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Sample records for age-related metabolic dysfunction

  1. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J M; Bivalacqua, T J; Lagoda, G A; Burnett, A L; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 'young' (4-month-old) and 'aged' (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH(4) precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  2. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  3. Understanding Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle Metabolism: Differences Between Females and Males.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Brandon J F; Riddle, Emily S; Lem, Melinda R; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-07-17

    Skeletal muscle is the largest metabolic organ system in the human body. As such, metabolic dysfunction occurring in skeletal muscle impacts whole-body nutrient homeostasis. Macronutrient metabolism changes within the skeletal muscle with aging, and these changes are associated in part with age-related skeletal muscle remodeling. Moreover, age-related changes in skeletal muscle metabolism are affected differentially between males and females and are likely driven by changes in sex hormones. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors impact observed age-related changes and sex-related differences in skeletal muscle metabolism. Despite some support for sex-specific differences in skeletal muscle metabolism with aging, more research is necessary to identify underlying differences in mechanisms. Understanding sex-specific aging skeletal muscle will assist with the development of therapies to attenuate adverse metabolic and functional outcomes.

  4. Increased Age-Related Cardiac Dysfunction in Bradykinin B2 Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenjing; Xu, Xizhen; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Junjie; Dong, Ruolan; Ma, Ben; Zhang, Yanjun; Long, Guangwen; Wang, Dao Wen; Tu, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the kinin peptide binds to bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) to trigger various beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of B2R in cardiac aging remain unknown. A significant age-dependent decrease in B2R expression in the myocardium was observed in C57BL/6J mice. Echocardiographic measurements showed that aging caused a significant cardiac dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice, and importantly B2R deficiency augmented this dysfunction in aging mice. The deficiency of B2R expression in the aging heart repressed p53-pGC-1α-induced mitochondria renewal, increased reactive oxygen species production, and destroyed mitochondrial ultrastructure. Age-related decrease or lack of B2R increased oxidative stress, macrophage infiltration, and inflammatory cytokine expression and compromised antioxidant enzyme expression. Moreover, the inflammatory signals were mainly mediated by the activation of p38 MAPK, JNK, and subsequent translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B to the nucleus. In summary, our data provide evidence that B2R deficiency contributes to the aging-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is likely mediated by increased mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This study indicates that preventing the loss of cardioprotective B2R expression may be a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of age-related cardiac dysfunction.

  5. Emerging therapeutic roles for NAD(+) metabolism in mitochondrial and age-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sarika

    2016-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a central metabolic cofactor in eukaryotic cells that plays a critical role in regulating cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. NAD(+) in its reduced form (i.e. NADH) serves as the primary electron donor in mitochondrial respiratory chain, which involves adenosine triphosphate production by oxidative phosphorylation. The NAD(+)/NADH ratio also regulates the activity of various metabolic pathway enzymes such as those involved in glycolysis, Kreb's cycle, and fatty acid oxidation. Intracellular NAD(+) is synthesized de novo from L-tryptophan, although its main source of synthesis is through salvage pathways from dietary niacin as precursors. NAD(+) is utilized by various proteins including sirtuins, poly ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) and cyclic ADP-ribose synthases. The NAD(+) pool is thus set by a critical balance between NAD(+) biosynthetic and NAD(+) consuming pathways. Raising cellular NAD(+) content by inducing its biosynthesis or inhibiting the activity of PARP and cADP-ribose synthases via genetic or pharmacological means lead to sirtuins activation. Sirtuins modulate distinct metabolic, energetic and stress response pathways, and through their activation, NAD(+) directly links the cellular redox state with signaling and transcriptional events. NAD(+) levels decline with mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced NAD(+)/NADH ratio is implicated in mitochondrial disorders, various age-related pathologies as well as during aging. Here, I will provide an overview of the current knowledge on NAD(+) metabolism including its biosynthesis, utilization, compartmentalization and role in the regulation of metabolic homoeostasis. I will further discuss how augmenting intracellular NAD(+) content increases oxidative metabolism to prevent bioenergetic and functional decline in multiple models of mitochondrial diseases and age-related disorders, and how this knowledge could be translated to the clinic for human relevance. PMID

  6. Red ginseng delays age-related hearing and vestibular dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunjie; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Kim, Young Sun; Park, Hun Yi; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Since Korean red ginseng (KRG) has been proven to protect against gentamicin-induced vestibular and hearing dysfunction, the effects of KRG on age-related inner ear disorder in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. While age-related hearing loss was detected at the age of 6months (32kHz) and 9months (16kHz) in the control group, it was significantly delayed (p<0.05) in the 150mg/kg KRG-treated group. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in the tail-hanging and swimming tests, with significantly different severity scores and swimming times detected between the control and 150mg/kg KRG-treated group at the age of 12months (p<0.05). Mice treated with 500mg/kg KRG exhibited irritability and aggravated inner ear dysfunction. Histological observation supported the findings of hearing and vestibular function defects. In conclusion, C57BL/6 mice showed early-onset hearing loss and progressive vestibular dysfunction with aging, which were delayed by treatment with 150mg/kg KRG. However, 500mg/kg KRG treatment may induce aggressive behavior. PMID:24952098

  7. Nucleotide Excision DNA Repair is Associated with Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Durik, Matej; Kavousi, Maryam; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Isaacs, Aaron; Cheng, Caroline; Verdonk, Koen; Loot, Annemarieke E.; Oeseburg, Hisko; Musterd-Bhaggoe, Usha; Leijten, Frank; van Veghel, Richard; de Vries, Rene; Rudez, Goran; Brandt, Renata; Ridwan, Yanto R.; van Deel, Elza D.; de Boer, Martine; Tempel, Dennie; Fleming, Ingrid; Mitchell, Gary F.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Duckers, Henricus J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Danser, A.H. Jan; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.; Roks, Anton J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction in atherosclerosis and diabetes, as observed in the aging population of developed societies, is associated with vascular DNA damage and cell senescence. We hypothesized that cumulative DNA damage during aging contributes to vascular dysfunction. Methods and Results In mice with genomic instability due to the defective nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1 and XPD (Ercc1d/− and XpdTTD mice), we explored age-dependent vascular function as compared to wild-type mice. Ercc1d/− mice showed increased vascular cell senescence, accelerated development of vasodilator dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness and elevated blood pressure at very young age. The vasodilator dysfunction was due to decreased endothelial eNOS levels as well as impaired smooth muscle cell function, which involved phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Similar to Ercc1d/− mice, age-related endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction in XpdTTD animals was increased. To investigate the implications for human vascular disease, we explored associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of selected nucleotide excision repair genes and arterial stiffness within the AortaGen Consortium, and found a significant association of a SNP (rs2029298) in the putative promoter region of DDB2 gene with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Conclusions Mice with genomic instability recapitulate age-dependent vascular dysfunction as observed in animal models and in humans, but with an accelerated progression, as compared to wild type mice. In addition, we found associations between variations in human DNA repair genes and markers for vascular stiffness which is associated with aging. Our study supports the concept that genomic instability contributes importantly to the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22705887

  8. Genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lili; Feng, Haiyan; Gong, Dezheng; Zhao, Xu; Cai, Li; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zou, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) increases with age and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are supposed to be major factors leading to age-related IR. Genipin, an extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit, has been reported to stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells by regulating mitochondrial function. In this study, we first investigated the effects of genipin on insulin sensitivity and the potential mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver of aging rats. The rats were randomly assigned to receive intraperitoneal injections of either 25mg/kg genipin or vehicle once daily for 12days. The aging rats showed hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance as examined by the decreased glucose decay constant rate during insulin tolerance test (kITT). The hepatic tissues showed steatosis and reduced glycogen content. Hepatic malondialdehyde level and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were higher, and levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP were lower as compared with the normal control rats. Administration of genipin ameliorated systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, alleviated hyperinsulinemia, hyperglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, relieved hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rats. Furthermore, genipin not only improved insulin sensitivity by promoting insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and glycogen synthesis, inhibited cellular ROS overproduction and alleviated the reduction of levels of MMP and ATP, but also reversed oxidative stress-associated JNK hyperactivation and reduced Akt phosphorylation in palmitate-treated L02 hepatocytes. In conclusion, genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24041487

  9. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD).

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Geraint J; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J; Jester, James V

    2013-11-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction.

  10. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  11. Misregulation of an adaptive metabolic response contributes to the age-related disruption of lipid homeostasis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Karpac, Jason; Biteau, Benoit; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-09-26

    Loss of metabolic homeostasis is a hallmark of aging and is commonly characterized by the deregulation of adaptive signaling interactions that coordinate energy metabolism with dietary changes. The mechanisms driving age-related changes in these adaptive responses remain unclear. Here, we characterize the deregulation of an adaptive metabolic response and the development of metabolic dysfunction in the aging intestine of Drosophila. We find that activation of the insulin-responsive transcription factor Foxo in intestinal enterocytes is required to inhibit the expression of evolutionarily conserved lipases as part of a metabolic response to dietary changes. This adaptive mechanism becomes chronically activated in the aging intestine, mediated by changes in Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Age-related chronic JNK/Foxo activation in enterocytes is deleterious, leading to sustained repression of intestinal lipase expression and the disruption of lipid homeostasis. Changes in the regulation of Foxo-mediated adaptive responses thus contribute to the age-associated breakdown of metabolic homeostasis.

  12. NAD+ metabolism, a therapeutic target for age-related metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a central metabolic cofactor by virtue of its redox capacity, and as such regulates a wealth of metabolic transformations. However, the identification of the longevity protein Sir2, the founding member of the sirtuin protein family, as being NAD+-dependent reignited interest in this metabolite. The sirtuins (SIRT1-7 in mammals) utilize NAD+ to deacetylate proteins in different subcellular compartments with a variety of functions, but with a strong convergence on optimizing mitochondrial function. Since cellular NAD+ levels are limiting for sirtuin activity, boosting its levels is a powerful means to activate sirtuins as a potential therapy for mitochondrial, often age-related, diseases. Indeed, supplying excess precursors, or blocking its utilization by PARP enzymes or CD38/CD157, boosts NAD+ levels, activates sirtuins and promotes healthy aging. Here, we discuss the current state of knowledge of NAD+ metabolism, primarily in relation to sirtuin function. We highlight how NAD+ levels change in diverse physiological conditions, and how this can be employed as a pharmacological strategy. PMID:23742622

  13. NPY antagonism reduces adiposity and attenuates age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjoon; Fujishita, Chika; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Kim, Sang Eun; Chiba, Takuya; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-12-01

    An orexigenic hormone, neuropeptide Y (NPY), plays a role not only in the hypothalamic regulation of appetite, but also in the peripheral regulation of lipid metabolism. However, the intracellular mechanisms triggered by NPY to regulate lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we report that NPY deficiency reduces white adipose tissue (WAT) mass and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism in mice. Gene expression involved in adipogenesis/lipogenesis was found to decrease, whereas proteins involved in lipolysis increased in gonadal WAT (gWAT) of NPY-knockout mice. These changes were associated with an activated SIRT1- and PPARγ-mediated pathway. Moreover, the age-related decrease of de novo lipogenesis in gWAT and thermogenesis in inguinal WAT was inhibited by NPY deficiency. Further analysis using 3T3-L1 cells showed that NPY inhibited lipolysis through the Y1 receptor and enhanced lipogenesis following a reduction in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and SIRT1 protein expression. Therefore, NPY appears to act as a key regulator of adipose tissue metabolism via the CREB-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Taken together, NPY deficiency reduces adiposity and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism, suggesting that antagonism of NPY may be a promising target for drug development to prevent age-related metabolic diseases.

  14. Glycolytic fast-twitch muscle fiber restoration counters adverse age-related changes in body composition and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akasaki, Yuichi; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Bernardo, Barbara L; Lebrasseur, Nathan K; Walsh, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with the development of insulin resistance, increased adiposity, and accumulation of ectopic lipid deposits in tissues and organs. Starting in mid-life there is a progressive decline in lean muscle mass associated with the preferential loss of glycolytic, fast-twitch myofibers. However, it is not known to what extent muscle loss and metabolic dysfunction are causally related or whether they are independent epiphenomena of the aging process. Here, we utilized a skeletal-muscle-specific, conditional transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active form of Akt1 to examine the consequences of glycolytic, fast-twitch muscle growth in young vs. middle-aged animals fed standard low-fat chow diets. Activation of the Akt1 transgene led to selective skeletal muscle hypertrophy, reversing the loss of lean muscle mass observed upon aging. The Akt1-mediated increase in muscle mass led to reductions in fat mass and hepatic steatosis in older animals, and corrected age-associated impairments in glucose metabolism. These results indicate that the loss of lean muscle mass is a significant contributor to the development of age-related metabolic dysfunction and that interventions that preserve or restore fast/glycolytic muscle may delay the onset of metabolic disease.

  15. Age-related motor dysfunction and neuropathology in a transgenic mouse model of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fernagut, P O; Meissner, W G; Biran, M; Fantin, M; Bassil, F; Franconi, J M; Tison, F

    2014-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive degeneration of the striatonigral, olivo-ponto-cerebellar, and autonomic systems. Glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) containing alpha-synuclein represent the hallmark of MSA and are recapitulated in mice expressing alpha-synuclein in oligodendrocytes. To assess if oligodendroglial expression of human wild-type alpha-synuclein in mice (proteolipid promoter, PLP-SYN) could be associated with age-related deficits, PLP-SYN and wild-type mice were assessed for motor function, brain morphometry, striatal levels of dopamine and metabolites, dopaminergic loss, and distribution of GCIs. PLP-SYN displayed age-related impairments on a beam-traversing task. MRI revealed a significantly smaller brain volume in PLP-SYN mice at 12 months, which further decreased at 18 months together with increased volume of ventricles and cortical atrophy. The distribution of GCIs was reminiscent of MSA with a high burden in the basal ganglia. Mild dopaminergic cell loss was associated with decreased dopamine turnover at 18 months. These data indicate that PLP-SYN mice may recapitulate some of the progressive features of MSA and deliver endpoints for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies.

  16. Prefrontal Cortical GABAergic Dysfunction Contributes to Age-Related Working Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B. Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Frazier, Charles J.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions. PMID:24599447

  17. Age-Related Impairments in Object-Place Associations Are Not Due to Hippocampal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Abigail R.; Maurer, Andrew P.; Reasor, Jordan E.; Turner, Sean M.; Barthle, Sarah E.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline can reduce an individual’s quality of life. As no single neurobiological deficit can account for the wide spectrum of behavioral impairments observed in old age, it is critical to develop an understanding of how interactions between different brain regions change over the life span. The performance of young and aged animals on behaviors that require the hippocampus and cortical regions to interact, however, has not been well characterized. Specifically, the ability to link a spatial location with specific features of a stimulus, such as object identity, relies on the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices. Although aging is associated with dysfunction in each of these brain regions, behavioral measures of functional change within the hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortices in individual animals are often not correlated. Thus, how dysfunction of a single brain region within this circuit, such as the hippocampus, impacts behaviors that require communication with the perirhinal and prefrontal cortices remains unknown. To address this question, young and aged rats were tested on the interregion dependent object-place paired association task, as well as a hippocampal-dependent test of spatial reference memory. This particular cohort of aged rats did not show deficits on the hippocampal-dependent task, but were significantly impaired at acquiring object-place associations relative to young. These data suggest that behaviors requiring functional connectivity across different regions of the memory network may be particularly sensitive to aging, and can be used to develop models that will clarify the impact of systems-level dysfunction in the elderly. PMID:26413723

  18. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-06-10

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  19. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  20. Exercise Counteracts Aging-Related Memory Impairment: A Potential Role for the Astrocytic Metabolic Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Pei-Chun; Calkins, Marcus J.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment has become one of the most common health threats in many countries. The biological substrate of cognition is the interconnection of neurons to form complex information processing networks. Experience-based alterations in the activities of these information processing networks lead to neuroadaptation, which is physically represented at the cellular level as synaptic plasticity. Although synaptic plasticity is known to be affected by aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well described. Astrocytes, a glial cell type that is infrequently investigated in cognitive science, have emerged as energy suppliers which are necessary for meeting the abundant energy demand resulting from glutamatergic synaptic activity. Moreover, the concerted action of an astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle is essential for cognitive function; whereas, energetic incoordination between astrocytes and neurons may contribute to cognitive impairment. Whether altered function of the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle links aging to reduced synaptic plasticity is unexplored. However, accumulated evidence documents significant beneficial effects of long-term, regular exercise on cognition and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, exercise increases the effectiveness of astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle by upregulation of astrocytic lactate transporter levels. This review summarizes previous findings related to the neuronal activity-dependent astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle. Moreover, we discuss how aging and exercise may shape the astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttle in cognition-associated brain areas. PMID:27047373

  1. Age-related relationships between muscle fat content and metabolic traits in growing rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gondret, Florence; Hocquette, Jean-François; Herpin, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed at ascribing muscle fat accretion in growing rabbits to changes in several extra-muscular and intra-muscular metabolic pathways. At 10 wk or 20 wk of age (n = 8 per group), tissue lipid content and metabolic indicators of nutrient anabolic or catabolic pathways were simultaneously assessed in the liver, perirenal fat, the heart and the Longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle, together with plasma concentrations in energy-yielding metabolites. Lipid content significantly increased with age (P < or = 0.01) in the glycolytic LL muscle (+67%) and the oxidative heart (+30%). In the former muscle, it was statistically correlated (r2 = 0.68; P < 0.01) to the changes in the orientation of muscle metabolism towards an enhanced lipogenic capacity and a depressed capacity for fatty acid transport and nutrient oxidation, and to indications of lower availability in plasma glucose and triglycerides. In the heart, age-related fat accretion was positively associated (r2 = 0.48, P < 0.01) to intrinsic metabolic changes towards an enhanced lipogenic capacity, together with a lower availability in plasma glucose. Variables representative of cardiac catabolic capacity tended to be negatively correlated to fat content in the heart (r2 = 0.15, P = 0.07). In growing rabbits, muscle fat content variation was proven to result from a reciprocal balance between catabolic and anabolic fatty acid fluxes, rather than to be assigned to one specific energy metabolic pathway.

  2. Age-related decline in metabolic competence of small and medium-sized synaptic mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Spazzafumo, Liana; Solazzi, Moreno; Balietti, Marta

    2005-02-01

    A computer-assisted morphometric investigation of cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity, selectively evidenced by preferential diaminobenzidine cytochemistry, has been carried out on synaptic mitochondria in the cerebellar cortex of adult and old rats. The ratio (R) of the area of the cytochemical precipitate (CPA) to the overall area of each mitochondrion (MA) was calculated. R refers to the fraction of the inner mitochondrial membrane actively involved in cellular respiration, thus its quantitative estimation constitutes a reliable index of the mitochondrial metabolic competence (MMC). In adult rats a significant negative correlation between MA and R values was found, while in old animals there was just a positive trend. Paired-quartile comparisons of R values showed a significant age-related decrease in small and medium-sized mitochondria, whereas the lowest and not significant age-related reduction was found in oversized organelles. A paired decrease in number and increase in size is reported to be a general trend for mitochondria during aging, but oversized organelles, according to their low R value, constitute a scanty, though functional, compensating reaction. Thus, the present findings support the argument that the currently reported age-related cellular metabolic decay appears to rely both on the decline in MMC of the small and medium-sized mitochondria, and on their specific reduction in number. This novel result is of biological relevance since it is largely the small and medium-sized mitochondria that are required for the provision of adequate amounts of ATP for actual cellular performance, while the significantly enlarged organelles are thought to represent an intermediate ultrastructural feature in mitochondrial genesis and/or remodelling.

  3. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline.

    PubMed

    Chabi, B; Pauly, M; Carillon, J; Carnac, G; Favier, F B; Fouret, G; Bonafos, B; Vanterpool, F; Vernus, B; Coudray, C; Feillet-Coudray, C; Bonnieu, A; Lacan, D; Koechlin-Ramonatxo, C

    2016-06-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent age-related disorders, we orally administered to the two genotypes a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase for 12 weeks. We reported that mitochondrial functional abnormalities persisted (decreased state 3 and 4 of respiration; p<0.05) in skeletal muscle from aged KO mice; however, differences with WT mice were attenuated at old age in line with reduced difference on running endurance between the two genotypes. Interestingly, we showed an increase in glutathione levels, associated with lower lipid peroxidation levels in KO muscle. Enriched antioxidant diet reduced the aging-related negative effects on maximal aerobic velocity and running limit time (p<0.05) in both groups, with systemic adaptations on body weight. The redox status and the hypertrophic phenotype appeared to be beneficial to KO mice, mitigating the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle metabolic remodeling.

  4. Aging-Related Dysfunction of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Produces Conflict in Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Matamales, Miriam; Skrbis, Zala; Hatch, Robert J; Balleine, Bernard W; Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-04-20

    For goal-directed action to remain adaptive, new strategies are required to accommodate environmental changes, a process for which parafascicular thalamic modulation of cholinergic interneurons in the striatum (PF-to-CIN) appears critical. In the elderly, however, previously acquired experience frequently interferes with new learning, yet the source of this effect has remained unexplored. Here, combining sophisticated behavioral designs, cell-specific manipulation, and extensive neuronal imaging, we investigated the involvement of the PF-to-CIN pathway in this process. We found functional alterations of this circuit in aged mice that were consistent with their incapacity to update initial goal-directed learning, resulting in faulty activation of projection neurons in the striatum. Toxicogenetic ablation of CINs in young mice reproduced these behavioral and neuronal defects, suggesting that age-related deficits in PF-to-CIN function reduce the ability of older individuals to resolve conflict between actions, likely contributing to impairments in adaptive goal-directed action and executive control in aging. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27100198

  5. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  6. Age-related proteostasis and metabolic alterations in Caspase-2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C H; Shalini, S; Filipovska, A; Richman, T R; Davies, S; Martin, S D; McGee, S L; Puccini, J; Nikolic, A; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a complex biological process for which underlying biochemical changes are still largely unknown. We performed comparative profiling of the cellular proteome and metabolome to understand the molecular basis of ageing in Caspase-2-deficient (Casp2−/−) mice that are a model of premature ageing in the absence of overt disease. Age-related changes were determined in the liver and serum of young (6–9 week) and aged (18–24 month) wild-type and Casp2−/− mice. We identified perturbed metabolic pathways, decreased levels of ribosomal and respiratory complex proteins and altered mitochondrial function that contribute to premature ageing in the Casp2−/− mice. We show that the metabolic profile changes in the young Casp2−/− mice resemble those found in aged wild-type mice. Intriguingly, aged Casp2−/− mice were found to have reduced blood glucose and improved glucose tolerance. These results demonstrate an important role for caspase-2 in regulating proteome and metabolome remodelling during ageing. PMID:25611376

  7. Tumor Mechanics and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jason C.; Barnes, J. Matthew; Desai, Shraddha R.; Sistrunk, Christopher; Conklin, Matthew; Schedin, Pepper; Keely, Patricia J.; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosplasia is a characteristic of most solid tumors and leads to fibrosis through abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, remodeling and post translational modifications. The resulting stiff tumor stroma not only compromises vascular integrity to induce hypoxia and impede drug delivery, but also promotes aggressiveness by potentiating the activity of key growth, invasion, and survival pathways. Intriguingly, many of the pro-tumorigenic signaling pathways which are mechanically activated by ECM stiffness also promote glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis, and an altered metabolism is a recognized hallmark of cancer. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that metabolic alterations and an abnormal ECM may cooperatively drive cancer cell aggression and treatment resistance. Accordingly, improved methods to monitor tissue mechanics and metabolism promise to improve diagnostics and treatments to ameliorate ECM stiffening and elevated mechanosignaling may improve patient outcome. Here we discuss the interplay between ECM mechanics and metabolism in tumor biology and suggest that monitoring these processes and targeting their regulatory pathways may improve diagnostics, therapy, and the prevention of malignant transformation. PMID:25532934

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    PubMed

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  10. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  11. Resveratrol prevents age-related memory and mood dysfunction with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and microvasculature, and reduced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-01-28

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol.

  12. Towards finding the linkage between metabolic and age-related disorders using semantic gene data network analysis.

    PubMed

    Uzzal Hossain, Mohammad; Zaffar Shibly, Abu; Md Omar, Taimur; Tous Zohora, Fatama; Sara Santona, Umme; Hossain, Md Jakir; Hosen Khoka, Md Sadek; Ara Keya, Chaman; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    A metabolic disorder (MD) occurs when the metabolic process is disturbed. This process is carried out by thousands of enzymes participating in numerous inter-dependent metabolic pathways. Critical biochemical reactions that involve the processing and transportation of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids are affected in metabolic diseases. Therefore, it is of interest to identify the common pathways of metabolic disorders by building protein-protein interactions (PPI) for network analysis. The molecular network linkages between MD and age related diseases (ARD) are intriguing. Hence, we created networks of protein-protein interactions that are related with MD and ARD using relevant known data in the public domain. The network analysis identified known MD associated proteins and predicted genes and or its products of ARD in common pathways. The genes in the common pathways were isolated from the network and further analyzed for their co-localization and shared domains. Thus, a model hypothesis is proposed using interaction networks that are linked between MD and ARD. This data even if less conclusive finds application in understanding the molecular mechanism of known diseases in relation to observed molecular events.

  13. Influence of metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its age-related change in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Berenson, Gerald S

    2005-06-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with risk variables of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older adults. However, information regarding the influence of the metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its rate of change with age in young adults is limited. These aspects were examined in a sample of 806 asymptomatic, healthy young adults aged 24-44 years from a black-white community. Brachial to ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measured by an oscillometric method was used as an index of arterial stiffness. baPWV increased with the increasing number of metabolic syndrome components, defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (1256, 1314, and 1422 cm/s for those with 0, 1-2, and 3-5 components, respectively, P for trend <0.001). Furthermore, the rate of change (slope) of baPWV with age increased as the number of metabolic syndrome components increased (4.1, 10.7, and 18.7 cm/s per year for those with 0, 1-2, and 3-5 components, respectively; P for comparison of slopes <0.001). These findings by showing the deleterious effects of metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its age-related increase in young adults underscore the importance of this syndrome in cardiovascular risk assessment even in a younger population. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the current cross-sectional findings.

  14. Centrosome and microtubule functions and dysfunctions in meiosis: implications for age-related infertility and developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    The effects of oocyte aging on meiotic spindle dynamics have been well recognised, but the mechanisms underlying the effects are not well understood. In this paper we review the role of centrosomes and the microtubule cytoskeleton in meiotic spindle formation and maintenance, and the impact of oocyte aging on spindle integrity resulting in centrosome and microtubule dysfunctions that are associated with aneuploidy. Loss of spindle integrity includes dispersion of proteins from the centrosome core structure and loss of attachment of microtubules to centrosomes and kinetochores, which will result in abnormal chromosome separation. The inability of centrosomal proteins to accurately associate with the centrosome structure may be the result of destabilisation of the core structure itself or of microtubule destabilisation at the centrosome-facing microtubule areas that are acetylated in fresh oocytes but may not be acetylated in aging oocytes. Microtubule destabilisation prevents accurate motor-driven transport of centrosomal proteins along microtubules to form and maintain a functional centrosome. Other factors to form and maintain the MII spindle include signal transductions that affect microtubule dynamics and stability. Understanding the mechanisms underlying centrosome and microtubule dysfunctions during oocyte aging will allow diagnosis and analysis of oocyte quality and abnormalities as important aspects for targeted treatment of aging oocytes to extend or restore viability and developmental capacity. New therapeutic approaches will allow improvements in reproductive success rates in IVF clinics, as well as improvements in reproductive success rates in farm animals. This review is focused on: (1) centrosome and microtubule dynamics in fresh and aging oocytes; (2) regulation of centrosome and/or microtubule dynamics and function; and (3) possible treatments to extend the oocyte's reproductive capacity and viability span. PMID:25903261

  15. Age-related acceleration of endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis in subjects with coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Noto, Nobutaka; Okada, Tomoo; Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Sumitomo, Naokata; Harada, Kensuke; Mugishima, Hideo

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that accelerated endothelial dysfunction and the development of premature atherosclerosis are associated with age in subjects with coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease (KD). A case-control study was performed at a university hospital that included 35 post-KD subjects across a wide age range (range, 8-42 years) without traditional cardiovascular risk factors and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (Cont). Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery-induced by reactive hyperemia, intima media thickness (IMT), and elastic modulus (Ep) of the common carotid artery were compared between KD and Cont subjects assessed against age. KD subjects had slightly higher levels of body mass index, lipid profile, and HbA1c than Cont subjects, but the differences were not significant. The mean IMT (p < 0.001), age-adjusted percentage normal IMT (%N IMT; p < 0.0001), and Ep (p < 0.001) were significantly higher in KD than Cont subjects, and the peak FMD% (p < 0.01) was significantly lower in KD than Cont subjects. There were significant correlations between FMD% and age (r = -0.51 p < 0.0001), IMT and age (r = 0.68, p < 0.001), and Ep and age (r = 0.58, p < 0.01) in KD but not Cont subjects. When the difference in FMD% between KD and matched Cont subjects (DeltaFMD%) was plotted against age, no significant relationship was found, although significant correlations between DeltaIMT and age (r = 0.52, p < 0.01) as well as between DeltaEp and age (r = 0.46, p < 0.05) were observed. When we defined values that were +2.0 SD over the mean control values (i.e., %N IMT >or= 120% and/or Ep >or= 50 kPa) as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, 15 subjects met the criteria. Subjects over the age of 22 years were more likely to have (OR = 16.54, p = 0.0001) subclinical atherosclerosis in this cohort. Our results suggest that endothelial dysfunction and the development of premature atherosclerosis were

  16. Left Atrial Volume and Pulmonary Artery Diameter Are Noninvasive Measures of Age-Related Diastolic Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Hermosillo-Rodriguez, Jesus; Pham, Thuy; Granillo, Alejandro; Hartley, Craig J; Reddy, Anilkumar; Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Entman, Mark L; Taffet, George E

    2016-09-01

    Impaired cardiac diastolic function occurs with aging in many species and may be difficult to measure noninvasively. In humans, left atrial (LA) volume is a robust measure of chronic diastolic function as the LA is exposed to increased left ventricular filling pressures. We hypothesized that LA volume would be a useful indicator of diastolic function in aging mice. Further, we asked whether pressures were propagated backwards affecting pulmonary arteries (PAs) and right ventricle (RV). We measured LA, PA, and RV infundibulum dimensions with echocardiography and used mouse-specific Doppler systems and pressure catheters for noninvasive and invasive measures. As C57BL/6 mice aged from 3 to 29-31 months, LA volume almost tripled. LA volume increases correlated with traditional diastolic function measures. Within groups of 14- and 31-month-old mice, LA volume correlated with diastolic function measured invasively. In serial studies, mice evaluated at 20 and 24 months showed monotonic increases in LA volume; other parameters changed less predictably. PA diameters, larger in 30-month-old mice than 6-month-old mice, correlated with LA volumes. Noninvasive LA volume and PA diameter assessments are useful and state independent measures of diastolic function in mice, correlating with other measures of diastolic dysfunction in aging. Furthermore, serial measurements over 4 months demonstrated consistent increases in LA volume suitable for longitudinal cardiac aging studies.

  17. Left Atrial Volume and Pulmonary Artery Diameter Are Noninvasive Measures of Age-Related Diastolic Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Hermosillo-Rodriguez, Jesus; Pham, Thuy; Granillo, Alejandro; Hartley, Craig J; Reddy, Anilkumar; Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Entman, Mark L; Taffet, George E

    2016-09-01

    Impaired cardiac diastolic function occurs with aging in many species and may be difficult to measure noninvasively. In humans, left atrial (LA) volume is a robust measure of chronic diastolic function as the LA is exposed to increased left ventricular filling pressures. We hypothesized that LA volume would be a useful indicator of diastolic function in aging mice. Further, we asked whether pressures were propagated backwards affecting pulmonary arteries (PAs) and right ventricle (RV). We measured LA, PA, and RV infundibulum dimensions with echocardiography and used mouse-specific Doppler systems and pressure catheters for noninvasive and invasive measures. As C57BL/6 mice aged from 3 to 29-31 months, LA volume almost tripled. LA volume increases correlated with traditional diastolic function measures. Within groups of 14- and 31-month-old mice, LA volume correlated with diastolic function measured invasively. In serial studies, mice evaluated at 20 and 24 months showed monotonic increases in LA volume; other parameters changed less predictably. PA diameters, larger in 30-month-old mice than 6-month-old mice, correlated with LA volumes. Noninvasive LA volume and PA diameter assessments are useful and state independent measures of diastolic function in mice, correlating with other measures of diastolic dysfunction in aging. Furthermore, serial measurements over 4 months demonstrated consistent increases in LA volume suitable for longitudinal cardiac aging studies. PMID:26511013

  18. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 induce different age-related metabolic profiles revealed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy in urine and feces of mice.

    PubMed

    Brasili, Elisa; Mengheri, Elena; Tomassini, Alberta; Capuani, Giorgio; Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Sciubba, Fabio; Marini, Federico; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    Age-related dysbioses of intestinal microbiota and decline in the overall metabolic homeostasis are frequently found in the elderly. Probiotic supplementation may represent a way to prevent or reduce the senescence-associated metabolic disorders. The present study evaluated the metabolic impact of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 supplementation in relation to age by analyzing urine and feces metabolic profiles using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis. Adult (3 mo old) and aged (16 mo old) mice received an oral supplementation of the 2 probiotics (1 × 10(9) colony-forming units/d each) or phosphate buffered saline (control) daily for 30 d. Urine and feces were collected for 48 h before the end of the study. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed that the urinary discriminant metabolites for the probiotic treatment included higher dimethylglycine in adult and aged mice, lower sarcosine and nicotinate in adult mice, higher N-methylnicotinamide in adult mice and lower N-methylnicotinamide in aged mice compared with their controls. These results indicate a probiotic-induced modulation of homocysteine and NAD metabolism pathways, which have important implications because these pathways are involved in essential cellular processes that can be altered in senescence. The probiotic supplementation also modified the fecal metabolic profiles, inducing in both adult and aged mice higher 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and lower xylose in treated mice compared with their control mice, whereas valerate was greater in treated adult mice and lower in treated aged mice compared with their controls. The ANOVA simultaneous component analysis on urinary and fecal metabolic profiling showed an age × treatment interaction (P < 0.05), confirming the age-related modulation of the metabolic response to probiotic supplementation. The results suggest that L. acidophilus and B. lactis may prevent or reduce age-related

  19. Energy metabolic dysfunction as a carcinogenic factor in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongyan; Shi, Zhenhua; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Cancer, as a leading cause of death, has attracted enormous public attention. Reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is deemed to be one of the principal hallmarks of cancer. In this article, we reviewed the mutual relationships among environmental pollution factors, energy metabolic dysfunction, and various cancers. We found that most environmental pollution factors could induce cancers mainly by disturbing the energy metabolism. By triggering microenvironment alteration, energy metabolic dysfunction can be treated as a factor in carcinogenesis. Thus, we put forward that energy metabolism might be as a key point for studying carcinogenesis and tumor development to propose new methods for cancer prevention and therapy.

  20. Common cell biologic and biochemical changes in aging and age-related diseases of the eye: Toward new therapeutic approaches to age-related ocular diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reviews of information about age related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, and glaucoma make it apparent that while each eye tissue has its own characteristic metabolism, structure and function, there are common perturbations to homeostasis that are associated with age-related dysfunction. The c...

  1. Gut microbiome, obesity, and metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tilg, Herbert; Kaser, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related disorders such as metabolic syndrome has vastly increased throughout the world. Recent insights have generated an entirely new perspective suggesting that our microbiota might be involved in the development of these disorders. Studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with profound microbiotal changes, and the induction of a metabolic syndrome phenotype through fecal transplants corroborates the important role of the microbiota in this disease. Dietary composition and caloric intake appear to swiftly regulate intestinal microbial composition and function. As most findings in this field of research are based on mouse studies, the relevance to human biology requires further investigation. PMID:21633181

  2. Gut microbiome, obesity, and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Kaser, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related disorders such as metabolic syndrome has vastly increased throughout the world. Recent insights have generated an entirely new perspective suggesting that our microbiota might be involved in the development of these disorders. Studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with profound microbiotal changes, and the induction of a metabolic syndrome phenotype through fecal transplants corroborates the important role of the microbiota in this disease. Dietary composition and caloric intake appear to swiftly regulate intestinal microbial composition and function. As most findings in this field of research are based on mouse studies, the relevance to human biology requires further investigation.

  3. Mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction in cancer-associated cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Wagner, Erwin F.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction contributes to the clinical deterioration observed in advanced cancer patients and is characterized by weight loss, skeletal muscle wasting, and atrophy of the adipose tissue. This systemic syndrome, termed cancer-associated cachexia (CAC), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While once attributed solely to decreased food intake, the present description of cancer cachexia is a disorder of multiorgan energy imbalance. Here we review the molecules and pathways responsible for metabolic dysfunction in CAC and the ideas that led to the current understanding. PMID:26944676

  4. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  5. Surgical management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2012-03-10

    Metabolic disturbances are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Obesity is the major link in the association of PCOS with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, low-grade chronic inflammation and increased body iron stores, among others. Metabolic prevention in PCOS women should start as early as possible, usually meaning at diagnosis. Among preventive strategies, those promoting a healthy life-style based on diet, regular exercising and smoking cessation are possibly the most effective therapies, but also are the most difficult to achieve. To this regard, every effort must be made to avoid weight gain and obesity, given the deleterious impact that obesity exerts on the metabolic and cardiovascular associations of PCOS. Unfortunately, classic strategies that address obesity by life-style modification and dieting are seldom successful on a long-term basis, especially in women with severe obesity. In selected cases, metabolic surgery in severely obese women may resolve signs and symptoms of PCOS restoring insulin sensitivity and fertility, and avoiding the long-term risks associated with PCOS and morbid obesity. Surgical techniques for bariatric surgery have evolved in the past decades and newer procedures do not longer carry the severe side effects associated with earlier bariatric procedures. The choice of bariatric procedure should consider both the severity of obesity and the possibility of future pregnancy, since fertility may be restored by the sustained and marked weight loss usually attained after bariatric surgery. Finally, avoidance of the risks associated with morbid obesity compensate for the possible residual risks for pregnancy derived from the previous bariatric procedure itself. PMID:22172592

  6. Surgical management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2012-03-10

    Metabolic disturbances are common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Obesity is the major link in the association of PCOS with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, low-grade chronic inflammation and increased body iron stores, among others. Metabolic prevention in PCOS women should start as early as possible, usually meaning at diagnosis. Among preventive strategies, those promoting a healthy life-style based on diet, regular exercising and smoking cessation are possibly the most effective therapies, but also are the most difficult to achieve. To this regard, every effort must be made to avoid weight gain and obesity, given the deleterious impact that obesity exerts on the metabolic and cardiovascular associations of PCOS. Unfortunately, classic strategies that address obesity by life-style modification and dieting are seldom successful on a long-term basis, especially in women with severe obesity. In selected cases, metabolic surgery in severely obese women may resolve signs and symptoms of PCOS restoring insulin sensitivity and fertility, and avoiding the long-term risks associated with PCOS and morbid obesity. Surgical techniques for bariatric surgery have evolved in the past decades and newer procedures do not longer carry the severe side effects associated with earlier bariatric procedures. The choice of bariatric procedure should consider both the severity of obesity and the possibility of future pregnancy, since fertility may be restored by the sustained and marked weight loss usually attained after bariatric surgery. Finally, avoidance of the risks associated with morbid obesity compensate for the possible residual risks for pregnancy derived from the previous bariatric procedure itself.

  7. Decrease in age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive improvement following vitamin D supplementation are associated with modulation of brain energy metabolism and redox state.

    PubMed

    Briones, T L; Darwish, H

    2014-03-14

    In the present study we examined whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive impairment by enhancing brain energy homeostasis and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and modulating the redox state. Male F344 rats aged 20 months (aged) and 6 months (young) were randomly assigned to either vitamin D supplementation or no supplementation (control). Rats were housed in pairs and the supplementation group (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received subcutaneous injections of vitamin D (1, α25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) for 21 days. Control animals (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received equal volume of normal saline and behavioral testing in the water maze started on day 14 after the initiation of vitamin D supplementation. Tau phosphorylation, markers of brain energy metabolism (ADP/ATP ratio and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) and redox state (levels of reactive oxygen species, activity of superoxide dismutase, and glutathione levels) as well as PP2A activity were measured in hippocampal tissues. Our results extended previous findings that: (1) tau phosphorylation significantly increased during aging; (2) markers of brain energy metabolism and redox state are significantly decreased in aging; and (3) aged rats demonstrated significant learning and memory impairment. More importantly, we found that age-related changes in brain energy metabolism, redox state, and cognitive function were attenuated by vitamin D supplementation. No significant differences were seen in tau hyperphosphorylation, markers of energy metabolism and redox state in the young animal groups. Our data suggest that vitamin D ameliorated the age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive decline by enhancing brain energy metabolism, redox state, and PP2A activity making it a potentially useful therapeutic option to alleviate the effects of aging.

  8. Complex mechanisms linking neurocognitive dysfunction to insulin resistance and other metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gandy, Sam; Small, Dana; Kahn, C. Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Pawlyk, Aaron; Sherwin, Robert; Smith, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scientific evidence has established several links between metabolic and neurocognitive dysfunction, and epidemiologic evidence has revealed an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in patients with diabetes. In July 2015, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases gathered experts from multiple clinical and scientific disciplines, in a workshop entitled “The Intersection of Metabolic and Neurocognitive Dysfunction”, to clarify the state-of-the-science on the mechanisms linking metabolic dysfunction, and insulin resistance and diabetes in particular, to neurocognitive impairment and dementia. This perspective is intended to serve as a summary of the opinions expressed at this meeting, which focused on identifying gaps and opportunities to advance research in this emerging area with important public health relevance. PMID:27303627

  9. Age-related transcriptional changes in gene expression in different organs of mice support the metabolic stability theory of aging.

    PubMed

    Brink, Thore C; Demetrius, Lloyd; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2009-10-01

    Individual differences in the rate of aging are determined by the efficiency with which an organism transforms resources into metabolic energy thus maintaining the homeostatic condition of its cells and tissues. This observation has been integrated with analytical studies of the metabolic process to derive the following principle: The metabolic stability of regulatory networks, that is the ability of cells to maintain stable concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other critical metabolites is the prime determinant of life span. The metabolic stability of a regulatory network is determined by the diversity of the metabolic pathways or the degree of connectivity of genes in the network. These properties can be empirically evaluated in terms of transcriptional changes in gene expression. We use microarrays to investigate the age-dependence of transcriptional changes of genes in the insulin signaling, oxidative phosphorylation and glutathione metabolism pathways in mice. Our studies delineate age and tissue specific patterns of transcriptional changes which are consistent with the metabolic stability-longevity principle. This study, in addition, rejects the free radical hypothesis which postulates that the production rate of ROS, and not its stability, determines life span.

  10. Interventions for the metabolic dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gurkan; Yildiz, Bulent O

    2013-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with metabolic disturbances including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Cardiometabolic risk should be assessed at regular intervals starting from diagnosis. A comprehensive clinical evaluation includes determination of body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure and measurement of serum lipid and glucose levels in all women with PCOS. A standard 2-h 75g oral glucose tolerance test is required for women with a body mass index over 25kg/m(2) and with other risk factors for glucose intolerance. No long-term data are available for the risk or benefit of any medical intervention for metabolic dysfunction of PCOS. For the initial management of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS, available guidelines recommend lifestyle intervention which improves androgen excess and insulin resistance without significant effect on glucose intolerance or dyslipidemia. Pharmacological interventions include insulin sensitizing agents and statins. Metformin is the most commonly prescribed insulin sensitizer in PCOS. Available randomized controlled trials suggest that metformin improves insulin resistance without any effect on body mass index, fasting glucose or lipid levels. Short term use of statins alone or in combination with metformin decreases total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides in PCOS patients with dyslipidemia. Low dose oral contraception in PCOS appears not to be associated with clinically significant metabolic dysfunction.

  11. Is age-related failure of metabolic reprogramming a principal mediator in idiopathic Parkinson's disease? Implications for treatment and inverse cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Engel, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other vulnerable nervous system regions characterized by extensive axonal arborization and intense energy requirements. Systemic age-related depression of mitochondrial function, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and depressed expression of genes supporting energy homeostasis is more severe in IPD than normal aging such that energy supply may exceed regional demand. In IPD, the overall risk of malignancy is reduced. Cancer is a collection of proliferative diseases marked by malignant transformation, dysregulated mitosis, invasion and metastasis. Many cancers demonstrate normal mitochondrial function, preserved OXPHOS, competent mechanisms of energy homeostasis, and metabolic reprogramming capacities that are lacking in IPD. Metabolic reprogramming adjusts OXPHOS and glycolytic pathways in response to changing metabolic needs. These opposite metabolic features form the basis of a two component hypothesis. First, that depressed mitochondrial function, OXPHOS deficiency and impaired metabolic reprogramming contribute to focal energy failure, neurodegeneration and disease expression in IPD. Second, that the same systemic metabolic deficits inhibit development and proliferation of malignancies in IPD. Studies of mitochondrial aging, familial PD (FPD), the lysosomal storage disorder, Gaucher's disease, Parkinson's disease cybrids, the mitochondrial cytopathies, and disease-related metabolic reprogramming both in IPD and cancer provide support for this model. PMID:27372878

  12. Lack of serotonin1B receptor expression leads to age-related motor dysfunction, early onset of brain molecular aging and reduced longevity

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, E; Su, J; Leman, S; Le Guisquet, AM; Ibarguen-Vargas, Y; Joeyen-Waldorf, J; Glorioso, C; Tseng, GC; Pezzone, M; Hen, R; Belzung, C

    2008-01-01

    Normal aging of the brain differs from pathological conditions and is associated with increased risk for psychiatric and neurological disorders. In addition to its role in the etiology and treatment of mood disorders, altered serotonin (5-HT) signaling is considered a contributing factor to aging; however, no causative role has been identified in aging. We hypothesized that a deregulation of the 5-HT system would reveal its contribution to age-related processes and investigated behavioral and molecular changes throughout adult life in mice lacking the regulatory presynaptic 5-HT1B receptor (5-HT1BR), a candidate gene for 5-HT-mediated age-related functions. We show that the lack of 5-HT1BR (Htr1bKO mice) induced an early age-related motor decline and resulted in decreased longevity. Analysis of life-long transcriptome changes revealed an early and global shift of the gene expression signature of aging in the brain of Htr1bKO mice. Moreover, molecular changes reached an apparent maximum effect at 18-months in Htr1bKO mice, corresponding to the onset of early death in that group. A comparative analysis with our previous characterization of aging in the human brain revealed a phylogenetic conservation of age-effect from mice to humans, and confirmed the early onset of molecular aging in Htr1bKO mice. Potential mechanisms appear independent of known central mechanisms (Bdnf, inflammation), but may include interactions with previously identified age-related systems (IGF-1, sirtuins). In summary, our findings suggest that the onset of age-related events can be influenced by altered 5-HT function, thus identifying 5-HT as a modulator of brain aging, and suggesting age-related consequences to chronic manipulation of 5-HT. PMID:17420766

  13. [Age-related aspects of the extent of lipid metabolism and post-traumatic stress disorders among veterans of modern warfare].

    PubMed

    Torgashov, M N; Miakotnykh, V S; Pal'tsev, A I

    2013-01-01

    The peculiarities of violations of lipid metabolism and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 161 patients of 25-69 years, veterans of the military actions on the territory of Afghanistan and the Northern Caucasus were investigated. The dependence of the formation of dyslipidemia and related changes of atherosclerosis in the young age on neuroendocrine effects, accompanying the effects of combat stress and promoting accelerated aging was determined. On the other hand, with the time, after 15-25 years after participating in hostilities, the intensity of PTSD and its influence on the development of violations of lipid spectrum may decline. The leading role in the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia goes to age-related changes, accompanying a process of accelerated aging of veterans of combat operations, and to pathological disorders of metabolism in liver associated with alcohol abuse and the consequences of infectious diseases.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. PMID:27307216

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10575.001 PMID:27307216

  16. Prevention of age-related endothelial dysfunction by habitual aerobic exercise in healthy humans: possible role of nuclear factor κB.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Pierce, Gary L; Nowlan, Molly J; Seals, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Habitual aerobic exercise prevents age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). We have hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) impairs EDD with sedentary aging, and habitual aerobic exercise prevents this age-related suppression of EDD by NF-κB. To test this hypothesis, we have inhibited NF-κB signalling via oral salsalate administration in healthy older aerobic exercise-trained adults (OT, n=14, 58 ± 2 years), older non-exercising adults (ON, n=16, 61 ± 1 years) and young non-exercising controls (YN, n=8, 23 ± 1 years). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell expression of NF-κB p65 by ~25% in ON (P<0.05) but did not significantly change expression in OT or YN (P>0.05). EDD, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), was improved by salsalate in ON (4.0 ± 0.7% compared with 6.8 ± 0.7%, placebo compared with salsalate, P<0.001) but did not change with salsalate in OT or YN (OT: 7.2 ± 0.7% compared with 7.7 ± 0.6%; YN: 7.6 ± 0.9% compared with 8.1 ± 0.8%; placebo compared with salsalate, P>0.05). Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by salsalate in any group (P>0.05). In ON, vitamin C infusion improved FMD by ~30% during placebo (P<0.001) but had no affect during salsalate (P>0.05). In OT and YN, vitamin C infusion did not affect FMD during either placebo or salsalate (P>0.05). Salsalate reduced endothelial cell nitrotyrosine content by ~25% and NADPH oxidase p47phox expression by ~30% in ON (P<0.05) but had no effect in OT or YN (P>0.05). Our results suggest that endothelial NF-κB signalling is associated with oxidative stress-related impairment of EDD in healthy non-exercising but not aerobically exercising older adults. This may be a key mechanism by which regular aerobic exercise preserves endothelial function and reduces cardiovascular risk with aging.

  17. Renal glycosphingolipid metabolism is dysfunctional in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nowling, Tamara K; Mather, Andrew R; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Powers, Thomas W; Jones, E Ellen; Snider, Ashley J; Oates, Jim C; Drake, Richard R; Siskind, Leah J

    2015-06-01

    Nearly one half of patients with lupus develop glomerulonephritis (GN), which often leads to renal failure. Although nephritis is diagnosed by the presence of proteinuria, the pathology of nephritis can fall into one of five classes defined by different forms of tissue injury, and the mechanisms involved in pathogenesis are not completely understood. Glycosphingolipids are abundant in the kidney, have roles in many cellular functions, and were shown to be involved in other renal diseases. Here, we show dysfunctional glycosphingolipid metabolism in patients with lupus nephritis and MRL/lpr lupus mice. Specifically, we found that glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) levels are significantly higher in the kidneys of nephritic MRL/lpr lupus mice than the kidneys of non-nephritic lupus mice or healthy controls. This elevation may be, in part, caused by altered transcriptional regulation and/or activity of LacCer synthase (GalT5) and neuraminidase 1, enzymes that mediate glycosphingolipid metabolism. We show increased neuraminidase 1 activity early during the progression of nephritis (before significant elevation of GlcCer and LacCer in the kidney). Elevated levels of urinary LacCer were detected before proteinuria in lupus mice. Notably, LacCer levels were higher in the urine and kidneys of patients with lupus and nephritis than patients with lupus without nephritis or healthy controls. Together, these results show early and significant dysfunction of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway in the kidneys of lupus mice and patients with lupus nephritis and suggest that molecules in this pathway may serve as early markers in lupus nephritis.

  18. Age-related impairments in skeletal muscle PDH phosphorylation and plasma lactate are indicative of metabolic inflexibility and the effects of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Consitt, Leslie A; Saxena, Gunjan; Saneda, Alicson; Houmard, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether plasma lactate and skeletal muscle glucose regulatory pathways, specifically PDH dephosphorylation, are impaired during hyperinsulinemic conditions in middle- to older-aged individuals and determine whether exercise training could improve key variables responsible for skeletal muscle PDH regulation. Eighteen young (19-29 yr; n = 9 males and 9 females) and 20 middle- to older-aged (57-82 yr; n = 10 males and 10 females) individuals underwent a 2-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 50, 90, and 120 min for analysis of lactate, and skeletal muscle biopsies were performed at 60 min for analysis of protein associated with glucose metabolism. In response to insulin, plasma lactate was elevated in aged individuals when normalized to insulin action. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of skeletal muscle PDH on serine sites 232, 293, and 300 decreased in young individuals only. Changes in insulin-stimulated PDH phosphorylation were positively related to changes in plasma lactate. No age-related differences were observed in skeletal muscle phosphorylation of LDH, GSK-3α, or GSK-3β in response to insulin or PDP1, PDP2, PDK2, PDK4, or MPC1 total protein. Twelve weeks of endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training improved insulin-stimulated PDH dephosphorylation, which was related to a reduced lactate response. These findings suggest that impairments in insulin-induced PDH regulation in a sedentary aging population contribute to impaired glucose metabolism and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating metabolic inflexibility. PMID:27221120

  19. Metabolic Dysfunction of Astrocyte: An Initiating Factor in Beta-amyloid Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liang-Jun; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Ran; Cai, Zhiyou

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most important energy regulator in the brain, support brain energy needs. In the meantime, numerous studies have demonstrated that impaired brain glucose metabolism is closely linked to abnormal astrocytic metabolism in AD. Indeed, the interaction between amyloid plaques and perturbed astrocytic homeostasis contributes to AD pathogenesis and astrocytic metabolic dysfunction is thought to be a trigger for Aβ pathology through oxidative stress and neuroinflammation Moreover, astrocytic metabolic dysfunction may regulate Aβ generation via modulating proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase, γ-secretase, and α-secretase, and may also modulate APP post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, and tyrosine sulfation. While it is known that metabolic dysfunction of astrocytes contributes to the failure of Aβ clearance, it has also been reported that such dysfunction has neuroprotective property and exhibits no detrimental outcomes. Therefore, the exact role of astrocytic metabolic dysfunction in Aβ pathology remains to be further investigated. PMID:24443714

  20. Adipokines, metabolic dysfunction and illness course in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Rizzo, Lucas B; Santos, Camila M; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    Replicated evidence indicates that individuals with BD are differentially affected by metabolic comorbidities and that its occurrence is a critical mediator and/or moderator of BD outcomes. This study aimed to explore the role of adipokines on bipolar disorder (BD) course and its relationship with metabolic comorbidities (i.e. type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity). We measured plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin, as well as anthropometric and metabolic parameters of 59 patients with BD and 28 healthy volunteers. Our results showed that, in female participants, adiponectin was lower in individuals with BD, relative to healthy controls (p = 0.017). In the BD population, adiponectin levels were correlated with fasting glucose (r = -0.291, p = 0.047), fasting insulin (r = -0.332, p = 0.023), C-peptide (r = 0.040, p = 0.040), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (r = -0.411, p = 0.004), HDL (r = 0.508, p < 0.001), VLDL (r = -0.395, p = 0.005) and triglycerides (r = -0.310, p = 0.030). After adjustment for age, gender and BMI, individuals with BD and low adiponectin levels (i.e. < 7.5 μg/ml), had a higher number of mood episodes (p < 0.001), lower number of psychiatric hospitalizations (p = 0.007), higher depressive symptoms (p < 0.001) and lower levels of functioning (p = 0.020). In conclusion, adiponectin levels, either directly or as a proxy of metabolic dysfunction, is independently associated with an unfavorable course of illness in BD. PMID:26748249

  1. Can brain dysfunction be a predisposing factor for metabolic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram B; Pella, Daniel; Mechirova, Viola; Otsuka, Kuniaki

    2004-10-01

    The various mechanisms that may explain the association between brain dysfunction and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MS) leading to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes have been reviewed. A Medline search was conducted until September 2003, and articles published in various national and international journals were reviewed. Experts working in the field were also consulted. Compelling evidence was found that saturated and total fat and low dietary n-3 fatty acids and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in conjunction with sedentary behavior and mental stress combined with various personality traits can enhance sympathetic activity and increase the secretion of catecholamine, cortisol and serotonin, all of which appear to be underlying mechanisms involved in MS. Excess secretion of these neurotransmitters in conjunction with underlying long-chain PUFA deficiency may damage the neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus and insulin receptors in the brain, in particular during fetal life, infancy and childhood, and lead to their dysfunction. Since 30-50% of the fatty acids in the brain are long-chain PUFAs, especially omega-3 fatty acids which are incorporated in the cell membrane phospholipids, it is possible that their supplementation may have a protective effect. Omega-3 fatty acids are also known to enhance parasympathetic activity and to increase the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as acetylecholine in the hippocampus. It is possible that a marginal deficiency of long-chain PUFAs, especially n-3 fatty acids, due to poor dietary intake during the critical period of brain growth and development in the fetus, and later in the infant and also possibly in the child, adolescent and adult may enhance the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) interleukin (IL)-1, 2 and 6 and cause neuronal dysfunction. Experimental studies indicate that ventromedial hypothalamic lesions in rats induce hyperphagia, resulting in

  2. PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, ameliorates age-related renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Nim; Lim, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-08-01

    The kidney ages quickly compared with other organs. Expression of senescence markers reflects changes in the energy metabolism in the kidney. Two important issues in aging are mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. PPARα plays a major role as a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in various processes. In this study, 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, the control group (n=7) and the fenofibrate-treated group (n=7) was fed the normal chow plus fenofibrate for 6months. The PPARα agonist, fenofibrate, improved renal function, proteinuria, histological change (glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial fibrosis), inflammation, and apoptosis in aging mice. This protective effect against age-related renal injury occurred through the activation of AMPK and SIRT1 signaling. The activation of AMPK and SIRT1 allowed for the concurrent deacetylation and phosphorylation of their target molecules and decreased the kidney's susceptibility to age-related changes. Activation of the AMPK-FOXO3a and AMPK-PGC-1α signaling pathways ameliorated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that activation of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling may have protective effects against age-related renal injury. Pharmacological targeting of PPARα and AMPK-SIRT1 signaling molecules may prevent or attenuate age-related pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27130813

  3. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  4. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; et al

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  5. Long-term dietary extra-virgin olive oil rich in polyphenols reverses age-related dysfunctions in motor coordination and contextual memory in mice: role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pitozzi, Vanessa; Jacomelli, Michela; Catelan, Dolores; Servili, Maurizio; Taticchi, Agnese; Biggeri, Annibale; Dolara, Piero; Giovannelli, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of olive oil phenols on brain aging in mice and to verify whether the antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities of these polyphenols were involved. C57Bl/6J mice were fed from middle age to senescence with extra-virgin olive oil (10% wt/wt dry diet) rich in phenols (total polyphenol dose/day, 6 mg/kg). Behavioral tests were employed to assess cognitive, motor, and emotional behavior after 6 or 12 months of treatment. Parameters of oxidative status and inflammation were measured in different brain areas at the same times and evaluated for correlation with behavioral changes. The treatment with olive oil phenols improved contextual memory in the step-down test to levels similar to young animals and prevented the age-related impairment in motor coordination in the rotarod test. This motor effect was correlated with reduced lipid peroxidation in the cerebellum (p<0.05), whereas the memory effect did not correlate with oxidation or inflammation parameters. In conclusion, this work points out that natural polyphenols contained in extra-virgin olive oil can improve some age-related dysfunctions by differentially affecting different brain areas. Such a modulation can be obtained with an olive oil intake that is normal in the Mediterranean area, provided that the oil has a sufficiently high content of polyphenols.

  6. Aging-Related Gene Expression in Hippocampus Proper compared to Dentate Gyrus is Selectively Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Variables in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, E. M.; Grondin, R.; Chen, K. C.; Thibault, O.; Thibault, V.; Pandya, J. D.; Dowling, A.; Zhang, Z.; Sullivan, P.; Porter, N. M.; Landfield, P. W.

    2010-01-01

    Age-dependent metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it also confers major risk for impaired cognition in normal aging or Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the specific pathways mediating MetS-brain interactions. Here, we performed the first studies quantitatively linking MetS variables to aging changes in brain genome-wide expression and mitochondrial function. In six young adult and six aging female rhesus monkeys, we analyzed gene expression in two major hippocampal subdivisions critical for memory/cognitive function (hippocampus proper, or cornu ammonis (CA), and dentate gyrus (DG)). Genes that changed with aging (aging-related genes, ARGs) were identified in each region. Serum variables reflecting insulin resistance and dyslipidemia were used to construct a quantitative MetS index (MSI). This MSI increased with age and correlated negatively with hippocampal mitochondrial function (state III oxidation). Over 2000 ARGs were identified in CA and/or DG, in approximately equal numbers, but substantially more ARGs in CA than in DG were correlated selectively with the MSI. Pathways represented by MSI-correlated ARGs were determined from the Gene Ontology database and literature. In particular, upregulated CA-ARGs representing glucocorticoid receptor (GR), chromatin assembly/histone acetyltransferase, and inflammatory/immune pathways were closely associated with the MSI. These results suggest a novel model in which MetS is associated with upregulation of hippocampal GR-dependent transcription and epigenetic co-activators, contributing to decreased mitochondrial function and brain energetic dysregulation. In turn, these MSI-associated neuroenergetic changes may promote inflammation, neuronal vulnerability and risk of cognitive impairment/AD. PMID:20427664

  7. Hormonal modulation in aging patients with erectile dysfunction and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Inês Campos; Carvalho, Hugo Nogueira; Pacheco-Figueiredo, Luís; Tomada, Inês; Tomada, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and hypogonadism are closely related, often coexisting in the aging male. Obesity was shown to raise the risk of ED and hypogonadism, as well as other endocrinological disturbances with impact on erectile function. We selected 179 patients referred for ED to our andrology unit, aiming to evaluate gonadotropins and estradiol interplay in context of ED, MetS, and hypogonadism. Patients were stratified into groups in accordance with the presence (or not) of MetS and/or hypogonadism. Noticeable differences in total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) levels were found between patients with and without MetS. Men with MetS evidenced lower TT circulating levels with an increasing number of MetS parameters, for which hypertriglyceridemia and waist circumference strongly contributed. Regarding the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, patients with hypogonadism did not exhibit raised LH levels. Interestingly, among those with higher LH levels, estradiol values were also increased. Possible explanations for this unexpected profile of estradiol may be the age-related adiposity, other estrogen-raising pathways, or even unknown mechanisms. Estradiol is possibly a molecule with further interactions beyond the currently described. Our results further enlighten this still unclear multidisciplinary and complex subject, raising new investigational opportunities.

  8. Systems biology-based analysis implicates a novel role for vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to have anti-angiogenic properties and to play a protective role in several types of cancer, including breast, prostate and cutaneous melanoma. Similarly, vitamin D levels have been shown to be protective for risk of a number of conditions, including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease, as well as numerous autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and type 1 diabetes mellitus. A study performed by Parekh et al. was the first to suggest a role for vitamin D in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and showed a correlation between reduced serum vitamin D levels and risk for early AMD. Based on this study and the protective role of vitamin D in diseases with similar pathophysiology to AMD, we examined the role of vitamin D in a family-based cohort of 481 sibling pairs. Using extremely phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, initially we evaluated the association of neovascular AMD and vitamin D/sunlight-related epidemiological factors. After controlling for established AMD risk factors, including polymorphisms of the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2/HtrA serine peptidase (ARMS2/HTRA1), and smoking history, we found that ultraviolet irradiance was protective for the development of neovascular AMD (p = 0.001). Although evaluation of serum vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) was higher in unaffected individuals than in their affected siblings, this finding did not reach statistical significance. Based on the relationship between ultraviolet irradiance and vitamin D production, we employed a candidate gene approach for evaluating common variation in key vitamin D pathway genes (the genes encoding the vitamin D receptor [VDR]; cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 [CYP27B1]; cytochrome P450, family 24, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 [CYP24A1]; and CYP27A1) in this same family-based cohort. Initial findings were then

  9. How to Study Basement Membrane Stiffness as a Biophysical Trigger in Prostate Cancer and Other Age-related Pathologies or Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Breit, Claudia; Clarke, Mitchell; Talar, Kamil; Wang, Kai; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Pickwell, Sage; Etchandy, Guillermina; Stasiuk, Graeme J; Sturge, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that can be used to study the biophysical microenvironment related to increased thickness and stiffness of the basement membrane (BM) during age-related pathologies and metabolic disorders (e.g. cancer, diabetes, microvascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy). The premise of the model is non-enzymatic crosslinking of reconstituted BM (rBM) matrix by treatment with glycolaldehyde (GLA) to promote advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) generation via the Maillard reaction. Examples of laboratory techniques that can be used to confirm AGE generation, non-enzymatic crosslinking and increased stiffness in GLA treated rBM are outlined. These include preparation of native rBM (treated with phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) and stiff rBM (treated with GLA) for determination of: its AGE content by photometric analysis and immunofluorescent microscopy, its non-enzymatic crosslinking by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) as well as confocal microscopy, and its increased stiffness using rheometry. The procedure described here can be used to increase the rigidity (elastic moduli, E) of rBM up to 3.2-fold, consistent with measurements made in healthy versus diseased human prostate tissue. To recreate the biophysical microenvironment associated with the aging and diseased prostate gland three prostate cell types were introduced on to native rBM and stiff rBM: RWPE-1, prostate epithelial cells (PECs) derived from a normal prostate gland; BPH-1, PECs derived from a prostate gland affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); and PC3, metastatic cells derived from a secondary bone tumor originating from prostate cancer. Multiple parameters can be measured, including the size, shape and invasive characteristics of the 3D glandular acini formed by RWPE-1 and BPH-1 on native versus stiff rBM, and average cell length, migratory velocity and persistence of cell movement of 3D spheroids formed by PC3 cells under

  10. Principles of targeting endothelial cell metabolism to treat angiogenesis and endothelial cell dysfunction in disease

    PubMed Central

    Goveia, Jermaine; Stapor, Peter; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is the orchestral conductor of blood vessel function. Pathological blood vessel formation (a process termed pathological angiogenesis) or the inability of endothelial cells (ECs) to perform their physiological function (a condition known as EC dysfunction) are defining features of various diseases. Therapeutic intervention to inhibit aberrant angiogenesis or ameliorate EC dysfunction could be beneficial in diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, respectively, but current strategies have limited efficacy. Based on recent findings that pathological angiogenesis and EC dysfunction are accompanied by EC-specific metabolic alterations, targeting EC metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how EC metabolism is altered in disease and discuss potential metabolic targets and strategies to reverse EC dysfunction and inhibit pathological angiogenesis. PMID:25063693

  11. Estrogens prevent metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian disruption has become a significant factor contributing to the epidemics of obesity and insulin resistance. However, interventions to treat metabolic dysfunctions induced by circadian disruptions are limited. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, produces important antiobesity and antidiabetic ef...

  12. Fermented Red Ginseng Potentiates Improvement of Metabolic Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Min Chul; Lee, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Hun; Kim, Hye Yoom; Yoon, Jung Joo; Ahn, You Mee; Tan, Rui; Park, Min Cheol; Cha, Jeong Dan; Choi, Kyung Min; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome including obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension is a cluster of risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. Red ginseng (RG), a widely used traditional herbal medicine, was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. Aim in the present study was to investigate that the effects of fermented red ginseng (FRG) on a high-fructose (HF) diet induced metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to RG and losartan. Animals were divided into four groups: a control group fed a regular diet and tap water, and fructose groups that were fed a 60% high-fructose (HF) diet with/without RG 250 mg/kg/day or FRG 250 mg/kg/day for eight weeks, respectively. Treatment with FRG significantly suppressed the increments of body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat weight and adipocyte size. Moreover, FRG significantly prevented the development of metabolic disturbances such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Staining with Oil-red-o demonstrated a marked increase of hepatic accumulation of triglycerides, and this increase was prevented by FRG. FRG ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by downregulation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and adhesion molecules in the aorta. In addition, FRG induced markedly upregulation of Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4) in the muscle. These results indicate that FRG ameliorates obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and fatty liver in HF diet rats. More favorable pharmacological effects on HF diet induced metabolic disorders were observed with FRG, compared to an equal dose of RG. These results showed that the pharmacological activity of RG was enhanced by fermentation. Taken together, fermentated red ginseng might be a beneficial therapeutic approach for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27322312

  13. Steroidogenic versus Metabolic Programming of Reproductive Neuroendocrine, Ovarian and Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rodolfo C; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of the reproductive system to early exposure to steroid hormones has become a major concern in our modern societies. Human fetuses are at risk of abnormal programming via exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, inadvertent use of contraceptive pills during pregnancy, as well as from excess exposure to steroids due to disease states. Animal models provide an unparalleled resource to understand the developmental origin of diseases. In female sheep, prenatal exposure to testosterone excess results in an array of adult reproductive disorders that recapitulate those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), including disrupted neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, increased pituitary sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone excess, functional hyperandrogenism, and multifollicular ovarian morphology culminating in early reproductive failure. Prenatal testosterone treatment also leads to fetal growth retardation, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Mounting evidence suggests that developmental exposure to an improper steroidal/metabolic environment may mediate the programming of adult disorders in prenatal testosterone-treated females, and these defects are maintained or amplified by the postnatal sex steroid and metabolic milieu. This review addresses the steroidal and metabolic contributions to the development and maintenance of the PCOS phenotype in the prenatal testosterone-treated sheep model, including the effects of prenatal and postnatal treatment with an androgen antagonist or insulin sensitizer as potential strategies to prevent/ameliorate these dysfunctions. Insights obtained from these intervention strategies on the mechanisms underlying these defects are likely to have translational relevance to human PCOS.

  14. Steroidogenic vs. metabolic programming of reproductive neuroendocrine, ovarian, and metabolic dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rodolfo C.; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of the reproductive system to early exposure to steroid hormones has become a major concern in our modern societies. Human fetuses are at risk of abnormal programming via exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, inadvertent use of contraceptive pills during pregnancy, as well as from excess exposure to steroids through disease states. Animal models provide an unparalleled resource to understand the developmental origin of diseases. In female sheep, prenatal exposure to testosterone (T) excess results in an array of adult reproductive disorders that recapitulate those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), including disrupted neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, increased pituitary sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) excess, functional hyperandrogenism, and multifollicular ovarian morphology culminating in early reproductive failure. Prenatal T-treatment also leads to fetal growth retardation, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Mounting evidence suggests that developmental exposure to improper steroidal as well as metabolic environment may mediate the programming of adult disorders in prenatal T-treated females and these defects are maintained or amplified by postnatal sex steroid and metabolic milieu. This review addresses the steroidal and metabolic contributions to the development and maintenance of PCOS phenotype in the prenatal T-treated sheep model, centering specifically on the effects of prenatal and postnatal treatment with androgen antagonist or insulin sensitizer as potential strategies to prevent/ameliorate these dysfunctions. Insights obtained from these intervention strategies on the mechanisms underlying these defects are likely to have translational relevance to human PCOS. PMID:25832114

  15. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  16. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions.

  17. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S. Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M.; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  18. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ordiz, M Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12-59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  19. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12–59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  20. Preparing Muscles for Diving: Age-Related Changes in Muscle Metabolic Profiles in Harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Hooded (Cystophora cristata) Seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Lestyk, K; Freistroffer, D; Hammill, M O

    2015-01-01

    In adult marine mammals, muscles can sustain aerobic metabolism during dives in part because they contain large oxygen (O2) stores and metabolic rates are low. However, young pups have significantly lower tissue O2 stores and much higher mass-specific metabolic rates. To investigate how these differences may influence muscle function during dives, we measured the activities of enzymes involved in aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways (citrate synthase [CS], β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase [HOAD], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) and the LDH isoform profile in six muscles from 41 harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and 30 hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals ranging in age from fetal to adult. All neonatal muscles had significantly higher absolute but lower metabolically scaled CS and HOAD activities than adults (∼ 70% and ∼ 85% lower, respectively). Developmental increases in LDH activity lagged that of aerobic enzymes and were not accompanied by changes in isozyme profile, suggesting that changes in enzyme concentration rather than structure determine activity levels. Biochemical maturation proceeded faster in the major locomotory muscles. In combination, findings suggest that pup muscles are unable to support strenuous aerobic exercise or rely heavily on anaerobic metabolism during early diving activities and that pups' high mass-specific metabolic rates may play a key role in limiting the ability of their muscles to support underwater foraging. PMID:25730272

  1. Preparing Muscles for Diving: Age-Related Changes in Muscle Metabolic Profiles in Harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Hooded (Cystophora cristata) Seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Lestyk, K; Freistroffer, D; Hammill, M O

    2015-01-01

    In adult marine mammals, muscles can sustain aerobic metabolism during dives in part because they contain large oxygen (O2) stores and metabolic rates are low. However, young pups have significantly lower tissue O2 stores and much higher mass-specific metabolic rates. To investigate how these differences may influence muscle function during dives, we measured the activities of enzymes involved in aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways (citrate synthase [CS], β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase [HOAD], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) and the LDH isoform profile in six muscles from 41 harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and 30 hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals ranging in age from fetal to adult. All neonatal muscles had significantly higher absolute but lower metabolically scaled CS and HOAD activities than adults (∼ 70% and ∼ 85% lower, respectively). Developmental increases in LDH activity lagged that of aerobic enzymes and were not accompanied by changes in isozyme profile, suggesting that changes in enzyme concentration rather than structure determine activity levels. Biochemical maturation proceeded faster in the major locomotory muscles. In combination, findings suggest that pup muscles are unable to support strenuous aerobic exercise or rely heavily on anaerobic metabolism during early diving activities and that pups' high mass-specific metabolic rates may play a key role in limiting the ability of their muscles to support underwater foraging.

  2. Maintenance of basal levels of autophagy in Huntington's disease mouse models displaying metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Barbara; Soylu, Rana; Petersén, Asa

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat in the huntingtin protein. Neuropathology in the basal ganglia and in the cerebral cortex has been linked to the motor and cognitive symptoms whereas recent work has suggested that the hypothalamus might be involved in the metabolic dysfunction. Several mouse models of HD that display metabolic dysfunction have hypothalamic pathology, and expression of mutant huntingtin in the hypothalamus has been causally linked to the development of metabolic dysfunction in mice. Although the pathogenic mechanisms by which mutant huntingtin exerts its toxic functions in the HD brain are not fully known, several studies have implicated a role for the lysososomal degradation pathway of autophagy. Interestingly, changes in autophagy in the hypothalamus have been associated with the development of metabolic dysfunction in wild-type mice. We hypothesized that expression of mutant huntingtin might lead to changes in the autophagy pathway in the hypothalamus in mice with metabolic dysfunction. We therefore investigated whether there were changes in basal levels of autophagy in a mouse model expressing a fragment of 853 amino acids of mutant huntingtin selectively in the hypothalamus using a recombinant adeno-associate viral vector approach as well as in the transgenic BACHD mice. We performed qRT-PCR and Western blot to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of selected autophagy markers. Our results show that basal levels of autophagy are maintained in the hypothalamus despite the presence of metabolic dysfunction in both mouse models. Furthermore, although there were no major changes in autophagy in the striatum and cortex of BACHD mice, we detected modest, but significant differences in levels of some markers in mice at 12 months of age. Taken together, our results indicate that overexpression of mutant huntingtin in mice do not significantly perturb basal levels of

  3. Thyroid metabolism in the recessive sex-linked dwarf female chicken. 1. Age related changes in thyroid hormone synthesis and circulating thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Grandhi, R R; Brown, R G

    1975-03-01

    Age related changes in the levels of circulating thyroid hormones as well as the type of hormones synthesized in the thyroid glands from normal and sex-linked recessive dwarf, female chickens were studied. The impact of the presence of the dwarf gene on the parameters measured was minimal but significant alterations in the types of hormones produced in the thyroid gland with increasing age were observed. As the birds approached sexual maturity, the synthesis of triiodothyronine increased sharply such that the ratio of triiodothyronine (T3): tetraiodothyronine (T4) was approximately 15:1. This was in contrast to the T3:T4 ratio of younger birds which was approximately 0.7:1.0. This shift in hormone synthesis was reflected in relatively more circulating T3 in laying hens when compared with younger birds. It was also noted that four week old dwarf birds had higher circulating T3 values than those found for the normals.

  4. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  5. A Metabolic Signature of Mitochondrial Dysfunction Revealed through a Monogenic Form of Leigh Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson Legault, Julie; Strittmatter, Laura; Tardif, Jessica; Sharma, Rohit; Tremblay-Vaillancourt, Vanessa; Aubut, Chantale; Boucher, Gabrielle; Clish, Clary B; Cyr, Denis; Daneault, Caroline; Waters, Paula J; Vachon, Luc; Morin, Charles; Laprise, Catherine; Rioux, John D; Mootha, Vamsi K; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-11-01

    A decline in mitochondrial respiration represents the root cause of a large number of inborn errors of metabolism. It is also associated with common age-associated diseases and the aging process. To gain insight into the systemic, biochemical consequences of respiratory chain dysfunction, we performed a case-control, prospective metabolic profiling study in a genetically homogenous cohort of patients with Leigh syndrome French Canadian variant, a mitochondrial respiratory chain disease due to loss-of-function mutations in LRPPRC. We discovered 45 plasma and urinary analytes discriminating patients from controls, including classic markers of mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction (lactate and acylcarnitines), as well as unexpected markers of cardiometabolic risk (insulin and adiponectin), amino acid catabolism linked to NADH status (?-hydroxybutyrate), and NAD(+) biosynthesis (kynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid). Our study identifies systemic, metabolic pathway derangements that can lie downstream of primary mitochondrial lesions, with implications for understanding how the organelle contributes to rare and common diseases.

  6. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Davel, A P; Wenceslau, C F; Akamine, E H; Xavier, F E; Couto, G K; Oliveira, H T; Rossoni, L V

    2011-09-01

    The endothelium plays a vital role in maintaining circulatory homeostasis by the release of relaxing and contracting factors. Any change in this balance may result in a process known as endothelial dysfunction that leads to impaired control of vascular tone and contributes to the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and increased production of thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and superoxide anion in conductance and resistance arteries are commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive, diabetic and obese animals, resulting in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and in increased vasoconstrictor responses. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the role of enhanced overactivation of β-adrenergic receptors inducing vascular cytokine production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling that seem to be the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in hypertension, heart failure and in endocrine-metabolic disorders. However, some adaptive mechanisms can occur in the initial stages of hypertension, such as increased NO production by eNOS. The present review focuses on the role of NO bioavailability, eNOS uncoupling, cyclooxygenase-derived products and pro-inflammatory factors on the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in hypertension, sympathetic hyperactivity, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. These are cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases of high incidence and mortality around the world, especially in developing countries and endothelial dysfunction contributes to triggering, maintenance and worsening of these pathological situations.

  7. Metabolic dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: A critical examination of underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    MESARWI, Omar A.; SHARMA, Ellora V.; JUN, Jonathan C.; POLOTSKY, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    It has recently become clear that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, a disorder of defective energy storage and use. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this finding, drawing upon the characteristics that define OSA. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, elevated sympathetic tone, and oxidative stress – all consequences of OSA – have been implicated in the progression of poor metabolic outcomes in OSA. In this review we examine the evidence to support each of these disease manifestations of OSA as a unique risk for metabolic dysfunction. Tissue hypoxia and sleep fragmentation are each directly connected to insulin resistance and hypertension, and each of these also may increase sympathetic tone, resulting in defective glucose homeostasis, excessive lipolysis, and elevated blood pressure. Oxidative stress further worsens insulin resistance and in turn, metabolic dysfunction also increases oxidative stress. However, despite many studies linking each of these individual components of OSA to the development of metabolic syndrome, there are very few reports that actually provide a coherent narrative about the mechanism underlying metabolic dysfunction in OSA. PMID:26412981

  8. Dysregulated Arginine Metabolism and Cardiopulmonary Dysfunction in Patients with Thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Claudia R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wood, John; Porter, John B.; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A.; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H.; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-minute-walk-test, Borg Dyspnea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanism of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥2.5m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥2.5m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia. PMID:25907665

  9. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  10. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process. PMID:27040114

  11. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process.

  12. Mitochondrial Stress: A Bridge between Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, excessive oxidation of nutrients may induce mitochondrial stress, leading to mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and initiation of a retrograde stress signaling pathway. Defects in the UPRmt and the retrograde signaling pathways may disrupt the integrity and homeostasis of the mitochondria, resulting endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance. Improving the capacity of mitochondria to reduce stress may be an effective approach to improve mitochondria function and to suppress obesity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21616143

  13. Metabolic Dysfunction in Heart Failure: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Pathophysiologic Insights From Metabolomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Wynn G; Kelly, Jacob P; McGarrah, Robert W; Kraus, William E; Shah, Svati H

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic impairment is an intrinsic component of heart failure (HF) pathophysiology. Although initially conceived as a myocardial defect, metabolic dysfunction is now recognized as a systemic process with complex interplay between the myocardium and peripheral tissues and organs. Specifically, HF-associated metabolic dysfunction includes alterations in substrate utilization, insulin resistance, defects in energy production, and imbalanced anabolic-catabolic signaling leading to cachexia. Each of these metabolic abnormalities is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with HF; however, their detection and therapeutic management remains challenging. Given the difficulty in obtaining human cardiac tissue for research purposes, peripheral blood metabolomic profiling, a well-established approach for characterizing small-molecule metabolite intermediates from canonical biochemical pathways, may be a useful technology for dissecting biomarkers and mechanisms of metabolic impairment in HF. In this review, metabolic abnormalities in HF will be discussed with particular emphasis on the application of metabolomic profiling to detecting, risk stratifying, and identifying novel targets for metabolic therapy in this heterogeneous population. PMID:27216948

  14. Association of hypertension with coexistence of abnormal metabolism and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Guiyan; Wang, Aili; Tong, Weijun; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    To explore association of hypertension with coexistence of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal metabolism, a community-based study was conducted among Mongolian people in China. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle risk factors were investigated, blood pressure, body weight and waist circumference were measured, fasting blood samples were obtained to measure blood lipids, fasting plasma glucose and the biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and angiotensin II. Rates of abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II as well as coexistence of abnormal metabolism with the elevated biomarkers were all higher in hypertensives than these in normotensives (all p < 0.01). Compared with subjects with normal metabolism and without any elevated biomarker, multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of hypertension associated with abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin, elevated angiotensin II, coexistences of abnormal metabolism with elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1,elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II were 2.209 (1.594-3.062), 2.820 (1.992-3.992), 2.370 (1.665-3.374), 1.893 (1.331-2.691), 2.545 (1.793-3.612), 2.990 (2.102-4.252), 2.551 (1.775-3.667), 2.223 (1.544-3.220), 3.135 (2.185-4.519), respectively. In conclusion, this study indicated that inflammation and endothelial dysfunction was associated with hypertension and abnormal metabolism, and individuals with co-existence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction had higher risk of prevalent hypertension among Mongolian population. This study suggests that further study on treatment for hypertension patients with coexistence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction should be conducted in the near

  15. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein-protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  16. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein–protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  17. A constraint-based modelling approach to metabolic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Longfei; Nicolae, Averina; Oliveira, Miguel A.P.; He, Feng; Hachi, Siham; Fleming, Ronan M.T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of sporadic Parkinson's disease is degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. The aetiopathogenesis of this degeneration is still not fully understood, with dysfunction of many biochemical pathways in different subsystems suggested to be involved. Recent advances in constraint-based modelling approaches hold great potential to systematically examine the relative contribution of dysfunction in disparate pathways to dopaminergic neuronal degeneration, but few studies have employed these methods in Parkinson's disease research. Therefore, this review outlines a framework for future constraint-based modelling of dopaminergic neuronal metabolism to decipher the multi-factorial mechanisms underlying the neuronal pathology of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26504511

  18. Age-related changes in protein metabolism of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds during alleviation of dormancy and in the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Kalemba, Ewa M; Pukacka, Stanislawa

    2015-09-01

    The long-term storage of seeds generally reduces their viability and vigour. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of long-term storage on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds at optimal conditions, over 9 years, on the total and soluble protein levels and activity of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and aminopeptidases, as well as free amino acid levels and protein synthesis, in dry seeds, after imbibition and during cold stratification leading to dormancy release and germination. The same analyses were conducted in parallel on seeds gathered from the same tree in the running growing season and stored under the same conditions for only 3 months. The results showed that germination capacity decreased from 100% in freshly harvested seeds to 75% in seeds stored for 9 years. The levels of total and soluble proteins were highest in freshly harvested seeds and decreased significantly during storage, these proportions were retained during cold stratification and germination of seeds. Significant differences between freshly harvested and stored seeds were observed in the activities of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases, and in the levels of free amino acids. The neosynthesis of proteins during dormancy release and in the early stage of seed germination was significantly weaker in stored seeds. These results confirm the importance of protein metabolism for seed viability and the consequences of its reduction during seed ageing.

  19. Age-related changes in protein metabolism of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds during alleviation of dormancy and in the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Kalemba, Ewa M; Pukacka, Stanislawa

    2015-09-01

    The long-term storage of seeds generally reduces their viability and vigour. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of long-term storage on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds at optimal conditions, over 9 years, on the total and soluble protein levels and activity of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and aminopeptidases, as well as free amino acid levels and protein synthesis, in dry seeds, after imbibition and during cold stratification leading to dormancy release and germination. The same analyses were conducted in parallel on seeds gathered from the same tree in the running growing season and stored under the same conditions for only 3 months. The results showed that germination capacity decreased from 100% in freshly harvested seeds to 75% in seeds stored for 9 years. The levels of total and soluble proteins were highest in freshly harvested seeds and decreased significantly during storage, these proportions were retained during cold stratification and germination of seeds. Significant differences between freshly harvested and stored seeds were observed in the activities of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases, and in the levels of free amino acids. The neosynthesis of proteins during dormancy release and in the early stage of seed germination was significantly weaker in stored seeds. These results confirm the importance of protein metabolism for seed viability and the consequences of its reduction during seed ageing. PMID:26071872

  20. Links between Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Garruti, G.; Giampetruzzi, F.; Vita, M. G.; Pellegrini, F.; Lagioia, P.; Stefanelli, G.; Bellomo-Damato, A.; Giorgino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) might occur within metabolic syndrome (MbS). One of the complications of T2D is an impaired (imp) cardiovascular autonomic function (CAF). Aims. In subjects with T2D and age ≤ 55 years, the prevalence of impCAF and its relationship with BMI, waist, HbA1c values, MbS, hypertension, and family history of T2D and/or hypertension were analysed. Methods. 180 subjects consecutively undergoing a day hospital for T2D were studied. The IDF criteria were used to diagnose MbS. To detect impCAF, 5 tests for the evaluation of CAF were performed with Cardionomic (Meteda, Italy). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results. The prevalence of impCAF and MbS were 33.9% and 67.8%, respectively. Among diabetics with impCAF, 86.9% had MbS. ImpCAF was significantly associated with MbS, overweight, and HbA1c > 7%. Both logistic (P = 0.0009) and Poisson (P = 0.0113) models showed a positive association between impCAF and MbS. The degree of ImpCAF showed a positive linear correlation with BMI and HbA1c values. Conclusions. The study demonstrates that glycaemic control and overweight influence CAF and that T2D + MbS is more strongly associated with impCAF than isolated T2D. We suggest that MbS not only increases the cardiovascular risk of relatively young subjects with T2D but is also associated with impCAF. PMID:22474426

  1. Translational approaches to understanding metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cravo, Sergio L.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Machado, Benedito H.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be independently associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. To determine how OSA can increase cardiovascular risk, animal models have been developed to explore the underlying mechanisms and the cellular and end-organ targets of the predominant pathophysiological disturbance in OSA–intermittent hypoxia. Despite several limitations in translating data from animal models to the clinical arena, significant progress has been made in our understanding of how OSA confers increased cardiovascular risk. It is clear now that the hypoxic stress associated with OSA can elicit a broad spectrum of pathological systemic events including sympathetic activation, systemic inflammation, impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, and endothelial dysfunction, among others. This review provides an update of the basic, clinical, and translational advances in our understanding of the metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of OSA and highlights the most recent findings and perspectives in the field. PMID:26232233

  2. Immune-Mediated Metabolic Kynurenine Pathways Are Involved in the Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction after Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shuang Qiang; Yang, Mi; Duan, Kai Ming

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after cardiopulmonary bypass is a serious complication that can lead to personality changes, memory loss, reduction in the ability to learn, and other central nervous system dysfunctions. In recent years, there have been improvements in measures to protect the brain during surgery, although the incidence of cognitive dysfunction after cardiac surgery remains high (33 to 83% short-term and 20 to 60% long-term cognitive dysfunction). Despite the large amount of basic and clinical research on the incidence of POCD, its exact pathogenesis and complexity are not clear. Many studies have shown that the kynurenine pathway (KP) and cognitive function in humans are closely related. Some reports also show that the imbalance of some metabolites of the KP such as kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid (QUIN), which act in dynamic equilibrium under physiologic conditions, have effects on the central nervous system and can significantly affect cognitive function. Further studies have shown that inflammatory mediators may act on key enzymes of the KP causing KP-induced disorders. Severe inflammatory reaction occurs in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass, which triggers metabolic pathways that are closely related to changes in cognitive function. In this review, we summarize that inflammation-induced metabolic kynurenine (KYN) pathway disorders are likely to have an important role in incidence of POCD after CPB surgery. PMID:25893921

  3. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Michel, Sébastien; Vannuvel, Kayleen; Wanet, Anaïs; Renard, Patricia; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion. PMID:24710422

  4. Neuropharmacology of depression in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Gareri, Pietro; De Fazio, Pasquale; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2002-02-01

    Depression in the elderly is nowadays a predominant health care problem, mainly due to the progressive aging of the population. It results from psychosocial stress, polypathology, as well as some biochemical changes which occur in the aged brain and can lead to cognitive impairments, increased symptoms from medical illness, higher utilization of health care services and increased rates of suicide and non-suicide mortality. Depression may be also caused by a various number of drugs currently administered; this is remarkable especially in elderly people, where polypathology is often associated with polypharmacotherapy. However, the pathogenesis of geriatric depression is not well understood; major depression may arise from dysfunction of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Some clinical observations also suggest that striato-frontal dysfunction is associated with late life depression. A number of hypotheses have been made, focusing that mood disturbances are probably linked to a disturbed central metabolism of monoamines 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline and dopamine; however most of this knowledge is derived from animal models. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases are age-related diseases associated to decreased activity or brain lesions in the orbital frontal cortex and basal ganglia. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the dysfunction of one or more of the cortical basal ganglia-thalamic neuronal loops are involved in the pathophysiology of primary and secondary depression. This dysfunction may be mediated by decreased serotonin release and probably, also by reduction in serotonin receptors. Development of novel approaches such as dynamic brain imaging methods, together with indirect knowledge coming from the effects of new antidepressants, will increase the understanding of neurochemistry of depression in old age. PMID:12039452

  5. Dialogue between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria as a key actor of vascular dysfunction associated to metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Safiedeen, Zainab; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Martinez, M Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome due to its association with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cardiac mortality, comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities such as central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Recent studies have shown that metabolic syndrome patients exhibit impaired nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation leading to endothelial dysfunction in addition to insulin resistance. Interestingly, development and maintenance of the unfolded protein response of the endoplasmic reticulum stress revealed a surprisingly direct link with metabolic syndrome and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, in metabolic disorders, interaction between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria is mandatory for the generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and perturbation of mitochondrial function accounting, at least in part, for vascular dysfunction. Herein, we review the impact of the dialogue between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in modulating the cellular signals governing vascular alterations associated to metabolic disorders.

  6. Sex Dimorphism in Late Gestational Sleep Fragmentation and Metabolic Dysfunction in Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Hakim, Fahed; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excessive sleep fragmentation (SF) is common in pregnant women. Adult-onset metabolic disorders may begin during early development and exhibit substantial sex dimorphism. We hypothesized that metabolic dysfunction induced by gestational SF in male mice would not be apparent in female littermates. Methods: Body weight and food consumption were measured weekly in male and female offspring after late gestational SF or control sleep (SC). At 20 weeks, plasma leptin, adiponectin, lipid profiles, and insulin and glucose tolerance tests were assessed. Leptin and adiponectin, M1, and M2 macrophage messenger RNA expression and polarity were examined. Adiponectin gene promoter methylation levels in several tissues were assessed. Results: Food intake, body weight, visceral fat mass, and insulin resistance were higher, and adiponectin levels lower in male but not female offspring exposed to gestational SF. However, dyslipidemia was apparent in both male and female offspring exposed to SF, albeit of lesser magnitude. In visceral fat, leptin messenger RNA expression was selectively increased and adiponectin expression was decreased in male offspring exposed to gestational SF, but adiponectin was increased in exposed female offspring. Differences in adipokine expression also emerged in liver, subcutaneous fat, and muscle. Increased M1 macrophage markers were present in male offspring exposed to SF (SFOM) while increased M2 markers emerged in SF in female offspring (SFOF). Similarly, significant differences emerged in the methylation patterns of adiponectin promoter in SFOM and SFOF. Conclusion: Gestational sleep fragmentation increases the susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome in male but not in female offspring, most likely via epigenetic changes. Thus, sleep perturbations impose long-term detrimental effects to the fetus manifesting as sex dimorphic metabolic dysfunction in adulthood. Citation: Khalyfa A, Carreras A, Almendros I, Hakim F, Gozal D. Sex

  7. Resistance to aerobic exercise training causes metabolic dysfunction and reveals novel exercise-regulated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sarah J; Rivas, Donato A; Alves-Wagner, Ana B; Hirshman, Michael F; Gallagher, Iain J; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L; Qi, Nathan R; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A; Timmons, James A; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-08-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are "exercise-resistant" and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  8. No evidence of association between variant rs2075650 in lipid metabolism-related locus APOE/TOMM40 and advanced age-related macular degeneration in Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Mengyuan; Weng, Xiaoling; Wang, Ting; Liu, Fatao; Ye, Junyi; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Mingqing; Zhou, Daizhan

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a late-onset, neurodegenerative disease. Genes related to lipid metabolism are important in AMD pathogenesis. Recently, a variant rs2075650 located in lipid metabolism-related locus APOE/TOMM40 was identified to be associated with advanced AMD and early AMD, respectively, in two genome-wide association studies with European ancestry, while no association study between rs2075650 and overall advanced AMD in Chinese population has been conducted before. We evaluated the potential effect of this variant on advanced AMD in a Han Chinese cohort with 204 advanced AMD patients and 1536 healthy controls. The results suggested that rs2075650 was neither associated with advanced AMD in allele level (P = 0.348) nor in genotype level (P = 0.890 under additive model with age and sex adjusted). In conclusion, our study did not confirm the impact of rs2075650 on advanced AMD risk, indicating that rs2075650 is unlikely a superior marker for APOE/TOMM40 susceptible region with advanced AMD in Han Chinese population. PMID:25304313

  9. Analysis of abnormalities in purine metabolism leading to gout and to neurological dysfunctions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Cascante, M

    1998-01-01

    A modelling approach is used to analyse diseases associated with purine metabolism in man. The specific focus is on deficiencies in two enzymes, hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenylosuccinate lyase. These deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms, including neurological dysfunctions and mental retardation. Although the biochemical mechanisms of dysfunctions associated with adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency are not completely understood, there is at least general agreement in the literature about possible causes. Simulations with our model confirm that accumulation of the two substrates of the enzyme can lead to significant biochemical imbalance. In hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency the biochemical mechanisms associated with neurological dysfunctions are less clear. Model analyses support some old hypotheses but also suggest new indicators for possible causes of neurological dysfunctions associated with this deficiency. Hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is known to cause hyperuricaemia and gout. We compare the relative importance of this deficiency with other known causes of gout in humans. The analysis suggests that defects in the excretion of uric acid are more consequential than defects in uric acid synthesis such as hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:9445373

  10. Obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and cardiac fibrosis: pathophysiological pathways, molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cavalera, Michele; Wang, Junhong; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is strongly associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction and may contribute to the increased incidence of heart failure, atrial arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death in obese subjects. This review discusses the evidence linking obesity and myocardial fibrosis in animal models and human patients, focusing on the fundamental pathophysiological alterations that may trigger fibrogenic signaling, the cellular effectors of fibrosis, and the molecular signals that may regulate the fibrotic response. Obesity is associated with a wide range of pathophysiological alterations (such as pressure and volume overload, metabolic dysregulation, neurohumoral activation, and systemic inflammation); their relative role in mediating cardiac fibrosis is poorly defined. Activation of fibroblasts likely plays a major role in obesity-associated fibrosis; however, inflammatory cells, cardiomyocytes, and vascular cells may also contribute to fibrogenic signaling. Several molecular processes have been implicated in regulation of the fibrotic response in obesity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, induction of transforming growth factor β, oxidative stress, advanced glycation end-products, endothelin 1, Rho-kinase signaling, leptin-mediated actions, and upregulation of matricellular proteins (such as thrombospondin 1) may play a role in the development of fibrosis in models of obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Moreover, experimental evidence suggests that obesity and insulin resistance profoundly affect the fibrotic and remodeling response after cardiac injury. Understanding the pathways implicated in obesity-associated fibrosis may lead to the development of novel therapies to prevent heart failure and attenuate postinfarction cardiac remodeling in patients with obesity.

  11. Olfactory dysfunction and cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegeneration: prevalence related to patient selection, diagnostic criteria and therapeutic treatment of aged clients receiving clinical neurology and community-based care.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-11-01

    A decrease in olfactory function with age has been attributed to a variety of factors including normal anatomical and physiological changes in aging, surgery, trauma, environmental factors, medications and disease. Olfactory impairment has also been associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease. Deficits in these chemical senses cannot only reduce the pleasure and comfort from food, but represent risk factors for nutritional and immune deficiencies as well as adherence to specific dietary regimens. Therapy is limited, but one should be aware of the existing medical and surgical treatment modalities. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, copper and zinc ions, glycating agents and reactive aldehydes, protein cross-linking and proteolytic dysfunction may all contribute to neurodegeneration, olfactory dysfunction, AD. Carnosine (beta-alanyl- L-histidine) is a naturally-occurring, pluripotent, homeostatic transglycating agent. The olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc. Loss of olfactory function and oxidative damage to olfactory tissue are early symptoms of AD. Protein and lipid oxidation and glycation are integral components of the AD pathophysiology. Carnosine can suppress amyloidbeta peptide toxicity, inhibit production of oxygen free-radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and reactive aldehydes, and suppresses protein glycation. The observations suggest that patented non-hydrolyzed carnosine lubricant drug delivery or perfume toilet water formulations combined with related moiety amino acid structures, such as beta-alanine, should be explored for therapeutic potential towards olfactory dysfunction, AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. "The olfactory system, anatomically, is right in the middle of the part of the brain that's very important for memory. There are strong neural connections between the two." ~ Donald Wilson.

  12. Sympathetic overactivity precedes metabolic dysfunction in a fructose model of glucose intolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Katia; Senador, Danielle D; Mostarda, Cristiano; Irigoyen, Maria C; Morris, Mariana

    2012-04-15

    Consumption of high levels of fructose in humans and animals leads to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. There are questions as to the role of the autonomic changes in the time course of fructose-induced dysfunction. C57/BL male mice were given tap water or fructose water (100 g/l) to drink for up to 2 mo. Groups were control (C), 15-day fructose (F15), and 60-day fructose (F60). Light-dark patterns of arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR), and their respective variabilities were measured. Plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, resistin, adiponectin, and glucose tolerance were quantified. Fructose increased systolic AP (SAP) at 15 and 60 days during both light (F15: 123 ± 2 and F60: 118 ± 2 mmHg) and dark periods (F15: 136 ± 4 and F60: 136 ± 5 mmHg) compared with controls (light: 111 ± 2 and dark: 117 ± 2 mmHg). SAP variance (VAR) and the low-frequency component (LF) were increased in F15 (>60% and >80%) and F60 (>170% and >140%) compared with C. Cardiac sympatho-vagal balance was enhanced, while baroreflex function was attenuated in fructose groups. Metabolic parameters were unchanged in F15. However, F60 showed significant increases in plasma glucose (26%), cholesterol (44%), triglycerides (22%), insulin (95%), and leptin (63%), as well as glucose intolerance. LF of SAP was positively correlated with SAP. Plasma leptin was correlated with triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Results show that increased sympathetic modulation of vessels and heart preceded metabolic dysfunction in fructose-consuming mice. Data suggest that changes in autonomic modulation may be an initiating mechanism underlying the cluster of symptoms associated with cardiometabolic disease.

  13. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision.

  14. The Marmoset as a Model of Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Suzette D.; Mansfield, Keith G.; Ratnam, Rama; Ross, Corinna N.; Ziegler, Toni E.

    2013-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate aging model. With an average lifespan of 5 to 7 years and a maximum lifespan of 16.5 years, marmosets are the shortest-lived anthropoid primates. They display age-related changes in pathologies that mirror those seen in humans, such as cancer, amyloidosis, diabetes, and chronic renal disease. They also display predictable age-related differences in lean mass, calf circumference, circulating albumin, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Features of spontaneous sensory and neurodegenerative change—for example, reduced neurogenesis, β-amyloid deposition in the cerebral cortex, loss of calbindin D28k binding, and evidence of presbycusis—appear between the ages of 7 and 10 years. Variation among colonies in the age at which neurodegenerative change occurs suggests the interesting possibility that marmosets could be specifically managed to produce earlier versus later occurrence of degenerative conditions associated with differing rates of damage accumulation. In addition to the established value of the marmoset as a model of age-related neurodegenerative change, this primate can serve as a model of the integrated effects of aging and obesity on metabolic dysfunction, as it displays evidence of such dysfunction associated with high body weight as early as 6 to 8 years of age. PMID:21411858

  15. Age-related structural abnormalities in the human retina-choroid complex revealed by two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Giese, Guenter; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Yu, Jiayi; Bille, Josef F; Niemz, Markolf H

    2007-01-01

    The intensive metabolism of photoreceptors is delicately maintained by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. Dysfunction of either the RPE or choroid may lead to severe damage to the retina. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) from endogenous fluorophores in the human retina provides a novel opportunity to reveal age-related structural abnormalities in the retina-choroid complex prior to apparent pathological manifestations of age-related retinal diseases. In the photoreceptor layer, the regularity of the macular photoreceptor mosaic is preserved during aging. In the RPE, enlarged lipofuscin granules demonstrate significantly blue-shifted autofluorescence, which coincides with the depletion of melanin pigments. Prominent fibrillar structures in elderly Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaries represent choroidal structure and permeability alterations. Requiring neither slicing nor labeling, TPEF imaging is an elegant and highly efficient tool to delineate the thick, fragile, and opaque retina-choroid complex, and may provide clues to the trigger events of age-related macular degeneration.

  16. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 inhibition improves glucose and lipid metabolism and protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rahtu-Korpela, Lea; Karsikas, Sara; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mäkelä, Kari A; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Walkinshaw, Gail; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, predisposing subjects to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Specific prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a potent governor of metabolism, with isoenzyme 2 being the main regulator. We investigated whether HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be used to treat obesity and its consequences. Hif-p4h-2-deficient mice, whether fed normal chow or a high-fat diet, had less adipose tissue, smaller adipocytes, and less adipose tissue inflammation than their littermates. They also had improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the HIF-1 targets glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 were increased in their tissues, whereas acetyl-CoA concentration was decreased. The hepatic mRNA level of the HIF-2 target insulin receptor substrate-2 was higher, whereas that of two key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis was lower. Serum cholesterol levels and de novo lipid synthesis were decreased, and the mice were protected against hepatic steatosis. Oral administration of an HIF-P4H inhibitor, FG-4497, to wild-type mice with metabolic dysfunction phenocopied these beneficial effects. HIF-P4H-2 inhibition may be a novel therapy that not only protects against the development of obesity and its consequences but also reverses these conditions.

  17. Effect of diosgenin on metabolic dysfunction: Role of ERβ in the regulation of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Jun; Long, Zi; Sun, Quangui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Lele; Zhang, Xiaodi; Hai, Chunxu

    2015-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of diosgenin (DSG) on metabolic dysfunction and to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms. High fat (HF) diet-fed mice and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was used to evaluate the effect of DSG. We showed that DSG attenuated metabolic dysfunction in HF diet-fed mice, as evidenced by reduction of blood glucose level and improvement of glucose and insulin intolerance. DSG ameliorated oxidative stress, reduced body weight, fat pads, and systematic lipid profiles and attenuated lipid accumulation. DSG inhibited 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and reduced adipocyte size through regulating key factors. DSG inhibited PPARγ and its target gene expression both in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat tissues in HF diet-fed mice. Overexpression of PPARγ suppressed DSG-inhibited adipocyte differentiation. DSG significantly increased nuclear expression of ERβ. Inhibition of ERβ significantly suppressed DSG-exerted suppression of adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ expression. In response to DSG stimulation, ERβ bound with RXRα and dissociated RXRα from PPARγ, leading to the reduction of transcriptional activity of PPARγ. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of DSG on adipocyte differentiation and demonstrate that ERβ-exerted regulation of PPARγ expression and activity is critical for DSG-inhibited adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26408789

  18. Neonatal treatment with scopolamine butylbromide prevents metabolic dysfunction in male rats.

    PubMed

    Malta, Ananda; Souza, Aline Amenencia de; Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Pavanello, Audrei; Prates, Kelly Valério; Tófolo, Laize Peron; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Oliveira, Júlio Cezar de; Martins, Isabela Peixoto; Previate, Carina; Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether treatment with a cholinergic antagonist could reduce insulin levels in early postnatal life and attenuate metabolic dysfunctions induced by early overfeeding in adult male rats. Wistar rats raised in small litters (SLs, 3 pups/dam) and normal litters (NLs, 9 pups/dam) were used in models of early overfeeding and normal feeding, respectively. During the first 12 days of lactation, animals in the SL and NL groups received scopolamine butylbromide (B), while the controls received saline (S) injections. The drug treatment decreased insulin levels in pups from both groups, and as adults, these animals showed improvements in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, vagus nerve activity, fat tissue accretion, insulinemia, leptinemia, body weight gain and food intake. Low glucose and cholinergic insulinotropic effects were observed in pancreatic islets from both groups. Low protein expression was observed for the muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptor subtype (M3mAChR), although M2mAChR subtype expression was increased in SL-B islets. In addition, beta-cell density was reduced in drug-treated rats. These results indicate that early postnatal scopolamine butylbromide treatment inhibits early overfeeding-induced metabolic dysfunctions in adult rats, which might be caused by insulin decreases during lactation, associated with reduced parasympathetic activity and expression of M3mAChR in pancreatic islets. PMID:27561682

  19. Neonatal treatment with scopolamine butylbromide prevents metabolic dysfunction in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Ananda; Souza, Aline Amenencia de; Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Pavanello, Audrei; Prates, Kelly Valério; Tófolo, Laize Peron; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Oliveira, Júlio Cezar de; Martins, Isabela Peixoto; Previate, Carina; Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether treatment with a cholinergic antagonist could reduce insulin levels in early postnatal life and attenuate metabolic dysfunctions induced by early overfeeding in adult male rats. Wistar rats raised in small litters (SLs, 3 pups/dam) and normal litters (NLs, 9 pups/dam) were used in models of early overfeeding and normal feeding, respectively. During the first 12 days of lactation, animals in the SL and NL groups received scopolamine butylbromide (B), while the controls received saline (S) injections. The drug treatment decreased insulin levels in pups from both groups, and as adults, these animals showed improvements in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, vagus nerve activity, fat tissue accretion, insulinemia, leptinemia, body weight gain and food intake. Low glucose and cholinergic insulinotropic effects were observed in pancreatic islets from both groups. Low protein expression was observed for the muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptor subtype (M3mAChR), although M2mAChR subtype expression was increased in SL-B islets. In addition, beta-cell density was reduced in drug-treated rats. These results indicate that early postnatal scopolamine butylbromide treatment inhibits early overfeeding-induced metabolic dysfunctions in adult rats, which might be caused by insulin decreases during lactation, associated with reduced parasympathetic activity and expression of M3mAChR in pancreatic islets. PMID:27561682

  20. Age-Related Conjunctival Disease in the C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 Mouse Model of Sjögren Syndrome Develops Independent of Lacrimal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    You, In-Cheon; Bian, Fang; Volpe, Eugene A.; de Paiva, Cintia S.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate parameters of ocular surface disease in C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 (Aec) mice with aging and their correlation with development of Sjögren syndrome (SS)–like lacrimal gland (LG) disease. Methods. Aec and C57BL/6 wild-type (B6) female mice were evaluated at 4, 12, and 20 weeks of age. Whole LG and eyes and adnexa were excised for histology and gene expression analysis and evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Tear volume and goblet cell density was measured. Quantitative PCR evaluated T-cell–related cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Results. Both strains showed age-related conjunctival goblet cell loss that was more pronounced in the Aec strain and significantly greater than in B6 mice at 12 weeks. This was accompanied by CD4+ T-cell infiltration of the conjunctiva that was greater in Aec strain at 20 weeks. Aec mice had higher levels of IL-17A, IL-17R, IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the conjunctiva, and they significantly increase with aging. Aec mice had greater lymphocytic infiltration of the LG and conjunctiva at 20 weeks that consisted of a mixture of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Flow cytometry showed a significant increase in CD4+ T cells in Aec LG compared to B6 mice. Tear volume was significantly increased in both strains at 20 weeks. Conclusions. Aec mice developed greater conjunctival goblet cell loss associated with lymphocytic infiltration of the LG and conjunctiva with aging. Increased expression of certain T helper or inflammatory cytokines in these tissues was observed in Aec mice. The conjunctival disease appeared to be due to inflammation and not a decrease in tear volume. PMID:25758816

  1. Myocardial mechanical dysfunction following endotoxemia: role of changes in energy substrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soraya, Hamid; Masoud, Waleed G T; Gandhi, Manoj; Garjani, Alireza; Clanachan, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular depression due to endotoxemia remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care patients. To determine whether drug-induced alterations in cardiac metabolism may be a viable strategy to reduce endotoxemia-mediated cardiac dysfunction, we assessed endotoxemia-induced changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism under aerobic and post-ischemic conditions. Endotoxemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli 0111:B4c, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 6 h prior to heart removal for ex vivo assessment of left ventricular (LV) work and rates of glucose metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis and glucose oxidation) and palmitate oxidation. Under aerobic conditions, endotoxemic hearts had impaired LV function as judged by echocardiography in vivo (% ejection fraction, 66.0 ± 3.2 vs 78.0 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) or by LV work ex vivo (2.14 ± 0.16 vs 3.28 ± 0.16, Joules min(-1) g dry wt(-1), p < 0.05). However, rates of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation were not altered. Palmitate oxidation was lower in endotoxemic hearts in proportion to the decreased workload, thus metabolic efficiency was unaffected. In hearts reperfused following global ischemia, untreated hearts had impaired recovery of LV work (52.3 ± 9.4 %) whereas endotoxemic hearts had significantly higher recovery (105.6 ± 11.3 %, p < 0.05). During reperfusion, fatty acid oxidation, acetyl CoA production and metabolic efficiency were similar in both groups. As impaired cardiac function appeared unrelated to depression of energy substrate oxidation, it is unlikely that drug-induced acceleration of fatty acid oxidation will improve mechanical function. The beneficial repartitioning of glucose metabolism in reperfused endotoxemic hearts may contribute to the cardioprotected phenotype.

  2. Myocardial mechanical dysfunction following endotoxemia: role of changes in energy substrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soraya, Hamid; Masoud, Waleed G T; Gandhi, Manoj; Garjani, Alireza; Clanachan, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular depression due to endotoxemia remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care patients. To determine whether drug-induced alterations in cardiac metabolism may be a viable strategy to reduce endotoxemia-mediated cardiac dysfunction, we assessed endotoxemia-induced changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism under aerobic and post-ischemic conditions. Endotoxemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli 0111:B4c, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 6 h prior to heart removal for ex vivo assessment of left ventricular (LV) work and rates of glucose metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis and glucose oxidation) and palmitate oxidation. Under aerobic conditions, endotoxemic hearts had impaired LV function as judged by echocardiography in vivo (% ejection fraction, 66.0 ± 3.2 vs 78.0 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) or by LV work ex vivo (2.14 ± 0.16 vs 3.28 ± 0.16, Joules min(-1) g dry wt(-1), p < 0.05). However, rates of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation were not altered. Palmitate oxidation was lower in endotoxemic hearts in proportion to the decreased workload, thus metabolic efficiency was unaffected. In hearts reperfused following global ischemia, untreated hearts had impaired recovery of LV work (52.3 ± 9.4 %) whereas endotoxemic hearts had significantly higher recovery (105.6 ± 11.3 %, p < 0.05). During reperfusion, fatty acid oxidation, acetyl CoA production and metabolic efficiency were similar in both groups. As impaired cardiac function appeared unrelated to depression of energy substrate oxidation, it is unlikely that drug-induced acceleration of fatty acid oxidation will improve mechanical function. The beneficial repartitioning of glucose metabolism in reperfused endotoxemic hearts may contribute to the cardioprotected phenotype. PMID:26926341

  3. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  4. Mitochondrial regulators of fatty acid metabolism reflect metabolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Fritz, Tomas; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Osler, Megan E

    2012-02-01

    The delicate homeostatic balance between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in relation to whole-body energy regulation is influenced by mitochondrial function. We determined expression and regulation of mitochondrial enzymes including pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) 4, PDK2, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase in skeletal muscle from people with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from NGT (n = 79) or T2DM (n = 33) men and women matched for age and body mass index. A subset of participants participated in a 4-month lifestyle intervention program consisting of an unsupervised walking exercise. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for expression and DNA methylation status. Primary myotubes were derived from biopsies obtained from NGT individuals for metabolic studies. Cultured skeletal muscle was exposed to agents mimicking exercise activation for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression analysis. The mRNA expression of PDK4, PDK2, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase was increased in skeletal muscle from T2DM patients. Methylation of the PDK4 promoter was reduced in T2DM and inversely correlated with PDK4 expression. Moreover, PDK4 expression was positively correlated with body mass index, blood glucose, insulin, C peptide, and hemoglobin A(1c). A lifestyle intervention program resulted in increased PDK4 mRNA expression in NGT individuals, but not in those with T2DM. Exposure to caffeine or palmitate increased PDK4 mRNA in a cultured skeletal muscle system. Our findings reveal that skeletal muscle expression of PDK4 and related genes regulating mitochondrial function reflects alterations in substrate utilization and clinical features associated with T2DM. Furthermore, hypomethylation of the PDK4 promoter in T2DM coincided with an impaired response of PDK4 mRNA after exercise. PMID:21816445

  5. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome, Hormone Levels, and Inflammation in Patients with Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; López-Carmona Pintado, Fernando; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Lahoz-García, Clara; Zuluaga-Gómez, Armando; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background. The end point of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MS in patients with ED in comparison with control subjects and to analyse the association with acute phase reactants (CRP, ESR) and hormone levels. Methods. This case-control study included 65 patients, 37 with erectile dysfunction, according to the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) from the Urology Department of San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada (Spain) and 28 healthy controls. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was calculated according to ATP-III criteria. Hormone levels and acute phase parameters were studied in samples drawn. Results. The ATP-III criteria for MS were met by 64.9% of the patients with ED and only 9.5% of the controls (P < 0.0001, OR = 17.53, 95% CI: 3.52–87.37). Binary logistic regression analysis showed a strong association between patients with ED and MS, even after additional adjustment for confounding factors (OR = 20.05, 95% CI: 1.24–32.82, P < 0.034). Patients with hypogonadism presented a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that systolic BP and CRP predicted 0.46 (model R2) of IIEF changes. Conclusion. Chronic inflammation found in patients with ED might explain the association between ED and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22973171

  7. A Role for Timp3 in Microbiota-Driven Hepatic Steatosis and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mavilio, Maria; Marchetti, Valentina; Fabrizi, Marta; Stöhr, Robert; Marino, Arianna; Casagrande, Viviana; Fiorentino, Loredana; Cardellini, Marina; Kappel, Ben; Monteleone, Ivan; Garret, Celine; Mauriello, Alessandro; Monteleone, Giovanni; Farcomeni, Alessio; Burcelin, Remy; Menghini, Rossella; Federici, Massimo

    2016-07-19

    The effect of gut microbiota on obesity and insulin resistance is now recognized, but the underlying host-dependent mechanisms remain poorly undefined. We find that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 knockout (Timp3(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat diet exhibit gut microbiota dysbiosis, an increase in branched chain and aromatic (BCAA) metabolites, liver steatosis, and an increase in circulating soluble IL-6 receptors (sIL6Rs). sIL6Rs can then activate inflammatory cells, such as CD11c(+) cells, which drive metabolic inflammation. Depleting the microbiota through antibiotic treatment significantly improves glucose tolerance, hepatic steatosis, and systemic inflammation, and neutralizing sIL6R signaling reduces inflammation, but only mildly impacts glucose tolerance. Collectively, our results suggest that gut microbiota is the primary driver of the observed metabolic dysfunction, which is mediated, in part, through IL-6 signaling. Our findings also identify an important role for Timp3 in mediating the effect of the microbiota in metabolic diseases.

  8. Dysfunctional adipose tissue and low-grade inflammation in the management of the metabolic syndrome: current practices and future advances

    PubMed Central

    van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing worldwide obesity epidemic makes the metabolic syndrome an increasingly important entity. In this review, we provide a short background on the metabolic syndrome, we discuss recent developments in the three main options that have been identified for intervention in the metabolic syndrome, i.e. lifestyle and surgical and pharmacological interventions, and we focus on different views in the literature and also include our own viewpoints on the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss some emerging treatment targets for adipose tissue dysfunction and low-grade inflammation, i.e. activation of the inflammasome and the complement system, and consider some selected opportunities for intervention in these processes. PMID:27803798

  9. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations.

    PubMed

    Saben, Jessica L; Boudoures, Anna L; Asghar, Zeenat; Thompson, Alysha; Drury, Andrea; Zhang, Wendy; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-06-28

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance. PMID:27320925

  10. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients.

  11. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Damon T.; Silva, Luciane M.; Allard, Bailey A.; Schonfeld, Michael P.; Chatterjee, Anindita; Talbott, George C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139) encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp) expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:27482817

  12. Facilitated ethanol metabolism promotes cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through autophagy in murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Hu, Nan; Kandadi, Machender R.; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Chronic drinking leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction where ethanol metabolism plays an essential role. Acetaldehyde, the main ethanol metabolite, mediates alcohol-induced cell injury although the underlying mechanism is still elusive. This study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in accelerated ethanol metabolism-induced cardiac defect with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type FVB and cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase mice were placed on a 4% nutrition-balanced alcohol diet for 8 weeks. Myocardial histology, immunohistochemistry, autophagy markers and signal molecules were examined. Expression of micro RNA miR-30a, a potential target of Beclin 1, was evaluated by real-time PCR. Chronic alcohol intake led to cardiac acetaldehyde accumulation, hypertrophy and overt autophagosome accumulation (LC3-II and Atg7), the effect of which was accentuated by ADH. Signaling molecules governing autophagy initiation including class III PtdIns3K, phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K were enhanced and dampened, respectively, following alcohol intake. These alcohol-induced signaling responses were augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated or unmasked alcohol-induced downregulation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and MiR-30a. Interestingly, ADH aggravated alcohol-induced p62 accumulation. Autophagy inhibition using 3-MA abolished alcohol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Moreover, acetaldehyde led to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and autophagy induction, which was ablated by 3-MA. Ethanol or acetaldehyde increased GFP-LC3 puncta in H9c2 cells, the effect of which was ablated by 3-MA but unaffected by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1, E64D and pepstatin A. In summary, these data suggested that facilitated acetaldehyde production via ADH following alcohol intake triggered cardiac autophagosome formation along with impaired lysosomal degradation, en route to myocardial defect. PMID:22441020

  13. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Damon T; Silva, Luciane M; Allard, Bailey A; Schonfeld, Michael P; Chatterjee, Anindita; Talbott, George C; Beier, David R; Tran, Pamela V

    2016-07-01

    Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139) encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp) expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:27482817

  14. Microcystin-LR induced thyroid dysfunction and metabolic disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun; Steinman, Alan D

    2015-02-01

    There is growing evidence that microcystins (MCs) act as hazardous materials and can disrupt the endocrine systems of animals. However, the response of thyroid function and the related energy metabolism following MCs exposure is still unknown. In the present study, mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with doses of either 5 or 20 μg/kg MC-LR for 4 weeks. We report, for the first time, that mice exposed to 20 μg/kg MC-LR showed disrupted glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism with obvious symptoms of hyperphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. The circulating thyroid hormone (TH) levels in mice following MC-LR exposure were detected. Significantly increased free triiodothyronine (FT3) and decreased free thyroxin (FT4) were largely responsible for the physiological aberrations and metabolic disorders observed in mice after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure. Increased expression of TH receptor (Trα) and mTOR expression in the brain after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure suggests that the increased FT3 enhanced mTOR signaling subsequently led to hyperphagia and elevated energy expenditure in mice. Furthermore, several genes involved in glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, which have been identified affected by TH, were also differentially expressed after MC-LR exposure. The above results clearly showed that mice exposed to MC-LR experienced thyroid dysfunction and its downstream functional changes, and are useful to better understand the endocrine toxicity of MC-LR to mammals or even humans.

  15. Microcystin-LR induced thyroid dysfunction and metabolic disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun; Steinman, Alan D

    2015-02-01

    There is growing evidence that microcystins (MCs) act as hazardous materials and can disrupt the endocrine systems of animals. However, the response of thyroid function and the related energy metabolism following MCs exposure is still unknown. In the present study, mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with doses of either 5 or 20 μg/kg MC-LR for 4 weeks. We report, for the first time, that mice exposed to 20 μg/kg MC-LR showed disrupted glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism with obvious symptoms of hyperphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. The circulating thyroid hormone (TH) levels in mice following MC-LR exposure were detected. Significantly increased free triiodothyronine (FT3) and decreased free thyroxin (FT4) were largely responsible for the physiological aberrations and metabolic disorders observed in mice after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure. Increased expression of TH receptor (Trα) and mTOR expression in the brain after the 20 μg/kg MC-LR exposure suggests that the increased FT3 enhanced mTOR signaling subsequently led to hyperphagia and elevated energy expenditure in mice. Furthermore, several genes involved in glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, which have been identified affected by TH, were also differentially expressed after MC-LR exposure. The above results clearly showed that mice exposed to MC-LR experienced thyroid dysfunction and its downstream functional changes, and are useful to better understand the endocrine toxicity of MC-LR to mammals or even humans. PMID:25497113

  16. Excess perigestational folic acid exposure induces metabolic dysfunction in post-natal life.

    PubMed

    Keating, Elisa; Correia-Branco, Ana; Araújo, João R; Meireles, Manuela; Fernandes, Rita; Guardão, Luísa; Guimarães, João T; Martel, Fátima; Calhau, Conceição

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand whether high folic acid (HFA) exposure during the perigestational period induces metabolic dysfunction in the offspring, later in life. To do this, female Sprague-Dawley rats (G0) were administered a dose of folic acid (FA) recommended for pregnancy (control, C, 2 mg FA/kg of diet, n=5) or a high dose of FA (HFA, 40 mg FA/kg of diet, n=5). Supplementation began at mating and lasted throughout pregnancy and lactation. Body weight and food and fluid intake were monitored in G0 and their offspring (G1) till G1 were 13 months of age. Metabolic blood profiles were assessed in G1 at 3 and 13 months of age (3M and 13M respectively). Both G0 and G1 HFA females had increased body weight gain when compared with controls, particularly 22 (G0) and 10 (G1) weeks after FA supplementation had been stopped. G1 female offspring of HFA mothers had increased glycemia at 3M, and both female and male G1 offspring of HFA mothers had decreased glucose tolerance at 13M, when compared with matched controls. At 13M, G1 female offspring of HFA mothers had increased insulin and decreased adiponectin levels, and G1 male offspring of HFA mothers had increased levels of leptin, when compared with matched controls. In addition, feeding of fructose to adult offspring revealed that perigestational exposure to HFA renders female progeny more susceptible to developing metabolic unbalance upon such a challenge. The results of this work indicate that perigestational HFA exposure the affects long-term metabolic phenotype of the offspring, predisposing them to an insulin-resistant state.

  17. Microvascular dysfunction in the course of metabolic syndrome induced by high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). One important feature underlying the pathophysiology of many types of CVD is microvascular dysfunction. Although components of MetS are themselves CVD risk factors, the risk is increased when the syndrome is considered as one entity. We aimed to characterize microvascular function and some of its influencing factors in the course of MetS development. Methods Development of MetS in C57BL/6 mice on a high-fat diet (HFD, 51% of energy from fat) was studied. The initial phase of MetS (I-MetS) was defined as the first 2 weeks of HFD feeding, with the fully developed phase occurring after 8 weeks of HFD. We characterized these phases by assessing changes in adiposity, blood pressure, and microvascular function. All data are presented as mean ± standard error (SEM). Differences between cumulative dose–response curves of myograph experiments were calculated using non-linear regression analysis. In other experiments, comparisons between two groups were made with Student’s t-test. Comparisons between more than two groups were made using one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. A probability value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results I-MetS mice presented with weight gain, blood pressure elevation, and microvascular dysfunction characterized by augmented vasoconstriction. This finding, contrary to those in mice with fully developed MetS, was not associated with endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation. In the initial phase, perivascular adipose tissue showed no sign of inflammation and had no influence on the pattern of vasoconstriction. These findings suggest that the onset of hypertension in MetS is strongly influenced by vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction and independent of important factors known to influence microvascular function and consequently blood pressure levels. Conclusion We identified in I

  18. Mitochondrial (Dys)function in Adipocyte (De)differentiation and Systemic Metabolic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Aurélia; Tejerina, Silvia; Raes, Martine; Keijer, Jaap; Arnould, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, adipose tissue, composed of BAT and WAT, collaborates in energy partitioning and performs metabolic regulatory functions. It is the most flexible tissue in the body, because it is remodeled in size and shape by modifications in adipocyte cell size and/or number, depending on developmental status and energy fluxes. Although numerous reviews have focused on the differentiation program of both brown and white adipocytes as well as on the pathophysiological role of white adipose tissues, the importance of mitochondrial activity in the differentiation or the dedifferentiation programs of adipose cells and in systemic metabolic alterations has not been extensively reviewed previously. Here, we address the crucial role of mitochondrial functions during adipogenesis and in mature adipocytes and discuss the cellular responses of white adipocytes to mitochondrial activity impairment. In addition, we discuss the increase in scientific knowledge regarding mitochondrial functions in the last 10 years and the recent suspicion of mitochondrial dysfunction in several 21st century epidemics (ie, obesity and diabetes), as well as in lipodystrophy found in HIV-treated patients, which can contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies targeting adipocyte mitochondria. PMID:19700756

  19. Circadian desynchrony and metabolic dysfunction; did light pollution make us fat?

    PubMed

    Wyse, C A; Selman, C; Page, M M; Coogan, A N; Hazlerigg, D G

    2011-12-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations in physiology and behaviour that recur with a period of 24h, and that are entrained by the daily photoperiod. The cycle of sunrise and sunset provided a reliable time cue for many thousands of years, until the advent of artificial lighting disrupted the entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the solar photoperiod. Circadian desynchrony (CD) occurs when endogenous rhythms become misaligned with daily photoperiodic cycles, and this condition is facilitated by artificial lighting. This review examines the hypothesis that chronic CD that has accompanied the availability of electric lighting in the developed world induces a metabolic and behavioural phenotype that is predisposed to the development of obesity. The evidence to support this hypothesis is based on epidemiological data showing coincidence between the appearance of obesity and the availability of artificial light, both geographically, and historically. This association links CD to obesity in humans, and is corroborated by experimental studies that demonstrate that CD can induce obesity and metabolic dysfunction in humans and in rodents. This association between CD and obesity has far reaching implications for human health, lifestyle and work practices. Attention to the rhythmicity of daily sleep, exercise, work and feeding schedules could be beneficial in targeting or reversing the modern human predisposition to obesity. PMID:21983352

  20. The glycolytic enzyme PKM2 bridges metabolic and inflammatory dysfunction in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; Wallis, Barbara B.; Yanes, Rolando E.; Watanabe, Ryu; Hilhorst, Marc; Tian, Lu; Harrison, David G.; Giacomini, John C.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress accelerate cardiovascular disease, a chronic inflammatory condition causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report that in monocytes and macrophages of patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD), overutilization of glucose promotes excessive and prolonged production of the cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β, driving systemic and tissue inflammation. In patient-derived monocytes and macrophages, increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux fuel the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn promote dimerization of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) and enable its nuclear translocation. Nuclear PKM2 functions as a protein kinase that phosphorylates the transcription factor STAT3, thus boosting IL-6 and IL-1β production. Reducing glycolysis, scavenging superoxide and enforcing PKM2 tetramerization correct the proinflammatory phenotype of CAD macrophages. In essence, PKM2 serves a previously unidentified role as a molecular integrator of metabolic dysfunction, oxidative stress and tissue inflammation and represents a novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26926996

  1. Metabolic Dysfunction Is Restricted to the Sciatic Nerve in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Oliver J; Unwin, Richard D; Dowsey, Andrew W; Begley, Paul; Ali, Sumia; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rustogi, Nitin; Petersen, Rasmus S; Dunn, Warwick B; Cooper, Garth J S; Gardiner, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    High glucose levels in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause the marked distal pathology is incomplete. We performed a comprehensive, system-wide analysis of the PNS of a rodent model of DN. We integrated proteomics and metabolomics from the sciatic nerve (SN), the lumbar 4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of streptozotocin-diabetic and healthy control rats. Even though all tissues showed a dramatic increase in glucose and polyol pathway intermediates in diabetes, a striking upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and perturbation of lipid metabolism was found in the distal SN that was not present in the corresponding cell bodies of the DRG or the cranial TG. This finding suggests that the most severe molecular consequences of diabetes in the nervous system present in the SN, the region most affected by neuropathy. Such spatial metabolic dysfunction suggests a failure of energy homeostasis and/or oxidative stress, specifically in the distal axon/Schwann cell-rich SN. These data provide a detailed molecular description of the distinct compartmental effects of diabetes on the PNS that could underlie the distal-proximal distribution of pathology. PMID:26470786

  2. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A. M.; Kasimov, M. R.; Zefirov, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body’s total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington’s, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  3. The glycolytic enzyme PKM2 bridges metabolic and inflammatory dysfunction in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Wallis, Barbara B; Yanes, Rolando E; Watanabe, Ryu; Hilhorst, Marc; Tian, Lu; Harrison, David G; Giacomini, John C; Assimes, Themistocles L; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress accelerate cardiovascular disease, a chronic inflammatory condition causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report that in monocytes and macrophages of patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD), overutilization of glucose promotes excessive and prolonged production of the cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β, driving systemic and tissue inflammation. In patient-derived monocytes and macrophages, increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux fuel the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn promote dimerization of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) and enable its nuclear translocation. Nuclear PKM2 functions as a protein kinase that phosphorylates the transcription factor STAT3, thus boosting IL-6 and IL-1β production. Reducing glycolysis, scavenging superoxide and enforcing PKM2 tetramerization correct the proinflammatory phenotype of CAD macrophages. In essence, PKM2 serves a previously unidentified role as a molecular integrator of metabolic dysfunction, oxidative stress and tissue inflammation and represents a novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy: a series of unfortunate metabolic events.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a dying back neurodegenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system where mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an etiological factor. Diabetes (type 1 or type 2) invokes an elevation of intracellular glucose concentration simultaneously with impaired growth factor support by insulin, and this dual alteration triggers a maladaptation in metabolism of adult sensory neurons. The energy sensing pathway comprising the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/sirtuin (SIRT)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator α (PGC-1α) signaling axis is the target of these damaging changes in nutrient levels, e.g., induction of nutrient stress, and loss of insulin-dependent growth factor support and instigates an aberrant metabolic phenotype characterized by a suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and shift to anaerobic glycolysis. There is discussion of how this loss of mitochondrial function and transition to overreliance on glycolysis contributes to the diminishment of collateral sprouting and axon regeneration in diabetic neuropathy in the context of the highly energy-consuming nerve growth cone. PMID:26370700

  5. Pattern of Thyroid Dysfunction in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Relationship with Components of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takanche, Jyoti Shrestha; Shrestha, Raj Kumar; Bhattarai, Prem; Khanal, Kishor; Risal, Prabodh; Koju, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroid dysfunction (TD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are known risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). TD is risk factor for ASCVD mediated by the effects of thyroid hormones on lipid metabolism and blood pressure hence the components of MetS. It is possible that coexistence of these two disease entities and unrecognized TD in patients with MetS might substantially increase ASCVD risk. Moreover, little is known about the relationship between TD and the components of MetS. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of TD in patients with MetS and its relationship with components of the MetS. Methods A total of 358 previously diagnosed patients with MetS were recruited in the study. The thyroid function test parameters were measured to classify TD at Dhulikhel Hospital-Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel, Nepal. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 16.0 to evaluate pattern and relationship. Results The overall prevalence of TD in patients with MetS was 31.84% with high prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (29.32%). We found no evidence of a relationship between TD and components of MetS, although there was significant difference in waist circumference between four groups of TD. Conclusion Patients with MetS had subclinical hypothyroidism greatly. Although there was no evidence of any relationship between thyroid status and all components of MetS, TD should be taken into account when evaluating and treating patients with MetS to reduce the impending risk. PMID:25729715

  6. Brain metabolic dysfunction at the core of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Tong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the concept that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is fundamentally a metabolic disease with molecular and biochemical features that correspond with diabetes mellitus and other peripheral insulin resistance disorders. Brain insulin/IGF resistance and its consequences can readily account for most of the structural and functional abnormalities in AD. However, disease pathogenesis is complicated by the fact that AD can occur as a separate disease process, or arise in association with systemic insulin resistance diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Whether primary or secondary in origin, brain insulin/IGF resistance initiates a cascade of neurodegeneration that is propagated by metabolic dysfunction, increased oxidative and ER stress, neuro-inflammation, impaired cell survival, and dysregulated lipid metabolism. These injurious processes compromise neuronal and glial functions, reduce neurotransmitter homeostasis, and cause toxic oligomeric pTau and (amyloid beta peptide of amyloid beta precursor protein) AβPP-Aβ fibrils and insoluble aggregates (neurofibrillary tangles and plaques) to accumulate in brain. AD progresses due to: (1) activation of a harmful positive feedback loop that progressively worsens the effects of insulin resistance; and (2) the formation of ROS- and RNS-related lipid, protein, and DNA adducts that permanently damage basic cellular and molecular functions. Epidemiologic data suggest that insulin resistance diseases, including AD, are exposure-related in etiology. Furthermore, experimental and lifestyle trend data suggest chronic low-level nitrosamine exposures are responsible. These concepts offer opportunities to discover and implement new treatments and devise preventive measures to conquer the AD and other insulin resistance disease epidemics. PMID:24380887

  7. Age-related atrial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gramley, Felix; Lorenzen, Johann; Knackstedt, Christian; Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Frechen, Dirk; Stanzel, Sven; Pezzella, Francesco; Koellensperger, Eva; Weiss, Christian; Münzel, Thomas; Schauerte, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Many age-related diseases are associated with, and may be promoted by, cardiac fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF), and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system have been implicated in fibrogenesis. Thus, we investigated whether age is related to these systems and to atrial fibrosis. Right atrial appendages (RAA) obtained during heart surgery (n = 115) were grouped according to patients' age (<50 years, 51-60 years, 61-70 years, or >70 years). Echocardiographic ejection fractions (EF) and fibrosis using Sirius-red-stained histological sections were determined. TGF-beta was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and hypoxia-related factors [HIF1 alpha, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-receptor, CD34 (a surrogate marker for microvessel density), the factor inhibiting HIF (FIH), and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD 3)] were detected by immunostaining. MMP-2 and -9 activity were determined zymographically, and mRNA levels of their common tissue inhibitor TIMP-1 were determined by RT-PCR. Younger patients (<50 years) had significantly less fibrosis (10.1% +/- 4.4% vs 16.6% +/- 8.3%) than older individuals (>70 years). While HIF1 alpha, FIH, the VEGF-receptor, and CD34 were significantly elevated in the young, TGF-beta and PHD3 were suppressed in these patients. MMP-2 and -9 activity was found to be higher while TIMP-1 levels were lower in older patients. Statistical analysis proved age to be the only factor influencing fibrogenesis. With increasing age, RAAs develop significantly more fibrosis. An increase of fibrotic and decrease of hypoxic signalling and microvessel density, coupled with differential expression of MMPs and TIMP-1 favouring fibrosis may have helped promote atrial fibrogenesis. PMID:19234766

  8. Resveratrol partially prevents oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction in pregnant rats fed a low protein diet and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Rodríguez-González, Guadalupe L; Bautista, Claudia J; Vázquez-Martínez, Magaly; Larrea, Fernando; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Zambrano, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Protein restriction in pregnancy produces maternal and offspring metabolic dysfunction potentially as a result of oxidative stress. Data are lacking on the effects of inhibition of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that maternal resveratrol administration decreases oxidative stress, preventing, at least partially, maternal low protein-induced maternal and offspring metabolic dysfunction. In the present study, pregnant wistar rats ate control (C) (20% casein) or a protein-restricted (R) (10% casein) isocaloric diet. Half of each group received resveratrol orally, 20 mg kg(-1) day(-1), throughout pregnancy. Post-delivery, mothers and offspring ate C. Oxidative stress biomarkers and anti-oxidant enzymes were measured in placenta, maternal and fetal liver, and maternal serum corticosterone at 19 days of gestation (dG). Maternal (19 dG) and offspring (postnatal day 110) glucose, insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, fat and leptin were determined. R mothers showed metabolic dysfunction, increased corticosterone and oxidative stress and reduced anti-oxidant enzyme activity vs. C. R placental and fetal liver oxidative stress biomarkers and anti-oxidant enzyme activity increased. R offspring showed higher male and female leptin, insulin and corticosterone, male triglycerides and female fat than C. Resveratrol decreased maternal leptin and improved maternal, fetal and placental oxidative stress markers. R induced offspring insulin and leptin increases were prevented and other R changes were offspring sex-dependent. Resveratrol partially prevents low protein diet-induced maternal, placental and sex-specific offspring oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Oxidative stress is one mechanism programming offspring metabolic outcomes. These studies provide mechanistic evidence to guide human pregnancy interventions when fetal nutrition is impaired by poor maternal nutrition or placental function. PMID:26662841

  9. Dose-Dependent Effects of Radiation Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow, Metabolism, and Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Carol A. Zhou Sumin; Raynor, Renee; Tisch, Andrea; Light, Kim; Shafman, Timothy; Kirkpatrick, John; Turkington, Timothy; Hollis, Donna; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: A prospective study was performed to formally relate dose-dependent radiologically defined changes in normal brain induced by radiotherapy (RT) to neurocognitive dysfunction in subjects with primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Adult patients receiving three-dimensional RT for central nervous system (CNS) tumors were enrolled. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and neuropsychological testing were performed before RT and 3 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Analyses were performed for correlations between changes in 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET (metabolism), {sup 15}O-PET (relative blood flow), regional radiation dose, follow-up time, and neuropsychological test scores. Results: Eleven subjects were enrolled and 6 completed follow-up studies. The PET data showed reduced FDG uptake, with average decreases of 2-6% in regions of the brain receiving greater than 40 Gy at 3 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O PET showed increases (<10%) at 3 weeks in relative regional blood flow in brain receiving greater than 30 Gy, but less at the 6-month follow-up studies. There were significant correlations between decreases in FDG uptake and increased scores from the Symptom Checklist-90-R, with an average increase in T score of 2 (p < 0.0001). The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test showed a significant correlation of decreased FDG uptake with increased errors and perseveration in test performance, with an average decrease in T score of 11 (p = 0.037). Conclusions: A dose-dependent response of CNS tissue was detected using FDG PET in this small number of patients. Decreases in CNS metabolism correlated with decreased performance on neuropsychological tests for problem solving, cognitive flexibility, and global measures of psychopathology. Additional research is needed to verify and define these findings.

  10. Converging Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Yeast Model of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; John, Lijo; Maity, Shuvadeep; Manchanda, Mini; Sharma, Abhay; Saini, Neeru; Chakraborty, Kausik; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine, a thiol amino acid, is associated with various complex disorders. The cellular effects of homocysteine and its precursors S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) are, however, poorly understood. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to understand the basis of pathogenicity induced by homocysteine and its precursors. Both homocysteine and AdoHcy but not AdoMet inhibited the growth of the str4Δ strain (which lacks the enzyme that converts homocysteine to cystathionine-mimicking vascular cells). Addition of AdoMet abrogated the inhibitory effect of AdoHcy but not that of homocysteine indicating that an increase in the AdoMet/AdoHcy ratio is sufficient to overcome the AdoHcy-mediated growth defect but not that of homocysteine. Also, the transcriptomic profile of AdoHcy and homocysteine showed gross dissimilarity based on gene enrichment analysis. Furthermore, compared with homocysteine, AdoHcy treatment caused a higher level of oxidative stress in the cells. However, unlike a previously reported response in wild type (Kumar, A., John, L., Alam, M. M., Gupta, A., Sharma, G., Pillai, B., and Sengupta, S. (2006) Biochem. J. 396, 61–69), the str4Δ strain did not exhibit an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. This suggests that homocysteine induces varied response depending on the flux of homocysteine metabolism. We also observed altered expression of mitochondrial genes, defective membrane potential, and fragmentation of the mitochondrial network together with the increased expression of fission genes indicating that the imbalance in homocysteine metabolism has a major effect on mitochondrial functions. Furthermore, treatment of cells with homocysteine or AdoHcy resulted in apoptosis as revealed by annexin V staining and TUNEL assay. Cumulatively, our results suggest that elevated levels of homocysteine lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, which could potentially initiate pro-apoptotic pathways, and

  11. Metabolic Dysfunction Consistent with Premature Aging Results from Deletion of Pim Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Din, Shabana; Konstandin, Mathias H; Johnson, Bevan; Emathinger, Jacqueline; Völkers, Mirko; Toko, Haruhiro; Collins, Brett; Ormachea, Lucy; Samse, Kaitlen; Kubli, Dieter A; De La Torre, Andrea; Kraft, Andrew S; Gustafsson, Asa B; Kelly, Daniel P; Sussman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The senescent cardiac phenotype is accompanied by changes in mitochondrial function and biogenesis causing impairment in energy provision. The relationship between myocardial senescence and Pim kinases deserves attention since Pim-1 kinase is cardioprotective, in part, by preservation of mitochondrial integrity. Study of the pathological effects resulting from genetic deletion of all Pim kinase family members could provide important insight regarding cardiac mitochondrial biology and the aging phenotype. Objective Demonstrate myocardial senescence is promoted by loss of Pim leading to premature aging and aberrant mitochondrial function. Methods and Results Cardiac myocyte senescence was evident at three months of age in Pim Triple KnockOut (PTKO) mice, where all three isoforms of Pim kinase family members are genetically deleted. Cellular hypertrophic remodeling and fetal gene program activation was followed by heart failure at six months in PTKO mice. Metabolic dysfunction is an underlying cause of cardiac senescence and instigates a decline in cardiac function. Altered mitochondrial morphology is evident consequential to Pim deletion together with decreased ATP levels and increased phosphorylated AMPK, exposing an energy deficiency in PTKO mice. Expression of the genes encoding master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, PPARγ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) α and β were diminished in PTKO hearts, as were downstream targets included in mitochondrial energy transduction, including fatty acid oxidation. Reversal of the dysregulated metabolic phenotype was observed by overexpressing c-Myc, a downstream target of Pim kinases. Conclusion Pim kinases prevent premature cardiac aging and maintain a healthy pool of functional mitochondria leading to efficient cellular energetics. PMID:24916111

  12. The dark side of testosterone deficiency: I. Metabolic syndrome and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Guay, Andre; Feeley, Robert; Saad, Farid

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is considered the most important public health threat of the 21st century. This syndrome is characterized by a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors including increased central abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein, high blood pressure, increased fasting glucose, and hyperinsulinemia. These factors increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or type 2 diabetes. Although the etiology of this syndrome is thought to stem from obesity and physical inactivity, the extent of interactions of the individual MetS components with one another remains poorly defined. Obesity, diabetes, hypogonadism, and specific hormone and metabolic profiles have been implicated in the pathophysiology of CVD. The evolving role of androgens in MetS and CVD is of paramount importance. Reduced androgen levels associated with hypogonadism or androgen deprivation therapy increase cardiovascular risk factors and produce marked adverse effects on cardiovascular function. MetS has been associated with hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction (ED), and MetS may be considered a risk factor for ED. It is suggested that MetS, diabetes, and CVD will increase in the upcoming decades. Thus, it is critically important to develop a better understanding of how obesity, diabetes and hypogonadism contribute to androgen deficiency and the various pathophysiologic states of vascular disease. In this review we discuss the current literature pertaining to androgen deficiency, MetS, and ED, because the relationship of these factors is of scientific and clinical importance. Specifically, we will focus on exploring the relationships between hypogonadism, obesity, MetS, and ED. PMID:18641413

  13. Mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunction in renal convoluted tubules of obese mice: protective role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Favero, Gaia; Giugno, Lorena; Lavazza, Antonio; Reiter, Russel J; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common and complex health problem, which impacts crucial organs; it is also considered an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Few studies have analyzed the consequence of obesity in the renal proximal convoluted tubules, which are the major tubules involved in reabsorptive processes. For optimal performance of the kidney, energy is primarily provided by mitochondria. Melatonin, an indoleamine and antioxidant, has been identified in mitochondria, and there is considerable evidence regarding its essential role in the prevention of oxidative mitochondrial damage. In this study we evaluated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial alterations in an animal model of obesity (ob/ob mice) and describe the beneficial effects of melatonin treatment on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics as influenced by mitofusin-2 and the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Melatonin dissolved in 1% ethanol was added to the drinking water from postnatal week 5-13; the calculated dose of melatonin intake was 100 mg/kg body weight/day. Compared to control mice, obesity-related morphological alterations were apparent in the proximal tubules which contained round mitochondria with irregular, short cristae and cells with elevated apoptotic index. Melatonin supplementation in obese mice changed mitochondria shape and cristae organization of proximal tubules, enhanced mitofusin-2 expression, which in turn modulated the progression of the mitochondria-driven intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These changes possibly aid in reducing renal failure. The melatonin-mediated changes indicate its potential protective use against renal morphological damage and dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic disease.

  14. MLK3 promotes metabolic dysfunction induced by saturated fatty acid-enriched diet

    PubMed Central

    Gadang, Vidya; Kohli, Rohit; Myronovych, Andriy; Hui, David Y.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids activate the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. Mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that mediates JNK activation in response to saturated fatty acids in vitro; however, the exact mechanism for diet-induced JNK activation in vivo is not known. Here, we have used MLK3-deficient mice to examine the role of MLK3 in a saturated-fat diet model of obesity. MLK3-KO mice fed a high-fat diet enriched in medium-chain saturated fatty acids for 16 wk had decreased body fat compared with wild-type (WT) mice due to increased energy expenditure independently of food consumption and physical activity. Moreover, MLK3 deficiency attenuated palmitate-induced JNK activation and M1 polarization in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro, and obesity induced JNK activation, macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in vivo. In addition, loss of MLK3 improved insulin resistance and decreased hepatic steatosis. Together, these data demonstrate that MLK3 promotes saturated fatty acid-induced JNK activation in vivo and diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23860122

  15. Bioenergetic Impairment in Animal and Cellular Models of Alzheimer's Disease: PARP-1 Inhibition Rescues Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Martire, Sara; Fuso, Andrea; Mosca, Luciana; Forte, Elena; Correani, Virginia; Fontana, Mario; Scarpa, Sigfrido; Maras, Bruno; d'Erme, Maria

    2016-08-10

    Amyloid-beta peptide accumulation in the brain is one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid aggregation process is associated with the generation of free radical species responsible for mitochondrial impairment and DNA damage that in turn activates poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosylation), a post-translational modification of proteins, cleaving the substrate NAD+ and transferring the ADP-ribose moieties to the enzyme itself or to an acceptor protein to form branched polymers of ADP-ribose. In this paper, we demonstrate that a mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in Alzheimer's transgenic mice TgCRND8, in SH-SY5Y treated with amyloid-beta and in 7PA2 cells. Moreover, PARP-1 activation contributes to the functional energetic decline affecting cytochrome oxidase IV protein levels, oxygen consumption rates, and membrane potential, resulting in cellular bioenergetic deficit. We also observed, for the first time, an increase of pyruvate kinase 2 expression, suggesting a modulation of the glycolytic pathway by PARP-1. PARP-1 inhibitors are able to restore both mitochondrial impairment and pyruvate kinase 2 expression. The overall data here presented indicate a pivotal role for this enzyme in the bioenergetic network of neuronal cells and open new perspectives for investigating molecular mechanisms underlying energy charge decline in Alzheimer's disease. In this scenario, PARP-1 inhibitors might represent a novel therapeutic intervention to rescue cellular energetic metabolism. PMID:27567805

  16. Management of endocrino-metabolic dysfunctions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cornillon, Jérôme; Decanter, Christine; Defrance, Frédérique; Karrouz, Wassila; Leroy, Clara; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Couturier, Marie-Anne; De Berranger, Eva; Hermet, Eric; Maillard, Natacha; Marcais, Ambroise; Francois, Sylvie; Tabrizi, Reza; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-10-29

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is mainly indicated in bone marrow dysfunction related to blood diseases, but also in some rare diseases (adrenoleucodystrophy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy or MNGIE...). After decades, this treatment has proven to be efficient at the cost of numerous early and delayed side effects such as infection, graft-versus-host disease, cardiovascular complications and secondary malignancies. These complications are mainly related to the conditioning, which requires a powerful chemotherapy associated to total body irradiation (myelo-ablation) or immunosuppression (non myelo-ablation). Among side effects, the endocrine complications may be classified as 1) hormonal endocrine deficiencies (particularly gonado- and somatotropic) related to delayed consequences of chemo- and above all radiotherapy, with their consequences on growth, puberty, bone and fertility); 2) auto-immune diseases, particularly dysthyroidism; 3) secondary tumors involving either endocrine glands (thyroid carcinoma) or dependent on hormonal status (breast cancer, meningioma), favored by immune dysregulation and radiotherapy; 4) metabolic complications, especially steroid-induced diabetes and dyslipidemia with their increased cardio-vascular risk. These complications are intricate. Moreover, hormone replacement therapy can modulate the cardio-vascular or the tumoral risk of patients, already increased by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially steroids and anthracyclins... Therefore, patients and families should be informed of these side effects and of the importance of a long-term follow-up requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

  17. The Subcellular Compartmentalization of Arginine Metabolizing Enzymes and Their Role in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through the conversion of its substrate, l-arginine to l-citrulline. Reduced access to l-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2) metabolize l-arginine to generate l-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of l-arginine. Indeed, supplemental l-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, this simple relationship is complicated by observations that l-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis. Accordingly, the subcellular compartmentalization of intracellular l-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of pools or pockets of l-arginine. In agreement with this, there is considerable evidence supporting the importance of the subcellular localization of l-arginine metabolizing enzymes. In endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localization inside the cell. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, arginosuccinate lyase, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. Herein, we

  18. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  19. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  20. Skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in an animal model of pulmonary emphysema: formoterol and skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sullo, Nikol; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Matteis, Maria; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Lombardi, Assunta; Lucattelli, Monica; Polverino, Francesca; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cirino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a significant contributor to exercise limitation in pulmonary emphysema. This study investigated skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism before and after aerosol exposure to a long-acting β-agonist (LABA), such as formoterol, in the pallid mouse (B6.Cg-Pldnpa/J), which has a deficiency in serum α(1)-antitrypsin (α(1)-PI) and develops spontaneous pulmonary emphysema. C57 BL/6J and its congener pallid mice of 8-12 and 16 months of age were treated with vehicle or formoterol aerosol challenge for 120 seconds. Morphological and morphometric studies and evaluations of mitochondrial adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration and of cytochrome oxidase activity on skeletal muscle were performed. Moreover, the mtDNA content in skeletal muscle and the mediators linked to muscle mitochondrial function and biogenesis, as well as TNF-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), were also evaluated. The lungs of pallid mice at 12 and 16 months of age showed patchy areas of airspace enlargements, with the destruction of alveolar septa. No significant differences were observed in basal values of mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes between C57 BL/6J and pallid mice. Exposure to LABA significantly improved mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes in emphysematous mice, where the mtDNA content was significantly higher with respect to 8-month-old pallid mice. This effect was compared with a significant increase of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles of 16-month-old pallid mice, with no significant changes in TNF-α concentrations. In conclusion, in emphysematous mice that showed an increased mtDNA content, exposure to inhaled LABA can improve mitochondrial skeletal muscle oxidative processes. PGC-1α may serve as a possible mediator of this effect.

  1. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments

  2. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  3. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  4. Exploring Temporospatial Changes in Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Diffuse Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Gu, Lei; Ding, Fang; Zhu, Guangyao; Rong, Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the predominant effect of severe traumatic brain injury and contributes significantly to cognitive deficits. The mechanisms underlying these cognitive deficits are often associated with complex metabolic alterations. However, the relationships between temporospatial alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism and the pathophysiology of DAI-related learning and memory dysfunction are not yet completely understood. We used a small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) as a molecular probe to evaluate temporospatial glucose metabolism in vulnerable areas of rats with DAI. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate the development and progression of learning and memory dysfunction. Compared to the sham-treated group, PET-MRI fusion images showed that glucose metabolism was reduced in animals with DAI. In addition, the standardized uptake value (SUV) of 18F-FDG was significantly decreased in the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, corpus callosum, caudate putamen, brain stem, and cerebellum at days 1, 3, and 7 after injury. SUV returned to baseline levels by 30 days after injury. The escape latency of the injured group was significantly increased, and the percentages of distance travelled and time spent in the target quadrant were significantly decreased 1 month after injury. These effects persisted for 3 months. SUVs in the hippocampus at the acute stage were significantly correlated with MWM performance during the recovery stage of DAI. These results demonstrate that microstructural injury-induced hypometabolism in the hippocampus at the acute stage are all significantly correlated with learning and memory dysfunctions during the recovery stage of DAI. PMID:22880625

  5. Nutrition and age-related eye diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision loss among the elderly is an important health problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65 [1]. Age-related cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are the major diseases resulting in visu...

  6. Alcohol-induced One-carbon Metabolism Impairment Promotes Dysfunction of DNA Base Excision Repair in Adult Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G.; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Henderson, George I.; Kruman, Inna I.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr+/− mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain. PMID:23118224

  7. Additive Effect of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Metabolic Syndrome-Related Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Maria; Cimellaro, Antonio; Maio, Raffaele; Caroleo, Benedetto; Sciacqua, Angela; Sesti, Giorgio; Perticone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by an increased risk of incident diabetes and cardiovascular (CV) events, identifying insulin resistance (IR) and endothelial dysfunction as key elements. Moreover, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is bidirectionally linked with MS as a consequence of metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities. We addressed the question if the evolution in NAFLD might worsen endothelium-dependent vasodilating response in MS hypertensives. We recruited 272 Caucasian newly-diagnosed never-treated hypertensive outpatients divided into three groups according to the presence/absence of MS alone or in combination with NAFLD. MS and NAFLD were defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) and non-invasive fatty liver index, respectively. We determined IR by using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Vascular function, as forearm blood flow (FBF), was determined through strain-gauge plethysmography after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside. MS+NAFLD+ group showed worse metabolic, inflammatory and vascular profiles compared with MS-NAFLD- and MS+NAFLD-. HOMA resulted in being the strongest predictor of FBF both in the MS+NAFLD- and in the MS+NAFLD+ groups, accounting for 20.5% and 33.2% of its variation, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MS+NAFLD+ hypertensives show a worse endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared with MS+NAFLD-, allowing for consideration of NAFLD as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction in hypertensives. PMID:27023537

  8. Age Related Changes in Metabolite Concentrations in the Normal Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Khaled; Solanky, Bhavana S.; Yiannakas, Marios C.; Altmann, Daniel R.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have previously described metabolite changes associated with aging of the healthy brain and provided insights into normal brain aging that can assist us in differentiating age-related changes from those associated with neurological disease. The present study investigates whether age-related changes in metabolite concentrations occur in the healthy cervical spinal cord. 25 healthy volunteers, aged 23–65 years, underwent conventional imaging and single-voxel MRS of the upper cervical cord using an optimised point resolved spectroscopy sequence on a 3T Achieva system. Metabolite concentrations normalised to unsuppressed water were quantified using LCModel and associations between age and spinal cord metabolite concentrations were examined using multiple regressions. A linear decline in total N-Acetyl-aspartate concentration (0.049 mmol/L lower per additional year of age, p = 0.010) and Glutamate-Glutamine concentration (0.054 mmol/L lower per additional year of age, p = 0.002) was seen within our sample age range, starting in the early twenties. The findings suggest that neuroaxonal loss and/or metabolic neuronal dysfunction, and decline in glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter pool progress with aging. PMID:25310093

  9. The relation of high fat diet, metabolic disturbances and brain oxidative dysfunction: modulation by hydroxy citric acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to examine the effect of high fat diet (HFD) to modulate brain dysfunction, and understand the linkages between obesity, metabolic disturbances and the brain oxidative stress (BOS) dysfunction and modulation with hydroxyl citric acid of G. Cambogia. Methods Rats were divided into 3 groups; 1st control, maintained on standard normal rat chow diet, 2nd HFD, maintained on high fat diet along 12 week and 3rd HFD+G, administered G. Cambogia for 4 weeks and each group include 8 rats. Blood, brain and abdominal fat were collected for biochemical measurements. Results HFD group showed significant increase in energy intake, final BW and BW gain. Also significant increase in weight of abdominal fat in HFD group. HFD induce metabolic disturbance through increasing the lipid profile (LDL, TG, TC), γGT and α-amylase activity, uric acid level and hyperglycemia, while decreasing creatine kinase (CK) activity. These changes associated with lowering in brain nitric oxide (NO) level and rising in serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), brain catalase activity and MDA levels as oxidative stress markers. These alterations improved by G. Cambogia that decrease BOS and increased NO level. Conclusions Rats fed HFD showed, metabolic disturbances produce hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia and increased LDL associated with increased BOS. Involvement of BuChE, NO and oxidative stress associated with metabolic disturbances in the pathophysiological progression in brain, suggesting association between obesity, metabolic disorders and brain alteration while, using G. Cambogia, ameliorate the damaging effects of the HFD via lowering feed intake and BOS. PMID:21569551

  10. Brain mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and glutamate level reduction in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smeland, Olav B; Hadera, Mussie G; McDonald, Tanya S; Sonnewald, Ursula; Borges, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Although certain metabolic characteristics such as interictal glucose hypometabolism are well established for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), its pathogenesis still remains unclear. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of brain metabolism in a mouse model of TLE, induced by pilocarpine–status epilepticus (SE). To investigate glucose metabolism, we injected mice 3.5–4 weeks after SE with [1,2-13C]glucose before microwave fixation of the head. Using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantified metabolites and 13C labeling in extracts of cortex and hippocampal formation (HF). Hippocampal levels of glutamate, glutathione and alanine were decreased in pilocarpine–SE mice compared with controls. Moreover, the contents of N-acetyl aspartate, succinate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) NAD(P)H were decreased in HF indicating impairment of mitochondrial function. In addition, the reduction in 13C enrichment of hippocampal citrate and malate suggests decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover in this region. In cortex, we found reduced 13C labeling of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate via the pyruvate carboxylation and pyruvate dehydrogenation pathways, suggesting slower turnover of these amino acids and/or the TCA cycle. In conclusion, mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and altered amino-acid metabolism is found in both cortex and HF in this epilepsy model. PMID:23611869

  11. mTOR signaling in aging and neurodegeneration: At the crossroad between metabolism dysfunction and impairment of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, Marzia; Di Domenico, Fabio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-12-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is involved in cellular senescence, organismal aging and age-dependent diseases. mTOR is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that is known to be part of two different protein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2, which differ in some components and in upstream and downstream signalling. In multicellular organisms, mTOR regulates cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and cellular energy conditions. Growing studies highlight that disturbance in mTOR signalling in the brain affects multiple pathways including glucose metabolism, energy production, mitochondrial function, cell growth and autophagy. All these events are key players in age-related cognitive decline such as development of Alzheimer disease (AD). The current review discusses the main regulatory roles of mTOR signalling in the brain, in particular focusing on autophagy, glucose metabolism and mitochondrial functions. Targeting mTOR in the CNS can offer new prospective for drug discovery; however further studies are needed for a comprehensive understanding of mTOR, which lies at the crossroads of multiple signals involved in AD etiology and pathogenesis.

  12. Rimonabant-mediated changes in intestinal lipid metabolism and improved renal vascular dysfunction in the JCR:LA-cp rat model of prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Kelly, Sandra E; Diane, Abdoulaye; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Novak, Susan; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2010-08-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) is a specific antagonist of the cannabinoid-1 receptor. Activation of the receptor initiates multiple effects on central nervous system function, metabolism, and body weight. The hypothesis that rimonabant has protective effects against vascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome was tested using JCR:LA-cp rats. JCR:LA-cp rats are obese if they are cp/cp, insulin resistant, and exhibit associated micro- and macrovascular disease with end-stage myocardial and renal disease. Treatment of obese rats with rimonabant (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), 12-24 wk of age) caused transient reduction in food intake for 2 wk, without reduction in body weight. However, by 4 wk, there was a modest, sustained reduction in weight gain. Glycemic control improved marginally compared with controls, but at the expense of increased insulin concentration. In contrast, rimonabant normalized fasting plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and acute phase protein haptoglobin in cp/cp rats. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by reduced postprandial intestinal lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48, cholesterol, and haptoglobin. While macrovascular dysfunction and ischemic myocardial lesion frequency were unaffected by rimonabant treatment, both microalbuminuria and glomerular sclerosis were substantially reduced. In summary, rimonabant has a modest effect on body weight in freely eating obese rats and markedly reduces plasma triglyceride levels and microvascular disease, in part due to changes in intestinal metabolism, including lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48 and haptoglobin. We conclude that rimonabant improves renal disease and intestinal lipid oversecretion associated with an animal model of the metabolic syndrome that appears to be independent of hyperinsulinemia or macrovascular dysfunction.

  13. Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Solís-Lozano, Lourdes; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; González-Chávez, Antonio; Béjar, Yadira L.; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Escobedo, Galileo

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = −0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings. PMID:23986664

  14. Hyperleptinemia is associated with parameters of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in obese human beings.

    PubMed

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Solís-Lozano, Lourdes; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; González-Chávez, Antonio; Béjar, Yadira L; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Escobedo, Galileo

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been involved in hypothalamic and systemic inflammation, altered food-intake patterns, and metabolic dysfunction in obese mice. However, it remains unclear whether leptin has a relationship with parameters of systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in humans. We thus evaluated in a cross-sectional study the circulating levels of leptin in 40 non-obese and 41 obese Mexican individuals, examining their relationship with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12, IL-10, central obesity, serum glucose and insulin levels, and serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. Circulating levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10, and insulin were measured by ELISA, while concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were determined by enzymatic assays. As expected, serum levels of leptin exhibited a significant elevation in obese individuals as compared to non-obese subjects, showing a clear association with increased body mass index (r = 0.4173), central obesity (r = 0.4678), and body fat percentage (r = 0.3583). Furthermore, leptin also showed a strong relationship with serum TNF-α (r = 0.6989), IL-12 (r = 0.3093), and IL-10 (r = -0.5691). Interestingly, leptin was also significantly related with high concentrations of fasting glucose (r = 0.5227) and insulin (r = 0.2229), as well as elevated levels of insulin resistance (r = 0.3611) and circulating triglyceride (r = 0.4135). These results suggest that hyperleptinemia is strongly associated with the occurrence of low-grade systemic inflammation and metabolic alteration in obese subjects. Further clinical research is still needed to determine whether hyperleptinemia may be a potential marker for recognizing the advent of obesity-related metabolic disorders in human beings.

  15. Age Related Bioenergetics Profiles in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes Using Extracellular Flux Analyses.

    PubMed

    Mdaki, Kennedy S; Larsen, Tricia D; Weaver, Lucinda J; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized and studied as a mediator of heart disease. Extracellular flux analysis (XF) has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate cellular bioenergetics in the context of cardiac health and disease, however its use and interpretation requires improved understanding of the normal metabolic differences in cardiomyocytes (CM) at various stages of maturation. This study standardized XF analyses methods (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test and palmitate oxidation test) and established age related differences in bioenergetics profiles of healthy CMs at newborn (NB1), weaning (3WK), adult (10WK) and aged (12-18MO) time points. Findings show that immature CMs demonstrate a more robust and sustained glycolytic capacity and a relative inability to oxidize fatty acids when compared to older CMs. The study also highlights the need to recognize the contribution of CO2 from the Krebs cycle as well as lactate from anaerobic glycolysis to the proton production rate before interpreting glycolytic capacity in CMs. Overall, this study demonstrates that caution should be taken to assure that translatable developmental time points are used to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of cardiac disease. Specifically, XF analysis of newborn CMs should be reserved to study fetal/neonatal disease and older CMs (≥10 weeks) should be used to investigate adult disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained will aid in improved investigation of developmentally programmed heart disease and stress the importance of discerning maturational differences in bioenergetics when developing mitochondrial targeted preventative and therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26872351

  16. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  17. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kang, Jun-Myung; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2010). A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1) WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2) fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3) fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4) HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5) SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026). However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.820) only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women. PMID:26859830

  18. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kang, Jun-Myung; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2010). A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1) WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2) fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3) fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4) HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5) SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026). However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.820) only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women.

  19. High-fructose corn syrup causes vascular dysfunction associated with metabolic disturbance in rats: protective effect of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Akar, Fatma; Uludağ, Orhan; Aydın, Ali; Aytekin, Yasin Atacan; Elbeg, Sehri; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used in many prepared foods and soft drinks. However, limited data is available on the consequences of HFCS consumption on metabolic and cardiovascular functions. This study was, therefore, designed to assess whether HFCS drinking influences the endothelial and vascular function in association with metabolic disturbances in rats. Additionally, resveratrol was tested at challenge with HFCS. We investigated the effects of HFCS (10% and 20%) and resveratrol (50mg/l) beverages on several metabolic parameters as well as endothelial relaxation, vascular contractions, expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins and superoxide generation in the aortas. Consumption of HFCS (20%) increased serum triglyceride, VLDL and insulin levels as well as blood pressure. Impaired relaxation to acetylcholine and intensified contractions to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were associated with decreased eNOS and SIRT1 whereas increased gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins, along with provoked superoxide production in the aortas from HFCS-treated rats. Resveratrol supplementation efficiently restored HFCS-induced deteriorations. Thus, intake of HFCS leads to vascular dysfunction by decreasing vasoprotective factors and provoking oxidative stress in association with metabolic disturbances. Resveratrol has a protective potential against the harmful consequences of HFCS consumption. PMID:22465803

  20. High-fructose corn syrup causes vascular dysfunction associated with metabolic disturbance in rats: protective effect of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Akar, Fatma; Uludağ, Orhan; Aydın, Ali; Aytekin, Yasin Atacan; Elbeg, Sehri; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used in many prepared foods and soft drinks. However, limited data is available on the consequences of HFCS consumption on metabolic and cardiovascular functions. This study was, therefore, designed to assess whether HFCS drinking influences the endothelial and vascular function in association with metabolic disturbances in rats. Additionally, resveratrol was tested at challenge with HFCS. We investigated the effects of HFCS (10% and 20%) and resveratrol (50mg/l) beverages on several metabolic parameters as well as endothelial relaxation, vascular contractions, expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins and superoxide generation in the aortas. Consumption of HFCS (20%) increased serum triglyceride, VLDL and insulin levels as well as blood pressure. Impaired relaxation to acetylcholine and intensified contractions to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were associated with decreased eNOS and SIRT1 whereas increased gp91(phox) and p22(phox) proteins, along with provoked superoxide production in the aortas from HFCS-treated rats. Resveratrol supplementation efficiently restored HFCS-induced deteriorations. Thus, intake of HFCS leads to vascular dysfunction by decreasing vasoprotective factors and provoking oxidative stress in association with metabolic disturbances. Resveratrol has a protective potential against the harmful consequences of HFCS consumption.

  1. Metabolic Profiling and Phenotyping of Central Nervous System Diseases: Metabolites Bring Insights into Brain Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic phenotyping corresponds to the large-scale quantitative and qualitative analysis of the metabolome i.e., the low-molecular weight <1 KDa fraction in biological samples, and provides a key opportunity to advance neurosciences. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are the main analytical platforms used for metabolic profiling, enabling detection and quantitation of a wide range of compounds of particular neuro-pharmacological and physiological relevance, including neurotransmitters, secondary messengers, structural lipids, as well as their precursors, intermediates and degradation products. Metabolic profiling is therefore particularly indicated for the study of central nervous system by probing metabolic and neurochemical profiles of the healthy or diseased brain, in preclinical models or in human samples. In this review, we introduce the analytical and statistical requirements for metabolic profiling. Then, we focus on key studies in the field of metabolic profiling applied to the characterization of animal models and human samples of central nervous system disorders. We highlight the potential of metabolic profiling for pharmacological and physiological evaluation, diagnosis and drug therapy monitoring of patients affected by brain disorders. Finally, we discuss the current challenges in the field, including the development of systems biology and pharmacology strategies improving our understanding of metabolic signatures and mechanisms of central nervous system diseases. PMID:25616565

  2. Oxidative stress in the etiology of age-associated decline in glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Adam B

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common pathologies in aging humans is the development of glucose metabolism dysfunction. The high incidence of metabolic dysfunction, in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus, is a significant health and economic burden on the aging population. However, the mechanisms that regulate this age-related physiological decline, and thus potential preventative treatments, remain elusive. Even after accounting for age-related changes in adiposity, lean mass, blood lipids, etc., aging is an independent factor for reduced glucose tolerance and increased insulin resistance. Oxidative stress has been shown to have significant detrimental impacts on the regulation of glucose homeostasis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to be modulated by age and diet in several model systems. This review provides an overview of these data and addresses whether increases in oxidative stress with aging may be a primary determinant of age-related metabolic dysfunction.

  3. In vivo metabolic flux profiling with stable isotopes discriminates sites and quantifies effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Julian; Clarke, Colleen; Preston, Judith; Bennett, Michael J.; Yudkoff, Marc; Xiao, Rui; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    mutants but resembled that of the TCA cycle mutant (idh-1) and both signaling mutants (daf-2 and sir-2.1). All branched chain amino acid levels were significantly increased in the complex I and III mutants but decreased in the PDH mutant (pdha-1). The RC complex I, coenzyme Q, TCA cycle, and PDH mutants shared significantly increased relative enrichment of lactate+1 and absolute concentration of alanine+1, while glutamate+1 enrichment was significantly decreased uniquely in the RC mutants. Relative intermediary flux analyses were suggestive of proximal TCA cycle disruption in idh-1, completely reduced TCA cycle flux in sir-2.1, and apparent distal TCA cycle alteration in daf-2. GC/MS analysis with universally-labeled 13C-glucose in adult worms further showed significantly increased isotopic enrichment in lactate, citrate, and malate species in the complex I (gas-1) mutant. Conclusions Stable isotopic/mass spectrometric analysis can sensitively discriminate primary RC dysfunction from genetic deficiencies affecting either the TCA cycle or pyruvate metabolism. These data are further suggestive that metabolic flux analysis using stable isotopes may offer a robust means to discriminate and quantify the secondary effects of primary RC dysfunction across intermediary metabolism. PMID:24445252

  4. Fatty old hearts: role of cardiac lipotoxicity in age-related cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Drosatos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cardiomyopathy accounts for a significant part of heart failure cases. Imbalance of the energetic equilibrium of the heart along with mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired β-adrenergic receptor signaling contributes in the aggravation of cardiac function in the elderly. In this review article, studies that correlate cardiac aging with lipotoxicity are summarized. The involvement of inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, β-adrenergic receptor desensitization, and mitochondrial dysfunction as underlying mechanisms for the lipid-driven age-related cardiomyopathy are presented with the aim to indicate potential therapeutic targets for cardiac aging. PMID:27558317

  5. Sepsis induces long-term metabolic and mitochondrial muscle stem cell dysfunction amenable by mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocheteau, P.; Chatre, L.; Briand, D.; Mebarki, M.; Jouvion, G.; Bardon, J.; Crochemore, C.; Serrani, P.; Lecci, P. P.; Latil, M.; Matot, B.; Carlier, P. G.; Latronico, N.; Huchet, C.; Lafoux, A.; Sharshar, T.; Ricchetti, M.; Chrétien, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is the major cause of critical illness resulting in admission to intensive care units. Sepsis is caused by severe infection and is associated with mortality in 60% of cases. Morbidity due to sepsis is complicated by neuromyopathy, and patients face long-term disability due to muscle weakness, energetic dysfunction, proteolysis and muscle wasting. These processes are triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic imbalances and are aggravated by malnutrition and drugs. Skeletal muscle regeneration depends on stem (satellite) cells. Herein we show that mitochondrial and metabolic alterations underlie the sepsis-induced long-term impairment of satellite cells and lead to inefficient muscle regeneration. Engrafting mesenchymal stem cells improves the septic status by decreasing cytokine levels, restoring mitochondrial and metabolic function in satellite cells, and improving muscle strength. These findings indicate that sepsis affects quiescent muscle stem cells and that mesenchymal stem cells might act as a preventive therapeutic approach for sepsis-related morbidity. PMID:26666572

  6. [The role of oxidative metabolism disturbance in the development of NO-related endothelial dysfunction during chronic hearth failure].

    PubMed

    Goishvili, N; Kakauridze, N; Sanikidze, T

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the work was to establish the oxidative metabolism changes and NO data in Chronic Hearth Failure (HF). 52 patients were included in the investigation, among them 37 patients with CHD and chronic HF (II-IV functional class by NIHA) and 17 without it (control group). For revealing of organism redox-status (ceruloplasmine, Fe3+-transfferine, Mn2+, methemoglobine) the blood paramagnetic centers was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance method. For revealing of blood free NO, the diethyldithiocarbamat (SIGMA) was used. In chronic HF the oxidative process intensification and organism compensate reaction reduction with low Fe3+-transferine levels, increased Mn2++, methaemoglobin and inactivation of erythrocytes membranes adrenergic receptors were revealed. In chronic HF the accumulation of reactive oxygen levels provoke NO transformation in peroxynitrote with following decreases of blood free NO and develop the endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  8. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  9. parkin-induced defects in neurophysiology and locomotion are generated by metabolic dysfunction and not oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amanda; Briggs, Laura; Chatwin, Griff F.J.; Emery, Elizabeth; Tomlins, Rose; Oswald, Matt; Middleton, C. Adam; Evans, Gareth J.O.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Elliott, Christopher J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by movement disorders, including bradykinesia. Analysis of inherited, juvenile PD, identified several genes linked via a common pathway to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that the larva of the Drosophila parkin mutant faithfully models the locomotory and metabolic defects of PD and is an excellent system for investigating their inter-relationship. parkin larvae displayed a marked bradykinesia that was caused by a reduction in both the frequency of peristalsis and speed of muscle contractions. Rescue experiments confirmed that this phenotype was due to a defect in the nervous system and not in the muscle. Furthermore, recordings of motoneuron activity in parkin larvae revealed reduced bursting and a striking reduction in evoked and miniature excitatory junction potentials, suggesting a neuronal deficit. This was supported by our observations in parkin larvae that the resting potential was depolarized, oxygen consumption and ATP concentration were drastically reduced while lactate was increased. These findings suggest that neuronal mitochondrial respiration is severely compromised and there is a compensatory switch to glycolysis for energy production. parkin mutants also possessed overgrown neuromuscular synapses, indicative of oxidative stress, which could be rescued by overexpression of parkin or scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Surprisingly, scavengers of ROS did not rescue the resting membrane potential and locomotory phenotypes. We therefore propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in parkin mutants induces Parkinsonian bradykinesia via a neuronal energy deficit and resulting synaptic failure, rather than as a consequence of downstream oxidative stress. PMID:22215442

  10. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-04-19

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  11. parkin-induced defects in neurophysiology and locomotion are generated by metabolic dysfunction and not oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amanda; Briggs, Laura; Chatwin, Griff F J; Emery, Elizabeth; Tomlins, Rose; Oswald, Matt; Middleton, C Adam; Evans, Gareth J O; Sweeney, Sean T; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2012-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by movement disorders, including bradykinesia. Analysis of inherited, juvenile PD, identified several genes linked via a common pathway to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that the larva of the Drosophila parkin mutant faithfully models the locomotory and metabolic defects of PD and is an excellent system for investigating their inter-relationship. parkin larvae displayed a marked bradykinesia that was caused by a reduction in both the frequency of peristalsis and speed of muscle contractions. Rescue experiments confirmed that this phenotype was due to a defect in the nervous system and not in the muscle. Furthermore, recordings of motoneuron activity in parkin larvae revealed reduced bursting and a striking reduction in evoked and miniature excitatory junction potentials, suggesting a neuronal deficit. This was supported by our observations in parkin larvae that the resting potential was depolarized, oxygen consumption and ATP concentration were drastically reduced while lactate was increased. These findings suggest that neuronal mitochondrial respiration is severely compromised and there is a compensatory switch to glycolysis for energy production. parkin mutants also possessed overgrown neuromuscular synapses, indicative of oxidative stress, which could be rescued by overexpression of parkin or scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Surprisingly, scavengers of ROS did not rescue the resting membrane potential and locomotory phenotypes. We therefore propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in parkin mutants induces Parkinsonian bradykinesia via a neuronal energy deficit and resulting synaptic failure, rather than as a consequence of downstream oxidative stress. PMID:22215442

  12. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  13. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  14. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  15. The presentation of metabolic dysfunction and the relationship with energy output in breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer prognosis can be adversely influenced by obesity, physical inactivity and metabolic dysfunction. Interventions aimed at improving surrogate markers of breast cancer risk such as insulin resistance may result in improved breast cancer outcomes. The design of such interventions may be improved through increased understanding of metabolic presentation in this cohort. This cross-sectional study aimed to characterise the metabolic profile of breast cancer survivors relative to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. A secondary aim was to compare measures of energy output across these groups. Methods Sixty-nine women (mean (SD) age 53.43 (9.39) years) who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer were recruited. All measures were completed during one assessment conducted 3.1 (1.0) years post diagnosis. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance analysis and waist circumference (WC). Fasting (12 hour) blood samples were drawn to measure lipid profile, glucose, insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR)). Energy output was evaluated by resting metabolic rate (RMR) measured by indirect calorimetry and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Characteristics were compared across four groups (1. WC <80 cm, not insulin resistant; 2. WC 80–87.9 cm, not insulin resistant; 3. WC >88 cm, not insulin resistant; 4. WC >80 cm, insulin resistant) using ANOVA (p < 0.05). Results Group 4 was characterised by significant disturbances in measures of glucose metabolism (glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and HBA1c) and raised CRP compared to other groups. Group 4 also displayed evidence of dyslipidemia and higher body composition values compared to Groups 1 and 2. Both absolute and adjusted RMR were significantly higher in the Group 4 versus all other groups. Physical activity levels were similar for all

  16. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  17. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  18. Female rats selectively bred for high intrinsic aerobic fitness are protected from ovariectomy-associated metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Park, Young-Min; Welly, Rebecca J.; Scroggins, Rebecca J.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Zidon, Terese; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M. E.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovariectomized rodents model human menopause in that they rapidly gain weight, reduce spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and develop metabolic dysfunction, including insulin resistance. How contrasting aerobic fitness levels impacts ovariectomy (OVX)-associated metabolic dysfunction is not known. Female rats selectively bred for high and low intrinsic aerobic fitness [high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR), respectively] were maintained under sedentary conditions for 39 wk. Midway through the observation period, OVX or sham (SHM) operations were performed providing HCR-SHM, HCR-OVX, LCR-SHM, and LCR-OVX groups. Glucose tolerance, energy expenditure, and SPA were measured before and 4 wk after surgery, while body composition via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and adipose tissue distribution, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle phenotype, hepatic lipid content, insulin resistance via homeostatic assessment model of insulin resistance and AdipoIR, and blood lipids were assessed at death. Remarkably, HCR were protected from OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance, observed only in LCR. HCR rats were ∼30% smaller, had ∼70% greater spontaneous physical activity (SPA), consumed ∼10% more relative energy, had greater skeletal muscle proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1-alpha, and ∼40% more BAT. OVX did not increase energy intake and reduced SPA to the same extent in both HCR and LCR. LCR were particularly affected by an OVX-associated reduction in resting energy expenditure and experienced a reduction in relative BAT; resting energy expenditure correlated positively with BAT across all animals (r = 0.6; P < 0.001). In conclusion, despite reduced SPA following OVX, high intrinsic aerobic fitness protects against OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance. The mechanism may involve preservation of resting energy expenditure. PMID:25608751

  19. The role of maternal nutrition, metabolic function and the placenta in developmental programming of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richter, V F I; Briffa, J F; Moritz, K M; Wlodek, M E; Hryciw, D H

    2016-01-01

    The intrauterine environment is critical for the development of the foetus. Barker and colleagues were the first to identify that adverse perturbations during foetal development are associated with an increased risk of developing diseases in adulthood, including cardiorenal disease. Specifically for the kidney, perturbations in utero can lead to nephron deficits and renal dysfunction by a number of mechanisms. Altered programming of nephron number is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney disease via glomerular hypertrophy and reduced vasodilative capacity of the renal blood vessels; both of which would contribute to hypertension in adulthood, with males being more susceptible to disease outcomes. Additionally, alterations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) such as an upregulation or downregulation of specific receptors, depending on the nature of the insult, have also been implicated in the development of renal dysfunction. Sex-specific differences in the expression of the RAS during late gestation and in the early postnatal environment have also been identified. Extensive research has demonstrated that both uteroplacental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition alter renal development in utero. Equally, exposure to maternal diabetes and maternal obesity during development are also associated with an increased risk of developing renal disease, however, the mechanism behind this association is poorly understood. Therefore, identifying the link between an adverse intrauterine environment and the programmed kidney disease risk in adulthood may facilitate the development of strategies to alleviate the epidemics of cardiorenal disease worldwide, in addition to understanding why males are more susceptible to adult-onset cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Paradigm shift redefining molecular, metabolic and structural events in Alzheimer's disease involves a proposed contribution by transition metals. Defined lengthy preclinical stage provides new hope to circumvent advancement of disease- and age-related neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2015-05-01

    It is estimated that 5.5 Million North Americans suffer from varying degrees of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by the year 2050 it may be one in 85 people globally (100 Million). It will be shown that heavy metal toxicity plays a significant role in sporadic AD. Although current literature speaks to involvement of metal ions (via Fenton reaction), studies and reviewers have yet to link cellular events including known structural changes such as amyloid plaque development to this metal toxicity the way it is proposed here. Contrary to the current AD model which positions BACE1 (β-secretase) as an aberrant or AD-advancing enzyme, it is proposed herein that the neuron's protective counteraction to this metal toxicity is, in fact, a justified increase in BACE1 activity and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing to yield more secreted APP (sAPP) and β-amyloid peptide in response to metal toxicity. This new perspective which justifies a functional role for APP, BACE1 enzyme activity and the peptide products from this activity may at first appear to be counterintuitive. Compelling evidence, however, is presented and a mechanism is shown herein that validate BACE1 recruitment and the resulting β-amyloid protein as strategic countermeasures serving the cell effectively against neuro-impeding disease. It is proposed that β-amyloid peptide chelates and sequesters free heavy metals in the extracellular medium to aggregate as amyloid plaque while unchelated β-amyloid migrates across the cell membrane to chelate intracellular free divalent metals. The sequestered intracellular metal is subsequently chaperoned as a metallo-peptide to cross the plasma membrane and aggregate as amyloid plaques extracellularly. The BACE1 countermeasure is not genetic or metabolic aberration; and this novel conclusion demonstrates that it must not be inhibited as currently targeted. APP, BACE1, β-amyloid peptide, and sAPP play positive roles against the preclinical oxidative load that predates

  1. Paradigm shift redefining molecular, metabolic and structural events in Alzheimer's disease involves a proposed contribution by transition metals. Defined lengthy preclinical stage provides new hope to circumvent advancement of disease- and age-related neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2015-05-01

    It is estimated that 5.5 Million North Americans suffer from varying degrees of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by the year 2050 it may be one in 85 people globally (100 Million). It will be shown that heavy metal toxicity plays a significant role in sporadic AD. Although current literature speaks to involvement of metal ions (via Fenton reaction), studies and reviewers have yet to link cellular events including known structural changes such as amyloid plaque development to this metal toxicity the way it is proposed here. Contrary to the current AD model which positions BACE1 (β-secretase) as an aberrant or AD-advancing enzyme, it is proposed herein that the neuron's protective counteraction to this metal toxicity is, in fact, a justified increase in BACE1 activity and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing to yield more secreted APP (sAPP) and β-amyloid peptide in response to metal toxicity. This new perspective which justifies a functional role for APP, BACE1 enzyme activity and the peptide products from this activity may at first appear to be counterintuitive. Compelling evidence, however, is presented and a mechanism is shown herein that validate BACE1 recruitment and the resulting β-amyloid protein as strategic countermeasures serving the cell effectively against neuro-impeding disease. It is proposed that β-amyloid peptide chelates and sequesters free heavy metals in the extracellular medium to aggregate as amyloid plaque while unchelated β-amyloid migrates across the cell membrane to chelate intracellular free divalent metals. The sequestered intracellular metal is subsequently chaperoned as a metallo-peptide to cross the plasma membrane and aggregate as amyloid plaques extracellularly. The BACE1 countermeasure is not genetic or metabolic aberration; and this novel conclusion demonstrates that it must not be inhibited as currently targeted. APP, BACE1, β-amyloid peptide, and sAPP play positive roles against the preclinical oxidative load that predates

  2. Intestine-selective farnesoid X receptor inhibition improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Lv, Ying; Li, Jing; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Shi, Jingmin; Brocker, Chad N.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G.; Bisson, William H.; Liu, Yulan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Here we show that treatment of mice with glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA) inhibits FXR signalling exclusively in intestine, and improves metabolic parameters in mouse models of obesity. Gly-MCA is a selective high-affinity FXR inhibitor that can be administered orally and prevents, or reverses, high-fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. The high-affinity FXR agonist GW4064 blocks Gly-MCA action in the gut, and intestine-specific Fxr-null mice are unresponsive to the beneficial effects of Gly-MCA. Mechanistically, the metabolic improvements with Gly-MCA depend on reduced biosynthesis of intestinal-derived ceramides, which directly compromise beige fat thermogenic function. Consequently, ceramide treatment reverses the action of Gly-MCA in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. We further show that FXR signalling in ileum biopsies of humans positively correlates with body mass index. These data suggest that Gly-MCA may be a candidate for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:26670557

  3. Intestine-selective farnesoid X receptor inhibition improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Lv, Ying; Li, Jing; Krausz, Kristopher W; Shi, Jingmin; Brocker, Chad N; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Liu, Yulan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-12-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Here we show that treatment of mice with glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA) inhibits FXR signalling exclusively in intestine, and improves metabolic parameters in mouse models of obesity. Gly-MCA is a selective high-affinity FXR inhibitor that can be administered orally and prevents, or reverses, high-fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. The high-affinity FXR agonist GW4064 blocks Gly-MCA action in the gut, and intestine-specific Fxr-null mice are unresponsive to the beneficial effects of Gly-MCA. Mechanistically, the metabolic improvements with Gly-MCA depend on reduced biosynthesis of intestinal-derived ceramides, which directly compromise beige fat thermogenic function. Consequently, ceramide treatment reverses the action of Gly-MCA in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. We further show that FXR signalling in ileum biopsies of humans positively correlates with body mass index. These data suggest that Gly-MCA may be a candidate for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  4. Intestine-selective farnesoid X receptor inhibition improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changtao; Xie, Cen; Lv, Ying; Li, Jing; Krausz, Kristopher W; Shi, Jingmin; Brocker, Chad N; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Liu, Yulan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Here we show that treatment of mice with glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA) inhibits FXR signalling exclusively in intestine, and improves metabolic parameters in mouse models of obesity. Gly-MCA is a selective high-affinity FXR inhibitor that can be administered orally and prevents, or reverses, high-fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. The high-affinity FXR agonist GW4064 blocks Gly-MCA action in the gut, and intestine-specific Fxr-null mice are unresponsive to the beneficial effects of Gly-MCA. Mechanistically, the metabolic improvements with Gly-MCA depend on reduced biosynthesis of intestinal-derived ceramides, which directly compromise beige fat thermogenic function. Consequently, ceramide treatment reverses the action of Gly-MCA in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. We further show that FXR signalling in ileum biopsies of humans positively correlates with body mass index. These data suggest that Gly-MCA may be a candidate for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:26670557

  5. Effect of peripheral circadian dysfunction on metabolic disease in response to a diabetogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Pijut, Sonja S; Corbett, Danielle E; Wang, Yuhuan; Li, Jianing; Charnigo, Richard J; Graf, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    BMAL1 is a core component of the transcription/translation machinery that regulates central and peripheral circadian rhythms that coordinate behavior and metabolism, respectively. Our objective was to determine the impact of BMAL1 in adipose alone or in combination with liver on metabolic phenotypes. Control, adipose-Bmal1 knockout (ABKO), and liver- and adipose-Bmal1 knockout (LABKO) female mice were placed in TSE System metabolic chambers for metabolic phenotyping. A second cohort of male mice was fed a control or diabetogenic diet, and body weight and composition, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and serum and hepatic lipids were measured. Both female ABKO and LABKO mice exhibited increased food consumption compared with control mice. ABKO mice also exhibited increased overall activity predominantly during the light phase compared with both control and LABKO mice and were protected from increased weight gain. When the male cohort was challenged with a diabetogenic diet, LABKO mice had increased body weight due to increased fat mass compared with control and ABKO mice. However, these mice did not present further impairments in glycemic control, adipose inflammation, or liver injury. LABKO mice had increased hepatic cholesterol and elevated expression of cholesterol synthesis and uptake genes. Our data indicate that deletion of this allele in adipose or in combination with liver alters feeding behavior and locomotor activity. However, obesity is exacerbated only with the combination of liver and adipose deletion. PMID:27048996

  6. ED 05-2 INTERACTION OF GUT DYSBIOSIS AND INNATE IMMUNE DYSFUNCTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF METABOLIC SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Low-grade systemic inflammation in adipose tissues or liver, is an important etiologic factor in insulin resistance. LPS is an important element causing such metabolic inflammation, and intestinal flora is considered a major source of systemic LPS. We studied changes of intestinal microbiota associated with high-fat diet (HFD) that causes insulin resistance and metabolic stress. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that HFD significantly decreased the abundance of a mucin-degrading bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to control diet. Reduced abundance of Akkermansia in HFD-fed mice was reversed by metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic medicine. Oral administration of Akkermansia to HFD-fed mice significantly enhanced insulin sensitivity and attenuated adipose tissue inflammation probably by inducing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the visceral adipose tissue. We also studied Paneth cells, specialized intestinal epithelial cells that produce antimicrobial peptides (AMP) and shape gut microbial milieu. We studied whether high-fat diet (HFD) impairs the function of Paneth cells and interferes with intestinal microbial homeostasis, potentially contributing to the development of metabolic syndrome. HFD-fed mice exhibited reduced expressions of some AMP and defective antimicrobial activity, which led to loss of epithelial integrity and a significantly higher content of LPS in the liver and serum of HFD-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Antibiotic treatment reduced translocation of bacterial components, steatosis, and inflammation in the liver of HFD-fed mice, which in turn improved systemic glucose metabolism. HFD-fed mice were also more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis, probably due to impaired Paneth cell function. Our data suggest that Paneth cell dysfunction may be one of the underlying mechanisms of glucose intolerance and inflammatory bowel disease associated with western diet. These results suggest that high-fat diet could be a

  7. Caloric Restriction as a Strategy to Improve Vascular Dysfunction in Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Concha F.; Fernández-Alfonso, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has proved to be the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention to increase healthy lifespan and aging. A reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in obese subjects can be already achieved by a moderate and sustainable weight loss. Since pharmacological approaches for body weight reduction have, at present, a poor long-term efficacy, CR is of great interest in the prevention and/or reduction of CVD associated with obesity. Other dietary strategies changing specific macronutrients, such as altering carbohydrates, protein content or diet glycemic index have been also shown to decrease the progression of CVD in obese patients. In this review, we will focus on the positive effects and possible mechanisms of action of these strategies on vascular dysfunction. PMID:27314388

  8. Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Grandone, Anna; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Perrone, Laura; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research. PMID:26561830

  9. Caloric Restriction as a Strategy to Improve Vascular Dysfunction in Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, Concha F; Fernández-Alfonso, María S

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has proved to be the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention to increase healthy lifespan and aging. A reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in obese subjects can be already achieved by a moderate and sustainable weight loss. Since pharmacological approaches for body weight reduction have, at present, a poor long-term efficacy, CR is of great interest in the prevention and/or reduction of CVD associated with obesity. Other dietary strategies changing specific macronutrients, such as altering carbohydrates, protein content or diet glycemic index have been also shown to decrease the progression of CVD in obese patients. In this review, we will focus on the positive effects and possible mechanisms of action of these strategies on vascular dysfunction. PMID:27314388

  10. Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

    PubMed

    Grandone, Anna; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Perrone, Laura; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia

    2015-11-06

    Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

  11. Ameliorative effects of oleanolic acid on fluoride induced metabolic and oxidative dysfunctions in rat brain: Experimental and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chaitali; Pal, Sudipta; Das, Niranjan; Dinda, Biswanath

    2014-04-01

    Beneficial effects of oleanolic acid on fluoride-induced oxidative stress and certain metabolic dysfunctions were studied in four regions of rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with sodium fluoride at a dose of 20 mg/kg b.w./day (orally) for 30 days. Results indicate marked reduction in acidic, basic and neutral protein contents due to fluoride toxicity in cerebrum, cerebellum, pons and medulla. DNA, RNA contents significantly decreased in those regions after fluoride exposure. Activities of proteolytic enzymes (such as cathepsin, trypsin and pronase) were inhibited by fluoride, whereas transaminase enzyme (GOT and GPT) activities increased significantly in brain tissue. Fluoride appreciably elevated brain malondialdehyde level, free amino acid nitrogen, NO content and free OH radical generation. Additionally, fluoride perturbed GSH content and markedly reduced SOD, GPx, GR and CAT activities in brain tissues. Oral supplementation of oleanolic acid (a plant triterpenoid), at a dose of 5mg/kgb.w./day for last 14 days of fluoride treatment appreciably ameliorated fluoride-induced alteration of brain metabolic functions. Appreciable counteractive effects of oleanolic acid against fluoride-induced changes in protein and nucleic acid contents, proteolytic enzyme activities and other oxidative stress parameters indicate that oleanolic acid has potential antioxidative effects against fluoride-induced oxidative brain damage.

  12. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD. PMID:27442922

  13. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD.

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Plus High-Sugar Diet Provokes a Metabolic Crisis That Inhibits Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Esko; George, Jack; Garipler, Görkem; Tuomela, Tea; Kiviranta, Essi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Dunn, Cory D.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila mutant tko25t exhibits a deficiency of mitochondrial protein synthesis, leading to a global insufficiency of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. This entrains an organismal phenotype of developmental delay and sensitivity to seizures induced by mechanical stress. We found that the mutant phenotype is exacerbated in a dose-dependent fashion by high dietary sugar levels. tko25t larvae were found to exhibit severe metabolic abnormalities that were further accentuated by high-sugar diet. These include elevated pyruvate and lactate, decreased ATP and NADPH. Dietary pyruvate or lactate supplementation phenocopied the effects of high sugar. Based on tissue-specific rescue, the crucial tissue in which this metabolic crisis initiates is the gut. It is accompanied by down-regulation of the apparatus of cytosolic protein synthesis and secretion at both the RNA and post-translational levels, including a novel regulation of S6 kinase at the protein level. PMID:26812173

  15. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p < 0.05 for both). Gene expression analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue revealed significant down-regulation of genes related to BCAA catabolism and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of several inflammation-related pathways in high HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  16. Dietary exposure to the endocrine disruptor tolylfluanid promotes global metabolic dysfunction in male mice.

    PubMed

    Regnier, Shane M; Kirkley, Andrew G; Ye, Honggang; El-Hashani, Essam; Zhang, Xiaojie; Neel, Brian A; Kamau, Wakanene; Thomas, Celeste C; Williams, Ayanna K; Hayes, Emily T; Massad, Nicole L; Johnson, Daniel N; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Chunling; Sargis, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors are implicated as putative contributors to the burgeoning metabolic disease epidemic. Tolylfluanid (TF) is a commonly detected fungicide in Europe, and previous in vitro and ex vivo work has identified it as a potent endocrine disruptor with the capacity to promote adipocyte differentiation and induce adipocytic insulin resistance, effects likely resulting from activation of glucocorticoid receptor signaling. The present study extends these findings to an in vivo mouse model of dietary TF exposure. After 12 weeks of consumption of a normal chow diet supplemented with 100 parts per million TF, mice exhibited increased body weight gain and an increase in total fat mass, with a specific augmentation in visceral adipose depots. This increased adipose accumulation is proposed to occur through a reduction in lipolytic and fatty acid oxidation gene expression. Dietary TF exposure induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and metabolic inflexibility, while also disrupting diurnal rhythms of energy expenditure and food consumption. Adipose tissue endocrine function was also impaired with a reduction in serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, adipocytes from TF-exposed mice exhibited reduced insulin sensitivity, an effect likely mediated through a specific down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression, mirroring effects of ex vivo TF exposure. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed an increase in adipose glucocorticoid receptor signaling with TF treatment. Taken together, these findings identify TF as a novel in vivo endocrine disruptor and obesogen in mice, with dietary exposure leading to alterations in energy homeostasis that recapitulate many features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25535829

  17. Metabolomics Reveals that Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Environmental Chemicals Induces Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Nichols, Robert G.; Hao, Ruixin; Correll, Jared; Smith, Philip B.; Chiaro, Christopher R.; Perdew, Gary H.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds poses a significant health risk for human health. Developing a better understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is likely to improve the reliability of risk assessment. In this study, the AHR-dependent metabolic response of mice exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) were assessed using global 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics and targeted metabolic profiling of extracts obtained from serum and liver. 1H NMR analyses revealed that TCDF exposure suppressed gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, stimulated lipogenesis, and triggered inflammatory gene expression in an Ahr-dependent manner. Targeted analyses using gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed TCDF treatment altered the ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids. Consistent with this observation, an increase in hepatic expression of stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 was also observed. In addition, TCDF exposure resulted in inhibition of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis manifested by down-regulation of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA metabolites and related mRNA levels. In contrast, no significant changes in the levels of glucose and lipid were observed in serum and liver obtained from Ahr-null mice following TCDF treatment, thus strongly supporting the important role of the AHR in mediating the metabolic effects seen following TCDF exposure. PMID:26023891

  18. Dietary Exposure to the Endocrine Disruptor Tolylfluanid Promotes Global Metabolic Dysfunction in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Regnier, Shane M.; Kirkley, Andrew G.; Ye, Honggang; El-Hashani, Essam; Zhang, Xiaojie; Neel, Brian A.; Kamau, Wakanene; Thomas, Celeste C.; Williams, Ayanna K.; Hayes, Emily T.; Massad, Nicole L.; Johnson, Daniel N.; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors are implicated as putative contributors to the burgeoning metabolic disease epidemic. Tolylfluanid (TF) is a commonly detected fungicide in Europe, and previous in vitro and ex vivo work has identified it as a potent endocrine disruptor with the capacity to promote adipocyte differentiation and induce adipocytic insulin resistance, effects likely resulting from activation of glucocorticoid receptor signaling. The present study extends these findings to an in vivo mouse model of dietary TF exposure. After 12 weeks of consumption of a normal chow diet supplemented with 100 parts per million TF, mice exhibited increased body weight gain and an increase in total fat mass, with a specific augmentation in visceral adipose depots. This increased adipose accumulation is proposed to occur through a reduction in lipolytic and fatty acid oxidation gene expression. Dietary TF exposure induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and metabolic inflexibility, while also disrupting diurnal rhythms of energy expenditure and food consumption. Adipose tissue endocrine function was also impaired with a reduction in serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, adipocytes from TF-exposed mice exhibited reduced insulin sensitivity, an effect likely mediated through a specific down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression, mirroring effects of ex vivo TF exposure. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed an increase in adipose glucocorticoid receptor signaling with TF treatment. Taken together, these findings identify TF as a novel in vivo endocrine disruptor and obesogen in mice, with dietary exposure leading to alterations in energy homeostasis that recapitulate many features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25535829

  19. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  20. [Epidemiology of age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Leveziel, N; Delcourt, C; Zerbib, J; Dollfus, H; Kaplan, J; Benlian, P; Coscas, G; Souied, E H; Soubrane, G

    2009-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial and polygenic disease and is the main cause of vision loss in developed countries. The environmental factors of ARMD can modify prevalence and incidence of this disease. This article is a review of the main environmental factors currently recognized as at risk or protective factor for ARMD. Modification of these factors is of crucial importance because it could delay the onset of exudative or atrophic forms of the disease. PMID:19515460

  1. Age-related vascular stiffening: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Julie C.; Lampi, Marsha C.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffening occurs with age and is closely associated with the progression of cardiovascular disease. Stiffening is most often studied at the level of the whole vessel because increased stiffness of the large arteries can impose increased strain on the heart leading to heart failure. Interestingly, however, recent evidence suggests that the impact of increased vessel stiffening extends beyond the tissue scale and can also have deleterious microscale effects on cellular function. Altered extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture has been recognized as a key component of the pre-atherogenic state. Here, the underlying causes of age-related vessel stiffening are discussed, focusing on age-related crosslinking of the ECM proteins as well as through increased matrix deposition. Methods to measure vessel stiffening at both the macro- and microscale are described, spanning from the pulse wave velocity measurements performed clinically to microscale measurements performed largely in research laboratories. Additionally, recent work investigating how arterial stiffness and the changes in the ECM associated with stiffening contributed to endothelial dysfunction will be reviewed. We will highlight how changes in ECM protein composition contribute to atherosclerosis in the vessel wall. Lastly, we will discuss very recent work that demonstrates endothelial cells (ECs) are mechano-sensitive to arterial stiffening, where changes in stiffness can directly impact EC health. Overall, recent studies suggest that stiffening is an important clinical target not only because of potential deleterious effects on the heart but also because it promotes cellular level dysfunction in the vessel wall, contributing to a pathological atherosclerotic state. PMID:25926844

  2. Age-related changes in the meibomian gland.

    PubMed

    Nien, Chyong Jy; Paugh, Jerry R; Massei, Salina; Wahlert, Andrew J; Kao, Winston W; Jester, James V

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the age-related changes of the mouse meibomian gland. Eyelids from adult C57Bl/6 mice at 2, 6, 12 and 24 months of age were stained with specific antibodies against peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) to identify differentiating meibocytes, Oil Red O (ORO) to identify lipid, Ki67 nuclear antigen to identify cycling cells, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1) to identify potential stem cells and CD45 to identify immune cells. Meibomian glands from younger mice (2 and 6 months) showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear staining with anti-PPARgamma antibodies with abundant ORO staining of small, intracellular lipid droplets. Meibomian glands from older mice (12 and 24 months) showed only nuclear PPARgamma localization with less ORO staining and significantly reduced acinar tissue (p < 0.04). Acini of older mice also showed significantly reduced (p < 0.004) numbers of Ki67 stained nuclei. While Blimp1 appeared to diffusely stain the superficial ductal epithelium, isolated cells were occasionally stained within the meibomian gland duct and acini of older mice that also stained with CD45 antibodies, suggesting the presence of infiltrating plasmacytoid cells. These findings suggest that there is altered PPARgamma receptor signaling in older mice that may underlie changes in cell cycle entry/proliferation, lipid synthesis and gland atrophy during aging. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that mouse meibomian glands undergo age-related changes similar to those identified in humans and may be used as a model for age-related meibomian gland dysfunction.

  3. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. Methods Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), aromatic amino acid (AAA) and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all). Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all), whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26439744

  4. Maternal magnesium deficiency in mice leads to maternal metabolic dysfunction and altered lipid metabolism with fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Solanki, Malvika H; Chatterjee, Prodyot K; Xue, Xiangying; Roman, Amanda; Desai, Neeraj; Rochelson, Burton; Metz, Christine N

    2014-08-14

    Inadequate magnesium (Mg) intake is a widespread problem, with over 50% of women of reproductive age consuming less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). Because pregnancy increases the requirement for Mg and the beneficial effects of magnesium sulfate for preeclampsia/eclampsia and fetal neuroprotection are well described, we examined the outcomes of Mg deficiency during pregnancy. Briefly, pregnant Swiss Webster mice were fed either control or Mg-deficient diets starting on gestational day (GD) 6 through euthanasia on GD17. Mg-deficient dams had significantly reduced weight gain and higher plasma adipokines, in the absence of inflammation. Livers of Mg-deficient dams had significantly higher saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and lower polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (P < 0.0001) and arachidonic acid (AA) (P < 0.0001). Mechanistically, Mg deficiency was accompanied by enhanced desaturase and elongase mRNA expression in maternal livers along with higher circulating insulin and glucose concentrations (P < 0.05) and increased mRNA expression of Srebf1 and Chrebp, regulators of fatty acid synthesis (P < 0.05). Fetal pups exposed to Mg deficiency were growth-restricted and exhibited reduced survival. Mg-deficient fetal livers showed lower MUFAs and higher PUFAs, with lower desaturase and elongase mRNA expression than controls. In addition, DHA concentrations were lower in Mg-deficient fetal brains (P < 0.05). These results indicate that Mg deficiency during pregnancy influences both maternal and fetal fatty acid metabolism, fetal growth and fetal survival, and support better understanding maternal Mg status before and during pregnancy.

  5. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere's disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  6. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  7. Neuroendorine and Epigentic Mechanisms Subserving Autonomic Imbalance and HPA Dysfunction in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemche, Erwin; Chaban, Oleg S.; Lemche, Alexandra V.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of environmental stress upon pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been substantiated by epidemiological, psychophysiological, and endocrinological studies. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of causative roles of nutritional factors, sympathomedullo-adrenal (SMA) and hypothalamic-pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axes, and adipose tissue chronic low-grade inflammation processes in MetS. Disturbances in the neuroendocrine systems for leptin, melanocortin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein systems have been found resulting directly in MetS-like conditions. The review identifies candidate risk genes from factors shown critical for the functioning of each of these neuroendocrine signaling cascades. In its meta-analytic part, recent studies in epigenetic modification (histone methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination) and posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs are evaluated. Several studies suggest modification mechanisms of early life stress (ELS) and diet-induced obesity (DIO) programming in the hypothalamic regions with populations of POMC-expressing neurons. Epigenetic modifications were found in cortisol (here HSD11B1 expression), melanocortin, leptin, NPY, and adiponectin genes. With respect to adiposity genes, epigenetic modifications were documented for fat mass gene cluster APOA1/C3/A4/A5, and the lipolysis gene LIPE. With regard to inflammatory, immune and subcellular metabolism, PPARG, NKBF1, TNFA, TCF7C2, and those genes expressing cytochrome P450 family enzymes involved in steroidogenesis and in hepatic lipoproteins were documented for epigenetic modifications. PMID:27147943

  8. The P72R polymorphism of p53 predisposes to obesity and metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Che-Pei; Leu, Julia I-Ju; Basu, Subhasree; Khaku, Sakina; Anokye-Danso, Frederick; Liu, Qin; George, Donna L.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY p53 is well known for its tumor suppressor role, but this protein also has a poorly understood role in the regulation of metabolism. Human studies have implicated a common polymorphism at codon 72 of p53 in diabetic and pre-diabetic phenotypes. To understand this role, we utilized a humanized mouse model of the p53 codon 72 variants and monitored these mice following challenge with a high fat diet (HFD). Mice with the arginine 72 (R72) variant of p53 developed more severe obesity and glucose intolerance on a HFD, compared to mice with the proline 72 variant (P72). R72 mice developed insulin resistance, islet hypertrophy, increased infiltration of immune cells, and fatty liver disease. Gene expression analyses and studies with small molecule inhibitors indicate that the p53 target genes Tnf and Npc1l1 underlie this phenotype. These results shed light on the role of p53 in obesity, metabolism and inflammation. PMID:26947067

  9. Apigenin and naringenin regulate glucose and lipid metabolism, and ameliorate vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Qin, Weiwei; Wu, Feihua; Wang, Shanshan; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Liying; Zeng, Biao; Ma, Shiping; Liang, Jingyu

    2016-02-15

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial step of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the amelioration of apigenin and naringenin in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin and explored the underlying mechanism. Apigenin or naringenin was intragastrically administered at 50 or 100mg/kg once a day for 6 weeks. Biochemical parameters including blood glucose, glycated serum protein, serum lipid, insulin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured. Vascular reactivity in isolated thoracic aortic rings was examined. Pathological features of the thoracic aorta were further observed through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Lastly, we evaluated their effects on insulin resistance of palmitic acid (PA)-induced endothelial cells. Compared with diabetic control group, apigenin and naringenin significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, serum lipid, malonaldehyde, ICAM-1 and insulin resistance index, increased SOD activity and improved impaired glucose tolerance. Apigenin and naringenin restored phenylephrine-mediated contractions and acetylcholine or insulin-induced relaxations in aortic tissues. Furthermore, pathological damage in the thoracic aorta of apigenin and naringenin groups was more remissive than diabetic control group. In vitro, apigenin and naringenin inhibited NF-κB activation and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in PA-treated endothelial cells and improved nitric oxide production in the presence of insulin. In conclusion, both apigenin and naringenin can ameliorate glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as endothelial dysfunction in T2D rats at least in part by down-regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. In general, apigenin showed greater potency than naringenin equivalent. PMID:26801071

  10. Age related microsatellite instability in T cells from healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Krichevsky, Svetlana; Pawelec, Graham; Gural, Alexander; Effros, Rita B; Globerson, Amiela; Yehuda, Dina Ben; Yehuda, Arie Ben

    2004-04-01

    Many immune functions decline with age and may jeopardize the elderly, as illustrated, for example by the significantly higher mortality rate from influenza in old age. Although innate and humoral immunity are affected by aging, it is the T cell compartment, which manifests most alterations. The mechanisms behind these alterations are still unclear, and several explanations have been offered including thymic involution and Telomere attrition leading to cell senescence. Age related accumulation of mutations has been documented and could serve as an additional mechanism of T cell dysfunction. One effective repair mechanism capable of rectifying errors in DNA replications is the mismatch repair (MMR) system. We previously reported a comparative examination of individual DNA samples from blood cells obtained at 10 year intervals from young and old subjects. We showed significantly higher rates of microsatellite instability (MSI), an indicator of MMR dysfunction in older subjects, compared to young. In the present study we confirm this result, using direct automated sequencing and in addition, we demonstrate that as CD8 lymphocytes from aged individuals, undergo repeated population doublings (PDs) in culture, they develop MSI. CD4 clones that also undergo repeated PDs in culture develop significant MSI as well. Elucidation of this previously unexplored facet of lymphocyte dynamics in relation to aging may help identify novel mechanisms of immunosenescence and pathways that could serve as targets for interventions to restore immune function.

  11. Association of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction with metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes in adults from Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined the association of biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction with diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in persons from Inner Mongolia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,536 people aged 20 years and older from Inner Mongolia, China. Overnight fasting blood samples were obtained to measure plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), sE-selectin, angiotensin II, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood glucose. Waist circumference and blood pressure were measured by trained staff. MetS was defined according to the modified ATP III definition for Asians. Elevated level of the biomarker was defined as values in the upper tertile of the distribution. Participants were categorized into one of four groups based on the presence or absence of metabolic and glycemic abnormalities: 1) free of prediabetes, diabetes and MetS (reference group), 2) prediabetes or diabetes only, 3) MetS without prediabetes or diabetes, and 4) MetS plus prediabetes or diabetes. The multivariable models are adjusted for age, gender, smoking, drinking, family history of hypertension, and body mass index. Results Among study participants, 18.5% had prediabetes, 3.6% had diabetes, and 27.4% of the entire study population had 3 or more components of the MetS. Elevated hsCRP was associated with an increased odds of prediabetes or diabetes only, MetS without prediabetes or diabetes, and MetS plus prediabetes or diabetes with multivariable adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 2.3 (1.7-3.1), 3.0 (2.4-3.8), and 5.8 (4.5-7.5), respectively. Elevated sICAM-1 was associated with increased odds (95% CI) of prediabetes or diabetes only (2.1, 1.6-2.9) and MetS plus prediabetes or diabetes (4.2, 3.2-5.3) but was not associated with MetS alone. Elevated sE-selectin was associated with a modestly increased risk of MetS (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1

  12. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity.

  13. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  14. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. PMID:26370651

  15. [Age-related changes of the brain].

    PubMed

    Paltsyn, A A; Komissarova, S V

    2015-01-01

    The first morphological signs of aging of the brain are found in the white matter already at a young age (20-40 years), and later (40-50 years) in a gray matter. After the 40-50 years appear and in subsequently are becoming more pronounced functional manifestations of morphological changes: the weakening of sensory-motor and cognitive abilities. While in principle this dynamic of age-related changes is inevitable, the rate of their development to a large extent determined by the genetic characteristics and lifestyle of the individual. According to modem concepts age-related changes in the number of nerve cells are different in different parts of the brain. However, these changes are not large and are not the main cause of senile decline brain. The main processes that contribute to the degradation of the brain develop as in the bodies of neurons and in neuropil. In the bodies of neurons--it is a damage (usually decrease) of the level of expression of many genes, and especially of the genes determining cell communication. In neuropil: reduction in the number of synapses and the strength of synaptic connections, reduction in the number of dendritic spines and axonal buttons, reduction in the number and thickness of the dendritic branches, demyelination of axons. As the result of these events, it becomes a violation of the rate of formation and rebuilding neuronal circuits. It is deplete associative ability, brain plasticity, and memory. PMID:27116888

  16. Multiple effects of circadian dysfunction induced by photoperiod shifts: alterations in context memory and food metabolism in the same subjects.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert J; Zelinski, Erin L; Keeley, Robin J; Sutherland, Dylan; Fehr, Leah; Hong, Nancy S

    2013-06-13

    Humans exposed to shiftwork conditions have been reported to have increased susceptibility to various health problems including various forms of dementia, cancer, heart disease, and metabolic disorders related to obesity. The present experiments assessed the effects of circadian disruption on learning and memory function and various food related processes including diet consumption rates, food metabolism, and changes in body weight. These experiments utilized a novel variant of the conditioned place preference task (CPP) that is normally used to assess Pavlovian associative learning and memory processes produced via repeated context-reward pairings. For the present experiments, the standard CPP paradigm was modified in that both contexts were paired with food, but the dietary constituents of the food were different. In particular, we were interested in whether rats could differentiate between two types of carbohydrates, simple (dextrose) and complex (starch). Consumption rates for each type of carbohydrate were measured throughout training. A test of context preference without the food present was also conducted. At the end of behavioral testing, a fasting glucose test and a glucose challenge test were administered. Chronic photoperiod shifting resulted in impaired context learning and memory processes thought to be mediated by a neural circuit centered on the hippocampus. The results also showed that preferences for the different carbohydrate diets were altered in rats experiencing photoperiod shifting in that they maintained an initial preference for the simple carbohydrate throughout training. Lastly, photoperiod shifting resulted in changes in fasting blood glucose levels and elicited weight gain. These results show that chronic photoperiod shifting, which likely resulted in circadian dysfunction, impairs multiple functions of the brain and/or body in the same individual. PMID:23660277

  17. Ataxin-10 is part of a cachexokine cocktail triggering cardiac metabolic dysfunction in cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Michaela; Oeing, Christian U.; Rohm, Maria; Baysal-Temel, Ezgi; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Bauer, Ralf; Volz, H. Christian; Boutros, Michael; Sohn, Daniela; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Eichelbaum, Katrin; Werner, Tessa; Hirt, Marc N.; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Müller-Decker, Karin; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katus, Hugo A.; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Backs, Johannes; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cancer cachexia affects the majority of tumor patients and significantly contributes to high mortality rates in these subjects. Despite its clinical importance, the identity of tumor-borne signals and their impact on specific peripheral organ systems, particularly the heart, remain mostly unknown. Methods and results By combining differential colon cancer cell secretome profiling with large-scale cardiomyocyte phenotyping, we identified a signature panel of seven “cachexokines”, including Bridging integrator 1, Syntaxin 7, Multiple inositol-polyphosphate phosphatase 1, Glucosidase alpha acid, Chemokine ligand 2, Adamts like 4, and Ataxin-10, which were both sufficient and necessary to trigger cardiac atrophy and aberrant fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes. As a prototypical example, engineered secretion of Ataxin-10 from non-cachexia-inducing cells was sufficient to induce cachexia phenotypes in cardiomyocytes, correlating with elevated Ataxin-10 serum levels in murine and human cancer cachexia models. Conclusions As Ataxin-10 serum levels were also found to be elevated in human cachectic cancer patients, the identification of Ataxin-10 as part of a cachexokine cocktail now provides a rational approach towards personalized predictive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures in cancer cachexia. PMID:26909315

  18. Silymarin Ameliorates Metabolic Dysfunction Associated with Diet-Induced Obesity via Activation of Farnesyl X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Jinwen; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yahui; Li, Yin; Li, Yifei; Fan, Shengjie; Ma, Yue-Ming; Tong, Qingchun; Yang, Li; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Silymarin, a standardized extract of the milk thistle seeds, has been widely used to treat chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other types of toxic liver damage. Despite increasing studies on the action of silymarin and its major active constituent, silybin in their therapeutic properties against insulin resistance, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism underlying silymarin action remains unclear. Experimental approach: C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months to induce obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia, and fatty liver. These mice were then continuously treated with HFD alone or mixed with silymarin at 40 mg/100 g for additional 6 weeks. Biochemical analysis was used to test the serum lipid and bile acid profiles. Farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transactivities were analyzed in liver using a gene reporter assay based on quantitative RT-PCR. Key results: Silymarin treatment ameliorated insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and inflammation, and reconstituted the bile acid pool in liver of diet-induced obesity. Associated with this, silybin and silymarin enhanced FXR transactivity. Consistently, in HepG2 cells, silybin inhibited NF-κB signaling, which was enhanced by FXR activation. Conclusion and implications: Our results suggest that silybin is an effective component of silymarin for treating metabolic syndrome by stimulating FXR signaling. PMID:27733832

  19. Hemodynamic and metabolic basis of impaired exercise tolerance in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Roubin, G.S.; Anderson, S.D.; Shen, W.F.; Choong, C.Y.; Alwyn, M.; Hillery, S.; Harris, P.J.; Kelly, D.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Hemodynamic and metabolic changes were measured at rest and during exercise in 23 patients with chronic heart failure and in 6 control subjects. Exercise was limited by leg fatigue in both groups and capacity was 40% lower in the patients with failure. At rest, comparing patients with control subjects, heart rate and right atrial and pulmonary wedge pressure were higher; cardiac output, stroke volume and work indexes and ejection fraction were lower; mean arterial and right atrial pressure and systemic resistance were similar. During all phases of exercise in patients with heart failure, pulmonary wedge pressure and systemic vascular resistance were higher and pulmonary vascular resistance remained markedly elevated compared with values in control subjects. Cardiac output was lower in the patients with failure, but appeared to have the same physiologic distribution in both groups during exercise. Although arterial-femoral venous oxygen content difference was higher in patients with heart failure, this increase did not compensate for the reduced blood flow. Even though the maximal oxygen consumption was significantly reduced, femoral venous lactate and pH values were higher than values in control subjects, but femoral venous pH was similar in both groups at their respective levels of maximal exercise. Ejection fraction was lower in those with heart failure at rest and did not increase with exercise. Ventilation in relation to oxygen consumption was higher in patients with failure than in control subjects.

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Meets Senescence.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Suchira; Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction are hallmarks of ageing, but until now their relationship has not been clear. Recent work by Wiley et al. shows that mitochondrial defects can cause a distinct senescence phenotype termed MiDAS (mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence). MiDAS has a specific secretome that is able to drive some of the aging phenotypes. These findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for treating age-related pathologies. PMID:26874922

  1. Hypoglycemic effects of Zanthoxylum alkylamides by enhancing glucose metabolism and ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    You, Yuming; Ren, Ting; Zhang, Shiqi; Shirima, Gerald Gasper; Cheng, YaJiao; Liu, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of Zanthoxylum alkylamides and explore the potential mechanism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were orally treated with 3, 6, and 9 mg per kg bw alkylamides daily for 28 days. As the alkylamide dose increased, the relative weights of the liver and kidney, fasting blood glucose, and fructosamine levels were significantly decreased. The alkylamides also significantly increased the body weight and improved the oral glucose tolerance of the rats. Likewise, the alkylamides significantly increased the levels of liver and muscle glycogen and plasma insulin. These substances further alleviated the histopathological changes in the pancreas of the diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of high-dose alkylamides showed a comparable activity to the anti-diabetic drug glibenclamide. Western blot and real-time PCR results revealed that the alkylamide treatment significantly decreased the expression levels of the key enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate caboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) involved in gluconeogenesis and increased the glycolysis enzyme (glucokinase) in the liver, and enhanced the expression levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase, and glucose transporter 2 in the pancreas. In addition, it was also observed that the alkylamides, unlike glibenclamide, increased the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 and decreased cannabinoid receptor 1 expressions in the liver and pancreas. Therefore, alkylamides can prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia by altering the expression levels of the genes related to glucose metabolism and by ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction.

  2. Endocrine dysfunction in anorexia nervosa and bulimia: comparison with abnormalities in other psychiatric disorders and disturbances due to metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J I; Hudson, M S

    1984-01-01

    The eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia are associated with marked disturbances in endocrine function. Studies of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal,-thyroid, and -ovarian axes are reviewed, in order to ascertain whether and to what extent alteration in endocrine response is the consequence of abnormal eating, or whether the endocrine abnormalities are primary. Many, if not all, of the disturbances which have been documented can be accounted for the metabolic consequences of disturbed eating behavior, including especially the effects of weight loss. However, it is possible that primary hypothalamic dysfunction may account for or contribute to the following abnormalities: hypercortisolism, blunted TSH response to TRH, and hypogonadism. Given the possibility that primary hypothalamic disturbances are present, the specificity of these disturbances with respect to eating disorders as opposed to other psychiatric disorders, is investigated. It is concluded that, with the possible exception of alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, such disturbances appear not to be specific to eating disorders; rather, they are also present in other psychiatric disorders. In particular, the data reviewed are consistent with the hypothesis that the eating disorders have psychobiological features in common with major affective disorder.

  3. Ubc13 haploinsufficiency protects against age-related insulin resistance and high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Erina; Fukushima, Toru; Harada, Norio; Reed, John C.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation that leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes via Toll-like Receptor (TLR) and TNF-family cytokine receptor (TNFR) signaling pathways. Ubc13 is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme responsible for non-canonical K63-linked polyubiquitination of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-family adapter proteins involved in TLR and TNFR pathways. However, the relationship between Ubc13 and metabolic disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Ubc13 in insulin resistance and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We compared wild-type (WT) and Ubc13 haploinsufficient (ubc13+/−) mice under normal diet (ND) and HFD, since homozygous knockout mice (ubc13−/−) are embryonic lethal. Male and female ubc13+/− mice were protected against age-related insulin resistance under ND and HFD compared to WT mice. Interestingly, only female ubc13+/− mice were protected against HFD-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. Moreover, only female HFD-fed ubc13+/− mice showed lower expression of inflammatory cytokines that was secondary to reduction in weight gain not present in the other groups. In summary, our results indicate that suppression of Ubc13 activity may play a metabolic role independent of its inflammatory function. Thus, Ubc13 could represent a therapeutic target for insulin resistance, diet-induced obesity, and associated metabolic dysfunctions. PMID:27796312

  4. Neuroadrenergic dysfunction along the diabetes continuum: a comparative study in obese metabolic syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Sari, Carolina I; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Nestel, Paul J; Esler, Murray D; Dixon, John B; Chopra, Reena; Tilbrook, Alan J; Schlaich, Markus P; Lambert, Gavin W

    2012-10-01

    Neuroadrenergic function in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients without neuropathy is poorly characterized. We therefore compared sympathetic nervous system activity at rest and during an oral glucose tolerance test in obese metabolic syndrome (MetS) subjects classified as glucose intolerant (impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]; n = 17) or treatment-naive T2D (n = 17). Untreated subjects, matched for age (mean 59 ± 1 year), sex, BMI (32.4 ± 0.6 kg/m(2)), and family history of diabetes were studied. We measured resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) by microneurography, whole-body norepinephrine kinetics by isotope dilution, insulin sensitivity by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (steady-state glucose utilization adjusted for fat-free mass and steady-state insulin concentration [M/I]), and MetS components. T2D subjects had higher resting MSNA burst incidence (67 ± 4 versus 55 ± 3 bursts per 100 heartbeats; P = 0.05) and arterial norepinephrine levels (264 ± 33 versus 167 ± 16 pg/mL; P = 0.02), lower plasma norepinephrine clearance (by 17%; P = 0.03), and reduced neuronal reuptake compared with IGT subjects (by 46%; P = 0.04). Moreover, norepinephrine spillover responses to glucose ingestion were blunted in T2D subjects. The M/I value independently predicted whole-body norepinephrine spillover (r = -0.47; P = 0.008), whereas fasting insulin level related to neuronal norepinephrine reuptake (r = -0.35, P = 0.047). These findings demonstrate that progression to T2D is associated with increased central sympathetic drive, blunted sympathetic responsiveness, and altered norepinephrine disposition.

  5. Long-term methionine-diet induced mild hyperhomocysteinemia associated cardiac metabolic dysfunction in multiparous rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Ojaimi, Caroline; Martin-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kandhi, Sharath; Wolin, Michael; Hintze, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, clinically defined as less than 30 μmol/L) is an independent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, and is associated with many complications during pregnancy, such as preeclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of long-term mild HHcy on cardiac metabolic function of multiparous rats. Female rats were mated 3 to 4 times and were fed with methionine in drinking water to increase plasma Hcy (2.9 ± 0.3 to 10.5 ± 2.3 μmol/L) until termination. This caused significant increase of heart weight/body weight (0.24 ± 0.01 to 0.27 ± 0.01 g/100 g) and left ventricle weight (0.69 ± 0.03 to 0.78 ± 0.01 g). Superoxide production was increased by 2.5-fold in HHcy hearts using lucigenin chemiluminescence. The ability of bradykinin and carbachol to regulate myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) in vitro was impaired by 59% and 66% in HHcy heart, and it was restored by ascorbic acid (AA), tempol, or apocynin (Apo). Protein expression of p22phox subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase was increased by 2.6-fold, but there were no changes in other NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOSs or SODs. Microarray revealed 1518 genes to be differentially regulated (P < 0.05). The mRNA level of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOSs or SODs remained unchanged. In conclusion, long-term mild HHcy increases cardiac superoxide mainly through regulation of p22phox component of the NAD(P)H oxidase and impairs the ability of NO to regulate MVO2 in heart of multiparous mothers. PMID:26009634

  6. Prevalence of Pituitary Hormone Dysfunction, Metabolic Syndrome, and Impaired Quality of Life in Retired Professional Football Players: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J.; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C.J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30–65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and

  7. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  8. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive. PMID:20623902

  9. [Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Brandl, C; Stark, K J; Wintergerst, M; Heinemann, M; Heid, I M; Finger, R P

    2016-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of blindness in industrialized societies. Population-based epidemiological investigations generate important data on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and future trends. This review summarizes the most important epidemiological studies on AMD with a focus on their transferability to Germany including existing evidence for the main risk factors for AMD development and progression. Future tasks, such as the standardization of grading systems and the use of recent retinal imaging technology in epidemiological studies are discussed. In Germany, epidemiological data on AMD are scarce. However, the need for epidemiological research in ophthalmology is currently being addressed by several recently started population-based studies. PMID:27541733

  10. Inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ema; Campbell, Matthew; Kiang, Anna-Sophia; Humphries, Marian; Doyle, Sarah L; Humphries, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness in elderly individuals in the developed world, affecting 30-50 million people worldwide. AMD primarily affects the macular region of the retina that is responsible for the majority of central, color and daytime vision. The presence of drusen, extracellular protein aggregates that accumulate under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a major pathological hallmark in the early stages of the disease. The end stage 'dry' and 'wet' forms of the disease culminate in vision loss and are characterized by focal degeneration of the RPE and cone photoreceptors, and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), respectively. Being a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease, the pathophysiology of AMD remains unclear, yet, there is ample evidence supporting immunological and inflammatory processes. Here, we review the recent literature implicating some of these immune processes in human AMD and in animal models. PMID:24664703

  11. Consequences of Age-Related Cognitive Declines

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adult age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities are well documented, and many of those abilities have been found to be related to success in the workplace and in everyday life. However, increased age is seldom associated with lower levels of real-world functioning, and the reasons for this lab-life discrepancy are not well understood. This article briefly reviews research concerned with relations of age to cognition, relations of cognition to successful functioning outside the laboratory, and relations of age to measures of work performance and achievement. The final section discusses several possible explanations for why there are often little or no consequences of age-related cognitive declines in everyday functioning. PMID:21740223

  12. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques M; Schloendorn, John; Rittmann, Bruce E; Alvarez, Pedro JJ

    2009-01-01

    Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods. PMID:19358742

  13. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  14. The Potential of Chitosan and Its Derivatives in Prevention and Treatment of Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kerch, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Age-related, diet-related and protein conformational diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases are common in the elderly population. The potential of chitosan, chitooligosaccharides and their derivatives in prevention and treatment of age-related dysfunctions is reviewed and discussed in this paper. The influence of oxidative stress, low density lipoprotein oxidation, increase of tissue stiffness, protein conformational changes, aging-associated chronic inflammation and their pathobiological significance have been considered. The chitosan-based functional food also has been reviewed. PMID:25871293

  15. The potential of chitosan and its derivatives in prevention and treatment of age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kerch, Garry

    2015-04-01

    Age-related, diet-related and protein conformational diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases are common in the elderly population. The potential of chitosan, chitooligosaccharides and their derivatives in prevention and treatment of age-related dysfunctions is reviewed and discussed in this paper. The influence of oxidative stress, low density lipoprotein oxidation, increase of tissue stiffness, protein conformational changes, aging-associated chronic inflammation and their pathobiological significance have been considered. The chitosan-based functional food also has been reviewed.

  16. Long noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the universal, intrinsic, genetically-controlled, evolutionarily-conserved and time-dependent intricate biological process characterised by the cumulative decline in the physiological functions and their coordination in an organism after the attainment of adulthood resulting in the imbalance of neurological, immunological and metabolic functions of the body. Various biological processes and mechanisms along with altered levels of mRNAs and proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of aging. It is one of the major risk factors in the patho-physiology of various diseases and disorders. Recently, the discovery of pervasive transcription of a vast pool of heterogeneous regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including small ncRNAs (sncRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), in the mammalian genome have provided an alternative way to study and explore the missing links in the aging process, its mechanism(s) and related diseases in a whole new dimension. The involvement of small noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases have been extensively studied and recently reviewed. However, lncRNAs, whose function is far less explored in relation to aging, have emerged as a class of major regulators of genomic functions. Here, we have described some examples of known as well as novel lncRNAs that have been implicated in the progression of the aging process and age-related diseases. This may further stimulate research on noncoding RNAs and the aging process.

  17. Long noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the universal, intrinsic, genetically-controlled, evolutionarily-conserved and time-dependent intricate biological process characterised by the cumulative decline in the physiological functions and their coordination in an organism after the attainment of adulthood resulting in the imbalance of neurological, immunological and metabolic functions of the body. Various biological processes and mechanisms along with altered levels of mRNAs and proteins have been reported to be involved in the progression of aging. It is one of the major risk factors in the patho-physiology of various diseases and disorders. Recently, the discovery of pervasive transcription of a vast pool of heterogeneous regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including small ncRNAs (sncRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), in the mammalian genome have provided an alternative way to study and explore the missing links in the aging process, its mechanism(s) and related diseases in a whole new dimension. The involvement of small noncoding RNAs in aging and age-related diseases have been extensively studied and recently reviewed. However, lncRNAs, whose function is far less explored in relation to aging, have emerged as a class of major regulators of genomic functions. Here, we have described some examples of known as well as novel lncRNAs that have been implicated in the progression of the aging process and age-related diseases. This may further stimulate research on noncoding RNAs and the aging process. PMID:26655093

  18. Curcumin, inflammation, ageing and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Sikora, E; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Mario

    2010-01-17

    A Symposium regarding the Pathophysiology of Successful and Unsuccessful Ageing was held in Palermo, Italy between April 7 and 8th 2009. Here the lecture by Sikora with some input from the chairpersons Scapagnini and Barbagallo is summarized. Ageing is manifested by the decreasing health status and increasing probability to acquire age-related disease such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic disorders and others. They are likely caused by low grade inflammation driven by oxygen stress and manifested by the increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, encoded by genes activated by the transcription factor NF-kappaB. It is believed that ageing is plastic and can be slowed down by caloric restriction as well as by some nutraceuticals. Accordingly, slowing down ageing and postponing the onset of age-related diseases might be achieved by blocking the NF-kappaB-dependent inflammation. In this review we consider the possibility of the spice curcumin, a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent possibly capable of improving the health status of the elderly.

  19. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Armanios, Mary; de Cabo, Rafael; Mannick, Joan; Partridge, Linda; van Deursen, Jan; Villeda, Saul

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine.

  20. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Armanios, Mary; de Cabo, Rafael; Mannick, Joan; Partridge, Linda; van Deursen, Jan; Villeda, Saul

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine. PMID:26646495

  1. Aging, frailty and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Fulop, T; Larbi, A; Witkowski, J M; McElhaney, J; Loeb, M; Mitnitski, A; Pawelec, G

    2010-10-01

    The concept of frailty as a medically distinct syndrome has evolved based on the clinical experience of geriatricians and is clinically well recognizable. Frailty is a nonspecific state of vulnerability, which reflects multisystem physiological change. These changes underlying frailty do not always achieve disease status, so some people, usually very elderly, are frail without a specific life threatening illness. Current thinking is that not only physical but also psychological, cognitive and social factors contribute to this syndrome and need to be taken into account in its definition and treatment. Together, these signs and symptoms seem to reflect a reduced functional reserve and consequent decrease in adaptation (resilience) to any sort of stressor and perhaps even in the absence of extrinsic stressors. The overall consequence is that frail elderly are at higher risk for accelerated physical and cognitive decline, disability and death. All these characteristics associated with frailty can easily be applied to the definition and characterization of the aging process per se and there is little consensus in the literature concerning the physiological/biological pathways associated with or determining frailty. It is probably true to say that a consensus view would implicate heightened chronic systemic inflammation as a major contributor to frailty. This review will focus on the relationship between aging, frailty and age-related diseases, and will highlight possible interventions to reduce the occurrence and effects of frailty in elderly people. PMID:20559726

  2. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  3. Mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Fowler, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a progressive condition that is untreatable in up to 90% of patients, is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. The two forms of AMD, wet and dry, are classified based on the presence or absence of blood vessels that have disruptively invaded the retina, respectively. A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying wet AMD has led to several robust FDA-approved therapies. In contrast, there are not any approved treatments for dry AMD. In this review, we provide insight into the critical effector pathways that mediate each form of disease. The interplay of immune and vascular systems for wet AMD, and the proliferating interest in hunting for gene variants to explain AMD pathogenesis, are placed in the context of the latest clinical and experimental data. Emerging models of dry AMD pathogenesis are presented, with a focus on DICER1 deficit and the toxic accumulation of retinal debris. A recurring theme that spans most aspects of AMD pathogenesis is defective immune modulation in the classically immune-privileged ocular haven. Interestingly, the latest advances in AMD research highlight common molecular disease pathways with other common neurodegenerations. Finally, the therapeutic potential of intervening at known mechanisms of AMD pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:22794258

  4. Age related degradation in operating nuclear plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, R.A.; Davis, J.A.; Banic, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The aging issues being addressed for today`s operating commercial nuclear power plants encompass a wide spectrum of components, complexities, and reasons for concern. Issues include such things as the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals, the degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) Alloy 600 components by primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) to those associated with significant portions of piping systems, such as service water systems. a discussion of the regulatory activity and action associated with the above issues is provided. Proactive NRC/Industry programs for inspection and repair or replacement of affected components are essential for continued operation of these nuclear reactors. These programs are also essential as licensees consider license extensions for their facilities. These plants are licensed for 40 years and can be granted an extension for an additional 20 years of operation if all of the NRC rules and regulations are met. Proper handling of potential age related problems will be a key consideration in the granting of a license extension.

  5. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  6. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms.

  7. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  8. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  9. Age-related carbonyl stress and erythrocyte membrane protein carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Qiong; Xie, Fuxia; Chen, Keke; Liu, Shenglin; Chen, Yaqin; Shi, Wang; Yin, Dazhong

    2010-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) have been widely used as indicators of oxidative stress. However, the associations of carbonyl stress with aging process and biochemical alteration of erythrocyte are still poorly understood. Fresh blood samples in vacutainer tubes containing sodium heparinate were obtained from 874 volunteers who were divided into young, adult and old groups based on their age. Plasma RCS and thiols concentrations between different age groups and erythrocyte membrane protein carbonylation in the adult group were detected within 24h of the blood sampling. Results showed that the plasma thiols concentration decreased gradually during aging process, and the p-values between all three groups are less than 0.05. The plasma RCS concentration in different age groups showed a nonlinear association with age. The levels in the young group were slightly higher than the adult group (not significant) and lower than the old group (p < 0.01). The protein carbonylation of erythrocyte membrane was positively correlated with plasma RCS concentration (p < 0.01), but not plasma thiols concentration. We conclude that higher levels of RCS, not lower levels of thiols, in plasma are a direct risk factor for the protein carbonylation of erythrocyte membrane. Owing to the decrease of thiols levels and increase of RCS levels during aging process, a shift from RCS-related redox allostasis to carbonyl stress would contribute to age-related biological dysfunction and even aging process.

  10. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Shibata, R; Ouchi, N; Kondo, K; Ishii, M; Katahira, N; Kambara, T; Inoue, Y; Takahashi, R; Ikeda, N; Kihara, S; Ueda, H; Murohara, T

    2014-04-24

    Obesity-related disorders are closely associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Adiponectin (APN) exerts protective effects against obesity-related conditions including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the impact of APN on ARHI. APN-knockout (APN-KO) mice developed exacerbation of hearing impairment, particularly in the high frequency range, compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Supplementation with APN prevented the hearing impairment in APN-KO mice. At 2 months of age, the cochlear blood flow and capillary density of the stria vascularis (SV) were significantly reduced in APN-KO mice as compared with WT mice. APN-KO mice also showed a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells in the organ of Corti in the cochlea at 2 months of age. At the age of 6 months, hair cells were lost at the organ of Corti in APN-KO mice. In cultured auditory HEI-OC1 cells, APN reduced apoptotic activity under hypoxic conditions. Clinically, plasma APN levels were significantly lower in humans with ARHI. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified APN as a significant and independent predictor of ARHI. Our observations indicate that APN has an important role in preventing ARHI.

  11. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yea Eun; Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  12. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A.; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  13. Association of Age Related Macular Degeneration and Age Related Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourakbari, Malihe Shahidi; Entezari, Morteza; Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and sensory neural hearing impairment (SHI). Methods: In this case-control study, hearing status of 46 consecutive patients with ARMD were compared with 46 age-matched cases without clinical ARMD as a control group. In all patients, retinal involvements were confirmed by clinical examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All participants were examined with an otoscope and underwent audiological tests including pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech reception threshold (SRT), speech discrimination score (SDS), tympanometry, reflex tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results: A significant (P = 0.009) association was present between ARMD, especially with exudative and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) components, and age-related hearing impairment primarily involving high frequencies. Patients had higher SRT and lower SDS against anticipated presbycusis than control subjects. Similar results were detected in exudative, CNV and scar patterns supporting an association between late ARMD with SRT and SDS abnormalities. ABR showed significantly prolonged wave I and IV latency times in ARMD (P = 0.034 and 0.022, respectively). Average latency periods for wave I in geographic atrophy (GA) and CNV, and that for wave IV in drusen patterns of ARMD were significantly higher than controls (P = 0.030, 0.007 and 0.050, respectively). Conclusion: The association between ARMD and age-related SHI may be attributed to common anatomical components such as melanin in these two sensory organs. PMID:27195086

  14. Adipocyte-Specific Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Deficiency Exacerbates Obesity-Induced Brown Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Metabolic Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Rubén; Alexaki, Vasileia I; Qin, Nan; Rubín de Celis, María F; Economopoulou, Matina; Ziogas, Athanasios; Gercken, Bettina; Kotlabova, Klara; Phieler, Julia; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Bornstein, Stefan R; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Breier, Georg; Blüher, Matthias; Hampe, Jochen; El-Armouche, Ali; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-02-01

    Angiogenesis is a central regulator for white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissue adaptation in the course of obesity. Here we show that deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) in adipocytes (by using Fabp4-Cre transgenic mice) but not in myeloid or endothelial cells negatively impacted WAT angiogenesis and promoted WAT inflammation, WAT dysfunction, hepatosteatosis, and systemic insulin resistance in obesity. Importantly, adipocyte HIF2α regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis of obese BAT as well as its thermogenic function. Consistently, obese adipocyte-specific HIF2α-deficient mice displayed BAT dysregulation, associated with reduced levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and a dysfunctional thermogenic response to cold exposure. VEGF administration reversed WAT and BAT inflammation and BAT dysfunction in adipocyte HIF2α-deficient mice. Together, our findings show that adipocyte HIF2α is protective against maladaptation to obesity and metabolic dysregulation by promoting angiogenesis in both WAT and BAT and by counteracting obesity-mediated BAT dysfunction. PMID:26572826

  15. Adipocyte-Specific Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Deficiency Exacerbates Obesity-Induced Brown Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Metabolic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Alexaki, Vasileia I.; Qin, Nan; Rubín de Celis, María F.; Economopoulou, Matina; Ziogas, Athanasios; Gercken, Bettina; Kotlabova, Klara; Phieler, Julia; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Breier, Georg; Blüher, Matthias; Hampe, Jochen; El-Armouche, Ali; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Chung, Kyoung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a central regulator for white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissue adaptation in the course of obesity. Here we show that deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) in adipocytes (by using Fabp4-Cre transgenic mice) but not in myeloid or endothelial cells negatively impacted WAT angiogenesis and promoted WAT inflammation, WAT dysfunction, hepatosteatosis, and systemic insulin resistance in obesity. Importantly, adipocyte HIF2α regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis of obese BAT as well as its thermogenic function. Consistently, obese adipocyte-specific HIF2α-deficient mice displayed BAT dysregulation, associated with reduced levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and a dysfunctional thermogenic response to cold exposure. VEGF administration reversed WAT and BAT inflammation and BAT dysfunction in adipocyte HIF2α-deficient mice. Together, our findings show that adipocyte HIF2α is protective against maladaptation to obesity and metabolic dysregulation by promoting angiogenesis in both WAT and BAT and by counteracting obesity-mediated BAT dysfunction. PMID:26572826

  16. Age-Related Changes in the Misinformation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Rachel; Hayne, Harlene

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined relation between age-related changes in retention and age-related changes in the misinformation effect. Found large age-related retention differences when participants were interviewed immediately and after 1 day, but after 6 weeks, differences were minimal. Exposure to misleading information increased commission errors.…

  17. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  18. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  19. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  20. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Adult Risk Factors for Age-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Andrea; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Harrington, HonaLee; Milne, Barry J.; Polanczyk, Guilherme; Pariante, Carmine M.; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand why children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences are at elevated risk for age-related disease, such as cardiovascular disease, by testing whether adverse childhood experiences predict enduring abnormalities in stress-sensitive biological systems, namely, the nervous, immune, and endocrine/metabolic systems. Design A 32-year prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Setting New Zealand. Participants A total of 1037 members of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study. Main Exposures During their first decade of life, study members were assessed for exposure to 3 adverse psychosocial experiences: socioeconomic disadvantage, maltreatment, and social isolation. Main Outcome Measures At age 32 years, study members were assessed for the presence of 3 age-related-disease risks: major depression, high inflammation levels (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level >3 mg/L), and the clustering of metabolic risk biomarkers (overweight, high blood pressure, high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high glycated hemoglobin, and low maximum oxygen consumption levels. Results Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences were at elevated risk of depression, high inflammation levels, and clustering of metabolic risk markers. Children who had experienced socioeconomic disadvantage (incidence rate ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–2.62), maltreatment (1.81; 1.38–2.38), or social isolation (1.87; 1.38–2.51) had elevated age-related-disease risks in adulthood. The effects of adverse childhood experiences on age-related-disease risks in adulthood were nonredundant, cumulative, and independent of the influence of established developmental and concurrent risk factors. Conclusions Children exposed to adverse psychosocial experiences have enduring emotional, immune, and metabolic abnormalities that contribute to explaining their elevated risk for age-related disease. The

  1. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  2. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Weight loss is associated with improved endothelial dysfunction via NOX2-generated oxidative stress down-regulation in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Francesco; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Augelletti, Teresa; Carnevale, Roberto; Pacella, Antonio; Albanese, Fabiana; Mancini, Ilaria; Di Santo, Serena; Del Ben, Maria; Violi, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether adherence to a restricted-calorie, Mediterranean-type diet improves endothelial dysfunction and markers of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome. A moderately low-calorie (600 calories/day negative energy balance), low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet (<30% energy from fat, <10% from saturated fat and 55% from carbohydrate) was prescribed to 53 outpatients with the metabolic syndrome. Participants were divided into two groups according to body weight loss > or < 5% after 6 months. Group A (n = 23) showed a remarkable decrease in body weight (-6.8%), body-mass-index (-4.6%), waist circumference (-4.8%), HOMA-IR (-27.2%), plasma glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, total and LDL-cholesterol, blood pressure, serum NOX2 (the catalytic core of NADPH oxidase) (-22.2%) and urinary8-isoprostanes (-39.0%) and an increase of serum NOx (Nitrite/Nitrate) (+116.8%) and adiponectine (+125.5%) as compared with those in group B (n = 30). A statistically significant increase in brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation was observed in group A (+24.7%; p < 0.001), while no changes were present in group B. Variations of flow-mediated dilatation were statistically and negatively correlated with changes of serum NOX2 levels (p = 0.04), body-mass-index (p < 0.01), waist circumference (0.01), glycosylated haemoglobin (p < 0.01), LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.01) and triglycerides (p < 0.05) and positively correlated with changes of serum NOx (p < 0.001) and adiponectin (p = 0.01). The results show that moderate weight loss is able to improve endothelial dysfunction in patients with the metabolic syndrome. The coexistent decrease of NOX2 activation suggests a role for oxidative stress in eliciting artery dysfunction.

  4. Age-related consequences of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zaepfel, Alysia; Bjornstad, Petter; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2014-01-01

    The severity and frequency of childhood obesity has increased significantly over the past three to four decades. The health effects of increased body mass index as a child may significantly impact obese youth as they age. However, many of the long-term outcomes of childhood obesity have yet to be studied. This article examines the currently available longitudinal data evaluating the effects of childhood obesity on adult outcomes. Consequences of obesity include an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and its associated retinal and renal complications, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnea, polycystic ovarian syndrome, infertility, asthma, orthopedic complications, psychiatric disease, and increased rates of cancer, among others. These disorders can start as early as childhood, and such early onset increases the likelihood of early morbidity and mortality. Being obese as a child also increases the likelihood of being obese as an adult, and obesity in adulthood also leads to obesity-related complications. This review outlines the evidence for childhood obesity as a predictor of adult obesity and obesity-related disorders, thereby emphasizing the importance of early intervention to prevent the onset of obesity in childhood. PMID:24434909

  5. Age-related consequences of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zaepfel, Alysia; Bjornstad, Petter; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2014-01-01

    The severity and frequency of childhood obesity has increased significantly over the past three to four decades. The health effects of increased body mass index as a child may significantly impact obese youth as they age. However, many of the long-term outcomes of childhood obesity have yet to be studied. This article examines the currently available longitudinal data evaluating the effects of childhood obesity on adult outcomes. Consequences of obesity include an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and its associated retinal and renal complications, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obstructive sleep apnea, polycystic ovarian syndrome, infertility, asthma, orthopedic complications, psychiatric disease, and increased rates of cancer, among others. These disorders can start as early as childhood, and such early onset increases the likelihood of early morbidity and mortality. Being obese as a child also increases the likelihood of being obese as an adult, and obesity in adulthood also leads to obesity-related complications. This review outlines the evidence for childhood obesity as a predictor of adult obesity and obesity-related disorders, thereby emphasizing the importance of early intervention to prevent the onset of obesity in childhood.

  6. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  7. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  8. Executive Functioning and Processing Speed in Age-Related Differences in Memory: Contribution of a Coding Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Alexia; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Isingrini, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine executive dysfunctioning and decreased processing speed as potential mediators of age-related differences in episodic memory. We compared the performances of young and elderly adults in a free-recall task. Participants were also given tests to measure executive functions and perceptual processing speed…

  9. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  10. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  11. Endocrine causes of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Riggs, B Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Women have an early postmenopausal phase of rapid bone loss that lasts for 5-10 years after menopause, whereas both ageing women and men have a slow continuous phase of bone loss that lasts indefinitely. In women, the rapid phase is mediated mainly by loss of the direct restraining effect of oestrogen on bone cell function, whereas the slow phase is mediated mainly by the loss of oestrogen action on extraskeletal calcium homeostasis leading to net calcium wasting and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Because elderly men have low serum bioavailable oestrogen and testosterone levels, and because recent data suggest that oestrogen is the main sex steroid regulating bone metabolism in men, oestrogen deficiency may also be the principal cause of bone loss in elderly men. Decreased bone formation contributes to bone loss in both genders and may be caused by a decreased production of growth hormone and IGF1 as well as oestrogen and testosterone deficiency. Other changes in endocrine secretion, although present in the elderly, seem less important in the pathophysiology of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis. PMID:11855691

  12. The role of methylglyoxal and the glyoxalase system in diabetes and other age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Maessen, Dionne E M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2015-06-01

    The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are related to diabetes and other age-related diseases. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound, is the major precursor in the formation of AGEs. MGO is mainly formed as a byproduct of glycolysis. Under physiological circumstances, MGO is detoxified by the glyoxalase system into D-lactate, with glyoxalase I (GLO1) as the key enzyme in the anti-glycation defence. New insights indicate that increased levels of MGO and the major MGO-derived AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1), and dysfunctioning of the glyoxalase system are linked to several age-related health problems, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and disorders of the central nervous system. The present review summarizes the mechanisms through which MGO is formed, its detoxification by the glyoxalase system and its effect on biochemical pathways in relation to the development of age-related diseases. Although several scavengers of MGO have been developed over the years, therapies to treat MGO-associated complications are not yet available for application in clinical practice. Small bioactive inducers of GLO1 can potentially form the basis for new treatment strategies for age-related disorders in which MGO plays a pivotal role.

  13. Pentosidine Accumulation in Human Oocytes and Their Correlation to Age-Related Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Matsumine, Miki; Shibata, Noriyuki; Ishitani, Ken; Kobayashi, Makio; Ohta, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Age-related atresia of ovarian follicles is characterized by apoptosis of the constituent cells. Recent studies have indicated that dysfunction of the proteasome and endoplasmic reticulum and subsequent apoptosis in the presence of oxidative stress have relevance to aging. The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of these processes in age-related follicular atresia. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of ovaries obtained at surgery from 74 women (age: 21–54 y) were examined with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated, dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method and an immunohistochemical technique. Primary antibodies used in immunohistochemistry were against pentosidine, ubiquitin and caspase 12. Histological localization of these substances in oocytes was observed by light microscopy, and labeling indices of these cells were evaluated by regression analysis. Positive signals for pentosidine, ubiquitin, caspase 12, and TUNEL were detectable in oocytes of the primordial, primary and their atretic follicles. Regression analysis revealed an age-related increase in the labeling indices for pentosidine, ubiquitin, caspase 12, and TUNEL. These results suggest that pentosidine accumulation in human oocytes is related to apoptosis and increases with age. Further studies will be necessary to clarify the involvement of pentosidine accumulation, proteasome inhibition, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in age-related apoptosis of oocytes in human ovaries. PMID:18787640

  14. Identification of hibernating myocardium: a comparison between dobutamine echocardiography and study of perfusion and metabolism in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mariani, M A; Palagi, C; Donatelli, F; Mengozzi, G; Biadi, O; Vanoli, G; Landoni, C; Paolini, G; Lucignani, G; Fazio, F

    1995-01-01

    The distinction between fibrotic and viable myocardium is a key issue in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and labeled tracers, along with the study of myocardial perfusion, is now available to identify hibernating myocardium. However, PET imaging of myocardial metabolism is a high-cost and time-consuming technique, and requires an on-site cyclotron. The aim of this study is to test the reliability of dobutamine echocardiography (DE) compared with PET imaging, for the identification of hibernating myocardium. In 16 patients, scheduled for myocardial revascularization, left ventricular shapes were divided in eight segments both for echocardiographic and nuclear study evaluation. All patients underwent a technetium 99m MIBI single-photon emission tomography stress-rest study of perfusion, a fluorine-18-labeled deoxyglucose (FDG(/PET study of metabolism, and a DE test (baseline, at a 5 micrograms/kg/min infusion of dobutamine for 8 minutes and at a 10 micrograms/kg/min dose for additional 8 minutes). Neither myocardial ischemia nor arrhythmia occurred during the DE test. Baseline echocardiograms showed 90 segments with wall motion abnormalities: wall motion impairment was decreased or reversed in 33 of 90 segments; it remained unchanged in 57 of 90 segments. In 32 of 33 segments considered viable on the basis of DE and in 21 of 57 segments with unchanged kinesis, some degree of FDG was detected. Thus, sensitivity and specificity of DE compared with nuclear studies was 60% and 97% respectively. Moreover, a good correlation and agreement (kappa = 0.51) between DE and the presence of FDG were found. We conclude that DE is a safe and reliable test for the screening of hibernating myocardium in patients with chronic coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. PMID:26572116

  16. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index.

  17. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Loss Disturbs Intracellular Redox Signaling, Resulting in Global Age-Related Pathological Changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which occur in a progressive and irreversible manner. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) serves as a major antioxidant and neutralizes superoxide radicals throughout the body. In vivo studies have demonstrated that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/−) mice show various aging-like pathologies, accompanied by augmentation of oxidative damage in organs. We found that antioxidant treatment significantly attenuated the age-related tissue changes and oxidative damage-associated p53 upregulation in Sod1−/− mice. This review will focus on various age-related pathologies caused by the loss of Sod1 and will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in Sod1−/− mice. PMID:25276767

  18. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  19. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan.

  20. Slowing Down: Age-Related Neurobiological Predictors of Processing Speed

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-related cognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed – dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging. PMID:21441995

  1. Age-related alterations in retinal neurovascular and inflammatory transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Van Kirk, Colleen A.; VanGuilder, Heather D.; Young, Megan; Farley, Julie A.; Sonntag, William E.

    2011-01-01

    factor [Pedf]) displayed patterns of expression dissimilar to that previously demonstrated with diabetes. Conclusions The commonalities in retinal age-related and diabetes-induced molecular alterations provide support for the hypothesis that diabetes and aging engage some common para-inflammatory processes. However, these results also demonstrate that while the retinal genomic response to diabetes and aging share commonalities, they are not superimposable phenotypes. The observed changes in retinal gene expression provide further evidence of retinal alterations in neurovascular and inflammatory processes across the adult rat lifespan; this is indicative of para-inflammation that may contribute to the functional impairments that occur with advanced age. The data also suggest the potential for an additive effect of aging and diabetes in the development of diabetic complications. PMID:21633715

  2. Targeting tissue-specific metabolic signaling pathways in aging: the promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that most of the age-related diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis are all closely related to metabolic dysfunction. On the other hand, interventions on metabolism such as calorie restriction or genetic manipulations of key metabolic signaling pathways such as the insulin and mTOR signaling pathways slow down the aging process and improve healthy aging. These findings raise an important question as to whether improving energy homeostasis by targeting certain metabolic signaling pathways in specific tissues could be an effective anti-aging strategy. With a more comprehensive understanding of the tissue-specific roles of distinct metabolic signaling pathways controlling energy homeostasis and the cross-talks between these pathways during aging may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions not only for metabolic dysfunction but also for aging.

  3. Glycolysis in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yokosako, Kanako; Mimura, Tatsuya; Funatsu, Hideharu; Noma, Hidetaka; Goto, Mari; Kamei, Yuko; Kondo, Aki; Matsubara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Retinal adenosine triphosphate is mainly produced via glycolysis, so inhibition of glycolysis may promote the onset and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). When glycolysis is inhibited, pyruvate is metabolized by lactic acid fermentation instead of entering the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We measured urinary pyruvate and lactate levels in patients with AMD. Methods: Eight patients with typical AMD (tAMD group) and 9 patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV group) were enrolled. Urinary levels of pyruvate, lactate, α-hydroxybutyrate, and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured in all patients. Results: The mean urinary levels of pyruvate and lactate were 8.0 ± 2.8 and 7.5 ± 8.3 μg/mg creatinine (reference values: 0.5-6.6 and 0.0-1.6), respectively, with the mean increase over the reference value being 83.6 ± 51.1% and 426.5 ± 527.8%, respectively. In 12 patients (70.6%), the lactate/pyruvate ratio was above the reference range. Urinary levels of α-hydroxybutyrate and β-hydroxybutyrate were decreased by -31.9 ± 15.2% and -33.1 ± 17.5% compared with the mean reference values. There were no significant differences of any of these glycolysis metabolites between the tAMD and PCV groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that none of the variables tested, including patient background factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, alcohol, smoking, visual acuity, and AMD phenotype), were significantly associated with the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Conclusion: A high lactate/pyruvate ratio is a well-known marker of mitochondrial impairment, and it indicates poor oxidative function in AMD. Our results suggest that increased lactate levels may be implicated in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25191529

  4. Age-Related Impairment of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function: Pathophysiological and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes significantly increases with age. The relevance of this association is dramatically magnified by the concomitant global aging of the population, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, some recent advances in this field are reviewed at the level of both the pathophysiology of glucose homeostasis and the cellular senescence of pancreatic islets. Overall, recent results highlight the crucial role of beta-cell dysfunction in the age-related impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and delineate the possibility of new original therapeutic interventions. PMID:25232350

  5. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M.; Nocera, Joe R.; Drucker, Jonathan H.; Tran, Stella M.; Butler, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered. PMID:26074807

  6. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  7. Transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein exhibit early metabolic deficits and a pathologically low leptin state associated with hypothalamic dysfunction in arcuate neuropeptide Y neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P; Iadecola, Costantino

    2014-07-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ.

  8. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  9. Nutrient-Induced Inflammation in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Role in the Development of Metabolic Aberration and Ovarian Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    González, Frank

    2015-07-01

    A pathophysiology paradigm shift has emerged with the discovery that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a proinflammatory state. Despite the dogma that the compensatory hyperinsulinemia of insulin resistance is the promoter of hyperandrogenism, physiological insulin infusion has no effect on androgen levels in PCOS. The dogma also does not explain the cause of hyperandrogenism and ovarian dysfunction in the 30 to 50% of women with PCOS who are of normal weight and lack insulin resistance. Inflammation is the underpinning of insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes, and may also be the cause of insulin resistance when present in PCOS. The origin of inflammation in PCOS has been ascribed to excess abdominal adiposity or frank obesity. However, nutrients such as glucose and saturated fat can incite inflammation from circulating mononuclear cells (MNC) of women with PCOS independent of excess adiposity and insulin resistance, and can also promote atherogenesis. Hyperandrogenism activates MNC in the fasting state to increase MNC sensitivity to nutrients, and is a potential mechanism for initiating inflammation in PCOS. However, chronic ovarian androgen suppression does not reduce inflammation in normal-weight women with PCOS. Direct exposure of ovarian theca cells to proinflammatory stimuli in vitro increases androgen production. These findings may be corroborated in vivo with anti-inflammatory therapy to normal-weight insulin-sensitive women with PCOS without abdominal adiposity to observe for amelioration of ovarian dysfunction.

  10. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  11. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  12. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  13. New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161359.html New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss Older people's brains have a ... the brain's ability to process speech declines with age. For the study, Alessandro Presacco and colleagues divided ...

  14. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  15. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B; Mishra, Sasmita; Ei-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J; Hill, R Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Housman, David E; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Morrow, Eric M

    2016-09-20

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  16. Age-related motor dysfunction: Manual slowing in Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    PubMed

    Mahovetz, Lindsay M; Stoinski, Tara S

    2015-12-01

    Aging in humans and rhesus monkeys is commonly associated with motor function decrements including dexterity, speed, and strength. Despite their longevity and phylogenetic relatedness to humans, the effects of aging on motor function in non-human apes have been minimally studied. We conducted two experiments with western lowland gorillas (11-54 years of age) to determine whether aged gorillas exhibit motor deficits similar to those seen in other species. In experiment one, gorillas extracted up to 12 food rewards lodged in holes of a Lexan board. Extraction rates were calculated for eight test sessions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed no main effects of session or sex on extraction rate, but a significant main effect of age. Comparisons between the first and last sessions showed that experience significantly improved extraction rates in young but not aged gorillas. In experiment two, gorillas retrieved a hex nut from three differently shaped rods with each hand for a reward. Latencies of retrieval were calculated for 16 test sessions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant main effects of age class, sex, and session. There were significant interactions between session and sex, session and age, and session, sex, and age. These findings held when analyzing each rod shape separately. Post hoc comparisons revealed that young gorillas were significantly faster at the task than aged gorillas, and females were faster than males. This finding held only for the question mark shaped rod when analyzing each rod shape separately. Comparisons between the first and last sessions showed that experience did not significantly improve latencies in either age or sex class. The direction of these results are congruent with previous findings in humans and monkeys and suggest that aged gorillas experience deficits in bimanual coordination compared to younger gorillas and that age and sex influence fine motor ability in gorillas.

  17. Age-related motor dysfunction: Manual slowing in Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    PubMed

    Mahovetz, Lindsay M; Stoinski, Tara S

    2015-12-01

    Aging in humans and rhesus monkeys is commonly associated with motor function decrements including dexterity, speed, and strength. Despite their longevity and phylogenetic relatedness to humans, the effects of aging on motor function in non-human apes have been minimally studied. We conducted two experiments with western lowland gorillas (11-54 years of age) to determine whether aged gorillas exhibit motor deficits similar to those seen in other species. In experiment one, gorillas extracted up to 12 food rewards lodged in holes of a Lexan board. Extraction rates were calculated for eight test sessions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed no main effects of session or sex on extraction rate, but a significant main effect of age. Comparisons between the first and last sessions showed that experience significantly improved extraction rates in young but not aged gorillas. In experiment two, gorillas retrieved a hex nut from three differently shaped rods with each hand for a reward. Latencies of retrieval were calculated for 16 test sessions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant main effects of age class, sex, and session. There were significant interactions between session and sex, session and age, and session, sex, and age. These findings held when analyzing each rod shape separately. Post hoc comparisons revealed that young gorillas were significantly faster at the task than aged gorillas, and females were faster than males. This finding held only for the question mark shaped rod when analyzing each rod shape separately. Comparisons between the first and last sessions showed that experience did not significantly improve latencies in either age or sex class. The direction of these results are congruent with previous findings in humans and monkeys and suggest that aged gorillas experience deficits in bimanual coordination compared to younger gorillas and that age and sex influence fine motor ability in gorillas. PMID:26436765

  18. Xanthohumol improves dysfunctional glucose and lipid metabolism in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cristobal L; Elias, Valerie D; Hay, Joshua J; Choi, Jaewoo; Reed, Ralph L; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-06-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a prenylated flavonoid found in hops (Humulus lupulus) and beer. The dose-dependent effects of XN on glucose and lipid metabolism in a preclinical model of metabolic syndrome were the focus of our study. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice, 9 weeks of age, were randomly divided into three XN dose groups of 16 animals. The mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) supplemented with XN at dose levels of 0, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight/day, for 12 weeks. Dietary XN caused a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain. Plasma levels of glucose, total triglycerides, total cholesterol, and MCP-1 were significantly decreased in mice on the 60 mg/kg/day treatment regimen. Treatment with XN at 60 mg/kg/day resulted in reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), IL-6, insulin and leptin levels by 80%, 78%, 42%, and 41%, respectively, compared to the vehicle control group. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin 9 (PCSK-9) levels were 44% lower in the 60 mg/kg dose group compared to the vehicle control group (p ≤ 0.05) which may account for the LDL-C lowering activity of XN. Our results show that oral administration of XN improves markers of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. PMID:26976708

  19. Duration of Type 2 Diabetes and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yogi-Morren, Divya; Galioto, Rachel; Strandjord, Sarah Elizabeth; Kennedy, L.; Manroa, Pooja; Kirwan, John P.; Kashyap, Sangeeta; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now recognized as an independent risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline and neurological conditions like Alzheimer's disease. Less is known about the neurocognitive function of T2D patients with comorbid metabolic syndrome, despite their elevated risk for impairment. Computerized testing in 47 adults with T2D that met criteria for NCEP metabolic syndrome revealed that cognitive impairment was prevalent, including 13% in tests of memory, 50% in attention, and 35% in executive function. Partial correlations showed that longer duration of diabetes was associated with poorer performance on tests of basic attention (r = −0.43), working memory (r = 0.43), and executive function (r = 0.42). Strong associations between very low density lipoprotein and poor cognitive function also emerged, including tests of set shifting (r = 0.47) and cognitive inhibition (r = −0.51). Findings suggest that patients with T2D that meet criteria for metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Prospective studies should look to replicate these findings and examine the possible neuroprotective effects of lipid-lowering medication in this population. PMID:25057411

  20. Interdependencies among Selected Pro-Inflammatory Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, C-Peptide, Anti-Inflammatory Interleukin-10 and Glucose Metabolism Disturbance in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Janowska, Joanna; Chudek, Jerzy; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Semik-Grabarczyk, Elżbieta; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently increasing importance is attributed to the inflammatory process as a crucial factor responsible for the progressive damage to vascular walls and progression of atherosclerosis in obese people. We have studied the relationship between clinical and biochemical parameters and C-peptide and anti-inflammatory IL-10, as well as selected markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction such as: CCL2, CRP, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and E-selectin in obese women with various degree of glucose metabolism disturbance. Material and methods: The studied group consisted of 61 obese women, and 20 normal weight, healthy volunteers. Obese patients were spited in subgroups based on the degree of glucose metabolism disorder. Serum samples were analyzed using ELISA kits. Results: Increased concentrations of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, E-selectin, CCL2 and CRP were found in all obese groups compared to the normal weight subjects. In patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) parameters characterizing the degree of obesity significantly positively correlated with levels of CRP and CCL2. Significant relationships were found between levels of glucose and sICAM-1and also E-selectin and HOMA-IR. C-peptide levels are positively associated with CCL2, E-selectin, triglycerides levels, and inversely with IL-10 levels in newly diagnosed T2DM group (p<0.05). Concentrations of IL-10 correlated negatively with E-selectin, CCL2, C-peptide levels, and HOMA-IR in T2DM group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Disturbed lipid and carbohydrate metabolism are manifested by enhanced inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with simply obesity. These disturbances are associates with an increase of adhesion molecules. The results suggest the probable active participation of higher concentrations of C-peptide in the intensification of inflammatory and atherogenic processes in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, altered serum concentrations of Il-10 seems

  1. The impact of base excision DNA repair in age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Giovana S; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-06-01

    The aging process and several age-related neurodegenerative disorders have been linked to elevated levels of DNA damage induced by ROS and deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms. DNA damage induced by ROS is a byproduct of cellular respiration and accumulation of damage over time, is a fundamental aspect of a main theory of aging. Mitochondria have a pivotal role in generating cellular oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with several diseases. DNA base excision repair is considered the major pathway for repair of oxidized bases in DNA both in the nuclei and in mitochondria, and in neurons this mechanism is particularly important because non-diving cells have limited back-up DNA repair mechanisms. An association between elevated oxidative stress and a decrease in BER is strongly related to the aging process and has special relevance in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the role of DNA repair in aging, focusing on the implications of the DNA base excision repair pathways and how alterations in expression of these DNA repair proteins are related to the aging process and to age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. GSK-3α is a central regulator of age-related pathologies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jibin; Freeman, Theresa A.; Ahmad, Firdos; Shang, Xiying; Mangano, Emily; Gao, Erhe; Farber, John; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Xin-Liang; Woodgett, James; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; Lal, Hind; Force, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aging is regulated by conserved signaling pathways. The glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) family of serine/threonine kinases regulates several of these pathways, but the role of GSK-3 in aging is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate premature death and acceleration of age-related pathologies in the Gsk3a global KO mouse. KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as sarcomere disruption and striking sarcopenia in cardiac and skeletal muscle, a classical finding in aging. We also observed severe vacuolar degeneration of myofibers and large tubular aggregates in skeletal muscle, consistent with impaired clearance of insoluble cellular debris. Other organ systems, including gut, liver, and the skeletal system, also demonstrated age-related pathologies. Mechanistically, we found marked activation of mTORC1 and associated suppression of autophagy markers in KO mice. Loss of GSK-3α, either by pharmacologic inhibition or Gsk3a gene deletion, suppressed autophagy in fibroblasts. mTOR inhibition rescued this effect and reversed the established pathologies in the striated muscle of the KO mouse. Thus, GSK-3α is a critical regulator of mTORC1, autophagy, and aging. In its absence, aging/senescence is accelerated in multiple tissues. Strategies to maintain GSK-3α activity and/or inhibit mTOR in the elderly could retard the appearance of age-related pathologies. PMID:23549082

  3. Lack of Acid Sphingomyelinase Induces Age-Related Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Fan, Jie; Boyer, Nicholas P.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Koutalos, Yiannis; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cause Niemann–Pick diseases type A and B, which are fatal inherited lipid lysosomal storage diseases, characterized with visceral organ abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, the effects of suppressing retinal ASMase expression are not understood. The goal of this study was to determine if the disruption of ASMase expression impacts the retinal structure and function in the mouse, and begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. Methods Acid sphingomyelinase knockout (ASMase KO) mice were utilized to study the roles of this sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme in the retina. Electroretinogram and morphometric analysis were used to assess the retinal function and structure at various ages. Sphingolipid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blots evaluated the level of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Results When compared to control animals, ASMase KO mice exhibited significant age-dependent reduction in ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Associated with these functional deficits, morphometric analysis revealed progressive thinning of retinal layers; however, the most prominent degeneration was observed in the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. Additional analyses of ASMase KO mice revealed early reduction in ERG c-wave amplitudes and increased lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Sphingolipid analyses showed abnormal accumulation of sphingomyelin and sphingosine in ASMase KO retinas. Western blot analyses showed a higher level of the autophagosome marker LC3-II. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that ASMase is necessary for the maintenance of normal retinal structure and function. The early outer retinal dysfunction, outer segment degeneration, accumulation of lipofuscin and autophagosome markers provide evidence that disruption of lysosomal function contributes to the age-dependent retinal degeneration exhibited by

  4. [The relationship between the polymorphism of immunity genes and both aging and age-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qing-Wei; Yu, Zhuo-Wei; Bao, Zhi-Jun; Ma, Yong-Xing

    2013-07-01

    Aging is acommon, progressive and irreversible state of multi-cell dysfunction. Immune aging mainly includes the declines of regenerative capacity and lymphoid lineage differentiation potential, the hyporesponsive to infection and vaccination, the hyperresponsive in the context of inflammatory pathology, and the increased risk of autoimmunity. The dysfunction of aged immune system accelerates the occurrence of aging and age-related diseases. The mutation of immunity genes that affect immune responses accelerates or slows aging process and age-related diseases. The frequencies of acquired immunity genes, such as immune protective HLA II DRB1*11 and DRB*16-associated haplotype, are increased in the longevity populations. The increased susceptibility of immune inflammatory response, morbidity and mortality in the elderly is often associated with decreased frequencies of anti-inflammatory factor IL-10 -1082G allele, TNF-β1 haplotype cnd10T/C, cnd25G/G, -988C/C, -800G/A, low proinflammatory fator TNFa level related extended TNF-A genotype -1031C/C, -863C/A, -857C/C, IL-6-174 CC and IFN-γ+874 T allele as well. The innate immunity genes, such as highly expressed anti-inflammatory +896 G KIR4 allele, CCR5Δ32 variant, -765 C Cox-2 allele, -1708 G and 21 C 5-Lox alleles are detected in centenarians. In age-related diseases, a higher CMV-specific IgG antibody level in elderly individuals is associated with a decreased frequency of KIR haplotypes KIR2DS5 and A1B10 and an increased frequency of MBL2 haplotypes LYPB, LYQC and HYPD that result in the absence of MBL2 protein. The increased frequencies of CRP ATG haplotypes and CFH 402 His allele indicate high mortality in the elderly. In the present study, we review the advances in the polymorphism and haplotype of innate and adoptive immunity genes, and their association with both aging and age-related diseases. To strengthen the analysis of extended haplotypes, epigenetic studies of immunity genes and genetic study of

  5. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  6. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  7. An Ethanolic Extract of Lindera obtusiloba Stems, YJP-14, Improves Endothelial Dysfunction, Metabolic Parameters and Physical Performance in Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ok; Auger, Cyril; Park, Dong Hyun; Kang, Moonkyu; Oak, Min-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Rak; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2013-01-01

    Lindera obtusiloba is a medicinal herb traditionally used in Asia for improvement of blood circulation, treatment of inflammation, and prevention of liver damage. A previous study has shown that an ethanolic extract of Lindera obtusiloba stems (LOE) has vasoprotective and antihypertensive effects. The possibility that Lindera obtusiloba improves endothelial function and metabolic parameters in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains to be examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the potential of LOE to prevent the development of an endothelial dysfunction, and improve metabolic parameters including hyperglycemia, albuminuria and physical exercise capacity in db/db mice, an experimental model of T2DM. The effect of LOE (100 mg/kg/day by gavage for 8 weeks) on these parameters was compared to that of an oral antidiabetic drug, pioglitazone (30 mg/kg/day by gavage). Reduced blood glucose level, body weight and albumin-creatinine ratio were observed in the group receiving LOE compared to the control db/db group. The LOE treatment improved endothelium-dependent relaxations, abolished endothelium-dependent contractions to acetylcholine in the aorta, and normalized the increased vascular oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase, cyclooxygenases, angiotensin II, angiotensin type 1 receptors and peroxynitrite and the decreased expression of endothelial NO synthase in db/db mice. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was reduced in the LOE group compared to that in the control db/db group. LOE also inhibited the activity of purified ACE, COX-1 and COX-2 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LOE improved physical exercise capacity. Thus, the present findings indicate that LOE has a beneficial effect on the vascular system in db/db mice by improving endothelium-dependent relaxations and vascular oxidative stress most likely by normalizing the angiotensin system, and also on metabolic parameters, and these effects are associated

  8. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases. PMID:23933092

  9. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases.

  10. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration.

  11. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  12. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders; Crowther, Damian C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibireTS flies that exhibit a temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotype as a reporter of proteostatic robustness. In this model, we found that increasing age but not Aβ expression lowered the flies' permissive temperature, suggesting that Aβ did not exert its lethal effects by proteostatic disruption. Instead, we observed that chemical challenges, in particular oxidative stressors, discriminated clearly between young (robust) and old (sensitive) flies. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis, we compared water-soluble metabolite profiles at various ages in flies expressing Aβ in their brains. We observed 2 genotype-linked metabolomic signals, the first reported the presence of any Aβ isoform and the second the effects of the lethal Arctic Aβ. Lethality was specifically associated with signs of oxidative respiration dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:27103517

  13. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  14. Heart-Specific Knockout of the Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Reductase (Txnrd2) Induces Metabolic and Contractile Dysfunction in the Aging Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Kiermayer, Claudia; Northrup, Emily; Schrewe, Anja; Walch, Axel; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Schoensiegel, Frank; Zischka, Hans; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Ivandic, Boris; Kupatt, Christian; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous deletion of thioredoxin reductase 2 (Txnrd2) in mice is embryonically lethal and associated with abnormal heart development, while constitutive, heart-specific Txnrd2 inactivation leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and perinatal death. The significance of Txnrd2 in aging cardiomyocytes, however, has not yet been examined. Methods and Results The tamoxifen-inducible heart-specific αMHC-MerCreMer transgene was used to inactivate loxP-flanked Txnrd2 alleles in adult mice. Hearts and isolated mitochondria from aged knockout mice were morphologically and functionally analyzed. Echocardiography revealed a significant increase in left ventricular end-systolic diameters in knockouts. Fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased compared with controls. Ultrastructural analysis of cardiomyocytes of aged mice showed mitochondrial degeneration and accumulation of autophagic bodies. A dysregulated autophagic activity was supported by higher levels of lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3-I (LC3-I), and p62 in knockout hearts. Isolated Txnrd2-deficient mitochondria used less oxygen and tended to produce more reactive oxygen species. Chronic hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit stabilization and altered transcriptional and metabolic signatures indicated that energy metabolism is deregulated. Conclusions These results imply a novel role of Txnrd2 in sustaining heart function during aging and suggest that Txnrd2 may be a modifier of heart failure. PMID:26199228

  15. Pathophysiology of ageing, longevity and age related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bürkle, Alexander; Caselli, Graziella; Franceschi, Claudio; Mariani, Erminia; Sansoni, Paolo; Santoni, Angela; Vecchio, Giancarlo; Witkowski, Jacek M; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    On April 18, 2007 an international meeting on Pathophysiology of Ageing, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Several interesting topics on Cancer, Immunosenescence, Age-related inflammatory diseases and longevity were discussed. In this report we summarize the most important issues. However, ageing must be considered an unavoidable end point of the life history of each individual, nevertheless the increasing knowledge on ageing mechanisms, allows envisaging many different strategies to cope with, and delay it. So, a better understanding of pathophysiology of ageing and age-related disease is essential for giving everybody a reasonable chance for living a long and enjoyable final part of the life. PMID:17683521

  16. Age-related differences in human skin proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Carrino, David A; Calabro, Anthony; Darr, Aniq B; Dours-Zimmermann, Maria T; Sandy, John D; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Sorrell, J Michael; Hascall, Vincent C; Caplan, Arnold I

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown that versican, decorin and a catabolic fragment of decorin, termed decorunt, are the most abundant proteoglycans in human skin. Further analysis of versican indicates that four major core protein species are present in human skin at all ages examined from fetal to adult. Two of these are identified as the V0 and V1 isoforms, with the latter predominating. The other two species are catabolic fragments of V0 and V1, which have the amino acid sequence DPEAAE as their carboxyl terminus. Although the core proteins of human skin versican show no major age-related differences, the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of adult skin versican are smaller in size and show differences in their sulfation pattern relative to those in fetal skin versican. In contrast to human skin versican, human skin decorin shows minimal age-related differences in its sulfation pattern, although, like versican, the GAGs of adult skin decorin are smaller than those of fetal skin decorin. Analysis of the catabolic fragments of decorin from adult skin reveals the presence of other fragments in addition to decorunt, although the core proteins of these additional decorin catabolic fragments have not been identified. Thus, versican and decorin of human skin show age-related differences, versican primarily in the size and the sulfation pattern of its GAGs and decorin in the size of its GAGs. The catabolic fragments of versican are detected at all ages examined, but appear to be in lower abundance in adult skin compared with fetal skin. In contrast, the catabolic fragments of decorin are present in adult skin, but are virtually absent from fetal skin. Taken together, these data suggest that there are age-related differences in the catabolism of proteoglycans in human skin. These age-related differences in proteoglycan patterns and catabolism may play a role in the age-related changes in the physical properties and injury response of human skin. PMID:20947661

  17. Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate.

    PubMed

    Sales, Allan R K; Fernandes, Igor A; Rocha, Natália G; Costa, Lucas S; Rocha, Helena N M; Mattos, João D M; Vianna, Lauro C; Silva, Bruno M; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2014-04-01

    Mental stress induces transient endothelial dysfunction, which is an important finding for subjects at cardiometabolic risk. Thus, we tested whether aerobic exercise prevents this dysfunction among subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and whether an increase in shear rate during exercise plays a role in this phenomenon. Subjects with MetS participated in two protocols. In protocol 1 (n = 16), endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Subjects then underwent a mental stress test followed by either 40 min of leg cycling or rest across two randomized sessions. FMD was assessed again at 30 and 60 min after exercise or rest, with a second mental stress test in between. Mental stress reduced FMD at 30 and 60 min after the rest session (baseline: 7.7 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.5%, and 60 min: 3.9 ± 0.5%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas exercise prevented this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.4%, 30 min: 7.2 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline). Protocol 2 (n = 5) was similar to protocol 1 except that the first period of mental stress was followed by either exercise in which the brachial artery shear rate was attenuated via forearm cuff inflation or exercise without a cuff. Noncuffed exercise prevented the reduction in FMD (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.7%, 30 min: 7.0 ± 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 ± 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas cuffed exercise failed to prevent this reduction (baseline: 7.5 ± 0.6%, 30 min: 5.4 ± 0.8%, and 60 min: 4.1 ± 0.9%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). In conclusion, exercise prevented mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction among subjects with MetS, and an increase in shear rate during exercise mediated this effect.

  18. Age-related decline in emotional prosody discrimination: acoustic correlates.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Kingston, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that older adults have difficulty recognizing prosodic emotion cues, but it is not clear at what processing stage this ability breaks down. We manipulated the acoustic characteristics of tones in pitch, amplitude, and duration discrimination tasks to assess whether impaired basic auditory perception coexisted with our previously demonstrated age-related prosodic emotion perception impairment. It was found that pitch perception was particularly impaired in older adults, and that it displayed the strongest correlation with prosodic emotion discrimination. We conclude that an important cause of age-related impairment in prosodic emotion comprehension exists at the fundamental sensory level of processing.

  19. Glutamatergic treatment strategies for age-related memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Scheuer, K; Stoll, S

    1994-01-01

    Age-related changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been found in cortical areas and in the hippocampus of many species. On the basis of a variety of experimental observations it has been suggested that the decrease of NMDA receptor density might be one of the causative factors of the cognitive decline with aging. Based on these findings several strategies have been developed to improve cognition by compensating the NMDA receptor deficits in aging. The most promising approaches are the indirect activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by agonists of the glycine site or the restoration of the age-related deficit of receptor density by several nootropics. PMID:7997073

  20. Clustering of lifestyle characteristics and their association with cardio-metabolic health: the Lifestyles and Endothelial Dysfunction (EVIDENT) study.

    PubMed

    Patino-Alonso, Maria C; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Magdalena-Belio, José Felix; Giné-Garriga, María; Martínez-Vizcaino, Vicente; Fernández-Alonso, Carmen; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, María Soledad; Galindo-Villardon, María Purificación; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2015-09-28

    Little is known about the clustering patterns of lifestyle behaviours in adult populations. We explored clusters in multiple lifestyle behaviours including physical activity (PA), smoking, alcohol use and eating habits in a sample of adult population. A cross-sectional and multi-centre study was performed with six participating groups distributed throughout Spain. Participants (n 1327) were part of the Lifestyles and Endothelial Dysfunction (EVIDENT) study and were aged between 20 and 80 years. The lifestyle and cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors were analysed using a clustering method based on the HJ-biplot coordinates to understand the variables underlying these groupings. The following three clusters were identified. Cluster 1: unhealthy, 677 subjects (51%), with a slight majority of men (58.7%), who were more sedentary and smokers with higher consumption of whole-fat dairy products, bigger waist circumference as well as higher TAG levels, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and CVR. Cluster 2: healthy/PA, 265 subjects (20%), including 24.0% of males with high PA. Cluster 3: healthy/diet, including 29% of the participants, with a higher consumption of olive oil, fish, fruits, nuts, vegetables and lower alcohol consumption. Using the unhealthy cluster as a reference, and after adjusting for age and sex, the multiple regression analysis showed that belonging to the healthy/PA cluster was associated with a lower waist circumference, body fat percentage, SBP and CVR. In summary, the three clusters were identified according to lifestyles. The 'unhealthy' cluster had the least favourable clinical parameters, the 'healthy/PA' cluster had good HDL-cholesterol levels and low SBP and the 'healthy/diet' cluster had lower LDL-cholesterol levels and clinical blood pressure.

  1. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Philp, Lisa K; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Janovska, Alena; Wittert, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    High saturated fat (HF-S) diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO) diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus) and white (extensor digitorum longus) muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group). Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic and gene

  2. Nutritional antioxidants and age-related cataract and maculopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of vision is the second greatest, next to death, fear among the elderly. Age-related cataract (ARC) and maculopathy (ARM) are two major causes of blindness worldwide. There are several important reasons to study relationships between risk for ARC/ARM and nutrition: (1) because it is likely that...

  3. [Impact of thymic function in age-related immune deterioration].

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; de la Fuente, Mónica; Guerrero, Juan Miguel; Leal, Manuel; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Age-related biological deterioration also includes immune system deterioration and, in consequence, a rise in the incidence and prevalence of infections and cancers, as well as low responses to vaccination strategies. Out of all immune cell subsets, T-lymphocytes seem to be involved in most of the age-related defects. Since T-lymphocytes mature during their passage through the thymus, and the thymus shows an age-related process of atrophy, thymic regression has been proposed as the triggering event of this immune deterioration in elderly people. Historically, it has been accepted that the young thymus sets the T-lymphocyte repertoire during the childhood, whereupon atrophy begins until the elderly thymus is a non-functional evolutionary trace. However, a rising body of knowledge points toward the thymus functioning during adulthood. In the elderly, higher thymic function is associated with a younger immune system, while thymic function failure is associated with all-cause mortality. Therefore, any new strategy focused on the improvement of the elderly quality of life, especially those trying to influence the immune system, should take into account, together with peripheral homeostasis, thymus function as a key element in slowing down age-related decline.

  4. Age-Related Differences in Idiom Production in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Peggy S.; Hyun, Jungmoon; O'Connor Wells, Barbara; Anema, Inge; Goral, Mira; Monereau-Merry, Marie-Michelle; Rubino, Daniel; Kuckuk, Raija; Obler, Loraine K.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether idiom production was vulnerable to age-related difficulties, we asked 40 younger (ages 18-30) and 40 older healthy adults (ages 60-85) to produce idiomatic expressions in a story-completion task. Younger adults produced significantly more correct idiom responses (73%) than did older adults (60%). When older adults generated…

  5. Age-Related Factors in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twyford, Charles William

    The convergence of several lines of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic research suggests possible explanations for age-related influences on language acquisition. These factors, which include cognitive development, sociocultural context, affective factors, and language input, can be helpful to language educators. By being alert to the cognitive…

  6. A Context for Teaching Aging-Related Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes two points of view regarding age-related public programs (Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security): that of devolutionists who would curtail them and safety netters who maintain the government's role is indispensable. Uses Relative Deprivation theory as a framework for teaching public policy about aging. (SK)

  7. Age-Related Differences in the Production of Textual Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Andrea; Boewe, Anke; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Narratives produced by 69 healthy Italian adults were analyzed for age-related changes of microlinguistic, macrolinguistic and informative aspects. The participants were divided into five age groups (20-24, 25-39, 40-59, 60-74, 75-84). One single-picture stimulus and two cartoon sequences were used to elicit three stories per subject. Age-related…

  8. Managed care implications of age-related ocular conditions.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, William J; Smith, Roderick A

    2013-05-01

    The economic costs of age-related ocular diseases and vision loss are increasing rapidly as our society ages. In addition to the direct costs of treating age-related eye diseases, elderly persons with vision loss are at significantly increased risk for falls and fractures, experiencing social isolation, and suffering from an array of comorbid medical conditions compared with individuals with normal vision. Recent studies estimate the total economic burden (direct and indirect costs) of adult vision impairment in the United States at $51.4 billion. This figure is expected to increase as the baby boomer generation continues to age. While a number of highly effective new therapies have caused a paradigm shift in the management of several major age-related ocular diseases in recent years, these treatments come at a substantial cost. This article reviews the economic burdens and treatment-related costs of 4 major ocular diseases of aging-glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and dry eye disease-and the implications for managed care.

  9. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  10. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  11. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  12. Age-Related Differences in Moral Identity across Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krettenauer, Tobias; Murua, Lourdes Andrea; Jia, Fanli

    2016-01-01

    In this study, age-related differences in adults' moral identity were investigated. Moral identity was conceptualized a context-dependent self-structure that becomes differentiated and (re)integrated in the course of development and that involves a broad range of value-orientations. Based on a cross-sectional sample of 252 participants aged 14 to…

  13. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    There are many reports of relations between age and cognitive variables and of relations between age and variables representing different aspects of brain structure and a few reports of relations between brain structure variables and cognitive variables. These findings have sometimes led to inferences that the age-related brain changes cause the…

  14. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  15. Age-Related Health Stereotypes and Illusory Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madey, Scott F.; Chasteen, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    This experiment investigated how age-related health stereotypes affect people's judgments of younger and older patients' medical compliance. Previous research has shown that stereotypes of young adults include healthy components, but stereotypes of older adults include both healthy and unhealthy components (Hummert, 1990). We predicted that…

  16. Increased whole-body adiposity without a concomitant increase in liver fat is not associated with augmented metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Fabbrini, Elisa; Mohammed, B Selma; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2010-08-01

    Aim of this study was to determine whether an increase in adiposity, without a concomitant increase in intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content, is associated with a deterioration in metabolic function. To this end, multiorgan insulin sensitivity, assessed by using a two-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure in conjunction with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusion, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) kinetics, assessed by using stable isotopically labeled tracer infusion and mathematical modeling, were determined in 10 subjects with class I obesity (BMI: 31.6 +/- 0.3 kg/m(2); 37 +/- 2% body fat; visceral adipose tissue (VAT): 1,225 +/- 144 cm(3)) and 10 subjects with class III obesity (BMI: 41.5 +/- 0.5 kg/m(2); 43 +/- 2% body fat; VAT: 2,121 +/- 378 cm(3)), matched on age, sex, and IHTG content (14 +/- 4 and 14 +/- 3%, respectively). No differences between class I and class III obese groups were detected in insulin-mediated suppression of palmitate (67 +/- 3 and 65 +/- 3%, respectively; P = 0.635) and glucose (67 +/- 3 and 73 +/- 5%, respectively; P = 0.348) rates of appearance in plasma, and the insulin-mediated increase in glucose disposal (218 +/- 18 and 193 +/- 30%, respectively; P = 0.489). In addition, no differences between class I and class III obese groups were detected in secretion rates of VLDL-triglyceride (6.5 +/- 1.0 and 6.0 +/- 1.4 micromol/l x min, respectively; P = 0.787) and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 (0.40 +/- 0.05 and 0.41 +/- 0.04 nmol/l x min, respectively; P = 0.866), and plasma clearance rates of VLDL-triglyceride (31 (16-59) and 29 (18-46) ml/min, respectively; P = 0.888) and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 (15 (11-19) and 17 (11-25) ml/min, respectively; P = 0.608). We conclude that increased adiposity without a concomitant increase in IHTG content does not cause additional abnormalities in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and hepatic insulin sensitivity, or VLDL metabolism. PMID:20395947

  17. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Mark A.; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q.; Tempesta, Zechari R.; Knight, Robert T.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15–53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20–30 years) and older (60–70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <−1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise

  18. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <-1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in

  19. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A New Metabolic Disease of the Aging Male and Its Correlation with Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Lotti, Francesco; Cipriani, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a well-recognized cluster of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycaemia, closely associated with an increased risk of forthcoming cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Emerging evidence indicates that benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and its related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) represent other clinical conditions frequently observed in subjects with MetS. Several modifiable factors involved in MetS determinism, such as inadequate diet, lack of physical exercise, and smoking and drinking behaviours are emerging as main contributors to the development of BPH. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the connection between MetS and BPH have not been completely clarified. MetS and its components, hypogonadism, and prostate inflammation probably play an important role in inducing BPH/LUTS. Although historically considered as a “normal” consequence of the aging process, BPH/LUTS should now be faced proactively, as a preventable disorder of the elderly. Type of diet and level of physical activity are now considered important factors affecting prostate health in the aging male. However, whether physical exercise, weight loss, and modifications of dietary habit can really alter the natural history of BPH/LUTS remains to be determined. Further research is advisable to better clarify these points. PMID:24688539

  20. Age-Related Changes in Hepatic Activity and Expression of Detoxification Enzymes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyskočilová, Erika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka; Bártíková, Hana; Hlaváčová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Process of aging is accompanied by changes in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and impairment of normal cellular functions by free radicals. Therefore, this study was designed to determine age-related differences in the activities and/or expressions of selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in young and old rats. Specific activities of 8 drug-metabolizing enzymes and 4 antioxidant enzymes were assessed in hepatic subcellular fractions of 6-week-old and 21-month-old male Wistar rats. Protein expressions of carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were determined using immunoblotting. Remarkable age-related decrease in specific activities of CYP2B, CYP3A, and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was observed, whereas no changes in activities of CYP1A2, flavine monooxygenase, aldo-keto reductase 1C, and antioxidant enzymes with advancing age were found. On the other hand, specific activity of CBR1 and GST was 2.4 folds and 5.6 folds higher in the senescent rats compared with the young ones, respectively. Interindividual variability in CBR1 activity increased significantly with rising age. We suppose that elevated activities of GST and CBR1 may protect senescent rats against xenobiotic as well as eobiotic electrophiles and reactive carbonyls, but they may alter metabolism of drugs, which are CBR1 and especially GSTs substrates. PMID:23971034

  1. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  2. Loss of CD24 in Mice Leads to Metabolic Dysfunctions and a Reduction in White Adipocyte Tissue.

    PubMed

    Fairbridge, Nicholas A; Southall, Thomas M; Ayre, D Craig; Komatsu, Yumiko; Raquet, Paula I; Brown, Robert J; Randell, Edward; Kovacs, Christopher S; Christian, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    CD24 is a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cell surface receptor that is involved in regulating the survival or differentiation of several different cell types. CD24 has been used to identify pre-adipocytes that are able to reconstitute white adipose tissue (WAT) in vivo. Moreover, we recently found that the dynamic upregulation of CD24 in vitro during early phases of adipogenesis is necessary for mature adipocyte development. To determine the role of CD24 in adipocyte development in vivo, we evaluated the development of the inguinal and interscapular subcutaneous WAT and the epididymal visceral WAT in mice with a homozygous deletion of CD24 (CD24KO). We observed a significant decrease in WAT mass of 40% to 74% in WAT mass from both visceral and subcutaneous depots in male mice, with no significant effect in female mice, compared to wild-type (WT) sex- and age-matched controls. We also found that CD24KO mice had increased fasting glucose and free fatty acids, decreased fasting insulin, and plasma leptin. No major differences were observed in the sensitivity to insulin or glucose, or in circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, or LDL-cholesterol levels between WT and CD24KO mice. Challenging the CD24KO mice with either high sucrose (35%) or high fat (45%) diets that promote increased adiposity, increased WAT mass and fasting insulin, adiponectin and leptin levels, as well as reduced the sensitivity to insulin and glucose, to the levels of WT mice on the same diets. The CD24-mediated reduction in fat pad size was due to a reduction in adipocyte cell size in all depots with no significant reduction pre-adipocyte or adipocyte cell number. Thus, we have clearly demonstrated that the global absence of CD24 affects adipocyte cell size in vivo in a sex- and diet-dependent manner, as well as causing metabolic disturbances in glucose homeostasis and free fatty acid levels. PMID:26536476

  3. Loss of CD24 in Mice Leads to Metabolic Dysfunctions and a Reduction in White Adipocyte Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fairbridge, Nicholas A.; Southall, Thomas M.; Ayre, D. Craig; Komatsu, Yumiko; Raquet, Paula I.; Brown, Robert J.; Randell, Edward; Kovacs, Christopher S.; Christian, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    CD24 is a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cell surface receptor that is involved in regulating the survival or differentiation of several different cell types. CD24 has been used to identify pre-adipocytes that are able to reconstitute white adipose tissue (WAT) in vivo. Moreover, we recently found that the dynamic upregulation of CD24 in vitro during early phases of adipogenesis is necessary for mature adipocyte development. To determine the role of CD24 in adipocyte development in vivo, we evaluated the development of the inguinal and interscapular subcutaneous WAT and the epididymal visceral WAT in mice with a homozygous deletion of CD24 (CD24KO). We observed a significant decrease in WAT mass of 40% to 74% in WAT mass from both visceral and subcutaneous depots in male mice, with no significant effect in female mice, compared to wild-type (WT) sex- and age-matched controls. We also found that CD24KO mice had increased fasting glucose and free fatty acids, decreased fasting insulin, and plasma leptin. No major differences were observed in the sensitivity to insulin or glucose, or in circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, or LDL-cholesterol levels between WT and CD24KO mice. Challenging the CD24KO mice with either high sucrose (35%) or high fat (45%) diets that promote increased adiposity, increased WAT mass and fasting insulin, adiponectin and leptin levels, as well as reduced the sensitivity to insulin and glucose, to the levels of WT mice on the same diets. The CD24-mediated reduction in fat pad size was due to a reduction in adipocyte cell size in all depots with no significant reduction pre-adipocyte or adipocyte cell number. Thus, we have clearly demonstrated that the global absence of CD24 affects adipocyte cell size in vivo in a sex- and diet-dependent manner, as well as causing metabolic disturbances in glucose homeostasis and free fatty acid levels. PMID:26536476

  4. Age-related changes in the transcriptome of antibody-secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurupati, Raj; Showe, Louise C.; Ertl, Hildegund C.J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed age-related defects in B cell populations from young and aged mice. Microarray analysis of bone marrow resident antibody secreting cells (ASCs) showed significant changes upon aging, affecting multiple genes, pathways and functions including those that play a role in immune regulation, humoral immune responses, chromatin structure and assembly, cell metabolism and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Further analysis showed upon aging defects in energy production through glucose catabolism with reduced oxidative phosphorylation. In addition aged B cells had increased levels of reactive oxygen-species (ROS), which was linked to enhanced expression of the co-inhibitor programmed cell death (PD)-1. PMID:26967249

  5. Age-related changes in intraventricular kinetic energy: a physiological or pathological adaptation?

    PubMed

    Wong, James; Chabiniok, Radomir; deVecchi, Adelaide; Dedieu, Nathalie; Sammut, Eva; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza

    2016-03-15

    Aging has important deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. We sought to compare intraventricular kinetic energy (KE) in healthy subjects of varying ages with subjects with ventricular dysfunction to understand if changes in energetic momentum may predispose individuals to heart failure. Four-dimensional flow MRI was acquired in 35 healthy subjects (age: 1-67 yr) and 10 patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (age: 28-79 yr). Healthy subjects were divided into age quartiles (1st quartile: <16 yr, 2nd quartile: 17-32 yr, 3rd quartile: 33-48 yr, and 4th quartile: 49-64 yr). KE was measured in the LV throughout the cardiac cycle and indexed to ventricular volume. In healthy subjects, two large peaks corresponding to systole and early diastole occurred during the cardiac cycle. A third smaller peak was seen during late diastole in eight adults. Systolic KE (P = 0.182) and ejection fraction (P = 0.921) were preserved through all age groups. Older adults showed a lower early peak diastolic KE compared with children (P < 0.0001) and young adults (P = 0.025). Subjects with LV dysfunction had reduced ejection fraction (P < 0.001) and compared with older healthy adults exhibited a similar early peak diastolic KE (P = 0.142) but with the addition of an elevated KE in diastasis (P = 0.029). In healthy individuals, peak diastolic KE progressively decreases with age, whereas systolic peaks remain constant. Peak diastolic KE in the oldest subjects is comparable to those with LV dysfunction. Unique age-related changes in ventricular diastolic energetics might be physiological or herald subclinical pathology.

  6. Age-related changes in intraventricular kinetic energy: a physiological or pathological adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, James; Chabiniok, Radomir; deVecchi, Adelaide; Dedieu, Nathalie; Sammut, Eva; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Aging has important deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. We sought to compare intraventricular kinetic energy (KE) in healthy subjects of varying ages with subjects with ventricular dysfunction to understand if changes in energetic momentum may predispose individuals to heart failure. Four-dimensional flow MRI was acquired in 35 healthy subjects (age: 1–67 yr) and 10 patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (age: 28–79 yr). Healthy subjects were divided into age quartiles (1st quartile: <16 yr, 2nd quartile: 17–32 yr, 3rd quartile: 33–48 yr, and 4th quartile: 49–64 yr). KE was measured in the LV throughout the cardiac cycle and indexed to ventricular volume. In healthy subjects, two large peaks corresponding to systole and early diastole occurred during the cardiac cycle. A third smaller peak was seen during late diastole in eight adults. Systolic KE (P = 0.182) and ejection fraction (P = 0.921) were preserved through all age groups. Older adults showed a lower early peak diastolic KE compared with children (P < 0.0001) and young adults (P = 0.025). Subjects with LV dysfunction had reduced ejection fraction (P < 0.001) and compared with older healthy adults exhibited a similar early peak diastolic KE (P = 0.142) but with the addition of an elevated KE in diastasis (P = 0.029). In healthy individuals, peak diastolic KE progressively decreases with age, whereas systolic peaks remain constant. Peak diastolic KE in the oldest subjects is comparable to those with LV dysfunction. Unique age-related changes in ventricular diastolic energetics might be physiological or herald subclinical pathology. PMID:26747496

  7. Prolongevity hormone FGF21 protects against immune senescence by delaying age-related thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Horvath, Tamas L; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2016-01-26

    Age-related thymic degeneration is associated with loss of naïve T cells, restriction of peripheral T-cell diversity, and reduced healthspan due to lower immune competence. The mechanistic basis of age-related thymic demise is unclear, but prior evidence suggests that caloric restriction (CR) can slow thymic aging by maintaining thymic epithelial cell integrity and reducing the generation of intrathymic lipid. Here we show that the prolongevity ketogenic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a member of the endocrine FGF subfamily, is expressed in thymic stromal cells along with FGF receptors and its obligate coreceptor, βKlotho. We found that FGF21 expression in thymus declines with age and is induced by CR. Genetic gain of FGF21 function in mice protects against age-related thymic involution with an increase in earliest thymocyte progenitors and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, FGF21 overexpression reduced intrathymic lipid, increased perithymic brown adipose tissue, and elevated thymic T-cell export and naïve T-cell frequencies in old mice. Conversely, loss of FGF21 function in middle-aged mice accelerated thymic aging, increased lethality, and delayed T-cell reconstitution postirradiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Collectively, FGF21 integrates metabolic and immune systems to prevent thymic injury and may aid in the reestablishment of a diverse T-cell repertoire in cancer patients following HSCT. PMID:26755598

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-1 ameliorates age-related behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Markowska, A L; Mooney, M; Sonntag, W E

    1998-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 has been found to be involved in the regulation of several aspects of brain metabolism, neural transmission, neural growth and differentiation. Because decreased insulin-like growth factor-1 and/or its receptors are likely to contribute to age-related abnormalities in behavior, the strategy of replacing this protein is one potential therapeutic alternative. The present study was designed to assess whether cognitive deficits with ageing may be partially overcome by increasing the availability of insulin-like growth factor-1 in the brain. Fischer-344 x Brown Norway hybrid (F1) male rats of two ages (four-months-old and 32-months-old) were preoperatively trained in behavioral tasks and subsequently implanted with osmotic minipumps to infuse the insulin-like growth factor-1 (23.5 microg/pump) or a vehicle, i.c.v. Animals were retested at two weeks and four weeks after surgery. Insulin-like growth factor-1 improved working memory in the repeated acquisition task and in the object recognition task. An improvement was also observed in the place discrimination task, which assesses reference memory. Insulin-like growth factor-1 had no effect on sensorimotor skills nor exploration, but mildly reversed some age-related deficits in emotionality. These data indicate a potentially important role for insulin-like growth factor-1 in the reversal of age-related behavioral impairments in rodents.

  9. Stem cell transplantation improves aging-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Susumu; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of damage accumulation, and has been viewed as experimentally and medically intractable. The number of patients with age-associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer has increased recently. Aging-related diseases are related to a deficiency of the immune system, which results from an aged thymus and bone marrow cells. Intra bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) is a useful method to treat intractable diseases. This review summarizes findings that IBM-BMT can improve and treat aging-related diseases, including T2DM, osteoporosis and AD, in animal models. PMID:25364723

  10. Veterans have less age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    McLay, R N; Lyketsos, C G

    2000-08-01

    Military service involves exposure to a number of stresses, both psychological and physical. On the other hand, military personnel generally maintain excellent fitness, and veterans have increased access to education and health care. The overall effect on age-related cognitive decline, whether for good or ill, of having served in the armed forces has not been investigated previously. In this study, we examined a diverse population of 208 veterans and 1,216 civilians followed as part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study in 1981, 1982, and 1993 to 1996. We examined change in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score after a median of 11.5 years. Veterans were found to have significantly less decrease in MMSE scores at follow-up even after sex, race, and education were taken into account. These results suggest an overall positive effect of military service on the rate of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:10957857

  11. Age-related cochlear hair cell loss in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Dayal, V S

    1985-01-01

    The spiral organ of the chinchilla was studied by the surface-preparation technique in four different age groups: 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 4 years, to assess age-related hair cell loss. Decrease in hair cell population is linearly related to age, and damage rate of outer hair cells is greater than that of inner hair cells. The mean percentage of damaged total outer hair cells was 0.60%, 1.16%, 1.71%, and 7.07% in animals in 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 4 years of age, respectively. Outer hair cell loss was greatest in the apex of the cochlea and, of these cells, the outermost row was the most affected. Damage to inner hair cells also increases with age. Age-related apical cochlear cell loss in the chinchilla is comparable to that observed in other laboratory animals. PMID:3970507

  12. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system.

  13. Ageism, age relations, and garment industry work in Montreal.

    PubMed

    McMullin, J A; Marshall, V W

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the complexities of age relations at work. Garment workers believed that their fate was linked to ageism and that their work experience was discounted by management. Managers wanted to be rid of older workers because they commanded higher wages than younger workers. The issue was cost reduction, and age was implicated unintendedly. Still, managers seemed to use stereotypical images to discourage older workers and they did not organize work routines to facilitate the adaptation of them. Instead, they subcontracted the easy jobs, relying on the experience of the older employees for difficult work while not adapting the workplace. Theoretically, the authors argue that ageism and age discrimination can best be understood through a recognition of the importance of structured age relations and human agency.

  14. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  15. Age-related changes in ultra-triathlon performances

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The age-related decline in performance has been investigated in swimmers, runners and triathletes. No study has investigated the age-related performance decline in ultra-triathletes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the age-related declines in swimming, cycling, running and overall race time for both Triple Iron ultra-triathlon (11.4-km swimming, 540-km cycling and 126.6-km running) and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (38-km swimming, 1,800-km cycling and 420-km running). Methods The age and performances of 423 male Triple Iron ultra-triathletes and 119 male Deca Iron ultra-triathletes were analysed from 1992 to 2010 using regression analyses and ANOVA. Results The mean age of the finishers was significantly higher for Deca Iron ultra-triathletes (41.3 ± 3.1 years) compared to a Triple Iron ultra-triathletes (38.5 ± 3.3 years) (P < 0.05). For both ultra-distances, the fastest overall race times were achieved between the ages of 25 and 44 years. Deca Iron ultra-triathletes achieved the same level of performance in swimming and cycling between 25 and 54 years of age. Conclusions The magnitudes of age-related declines in performance in the three disciplines of ultra-triathlon differ slightly between Triple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. Although the ages of Triple Iron ultra-triathletes were on average younger compared to Deca Iron ultra-triathletes, the fastest race times were achieved between 25 and 44 years for both distances. Further studies should investigate the motivation and training of ultra-triathletes to gain better insights in ultra-triathlon performance. PMID:23849327

  16. Age-Related Hyperkyphosis: Its Causes, Consequences, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Katzman, Wendy B.; Wanek, Linda; Shepherd, John A.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related postural hyperkyphosis is an exaggerated anterior curvature of the thoracic spine, sometimes referred to as Dowager’s hump or gibbous deformity. This condition impairs mobility,2,31 and increases the risk of falls33 and fractures.26 The natural history of hyperkyphosis is not firmly established. Hyperkyphosis may develop from either muscle weakness and degenerative disc disease, leading to vertebral fractures and worsening hyperkyphosis, or from initial vertebral fractures that precipitate its development. PMID:20511692

  17. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  18. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip. PMID:27444019

  19. Later developments: molecular keys to age-related memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Barad, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment, a cognitive decline not clearly related to any gross pathology, is progressive and widespread in the population, although not universal. While the mechanisms of learning and memory remain incompletely understood, the study of their molecular mechanisms is already yielding promising approaches toward therapy for such "normal" declines in the efficiency of learning. This review presents the rationale and results for two such approaches. One approach, partial inhibition of the type IV cAMP specific phosphodiesterase, appears to act indirectly. Although little evidence supports an age-related decline in this system, considerable evidence indicates that this approach can facilitate the transition from short-term to long-term memory and thus counterbalance defects in long-term memory, which may be due to other causes. A second approach, inhibition of l-type voltage gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) may be a specific corrective for a molecular pathology of aging, as substantial evidence indicates that an ongoing increase occurs throughout the lifespan in the density of these channels in hippocampal pyramidal cells, with a concomitant reduction in cellular excitability. Because LVGCCs are also crucial to extinction, a paradigm of inhibitory learning, age-related memory impairment may be an unfortunate side effect of a developmental process necessary to the maturation of the ability to suppress inappropriate behavior, an interpretation consistent with the antagonistic pleiotropy theory of aging.

  20. Age related alterations of adrenoreceptor activity in erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Lomsadze, G; Khetsuriani, R; Arabuli, M; Intskirveli, N; Sanikidze, T

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was the investigation of age-related functional alterations of adrenoreceptors and the effect of agonist and antagonist drugs on age related adrenoreceptor activity in erythrocyte membrane. The impact of isopropanol and propanol on functional activity β- adrenergic receptors in red blood cell membrane were studied in 50 practically healthy men--volunteers. (I group--75-89 years old, II group--22-30 years old). The EPR signals S1 and S2 were registered in red blood cell membrane samples after incubation with isopropanol and propanol respectively. It was found that decreasing sensitivity (functional activity) of red blood cells membrane adrenoreceptors comes with aging (S1oldage-related hypertension, heart failure, type II diabetes and other diseases, The findings suggests that the erythrocyte could be a new therapeutic marker in the treatment different diseases.

  1. Telomere length variations in aging and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are gene sequences present at chromosomal ends and are responsible for maintaining genome integrity. Telomere length is maximum at birth and decreases progressively with advancing age and thus is considered as a biomarker of chronological aging. This age associated decrease in the length of telomere is linked to various ageing associated diseases like diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, cancer etc. and their associated complications. Telomere length is a result of combined effect of oxidative stress, inflammation and repeated cell replication on it, and thus forming an association between telomere length and chronological aging and related diseases. Thus, decrease in telomere length was found to be important in determining both, the variations in longevity and age-related diseases in an individual. Ongoing and progressive research in the field of telomere length dynamics has proved that aging and age-related diseases apart from having a synergistic effect on telomere length were also found to effect telomere length independently also. Here a short description about telomere length variations and its association with human aging and age-related diseases is reviewed.

  2. Adverse environmental conditions influence age-related innate immune responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    May, Linda; van den Biggelaar, Anita HJ; van Bodegom, David; Meij, Hans J; de Craen, Anton JM; Amankwa, Joseph; Frölich, Marijke; Kuningas, Maris; Westendorp, Rudi GJ

    2009-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system plays an important role in the recognition and induction of protective responses against infectious pathogens, whilst there is increasing evidence for a role in mediating chronic inflammatory diseases at older age. Despite indications that environmental conditions can influence the senescence process of the adaptive immune system, it is not known whether the same holds true for the innate immune system. Therefore we studied whether age-related innate immune responses are similar or differ between populations living under very diverse environmental conditions. Methods- We compared cross-sectional age-related changes in ex vivo innate cytokine responses in a population living under affluent conditions in the Netherlands (age 20–68 years old, n = 304) and a population living under adverse environmental conditions in Ghana (age 23–95 years old, n = 562). Results- We found a significant decrease in LPS-induced Interleukin (IL)-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) production with age in the Dutch population. In Ghana a similar age-related decline in IL-10 responses to LPS, as well as to zymosan, or LPS plus zymosan, was observed. TNF production, however, did not show an age-associated decline, but increased significantly with age in response to co-stimulation with LPS and zymosan. Conclusion- We conclude that the decline in innate cytokine responses is an intrinsic ageing phenomenon, while pathogen exposure and/or selective survival drive pro-inflammatory responses under adverse living conditions. PMID:19480711

  3. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Tohru; Shibata, Rei; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Katahira, Nobuyuki; Kambara, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoko; Nonoyama, Hiroshi; Horibe, Yuichiro; Ueda, Hiromi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG), one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months) were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV), which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  4. Chronic acarbose treatment alleviates age-related behavioral and biochemical changes in SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing-Jing; Chen, Gui-Hai; Wang, Fang; Li, Xue-Wei; Cao, Lei; Sui, Xu; Tao, Fei; Yan, Wen-Wen; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The administration of maintaining the homeostasis of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling and/or glucose metabolism may reverse brain aging. In the present study, we investigated the effect of acarbose, an inhibitor of α-glucosidase, on age-related behavioral and biochemical changes. The SAMP8 mice were randomly divided into old control group and acarbose-treatment group. The mice in the acarbose group were administered acarbose (20 mg/kg/d, dissolved in drinking water) orally from 3 to 9 months of age when a new group of 3-month-old mice was added as young controls. The results showed that the aged controls exhibited declines in sensorimotor ability, open field anxiety, spatial and non-spatial memory abilities, decreased serum insulin levels, increased IGF-1 receptor and synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) levels and decreased insulin receptor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and syntaxin 1 (Stx1) levels in the hippocampal layers. The age-related behavioral deficits correlated with the serological and histochemical data. Chronic acarbose treatment relieved these age-related changes, especially with respect to learning and memory abilities. This protective effect of acarbose on age-related behavioral impairments might be related to changes in the insulin system and the levels of BDNF, IGF-1R, and the pre-synaptic proteins Syt1 and Stx1. In conclusion, long-term treatment with acarbose ameliorated the behavioral deficits and biochemical changes in old SAMP8 mice and promoted successful aging. This study provides insight into the potential of acarbose for the treatment of brain aging.

  5. Age-related morphological changes in lid margin and meibomian gland anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hykin, P G; Bron, A J

    1992-07-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is responsible for recurrent irritative symptoms. Attempts to characterize MGD have largely concentrated on microbial and lipid abnormalities in meibomian gland secretions. Few reports describe histological abnormalities in this disease, and fewer still morphological changes. This article follows a previous study that established a classification for MGD. This was based on morphological changes in the meibomian gland and lid margin. Using this classification, we studied the age-related changes in 80 subjects, between 5 and 87 years of age without ocular disease. The lid margin became thicker after childhood. Lid margin vascularity and cutaneous hyperkeratinization increased with age in both lids, whereas, telangiectasia increased with age in the lower lid and squamous blepharitis and posterior lid margin rounding were more common after 50 years of age in the upper lid. Multiple rows of meibomian gland orifices occurred more frequently in the upper than lower lid, and orifice narrowing and pouting increased with age. No age-related changes in the shape or form of the mucocutaneous function, gland ducts, or acini were found. Meibomian gland secretions were less easily expressed in the elderly. We have attempted to define a normal range of lid morphology in healthy children and adults that we believe to be important for the subsequent definition of lid disease, and in particular, posterior blepharitis.

  6. Estimation of Heterogeneity in Diagnostic Parameters of Age-related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Blokh, David; Stambler, Ilia

    2014-08-01

    The heterogeneity of parameters is a ubiquitous biological phenomenon, with critical implications for biological systems functioning in normal and diseased states. We developed a method to estimate the level of objects set heterogeneity with reference to particular parameters and applied it to type II diabetes and heart disease, as examples of age-related systemic dysfunctions. The Friedman test was used to establish the existence of heterogeneity. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison method was used to determine clusters. The normalized Shannon entropy was used to provide the quantitative evaluation of heterogeneity. There was obtained an estimate for the heterogeneity of the diagnostic parameters in healthy subjects, as well as in heart disease and type II diabetes patients, which was strongly related to their age. With aging, as with the diseases, the level of heterogeneity (entropy) was reduced, indicating a formal analogy between these phenomena. The similarity of the patterns in aging and disease suggested a kind of "early aging" of the diseased subjects, or alternatively a "disease-like" aging process, with reference to these particular parameters. The proposed method and its validation on the chronic age-related disease samples may support a way toward a formal mathematical relation between aging and chronic diseases and a formal definition of aging and disease, as determined by particular heterogeneity (entropy) changes. PMID:25110613

  7. Micro-RNAs Let7e and 126 in Plasma as Markers of Metabolic Dysfunction in 10 to 12 Years Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Bernardo J.; Carrasco-Wong, Ivo; Dominguez, Angélica; Arnaiz, Pilar; Farías, Marcelo; Barja, Salesa; Mardones, Francisco; Casanello, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing evidence shows that metabolic syndrome (MetS) is already starting in childhood however there is no consensus regarding how to diagnose this condition in pediatric population. Studies in adults show that altered levels of specific micro-RNAs are related with components of the MetS. Objective We determined the plasma levels of four MetS-associated micro-RNAs (miR-126, miR-132, mir-145 and Let-7e) in 10 to 12 years old children with or without MetS traits. Design Pediatric subjects were selected from a cohort of 3325 school-age children, and clustered by the absence (control, n = 30), or the presence of 1 (n = 50), 2 (n = 41) or 3 (n = 35) MetS traits according to Cook´s criteria. Micro-RNAs were isolated from plasma, and levels of miR-126, miR-132, miR-145 and Let-7e were determined by Taqman qPCR. Results Regression analysis of the different MetS traits regarding the different miRNAs analyzed showed that Let-7e presented a negative association with HDL-C levels, but a positive correlation with the number of MetS traits. Levels of miR-126 presented a positive correlation with waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, BMI, and plasma triglycerides and VLDL-C. Levels of miR-132 showed a positive correlation with waist to hip ratio. Plasma levels of Let-7e were increased (~3.4 fold) in subjects with 3 MetS traits, and showed significant AUC (0.681; 95%CI = [0.58, 0.78]; p < 0.001) in the ROC analysis which were improved when miR-126 was included in the analysis (AUC 0.729; p < 0.001). In silico analysis of the interaction of proteins derived from mRNAs targeted by Let7 and miR-126 showed an important effect of both Let-7e and miR-126 regulating the insulin signaling pathway. Conclusions These results suggest that changes in the plasma levels of Let-7e and miR-126 could represent early markers of metabolic dysfunction in children with MetS traits. PMID:26046362

  8. A BOLD Perspective on Age-Related Neurometabolic-Flow Coupling and Neural Efficiency Changes in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Joanna Lynn; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Lu, Hanzhang; Rypma, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Age-related performance declines in visual tasks have been attributed to reductions in processing efficiency. The neural basis of these declines has been explored by comparing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) index of neural activity in older and younger adults during visual task performance. However, neural activity is one of many factors that change with age and lead to BOLD signal differences. We investigated the origin of age-related BOLD changes by comparing blood flow and oxygen metabolic constituents of BOLD signal. Subjects periodically viewed flickering annuli and pressed a button when detecting luminance changes in a central fixation cross. Using magnetic resonance dual-echo arterial spin labeling and CO2 ingestion, we observed age-equivalent (i.e., similar in older and younger groups) fractional cerebral blood flow (ΔCBF) in the presence of age-related increases in fractional cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (ΔCMRO2). Reductions in ΔCBF responsiveness to increased ΔCMRO2 in elderly led to paradoxical age-related BOLD decreases. Age-related ΔCBF/ΔCMRO2 ratio decreases were associated with reaction times, suggesting that age-related slowing resulted from less efficient neural activity. We hypothesized that reduced vascular responsiveness to neural metabolic demand would lead to a reduction in ΔCBF/ΔCMRO2. A simulation of BOLD relative to ΔCMRO2 for lower and higher neurometabolic-flow coupling ratios (approximating those for old and young, respectively) indicated less BOLD signal change in old than young in relatively lower CMRO2 ranges, as well as greater BOLD signal change in young compared to old in relatively higher CMRO2 ranges. These results suggest that age-comparative studies relying on BOLD signal might be misinterpreted, as age-related BOLD changes do not merely reflect neural activity changes. Age-related declines in neurometabolic-flow coupling might lead to neural efficiency reductions that can adversely affect visual task

  9. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Subudhi, M.; Shier, W.; MacDougall, E. )

    1990-07-01

    An aging assessment of Westinghouse DS-series low-voltage air circuit breakers was performed as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. The objectives of this study are to characterize age-related degradation within the breaker assembly and to identify maintenance practices to mitigate their effect. Since this study has been promulgated by the failures of the reactor trip breakers at the McGuire Nuclear Station in July 1987, results relating to the welds in the breaker pole lever welds are also discussed. The design and operation of DS-206 and DS-416 breakers were reviewed. Failure data from various national data bases were analyzed to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and mechanisms. Additional operating experiences from one nuclear station and two industrial breaker-service companies were obtained to develop aging trends of various subcomponents. The responses of the utilities to the NRC Bulletin 88-01, which discusses the center pole lever welds, were analyzed to assess the final resolution of failures of welds in the reactor trips. Maintenance recommendations, made by the manufacturer to mitigate age-related degradation were reviewed, and recommendations for improving the monitoring of age-related degradation are discussed. As described in Volume 2 of this NUREG, the results from a test program to assess degradation in breaker parts through mechanical cycling are also included. The testing has characterized the cracking of center-pole lever welds, identified monitoring techniques to determine aging in breakers, and provided information to augment existing maintenance programs. Recommendations to improve breaker reliability using effective maintenance, testing, and inspection programs are suggested. 13 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Age-Related Deterioration of Rod Vision in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Fan, Jie; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2010-01-01

    Even in healthy individuals, aging leads to deterioration in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual field, and dark adaptation. Little is known about the neural mechanisms that drive the age-related changes of the retina and more specifically of photoreceptors. According to one hypothesis, the age-related deterioration in rod function is due to the limited availability of 11-cis-retinal for rod pigment formation. To determine how aging affects rod photoreceptors and to test the retinoid deficiency hypothesis, we compared the morphological and functional properties of rods of adult and aged B6D2F1/J mice. We found that the number of rods and the length of their outer segments were significantly reduced in 2.5 year-old mice compared to 4 month-old animals. Aging also resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the total level of opsin in the retina. Behavioral tests revealed that scotopic visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were decreased by 2-fold in aged mice, and rod ERG recordings demonstrated reduced amplitudes of both a- and b-waves. Sensitivity of aged rods determined from single-cell recordings was also decreased by 1.5-fold, corresponding to not more than 1% free opsin in these photoreceptors, and kinetic parameters of dim flash response were not altered. Notably, the rate of rod dark adaptation was unaffected by age. Thus, our results argue against age-related deficiency of 11-cis-retinal in the B6D2F1/J mouse rod visual cycle. Surprisingly, the level of cellular dark noise was increased in aged rods providing an alternative mechanism for their desensitization. PMID:20720130

  11. Age-related differences in updating working memory.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, M; Brédart, S; Beerten, A

    1994-02-01

    Age-related differences in updating working memory were investigated in two experiments using a running memory task. In the first experiment, the task of the young and elderly subjects was to watch strings of four to 10 consonants and then to recall serially the four most recent items. Results revealed no age effect. A second experiment was then carried out using a memory load that was close to memory span: lists of six to 12 consonants were presented and subjects had to recall the last six items. Age interacted with list length but not with serial position. This dissociation is discussed in terms of Baddeley's (1986) model.

  12. [Diagnostic Criteria for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanji; Shiraga, Fumio; Ishida, Susumu; Kamei, Motohiro; Yanagi, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for dry age-related macular degeneration is described. Criteria include visual acuity, fundscopic findings, diagnostic image findings, exclusion criteria and classification of severity grades. Essential findings to make diagnosis as "geographic atrophy" are, 1) at least 250 μm in diameter, 2) round/oval/cluster-like or geographic in shape, 3) sharp delineation, 4) hypopigmentation or depigmentation in retinal pigment epithelium, 5) choroidal vessels are more visible than in surrounding area. Severity grades were classified as mild, medium and severe by relation of geographic atrophy to the fovea and attendant findings. PMID:26571627

  13. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  14. [Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration intricacy].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among the elderly in Western nations. Age is also a well-known and well-evidenced risk factor for glaucoma. With increasing longevity and the rising prevalence of older people around the world, more and more patients will have glaucoma and AMD. Clinical evaluation of these patients still poses problems for clinicians. It is very important to order the right tests at the right time to distinguish glaucomatous defects from those caused by retinal lesions, because appropriate therapy has a beneficial effect on slowing or halting damage. PMID:18957915

  15. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  16. Squalamine lactate for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian; Desai, Avinash; Garcia, Charles A; Thomas, Edgar; Gast, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Squalamine lactate inhibits angiogenesis by a long-lived, intracellular mechanism of action. The drug is taken up into activated endothelial cells through caveolae, small invaginations in the cellular membrane. Subsequently, the drug binds to and "chaperones" calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment and blocks angiogenesis at several levels. A series of basic investigations, preclinical studies, and human clinical trials have begun to establish the proof of concept, efficacy, and safety parameters for use of squalamine lactate as a therapeutic agent for exudative age-related macular degeneration and several types of malignancies. PMID:16935213

  17. Osteoblast dysfunctions in bone diseases: from cellular and molecular mechanisms to therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierre J

    2015-04-01

    Several metabolic, genetic and oncogenic bone diseases are characterized by defective or excessive bone formation. These abnormalities are caused by dysfunctions in the commitment, differentiation or survival of cells of the osteoblast lineage. During the recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the osteoblast dysfunctions in osteoporosis, skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors. This led to suggest novel therapeutic approaches to correct these abnormalities such as the modulation of WNT signaling, the pharmacological modulation of proteasome-mediated protein degradation, the induction of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation, the repression of cancer cell proliferation and the manipulation of epigenetic mechanisms. This article reviews our current understanding of the major cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing osteoblastic cell abnormalities in age-related bone loss, genetic skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors, and discusses emerging therapeutic strategies to counteract the osteoblast abnormalities in these disorders of bone formation.

  18. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  19. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  20. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  1. Exploring age-related brain degeneration in meditation practitioners.

    PubMed

    Luders, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that meditation practices are associated with substantial psychological as well as physiological benefits. In searching for the biological mechanisms underlying the beneficial impact of meditation, studies have revealed practice-induced alterations of neurotransmitters, brain activity, and cognitive abilities, just to name a few. These findings not only imply a close link between meditation and brain structure, but also suggest possible modulating effects of meditation on age-related brain atrophy. Given that normal aging is associated with significant loss of brain tissue, meditation-induced growth and/or preservation might manifest as a seemingly reduced brain age in meditators (i.e., cerebral measures characteristic of younger brains). Surprisingly, there are only three published studies that have addressed the question of whether meditation diminishes age-related brain degeneration. This paper reviews these three studies with respect to the brain attributes studied, the analytical strategies applied, and the findings revealed. The review concludes with an elaborate discussion on the significance of existing studies, implications and directions for future studies, as well as the overall relevance of this field of research.

  2. Current Therapeutic Development for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarizes recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem-cell based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  3. Age-related changes to the production of linguistic prosody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Daniel R.

    The production of speech prosody (the rhythm, pausing, and intonation associated with natural speech) is critical to effective communication. The current study investigated the impact of age-related changes to physiology and cognition in relation to the production of two types of linguistic prosody: lexical stress and the disambiguation of syntactically ambiguous utterances. Analyses of the acoustic correlates of stress: speech intensity (or sound-pressure level; SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), key word/phrase duration, and pause duration revealed that both young and older adults effectively use these acoustic features to signal linguistic prosody, although the relative weighting of cues differed by group. Differences in F0 were attributed to age-related physiological changes in the laryngeal subsystem, while group differences in duration measures were attributed to relative task complexity and the cognitive-linguistic load of these respective tasks. The current study provides normative acoustic data for older adults which informs interpretation of clinical findings as well as research pertaining to dysprosody as the result of disease processes.

  4. Age-Related Deficits in Reality Monitoring of Action Memories

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Lyle, Keith B.; Butler, Karin M.; Dornburg, Courtney C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe three theoretical accounts of age-related increases in falsely remembering that imagined actions were performed (Thomas & Bulevich, 2006). To investigate these accounts and further explore age-related changes in reality monitoring of action memories, we used a new paradigm in which actions were (a) imagined-only (b) actually performed, or (c) both imagined and performed. Older adults were more likely than younger adults to misremember the source of imagined-only actions, with older adults’ more often specifying that the action was imagined and also that it was performed. For both age groups, as repetitions of the imagined-only events increased, illusions that the actions were only performed decreased. These patterns suggest that both older and younger adults utilize qualitative characteristics when making reality-monitoring judgments and that repeated imagination produces richer records of both sensory details and cognitive operations. However, sensory information derived from imagination appears to be more similar to that derived from performance for older than younger adults. PMID:18808253

  5. Age-Related Loss of Muscle Mass and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Goldspink, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Age-related muscle wasting and increased frailty are major socioeconomic as well as medical problems. In the quest to extend quality of life it is important to increase the strength of elderly people sufficiently so they can carry out everyday tasks and to prevent them falling and breaking bones that are brittle due to osteoporosis. Muscles generate the mechanical strain that contributes to the maintenance of other musculoskeletal tissues, and a vicious circle is established as muscle loss results in bone loss and weakening of tendons. Molecular and proteomic approaches now provide strategies for preventing age-related muscle wasting. Here, attention is paid to the role of the GH/IGF-1 axis and the special role of the IGFI-Ec (mechano growth factor/MGF) which is derived from the IGF-I gene by alternative splicing. During aging MGF levels decline but when administered MGF activates the muscle satellite (stem) cells that “kick start” local muscle repair and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22506111

  6. Age-related preferences and age weighting health benefits.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the relevance of age in the paradigm of quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The first section outlines two rationales for incorporating age weights into QALYs. One of them is based on efficiency concerns; and the other on equity concerns. Both of these are theoretical constructs. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of published empirical support for such age weighting. The second section is a brief survey of nine empirical studies that elicited age-related preferences from the general public. Six of these quantified the strength of the preferences, and these are discussed in more detail in the third section. The analysis distinguishes three kinds of age-related preference: productivity ageism, utilitarian ageism and egalitarian ageism. The relationship between them and their relevance to the two different rationales for age weighting are then explored. It is concluded that, although there is strong prima facie evidence of public support for both types of age weighting, the empirical evidence to support any particular set of weights is at present weak. PMID:10048783

  7. Auditory white noise reduces age-related fluctuations in balance.

    PubMed

    Ross, J M; Will, O J; McGann, Z; Balasubramaniam, R

    2016-09-01

    Fall prevention technologies have the potential to improve the lives of older adults. Because of the multisensory nature of human balance control, sensory therapies, including some involving tactile and auditory noise, are being explored that might reduce increased balance variability due to typical age-related sensory declines. Auditory white noise has previously been shown to reduce postural sway variability in healthy young adults. In the present experiment, we examined this treatment in young adults and typically aging older adults. We measured postural sway of healthy young adults and adults over the age of 65 years during silence and auditory white noise, with and without vision. Our results show reduced postural sway variability in young and older adults with auditory noise, even in the absence of vision. We show that vision and noise can reduce sway variability for both feedback-based and exploratory balance processes. In addition, we show changes with auditory noise in nonlinear patterns of sway in older adults that reflect what is more typical of young adults, and these changes did not interfere with the typical random walk behavior of sway. Our results suggest that auditory noise might be valuable for therapeutic and rehabilitative purposes in older adults with typical age-related balance variability. PMID:27495013

  8. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans

    PubMed Central

    Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W. M.; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs. PMID:26337083

  9. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W M; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-10-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs.

  10. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Oh, M Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  11. Intrinsic Hippocampal Excitability Changes of Opposite Signs and Different Origins in CA1 and CA3 Pyramidal Neurons Underlie Aging-Related Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, M. Matthew; Simkin, Dina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related cognitive deficits have been attributed to dysfunction of neurons due to failures at synaptic or intrinsic loci, or both. Given the importance of the hippocampus for successful encoding of memory and that the main output of the hippocampus is via the CA1 pyramidal neurons, much of the research has been focused on identifying the aging-related changes of these CA1 pyramidal neurons. We and others have discovered that the postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following a train of action potentials is greatly enlarged in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged animals. This enlarged postburst AHP is a significant factor in reducing the intrinsic excitability of these neurons, and thus limiting their activity in the neural network during learning. Based on these data, it has largely been thought that aging-related cognitive deficits are attributable to reduced activity of pyramidal neurons. However, recent in vivo and ex vivo studies provide compelling evidence that aging-related deficits could also be due to a converse change in CA3 pyramidal neurons, which show increased activity with aging. In this review, we will incorporate these recent findings and posit that an interdependent dynamic dysfunctional change occurs within the hippocampal network, largely due to altered intrinsic excitability in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which ultimately leads to the aging-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27375440

  12. Age-related priming effects in social judgments.

    PubMed

    Hess, T M; McGee, K A; Woodburn, S M; Bolstad, C A

    1998-03-01

    Two experiments investigated adult age differences in the impact of previously activated (and thus easily accessible) trait-related information on judgments about people. The authors hypothesized that age-related declines in the efficiency of controlled processing mechanisms during adulthood would be associated with increased susceptibility to judgment biases associated with such information. In each study, different-aged adults made impression judgments about a target, and assimilation of these judgments to trait constructs activated in a previous, unrelated task were examined. Consistent with the authors' hypotheses, older adults were likely to form impressions that were biased toward the primed trait constructs. In contrast, younger adults exhibited greater awareness of the primed information and were more likely to correct for its perceived influence, especially when distinctive contextual cues regarding the source of the primes were available. PMID:9533195

  13. Age-related differences in multiple task monitoring.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Ivo; Del Missier, Fabio; Mäntylä, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Coordinating multiple tasks with narrow deadlines is particularly challenging for older adults because of age related decline in cognitive control functions. We tested the hypothesis that multiple task performance reflects age- and gender-related differences in executive functioning and spatial ability. Young and older adults completed a multitasking session with four monitoring tasks as well as separate tasks measuring executive functioning and spatial ability. For both age groups, men exceeded women in multitasking, measured as monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of young adults' monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability was related to sex differences. For older adults, age and executive functioning, but not spatial ability, predicted multitasking performance. These results suggest that executive functions contribute to multiple task performance across the adult life span and that reliance on spatial skills for coordinating deadlines is modulated by age.

  14. Age-related changes in human vitreous structure.

    PubMed

    Sebag, J

    1987-01-01

    Changes in vitreous structure that occur with aging are important in the pathogenesis of vitreous liquefaction (synchisis senilis), vitreous detachment, and retinal disease. Vitreous morphology was studied in 59 human eyes post-mortem using dark-field horizontal slit illumination of the entire dissected vitreous. In many individuals younger than 30 years, the vitreous was homogeneous in structure. Middle-aged individuals had macroscopic fibers in the central vitreous, which coursed anteroposteriorly and inserted into the vitreous base and the vitreous cortex, posteriorly. During senescence, the vitreous volume was reduced, the vitreous body was collapsed (syneresis), and the fibers were thickened, tortuous, and surrounded by liquid vitreous. This sequence of age-related changes probably results from a progressive reorganization of the hyaluronic acid and collagen molecular networks. Characterization of the molecular events underlying these changes will elucidate the mechanisms of the phenomena of synchisis, syneresis, and detachment, and may provide methods with which to prevent or induce vitreous detachment prophylactically.

  15. Sex- and age-related differences in mathematics.

    PubMed

    Rustemeyer, Ruth; Fischer, Natalie

    2005-08-01

    This study examined sex differences and age-related changes in mathematics based on Eccles's 1985 expectancy-value model of "achievement-related choices" and Dweck's 1986 motivation-process model. We have assessed motivational variables and performance in mathematics for youth in Grades 5, 7, and 9 in a German comprehensive secondary school. Significant sex differences in Grades 7 and 9 were observed even when school marks were controlled for. Furthermore, the results indicated differences between Grade 7 and Grade 9 on most of the motivational variables. Older students show a less favorable motivational pattern. Our results give evidence of the importance of motivational encouragement in mathematics classes, especially for girls and low achieving learners. PMID:16279324

  16. Age-Related Differences in Multiple Task Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Ivo; Del Missier, Fabio; Mäntylä, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Coordinating multiple tasks with narrow deadlines is particularly challenging for older adults because of age related decline in cognitive control functions. We tested the hypothesis that multiple task performance reflects age- and gender-related differences in executive functioning and spatial ability. Young and older adults completed a multitasking session with four monitoring tasks as well as separate tasks measuring executive functioning and spatial ability. For both age groups, men exceeded women in multitasking, measured as monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of young adults' monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability was related to sex differences. For older adults, age and executive functioning, but not spatial ability, predicted multitasking performance. These results suggest that executive functions contribute to multiple task performance across the adult life span and that reliance on spatial skills for coordinating deadlines is modulated by age. PMID:25215609

  17. Gene-Diet Interactions in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50 % of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation is the only available treatment option for the dry form of the disease known to slow progression of AMD. Despite an excellent understanding of genes and nutrition in AMD, there is remarkably little known about gene-diet interactions that may identify efficacious approaches to treat individuals. This review will summarize our current understanding of gene-diet interactions in AMD with a focus on animal models and human epidemiological studies.

  18. Age-related responses to mild restraint in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rattner, B A; Michael, S D; Altland, P D

    1983-11-01

    Immature, postpubertal, young adult, and middle-aged rats were lightly restrained for 4 h. Relative to untreated controls, restraint uniformly reduced body weight and plasma luteinizing hormone concentration and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration in all age groups. However, restraint increased activities of plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, and fructose-diphosphate aldolase in only immature and middle-aged animals. This age-related release of tissue enzymes is hypothesized to reflect enhanced responsiveness to catecholamines in immature rats, and possible ischemia related to diminished vasodilatory activity in middle-aged rats. On the basis of these changes, tolerance to restraint in postpubertal and young adults appears to be slightly greater than that of immature and middle-aged rats.

  19. MicroRNAs in age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimmeler, Stefanie; Nicotera, Pierluigi

    2013-02-01

    Aging is a complex process that is linked to an increased incidence of major diseases such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, but also cancer and immune disorders. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally control gene expression by inhibiting translation or inducing degradation of targeted mRNAs. MiRNAs target up to hundreds of mRNAs, thereby modulating gene expression patterns. Many miRNAs appear to be dysregulated during cellular senescence, aging and disease. However, only few miRNAs have been so far linked to age-related changes in cellular and organ functions. The present article will discuss these findings, specifically focusing on the cardiovascular and neurological systems.

  20. Molecular pathology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD remain largely unclear, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is thought to exist. AMD pathology is characterized by degeneration involving the retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane, as well as, in some cases, alterations in choroidal capillaries. Recent research on the genetic and molecular underpinnings of AMD brings to light several basic molecular pathways and pathophysiological processes that might mediate AMD risk, progression, and/or response to therapy. This review summarizes, in detail, the molecular pathological findings in both humans and animal models, including genetic variations in CFH, CX3CR1, and ARMS2/HtrA1, as well as the role of numerous molecules implicated in inflammation, apoptosis, cholesterol trafficking, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:19026761

  1. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  2. Targeting MAPK Signaling in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness affecting elderly people in the world. AMD is a complex multifactorial disease associated with demographic, genetics, and environmental risk factors. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AMD. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are activated by diverse extracellular stimuli, including growth factors, mitogens, hormones, cytokines, and different cellular stressors such as oxidative stress. They regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. This review addresses the novel findings from human and animal studies on the relationship of MAPK signaling with AMD. The use of specific MAPK inhibitors may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of this debilitating eye disease. PMID:27385915

  3. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Albert O; Ritter, Robert; Abel, Kenneth J; Manning, Alisa; Panhuysen, Carolien; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2005-04-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, late-onset, and complex trait with multiple risk factors. Concentrating on a region harboring a locus for AMD on 1q25-31, the ARMD1 locus, we tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with AMD in two independent case-control populations. Significant association (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)) was identified within the regulation of complement activation locus and was centered over a tyrosine-402 --> histidine-402 protein polymorphism in the gene encoding complement factor H. Possession of at least one histidine at amino acid position 402 increased the risk of AMD 2.7-fold and may account for 50% of the attributable risk of AMD.

  4. The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Peelle, Jonathan E; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension. PMID:27262177

  5. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gorin, M B; Breitner, J C; De Jong, P T; Hageman, G S; Klaver, C C; Kuehn, M H; Seddon, J M

    1999-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is increasingly recognized as a complex genetic disorder in which one or more genes contribute to an individual's susceptibility for developing the condition. Twin and family studies as well as population-based genetic epidemiologic methods have convincingly demonstrated the importance of genetics in AMD, though the extent of heritability, the number of genes involved, and the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of the condition remain unresolved. The extent to which other hereditary macular dystrophies such as Stargardts disease, familial radial drusen (malattia leventinese), Best's disease, and peripherin/RDS-related dystrophy are related to AMD remains unclear. Alzheimer's disease, another late onset, heterogeneous degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, offers a valuable model for identifying the issues that confront AMD genetics.

  6. Age-related differences in arithmetic strategy sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I review a series of new findings concerning how age-related changes in strategic variations are modulated by sequential effects. Sequential effects refer to how strategy selection and strategy execution on current problems are influenced by which strategy is used on immediately preceding problems. Two sequential effects during strategy selection (i.e., strategy revisions and strategy perseverations) and during strategy execution (i.e., strategy switch costs and modulations of poorer strategy effects) are presented. I also discuss how these effects change with age during adulthood. These phenomena are important, as they shed light on arithmetic processes and how these processes change with age during adulthood. In particular, they speak to the role of executive control while participants select and execute arithmetic strategies. Finally, I discuss the implications of sequential effects for theories of strategies and of arithmetic.

  7. Age-related macular degeneration and the complement system.

    PubMed

    Khandhadia, S; Cipriani, V; Yates, J R W; Lotery, A J

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. It is a complex multifactorial disease, and despite new advances in treatment, many patients still succumb to visual impairment. The complement pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, and recently variants in several genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been associated with AMD. Complement proteins have been found in histological specimens of eyes with AMD. Altered levels of both intrinsic complement proteins and activated products have been found in the circulation of patients with AMD. Complement activation may be triggered by oxidative stress, resulting from retinal exposure to incoming light; indeed an inter-play between these two pathological processes seems to exist. Finally, complement inhibitors are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. This article reviews the role of the complement system in AMD, and the potential of complement inhibition in preventing the devastating blindness resulting from this disease.

  8. The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Peelle, Jonathan E; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension.

  9. Dietary folate improves age-related decreases in lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Field, Catherine J; Van Aerde, Arne; Drager, Kelly L; Goruk, Susan; Basu, Tapan

    2006-01-01

    Although low folate status is thought to be fairly common in the older population, its implication on immunity has not been adequately investigated. Using 11-month-old and 23-month-old male rats (Fisher 344), the present study was undertaken to examine the modifying effects of feeding a control diet (NIH-07) supplemented with folate (35.7 mg/kg) for 3 weeks on the immune cells of spleen and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) origin. The serum concentrations of folate along with vitamin B(12) were elevated in response to the folate supplementation (P<.05). These results were accompanied by an improved proliferative response (stimulation index) to mitogens in both the spleen and MLNs (P<.05). The proportion of T cells in the MLNs, but not in the spleen, was significantly increased in rats fed a diet supplemented with folate. In the spleen, the folate-supplemented diet prevented the age-associated decrease (P<.05) in the production of interferon (IFN)alpha by unstimulated cells and the decrease in T-helper (Th)1/Th2-type response after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. In the MLNs, on the other hand, the folate-supplemented diet failed to influence any age-related increase in interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha and IFNgamma following stimulation but did result in a significantly increased production of IL-4 (P<.05). Overall, this study provides data suggesting that aging is associated with changes in the proportion of T cells, the ability of immune cells to proliferate and the production of cytokines after stimulation. Supplementing a folate-sufficient diet with additional folate improves proliferative response to mitogens, the distribution of T cells in the MLNs and the age-related changes in cytokine production in the spleen. These results suggest that the dietary folate requirement may be higher in the older population than in the younger population to support immune functions.

  10. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  12. Age-related modifications in neural cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A U

    1992-09-01

    Integrated cardiovascular responses to a range of different stimuli, as well as the overall, spontaneously occurring variability in blood pressure and heart rate, undergo complex changes with aging. A general trend is that homeostatic control mechanisms lose part of their ability to modulate heart rate and to buffer the concomitant blood pressure variations; the two phenomena are possibly linked by a cause-effect relationship. A detailed analysis of the age-related changes in the major reflex systems reveals a clear-cut impairment in arterial baroreceptor control of the heart rate, but much less pronounced changes in its control of blood pressure, on the other hand, both the hemodynamic and humoral components of the cardiopulmonary reflex appear to be markedly attenuated. The experimental evidence of the mechanisms underlying these changes is still largely incomplete, and it appears that the gaps will have to be filled by a systematic, detailed analysis, i.e., that no generalizations or extrapolations will be possible. Indeed, the data available so far indicate that the age-related alterations are highly non-uniform, some functions undergoing a definite impairment but others being much better preserved and some being even enhanced; thus aging is by no means associated with a generalized decline in cardiovascular functions and should instead be viewed as a complex, highly selective process. These peculiar biological features of the aging phenomena merit further investigation in both the cardiovascular and the other organ systems, in order to verify the possibility that currently unrecognized homeostatic potentials in the elderly subject may be exploited to advance his/her clinical management in health and disease.

  13. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  14. Age-Related Tissue Stiffening: Cause and Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Tissue elasticity is severely compromised in aging skin, lungs, and blood vessels. In the vascular and pulmonary systems, respectively, loss of mechanical function is linked to hypertension, which in turn is a risk factor for heart and renal failure, stroke, and aortic aneurysms, and to an increased risk of mortality as a result of acute lung infections. Recent Advances Although cellular mechanisms were thought to play an important role in mediating tissue aging, the reason for the apparent sensitivity of elastic fibers to age-related degradation remained unclear. We have recently demonstrated that compared with type I collagen, a key component of the elastic fiber system, the cysteine-rich fibrillin microfibril is highly susceptible to direct UV exposure in a cell-free environment. We hypothesized therefore that, as a consequence of both their remarkable longevity and cysteine-rich composition, many elastic fiber-associated components will be susceptible to the accumulation of damage by both direct UV radiation and reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidation. Critical Issues Although elastic fiber remodeling is a common feature of aging dynamic tissues, the inaccessibility of most human tissues has hampered attempts to define the molecular causes. Clinical Care Relevance Although, currently, the localized repair of damaged elastic fibers may be effected by the topical application of retinoids and some cosmetic products, future studies may extend the application of systemic transforming growth factor β antagonists, which can prevent cardiovascular remodeling in murine Marfan syndrome, to aging humans. Acellular mechanisms may be key mediators of elastic fiber remodeling and hence age-related tissue stiffening. PMID:24527318

  15. Fetal thymus graft prevents age-related hearing loss and up regulation of the IL-1 receptor type II gene in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Inaba, Muneo

    2012-09-15

    We found that rejuvenation of the recipient immunity by inoculation of young CD4(+) T cells or a fetal thymus graft led to down regulation of the interleukin 1 receptor type II (IL-1R2) gene in CD4(+) T cells and reduced age-related hearing loss and degeneration of the spiral ganglion in SAMP1 mice, a murine model of human senescence. Our studies on the relationship between age-related systemic immune dysfunctions and neurodegeneration mechanisms open up new avenues of treatment of neurosenescence, including presbycusis, for which there is no effective therapy.

  16. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip Pn

    2015-11-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt.

  17. Meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles identifies common signatures of aging

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Curado, João; Church, George M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous microarray studies of aging have been conducted, yet given the noisy nature of gene expression changes with age, elucidating the transcriptional features of aging and how these relate to physiological, biochemical and pathological changes remains a critical problem. Results: We performed a meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles using 27 datasets from mice, rats and humans. Our results reveal several common signatures of aging, including 56 genes consistently overexpressed with age, the most significant of which was APOD, and 17 genes underexpressed with age. We characterized the biological processes associated with these signatures and found that age-related gene expression changes most notably involve an overexpression of inflammation and immune response genes and of genes associated with the lysosome. An underexpression of collagen genes and of genes associated with energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial genes, as well as alterations in the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle and cellular senescence biomarkers, were also observed. By employing a new method that emphasizes sensitivity, our work further reveals previously unknown transcriptional changes with age in many genes, processes and functions. We suggest these molecular signatures reflect a combination of degenerative processes but also transcriptional responses to the process of aging. Overall, our results help to understand how transcriptional changes relate to the process of aging and could serve as targets for future studies. Availability: http://genomics.senescence.info/uarrays/signatures.html Contact: jp@senescence.info Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19189975

  18. Update on the role of genetics in the onset of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Peter James; Klein, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), akin to other common age-related diseases, has a complex pathogenesis and arises from the interplay of genes, environmental factors, and personal characteristics. The past decade has seen very significant strides towards identification of those precise genetic variants associated with disease. That genes encoding proteins of the (alternative) complement pathway (CFH, C2, CFB, C3, CFI) are major players in etiology came as a surprise to many but has already lead to the development of therapies entering human clinical trials. Other genes replicated in many populations ARMS2, APOE, variants near TIMP3, and genes involved in lipid metabolism have also been implicated in disease pathogenesis. The genes discovered to date can be estimated to account for approximately 50% of the genetic variance of AMD and have been discovered by candidate gene approaches, pathway analysis, and latterly genome-wide association studies. Next generation sequencing modalities and meta-analysis techniques are being employed with the aim of identifying the remaining rarer but, perhaps, individually more significant sequence variations, linked to disease status. Complementary studies have also begun to utilize this genetic information to develop clinically useful algorithms to predict AMD risk and evaluate pharmacogenetics. In this article, contemporary commentary is provided on rapidly progressing efforts to elucidate the genetic pathogenesis of AMD as the field stands at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. PMID:21887094

  19. [Gonadal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tahara, R; Toma, Y; Yanaihara, T

    1997-11-01

    Function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is an essential factor for the maintenance of regular cycles in mature women. The disturbance of function of those organs causes gonadal dysfunction such as anovulation, amenorrhea and menstrual disorders. Therefore, the correct diagnosis for the assessment of CNS and ovarian function is clinically important to treat the patients those who have an menstrual disorders. In this review, the mechanism of normal gonadal cycles and the diagnostic method and the treatment of gonadal dysfunction are described.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of plasma proteins in patients with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin-Rong; Zhong, Lu; Huang, Bing-Lin; Wei, Yuan-Hua; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Fu-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To find the significant altered proteins in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients as potential biomarkers of AMD. METHODS A comparative analysis of the protein pattern of AMD patients versus healthy controls was performed by means of proteomic analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. RESULTS We identified 28 proteins that were significantly altered with clinical relevance in AMD patients. These proteins were involved in a wide range of biological functions including immune responses, growth cytokines, cell fate determination, wound healing, metabolism, and anti-oxidance. CONCLUSION These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of AMD patient plasma. In addition to the utility of this approach for biomarker discovery, identification of alterations in endogenous proteins in the plasma of AMD patient could improve our understanding of the disease pathogenesis. PMID:24790867

  1. THE ENERGY-REDOX AXIS IN AGING AND AGE-RELATED NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V.; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Decrease in mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity is a feature of the aging process that accompanies redox alterations, such as increased generation of mitochondrial oxidants, altered GSH status, and increased protein oxidation. The decrease in mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity and altered redox status should be viewed as a concerted process that embodies the mitochondrial energy – redox axis and is linked through various mechanisms including: (a) an inter-convertible reducing equivalents pool (i.e., NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H) and (b) redox-mediated protein post-translational modifications involved in energy metabolism. The energy–redox axis provides the rationale for therapeutic approaches targeted to each or both component(s) of the axis that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function and that have implications for aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19716388

  2. The impact of sleep on age-related sarcopenia: Possible connections and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Piovezan, Ronaldo D; Abucham, Julio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Mello, Marco Tulio; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2015-09-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric condition that comprises declined skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, leading to the risk of multiple adverse outcomes, including death. Its pathophysiology involves neuroendocrine and inflammatory factors, unfavorable nutritional habits and low physical activity. Sleep may play a role in muscle protein metabolism, although this hypothesis has not been studied extensively. Reductions in duration and quality of sleep and increases in prevalence of circadian rhythm and sleep disorders with age favor proteolysis, modify body composition and increase the risk of insulin resistance, all of which have been associated with sarcopenia. Data on the effects of age-related slow-wave sleep decline, circadian rhythm disruptions and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG), somatotropic axes, and glucose metabolism indicate that sleep disorder interventions may affect muscle loss. Recent research associating OSA with the risk of conditions closely related to the sarcopenia process, such as frailty and sleep quality impairment, indirectly suggest that sleep can influence skeletal muscle decline in the elderly. Several protein synthesis and degradation pathways are mediated by growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, cortisol and insulin, which act on the cellular and molecular levels to increase or reestablish muscle fiber, strength and function. Age-related sleep problems potentially interfere intracellularly by inhibiting anabolic hormone cascades and enhancing catabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle. Specific physical exercises combined or not with nutritional recommendations are the current treatment options for sarcopenia. Clinical studies testing exogenous administration of anabolic hormones have not yielded adequate safety profiles. Therapeutic approaches targeting sleep disturbances to normalize circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis may

  3. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-arginine, N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD+, and NADP+. Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson’s coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4–2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  4. The impact of sleep on age-related sarcopenia: Possible connections and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Piovezan, Ronaldo D; Abucham, Julio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Mello, Marco Tulio; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2015-09-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric condition that comprises declined skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, leading to the risk of multiple adverse outcomes, including death. Its pathophysiology involves neuroendocrine and inflammatory factors, unfavorable nutritional habits and low physical activity. Sleep may play a role in muscle protein metabolism, although this hypothesis has not been studied extensively. Reductions in duration and quality of sleep and increases in prevalence of circadian rhythm and sleep disorders with age favor proteolysis, modify body composition and increase the risk of insulin resistance, all of which have been associated with sarcopenia. Data on the effects of age-related slow-wave sleep decline, circadian rhythm disruptions and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG), somatotropic axes, and glucose metabolism indicate that sleep disorder interventions may affect muscle loss. Recent research associating OSA with the risk of conditions closely related to the sarcopenia process, such as frailty and sleep quality impairment, indirectly suggest that sleep can influence skeletal muscle decline in the elderly. Several protein synthesis and degradation pathways are mediated by growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, cortisol and insulin, which act on the cellular and molecular levels to increase or reestablish muscle fiber, strength and function. Age-related sleep problems potentially interfere intracellularly by inhibiting anabolic hormone cascades and enhancing catabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle. Specific physical exercises combined or not with nutritional recommendations are the current treatment options for sarcopenia. Clinical studies testing exogenous administration of anabolic hormones have not yielded adequate safety profiles. Therapeutic approaches targeting sleep disturbances to normalize circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis may

  5. Running for Exercise Mitigates Age-Related Deterioration of Walking Economy

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Justus D.; Beck, Owen N.; Roby, Jaclyn M.; Turney, Aria L.; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy) compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy. Purpose To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults. Methods 15 older adults (69±3 years) who walk ≥30 min, 3x/week for exercise, “walkers” and 15 older adults (69±5 years) who run ≥30 min, 3x/week, “runners” walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s). We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study. Results Older runners had a 7–10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016) and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p = .237). We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p = .461) and ∼26% worse walking economy than young adults (p<.0001). Conclusion Running mitigates the age-related deterioration of walking economy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy. PMID:25411850

  6. Progress on retinal image analysis for age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Abràmoff, Michael D; Smith, R Theodore; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in those over the age of 50 years in the developed countries. The number is expected to increase by ∼1.5 fold over the next ten years due to an increase in aging population. One of the main measures of AMD severity is the analysis of drusen, pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) from imaging based on color fundus photograph, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and other imaging modalities. Each of these imaging modalities has strengths and weaknesses for extracting individual AMD pathology and different imaging techniques are used in combination for capturing and/or quantification of different pathologies. Current dry AMD treatments cannot cure or reverse vision loss. However, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed that specific anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation reduces the risk of progression from intermediate stages (defined as the presence of either many medium-sized drusen or one or more large drusen) to late AMD which allows for preventative strategies in properly identified patients. Thus identification of people with early stage AMD is important to design and implement preventative strategies for late AMD, and determine their cost-effectiveness. A mass screening facility with teleophthalmology or telemedicine in combination with computer-aided analysis for large rural-based communities may identify more individuals suitable for early stage AMD prevention. In this review, we discuss different imaging modalities that are currently being considered or used for screening AMD. In addition, we look into various automated and semi-automated computer-aided grading systems and related retinal image analysis techniques for drusen, geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization detection and/or quantification for measurement of AMD severity using these imaging modalities. We also review the existing telemedicine studies which

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Histone Lysine Demethylases: Impact on the Aging Process and Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an environmental stress at high altitude and underground conditions but it is also present in many chronic age-related diseases, where blood flow into tissues is impaired. The oxygen-sensing system stimulates gene expression protecting tissues against hypoxic insults. Hypoxia stabilizes the expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α), which controls the expression of hundreds of survival genes related to e.g. enhanced energy metabolism and autophagy. Moreover, many stress-related signaling mechanisms, such as oxidative stress and energy metabolic disturbances, as well as the signaling cascades via ceramide, mTOR, NF-κB, and TGF-β pathways, can also induce the expression of HIF-1α protein to facilitate cell survival in normoxia. Hypoxia is linked to prominent epigenetic changes in chromatin landscape. Screening studies have indicated that the stabilization of HIF-1α increases the expression of distinct histone lysine demethylases (KDM). HIF-1α stimulates the expression of KDM3A, KDM4B, KDM4C, and KDM6B, which enhance gene transcription by demethylating H3K9 and H3K27 sites (repressive epigenetic marks). In addition, HIF-1α induces the expression of KDM2B and KDM5B, which repress transcription by demethylating H3K4me2,3 sites (activating marks). Hypoxia-inducible KDMs support locally the gene transcription induced by HIF-1α, although they can also control genome-wide chromatin landscape, especially KDMs which demethylate H3K9 and H3K27 sites. These epigenetic marks have important role in the control of heterochromatin segments and 3D folding of chromosomes, as well as the genetic loci regulating cell type commitment, proliferation, and cellular senescence, e.g. the INK4 box. A chronic stimulation of HIF-1α can provoke tissue fibrosis and cellular senescence, which both are increasingly present with aging and age-related diseases. We will review the regulation of HIF-1α-dependent induction of KDMs and clarify their role in

  8. Age-related changes in deformability of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutera, S P; Gardner, R A; Boylan, C W; Carroll, G L; Chang, K C; Marvel, J S; Kilo, C; Gonen, B; Williamson, J R

    1985-02-01

    The present study was designed to further the characterization of age-related changes in the deformability of human erythrocytes. The top (approximately young) and bottom (approximately old) 10% fractions of density-separated red cells from ten normal donors were subjected to graded levels of shear stress in a rheoscope. Measurements were made of steady-state elongation (cells tank treading in a state of dynamic equilibrium) and the time course of shape recovery following abrupt cessation of shear. In parallel with the rheologic experiments, several physical and chemical properties were assayed to determine correlates of mechanical properties. These included mean cell volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, type A1 hemoglobin, glucosylation of membrane proteins, and membrane phospholipid and protein concentration. The microrheologic observations revealed that only about 90% of the old cells retained their capacity to tank tread. However, the tank-treading cells elongated less than their younger counterparts at corresponding levels of shear stress, thus demonstrating a reduced level of deformability. Further analysis of the data indicates that increases in membrane viscosity and elastic modulus along with a significant loss in excess surface area contribute to the limitation of the ability of the older cells to change shape.

  9. Aging-related differences in chondrocyte viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Steklov, Nikolai; Srivastava, Ajay; Sung, K L P; Chen, Peter C; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2009-06-01

    The biomechanical properties of articular cartilage change profoundly with aging. These changes have been linked with increased potential for cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, less is known about the change in biomechanical properties of chondrocytes with increasing age. Cell stiffness can affect mechanotransduction pathways and may alter cell function. We measured aging-related changes in the biomechanical properties of chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from knee articular cartilage within 48 hours after death or from osteochondral specimens obtained from knee arthroplasty. Cells were divided into two age groups: between 18 and 35 years (18 - 35); and greater than 55 years (55+) of age. The 55+ group was further subdivided based on visual grade of osteoarthritis: normal (N) or osteoarthritic (OA). The viscoelastic properties of the cell were measured using the previously described micropipette cell aspiration technique. The equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, and apparent viscosity were significantly higher in the 55+ year age group than in the 18 - 35 age group. On the other hand, no differences were found in the equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, or apparent viscosity between the N and OA groups. The increase in cell stiffness can be attributed to altered mechanical properties of the cell membrane, the cytoplasm, or the cytoskeleton. Increased stiffness has been reported in osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which in turn has been attributed to the actin cytoskeleton. A similar mechanism may be responsible for our finding of increased stiffness in aging chondrocytes. With advancing age, changes in the biomechanical properties of the cell could alter molecular and biochemical responses.

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993–2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  11. Promising new treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2006-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from existing blood vessels, is responsible for vision loss in a variety of ophthalmic diseases. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause for legal blindness in many industrialised countries, abnormal blood vessels grow in the macula and cause blindness. There are a number of factors important in the angiogenic cascade but VEGF-A has been implicated in recent years as the major factor responsible for neovascular and exudative diseases of the eye. Numerous antiangiogenic drugs are in development but anti-VEGF drugs have shown great promise in treating neovascular AMD and other ocular diseases, and many of these drugs have been adopted from oncology where antiangiogenic therapy is gaining wide acceptance. For the first time in neovascular AMD, anti-VEGF drugs have brought the hope of vision improvement to a significant proportion of patients. This review provides an overview on angiogenic mechanisms, potential antiangiogenic treatment strategies and different antiangiogenic drugs with special focus on neovascular AMD.

  12. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Robert; Jackson, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD). Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET). Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002), with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections. PMID:21311657

  13. Review of nutrient actions on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zampatti, Stefania; Ricci, Federico; Cusumano, Andrea; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Novelli, Giuseppe; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-02-01

    The actions of nutrients and related compounds on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are explained in this review. The findings from 80 studies published since 2003 on the association between diet and supplements in AMD were reviewed. Antioxidants and other nutrients with an effect on AMD susceptibility include carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin, β-carotene), vitamins (vitamin A, E, C, D, B), mineral supplements (zinc, copper, selenium), dietary fatty acids [monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA both omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA), saturated fatty acids and cholesterol], and dietary carbohydrates. The literature revealed that many of these antioxidants and nutrients exert a protective role by functioning synergistically. Specifically, the use of dietary supplements with targeted actions can provide minimal benefits on the onset or progression of AMD; however, this does not appear to be particularly beneficial in healthy people. Furthermore, some supplements or nutrients have demonstrated discordant effects on AMD in some studies. Since intake of dietary supplements, as well as exposure to damaging environmental factors, is largely dependent on population habits (including dietary practices) and geographical localization, an overall healthy diet appears to be the best strategy in reducing the risk of developing AMD. As of now, the precise mechanism of action of certain nutrients in AMD prevention remains unclear. Thus, future studies are required to examine the effects that nutrients have on AMD and to determine which factors are most strongly correlated with reducing the risk of AMD or preventing its progression. PMID:24461310

  14. Age-related changes in skin topography and microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Marsaut, David; Sainthillier, Jean Marie; Nouveau, Stéphanie; Gharbi, Tijani; de Lacharriere, Olivier; Humbert, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    Skin topography and microvasculature undergo characteristic changes with age. Although several non-invasive bioengineering methods are currently available to measure them quantitatively, few publications have referred to their relationship with age in different anatomical sites. This study was carried out to observe the age-related changes of the skin topography and skin microcirculation. The microrelief was assessed with special processing software from scanning by interference fringe profilometry of silicone replicas performed on two sites (volar forearm and back of hand) on 50 female volunteers (aged 20-74 years who consisted of ten probands in each decade). The superficial vascular network of both sites was assessed by videocapillaroscopy, and the subpapillary vascular plexus was studied with laser Doppler flowmetry. Skin color, which is affected by blood flow, was observed by colorimeter. The skin roughness and the mean height between peak and valley increased with age. There were statistically significant differences between the evaluated sites. This study also shows that the capillary loops in the dermal papillae decrease but the subpapillary plexus increase with age. The interference fringe profilometry associated with videocapillaroscopy may be useful and accurate to measure the efficacy of medical or cosmetic products to delay skin aging.

  15. The Theory Behind the Age-Related Positivity Effect

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Andrew E.; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    The “positivity effect” refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather and Carstensen, 2005) scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people. PMID:23060825

  16. The Chromospheric Activity-Age Relation for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, N. M.; Oswalt, T. D.; Hawley, S. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present preliminary results from our study in which we use moderate resolution spectroscopy to determine the correlation between the chromospheric activity and age of M dwarf stars in wide binary systems. We have observed ~50 M dwarf stars from our sample with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. We measure the ratio of Hα luminosity to the bolometric luminosity (LHα /Lbol) of the M dwarf---a measure of activity that is proven to correlate well with age. This project is unique in that it will extend the chromospheric activity-age relation of low-mass main sequence stars beyond the ages provided by cluster methods. The ages so determined are also independent of the uncertainties in cluster age determinations. The technique has the potential to improve by at least a factor of two the precision and the range over which ages can currently be determined for main sequence stars. Work on this project is supported by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program grant NGT-50290 (N.M.S.).

  17. Age related changes in steroid receptors on cultured lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1986-03-05

    The number of high affinity glucocorticoid receptors (Ro) on human fetal lung fibroblasts decreases as the cells age in vitro, and it has been suggested that these cell systems may be useful models of age-related changes in vivo. They examined the relation between change in Ro with in vitro aging and donor age. Confluent monolayers of lung fibroblasts at various population doubling levels (PDL), were incubated with (/sup 3/H)-dexamethasone ((/sup 3/H)Dex) either alone or with excess (.01 mM) Dex. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between radioactivity in cells incubated with and without unlabeled Dex; Scatchard plots were used to analyze the data. Ro, measured as fmol (/sup 3/H)Dex/10/sup 6/ cells, for two lines of human fetal cells (HFL-1 and MRC-5) decreased with increasing age in vitro. However, human newborn (CRL-1485) and adult (CCL-201) cells and fetal rabbit cells (FAB-290), showed increases in Ro with continuous passage. For each cell line, the affinity constant (K/sub d/) did not change significantly with passage. They conclude that the direction of changes in steroid receptor levels on cells aging in vitro is influenced by donor age and species. Caution should be used in applying results obtained from model systems to aging organisms.

  18. Age-related neural changes in autobiographical remembering and imagining.

    PubMed

    Addis, Donna Rose; Roberts, Reece P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2011-11-01

    Numerous neuroimaging studies have revealed that in young adults, remembering the past and imagining the future engage a common core network. Although it has been observed that older adults engage a similar network during these tasks, it is unclear whether or not they activate this network in a similar manner to young adults. Young and older participants completed two autobiographical tasks (imagining future events and recalling past events) in addition to a semantic-visuospatial control task. Spatiotemporal Partial Least Squares analyses examined whole brain patterns of activity across both the construction and elaboration of autobiographical events. These analyses revealed that that both age groups activated a similar network during the autobiographical tasks. However, some key age-related differences in the activation of this network emerged. During the construction of autobiographical events, older adults showed less activation relative to younger adults, in regions supporting episodic detail such as the medial temporal lobes and the precuneus. Later in the trial, older adults showed differential recruitment of medial and lateral temporal regions supporting the elaboration of autobiographical events, and possibly reflecting an increased role of conceptual information when older adults describe their pasts and their futures.

  19. Parabiosis for the study of age-related chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Eggel, Alexander; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Summary Modern medicine wields the power to treat large numbers of diseases and injuries most of us would have died from just a hundred years ago. In view of this tremendous achievement, it can seem as if progress has slowed, and we have been unable to impact the most devastating diseases of our time. Chronic diseases of age such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, or Alzheimer’s disease turn out to be of a complexity that may require transformative ideas and paradigms to understand and treat them. Parabiosis, which mimics aspects of the naturally occurring shared blood supply in conjoined twins in humans and certain animals, may just have the power to be such a transformative experimental paradigm. Forgotten and now shunned in many countries, it has contributed to major breakthroughs in tumor biology, endocrinology, and transplantation research in the past century, and a set of new studies in the US and Britain report stunning advances in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration using parabiosis between young and old mice. We review here briefly the history of parabiosis and discuss its utility to study physiological and pathophysiological processes. We argue that parabiosis is a technique that should enjoy wider acceptance and application, and that policies should be revisited especially if one is to study complex age-related, chronic disorders. PMID:24496774

  20. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  1. Age-related hearing loss increases cross-modal distractibility.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Sandmann, Pascale; Bendixen, Alexandra; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-10-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have provided evidence that changes in multisensory processing in auditory cortex cannot only be observed following extensive hearing loss, but also in moderately hearing-impaired subjects. How the reduced auditory input affects audio-visual interactions is however largely unknown. Here we used a cross-modal distraction paradigm to investigate multisensory processing in elderly participants with an age-related high-frequency hearing loss as compared to young and elderly subjects with normal hearing. During the experiment, participants were simultaneously presented with independent streams of auditory and visual input and were asked to categorize either the auditory or visual information while ignoring the other modality. Unisensory sequences without any cross-modal input served as control conditions to assure that all participants were able to perform the task. While all groups performed similarly in these unisensory conditions, hearing-impaired participants showed significantly increased error rates when confronted with distracting cross-modal stimulation. This effect could be observed in both the auditory and the visual task. Supporting these findings, an additional regression analysis indicted that the degree of high-frequency hearing loss significantly modulates cross-modal visual distractibility in the auditory task. These findings provide new evidence that already a moderate sub-clinical hearing loss, a common phenomenon in the elderly population, affects the processing of audio-visual information.

  2. Modifiable risk factors for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Guymer, Robyn H; Chong, Elaine Wei-Tinn

    2006-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in Australia and other Western countries. As there is no cure for AMD, and treatments to stop its progression have met with limited success, there is an interest in identifying modifiable risk factors to prevent or slow disease progression. To date, smoking is the only proven modifiable risk factor for AMD. Other factors under study include (i) cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, body mass index, and atherosclerosis; and (ii) dietary risk factors including fat and antioxidant intake, but so far these studies have produced conflicting results. Dietary fat in relation to AMD has recently attracted media attention. Despite very limited work supporting an association between vegetable fat and AMD, widespread publicity advocating margarine as a cause of AMD and encouraging use of butter instead has caused confusion and anxiety among sufferers of AMD and the general public, as well as concern among health professionals. The antioxidant carotenoids--lutein and zeaxanthin--found in dark green or yellow vegetables exist in high concentrations in the macula and are hypothesised to play a protective role. Of nine controlled trials of supplementation with carotenoids and other antioxidants, three suggested that various combinations of antioxidants and carotenoids were protective. While a low-fat diet rich in dark green and yellow vegetables is advocated in general, any specific recommendations regarding certain fats or antioxidant supplementation and AMD are not based on consistent findings at this stage. PMID:16646746

  3. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD. PMID:27348529

  4. Defining the boundary: age-related changes in childhood amnesia.

    PubMed

    Tustin, Karen; Hayne, Harlene

    2010-09-01

    Childhood amnesia refers to the inability of adults to recall events that occurred during their infancy and early childhood. Although it is generally assumed that children and adolescents also experience childhood amnesia, with limited exceptions, most empirical research on the phenomenon has focused exclusively on adults. Here, we developed a new Timeline procedure to directly compare the early memories reported by children, adolescents, and adults. Overall, the proportion of memories reported before the age of 3 years was greater for the children and adolescents relative to the adults. In addition, the single earliest memory reported by children and adolescents was at a younger age than that reported by adults. In fact, the earliest memories reported by the children and adolescents, but not the adults, were significantly younger than the traditional 3 (1/2)-year-old boundary of childhood amnesia. Regardless of the age of the rememberer, participants' early memories had the same episodic characteristics. We conclude that the boundary and the density of childhood amnesia may increase over the course of human development and that age-related changes in basic memory mechanisms make an important contribution to our understanding of the source of childhood amnesia.

  5. Epigenetic modification of PKMζ rescues aging-related cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xue, Yan-Xue; Han, Ying; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Deng, Jia-Hui; Chen, Na; Bao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cao, Lin-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Shi, Jie; Song, Wei-Hong; Lu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Cognition is impacted by aging. However, the mechanisms that underlie aging-associated cognitive impairment are unclear. Here we showed that cognitive decline in aged rats was associated with changes in DNA methylation of protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) in the prelimbic cortex (PrL). PKMζ is a crucial molecule involved in the maintenance of long-term memory. Using different behavioral models, we confirmed that aged rats exhibited cognitive impairment in memory retention test 24 h after training, and overexpression of PKMζ in the PrL rescued cognitive impairment in aged rats. After fear conditioning, the protein levels of PKMζ and the membrane expression of GluR2 increased in the PrL in young and adult rats but not in aged rats, and the levels of methylated PKMζ DNA in the PrL decreased in all age groups, whereas the levels of unmethylated PKMζ DNA increased only in young and adult rats. We also found that environmentally enriched housing reversed the hypermethylation of PKMζ and restored cognitive performance in aged rats. Inactivation of PKMζ prevented the potentiating effects of environmental enrichment on memory retention in aged rats. These results indicated that PKMζ might be a potential target for the treatment of aging-related cognitive impairment, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue.

  6. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993-2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic's structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  7. Age-related impairment of mesenchymal progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Stolzing, Alexandra; Scutt, Andrew

    2006-06-01

    In most mesenchymal tissues a subcompartment of multipotent progenitor cells is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the tissue following trauma. With increasing age, the ability of tissues to repair themselves is diminished, which may be due to reduced functional capacity of the progenitor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on rat mesenchymal progenitor cells. Mesenchymal progenitor cells were isolated from Wistar rats aged 3, 7, 12 and 56 weeks. Viability, capacity for differentiation and cellular aging were examined. Cells from the oldest group accumulated raised levels of oxidized proteins and lipids and showed decreased levels of antioxidative enzyme activity. This was reflected in decreased fibroblast colony-forming unit (CFU-f) numbers, increased levels of apoptosis and reduced proliferation and potential for differentiation. These data suggest that the reduced ability to maintain mesenchymal tissue homeostasis in aged mammals is not purely due to a decline in progenitor cells numbers but also to a loss of progenitor functionality due to the accumulation of oxidative damage, which may in turn be a causative factor in a number of age-related pathologies such as arthritis, tendinosis and osteoporosis.

  8. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993-2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic's structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning.

  9. Nutritional Risk Factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Lebriz; Lechanteur, Yara T.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Kirchhof, Bernd; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of nutritional factors, serum lipids, and lipoproteins in late age-related macular degeneration (late AMD). Methods. Intake of red meat, fruit, fish, vegetables, and alcohol, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) were ascertained questionnaire-based in 1147 late AMD cases and 1773 controls from the European Genetic Database. Serum levels of lipids and lipoproteins were determined. The relationship between nutritional factors and late AMD was assessed using logistic regression. Based on multivariate analysis, area-under-the-curve (AUC) was calculated by receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC). Results. In a multivariate analysis, besides age and smoking, obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.44, P = 0.014) and red meat intake (daily: OR: 2.34, P = 8.22 × 10−6; 2–6x/week: OR: 1.67, P = 7.98 × 10−5) were identified as risk factors for developing late AMD. Fruit intake showed a protective effect (daily: OR: 0.52, P = 0.005; 2–6x/week: OR: 0.58, P = 0.035). Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels showed no significant association with late AMD. ROC for nutritional factors, smoking, age, and BMI revealed an AUC of 0.781. Conclusion. Red meat intake and obesity were independently associated with increased risk for late AMD, whereas fruit intake was protective. A better understanding of nutritional risk factors is necessary for the prevention of AMD. PMID:25101280

  10. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  11. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration among the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Zarghami, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Rajaee, Neda; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Elahe; Mikaniki, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in elderly population in the developing countries. Previous epidemiological studies revealed various potential modifiable risk factors for this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AMD among elderly living in Babol, North of Iran. Methods: The study population of this cross-sectional study came from the Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP), the first comprehensive cohort study of the health of people aged 60 years and over in Amirkola, North of Iran. The prevalence of AMD was estimated and its risk was determined using logistic regression analysis (LRA) with regard to variables such as smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Results: Five hundred and five participants with mean age of 71.55±5.9 (ranged 60-89) years entered the study. The prevalence of AMD was 17.6%. There was a significant association between AMD and smoking (P<0.001) but no association was seen with AMD and age, level of education, history of hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Multiple LRAs revealed that smoking increased AMD by odds ratio of 5.03 (95% confidence interval 2.47-10.23 p<0.001) as compared to nonsmokers Conclusion: According to our findings, the prevalence of AMD was relatively high and smoking increased the risk of AMD in the elderly population. PMID:26644880

  12. Age-Related Changes in Demand–Withdraw Communication Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Sarah R.; Haase, Claudia M.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Demand–withdraw communication is a set of conflict-related behaviors in which one partner blames or pressures while the other partner withdraws or avoids. The present study examined age-related changes in these behaviors longitudinally over the course of later life stages. One hundred twenty-seven middle-aged and older long-term married couples were observed at 3 time points across 13 years as they engaged in a conversation about an area of relationship conflict. Husbands’ and wives’ demand–withdraw behaviors (i.e., blame, pressure, withdrawal, avoidance) were objectively rated by trained coders at each time point. Data were analyzed using dyad-level latent growth curve models in a structural equation modeling framework. For both husbands and wives, the results showed a longitudinal pattern of increasing avoidance behavior over time and stability in all other demand and withdraw behaviors. This study supports the notion that there is an important developmental shift in the way that conflict is handled in later life. PMID:23913982

  13. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  14. Age-related changes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Comunoglu, Nil Ustundag; Comunoglu, Cem; Eren, Bulent; Ekici, Isin Dogan; Ozkan, Ferda

    2008-05-01

    The human brain is uniquely powerful in its cognitive abilities, yet the hippocampal and neocortical circuits that mediate these complex functions are highly vulnerable during aging. In this study, we analyzed age-related changes in the rat hippocampus by studying newborn (1 month), middle-aged (12 months), and older (24 months) male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We evaluated neuronal dystrophy, neuron scattering, and granulovacuolar degeneration in the hippocampal area using light microscopy, according to age and gender. We detected significant neuronal dystrophy in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas in male rats, and in the CA1, CA3, and CA4 areas in female rats. Degenerative changes, indicated by neuron scattering, were observed in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 areas of male and the CA2 and CA4 areas of female rats. Changes in all areas of the hippocampus were observed with increasing age; these changes included neuronal dystrophy and neuron scattering and did not differ significantly between male and female rats.

  15. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD.

  16. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  17. Caspase-2 Deficiency Enhances Aging-Related Traits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingpei; Padalecki, Susan S; Chaudhuri, Asish R; Waal, Eric De; Goins, Beth A; Grubbs, Barry; Ikeno, Yuji; Richardson, Arlan; Mundy, Gregory R; Herman, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Alteration of apoptotic activity has been observed in a number of tissues in aging mammals, but it remains unclear whether and/or how apoptosis may affect aging. Caspase-2 is a member of the cysteine protease family that plays a critical role in apoptosis. To understand the impact of compromised apoptosis function on mammalian aging, we conducted a comparative study on caspase-2 deficient mice and their wild-type littermates with a specific focus on the aging-related traits at advanced ages. We found that caspase-2 deficiency enhanced a number of traits commonly seen in premature aging animals. Loss of caspase-2 was associated with shortened maximum lifespan, impaired hair growth, increased bone loss, and reduced body fat content. In addition, we found that the livers of caspase-2 deficient mice had higher levels of oxidized proteins than those of age-matched wild-type mice, suggesting that caspase-2 deficiency compromised the animal's ability to clear oxidatively damaged cells. Collectively, these results suggest that caspase-2 deficiency affects aging in the mice. This study thus demonstrates for the first time that disruption of a key apoptotic gene has a significant impact on aging. PMID:17188333

  18. Epigenetic modification of PKMζ rescues aging-related cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Xue, Yan-Xue; Han, Ying; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Deng, Jia-Hui; Chen, Na; Bao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cao, Lin-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Shi, Jie; Song, Wei-Hong; Lu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cognition is impacted by aging. However, the mechanisms that underlie aging-associated cognitive impairment are unclear. Here we showed that cognitive decline in aged rats was associated with changes in DNA methylation of protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) in the prelimbic cortex (PrL). PKMζ is a crucial molecule involved in the maintenance of long-term memory. Using different behavioral models, we confirmed that aged rats exhibited cognitive impairment in memory retention test 24 h after training, and overexpression of PKMζ in the PrL rescued cognitive impairment in aged rats. After fear conditioning, the protein levels of PKMζ and the membrane expression of GluR2 increased in the PrL in young and adult rats but not in aged rats, and the levels of methylated PKMζ DNA in the PrL decreased in all age groups, whereas the levels of unmethylated PKMζ DNA increased only in young and adult rats. We also found that environmentally enriched housing reversed the hypermethylation of PKMζ and restored cognitive performance in aged rats. Inactivation of PKMζ prevented the potentiating effects of environmental enrichment on memory retention in aged rats. These results indicated that PKMζ might be a potential target for the treatment of aging-related cognitive impairment, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue. PMID:26926225

  19. Promising new treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2006-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the