods and results By combining differential colon cancer cell secretome profiling with large-scale cardiomyocyte phenotyping, we identified a signature panel of seven “cachexokines”, including Bridging integrator 1, Syntaxin 7, Multiple inositol-polyphosphate phosphatase 1, Glucosidase alpha acid, Chemokine ligand 2, Adamts like 4, and Ataxin-10, which were both sufficient and necessary to trigger cardiac atrophy and aberrant fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes. As a prototypical example, engineered secretion of Ataxin-10 from non-cachexia-inducing cells was sufficient to induce cachexia phenotypes in cardiomyocytes, correlating with elevated Ataxin-10 serum levels in murine and human cancer cachexia models. Conclusions As Ataxin-10 serum levels were also found to be elevated in human cachectic cancer patients, the identification of Ataxin-10 as part of a cachexokine cocktail now provides a rational approach towards personalized predictive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures in cancer cachexia. PMID:26909315

  17. Roles of vascular and metabolic components in cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: short- and long-term modification by non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-11-05

    It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of (1) compromised vascular reactivity, (2) vascular lesions, (3) hypo/hyperglycemia, and (4) exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. β-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: (1) functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, (2) MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, (3) clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  18. Abdominal adipose tissue: early metabolic dysfunction associated to insulin resistance and oxidative stress induced by an unbalanced diet.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo, O R; Marra, C A; Raschia, A; Rodriguez, S; Gagliardino, J J

    2008-11-01

    The possible contribution of early changes in lipid composition, function, and antioxidant status of abdominal adipose tissue (AAT) induced by a fructose-rich diet (FRD) to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and oxidative stress (OS) was studied. Wistar rats were fed with a commercial diet with (FRD) or without 10% fructose in the drinking water for 3 weeks. The glucose (G), triglyceride (TG), and insulin (I) plasma levels, and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, lyposoluble antioxidants, total glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation as TBARS, fatty acid (FA) composition of AAT-TG as well as their release by incubated pieces of AAT were measured. Rats fed with a FRD have significantly higher plasma levels of G, TG, and I. Their AAT showed a marked increase in content and ratios of saturated to monounsaturated and polyunsaturated FAs, TBARS, and catalase, GSH-transferase and GSH-reductase, together with a decrease in superoxide dismutase and GSH-peroxidase activity, and total GSH, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and lycopene content. Incubated AAT from FRD released in vitro higher amount of free fatty acids (FFAs) with higher ratios of saturated to monounsaturated and polyunsaturated FAs. Our data suggest that FRD induced an early prooxidative state and metabolic dysfunction in AAT that would favor the overall development of IR and OS and further development of pancreatic beta-cell failure; therefore, its early control would represent an appropriate strategy to prevent alterations such as the development of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Protective Effects of PGC-1α Against Lead-Induced Oxidative Stress and Energy Metabolism Dysfunction in Testis Sertoli Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Ye, Jingping; Wang, Lu; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Yucheng; Sun, Jiantao; Du, Chuang; Wang, Chunhong; Xu, Siyuan

    2017-02-01

    The reproductive system is sensitive to lead (Pb) toxicity, which has long been an area of research interest, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be illustrated. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is pivotal in mitochondrial function. In this study, mouse testis Sertoli cells (TM4 cells), PGC-1α lower-expression (PGC-1α(-)) TM4 cells and PGC-1α overexpression (PGC-1α(+)) TM4 cells were used to explore the protective roles of PGC-1α against lead toxicity on the mouse reproductive system. Lead acetate (PbAc) exposure decreased the expression level of PGC-1α, increased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reduced the level of ATP in the three TM4 cell lines. The effects of PbAc on intracellular ATP level and on ROS content were significantly weakened in PGC-1α(+)TM4 cells versus TM4 cells and were significantly amplified in PGC-1α(-)TM4 cells versus TM4 cells. These results suggest that PGC-1α is a protective factor against PbAc-induced oxidative stress and energy metabolism dysfunction in the mouse reproductive system, thereby holding the potential of being developed as a preventive or therapeutic strategy against disorders induced by lead exposure.

  20. Prevalence of Canine Obesity, Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction, and Relationship with Owner Obesity in an Obesogenic Region of Spain.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Alonso, J Alberto; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Peña, Cristina; Suárez, Lourdes; Juste, M Candelaria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of canine obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunction (ORMD) in the obesogenic area in Spain. The prevalence of overweight/obesity among owners of obese pets was also evaluated. In the sample population studied (93 client-owned dogs), 40.9% of dogs presented obesity (body condition score 7-9/9), 40.9% of dogs presented hypertension, 20.4% of dogs presented fasting hypertriglyceridemia, 20.4% fasting hypercholesterolemia, and 5.4% of dogs presented fasting hyperglycemia. The overall prevalence of ORMD was of 22.6%. Seventy-eight percent of overweight/obese owners had overweight/obese dogs (P < 0.001) including all dogs diagnosed with ORMD. In conclusion, in the studied obesogenic region of Spain, the prevalence of canine obesity and ORMD was shown to be elevated and related to the presence of overweight/obesity in owners. All dogs with ORMD were owned by overweight/obese persons. These results provide new inputs for future studies highlighting the relationship between owner and pet obesity and indicating the need of further efforts to control and reduce obesity prevalence in both.

  1. Murine filaggrin-2 is involved in epithelial barrier function and down-regulated in metabolically induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Britta; Ahrens, Kerstin; Wu, Zhihong; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2012-04-01

    The S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) are thought to be involved in the barrier formation and function of the skin. Mutations in the profilaggrin gene, one of the best investigated members of this family, are known to be the major risk factors for ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. Recently, we identified human filaggrin-2 as a new member of the SFTP family. To achieve further insight into its function, here the murine filaggrin-2 was analysed as a possible orthologue. The 5' and 3' ends of the mouse filaggrin-2 cDNA of the BALB/c strain were sequenced and confirmed an organization typical for SFTPs. Murine filaggrin-2 showed an expression pattern mainly in keratinizing epithelia in the upper cell layers on both mRNA and protein levels. The expression in cultured mouse keratinocytes was increased upon elevated Ca(2+) levels. Immunoblotting experiments indicated an intraepidermal processing of the 250-kDa full-length protein. In metabolically (essential fatty acid-deficient diet) induced skin barrier dysfunction, filaggrin-2 expression was significantly reduced, whereas filaggrin expression was up-regulated. In contrast, mechanical barrier disruption with acetone treatment did not affect filaggrin-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that filaggrin-2 may contribute to epidermal barrier function and its regulation differs, at least in parts, from that of filaggrin.

  2. Prevalence of Canine Obesity, Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysfunction, and Relationship with Owner Obesity in an Obesogenic Region of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Alonso, J. Alberto; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Peña, Cristina; Suárez, Lourdes; Juste, M. Candelaria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of canine obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunction (ORMD) in the obesogenic area in Spain. The prevalence of overweight/obesity among owners of obese pets was also evaluated. In the sample population studied (93 client-owned dogs), 40.9% of dogs presented obesity (body condition score 7–9/9), 40.9% of dogs presented hypertension, 20.4% of dogs presented fasting hypertriglyceridemia, 20.4% fasting hypercholesterolemia, and 5.4% of dogs presented fasting hyperglycemia. The overall prevalence of ORMD was of 22.6%. Seventy-eight percent of overweight/obese owners had overweight/obese dogs (P < 0.001) including all dogs diagnosed with ORMD. In conclusion, in the studied obesogenic region of Spain, the prevalence of canine obesity and ORMD was shown to be elevated and related to the presence of overweight/obesity in owners. All dogs with ORMD were owned by overweight/obese persons. These results provide new inputs for future studies highlighting the relationship between owner and pet obesity and indicating the need of further efforts to control and reduce obesity prevalence in both. PMID:28487859

  3. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in human muscle: Dysfunction causes abnormal metabolic recovery in exercise.

    PubMed

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Bear, Christine E; Huan, Ling Jun; Kim Chiaw, Patrick; Ackerley, Cameron A; Tein, Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have exercise intolerance and skeletal muscle weakness not solely attributable to physical inactivity or pulmonary function abnormalities. CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been demonstrated in human bronchial smooth and cardiac muscle. Using (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle, we showed CF patients to have lower resting muscle adenosine triphosphate and delayed phosphocreatine recovery times after high-intensity exercise, suggesting abnormal muscle aerobic metabolism; and higher end-exercise pH values, suggesting altered bicarbonate transport. Our objective was to study CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle. We studied CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle by Western blot with anti-CFTR antibody (Ab) L12B4 and demonstrated a single band with expected molecular weight of 168kDa. We isolated the cDNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced a 975bp segment (c. 3,600-4,575) that was identical to the human CFTR sequence. We showed punctate staining of CFTR in sarcoplasm and sarcolemma by immunofluorescence microscopy with L12B4 Ab and secondary Alexa 488-labeled Ab. We confirmed CFTR expression in the sarcotubular network and sarcolemma by electron microscopy, using immunogold-labeled anti-CFTR Ab. We observed activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels with iodide efflux, on addition of forskolin, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, and 8-chlorphenylthio-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, in wild-type C57BL/6J isolated muscle fibers in contrast to no efflux from mutant F508del-CFTR muscle. We speculate that a defect in sarcoplasmic reticulum CFTR Cl(-) channels could alter the electrochemical gradient, causing dysregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, for example, ryanodine receptor or sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) adenosine triphosphatases essential to excitation-contraction coupling leading to exercise intolerance and muscle weakness in CF.

  4. Normoxic resuscitation after cardiac arrest protects against hippocampal oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Vereczki, Viktoria; Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E; Hof, Patrick R; Hoffman, Gloria E; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Resuscitation and prolonged ventilation using 100% oxygen after cardiac arrest is standard clinical practice despite evidence from animal models indicating that neurologic outcome is improved using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. This study tested the hypothesis that normoxic ventilation during the first hour after cardiac arrest in dogs protects against prelethal oxidative stress to proteins, loss of the critical metabolic enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), and minimizes subsequent neuronal death in the hippocampus. Anesthetized beagles underwent 10 mins ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, followed by defibrillation and ventilation with either 21% or 100% O2. At 1 h after resuscitation, the ventilator was adjusted to maintain normal blood gas levels in both groups. Brains were perfusion-fixed at 2 h reperfusion and used for immunohistochemical measurements of hippocampal nitrotyrosine, a product of protein oxidation, and the E1α subunit of PDHC. In hyperoxic dogs, PDHC immunostaining diminished by approximately 90% compared with sham-operated dogs, while staining in normoxic animals was not significantly different from nonischemic dogs. Protein nitration in the hippocampal neurons of hyperoxic animals was 2–3 times greater than either sham-operated or normoxic resuscitated animals at 2 h reperfusion. Stereologic quantification of neuronal death at 24 h reperfusion showed a 40% reduction using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. These results indicate that postischemic hyperoxic ventilation promotes oxidative stress that exacerbates prelethal loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase and delayed hippocampal neuronal cell death. Moreover, these findings indicate the need for clinical trials comparing the effects of different ventilatory oxygen levels on neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:16251887

  5. Undiagnosed metabolic dysfunction and sudden infant death syndrome--a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ning An; Currier, Robert J; Baer, Rebecca J; Feuchtbaum, Lisa; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L

    2015-03-01

    Decades of research has yielded few clues about causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). While some studies have shown a link to inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), few have examined the link in a large population-based sample. This population-based case-control study assessed the association between undiagnosed IEMs and SIDS. Children born in California during 2005-08 who died from SIDS were obtained from death records and linked to the newborn screening, birth certificate, and hospital discharge databases. Individuals with known chromosomal and neural tube defects, genetic disorders, and non-singleton births were excluded. Five controls were matched to each case on tandem mass spectrometry testing date and lab code. Rates of undiagnosed IEMs were compared between cases and controls using conditional logistic regression adjusting for known confounding factors. After adjusting for known confounding factors, SIDS cases had similar risk of having IEMs as controls (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3, 5.5). Infants who were male, Black, and born preterm had higher risk of SIDS with the highest risk observed for those born preterm [adjusted HR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.3, 2.2]. Younger maternal age at delivery, mother being born in the US, parity after current birth >3, and delayed prenatal care were also significantly associated with higher risk of SIDS. While many maternal and infant factors are associated with an increased risk of SIDS, there is no evidence that undiagnosed IEMs are associated with increased risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparison between cafeteria and high-fat diets in the induction of metabolic dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Higa, Talita S; Spinola, Acauã V; Fonseca-Alaniz, Miriam H; Evangelista, Fabiana Sant Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to compare the metabolic responses induced by high-fat (HF) diet and cafeteria (CA) diet in mice. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into groups fed a chow (C, n=13), CA (n=12) or HF (n=11) diet during 12 weeks. Diets did not change body weight, Lee index, inguinal subcutaneous fat, the weight of organs and muscles, resting arterial pressure and heart rate. CA and HF increased visceral fat pad mass compared to C group, but only CA group showed greater adipocyte diameter and food intake compared to the C. Food intake was reduced in HF compared to C group. CA and HF showed hyperglycemia in the 3(rd), 6(th), 9(th) and 12(th) week and all values were higher in CA than HF, except in the 6(th) week. CA group showed glucose intolerance (GI) in the 6(th) week, while HF group did not show GI until the 9(th) week. CA decreased insulin sensitivity compared to C in the 12(th) week (kITT=3.3±0.2%/min vs. 4.2±0.1%/min). CA and HF groups presented higher insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides and FFA levels compared to the C group. Total cholesterol and LDL-C in mg/dL were higher in the HF (161.9±7.2 and 57.5±13.4) than the CA (110.5±9.1 and 48.5±11.4), and HDL-C was higher in the HF than in the C and CA groups. In conclusion, the CA diet was more efficient to induce hyperphagia, adipocyte hypertrophy, hyperglycemia, earlier GI and insulin resistance, while the HF diet was more efficient to induce lipid profile changes.

  7. Long-term methionine-diet induced mild hyperhomocysteinemia associated cardiac metabolic dysfunction in multiparous rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Ojaimi, Caroline; Martin-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kandhi, Sharath; Wolin, Michael; Hintze, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, clinically defined as less than 30 μmol/L) is an independent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, and is associated with many complications during pregnancy, such as preeclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of long-term mild HHcy on cardiac metabolic function of multiparous rats. Female rats were mated 3 to 4 times and were fed with methionine in drinking water to increase plasma Hcy (2.9 ± 0.3 to 10.5 ± 2.3 μmol/L) until termination. This caused significant increase of heart weight/body weight (0.24 ± 0.01 to 0.27 ± 0.01 g/100 g) and left ventricle weight (0.69 ± 0.03 to 0.78 ± 0.01 g). Superoxide production was increased by 2.5-fold in HHcy hearts using lucigenin chemiluminescence. The ability of bradykinin and carbachol to regulate myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) in vitro was impaired by 59% and 66% in HHcy heart, and it was restored by ascorbic acid (AA), tempol, or apocynin (Apo). Protein expression of p22phox subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase was increased by 2.6-fold, but there were no changes in other NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOSs or SODs. Microarray revealed 1518 genes to be differentially regulated (P < 0.05). The mRNA level of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOSs or SODs remained unchanged. In conclusion, long-term mild HHcy increases cardiac superoxide mainly through regulation of p22phox component of the NAD(P)H oxidase and impairs the ability of NO to regulate MVO2 in heart of multiparous mothers. PMID:26009634

  8. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yafi, Faysal A.; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J.; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man’s quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner’s sexual experience and the couple’s quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  9. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  10. Consequences of Age-Related Cognitive Declines

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adult age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities are well documented, and many of those abilities have been found to be related to success in the workplace and in everyday life. However, increased age is seldom associated with lower levels of real-world functioning, and the reasons for this lab-life discrepancy are not well understood. This article briefly reviews research concerned with relations of age to cognition, relations of cognition to successful functioning outside the laboratory, and relations of age to measures of work performance and achievement. The final section discusses several possible explanations for why there are often little or no consequences of age-related cognitive declines in everyday functioning. PMID:21740223

  11. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive.

  12. [Age-related changes of sensory system].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Hanyu, Haruo; Umahara, Takahiko

    2013-10-01

    Pathological processes usually superimpose on physiological aging even in the sensory system including visual, hearing, olfactory, taste and somatosensory functions. Representative changes of age-related changes are presbyopia, cataracts, and presbyacusis. Reduced sense of smell is seen in normal aging, but the prominent reduction detected by the odor stick identification test is noticed especially in early stage of Alzheimer or Parkinson disease. Reduced sense of taste is well-known especially in salty sense, while the changes of sweet, bitter, and sour tastes are different among individuals. Finally, deep sensation of vibration and proprioception is decreased with age as well as superficial sensation (touch, temperature, pain). As a result, impaired sensory system could induce deterioration of the activities of daily living and quality of life in the elderly.

  13. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL y